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Sample records for gap envelope transmembrane

  1. TMEM120A and B: Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Important for Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose I.; Czapiewski, Rafal; Mouras, Rabah; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the nuclear envelope is a major signaling node for the cell that can influence tissue differentiation processes. Here we present two nuclear envelope trans-membrane proteins TMEM120A and TMEM120B that are paralogs encoded by the Tmem120A and Tmem120B genes. The TMEM120 proteins are expressed preferentially in fat and both are induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Knockdown of one or the other protein altered expression of several genes required for adipocyte differentiation, Gata3, Fasn, Glut4, while knockdown of both together additionally affected Pparg and Adipoq. The double knockdown also increased the strength of effects, reducing for example Glut4 levels by 95% compared to control 3T3-L1 cells upon pharmacologically induced differentiation. Accordingly, TMEM120A and B knockdown individually and together impacted on adipocyte differentiation/metabolism as measured by lipid accumulation through binding of Oil Red O and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS). The nuclear envelope is linked to several lipodystrophies through mutations in lamin A; however, lamin A is widely expressed. Thus it is possible that the TMEM120A and B fat-specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins may play a contributory role in the tissue-specific pathology of this disorder or in the wider problem of obesity. PMID:26024229

  2. Antigenic and immunosuppressive properties of a trimeric recombinant transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Mühle, Michael; Lehmann, Melissa; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Stern, Daniel; Kroniger, Tobias; Luttmann, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane envelope (TM) protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus—1 (HIV-1) plays an important role during virus infection inducing the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. In addition, there are indications that the TM protein plays a role in the immunopathogenesis leading to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Inactivated virus particles and recombinant gp41 have been reported to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, as well as to alter cytokine release and gene expression. The same was shown for a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain of all retroviral TM proteins, the immunosuppressive domain. Due to its propensity to aggregate and to be expressed at low levels, studies comprising authentic gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells are extremely rare. Here we describe the production of a secreted, soluble recombinant gp41 in 293 cells. The antigen was purified to homogeneity and characterised thoroughly by various biochemical and immunological methods. It was shown that the protein was glycosylated and assembled into trimers. Binding studies by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies implied a six-helix bundle conformation. The low binding of broadly neutralising antibodies (bnAb) directed against the membrane proximal external region (MPER) suggested that this gp41 is probably not suited as vaccine to induce such bnAb. Purified gp41 bound to monocytes and to a lesser extent to lymphocytes and triggered the production of specific cytokines when added to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, gp41 expressed on target cells inhibited the antigen-specific response of murine CD8+ T cells by drastically impairing their IFNγ production. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of a gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells including its immunosuppressive properties. Our data provide another line of evidence that gp41 might be directly involved in HIV-1

  3. Antigenic and immunosuppressive properties of a trimeric recombinant transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Mühle, Michael; Lehmann, Melissa; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Stern, Daniel; Kroniger, Tobias; Luttmann, Werner; Denner, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane envelope (TM) protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) plays an important role during virus infection inducing the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. In addition, there are indications that the TM protein plays a role in the immunopathogenesis leading to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Inactivated virus particles and recombinant gp41 have been reported to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, as well as to alter cytokine release and gene expression. The same was shown for a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain of all retroviral TM proteins, the immunosuppressive domain. Due to its propensity to aggregate and to be expressed at low levels, studies comprising authentic gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells are extremely rare. Here we describe the production of a secreted, soluble recombinant gp41 in 293 cells. The antigen was purified to homogeneity and characterised thoroughly by various biochemical and immunological methods. It was shown that the protein was glycosylated and assembled into trimers. Binding studies by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies implied a six-helix bundle conformation. The low binding of broadly neutralising antibodies (bnAb) directed against the membrane proximal external region (MPER) suggested that this gp41 is probably not suited as vaccine to induce such bnAb. Purified gp41 bound to monocytes and to a lesser extent to lymphocytes and triggered the production of specific cytokines when added to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, gp41 expressed on target cells inhibited the antigen-specific response of murine CD8+ T cells by drastically impairing their IFNγ production. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of a gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells including its immunosuppressive properties. Our data provide another line of evidence that gp41 might be directly involved in HIV-1

  4. Transmembrane protein TMEM170A is a newly discovered regulator of ER and nuclear envelope morphogenesis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Andri; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Santama, Niovi; Mattaj, Iain W

    2016-04-15

    The mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphogenesis is incompletely understood. ER tubules are shaped by the reticulons (RTNs) and DP1/Yop1p family members, but the mechanism of ER sheet formation is much less clear. Here, we characterize TMEM170A, a human transmembrane protein, which localizes in ER and nuclear envelope membranes. Silencing or overexpressing TMEM170A in HeLa K cells alters ER shape and morphology. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that downregulation of TMEM170A specifically induces tubular ER formation, whereas overexpression of TMEM170A induces ER sheet formation, indicating that TMEM170A is a newly discovered ER-sheet-promoting protein. Additionally, downregulation of TMEM170A alters nuclear shape and size, decreases the density of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the nuclear envelope and causes either a reduction in inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins or their relocalization to the ER. TMEM170A interacts with RTN4, a member of the reticulon family; simultaneous co-silencing of TMEM170A and RTN4 rescues ER, NPC and nuclear-envelope-related phenotypes, implying that the two proteins have antagonistic effects on ER membrane organization, and nuclear envelope and NPC formation.

  5. Immunological properties of the transmembrane envelope protein of the feline foamy virus and its use for serological screening.

    PubMed

    Mühle, Michael; Bleiholder, Anne; Kolb, Susanne; Hübner, Janine; Löchelt, Martin; Denner, Joachim

    2011-04-10

    The transmembrane envelope (TM) proteins of retroviruses are used as antigen in diagnostic immunoassays and they represent a conserved target for neutralizing antibodies. To analyze the situation in infections with the feline foamy virus (FFV), its recombinant TM protein was produced and used for ELISA and Western blot analyses. Screening sera from 404 German cats showed that 39% reacted against the TM protein, the same infection rate was determined using the Gag protein. Epitope mapping showed antibodies against the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the TM protein in the sera from infected cats, but attempts to induce neutralizing antibodies by immunization with the recombinant TM protein failed. This is the first report demonstrating that the TM protein of the FFV is highly immunogenic and valuable for serological screening. Similar to HIV-1, but in contrast to different gammaretroviruses, immunization with the TM protein of FFV did not induce neutralizing antibodies.

  6. The single transmembrane segment of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The glycoprotein gp210 is located in the "pore membrane," a specialized domain of the nuclear envelope to which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is anchored. gp210 contains a large cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment (TM), and a COOH-terminal, 58-amino acid residue cytoplasmic tail (CT) (Wozniak, R. W., E. Bartnik, and G. Blobel. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2083-2092; Greber, U. F., A. Senior, and L. Gerace. 1990. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 9:1495-1502). To locate determinants for sorting of gp210 to the pore membrane, we constructed various cDNAs coding for wild-type, mutant, and chimeric gp210, and monitored localization of the expressed protein in 3T3 cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using appropriate antibodies. The large cisternal domain of gp210 (95% of its mass) did not reveal any sorting determinants. Surprisingly, the TM of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane. The CT also contains a sorting determinant, but it is weaker than that of the TM. We propose specific lateral association of the transmembrane helices of two proteins to yield either a gp210 homodimer or a heterodimer of gp210 and another protein. The cytoplasmically oriented tails of these dimers may bind cooperatively to the adjacent NPCs. In addition, we demonstrate that gp210 co-localizes with cytoplasmically dispersed nucleoporins, suggesting a cytoplasmic association of these components. PMID:1281815

  7. Gap and out-gap solitons in modulated systems of finite length: exact solutions in the slowly varying envelope limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Kirr, K.; Kovalev, A. S.; Kroon, L.

    2011-06-01

    We discuss nonlinear excitations in finite-size one-dimensional modulated systems. Considering a binary modulated discrete nonlinear Schrödinger chain of large but finite length with periodic boundary conditions, we obtain exact elliptic-function solutions corresponding to stationary excitations in the slowly varying envelope limit. From these solutions, we analyze how the transformation between (localized) gap and (delocalized) out-gap solitons manifests itself in a system of finite length. The analogue of a localized gap soliton appears through a bifurcation at a critical point, so that gap soliton analogues exist only for chains longer than a critical value, which scales inversely proportional to the modulation depth. The total norm of these gap-out-gap states is found to be a monotonic function of the frequency, always inside a 'nonlinear gap' with edges defined by the main nonlinear modes which approach the linear spectrum gap boundaries in the small-amplitude limit. The transformation from a gap to an out-gap state is associated with a particular frequency, close to the lower boundary of the linear gap; at this point the elliptic functions become trigonometric, corresponding to a finite-size analogue of an algebraic soliton. We compare the scenario with earlier results obtained numerically for purely discrete chains with few degrees of freedom.

  8. The HIV-1 Envelope Transmembrane Domain Binds TLR2 through a Distinct Dimerization Motif and Inhibits TLR2-Mediated Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Etai; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H.; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation. PMID:25121610

  9. The HIV-1 envelope transmembrane domain binds TLR2 through a distinct dimerization motif and inhibits TLR2-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Ali, Mohammad; Rotem, Etai; Schwarzer, Roland; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-08-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation.

  10. Mutations within a putative cysteine loop of the transmembrane protein of an attenuated immunodeficiency-inducing feline leukemia virus variant inhibit envelope protein processing.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, C C; Poss, M L; Thomas, E; Overbaugh, J

    1995-01-01

    A replication-defective feline leukemia virus molecular clone, 61B, has been shown to cause immunodeficiency in cats and cytopathicity in T cells after a long latency period when coinfected with a minimally pathogenic helper virus (J. Overbaugh, E. A. Hoover, J. I. Mullins, D. P. W. Burns, L. Rudensey, S. L. Quackenbush, V. Stallard, and P. R. Donahue, Virology 188:558-569, 1992). The long-latency phenotype of 61B has been mapped to four mutations in the extracellular domain of the envelope transmembrane protein, and we report here that these mutations cause a defect in envelope protein processing. Immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that the 61B gp85 envelope precursor was produced but that further processing to generate the surface protein (SU/gp70) and the transmembrane protein (TM/p15E) did not occur. The 61B precursor was not expressed on the cell surface and appeared to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. Two of the four 61B-specific amino acid changes are located within a putative cysteine loop in a region of TM that is conserved among retroviruses. Introduction of these two amino acid changes into a replication-competent highly cytopathic virus resulted in the production of noninfectious virus that exhibited an envelope-protein-processing defect. This analysis suggests that mutations in a conserved region within a putative cysteine loop affect retroviral envelope protein maturation and viral infectivity. PMID:7884859

  11. A flow cytometry-based screen of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins identifies NET4/Tmem53 as involved in stress-dependent cell cycle withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Korfali, Nadia; Srsen, Vlastimil; Waterfall, Martin; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Pekovic, Vanja; Hutchison, Christopher J; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-04-14

    Disruption of cell cycle regulation is one mechanism proposed for how nuclear envelope protein mutation can cause disease. Thus far only a few nuclear envelope proteins have been tested/found to affect cell cycle progression: to identify others, 39 novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins were screened for their ability to alter flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles when exogenously expressed. Eight had notable effects with seven increasing and one decreasing the 4N:2N ratio. We subsequently focused on NET4/Tmem53 that lost its effects in p53(-/-) cells and retinoblastoma protein-deficient cells. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown by siRNA altered flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles in a similar way as overexpression. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown did not affect total retinoblastoma protein levels, unlike nuclear envelope-associated proteins Lamin A and LAP2α. However, a decrease in phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein was observed along with a doubling of p53 levels and a 7-fold increase in p21. Consequently cells withdrew from the cell cycle, which was confirmed in MRC5 cells by a drop in the percentage of cells expressing Ki-67 antigen and an increase in the number of cells stained for ß-galactosidase. The ß-galactosidase upregulation suggests that cells become prematurely senescent. Finally, the changes in retinoblastoma protein, p53, and p21 resulting from loss of NET4/Tmem53 were dependent upon active p38 MAP kinase. The finding that roughly a fifth of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins screened yielded alterations in flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles suggests a much greater influence of the nuclear envelope on the cell cycle than is widely held.

  12. A Flow Cytometry-Based Screen of Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identifies NET4/Tmem53 as Involved in Stress-Dependent Cell Cycle Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, Martin; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; Pekovic, Vanja; Hutchison, Christopher J.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of cell cycle regulation is one mechanism proposed for how nuclear envelope protein mutation can cause disease. Thus far only a few nuclear envelope proteins have been tested/found to affect cell cycle progression: to identify others, 39 novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins were screened for their ability to alter flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles when exogenously expressed. Eight had notable effects with seven increasing and one decreasing the 4N∶2N ratio. We subsequently focused on NET4/Tmem53 that lost its effects in p53−/− cells and retinoblastoma protein-deficient cells. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown by siRNA altered flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles in a similar way as overexpression. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown did not affect total retinoblastoma protein levels, unlike nuclear envelope-associated proteins Lamin A and LAP2α. However, a decrease in phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein was observed along with a doubling of p53 levels and a 7-fold increase in p21. Consequently cells withdrew from the cell cycle, which was confirmed in MRC5 cells by a drop in the percentage of cells expressing Ki-67 antigen and an increase in the number of cells stained for ß-galactosidase. The ß-galactosidase upregulation suggests that cells become prematurely senescent. Finally, the changes in retinoblastoma protein, p53, and p21 resulting from loss of NET4/Tmem53 were dependent upon active p38 MAP kinase. The finding that roughly a fifth of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins screened yielded alterations in flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles suggests a much greater influence of the nuclear envelope on the cell cycle than is widely held. PMID:21533191

  13. Activation of the erythropoietin receptor by the gp55-P viral envelope protein is determined by a single amino acid in its transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Constantinescu, S N; Liu, X; Beyer, W; Fallon, A; Shekar, S; Henis, Y I; Smith, S O; Lodish, H F

    1999-01-01

    The spleen focus forming virus (SFFV) gp55-P envelope glycoprotein specifically binds to and activates murine erythropoietin receptors (EpoRs) coexpressed in the same cell, triggering proliferation of erythroid progenitors and inducing erythroleukemia. Here we demonstrate specific interactions between the single transmembrane domains of the two proteins that are essential for receptor activation. The human EpoR is not activated by gp55-P but by mutation of a single amino acid, L238, in its transmembrane sequence to its murine counterpart serine, resulting in its ability to be activated. The converse mutation in the murine EpoR (S238L) abolishes activation by gp55-P. Computational searches of interactions between the membrane-spanning segments of murine EpoR and gp55-P provide a possible explanation: the face of the EpoR transmembrane domain containing S238 is predicted to interact specifically with gp55-P but not gp55-A, a variant which is much less effective in activating the murine EpoR. Mutational studies on gp55-P M390, which is predicted to interact with S238, provide additional support for this model. Mutation of M390 to isoleucine, the corresponding residue in gp55-A, abolishes activation, but the gp55-P M390L mutation is fully functional. gp55-P is thought to activate signaling by the EpoR by inducing receptor oligomerization through interactions involving specific transmembrane residues. PMID:10369674

  14. Transmembrane Domains of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoproteins: Residues Involved in E1E2 Heterodimerization and Involvement of These Domains in Virus Entry▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciczora, Yann; Callens, Nathalie; Penin, François; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Dubuisson, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The transmembrane (TM) domains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 have been shown to play multiple roles during the biogenesis of the E1E2 heterodimer. By using alanine scanning insertion mutagenesis within the TM domains of HCV envelope glycoproteins, we have previously shown that the central regions of these domains as well as the N-terminal part of the TM domain of E1 are involved in heterodimerization. Here, we used a tryptophan replacement scan of these regions to identify individual residues that participate in those interactions. Our mutagenesis study identified at least four residues involved in heterodimerization: Gly 354, Gly 358, Lys 370, and Asp 728. Interestingly, Gly 354 and Gly 358 belong to a GXXXG oligomerization motif. Our tryptophan mutants were also used to generate retrovirus-based, HCV-pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) in order to analyze the effects of these mutations on virus entry. Surprisingly, two mutants consistently displayed higher infectivity compared to that of the wild type. In contrast, HCVpp infectivity was strongly affected for many mutants, despite normal E1E2 heterodimerization and normal levels of incorporation of HCV glycoproteins into HCVpp. The characterization of some of these HCVpp mutants in the recently developed in vitro fusion assay using fluorescent-labeled liposomes indicated that mutations reducing HCVpp infectivity without altering E1E2 heterodimerization affected the fusion properties of HCV envelope glycoproteins. In conclusion, this mutational analysis identified residues involved in E1E2 heterodimerization and revealed that the TM domains of HCV envelope glycoproteins play a major role in the fusion properties of these proteins. PMID:17166909

  15. Interactions of the Cytoplasmic Domains of Human and Simian Retroviral Transmembrane Proteins with Components of the Clathrin Adaptor Complexes Modulate Intracellular and Cell Surface Expression of Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Erdtmann, Lars; Delamarre, Lelia; Bouchaert, Isabelle; Sonigo, Pierre; Dokhelar, Marie Christine; Benarous, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of the transmembrane (TM) envelope proteins (TM-CDs) of most retroviruses have a Tyr-based motif, YXXØ, in their membrane-proximal regions. This signal is involved in the trafficking and endocytosis of membrane receptors via clathrin-associated AP-1 and AP-2 adaptor complexes. We have used CD8-TM-CD chimeras to investigate the role of the Tyr-based motif of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and human T-leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM-CDs in the cell surface expression of the envelope glycoprotein. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies showed that this motif is a major determinant of the cell surface expression of the CD8-HTLV chimera. The YXXØ motif also plays a key role in subcellular distribution of the envelope of lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, these viruses, which encode TM proteins with a long cytoplasmic domain, have additional determinants distal to the YXXØ motif that participate in regulating cell surface expression. We have also used the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro binding assays to demonstrate that all three retroviral YXXØ motifs interact with the μ1 and μ2 subunits of AP complexes and that the C-terminal regions of HIV-1 and SIV TM proteins interact with the β2 adaptin subunit. The TM-CDs of HTLV-1, HIV-1, and SIV also interact with the whole AP complexes. These results clearly demonstrate that the cell surface expression of retroviral envelope glycoproteins is governed by interactions with adaptor complexes. The YXXØ-based signal is the major determinant of this interaction for the HTLV-1 TM, which contains a short cytoplasmic domain, whereas the lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV have additional determinants distal to this signal that are also involved. PMID:9882340

  16. MCLIP, an effective method to detect interactions of transmembrane proteins of the nuclear envelope in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Vijayaraghavan, Balaje; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Crafoord, Ellinor; Gudise, Santhosh; Larsson, Veronica J; Hallberg, Einar

    2014-10-01

    Investigating interactions of proteins in the nuclear envelope (NE) using co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) has previously been difficult or even impossible due to their inherent resistance to extraction. We have developed a novel method, MCLIP (Membrane protein Cross-Link ImmunoPrecipitation), which takes advantage of a cell permeable crosslinker to enable effective detection and analysis of specific interactions of NE proteins in live cells using Western blot. Using MCLIP we show that, in U2OS cells, the integral inner nuclear membrane protein Samp1 interacts with Lamin B1, the LINC (Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex protein, Sun1 and the soluble small GTPase Ran. The results show that the previously detected in vitro interaction between Samp1 and Emerin also takes place in live cells. In vitro pull down experiments show, that the nucleoplasmic domains of Samp1 and Emerin can bind directly to each other. We also, show that MCLIP is suitable to coprecipitate protein interactions in different stages of the cell cycle.

  17. Nuclear translocation of RanGAP1 coincides with virtual nuclear envelope breakdown in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2011-05-01

    In higher eukaryotes, mitosis proceeds with nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) and disassembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC); this is designated "open" mitosis. On the other hand, in many fungi, mitosis and chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD; this is designated "closed" mitosis. In a recent study on Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a closed mitosis organism, we reported a novel phenomenon that is equivalent to NEBD: a mixing of nuclear proteins and cytoplasmic proteins occurred transiently for a few minutes in meiosis without physical breakdown of the nuclear envelope. We designated this event virtual nuclear envelope breakdown (V-NEBD). In S. pombe, nuclear translocation of Rna1, a RanGAP1 homolog in S. pombe, occurs during meiosis, and this translocation of Rna1 leads to collapse of the Ran-GTP gradient across the nuclear envelope and occurs coincidently with V-NEBD. Here, we describe possible roles of RanGAP1 in V-NEBD in S. pombe and provide insights into the roles V-NEBD may play in meiosis.

  18. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  19. VAP-B binds to Rab3GAP1 at the ER: its implication in nuclear envelope formation through the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment.

    PubMed

    Hantan, Degejirihu; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Sakisaka, Toshiaki

    2014-10-01

    The vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAP-B) is a tail-anchored protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). VAP-B functions as an adaptor protein to recruit target proteins to the ER and execute various cellular functions, lipid transport, membrane traffic, ER stress etc. Recently, VAP-B has been shown to regulate the nuclear envelope protein transport through the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). We showed here that VAP-B directly binds to Rab3 GTPase activating protein 1 (Rab3GAP1), the catalytic subunit of Rab3GAP, through the two phenylalanines (FF) in an acidic tract (FFAT)-like motif of Rab3GAP1. Rab3GAP consists of two subunits, the catalytic subunit Rab3GAP1 and the non-catalytic subunit Rab3GAP2. VAP-B binds to Rab3GAP1 even in the Rab3GAP1/2 heterodimer complex. A single amino acid substitution of the FFAT-like motif reduces the binding activity of Rab3GAP1 to VAP-B. On the other hand, the FFAT-like motif mutation increases the binding activity of Rab3GAP1 to ERGIC-53, the ERGIC marker protein. Overexpression of Rab3GAP1 affects nuclear envelope formation more potently than that of Rab3GAP1 FFAT-like motif mutant. These results suggest that the binding of VAP-B to Rab3GAP1 is implicated in the regulation of nuclear envelope formation through ERGIC.

  20. Gap Detection in School-Age Children and Adults: Effects of Inherent Envelope Modulation and the Availability of Cues across Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W., III; Porter, Heather; Grose, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study evaluated the effects of inherent envelope modulation and the availability of cues across frequency on behavioral gap detection with noise-band stimuli in school-age children. Method: Listeners were 34 normal-hearing children (ages 5.2-15.6 years) and 12 normal-hearing adults (ages 18.5-28.8 years). Stimuli were…

  1. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32.

  2. Analysis of Trafficking, Stability and Function of Human Connexin 26 Gap Junction Channels with Deafness-Causing Mutations in the Fourth Transmembrane Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E.; DePriest, Adam D.; Cone, Angela C.; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I. Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  3. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E; Depriest, Adam D; Cone, Angela C; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  4. The C-terminal tail of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D may exist in two conformations: an analysis of sequence, structure, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hollier, Mark J.; Dimmock, Nigel J. . E-mail: n.j.dimmock@warwick.ac.uk

    2005-07-05

    In addition to the major ectodomain, the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein of HIV-1 is now known to have a minor ectodomain that is part of the long C-terminal tail. Both ectodomains are highly antigenic, carry neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, and are involved in virus-mediated fusion activity. However, data have so far been biologically based, and derived solely from T cell line-adapted (TCLA), B clade viruses. Here we have carried out sequence and theoretically based structural analyses of 357 gp41 C-terminal sequences of mainly primary isolates of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D. Data show that all these viruses have the potential to form a tail loop structure (the minor ectodomain) supported by three, {beta}-sheet, membrane-spanning domains (MSDs). This means that the first (N-terminal) tyrosine-based sorting signal of the gp41 tail is situated outside the cell membrane and is non-functional, and that gp41 that reaches the cell surface may be recycled back into the cytoplasm through the activity of the second tyrosine-sorting signal. However, we suggest that only a minority of cell-associated gp41 molecules - those destined for incorporation into virions - has 3 MSDs and the minor ectodomain. Most intracellular gp41 has the conventional single MSD, no minor ectodomain, a functional first tyrosine-based sorting signal, and in line with current thinking is degraded intracellularly. The gp41 structural diversity suggested here can be viewed as an evolutionary strategy to minimize HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein expression on the cell surface, and hence possible cytotoxicity and immune attack on the infected cell.

  5. Effect of interfaces and the spin-orbit band on the band gaps of InAs/GaSb superlattices beyond the standard envelope-function approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, Frank; Haugan, Heather; Brown, Gail; Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2004-03-01

    We develop a modified 8x8 envelope-function approximation (EFA) formalism for the noncommon-atom (NCA) superlattices (SLs), incorporating the effect of anisotropic and other interface (IF) interactions that go beyond the standard EFA. The boundary conditions in the presence of IF interactions are used to set up a novel secular equation (including a transfer matrix derivation) whose physical transparency makes possible a number of valuable insights (possibility of IF bound states, analytic solutions, indirect gaps, etc.). We show that the heavy hole - spin-orbit IF coupling is very important due to the IF localization of the SO wave function components and the ability of the IF potential to potentially bind a hole at the IFs. With two adjustable parameter for the two possible IFs, we find a very good agreement between experiment and theory for the band gaps of several sets of very long- and mid-infrared InAs/GaSb SLs grown at several laboratories and by us. The band gaps as a function of GaSb and InAs widths are explained in terms of variations of the HH and conduction (C) band bandwidths. We show that the cut-off wavelengths can be reduced by increasing the GaSb layer width. Thus, a consistent application of the EFA method with the inclusion of well established IF effects can provide useful physical insights and possesses good predictive capacity in the design of NCA SLs.

  6. Effect of interfaces and the spin-orbit band on the band gaps of InAs/GaSb superlattices beyond the standard envelope-function approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, F.; Haugan, H.; Brown, G. J.

    2004-04-01

    We develop a modified 8×8 envelope-function approximation (EFA) formalism for the noncommon-atom (NCA) superlattices (SL’s), incorporating the effect of anisotropic and other interface (IF) interactions that go beyond the standard EFA. The boundary conditions in the presence of IF interactions are used to set up a secular equation (including a transfer matrix derivation) whose physical transparency makes possible a number of valuable insights (possibility of IF bound states, analytic solutions, indirect gaps, etc.). We show that the heavy-hole spin-orbit IF coupling is very important due to the IF localization of the SO wave function components and the ability of the IF potential to potentially bind a hole at the IF’s, all of which pose convergence problems for perturbative solutions. With two adjustable parameter for the two possible IF’s, we find a very good agreement between experiment and theory for the band gaps of several sets of very long-infrared and midinfrared InAs/GaSb SL’s grown at several laboratories and by us. The band gaps as a function of GaSb and InAs widths are explained in terms of variations of the HH and conduction (C) band bandwidths. We show that the cut-off wavelengths can be reduced by increasing the GaSb layer width. Thus, a consistent application of the EFA method with the inclusion of well established IF effects can provide useful physical insights and possesses good predictive capacity in the design of NCA SL’s.

  7. Coupling between the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle and the protonmotive force in Halobacterium halobium cell envelope vesicles. III. Time-resolved increase in the transmembrane electric potential and modeling of the associated ion fluxes.

    PubMed Central

    Helgerson, S L; Mathew, M K; Bivin, D B; Wolber, P K; Heinz, E; Stoeckenius, W

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin functions as an electrogenic, light-driven proton pump in Halobacterium halobium. In cell envelope vesicles, its photocycle kinetics can be correlated with membrane potential. The initial decay rate of the M photocycle intermediate(s) decreases with increasing membrane potential, allowing the construction of a calibration curve. The laser (592.5 nm) was flashed at various time delays following the start of background illumination (592 +/- 25 nm) and transient absorbance changes at 418 nm monitored in cell envelope vesicles. The vesicles were loaded with and suspended in either 3 M NaCl or 3 M KCl buffered with 50 mM HEPES at pH 7.5 and the membrane permeability to protons modified by pretreatment with N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. In each case the membrane potential rose with a halftime of approximately 75 ms. The steady-state potential achieved depends on the cation present and the proton permeability of the membrane, i.e., higher potentials are developed in dicyclohexylcarbodiimide treated vesicles or in NaCl media as compared with KCl media. The results are modeled using an irreversible thermodynamics formulation, which assumes a constant driving reaction affinity (Ach) and a variable reaction rate (Jr) for the proton-pumping cycle of bacteriorhodopsin. Additionally, the model includes a voltage-gated, electrogenic Na+/H+ antiporter that is active when vesicles are suspended in NaCl. Estimates for the linear phenomenological coefficients describing the overall proton-pumping cycle (Lr = 3.5 X 10(-11)/mol2/J X g X s), passive cation permeabilities (LHu = 2 X 10(-10), LKu = 2.2 X 10(-10), LNau = 1 X 10(-11)), and the Na+/H+ exchange via the antiporter (Lex = 5 X 10(-11)) have been obtained. PMID:4074833

  8. Transmembrane signaling proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins and their glycosaminoglycan chains is matched by diverse functions. However, all assume roles as coreceptors, often working alongside high-affinity growth factor receptors or adhesion receptors such as integrins. Other common themes are an ability to signal through their cytoplasmic domains, often to the actin cytoskeleton, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveals roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core proteins has been obtained in mouse knockout experiments. Here some of the latest developments in the field are examined in hopes of stimulating further interest in this fascinating group of molecules.

  9. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Duc Cao; Richard Metcalf

    2010-07-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z-testing. A brief analysis of the impact of the safeguards optimization on the rest of plant efficiency, criticality concerns, and overall requirements is presented.

  10. Elevated temperature envelope forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gane, David H. (Inventor); Starowski, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature envelope forming includes enclosing a part blank and form tool within an envelope sealed against the atmosphere, heat treating the combination while forming pressure holds the envelope and part against the form tool, and allowing part cool down to occur in an inert atmosphere with forming pressure removed. The forming pressure is provided by evacuating the envelope and may be aided by differential force applied between the envelope and the form tool.

  11. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  12. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  13. LINCing complex functions at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Rothballer, Andrea; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Kutay, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the double membrane of the nuclear envelope (NE) and physically connect nuclear structures to cytoskeletal elements. LINC complexes are envisioned as force transducers in the NE, which facilitate processes like nuclear anchorage and migration, or chromosome movements. The complexes are built from members of two evolutionary conserved families of transmembrane (TM) proteins, the SUN (Sad1/UNC-84) domain proteins in the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and the KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/SYNE homology) domain proteins in the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). In the lumen of the NE, the SUN and KASH domains engage in an intimate assembly to jointly form a NE bridge. Detailed insights into the molecular architecture and atomic structure of LINC complexes have recently revealed the molecular basis of nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. They bear important implications for LINC complex function and suggest new potential and as yet unexplored roles, which the complexes may play in the cell. PMID:23324460

  14. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  15. Virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Kojidani, Tomoko; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Sato, Mamiko; Ding, Da-Qiao; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2010-11-09

    Asymmetric localization of Ran regulators (RanGAP1 and RanGEF/RCC1) produces a gradient of RanGTP across the nuclear envelope. In higher eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope breaks down as the cell enters mitosis (designated "open" mitosis). This nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) leads to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and the diffusion of nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules in the cell, resulting in irreversible progression of the cell cycle. On the other hand, in many fungi, chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD (designated "closed" mitosis). Here we report that in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, despite the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complex remaining intact throughout both the meiotic and mitotic cell cycles, nuclear proteins diffuse into the cytoplasm transiently for a few minutes at the onset of anaphase of meiosis II. We also found that nuclear protein diffusion into the cytoplasm occurred coincidently with nuclear localization of Rna1, an S. pombe RanGAP1 homolog that is usually localized in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that nuclear localization of RanGAP1 and depression of RanGTP activity in the nucleus may be mechanistically tied to meiosis-specific diffusion of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This nucleocytoplasmic shuffling of RanGAP1 and nuclear proteins represents virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  16. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  17. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  18. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Localized Transmembrane Protein Dpy19L1 Is Required for Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Bizen, Norihisa; Sato, Noboru; Takebayashi, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), including the nuclear envelope, is a continuous and intricate membrane-bound organelle responsible for various cellular functions. In neurons, the ER network is found in cell bodies, axons, and dendrites. Recent studies indicate the involvement of the ER network in neuronal development, such as neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth. However, the regulation of neural development by ER-localized proteins is not fully understood. We previously reported that the multi-transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is required for neuronal migration in the developing mouse cerebral cortex. A Dpy19L family member, Dpy19L2, which is a causative gene for human Globozoospermia, is suggested to act as an anchor of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope. In this study, we found that the patterns of exogenous Dpy19L1 were partially coincident with the ER, including the nuclear envelope in COS-7 cells at the level of the light microscope. The reticular distribution of Dpy19L1 was disrupted by microtubule depolymerization that induces retraction of the ER. Furthermore, Dpy19L1 showed a similar distribution pattern with a ER marker protein in embryonic mouse cortical neurons. Finally, we showed that Dpy19L1 knockdown mediated by siRNA resulted in decreased neurite outgrowth in cultured neurons. These results indicate that transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is localized to the ER membrane and regulates neurite extension during development. PMID:27959946

  20. Structural Basis for Membrane Anchoring of HIV-1 Envelope Spike

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qingshan; Chen, Jia; Ha, Heather Jiwon; Ghantous, Fadi; Herrmann, Tobias; Chang, Weiting; Liu, Zhijun; Frey, Gary; Seaman, Michael S.; Chen, Bing; Chou, James J.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a type I membrane protein that mediates viral entry. We use NMR to determine an atomic structure of the transmembrane (TM) domain of HIV-1 Env reconstituted in bicelles that mimic a lipid bilayer. The TM forms a well-ordered trimer that protects a conserved membrane-embedded arginine. An N-terminal coiled-coil and a C-terminal hydrophilic core stabilize the trimer. Individual mutations of conserved residues did not disrupt the TM trimer and minimally affected membrane fusion and infectivity. Major changes in the hydrophilic core, however, altered the antibody sensitivity of Env. These results show how a TM domain anchors, stabilizes and modulates a viral envelope spike and suggest that its influence on Env conformation is an important consideration for HIV-1 immunogen design. PMID:27338706

  1. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  2. Refrigerated cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    Loudon, John D.

    1976-11-16

    An elongated cryogenic envelope including an outer tube and an inner tube coaxially spaced within said inner tube so that the space therebetween forms a vacuum chamber for holding a vacuum. The inner and outer tubes are provided with means for expanding or contracting during thermal changes. A shield is located in the vacuum chamber intermediate the inner and outer tubes; and, a refrigeration tube for directing refrigeration to the shield is coiled about at least a portion of the inner tube within the vacuum chamber to permit the refrigeration tube to expand or contract along its length during thermal changes within said vacuum chamber.

  3. Inducible Expression of Transmembrane Proteins on Bacterial Magnetic Particles in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Shimojo, Akiko; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs) produced by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 are used for a variety of biomedical applications. In particular, the lipid bilayer surrounding BacMPs has been reported to be amenable to the insertion of recombinant transmembrane proteins; however, the display of transmembrane proteins in BacMP membranes remains a technical challenge due to the cytotoxic effects of the proteins when they are overexpressed in bacterial cells. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible expression system was developed to display transmembrane proteins on BacMPs. The expression and localization of the target proteins were confirmed using luciferase and green fluorescent protein as reporter proteins. Gene expression was suppressed in the absence of anhydrotetracycline, and the level of protein expression could be controlled by modulating the concentration of the inducer molecule. This system was implemented to obtain the expression of the tetraspanin CD81. The truncated form of CD81 including the ligand binding site was successfully displayed at the surface of BacMPs by using Mms13 as an anchor protein and was shown to bind the hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2. These results suggest that the tetracycline-inducible expression system described here will be a useful tool for the expression and display of transmembrane proteins in the membranes of BacMPs. PMID:20038711

  4. A novel family of plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vidya; Poulet, Axel; Détourné, Gwénaëlle; Tatout, Christophe; Vanrobays, Emmanuel; Evans, David E; Graumann, Katja

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the characterisation of a new family of higher plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins (NEAPs) that interact with other proteins of the nuclear envelope. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the family consists of three genes expressed ubiquitously (AtNEAP1-3) and a pseudogene (AtNEAP4). NEAPs consist of extensive coiled-coil domains, followed by a nuclear localisation signal and a C-terminal predicted transmembrane domain. Domain deletion mutants confirm the presence of a functional nuclear localisation signal and transmembrane domain. AtNEAP proteins localise to the nuclear periphery as part of stable protein complexes, are able to form homo- and heteromers, and interact with the SUN domain proteins AtSUN1 and AtSUN2, involved in the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. An A. thaliana cDNA library screen identified a putative transcription factor called AtbZIP18 as a novel interactor of AtNEAP1, which suggest a connection between NEAP and chromatin. An Atneap1 Atneap3 double-knockout mutant showed reduced root growth, and altered nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. Thus AtNEAPs are suggested as inner nuclear membrane-anchored coiled-coil proteins with roles in maintaining nuclear morphology and chromatin structure.

  5. Fast Moreau envelope computation I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, Yves

    2006-11-01

    The present article summarizes the state of the art algorithms to compute the discrete Moreau envelope, and presents a new linear-time algorithm, named NEP for NonExpansive Proximal mapping. Numerical comparisons between the NEP and two existing algorithms: The Linear-time Legendre Transform (LLT) and the Parabolic Envelope (PE) algorithms are performed. Worst-case time complexity, convergence results, and examples are included. The fast Moreau envelope algorithms first factor the Moreau envelope as several one-dimensional transforms and then reduce the brute force quadratic worst-case time complexity to linear time by using either the equivalence with Fast Legendre Transform algorithms, the computation of a lower envelope of parabolas, or, in the convex case, the non expansiveness of the proximal mapping.

  6. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  7. Envelope glycoprotein of arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2012-10-17

    Arenaviruses include lethal human pathogens which pose serious public health threats. So far, no FDA approved vaccines are available against arenavirus infections, and therapeutic options are limited, making the identification of novel drug targets for the development of efficacious therapeutics an urgent need. Arenaviruses are comprised of two RNA genome segments and four proteins, the polymerase L, the envelope glycoprotein GP, the matrix protein Z, and the nucleoprotein NP. A crucial step in the arenavirus life-cycle is the biosynthesis and maturation of the GP precursor (GPC) by cellular signal peptidases and the cellular enzyme Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P) yielding a tripartite mature GP complex formed by GP1/GP2 and a stable signal peptide (SSP). GPC cleavage by SKI-1/S1P is crucial for fusion competence and incorporation of mature GP into nascent budding virion particles. In a first part of our review, we cover basic aspects and newer developments in the biosynthesis of arenavirus GP and its molecular interaction with SKI-1/S1P. A second part will then highlight the potential of SKI-1/S1P-mediated processing of arenavirus GPC as a novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses.

  8. Masonry building envelope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, Phillip C.

    1993-04-01

    Over the past five years, infrared thermography has proven an effective tool to assist in required inspections on new masonry construction. However, with more thermographers providing this inspection service, establishing a standard for conducting these inspections is imperative. To attempt to standardize these inspections, it is important to understand the nature of the inspection as well as the context in which the inspection is typically conducted. The inspection focuses on evaluating masonry construction for compliance with the design specifications with regard to structural components and thermal performance of the building envelope. The thermal performance of the building includes both the thermal resistance of the material as well as infiltration/exfiltration characteristics. Given that the inspections occur in the 'field' rather than the controlled environment of a laboratory, there are numerous variables to be considered when undertaking this type of inspection. Both weather and site conditions at the time of the inspection can vary greatly. In this paper we will look at the variables encountered during recent inspections. Additionally, the author will present the standard which was employed in collecting this field data. This method is being incorporated into a new standard to be included in the revised version of 'Guidelines for Specifying and Performing Infrared Inspections' developed by the Infraspection Institute.

  9. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Faakye, Omari; Griffiths, Dianne

    2015-05-08

    “The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deter program participants, and dissuade them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.” This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group for several California interests emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing—the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities—could easily be six times that, and that’s only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. This research seeks to provide an algorithm for predicting the guarded blower door test result based upon a single, total blower door test.

  10. TRAMPLE: the transmembrane protein labelling environment.

    PubMed

    Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Rossi, Ivan; Amico, Mauro; Zauli, Andrea; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita

    2005-07-01

    TRAMPLE (http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/biodec/) is a web application server dedicated to the detection and the annotation of transmembrane protein sequences. TRAMPLE includes different state-of-the-art algorithms for the prediction of signal peptides, transmembrane segments (both beta-strands and alpha-helices), secondary structure and fast fold recognition. TRAMPLE also includes a complete content management system to manage the results of the predictions. Each user of the server has his/her own workplace, where the data can be stored, organized, accessed and annotated with documents through a simple web-based interface. In this manner, TRAMPLE significantly improves usability with respect to other more traditional web servers.

  11. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  12. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  13. Spatial changes in the transmembrane potential during extracellular electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Knisley, S B; Smith, W M; Rollins, D; Pollard, A E; Ideker, R E

    1998-11-16

    The purpose of this study was to determine the spatial changes in the transmembrane potential caused by extracellular electric field stimulation. The transmembrane potential was recorded in 10 guinea pig papillary muscles in a tissue bath using a double-barrel microelectrode. After 20 S1 stimuli, a 10-ms square wave S2 shock field with a 30-ms S1-S2 coupling interval was given via patch shock electrodes 1 cm on either side of the tissue during the action potential plateau. Two shock strengths (2.1+/-0.2 and 6.5+/-0.6 V/cm) were tested with both shock polarities. The recording site was moved across the tissue along fibers with either 200 micrometer (macroscopic group [n=5], 12 consecutive recording sites over a 2. 2-mm tissue length in each muscle) or 20 micrometer (microscopic group [n=5], 21 consecutive recording sites over a 0.4-mm tissue length in each muscle) between adjacent recording sites. In the macroscopic group, the portion of the tissue toward the anode was hyperpolarized, whereas the portion toward the cathode was depolarized, with 1 zero-potential crossing from hyperpolarization to depolarization present near the center of the tissue. In the microscopic group, only 1 zero-potential crossing was observed in the center region of the tissue, whereas, away from the center, only hyperpolarization was observed toward the anode and depolarization toward the cathode. Although these results are consistent with predictions from field stimulation of continuous representations of myocardial structure, ie, the bidomain and cable equation models, they are not consistent with the prediction of depolarization-hyperpolarization oscillation from representations based on cellular-level resistive discontinuities associated with gap junctions, ie, the sawtooth model.

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  15. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  16. Nuclear envelope and genome interactions in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Talamas, Jessica A.; Capelson, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus houses an organism’s genome and is the location within the cell where all signaling induced and development-driven gene expression programs are ultimately specified. The genome is enclosed and separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope (NE), a double-lipid membrane bilayer, which contains a large variety of trans-membrane and associated protein complexes. In recent years, research regarding multiple aspects of the cell nucleus points to a highly dynamic and coordinated concert of efforts between chromatin and the NE in regulation of gene expression. Details of how this concert is orchestrated and how it directs cell differentiation and disease are coming to light at a rapid pace. Here we review existing and emerging concepts of how interactions between the genome and the NE may contribute to tissue specific gene expression programs to determine cell fate. PMID:25852741

  17. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of nonmetallic or fabric structures for space application is considered. The following structures are suggested: (1) unpressurized space hangars; (2) extendable tunnels for soft docking; and (3) manned habitat for space stations, storage facilities, and work structures. The uses of the tunnel as a passageway: for personnel and equipment, eliminating extravehicular activity, for access to a control cabin on a space crane and between free flyers and the space station are outlined. The personnal occupied woven envelope robot (POWER) device is shown. The woven envelope (tunnel) acts as part of the boom of a crane. Potential applications of POWER are outlined. Several possible deflection mechanisms and design criteria are determined.

  18. Carbon chemistry of circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieging, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical composition of envelopes surrounding cool evolved stars, as determined from microwave spectroscopic observations, is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on recent observations with the new large mm-wavelength telescopes and interferometer arrays, and on new theoretical work, especially concerning ion-molecule chemistry of carbon-bearing in these envelopes. Thermal (as opposed to maser) emission lines are discussed. Much progress has been made in the past few years in the theoretical understanding of these objects. It is already clear, however, that observations with the new generation of mm-telescopes will require substantial improvements in the theoretical models to achieve a thorough understanding of the data now becoming available.

  19. Identification of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein variant resistant to cold inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Aemro; Finzi, Andrés; Pancera, Marie; Courter, Joel R; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein trimer consists of gp120 and gp41 subunits and undergoes a series of conformational changes upon binding to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4, that promote virus entry. Surprisingly, we found that the envelope glycoproteins of some HIV-1 strains are functionally inactivated by prolonged incubation on ice. Serial exposure of HIV-1 to extremes of temperature, followed by expansion of replication-competent viruses, allowed selection of a temperature-resistant virus. The envelope glycoproteins of this virus resisted cold inactivation due to a single passage-associated change, H66N, in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Histidine 66 is located within the gp41-interactive inner domain of gp120 and, in other studies, has been shown to decrease the sampling of the CD4-bound conformation by unliganded gp120. Substituting asparagine or other amino acid residues for histidine 66 in cold-sensitive HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins resulted in cold-stable phenotypes. Cold inactivation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins occurred even at high pH, indicating that protonation of histidine 66 is not necessary for this process. Increased exposure of epitopes in the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein accompanied cold inactivation, but shedding of gp120 did not. An amino acid change in gp120 (S375W) that promotes the CD4-bound state or treatment with soluble CD4 or a small-molecule CD4 mimic resulted in increased cold sensitivity. These results indicate that the CD4-bound intermediate of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins is cold labile; avoiding the CD4-bound state increases temperature stability.

  20. Coat as a Dagger: The Use of Capsid Proteins to Perforate Membranes during Non-Enveloped DNA Viruses Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bilkova, Eva; Forstova, Jitka; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2014-01-01

    To get access to the replication site, small non-enveloped DNA viruses have to cross the cell membrane using a limited number of capsid proteins, which also protect the viral genome in the extracellular environment. Most of DNA viruses have to reach the nucleus to replicate. The capsid proteins involved in transmembrane penetration are exposed or released during endosomal trafficking of the virus. Subsequently, the conserved domains of capsid proteins interact with cellular membranes and ensure their efficient permeabilization. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the role of capsid proteins of small non-enveloped DNA viruses in intracellular membrane perturbation in the early stages of infection. PMID:25055856

  1. Functional role of the zipper motif region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane protein gp41.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S S

    1994-01-01

    To study the functional role of the zipper motif region, located in the N-terminal region of the envelope transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, a series of vaccinia virus-expressed mutant proteins containing a proline substitution in this region were characterized. All of the mutant proteins showed partial or no inhibition in gp160 cleavage, demonstrated impaired ability of gp120 to associate with gp41, and were unable to mediate syncytium formation with CD4+ cells. Moreover, mutants 580 and 587 secreted excessive gp120 into the medium compared with the wild type. Mutations in this region affected the conformation of the local or proximal sequence but did not alter the conformation conferred by a distal site. These studies reveal the crucial role of the C-terminal segment of the zipper motif region in envelope heterodimeric association and suggest that this sequence forms a gp120 contact site. Images PMID:7509005

  2. Anchors aweigh: protein localization and transport mediated by transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2013-10-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino acid sequences but physical properties such as the length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized, but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport.

  3. TSTMP: target selection for structural genomics of human transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2017-01-01

    The TSTMP database is designed to help the target selection of human transmembrane proteins for structural genomics projects and structure modeling studies. Currently, there are only 60 known 3D structures among the polytopic human transmembrane proteins and about a further 600 could be modeled using existing structures. Although there are a great number of human transmembrane protein structures left to be determined, surprisingly only a small fraction of these proteins have ‘selected’ (or above) status according to the current version the TargetDB/TargetTrack database. This figure is even worse regarding those transmembrane proteins that would contribute the most to the structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The database was built by sorting out proteins from the human transmembrane proteome with known structure and searching for suitable model structures for the remaining proteins by combining the results of a state-of-the-art transmembrane specific fold recognition algorithm and a sequence similarity search algorithm. Proteins were searched for homologues among the human transmembrane proteins in order to select targets whose successful structure determination would lead to the best structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The pipeline constructed for creating the TSTMP database guarantees to keep the database up-to-date. The database is available at http://tstmp.enzim.ttk.mta.hu. PMID:27924015

  4. Anchors Aweigh: Protein Traffic Mediated by Transmembrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2013-01-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in the cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino-acid sequences but physical properties such as length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport. PMID:23806646

  5. Characterization and interactome study of white spot syndrome virus envelope protein VP11.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wang-Jing; Shiung, Hui-Jui; Lo, Chu-Fang; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lai, Ying-Jang; Lee, Tai-Lin; Huang, Wei-Tung; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Chang, Yun-Shiang

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV viral particle consists of three structural layers that surround its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. Here we characterize the WSSV structural protein VP11 (WSSV394, GenBank accession number AF440570), and use an interactome approach to analyze the possible associations between this protein and an array of other WSSV and host proteins. Temporal transcription analysis showed that vp11 is an early gene. Western blot hybridization of the intact viral particles and fractionation of the viral components, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that VP11 is an envelope protein. Membrane topology software predicted VP11 to be a type of transmembrane protein with a highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain at its N-terminal. Based on an immunofluorescence assay performed on VP11-transfected Sf9 cells and a trypsin digestion analysis of the virion, we conclude that, contrary to topology software prediction, the C-terminal of this protein is in fact inside the virion. Yeast two-hybrid screening combined with co-immunoprecipitation assays found that VP11 directly interacted with at least 12 other WSSV structural proteins as well as itself. An oligomerization assay further showed that VP11 could form dimers. VP11 is also the first reported WSSV structural protein to interact with the major nucleocapsid protein VP664.

  6. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, D. P.; Chalmers, L.; Kusmartsev, F.; Swallowe, G. M.

    We present several new classes of metamaterials and/or locally resonant sonic crystal that are comprised of complex resonators. The proposed systems consist of multiple resonating inclusion that correspond to different excitation frequencies. This causes the formation of multiple overlapped resonance band gaps. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the individual band gaps achieved, span a far greater range (≈ 2kHz) than previously reported cases. The position and width of the band gap is independent of the crystal's lattice constant and forms in the low frequency regime significantly below the conventional Bragg band gap. The broad envelope of individual resonance band gaps is attractive for sound proofing applications and furthermore the devices can be tailored to attenuate lower or higher frequency ranges, i.e., from seismic to ultrasonic.

  7. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, D. P.; Chalmers, L.; Kusmartsev, F.; Swallowe, G. M.

    2011-03-01

    We present several new classes of metamaterials and/or locally resonant sonic crystal that are comprised of complex resonators. The proposed systems consist of multiple resonating inclusion that correspond to different excitation frequencies. This causes the formation of multiple overlapped resonance band gaps. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the individual band gaps achieved, span a far greater range (≈ 2kHz) than previously reported cases. The position and width of the band gap is independent of the crystal's lattice constant and forms in the low frequency regime significantly below the conventional Bragg band gap. The broad envelope of individual resonance band gaps is attractive for sound proofing applications and furthermore the devices can be tailored to attenuate lower or higher frequency ranges, i.e., from seismic to ultrasonic.

  8. Full-Envelope Launch Abort System Performance Analysis Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubuchon, Vanessa V.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of a new dispersion methodology is described, which dis-perses abort initiation altitude or time along with all other Launch Abort System (LAS) parameters during Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the standard methodology assumes that an abort initiation condition is held constant (e.g., aborts initiated at altitude for Mach 1, altitude for maximum dynamic pressure, etc.) while dispersing other LAS parameters. The standard method results in large gaps in performance information due to the discrete nature of initiation conditions, while the full-envelope dispersion method provides a significantly more comprehensive assessment of LAS abort performance for the full launch vehicle ascent flight envelope and identifies performance "pinch-points" that may occur at flight conditions outside of those contained in the discrete set. The new method has significantly increased the fidelity of LAS abort simulations and confidence in the results.

  9. Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X Long; Kitamoto, Yasunori; Sadler, J Evan

    2009-06-01

    Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease, is localized to the brush border of the duodenal and jejunal mucosa. It is synthesized as a zymogen (proenteropeptidase) that requires activation by another protease, either trypsin or possibly duodenase. Active enteropeptidase then converts the pancreatic precursor, trypsinogen, to trypsin by cleavage of the specific trypsinogen activation peptide, Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys- Ile that is highly conserved in vertebrates. Trypsin, in turn, activates other digestive zymogens such as chymotrypsinogen, proelastase, procarboxypeptidase and prolipase in the lumen of the gut. The important biological function of enteropeptidase is highlighted by the manifestation of severe diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoproteinemia and edema as a result of congenital deficiency of enteropeptidase activity in the gut. Conversely, duodenopancreatic reflux of proteolytically active enteropeptidase may cause acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  11. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  12. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  13. Hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain contributes to pre-fusion protein stability.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stacy; Nagy, Tamas; Moseley, Hunter; Fried, Michael; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-02-17

    Enveloped viruses utilize fusion (F) proteins studding the surface of the virus to facilitate membrane fusion with a target cell membrane. Fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is required for release of viral genomic material so the virus can ultimately reproduce and spread. To drive fusion, the F protein undergoes an irreversible conformational change, transitioning from a meta-stable pre-fusion conformation to a more thermodynamically stable post-fusion structure. Understanding the elements which control stability of the pre-fusion state and triggering to the post-fusion conformation is important for understanding F protein function. Mutations in F protein transmembrane (TM) domains implicated the TM domain in the fusion process, but the structural and molecular details in fusion remain unclear. Previously, analytical ultracentrifugation was utilized to demonstrate that isolated TM domains of Hendra virus F protein associate in a monomer-trimer equilibrium (Smith EC, et al. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins. 2013. J Biol Chem. 288, 35726). To determine factors driving this association, 140 paramyxovirus F protein TM domain sequences were analyzed. A heptad repeat of β-branched residues was found and analysis of the Hendra virus F TM domain revealed a heptad repeat leucine-isoleucine zipper motif (LIZ). Replacement of the LIZ with alanine resulted in dramatically reduced TM-TM association. Mutation of the LIZ in the whole protein resulted in decreased protein stability, including pre-fusion conformation stability. Together our data suggest that the heptad repeat LIZ contributed to TM-TM association and is important for F protein function and pre-fusion stability.

  14. Interfacial pre-transmembrane domains in viral proteins promoting membrane fusion and fission.

    PubMed

    Lorizate, Maier; Huarte, Nerea; Sáez-Cirión, Asier; Nieva, José L

    2008-01-01

    Membrane fusion and fission underlie two limiting steps of enveloped virus replication cycle: access to the interior of the host-cell (entry) and dissemination of viral progeny after replication (budding), respectively. These dynamic processes proceed mediated by specialized proteins that disrupt and bend the lipid bilayer organization transiently and locally. We introduced Wimley-White membrane-water partitioning free energies of the amino acids as an algorithm for predicting functional domains that may transmit protein conformational energy into membranes. It was found that many viral products possess unusually extended, aromatic-rich pre-transmembrane stretches predicted to stably reside at the membrane interface. Here, we review structure-function studies, as well as data reported on the interaction of representative peptides with model membranes, all of which sustain a functional role for these domains in viral fusion and fission. Since pre-transmembrane sequences also constitute antigenic determinants in a membrane-bound state, we also describe some recent results on their recognition and blocking at membrane interface by neutralizing antibodies.

  15. A pump-pore model for transmembrane transport of hydrophilic solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, E

    1993-01-01

    Transmembrane transport of a hydrophilic solute is presumed to begin when hydrated ligand adheres in Velcro-like fashion to hydrated membrane surface. Asymmetric physical forces cause rolling movements of ligand over membrane surface until contact occurs with appropriate transport machinery, consisting of a pump (Pu) to which is tethered a ligand (Li)-specific perm-selective pore (Po). The Po is in the open form when the Li is attached to an external high-affinity allosteric site on it. The active form of the Pu is stabilized by attachment of the Li to high-affinity internal or low-affinity external allosteric sites. The active form of the Pu induces closure of the Po, even when ligand is bound to it; the inactive conformation of the Pu permits Po opening. Attachment of Li to either one of two binding sites on the active Pu and irreversible envelopment by it in Venus fly-trap fashion trigger transmembrane transport of Li. Multistep attachment of Li is rate-limiting in the transport process. Application of a simple equation derived from relevant kinetic considerations relating velocity of transport (V) to concentration of Li (L), V = k1(L)1/2, gives V-L curves approximating transport data obtained in a variety of biological systems. This model is congruent with the ability of cells to concentrate substances from extremely dilute solutions and with the adaptive informational value to cells of rates of transport. PMID:8102798

  16. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean; Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill

    2008-09-01

    The Safeguards Envelope Project met its milestones by creating a rudimentary safeguards envelope, proving the value of the approach on a small scale, and determining the most appropriate path forward. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant’s large cache of reprocessing process monitoring data, dubbed UBER Data, was recovered and used in the analysis. A probabilistic Z test was used on a Markov Monte Carlo simulation of expected diversion data when compared with normal operating data. The data regarding a fully transient event in a tank was used to create a simple requirement, representative of a safeguards envelope, whose impact was a decrease in operating efficiency by 1.3% but an increase in material balance period of 26%. This approach is operator, state, and international safeguards friendly and should be applied to future reprocessing plants. Future requirements include tank-to-tank correlations in reprocessing facilities, detailed operations impact studies, simulation inclusion, automated optimization, advanced statistics analysis, and multi-attribute utility analysis.

  17. Heat recovery in building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-08-01

    Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

  18. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  19. Synthesis, Assembly, and Processing of the Env ERVWE1/Syncytin Human Endogenous Retroviral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Cheynet, V.; Ruggieri, A.; Oriol, G.; Blond, J.-L.; Boson, B.; Vachot, L.; Verrier, B.; Cosset, F.-L.; Mallet, F.

    2005-01-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation. PMID:15827173

  20. Synthesis, assembly, and processing of the Env ERVWE1/syncytin human endogenous retroviral envelope.

    PubMed

    Cheynet, V; Ruggieri, A; Oriol, G; Blond, J-L; Boson, B; Vachot, L; Verrier, B; Cosset, F-L; Mallet, F

    2005-05-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation.

  1. Targeting and biogenesis of transporters and channels in chloroplast envelope membranes: Unsolved questions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Jun; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-07-01

    Chloroplasts produce carbohydrates, hormones, vitamins, amino acids, pigments, nucleotides, ATP, and secondary metabolites. Channels and transporters are required for the movement of molecules across the two chloroplast envelope membranes. These transporters and channel proteins are grouped into two different types, including β-barrel proteins and transmembrane-domain (TMD) containing proteins. Most β-barrel proteins are localized at the outer chloroplast membrane, and TMD-containing proteins are localized at the inner chloroplast membrane. Many of these transporters and channels are encoded by nuclear genes; therefore, they have to be imported into chloroplasts after translation on cytosolic ribosomes. These proteins should have specific targeting signals for their final destination in the chloroplast membrane and for assembly into specific complexes. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the identification, functional characterization, and biogenesis of transporters and channels at the chloroplast envelope membranes, and discuss outstanding questions regarding transporter and channel protein biogenesis.

  2. Structure of a Dengue Virus Envelope Protein Late-Stage Fusion Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daryl E.; Choi, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    The final stages of dengue virus fusion are thought to occur when the membrane-proximal stem drives the transmembrane anchor of the viral envelope protein (E) toward the fusion loop, buried in the target cell membrane. Crystal structures of E have lacked this essential stem region. We expressed and crystallized soluble mutant forms of the dengue virus envelope protein (sE) that include portions of the juxtamembrane stem. Their structures represent late-stage fusion intermediates. The proximal part of the stem has both intra- and intermolecular interactions, so the chain “zips up” along the trimer seam. The penultimate interaction we detected involves the conserved residue F402, which has hydrophobic contacts with a conserved surface on domain II. These interactions do not require any larger-scale changes in trimer packing. The techniques for expression and crystallization of sE containing stem reported here may allow further characterization of the final stages of flavivirus fusion. PMID:23236058

  3. Measuring Mitochondrial Transmembrane Potential by TMRE Staining.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the main source of energy for metabolism. Mitochondria provide the majority of this ATP by a process known as oxidative phosphorylation. This process involves active transfer of positively charged protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane resulting in a net internal negative charge, known as the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). The proton gradient is then used by ATP synthase to produce ATP by fusing adenosine diphosphate and free phosphate. The net negative charge across a healthy mitochondrion is maintained at approximately -180 mV, which can be detected by staining cells with positively charged dyes such as tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE). TMRE emits a red fluorescence that can be detected by flow cytometry or fluorescence microscopy and the level of TMRE fluorescence in stained cells can be used to determine whether mitochondria in a cell have high or low ΔΨm. Cytochrome c is essential for producing ΔΨm because it promotes the pumping the protons into the mitochondrial intermembrane space as it shuttles electrons from Complex III to Complex IV along the electron transport chain. Cytochrome c is released from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol during apoptosis. This impairs its ability to shuttle electrons between Complex III and Complex IV and results in rapid dissipation of ΔΨm. Loss of ΔΨm is therefore closely associated with cytochrome c release during apoptosis and is often used as a surrogate marker for cytochrome c release in cells.

  4. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  5. The infrared dichroism of transmembrane helical polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Kaufman, B K; McElhaney, R N; Lewis, R N

    1995-01-01

    Polarized attenuated total internal reflectance techniques were applied to study the infrared dichroism of the amide I transition moment in two membrane-bound peptides that are known to form oriented transmembrane helices: gramicidin A in a supported phospholipid monolayer and Ac-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24) in oriented multibilayers. These studies were performed to test the ability of these techniques to determine the orientation of these peptides, to verify the value of optical parameters used to calculate electric field strengths, to examine the common assumptions regarding the amide I transition moment orientation, and to ascertain the effect of surface imperfections on molecular disorder. The two peptides exhibit marked differences in the shape and frequency of their amide I absorption bands. Yet both peptides are highly ordered and oriented with their helical axes perpendicular to the membrane surface. In the alpha-helix formed by L24, there is evidence for a mode with type E1 symmetry contributing to amide I, and the amide I transition moment must be more closely aligned with the peptide C=O (< 34 degrees) than earlier studies have suggested. These results indicate that long-standing assumptions about the orientation of amide I in a peptide require some revision, but that in general, infrared spectroscopy yields reliable information about the orientation of membrane-bound helical peptides. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8599683

  6. Molecular archeological studies of transmembrane transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saier, Milton H.; Wang, Bin; Sun, Eric I.; Matias, Madeleine; Yen, Ming Ren

    We here review studies concerned with the evolutionary pathways taken for the appearance of complex transport systems. The transmembrane protein constituents of these systems generally arose by (1) intragenic duplications, (2) gene fusions, and (3) the superimposition of enzymes onto carriers. In a few instances, we have documented examples of “reverse” or “retrograde” evolution where complex carriers have apparently lost parts of their polypeptide chains to give rise to simpler channels. Some functional superfamilies of transporters that are energized by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) include several independently evolving permease families. The ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily couples transport to ATP hydrolysis where the ATPases are superimposed on at least three distinct, independently evolving families of permeases. The prokaryotic sugar transporting phosphotransferase system (PTS) uses homologous PEP-dependent general energy-coupling phosphoryl transfer enzymes superimposed on at least three independently arising families of permeases to give rise to complex group translocators that modify their sugar substrates during transport, releasing cytoplasmic sugar phosphates. We suggest that simple carriers evolved independently of the energizing enzymes, and that chemical energization of transport resulted from the physical and functional coupling of the enzymes to the carriers.

  7. Isolating The Building Thermal Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrje, D. T.; Dutt, G. S.; Gadsby, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermal integrity of building envelopes by infrared scanning tech-niques is often hampered in mild weather because temperature differentials across the envelope are small. Combining the infrared scanning with positive or negative building pressures, induced by a "blower door" or the building ventilation system, considerably extends the periods during which meaningful diagnostics can be conducted. Although missing or poorly installed insulation may lead to a substantial energy penalty, it is the search for air leakage sites that often has the largest potential for energy savings. Infrared inspection of the attic floor with air forced from the occupied space through ceiling by-passes, and inspecting the interior of the building when outside air is being sucked through the envelope reveals unexpected leakage sites. Portability of the diagnostic equipment is essential in these surveys which may include access into some tight spaces. A catalog of bypass heat losses that have been detected in residential housing using the combined infrared pressure differential technique is included to point out the wide variety of leakage sites which may compromise the benefits of thermal insulation and allow excessive air infiltration. Detection and suppression of such leaks should be key items in any building energy audit program. Where a calibrated blower door is used to pressurize or evacuate the house, the leakage rate can be quantified and an excessively tight house recognized. Houses that are too tight may be improved with a minimal energy penalty by forced ventilation,preferably with a heat recuperator and/or by providing combustion air directly to the furnace.

  8. Aircraft maneuver envelope warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivens, Courtland C. (Inventor); Rosado, Joel M. (Inventor); Lee, Burnett (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A maneuver envelope warning system for an aircraft having operating limits, operating condition sensors and an indicator driver. The indicator driver has a plurality of visual indicators. The indicator driver determines a relationship between sensed operating conditions and the operating limits; such as, a ratio therebetween. The indicator driver illuminates a number of the indicators in proportion to the determined relationship. The position of the indicators illuminated represents to a pilot in an easily ascertainable manner whether the operational conditions are approaching operational limits of the aircraft, and the degree to which operational conditions lie within or exceed operational limits.

  9. Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoch, David R.; Lavallee, David; Weinstein, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: scheduling application; the motivation for the Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN); characteristics of FERN; types of information needed in requests; where information is stored in requests; FERN structures; generic requests; resource availability for pooled resources; expressive notation; temporal constraints; time formats; changes to FERN; sample FERN requests; the temporal relationship between two steps; maximum activity length to limit step delays; alternative requests; the temporal relationship between two activities; and idle resource usage between steps.

  10. Recombinant expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of the transmembrane and membrane proximal domains of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhen; Kessans, Sarah A; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Lee, Ho-Hsien; Meador, Lydia R; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G; Mor, Tsafrir S; Fromme, Petra

    2014-11-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 associates noncovalently with the surface subunit (gp120) and together they play essential roles in viral mucosal transmission and infection of target cells. The membrane proximal region (MPR) of gp41 is highly conserved and contains epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies. The transmembrane (TM) domain of gp41 not only anchors the envelope glycoprotein complex in the viral membrane but also dynamically affects the interactions of the MPR with the membrane. While high-resolution X-ray structures of some segments of the MPR were solved in the past, they represent the post-fusion forms. Structural information on the TM domain of gp41 is scant and at low resolution. Here we describe the design, expression and purification of a protein construct that includes MPR and the transmembrane domain of gp41 (MPR-TMTEV-6His), which reacts with the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 and thereby may represent an immunologically relevant conformation mimicking a prehairpin intermediate of gp41. The expression level of MPR-TMTEV-6His was improved by fusion to the C-terminus of Mistic protein, yielding ∼ 1 mg of pure protein per liter. The isolated MPR-TMTEV-6His protein was biophysically characterized and is a monodisperse candidate for crystallization. This work will enable further investigation into the structure of MPR-TMTEV-6His, which will be important for the structure-based design of a mucosal vaccine against HIV-1.

  11. Exogenous agents that target transmembrane domains of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang

    2008-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for approximately one third of all proteins encoded in the human genome, the functions and structures of their transmembrane domains are much less understood than the water-soluble regions. A major hurdle in studying these transmembrane domains is the lack of appropriate exogenous agents that can be used as specific probes. Despite the daunting challenges, major strides have recently been made in targeting the transmembrane domains of a variety of membrane proteins. High affinity and selectivity have been achieved in model biophysical systems, membranes of bacteria, and mammalian cells.

  12. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY10

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf

    2010-10-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details the additions to the advanced operating techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Research this year focused on combining disparate pieces of data together to maximize operating time with minimal downtime due to safeguards. A Chi-Square and Croiser's cumulative sum were both included as part of the new analysis. Because of a major issue with the original data, the implementation of the two new tests did not add to the existing set of tests, though limited one-variable optimization made a small increase in detection probability. Additional analysis was performed to determine if prior analysis would have caused a major security or safety operating envelope issue. It was determined that a safety issue would have resulted from the prior research, but that the security may have been increased under certain conditions.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of intercellular communication: transmembrane signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; George, J.S.; Siegel, H.N.; McGregor, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    This short discussion of transmembrane signaling depicts a particular class of signaling devices whose functional characteristics may well be representative of broader classes of membrane switches. These multicomponent aggregates are characterized by tight organization of interacting components which function by conformational interactions to provide sensitive, amplified, rapid, and modulated responses. It is clear that the essential role of such switches in cell-cell interactions necessitated their appearance early in the history of the development of multicellular organisms. It also seems clear that once such devices made their appearance, the conformationally interactive moieties were firmly locked into a regulatory relationship. Since modification of interacting components could perturb or interfere with the functional integrity of the whole switch, genetic drift was only permitted at the input and outflow extremes. However, the GTP binding moiety and its interacting protein domains on contiguous portions of the receptor and readout components were highly conserved. The observed stringent evolutionary conservation of the molecular features of these membrane switches thus applies primarily to the central (GTP binding) elements. An extraordinary degree of variation was permitted within the domains of signal recognition and enzymatic output. Thus, time and evolution have adapted the central logic of the regulatory algorithm to serve a great variety of cellular purposes and to recognize a great variety of chemical and physical signals. This is exemplified by the richness of the hormonal and cellular dialogues found in primates such as man. Here the wealth of intercellular communiation can support the composition and performance of symphonies and the study of cellular immunology.

  14. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins.

  15. Envelope solitons of acoustic plate modes and surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andreas P; Kovalev, Alexander S

    2003-06-01

    The problem of the existence of evelope solitons in elastic plates and at solid surfaces covered by an elastic film is revisited with special attention paid to nonlinear long-wave short-wave interactions. Using asymptotic expansions and multiple scales, conditions for the existence of envelope solitons are established and it is shown how their parameters can be expressed in terms of the elastic moduli and mass densities of the materials involved. In addition to homogeneous plates, weak periodic modulation of the plate's material parameters are also considered. In the case of wave propagation in an elastic plate, modulations of weakly nonlinear carrier waves are governed by a coupled system of partial differential equations consisting of evolution equations for the complex amplitude of the carrier wave (the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for envelope solitons and the Mills-Trullinger equations for gap solitons), and the wave equation for long-wavelength acoustic plate modes. In contrast to this situation, envelope solitons of surface acoustic waves in a layered structure are normally described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation alone. However, at higher orders of the carrier wave amplitude, the envelope soliton is found to be accompanied by a quasistatic long-wavelength strain field, which may be localized at the surface with penetration depth into the substrate of the order of the inverse amplitude or which may radiate energy into the bulk. A new set of modulation equations is derived for the resonant case of the carrier wave's group velocity being equal to the phase velocity of long-wavelength Rayleigh waves of the uncoated substrate.

  16. TOPPER: topology prediction of transmembrane protein based on evidential reasoning.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xinyang; Liu, Qi; Hu, Yong; Deng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The topology prediction of transmembrane protein is a hot research field in bioinformatics and molecular biology. It is a typical pattern recognition problem. Various prediction algorithms are developed to predict the transmembrane protein topology since the experimental techniques have been restricted by many stringent conditions. Usually, these individual prediction algorithms depend on various principles such as the hydrophobicity or charges of residues. In this paper, an evidential topology prediction method for transmembrane protein is proposed based on evidential reasoning, which is called TOPPER (topology prediction of transmembrane protein based on evidential reasoning). In the proposed method, the prediction results of multiple individual prediction algorithms can be transformed into BPAs (basic probability assignments) according to the confusion matrix. Then, the final prediction result can be obtained by the combination of each individual prediction base on Dempster's rule of combination. The experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the individual prediction algorithms, which illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. A deterministic algorithm for constrained enumeration of transmembrane protein folds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2004-07-01

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is presented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations, which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures.

  18. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  19. NET23/STING promotes chromatin compaction from the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Malik, Poonam; Zuleger, Nikolaj; de las Heras, Jose I; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture.

  20. NET23/STING Promotes Chromatin Compaction from the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I.; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture. PMID:25386906

  1. A folded protein can be transported across the chloroplast envelope and thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S A; Theg, S M

    1997-01-01

    Many thylakoid lumenal proteins are nuclear encoded, cytosolically synthesized, and reach their functional location after posttranslational targeting across two chloroplast envelope membranes and the thylakoid membrane via proteinaceous transport systems. To study whether these transmembrane transport machineries can translocate folded structures, we overexpressed the 17-kDa subunit of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (prOE17) that had been modified to contain a unique C-terminal cysteine. This allowed us to chemically link a terminal 6.5-kDa bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) moiety to prOE17 to create the chimeric protein prOE17-BPTI. Redox reagents and an irreversible sulfhydryl-specific cross-linker, bis-maleimidohexane, were used to manipulate the structure of BPTI. Import of prOE17-BPTI into isolated chloroplasts and thylakoids demonstrates that the small tightly folded BPTI domain is carried across both the chloroplast envelopes and the delta pH-dependent transmembrane transporter of the thylakoid membrane when linked to the correctly targeted OE17 precursor. Transport proceeded even when the BPTI moiety was internally cross-linked into a protease-resistant form. These data indicate that unfolding is not a ubiquitous requirement for protein translocation and that at least some domains of targeted proteins can maintain a nonlinear structure during their translocation into and within chloroplasts. Images PMID:9168475

  2. Fusogenic activity of reconstituted newcastle disease virus envelopes: a role for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein in the fusion process.

    PubMed

    Cobaleda, C; Muñoz-Barroso, I; Sagrera, A; Villar, E

    2002-04-01

    Enveloped viruses, such as newcastle disease virus (NDV), make their entry into the host cell by membrane fusion. In the case of NDV, the fusion step requires both transmembrane hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) viral envelope glycoproteins. The HN protein should show fusion promotion activity. To date, the nature of HN-F interactions is a controversial issue. In this work, we aim to clarify the role of the HN glycoprotein in the membrane fusion step. Four types of reconstituted detergent-free NDV envelopes were used, on differing in their envelope protein contents. Fusion of the different virosomes and erythrocyte ghosts was monitored using the octadecyl rhodamine B chloride assay. Only the reconstituted envelopes having the F protein, even in the absence of HN protein, displayed residual fusion activity. Treatment of such virosomes with denaturing agents affecting the F protein abolished fusion, indicating that the fusion detected was viral protein-dependent. Interestingly, the rate of fusion in the reconstituted systems was similar to that of intact viruses in the presence of the inhibitor of HN sialidase activity 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid. The results show that the residual fusion activity detected in the reconstituted systems was exclusively due to F protein activity, with no contribution from the fusion promotion activity of HN protein.

  3. Polyglycine Acts as a Rejection Signal for Protein Transport at the Chloroplast Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Endow, Joshua K.; Rocha, Agostinho Gomes; Baldwin, Amy J.; Roston, Rebecca L.; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Kamikubo, Hironari

    2016-01-01

    PolyGly is present in many proteins in various organisms. One example is found in a transmembrane β-barrel protein, translocon at the outer-envelope-membrane of chloroplasts 75 (Toc75). Toc75 requires its N-terminal extension (t75) for proper localization. t75 comprises signals for chloroplast import (n75) and envelope sorting (c75) in tandem. n75 and c75 are removed by stromal processing peptidase and plastidic type I signal peptidase 1, respectively. PolyGly is present within c75 and its deletion or substitution causes mistargeting of Toc75 to the stroma. Here we have examined the properties of polyGly-dependent protein targeting using two soluble passenger proteins, the mature portion of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (mSS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Both t75-mSS and t75-EGFP were imported into isolated chloroplasts and their n75 removed. Resultant c75-mSS was associated with the envelope at the intermembrane space, whereas c75-EGFP was partially exposed outside the envelope. Deletion of polyGly or substitution of tri-Ala for the critical tri-Gly segment within polyGly caused each passenger to be targeted to the stroma. Transient expression of t75-EGFP in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in accumulation of c75-EGFP exposed at the surface of the chloroplast, but the majority of the EGFP passenger was found free in the cytosol with most of its c75 attachment removed. Results of circular dichroism analyses suggest that polyGly within c75 may form an extended conformation, which is disrupted by tri-Ala substitution. These data suggest that polyGly is distinct from a canonical stop-transfer sequence and acts as a rejection signal at the chloroplast inner envelope. PMID:27936133

  4. The theoretical polarization of pure scattering axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    The Sobolev approach to the scattering of starlight through a pure scattering circumstellar envelope is developed. The theoretical polarization due to electron scattering in Be star envelopes is calculated for two geometries (an equatorially enhanced envelope and a spheroidal envelope). Only the disk-type envelope is found to yield a maximum polarization consistent with the observed range for Be stars. A lower limit, analytical approximation to the theoretical polarization from a pure scattering envelope is obtained.

  5. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8 × ( W L ¯ ) n = 3 , 4 , 5 / POPE . The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT.

  6. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-07

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8×(WL¯)n=3,4,5/POPE. The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT.

  7. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

    2009-09-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters which nuclear facilities may operate within to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a result of the U.S. having no operating nuclear chemical reprocessing plants, there has been a strong interest in obtaining process monitoring data from the ICPP. The ICPP was shut down in 1996 and a recent effort has been made to retrieve the PM data from storage in a data mining effort. In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z- testing7.

  8. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis; Teoh, William; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1988-01-01

    The Personnel Occupied Woven Envelope Robot (POWER) provides an alternative to extravehicular activity (EVA) of space suited astronauts and/or use of long slender manipulator arms such as are used in the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. POWER provides the capability for a shirt sleeved astronaut to perform such work by entering a control pod through air locks at both ends of an inflated flexible bellows (access tunnel). The exoskeleton of the tunnel is a series of six degrees of freedom (Six-DOF) articulated links compressible to 1/6 of their fully extended length. The operator can maneuver the control pod to almost any location within about 50 m of the base attachment to the space station. POWER can be envisioned as a series of hollow Six-DOF manipulator segments or arms wherein each arm grasps the shoulder of the next arm. Inside the hollow arms ia a bellow-type access tunnel. The control pod is the fist of the series of linked hollow arms. The fingers of the fist are conventional manipulator arms under direct visual control of the nearby operator in the pod. The applications and progress to date of the POWER system is given.

  9. Palmitoylation of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein and its effect on fusion activity and envelope incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Paladino, Monica G.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2012-06-20

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) possesses a short cytoplasmic domain of 53 amino acids containing four highly conserved cysteines at Env positions 804, 811, 815 and 848. Since palmitoylation of transmembrane proteins occurs at or near the membrane anchor, we investigated whether cysteines 804, 811 and 815 are acylated and analyzed the relevance of these residues for Env functions. Replacement of cysteines 804, 811 and 815 individually or in combination by serine residues resulted in Env glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed and processed. However, mutations C804S and C811S reduced Env fusogenicity by 93% and 84%, respectively, compared with wild-type Env. By contrast, mutant C815S exhibited a fusogenic capacity representing 50% of the wild-type value. Remarkably, the double mutation C804S/C811S abrogated both Env fusion activity and Env incorporation into virions. Finally, by means of Click chemistry assays we demonstrated that the four FIV Env cytoplasmic cysteines are palmitoylated.

  10. Resource envelope concepts for mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, K. Y.; Weiler, J. D.; Tokaz, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Seven proposed methods for creating resource envelopes for Space Station Freedom mission planning are detailed. Four reference science activity models are used to illustrate the effect of adding operational flexibility to mission timelines. For each method, a brief explanation is given along with graphs to illustrate the application of the envelopes to the power and crew resources. The benefits and costs of each method are analyzed in terms of resource utilization. In addition to the effect on individual activities, resource envelopes are analyzed at the experiment level.

  11. EMC1-dependent stabilization drives membrane penetration of a partially destabilized non-enveloped virus

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Parikshit; Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    Destabilization of a non-enveloped virus generates a membrane transport-competent viral particle. Here we probe polyomavirus SV40 endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-cytosol membrane transport, a decisive infection step where destabilization initiates this non-enveloped virus for membrane penetration. We find that a member of the ER membrane protein complex (EMC) called EMC1 promotes SV40 ER membrane transport and infection. Surprisingly, EMC1 does so by using its predicted transmembrane residue D961 to bind to and stabilize the membrane-embedded partially destabilized SV40, thereby preventing premature viral disassembly. EMC1-dependent stabilization enables SV40 to engage a cytosolic extraction complex that ejects the virus into the cytosol. Thus EMC1 acts as a molecular chaperone, bracing the destabilized SV40 in a transport-competent state. Our findings reveal the novel principle that coordinated destabilization-stabilization drives membrane transport of a non-enveloped virus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21470.001 PMID:28012275

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 envelope-initiated G2-phase programmed cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnitchenko, V; Wahl, L M; Tian, H; Sunila, I; Tani, Y; Hartmann, D P; Cossman, J; Raffeld, M; Orenstein, J; Samelson, L E

    1995-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation, no clearly defined mechanism explaining human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced cell killing has emerged. HIV-1 infection is initiated through a high-affinity interaction between the HIV-1 external envelope glycoprotein (gp120) and the CD4 receptor on T cells. Cell killing is a later event intimately linked by in vitro genetic analyses with the fusogenic properties of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 and transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. In this report, we describe aberrancies in cell cycle regulatory proteins initiated by cell-cell contact between T cells expressing HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins and other T cells expressing CD4 receptors. Cells rapidly accumulate cyclin B protein and tyrosine-hyperphosphorylated p34cdc2 (cdk1) kinase, indicative of cell cycle arrest at G2 phase. Moreover, these cells continue to synthesize cyclin B protein, enlarge and display an abnormal ballooned morphology, and disappear from the cultures in a pattern previously described for cytotoxicity induced by DNA synthesis (S phase) inhibitors. Similar changes are observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected in vitro with pathogenic primary isolates of HIV-1. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8524869

  13. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  14. Radiative accelerations in stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    In stars which are sufficiently quiescent, changes in the relative abundances of the chemical elements can result from gravitational settling and from levitation produced by radiation pressure forces, usually expressed as radiative accelerations g_rad. Those changes can affect the structure of such stars, due to modifications in opacities, and can lead to marked peculiarities in observed atmospheric abundances. It is necessary to consider diffusive movements both in the atmospheres and in much deeper layers of the stellar envelopes. For the envelopes the equation of radiative transfer can be solved in a diffusion approximation and, for an element k in ionization stage j, one obtains expressions for g_rad(j, k) proportional to the total radiative flux, to the Rosseland-mean opacity kappa_R (which may depend on the abundance of k), and to a dimensionless quantity gamma(j, k) which, due to saturation effects, can be sensitive to the abundance of k. The radiative accelerations are required for each ionization stage, because the diffusion coefficients depend on j. Using atomic data obtained in the course of the work of the Opacity Project (OP), we calculate kappa_R and gamma(j, k) for the chemical elements C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni. We start from standard Solar system abundances, and then vary the abundance of one element at a time (element k) by a factor chi. The following results are obtained and are available at the Centre de Donnees astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). (1) Files stages.zz (where zz specifies the nuclear charge of the selected element k) containing values of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) on a mesh of values of (T, N_e, chi), where T is temperature, and N_e is electron density. We include derivatives of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) with respect to chi, which are used for making interpolations. (2) A code add.f which reads a file stages.zz and writes a file acc.zz containing values of gamma(k) obtained on summing the gamma(j, k

  15. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Personnel Occupied Woven Envelope Robot (POWER) concept has evolved over the course of the study. The goal of the project was the development of methods and algorithms for solid modeling for the flexible robot arm.

  16. Transcriptional regulation at the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Babett; Sazer, Shelley; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome inside the nucleus affects many nuclear processes, such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. In metazoans, the nuclear periphery harbors mainly repressed genes that associate with the nuclear lamina. This review discusses how peripheral positioning is connected to transcriptional regulation in yeasts. Tethering of reporter genes to the nuclear envelope was found to result in transcriptional silencing. Similarly, repression of the silent mating type loci and subtelomeric genes is influenced by their position close to the nuclear envelope. In contrast, active genes are bound by nucleoporins and inducible genes associate with the nuclear pore complex upon activation. Taken together, these results portray the nuclear envelope as a platform for transcriptional regulation, both through activation at nuclear pores and silencing at the nuclear envelope. PMID:24021962

  17. Creating a Lunar EVA Work Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Howard, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Smitherman, David

    2009-01-01

    A work envelope has been defined for weightless Extravehicular Activity (EVA) based on the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), but there is no equivalent for planetary operations. The weightless work envelope is essential for planning all EVA tasks because it determines the location of removable parts, making sure they are within reach and visibility of the suited crew member. In addition, using the envelope positions the structural hard points for foot restraints that allow placing both hands on the job and provides a load path for reacting forces. EVA operations are always constrained by time. Tasks are carefully planned to ensure the crew has enough breathing oxygen, cooling water, and battery power. Planning first involves computers using a virtual work envelope to model tasks, next suited crew members in a simulated environment refine the tasks. For weightless operations, this process is well developed, but planetary EVA is different and no work envelope has been defined. The primary difference between weightless and planetary work envelopes is gravity. It influences anthropometry, horizontal and vertical mobility, and reaction load paths and introduces effort into doing "overhead" work. Additionally, the use of spacesuits other than the EMU, and their impacts on range of motion, must be taken into account. This paper presents the analysis leading to a concept for a planetary EVA work envelope with emphasis on lunar operations. There is some urgency in creating this concept because NASA has begun building and testing development hardware for the lunar surface, including rovers, habitats and cargo off-loading equipment. Just as with microgravity operations, a lunar EVA work envelope is needed to guide designers in the formative stages of the program with the objective of avoiding difficult and costly rework.

  18. Cryo-electron microscopy of hepatitis B virions reveals variability in envelope capsid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan; Antoni, Christoph; Böttcher, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major human pathogen causing about 750 000 deaths per year. The virion consists of a nucleocapsid and an envelope formed by lipids, and three integral membrane proteins. Although we have detailed structural insights into the organization of the HBV core, the arrangement of the envelope in virions and its interaction with the nucleocapsid is elusive. Here we show the ultrastructure of hepatitis B virions purified from patient serum. We identified two morphological phenotypes, which appear as compact and gapped particles with nucleocapsids in distinguishable conformations. The overall structures of these nucleocapsids resemble recombinant cores with two α-helical spikes per asymmetric unit. At the charged tips the spikes are contacted by defined protrusions of the envelope proteins, probably via electrostatic interactions. The HBV envelope in the two morphotypes is to some extent variable, but the surface proteins follow a general packing scheme with up to three surface protein dimers per asymmetric unit. The variability in the structure of the envelope indicates that the nucleocapsid does not firmly constrain the arrangement of the surface proteins, but provides a general template for the packing. PMID:17762862

  19. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-17

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  20. Cooling of neutron stars with diffusive envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Fortin, M.; Haensel, P.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars on their cooling. To this aim, we perform cooling simulations using newly constructed models of the envelopes composed of binary ion mixtures (H-He, He-C, C-Fe) varying the mass of lighter ions (H, He or C) in the envelope. The results are compared with those calculated using the standard models of the envelopes which contain the layers of lighter (accreted) elements (H, He and C) on top of the Fe layer, varying the mass of accreted elements. The main effect is that the chemical composition of the envelopes influences their thermal conductivity and, hence, thermal insulation of the star. For illustration, we apply these results to estimate the internal temperature of the Vela pulsar and to study the cooling of neutron stars of ages of 105-106 yr at the photon cooling stage. The uncertainties of the cooling models associated with our poor knowledge of chemical composition of the heat insulating envelopes strongly complicate theoretical reconstruction of the internal structure of cooling neutron stars from observations of their thermal surface emission.

  1. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway.

  2. The joke envelope: a neglected precursor of the psychic envelope concept in Freud's writing.

    PubMed

    Spero, Moshe Halevi

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of the primeval skin ego, psychic envelope, and related pre-ego containing and wrapping functions elaborated respectively by Esther Bick, Didier Anzieu, and Francis Tustin occupy an important position in contemporary psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice. The psychic envelope begins as a virtual mental protostructure ("proto" because it is not yet based on fully symbolized representations) that holds the budding mind together pending further developments. With maturity, the enveloping functions adopt symbolized, metaphoric form (for example, the aesthetic use of cloth, the analytic framework), but can regress to more concrete and pathological forms. The aforementioned authors based their ideas on a cluster of specific allusions to the idea of a psychic covering, barrier, or envelope in Freud's work. Yet they neglected one reference, hidden in Freud's analysis of the structure ofjokes and humor: the 'joke envelope"--die witzige Einkleidung. The present essay explores Freud's use of the term Einkleidung, including his intriguing idea that a joke requires three people whereas a dream does not and the fact that Freud nowhere speaks of a "dream envelope. "I take the "joke envelope" beyond its original context and posit a relationship between laughter and the early, normative traumas of breathing, crying, and loss, and the dawn of rhythmic envelopes that enable mentalization. Jokes and joking symbolically repeat the early rupture and rapture of breathing and self-other differentiation and the internalization of maternal containing and envelopment.

  3. Crystal Structures of Major Envelope Proteins VP26 and VP28 from White Spot Syndrome Virus Shed Light on Their Evolutionary Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,X.; Wu, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a virulent pathogen known to infect various crustaceans. It has bacilliform morphology with a tail-like appendage at one end. The envelope consists of four major proteins. Envelope structural proteins play a crucial role in viral infection and are believed to be the first molecules to interact with the host. Here, we report the localization and crystal structure of major envelope proteins VP26 and VP28 from WSSV at resolutions of 2.2 and 2.0 {angstrom}, respectively. These two proteins alone account for approximately 60% of the envelope, and their structures represent the first two structural envelope proteins of WSSV. Structural comparisons among VP26, VP28, and other viral proteins reveal an evolutionary relationship between WSSV envelope proteins and structural proteins from other viruses. Both proteins adopt {beta}-barrel architecture with a protruding N-terminal region. We have investigated the localization of VP26 and VP28 using immunoelectron microscopy. This study suggests that VP26 and VP28 are located on the outer surface of the virus and are observed as a surface protrusion in the WSSV envelope, and this is the first convincing observation for VP26. Based on our studies combined with the literature, we speculate that the predicted N-terminal transmembrane region of VP26 and VP28 may anchor on the viral envelope membrane, making the core {beta}-barrel protrude outside the envelope, possibly to interact with the host receptor or to fuse with the host cell membrane for effective transfer of the viral infection. Furthermore, it is tempting to extend this host interaction mode to other structural viral proteins of similar structures. Our finding has the potential to extend further toward drug and vaccine development against WSSV.

  4. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  5. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore.

    PubMed

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process.

  6. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process. PMID:28018169

  7. Solitary Alfven wave envelopes and the modulational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, C.F.

    1987-06-01

    The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation describes the modulational instability of circularly polarized dispersive Alfven wave envelopes. It also may be used to determine the properties of finite amplitude localized stationary wave envelopes. Such envelope solitons exist only in conditions of modulational stability. This leaves open the question of whether, and if so, how, the modulational instability produces envelope solitons. 12 refs.

  8. Kar5p is required for multiple functions in both inner and outer nuclear envelope fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Rose, Mark D

    2014-12-02

    During mating in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse via two sequential membrane fusion steps. SNAREs (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Prm3p mediate outer nuclear membrane fusion, but the inner membrane fusogen remains unknown. Kar5p is a highly conserved transmembrane protein that localizes adjacent to the spindle pole body (SPB), mediates nuclear envelope fusion, and recruits Prm3p adjacent to the SPB. To separate Kar5p's functions, we tested localization, Prm3p recruitment, and nuclear fusion efficiency in various kar5 mutants. All domains and the conserved cysteine residues were essential for nuclear fusion. Several kar5 mutant proteins localized properly but did not mediate Prm3p recruitment; other kar5 mutant proteins localized and recruited Prm3p but were nevertheless defective for nuclear fusion, demonstrating additional functions beyond Prm3p recruitment. We identified one Kar5p domain required for SPB localization, which is dependent on the half-bridge protein Mps3p. Electron microscopy revealed a kar5 mutant that arrests with expanded nuclear envelope bridges, suggesting that Kar5p is required after outer nuclear envelope fusion. Finally, a split-GFP assay demonstrated that Kar5p localizes to both the inner and outer nuclear envelope. These insights suggest a mechanism by which Kar5p mediates inner nuclear membrane fusion.

  9. Morphologically complex protostellar envelopes : structure and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.

    I present an in-depth study of protostars and their surrounding envelopes of dense gas and dust, using a multitude of observational methods to reveal new details of the star formation process. I use mid-infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, combined with photometry spanning the near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, to construct a model of the L1527 protostellar system. I modeled both the spectral energy distribution and resolved scattered light images to determine physical properties of the protostellar system. The nature of the apparent central point source in the Spitzer images was uncertain until high-resolution L-band imaging from the Gemini observatory resolved the point source into a disk in scattered light, having a radius of 200 AU. Protostellar envelopes are also often found to cast shadows against the 8 micron Galactic background in Spitzer imaging, enabling direct probes of envelope structure. The shadow images show that the dense envelopes around twenty-two Class 0 protostars are generally morphologically complex from 0.1 pc scales down to ˜1000 AU; they are often filamentary, and frequently non-axisymmetric. The observed envelope structure indicates a likely origin in turbulent cloud structure rather than a quasi-static/equilibrium formation. The complex envelope structure also may indicate an increased likelihood of fragmentation during collapse, forming close binaries. To further characterize these envelopes, I have observed them in the dense molecular gas tracers nthp and nht, both of which closely follow the 8 micron extinction morphology. The magnitude of the velocity gradients and envelope complexity on ˜10000 AU scales indicates that the velocity structure may reflect large-scale infall in addition to the often assumed rotation. Comparisons with three-dimensional filamentary and symmetric rotating collapse models reinforce the interpretation of velocities reflecting large-scale infall, showing that the structure of the envelope

  10. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region.

    PubMed

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Nieva, José L

    2015-05-22

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments.

  11. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Fields, J G; Voogt, R D; Deng, B; Lam, Y-W; Mintz, K P

    2015-04-01

    The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 27% of the predicted open reading frames in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. A total of 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, whereas others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity.

  12. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-07-07

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this work for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method - Signal Noise Slope Intersection (SNSI), incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called Geometric Method (GM). Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained post detection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid and subclavian arteries. Results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low - less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow; and also less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of Pulsatility Index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  13. Featured Image: Orbiting Stars Share an Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    This beautiful series of snapshots from a simulation (click for a better look!) shows what happens when two stars in a binary system become enclosed in the same stellar envelope. In this binary system, one of the stars has exhausted its hydrogen fuel and become a red giant, complete with an expanding stellar envelope composed of hydrogen and helium. Eventually, the envelope expands so much that the companion star falls into it, where it releases gravitational potential energy into the common envelope. A team led by Sebastian Ohlmann (Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies and University of Wrzburg) recently performed hydrodynamic simulations of this process. Ohlmann and collaborators discovered that the energy release eventually triggers large-scale flow instabilities, which leads to turbulence within the envelope. This process has important consequences for how these systems next evolve (for instance, determining whether or not a supernova occurs!). You can check out the authors video of their simulated stellar inspiral below, or see their paper for more images and results from their study.CitationSebastian T. Ohlmann et al 2016 ApJ 816 L9. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/816/1/L9

  14. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Looney, Leslie W.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang

    2010-04-01

    We use archived Infrared Array Camera images from the Spitzer Space Telescope to show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and non-axisymmetric structure within their dusty envelopes. Our 8 {mu}m extinction maps probe some of the densest regions in these protostellar envelopes. Many of the systems are observed to have highly irregular and non-axisymmetric morphologies on scales {approx}>1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. These results indicate that mass ejection is not responsible for much of the irregular morphologies we detect; rather, we suggest that the observed envelope complexity is mostly the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We also note that protostars in the sample appear to be formed preferentially near the edges of clouds or bends in filaments, suggesting formation by gravitational focusing.

  15. Defining the disease liability of variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene

    PubMed Central

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Siklosi, Karen R; Van Goor, Fredrick; Kaniecki, Kyle; Yu, Haihui; Sharma, Neeraj; Ramalho, Anabela S; Amaral, Margarida D; Dorfman, Ruslan; Zielenski, Julian; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel; Millen, Linda; Thomas, Philip J; Patrinos, George P; Corey, Mary; Lewis, Michelle H; Rommens, Johanna M; Castellani, Carlo; Penland, Christopher M; Cutting, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Allelic heterogeneity in disease-causing genes presents a substantial challenge to the translation of genomic variation to clinical practice. Few of the almost 2,000 variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have empirical evidence that they cause cystic fibrosis. To address this gap, we collected both genotype and phenotype data for 39,696 cystic fibrosis patients in registries and clinics in North America and Europe. Among these patients, 159 CFTR variants had an allele frequency of ≥0.01%. These variants were evaluated for both clinical severity and functional consequence with 127 (80%) meeting both clinical and functional criteria consistent with disease. Assessment of disease penetrance in 2,188 fathers of cystic fibrosis patients enabled assignment of 12 of the remaining 32 variants as neutral while the other 20 variants remained indeterminate. This study illustrates that sourcing data directly from well-phenotyped subjects can address the gap in our ability to interpret clinically-relevant genomic variation. PMID:23974870

  16. Ultradonut topology of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Torbati, Mehdi; Lele, Tanmay P.; Agrawal, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a unique topological structure formed by lipid membranes in eukaryotic cells. Unlike other membrane structures, the nuclear envelope comprises two concentric membrane shells fused at numerous sites with toroid-shaped pores that impart a “geometric” genus on the order of thousands. Despite the intriguing architecture and vital biological functions of the nuclear membranes, how they achieve and maintain such a unique arrangement remains unknown. Here, we used the theory of elasticity and differential geometry to analyze the equilibrium shape and stability of this structure. Our results show that modest in- and out-of-plane stresses present in the membranes not only can define the pore geometry, but also provide a mechanism for destabilizing membranes beyond a critical size and set the stage for the formation of new pores. Our results suggest a mechanism wherein nanoscale buckling instabilities can define the global topology of a nuclear envelope-like structure. PMID:27647910

  17. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei

    2016-02-25

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC--an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target--access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics.

  18. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC—an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target—access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics. PMID:26912110

  19. Envelope Solitons in Acoustically Dispersive Vitreous Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation-induced static strains, displacements, and stresses are manifested as rectified or dc waveforms linked to the energy density of an acoustic wave or vibrational mode via the mode nonlinearity parameter of the material. An analytical model is developed for acoustically dispersive media that predicts the evolution of the energy density of an initial waveform into a series of energy solitons that generates a corresponding series of radiation-induced static strains (envelope solitons). The evolutionary characteristics of the envelope solitons are confirmed experimentally in Suprasil W1 vitreous silica. The value (-11.9 plus or minus 1.43) for the nonlinearity parameter, determined from displacement measurements of the envelope solitons via a capacitive transducer, is in good agreement with the value (-11.6 plus or minus 1.16) obtained independently from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The agreement provides strong, quantitative evidence for the validity of the model.

  20. BST-2/tetherin: a new component of the innate immune response to enveloped viruses

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David T.; Serra-Moreno, Ruth; Singh, Rajendra K.; Guatelli, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The interferon-inducible, transmembrane protein BST-2 (CD317, tetherin) directly holds fully formed enveloped virus particles to the cells that produce them, inhibiting their spread. BST-2 inhibits members of the retrovirus, filovirus, arenavirus, and herpesvirus families. These viruses encode a variety of proteins to degrade BST-2 and/or direct it away from its site of action at the cell surface. Viral antagonism has subjected BST-2 to positive selection, leading to species-specific differences that presented a barrier to the transmission of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) to humans. This barrier was crossed by HIV-1 when its Vpu protein acquired activity as a BST-2 antagonist. Here, we review this new host-pathogen relationship and discuss its impact on the evolution of primate lentiviruses and the origins of the HIV pandemic. PMID:20688520

  1. [NESPRINS--nuclear envelope proteins ensuring integrity].

    PubMed

    Pershina, E G; Morozova, K N; Kiseleva, E V

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the nesprins (nuclear envelope spectrin-repeat proteins), which are recently discovered family of nuclear envelope proteins. These proteins play an important role in maintaining the cellular architecture and establish the link between the nucleus and other sub-cellular compartments. Many tissue-specific diseases including lipodystrophies, hearing loss, cardiac and skeletal myopathies are associated with nesprins mutations. These proteins comprise of multiple tissue specific isoforms which contain spectrin repeats providing interaction of nesprins with other nuclear membrane proteins, cytoskeleton and intranuclear matrix. We summarize recent findings and suggestions about nesprins structural organization and function inside the cell. Human diseases caused by abnormal nesprins expression are also described.

  2. The photodissociation of CO in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, G. A.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The CO photodissociation rate for the unshielded ISM is calculated using recent laboratory results which confirm that photodissociation occurs by way of line absorption. A value of 2.0 x 10 to the -10th/s, an order of magnitude higher than the rate used in the past, is obtained. The new rate and a treatment of the radiative transfer and shielding are used to develop a theory for the CO abundance in the circumstellar envelopes of cool, evolved stars, and results are presented on the spatial variation of CO, C, and C(+). It is shown that these distributions play important roles in determining the observational properties of circumstellar envelopes.

  3. Consumer access to utility billing envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, M.K.

    1984-09-13

    Billing envelope inserts are a medium of advertising used by utilities for a variety of purposes, from encouraging conservation to expressing political opinions. Recently, consumer groups have begun to assert a right of access to the same medium. A constitutional right of reply has been advocated. Commissions have found regulatory authority to direct companies to provide access on the basis of several different theories. At least two states have passed legislation permitting consumer groups to use bill inserts to solicit members and contributions. When examined, these developments reveal a trend of granting organizations access to utility billing envelopes.

  4. Perception and coding of envelopes in weakly electric fishes.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Chacron, Maurice J

    2013-07-01

    Natural sensory stimuli have a rich spatiotemporal structure and can often be characterized as a high frequency signal that is independently modulated at lower frequencies. This lower frequency modulation is known as the envelope. Envelopes are commonly found in a variety of sensory signals, such as contrast modulations of visual stimuli and amplitude modulations of auditory stimuli. While psychophysical studies have shown that envelopes can carry information that is essential for perception, how envelope information is processed in the brain is poorly understood. Here we review the behavioral salience and neural mechanisms for the processing of envelopes in the electrosensory system of wave-type gymnotiform weakly electric fishes. These fish can generate envelope signals through movement, interactions of their electric fields in social groups or communication signals. The envelopes that result from the first two behavioral contexts differ in their frequency content, with movement envelopes typically being of lower frequency. Recent behavioral evidence has shown that weakly electric fish respond in robust and stereotypical ways to social envelopes to increase the envelope frequency. Finally, neurophysiological results show how envelopes are processed by peripheral and central electrosensory neurons. Peripheral electrosensory neurons respond to both stimulus and envelope signals. Neurons in the primary hindbrain recipient of these afferents, the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL), exhibit heterogeneities in their responses to stimulus and envelope signals. Complete segregation of stimulus and envelope information is achieved in neurons in the target of ELL efferents, the midbrain torus semicircularis (Ts).

  5. Aurora B–mediated localized delays in nuclear envelope formation facilitate inclusion of late-segregating chromosome fragments

    PubMed Central

    Karg, Travis; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2015-01-01

    To determine how chromosome segregation is coordinated with nuclear envelope formation (NEF), we examined the dynamics of NEF in the presence of lagging acentric chromosomes in Drosophila neuroblasts. Acentric chromosomes often exhibit delayed but ultimately successful segregation and incorporation into daughter nuclei. However, it is unknown whether these late-segregating acentric fragments influence NEF to ensure their inclusion in daughter nuclei. Through live analysis, we show that acentric chromosomes induce highly localized delays in the reassembly of the nuclear envelope. These delays result in a gap in the nuclear envelope that facilitates the inclusion of lagging acentrics into telophase daughter nuclei. Localized delays of nuclear envelope reassembly require Aurora B kinase activity. In cells with reduced Aurora B activity, there is a decrease in the frequency of local nuclear envelope reassembly delays, resulting in an increase in the frequency of acentric-bearing, lamin-coated micronuclei. These studies reveal a novel role of Aurora B in maintaining genomic integrity by promoting the formation of a passageway in the nuclear envelope through which late-segregating acentric chromosomes enter the telophase daughter nucleus. PMID:25877868

  6. Behind the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  7. Yeast Aquaglyceroporins Use the Transmembrane Core to Restrict Glycerol Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Geijer, Cecilia; Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Palmgren, Madelene; Filipsson, Caroline; Klein, Dagmara Medrala; Tamás, Markus J.; Hohmann, Stefan; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins are transmembrane proteins belonging to the family of aquaporins, which facilitate the passage of specific uncharged solutes across membranes of cells. The yeast aquaglyceroporin Fps1 is important for osmoadaptation by regulating intracellular glycerol levels during changes in external osmolarity. Upon high osmolarity conditions, yeast accumulates glycerol by increased production of the osmolyte and by restricting glycerol efflux through Fps1. The extended cytosolic termini of Fps1 contain short domains that are important for regulating glycerol flux through the channel. Here we show that the transmembrane core of the protein plays an equally important role. The evidence is based on results from an intragenic suppressor mutation screen and domain swapping between the regulated variant of Fps1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the hyperactive Fps1 ortholog from Ashbya gossypii. This suggests a novel mechanism for regulation of glycerol flux in yeast, where the termini alone are not sufficient to restrict Fps1 transport. We propose that glycerol flux through the channel is regulated by interplay between the transmembrane helices and the termini. This mechanism enables yeast cells to fine-tune intracellular glycerol levels at a wide range of extracellular osmolarities. PMID:22593571

  8. Transmembrane allosteric coupling of the gates in a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Bhate, Manasi P; McDermott, Ann E

    2014-01-07

    It has been hypothesized that transmembrane allostery is the basis for inactivation of the potassium channel KcsA: opening the intracellular gate is spontaneously followed by ion expulsion at the extracellular selectivity filter. This suggests a corollary: following ion expulsion at neutral pH, a spontaneous global conformation change of the transmembrane helices, similar to the motion involved in opening, is expected. Consequently, both the low potassium state and the low pH state of the system could provide useful models for the inactivated state. Unique NMR studies of full-length KcsA in hydrated bilayers provide strong evidence for such a mutual coupling across the bilayer: namely, upon removing ambient potassium ions, changes are seen in the NMR shifts of carboxylates E118 and E120 in the pH gate in the hinges of the inner transmembrane helix (98-103), and in the selectivity filter, all of which resemble changes seen upon acid-induced opening and inhibition and suggest that ion release can trigger channel helix opening.

  9. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R

    2011-11-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus-truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets.

  10. Anesthetics Target Interfacial Transmembrane Sites in Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.; Chiara, David C.; Miller, Keith W.

    2014-01-01

    General anesthetics are a heterogeneous group of small amphiphilic ligands that interact weakly at multiple allosteric sites on many pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs), resulting in either inhibition, potentiation of channel activity, or both. Allosteric principles imply that modulator sites must change configuration and ligand affinity during receptor state transitions. Thus, general anesthetics and related compounds are useful both as state-dependent probes of receptor structure and as potentially selective modulators of pLGIC functions. This review focuses on general anesthetic sites in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which were among the first anesthetic-sensitive pLGIC experimental models studied, with particular focus on sites formed by transmembrane domain elements. Structural models place many of these sites at interfaces between two or more pLGIC transmembrane helices both within subunits and between adjacent subunits, and between transmembrane helices and either lipids (the lipid-protein interface) or water (i.e. the ion channel). A single general anesthetic may bind at multiple allosteric sites in pLGICs, producing a net effect of either inhibition (e.g. blocking the ion channel) or enhanced channel gating (e.g. inter-subunit sites). Other general anesthetic sites identified by photolabeling or crystallography are tentatively linked to functional effects, including intra-subunit helix bundle sites and the lipid-protein interface. PMID:25316107

  11. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  12. Critical role of the first transmembrane domain of Cx26 in regulating oligomerization and function

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Oscar; Acuña, Rodrigo; García, Isaac E.; Maripillán, Jaime; Figueroa, Vania; Sáez, Juan C.; Araya-Secchi, Raúl; Lagos, Carlos F.; Pérez-Acle, Tomas; Berthoud, Viviana M.; Beyer, Eric C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2012-01-01

    To identify motifs involved in oligomerization of the gap junction protein Cx26, we studied individual transmembrane (TM) domains and the full-length protein. Using the TOXCAT assay for interactions of isolated TM α-helices, we found that TM1, a Cx26 pore domain, had a strong propensity to homodimerize. We identified amino acids Val-37–Ala-40 (VVAA) as the TM1 motif required for homodimerization. Two deafness-associated Cx26 mutations localized in this region, Cx26V37I and Cx26A40G, differentially affected dimerization. TM1-V37I dimerized only weakly, whereas TM1-A40G did not dimerize. When the full-length mutants were expressed in HeLa cells, both Cx26V37I and Cx26A40G formed oligomers less efficiently than wild-type Cx26. A Cx26 cysteine substitution mutant, Cx26V37C formed dithiothreitol-sensitive dimers. Substitution mutants of Val-37 formed intercellular channels with reduced function, while mutants of Ala-40 did not form functional gap junction channels. Unlike wild-type Cx26, neither Cx26V37I nor Cx26A40G formed functional hemichannels in low extracellular calcium. Thus the VVAA motif of Cx26 is critical for TM1 dimerization, hexamer formation, and channel function. The differential effects of VVAA mutants on hemichannels and gap junction channels imply that inter-TM interactions can differ in unapposed and docked hemichannels. Moreover, Cx26 oligomerization appears dependent on transient TM1 dimerization as an intermediate step. PMID:22787277

  13. Assessing effects of variation in global climate data sets on spatial predictions from climate envelope models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romanach, Stephanie; Watling, James I.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Speroterra, Carolina; Bucklin, David N.; Brandt, Laura A.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Escribano, Yesenia; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change poses new challenges for natural resource managers. Predictive modeling of species–environment relationships using climate envelope models can enhance our understanding of climate change effects on biodiversity, assist in assessment of invasion risk by exotic organisms, and inform life-history understanding of individual species. While increasing interest has focused on the role of uncertainty in future conditions on model predictions, models also may be sensitive to the initial conditions on which they are trained. Although climate envelope models are usually trained using data on contemporary climate, we lack systematic comparisons of model performance and predictions across alternative climate data sets available for model training. Here, we seek to fill that gap by comparing variability in predictions between two contemporary climate data sets to variability in spatial predictions among three alternative projections of future climate. Overall, correlations between monthly temperature and precipitation variables were very high for both contemporary and future data. Model performance varied across algorithms, but not between two alternative contemporary climate data sets. Spatial predictions varied more among alternative general-circulation models describing future climate conditions than between contemporary climate data sets. However, we did find that climate envelope models with low Cohen's kappa scores made more discrepant spatial predictions between climate data sets for the contemporary period than did models with high Cohen's kappa scores. We suggest conservation planners evaluate multiple performance metrics and be aware of the importance of differences in initial conditions for spatial predictions from climate envelope models.

  14. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE: PREVIOUS WORK AND EXAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill; William Charlton; Robert Bean

    2008-07-01

    The future expansion of nuclear power will require not just electricity production but fuel cycle facilities such as fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants. As large reprocessing facilities are built in various states, they must be built and operated in a manner to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation. Process monitoring has returned to the spotlight as an added measure that can increase confidence in the safeguards of special nuclear material (SNM). Process monitoring can be demonstrated to lengthen the allowable inventory period by reducing accountancy requirements, and to reduce the false positive indications. The next logical step is the creation of a Safeguards Envelope, a set of operational parameters and models to maximize anomaly detection and inventory period by process monitoring while minimizing operator impact and false positive rates. A brief example of a rudimentary Safeguards Envelope is presented, and shown to detect synthetic diversions overlaying a measured processing plant data set. This demonstration Safeguards Envelope is shown to increase the confidence that no SNM has been diverted with minimal operator impact, even though it is based on an information sparse environment. While the foundation on which a full Safeguards Envelope can be built has been presented in historical demonstrations of process monitoring, several requirements remain yet unfulfilled. Future work will require reprocessing plant transient models, inclusion of “non-traditional” operating data, and exploration of new methods of identifying subtle events in transient processes.

  15. The Methodology of Data Envelopment Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    The methodology of data envelopment analysis, (DEA) a linear programming-based method, is described. Other procedures often used for measuring relative productive efficiency are discussed in relation to DEA, including ratio analysis and multiple regression analysis. The DEA technique is graphically illustrated for only two inputs and one output.…

  16. Ultraviolet Opacity and Fluorescence in Supernova Envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hongwei; McCray, Richard

    1996-01-01

    By the time the expanding envelope of a Type 2 supernova becomes transparent in the optical continuum, most of the gamma-ray luminosity produced by radioactive Fe/Co/Ni clumps propagates into the hydrogen/helium envelope and is deposited there, if at all. The resulting fast electrons excite He 1 and H 1, the two- photon continua of which are the dominant internal sources of ultraviolet radiation. The UV radiation is blocked by scattering in thousands of resonance lines of metals and converted by fluorescence into optical and infrared emission lines that escape freely. We describe results of Monte Carlo calculations that simulate non-LTE scattering and fluorescence in more than five million allowed lines of Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. For a model approximating conditions in the envelope of SN 1987A, the calculated emergent spectrum resembles the observed one. For the first 2 yr after explosion, the ultraviolet radiation (lambda less than or approximately equals 3000) is largely blocked and converted into a quasi continuum of many thousands of weak optical and infrared emission lines and some prominent emission features, such as the Ca 2 lambdalambda8600 triplet. Later, as the envelope cools and expands, it becomes more transparent, and an increasing fraction of the luminosity emerges in the UV band.

  17. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  18. 14 CFR 23.333 - Flight envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any combination of airspeed and load factor on and within the boundaries of a flight envelope (similar... altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from 50 f.p.s. at 20... considered at altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from...

  19. 14 CFR 23.333 - Flight envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... any combination of airspeed and load factor on and within the boundaries of a flight envelope (similar... altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from 50 f.p.s. at 20... considered at altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from...

  20. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  1. Right to Light: Ralph Knowles's Solar Envelope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, David

    1979-01-01

    At the University of Southern California solar-access design research project, Barry Knowles and students have devised a solar envelope: the largest volumetric container over a land parcel that allows solar access to all adjacent neighbors within useful time constraints. (Author/MLF)

  2. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1984-10-02

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations. 3 figs.

  3. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1984-01-01

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centrigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations.

  4. Adaptive envelope protection methods for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, Suraj

    Carefree handling refers to the ability of a pilot to operate an aircraft without the need to continuously monitor aircraft operating limits. At the heart of all carefree handling or maneuvering systems, also referred to as envelope protection systems, are algorithms and methods for predicting future limit violations. Recently, envelope protection methods that have gained more acceptance, translate limit proximity information to its equivalent in the control channel. Envelope protection algorithms either use very small prediction horizon or are static methods with no capability to adapt to changes in system configurations. Adaptive approaches maximizing prediction horizon such as dynamic trim, are only applicable to steady-state-response critical limit parameters. In this thesis, a new adaptive envelope protection method is developed that is applicable to steady-state and transient response critical limit parameters. The approach is based upon devising the most aggressive optimal control profile to the limit boundary and using it to compute control limits. Pilot-in-the-loop evaluations of the proposed approach are conducted at the Georgia Tech Carefree Maneuver lab for transient longitudinal hub moment limit protection. Carefree maneuvering is the dual of carefree handling in the realm of autonomous Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Designing a flight control system to fully and effectively utilize the operational flight envelope is very difficult. With the increasing role and demands for extreme maneuverability there is a need for developing envelope protection methods for autonomous UAVs. In this thesis, a full-authority automatic envelope protection method is proposed for limit protection in UAVs. The approach uses adaptive estimate of limit parameter dynamics and finite-time horizon predictions to detect impending limit boundary violations. Limit violations are prevented by treating the limit boundary as an obstacle and by correcting nominal control

  5. A Failure of Coalition Leadership: The Falaise-Argentan Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    when the Canadian advance was slowed eight miles north of Falaise on August 9th. 52 The evidence suggests thatthe Canadian attack, as the pincer ...of Argentan and sending two divisions toward the Seine River for a larger and longer pincer envelopment movement.6 This masterful decision by...Montgomery for the movement of the northern pincer (required to link the two forces and close the gap), it was doomed to disjointed failure. 67 When the

  6. CO line emission from circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, D.; Hernandez, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Yoshida, H.; Phillips, T. G.

    2006-04-01

    Aims.We present the results of a multi-transition CO observational program conducted on a sample of AGB and post-AGB stars envelopes. We have collected maps and single pointing observations of these envelopes in 5 rotational transitions ranging from J = 1-0 to J = 6-5, including in particular new observations of the CO line at 691 GHz at the CSO. The use of such a set of mm and submm CO line on stellar envelopes is rare and limited to the work of some authors on IRC+10216. Methods: .Using a model for the CO emission of an AGB circumstellar envelope, in combination with a standard LVG approach, we have conducted a systematic modelling analysis using the whole set of CO data collected for a sample of 12 sources. We simultaneously fit all five transitions, taking into account the spatial information provided by the maps. Results: .We find mass-loss rates in the range 1 × 10-7 to 4 × 10-4 M_⊙/yr, and envelope temperatures ranging from 20 K to 1000 K at a radius of 1016 cm. There seem to be a general anti-correlation between mass loss rates and temperature, the high mass loss rate AGBs having low temperatures, and vice versa. We show that most AGB data can be fitted using a constant mass loss rate, at least within the calibration uncertainties associated with the data collected at different frequencies. For some cases though (e.g. CIT 6, R Hya, χ Cyg), a change in the mass loss rate history needs to be invoked to reconcile data at low- and high-J, a scenario already mentioned by several authors to explain observations of WX Psc.

  7. The Circumstellar Envelope of IRC +10216.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keady, John Joseph

    1982-03-01

    Using recently obtained spatial and spectral line data on the circumstellar envelope of IRC +10216, we have attempted to semi-empirically probe the conditions in this envelope. The computational techniques utilized in our analysis accurately incorporate the effects of geometrical extension and velocity fields on the radiative transfer. We have also attempted to account for the non-equilibrium expected in the vibrational level populations of the gas phase species. Our modelling of the spatial distribution of the dust-produced circumstellar radiation field at 5 (mu)m and 11 (mu)m indicates that dust may be condensing in the circumstellar envelope. The dominant opacity source in our calculations, amorphous carbon, also seems to provide sufficient far-infrared flux. Modelling of the SiC emission feature confirms previous results that suggest a nonuniform particle-shape distribution for the SiC. We can produce multi-component absorption lines, very similar to the 2 (mu)m CO first overtone lines seen in IRC +10216, with continuous distributions of material. The requirement is regions of relatively low acceleration. Modelling of our high resolution, high signal-to-noise observations of the CO fundamental and first overtone indicates a mass -loss rate of 1.5(10('-4)) M(,(CIRCLE))/yr. Our calculations to date indicate that the gas reaches terminal velocity between 10 and 20 R(,*). The envelope mass within 100 R(,*) is 3(10('-2)) M(,(CIRCLE)), with the ratio (by mass) of dust to gas being 10('-3). The assumption of a constant mass-loss rate implies an envelope mass of (TURN)1 M(,(CIRCLE)) within 5000 R(,*). The computational techniques utilized are sufficiently adaptable and economical so that considerable future refinement of the modelling is possible.

  8. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla H; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this paper for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method-signal noise slope intersection, incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called geometric method. Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained postdetection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings, as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid, and subclavian arteries. The results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles, and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low-less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow, and also less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of pulsatility index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  9. The envelope-based cyclic periodogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclostationary analysis has proven effective in identifying signal components for diagnostic purposes. A key descriptor in this framework is the cyclic power spectrum, traditionally estimated by the averaged cyclic periodogram and the smoothed cyclic periodogram. A lengthy debate about the best estimator finally found a solution in a cornerstone work by Antoni, who proposed a unified form for the two families, thus allowing a detailed statistical study of their properties. Since then, the focus of cyclostationary research has shifted towards algorithms, in terms of computational efficiency and simplicity of implementation. Traditional algorithms have proven computationally inefficient and the sophisticated "cyclostationary" definition of these estimators slowed their spread in the industry. The only attempt to increase the computational efficiency of cyclostationary estimators is represented by the cyclic modulation spectrum. This indicator exploits the relationship between cyclostationarity and envelope analysis. The link with envelope analysis allows a leap in computational efficiency and provides a "way in" for the understanding by industrial engineers. However, the new estimator lies outside the unified form described above and an unbiased version of the indicator has not been proposed. This paper will therefore extend the analysis of envelope-based estimators of the cyclic spectrum, proposing a new approach to include them in the unified form of cyclostationary estimators. This will enable the definition of a new envelope-based algorithm and the detailed analysis of the properties of the cyclic modulation spectrum. The computational efficiency of envelope-based algorithms will be also discussed quantitatively for the first time in comparison with the averaged cyclic periodogram. Finally, the algorithms will be validated with numerical and experimental examples.

  10. Validating predictions from climate envelope models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watling, J.; Bucklin, D.; Speroterra, C.; Brandt, L.; Cabal, C.; Romañach, Stephanie S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Climate envelope models are a potentially important conservation tool, but their ability to accurately forecast species’ distributional shifts using independent survey data has not been fully evaluated. We created climate envelope models for 12 species of North American breeding birds previously shown to have experienced poleward range shifts. For each species, we evaluated three different approaches to climate envelope modeling that differed in the way they treated climate-induced range expansion and contraction, using random forests and maximum entropy modeling algorithms. All models were calibrated using occurrence data from 1967–1971 (t1) and evaluated using occurrence data from 1998–2002 (t2). Model sensitivity (the ability to correctly classify species presences) was greater using the maximum entropy algorithm than the random forest algorithm. Although sensitivity did not differ significantly among approaches, for many species, sensitivity was maximized using a hybrid approach that assumed range expansion, but not contraction, in t2. Species for which the hybrid approach resulted in the greatest improvement in sensitivity have been reported from more land cover types than species for which there was little difference in sensitivity between hybrid and dynamic approaches, suggesting that habitat generalists may be buffered somewhat against climate-induced range contractions. Specificity (the ability to correctly classify species absences) was maximized using the random forest algorithm and was lowest using the hybrid approach. Overall, our results suggest cautious optimism for the use of climate envelope models to forecast range shifts, but also underscore the importance of considering non-climate drivers of species range limits. The use of alternative climate envelope models that make different assumptions about range expansion and contraction is a new and potentially useful way to help inform our understanding of climate change effects on species.

  11. Gap probability - Measurements and models of a pecan orchard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, Alan H.; Li, Xiaowen; Moody, Aaron; Liu, YI

    1992-01-01

    Measurements and models are compared for gap probability in a pecan orchard. Measurements are based on panoramic photographs of 50* by 135 view angle made under the canopy looking upwards at regular positions along transects between orchard trees. The gap probability model is driven by geometric parameters at two levels-crown and leaf. Crown level parameters include the shape of the crown envelope and spacing of crowns; leaf level parameters include leaf size and shape, leaf area index, and leaf angle, all as functions of canopy position.

  12. An alternative conformation of the gp41 heptad repeat 1 region coiled coil exists in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Mische, Claudia C.; Yuan Wen; Strack, Bettina; Craig, Stewart; Farzan, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-07-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, gp41, which mediates virus-cell fusion, exists in at least three different conformations within the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex. The structures of the prefusogenic and intermediate states are unknown; structures representing the postfusion state have been solved. In the postfusion conformation, three helical heptad repeat 2 (HR2) regions pack in an antiparallel fashion into the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of a triple-helical coiled coil formed by the heptad repeat 1 (HR1) regions. We studied the prefusogenic conformation of gp41 by mutagenic alteration of membrane-anchored and soluble forms of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Our results indicate that, in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein precursor, the gp41 HR1 region is in a conformation distinct from that of a trimeric coiled coil. Thus, the central gp41 coiled coil is formed during the transition of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from the precursor state to the receptor-bound intermediate.

  13. Redirecting the Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transporters BicA and SbtA to the Chloroplast Envelope: Soluble and Membrane Cargos Need Different Chloroplast Targeting Signals in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Vivien; Badger, Murray R.; Price, G. Dean

    2016-01-01

    Most major crops used for human consumption are C3 plants, which yields are limited by photosynthetic inefficiency. To circumvent this, it has been proposed to implement the cyanobacterial CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), principally consisting of bicarbonate transporters and carboxysomes, into plant chloroplasts. As it is currently not possible to recover homoplasmic transplastomic monocots, foreign genes must be introduced in these plants via nuclear transformation. Consequently, it is paramount to ensure that resulting proteins reach the appropriate sub-cellular compartment, which for cyanobacterial transporters BicA and SbtA, is the chloroplast inner-envelope membrane (IEM). At present, targeting signals to redirect large transmembrane proteins from non-chloroplastic organisms to plant chloroplast envelopes are unknown. The goal of this study was to identify such signals, using agrobacteria-mediated transient expression and confocal microscopy to determine the sub-cellular localization of ∼37 GFP-tagged chimeras. Initially, fragments of chloroplast proteins known to target soluble cargos to the stroma were tested for their ability to redirect BicA, but they proved ineffective. Next, different N-terminal regions from Arabidopsis IEM transporters were tested. We demonstrated that the N-terminus of AtHP59, AtPLGG1 or AtNTT1 (92–115 amino acids), containing a cleavable chloroplast transit peptide (cTP) and a membrane protein leader (MPL), was sufficient to redirect BicA or SbtA to the chloroplast envelope. This constitutes the first evidence that nuclear-encoded transmembrane proteins from non-chloroplastic organisms can be targeted to the envelope of plant chloroplasts; a finding which represents an important advance in chloroplast engineering by opening up the door to further manipulation of the chloroplastic envelope. PMID:26973659

  14. The Psp system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis integrates envelope stress-sensing and envelope-preserving functions.

    PubMed

    Datta, Pratik; Ravi, Janani; Guerrini, Valentina; Chauhan, Rinki; Neiditch, Matthew B; Shell, Scarlet S; Fortune, Sarah M; Hancioglu, Baris; Igoshin, Oleg A; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial envelope integrates essential stress-sensing and adaptive functions; thus, envelope-preserving functions are important for survival. In Gram-negative bacteria, envelope integrity during stress is maintained by the multi-gene Psp response. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was thought to lack the Psp system since it encodes only pspA and no other psp ortholog. Intriguingly, pspA maps downstream from clgR, which encodes a transcription factor regulated by the MprAB-σ(E) envelope-stress-signaling system. clgR inactivation lowered ATP concentration during stress and protonophore treatment-induced clgR-pspA expression, suggesting that these genes express Psp-like functions. We identified a four-gene set - clgR, pspA (rv2744c), rv2743c, rv2742c - that is regulated by clgR and in turn regulates ClgR activity. Regulatory and protein-protein interactions within the set and a requirement of the four genes for functions associated with envelope integrity and surface-stress tolerance indicate that a Psp-like system has evolved in mycobacteria. Among Actinobacteria, the four-gene module occurred only in tuberculous mycobacteria and was required for intramacrophage growth, suggesting links between its function and mycobacterial virulence. Additionally, the four-gene module was required for MprAB-σ(E) stress-signaling activity. The positive feedback between envelope-stress-sensing and envelope-preserving functions allows sustained responses to multiple, envelope-perturbing signals during chronic infection, making the system uniquely suited to tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  15. Nuclear membrane: nuclear envelope PORosity in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Sazer, Shelley

    2010-11-09

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes closed mitosis but 'virtual nuclear envelope breakdown' at anaphase of meiosis II, in which the nuclear envelope is structurally closed but functionally open.

  16. Thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of the double shell (envelope) house

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, V.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of the envelope house are summarized and a systems approach to the house heat energy flows is presented. Some basic principles of physics in the area of thermodynamic conduction are discussed in relation to the envelope concept. (MHR)

  17. The nuclear envelope protein Nesprin-2 has roles in cell proliferation and differentiation during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rashmi, R N; Eckes, Beate; Glöckner, Gernot; Groth, Marco; Neumann, Sascha; Gloy, Joachim; Sellin, Lorenz; Walz, Gerd; Schneider, Maria; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Eichinger, Ludwig; Noegel, Angelika A

    2012-03-01

    Nesprin-2, a type II transmembrane protein of the nuclear envelope, is a component of the LINC complex that connects the nuclear lamina with the actin cytoskeleton. To elucidate its physiological role we studied wound healing in Nesprin-2 Giant deficient mice and found that a loss of the protein affected wound healing particularly at later stages during fibroblast differentiation and keratinocyte proliferation leading to delayed wound closure. We identified altered expression and localization of transcription factors as one of the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the actin cytoskeleton which surrounds the nucleus was altered and keratinocyte migration was slowed down and focal adhesion formation enhanced. We also uncovered a new activity of Nesprin-2. When we probed for an interaction of Nesprin-2 Giant with chromatin we observed in ChIP Seq experiments an association of the protein with heterochromatic and centromeric DNA. Through this activity Nesprin-2 can affect the nuclear landscape and gene regulation. Our findings suggest functions for Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope (NE) in gene regulation and in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton which impact on wound healing.

  18. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jimin Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  19. System analysis shows distinct mechanisms and common principles of nuclear envelope protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kelly, David A.; Richardson, A. Christine; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Goldberg, Martin W.; Goryachev, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear envelope contains >100 transmembrane proteins that continuously exchange with the endoplasmic reticulum and move within the nuclear membranes. To better understand the organization and dynamics of this system, we compared the trafficking of 15 integral nuclear envelope proteins using FRAP. A surprising 30-fold range of mobilities was observed. The dynamic behavior of several of these proteins was also analyzed after depletion of ATP and/or Ran, two functions implicated in endoplasmic reticulum–inner nuclear membrane translocation. This revealed that ATP- and Ran-dependent translocation mechanisms are distinct and not used by all inner nuclear membrane proteins. The Ran-dependent mechanism requires the phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-nucleoporin Nup35, which is consistent with use of the nuclear pore complex peripheral channels. Intriguingly, the addition of FGs to membrane proteins reduces FRAP recovery times, and this also depends on Nup35. Modeling of three proteins that were unaffected by either ATP or Ran depletion indicates that the wide range in mobilities could be explained by differences in binding affinities in the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:21444689

  20. Envelope-like retrotransposons in the plant kingdom: evidence of their presence in gymnosperms (Pinus pinaster).

    PubMed

    Miguel, Célia; Simões, Marta; Oliveira, Maria Margarida; Rocheta, Margarida

    2008-11-01

    Retroviruses differ from retrotransposons due to their infective capacity, which depends critically on the encoded envelope. Some plant retroelements contain domains reminiscent of the env of animal retroviruses but the number of such elements described to date is restricted to angiosperms. We show here the first evidence of the presence of putative env-like gene sequences in a gymnosperm species, Pinus pinaster (maritime pine). Using a degenerate primer approach for conserved domains of RNaseH gene, three clones from putative envelope-like retrotransposons (PpRT2, PpRT3, and PpRT4) were identified. The env-like sequences of P. pinaster clones are predicted to encode proteins with transmembrane domains. These sequences showed identity scores of up to 30% with env-like sequences belonging to different organisms. A phylogenetic analysis based on protein alignment of deduced aminoacid sequences revealed that these clones clustered with env-containing plant retrotransposons, as well as with retrotransposons from invertebrate organisms. The differences found among the sequences of maritime pine clones isolated here suggest the existence of different putative classes of env-like retroelements. The identification for the first time of env-like genes in a gymnosperm species may support the ancestrality of retroviruses among plants shedding light on their role in plant evolution.

  1. The nuclear envelope protein Nesprin-2 has roles in cell proliferation and differentiation during wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, R.N.; Eckes, Beate; Glöckner, Gernot; Groth, Marco; Neumann, Sascha; Gloy, Joachim; Sellin, Lorenz; Walz, Gerd; Schneider, Maria; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Eichinger, Ludwig; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2012-01-01

    Nesprin-2, a type II transmembrane protein of the nuclear envelope, is a component of the LINC complex that connects the nuclear lamina with the actin cytoskeleton. To elucidate its physiological role we studied wound healing in Nesprin-2 Giant deficient mice and found that a loss of the protein affected wound healing particularly at later stages during fibroblast differentiation and keratinocyte proliferation leading to delayed wound closure. We identified altered expression and localization of transcription factors as one of the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the actin cytoskeleton which surrounds the nucleus was altered and keratinocyte migration was slowed down and focal adhesion formation enhanced. We also uncovered a new activity of Nesprin-2. When we probed for an interaction of Nesprin-2 Giant with chromatin we observed in ChIP Seq experiments an association of the protein with heterochromatic and centromeric DNA. Through this activity Nesprin-2 can affect the nuclear landscape and gene regulation. Our findings suggest functions for Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope (NE) in gene regulation and in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton which impact on wound healing. PMID:22198684

  2. The action of three antiseptics/disinfectants against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Wood, A; Payne, D

    1998-04-01

    The antiviral action of chloroxylenol, benzalkonium chloride and cetrimide/chlorhexidine was assessed against a range of enveloped and non-enveloped human viruses using a suspension test method. Viral suspensions of 10(6)-10(7) pfu/TCID50 or sfu were prepared in each of the antiseptic/disinfectant solutions in the presence of a bovine serum/yeast extract mixture to simulate 'dirty conditions'. During incubation, aliquots were removed at predetermined timepoints up to 10 min to assess the kinetics of inactivation. Results indicate that all products were effective in inactivating the enveloped viruses herpes simplex virus type 1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1, whilst being ineffective in inactivating human coronavirus, also enveloped, and the non-enveloped viruses. The exception to this was the benzalkonium chloride-based product (Dettol Hospital Concentrate) which was active against the non-enveloped human coxsackie virus. Four antiseptic/disinfectant solutions with chloroxylenol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide/chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine were also assessed for antiviral effect against human immunodeficiency virus in the presence of whole human blood. All four solutions proved to be effective within 1 min despite the cytotoxic nature of the compounds to the detection system.

  3. High-throughput synthesis of stable isotope-labeled transmembrane proteins for targeted transmembrane proteomics using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Takemori, Nobuaki; Takemori, Ayako; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Morishita, Ryo; Matsushita, Natsuki; Aoshima, Masato; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Endo, Yaeta; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-02-01

    Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we developed a high-throughput method for the synthesis of stable isotope-labeled full-length transmembrane proteins as proteoliposomes to mimic the in vivo environment, and we successfully constructed an internal standard library for targeted transmembrane proteomics by using mass spectrometry.

  4. Solar Effective Envelope Design Advisor (SEEDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaek, Ekkachai

    The lack of effort by mainstream architects in integrating energy-efficient strategies in architectural designing is due to the complexity in a building's energy conscious concepts and theories, the difficulties to visualize and quantify energy consumption, and the late implementing of energy consumption analysis in the conventional design process. This task would be accomplishing by a building system's engineer where results might be determined only after the basic architectural design has been completed. An effective simple tool and method should then be available to assist architects in building's energy-efficient designing at the beginning of the design. The building's energy consumption is directly and mainly influenced by the relationship of the sun, site, and its building configuration. The solar radiations will first impact on the building's envelope, which will have a direct effect on the amount of energy a building will consume. If an architect can define or map the intensity of solar energy on the site's buildable volume, and use this information to determine the levels of solar insolation, a more energy efficient building form can be proposed. This research hypothesis has shared the fundamental techniques of the Solar Envelope projection by Professor Ralph Knowles [Knowles, 1981] of the University of Southern California. However a different approach is taken by including the influence of regional restrictions and the surrounding buildings' shadows when projecting of solar volumes and solar envelope. The research methodology will discuss the development of a computer-based approach to develop a three-dimensional architectural form based on an insolation map related to the design site. The prototype computer program is referred as the Solar Effective Envelope Design Advisor (SEEDA). The solar insolation volume of the site is determined by integrating three types of computer-generated models include the Buildable Volume model based on design constraints

  5. 200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.N.

    2000-03-28

    Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation.

  6. Analysis of Building Envelope Construction in 2003 CBECS

    SciTech Connect

    Winiarski, David W.; Halverson, Mark A.; Jiang, Wei

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine "typical" building envelope characteristics for buildings built after 1980. We address three envelope components in this paper - roofs, walls, and window area. These typical building envelope characteristics were used in the development of DOE’s Reference Buildings .

  7. Application of the Envelope Difference Index to Spectrally Sparse Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Pamela; Hoover, Eric; Gallun, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Amplitude compression is a common hearing aid processing strategy that can improve speech audibility and loudness comfort but also has the potential to alter important cues carried by the speech envelope. In previous work, a measure of envelope change, the Envelope Difference Index (EDI; Fortune, Woodruff, & Preves, 1994), was moderately…

  8. Closing the Pay Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    the pay gap has been narrowed, hut only to just under 10 percent. And current military compensation legislation does not close the gap until 2026. There...will continue to be a pay gap until 2026 unless the next administration and the next Congress provide more for pay above the 1999 legislated ramp- up...of .5 percent (one half of one percent) per year to attain pay equality . That means that soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and Coast Guardsmen

  9. Transmembrane anion transport and cytotoxicity of synthetic tambjamine analogs.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Elsa; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Cortés-Arroyo, Susana; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2014-03-21

    Ten synthetic analogs of the marine alkaloids tambjamines, bearing aromatic enamine moieties, have been synthesized. These compounds proved to be highly efficient transmembrane anion transporters in model liposomes. Changes in the electronic nature of the substituents of the aromatic enamine or the alkoxy group of the central pyrrole group did not affect this anionophore activity. The in vitro activity of these compounds has also been studied. They trigger apoptosis in several cancer cell lines with IC50 values in the low micromolar range as well as modify the intracellular pH, inducing the basification of acidic organelles.

  10. Membrane topology of transmembrane proteins: determinants and experimental tools.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hunsang; Kim, Hyun

    2014-10-17

    Membrane topology refers to the two-dimensional structural information of a membrane protein that indicates the number of transmembrane (TM) segments and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the plane of the membrane. Since membrane proteins are co-translationally translocated across and inserted into the membrane, the TM segments orient themselves properly in an early stage of membrane protein biogenesis. Each membrane protein must contain some topogenic signals, but the translocation components and the membrane environment also influence the membrane topology of proteins. We discuss the factors that affect membrane protein orientation and have listed available experimental tools that can be used in determining membrane protein topology.

  11. Molecular modelling approaches for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator studies.

    PubMed

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic disorders, caused by loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CFTR is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily and functions as an ATP-gated anion channel. This review summarises the vast majority of the efforts which utilised molecular modelling approaches to gain insight into the various aspects of CFTR protein, related to its structure, dynamic properties, function and interactions with other protein partners, or drug-like compounds, with emphasis to its relation to CF disease.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide in a circumstellar envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukita, N.; Morris, M.

    1983-01-01

    A search for hydrogen sulfide in the cool circumstellar envelopes of 25 stars was made using the 1(10)-1(01) rotational line at 1.8 mm. It was detected in the bipolar nebula/OH maser OH231.8+4.2, an object having a high rate of mass loss. An approximate analysis indicates that 1/60 of the sulfur in this outflowing envelope is in the form of H2S, a fraction which may be similar to that in the atmosphere of the central star. In addition, the shape of the observed line profile is discussed in terms of a possible variation of the outflow velocity with latitude above the system's equatorial plane.

  13. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  14. Constant envelope chirped OFDM power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dida, Mussa A.; Hao, Huan; Anjum, M. R.; Ran, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Fractional Fourier OFDM or simply chirped OFDM performs better in time-frequency selective channel than its convectional OFDM. Although chirped OFDM outperforms OFDM it still inherits Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR) drawback as a convectional OFDM. To eliminate PAPR drawback Constant Envelope OFDM was developed and for better performance in time frequency selective channel Constant Envelope Fractional Fourier OFDM (CE-COFDM) is used. Its BER performance is analyzed and compared to chirped OFDM and OFDM in AWGN and Rayleigh channel. The simulations show the BER performance of CE-COFDM is the same as chirped OFDM and OFDM. The power efficiency of CE-COFDM is also studied and different simulations performed shows CE-COFDM is more power efficient than chirped OFDM and convectional OFDM for class A and class B Linear Power Amplifier (LPA).

  15. Small carbon chains in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, R. J.; Hinkle, K.; Bernath, P. F.

    2014-11-01

    Observations of carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes were made using the Phoenix spectrograph on the Gemini South telescope to determine the abundance of small carbon chain molecules. Vibration-rotation lines of the ν3 antisymmetric stretch of C3 near 2040 cm-1 (4.902 μm) have been used to determine the column density for four carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes: CRL 865, CRL 1922, CRL 2023 and IRC +10216. We additionally calculate the column density of C5 for IRC +10216, and provide an upper limit for five more objects. An upper limit estimate for the C7 column density is also provided for IRC+10216. A comparison of these column densities suggests a revision to current circumstellar chemical models may be needed.

  16. Analysis of dihedral angle preferences for alanine and glycine residues in alpha and beta transmembrane regions.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, K M; Krishnaswamy, S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 50 years, the Ramachandran map has been used effectively to study the protein structure and folding. However, though extensive analysis has been done on dihedral angle preferences of residues in globular proteins, related studies and reports of membrane proteins are limited. It is of interest to explore the conformational preferences of residues in transmembrane regions of membrane proteins which are involved in several important and diverse biological processes. Hence, in the present work, a systematic comparative computational analysis has been made on dihedral angle preferences of alanine and glycine in alpha and beta transmembrane regions (the two major classes of transmembrane proteins) with the aid of the Ramachandran map. Further, the conformational preferences of residues in transmembrane regions were compared with the non-transmembrane regions. We have extracted cation-pi interacting residues present in transmembrane regions and explored the dihedral angle preferences. From our observations, we reveal the higher percentage of occurrences of glycine in alpha and beta transmembrane regions than other hydrophobic residues. Further, we noted a clear shift in ψ-angle preferences of glycine residues from negative bins in alpha transmembrane regions to positive bins in beta transmembrane regions. Also, cation-pi interacting residues in beta transmembrane regions avoid preferring ψ-angles in the range of -59° to -30°. In this article, we insist that the studies on preferences of dihedral angles in transmembrane regions, thorough understanding of structure and folding of transmembrane proteins, can lead to modeling of novel transmembrane regions towards designing membrane proteins.

  17. Envelope instability and the fourth order resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Zhao, Ya Liang

    2014-12-01

    The well-known envelope instability or the second order even collective mode [I. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. E 57, 4 (1998)] and the fourth order resonance 4 σ =360 ° due to the nonlinear space charge effect in high intensity beams have been studied previously. A wide stop band around 15° is found in a pure periodic focusing channel. In addition, it is illustrated that the fourth order resonance dominates over the envelope instability and practically replaces it in the stop band [D. Jeon et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 054204 (2009)]. In this paper, for a continuous beam with remarkable space charge, our 2D self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation work with the code topopic shows these two kinds of effects respectively in a periodic focusing defocusing (FD) channel. For a fixed tune depression η =0.8 , a stop band with a width of almost 15° is also demonstrated. Moreover, it is confirmed that analytical results of the rms envelope instability diagram are a valid tool to interpret the width of the stop band. Emittance growth rates in stop band are also well explained. It is found that, for a nearly rms matched beam, the emittance growth in the stop band is almost proportional to the saturation time of the nonlinear instability of the envelope, which happens in a quick manner and takes only a few FD cells. In contrast, the fourth order resonance is independent of rms matching and will be accompanied by beam evolution as "a long term effect" once the related mechanism is excited.

  18. Transmembrane TNF-α Facilitates HIV-1 Infection of Podocytes Cultured from Children with HIV-Associated Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinliang; Das, Jharna R; Tang, Pingtao; Han, Zhe; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Ray, Patricio E

    2017-03-01

    Studies have shown that podocytes and renal tubular epithelial cells from patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) express HIV-1 transcripts, suggesting that productive infection of renal epithelial cells precipitates development of HIVAN. However, podocytes and renal tubular epithelial cells do not express CD4 receptors, and it is unclear how these cells become productively infected in vivo We investigated the mechanisms underlying the infection by HIV-1 of podocytes cultured from the urine of children with HIVAN. We observed low-level productive infection on exposure of these cells to primary cell-free HIV-1 supernatants. However, envelope-defective recombinant HIV-1 did not infect the renal epithelial cell lines. Moreover, treatment of podocytes to inhibit endocytic transport or dynamin activity or remove cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans reduced infection efficiency. Transfection of CD4- 293T cells with a cDNA expression library developed from a podocyte cell line derived from a child with HIVAN led to the identification of TNF-α as a possible mediator of HIV-1 infection. Overexpression of transmembrane TNF-α in cultured CD4- renal tubular epithelial cells, 293T cells, and HeLa cells enabled the infection of these cells; exposure to soluble TNF-α did not. Immunohistochemistry showed TNF-α expression in podocytes of renal sections from children with HIVAN. Furthermore, we found that TNF-α enhanced NF-κB activation and integration of HIV-1 into the podocyte DNA. Finally, inhibition of dynamin activity blocked TNF-α-mediated infection. These data establish a role for transmembrane TNF-α in facilitating the viral entry and integration of HIV-1 into the DNA of renal epithelial cells.

  19. Structure and Mechanism of Proton Transport Through the Transmembrane Tetrameric M2 Protein Bundle of the Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect

    R Acharya; V Carnevale; G Fiorin; B Levine; A Polishchuk; V Balannick; I Samish; R Lamb; L Pinto; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} with a pK{sub a} near 6. A 1.65 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  20. The cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Angala, Shiva Kumar; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Wheat, William H.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the second most common cause of death due to a single infectious agent. The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of the disease in humans, is a source of unique glycoconjugates and the most distinctive feature of the biology of this organism. It is the basis of much of Mtb pathogenesis and one of the major causes of its intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. At the same time, the unique structures of Mtb cell envelope glycoconjugates, their antigenicity and essentiality for mycobacterial growth provide opportunities for drug, vaccine, diagnostic and biomarker development, as clearly illustrated by recent advances in all of these translational aspects. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure and biogenesis of Mtb glycoconjugates with particular emphasis on one of most intriguing and least understood aspect of the physiology of mycobacteria: the translocation of these complex macromolecules across the different layers of the cell envelope. It further reviews the rather impressive progress made in the last ten years in the discovery and development of novel inhibitors targeting their biogenesis. PMID:24915502

  1. Equine Tetherin Blocks Retrovirus Release and Its Activity Is Antagonized by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism. PMID:24227834

  2. Transmembrane Domains of Attraction on the TSH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Rejwan; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) has the propensity to form dimers and oligomers. Our data using ectodomain-truncated TSHRs indicated that the predominant interfaces for oligomerization reside in the transmembrane (TM) domain. To map the potentially interacting residues, we first performed in silico studies of the TSHR transmembrane domain using a homology model and using Brownian dynamics (BD). The cluster of dimer conformations obtained from BD analysis indicated that TM1 made contact with TM4 and two residues in TM2 made contact with TM5. To confirm the proximity of these contact residues, we then generated cysteine mutants at all six contact residues predicted by the BD analysis and performed cysteine cross-linking studies. These results showed that the predicted helices in the protomer were indeed involved in proximity interactions. Furthermore, an alternative experimental approach, receptor truncation experiments and LH receptor sequence substitution experiments, identified TM1 harboring a major region involved in TSHR oligomerization, in agreement with the conclusion from the cross-linking studies. Point mutations of the predicted interacting residues did not yield a substantial decrease in oligomerization, unlike the truncation of the TM1, so we concluded that constitutive oligomerization must involve interfaces forming domains of attraction in a cooperative manner that is not dominated by interactions between specific residues. PMID:25406938

  3. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Stine C.; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  4. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  5. Forming transmembrane channels using end-functionalized nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Little, Steven R; Balazs, Anna C

    2011-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, we examine the interaction between amphiphilic nanotubes and lipid bilayer membranes. The nanotubes are represented by a hydrophobic shaft that is end-functionalized with hydrophilic groups. Nanotubes that are capped by a monolayer of hydrophilic beads or also encompass hydrophilic "hairs" on just one end of the shaft are found to spontaneously penetrate and assume a transmembrane position; the process, however, depends critically on the membrane tension. On the other hand, nanotubes that include hydrophilic hairs at both ends of the hydrophobic shaft are not observed to spontaneously self-organize into the bilayer. When the membrane is stretched to form a pore, the nanotubes with two hairy ends adsorb on the edge of the pore and become localized in the membrane, thus forming a transmembrane channel. The findings from these studies provide guidelines for creating biomimetic nanotube channels that are capable of selectively transporting molecules through the membrane in response to changes in the local environment.

  6. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane.

  7. Highly Coarse-Grained Representations of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Numerous biomolecules and biomolecular complexes, including transmembrane proteins (TMPs), are symmetric or at least have approximate symmetries. Highly coarse-grained models of such biomolecules, aiming at capturing the essential structural and dynamical properties on resolution levels coarser than the residue scale, must preserve the underlying symmetry. However, making these models obey the correct physics is in general not straightforward, especially at the highly coarse-grained resolution where multiple (∼3–30 in the current study) amino acid residues are represented by a single coarse-grained site. In this paper, we propose a simple and fast method of coarse-graining TMPs obeying this condition. The procedure involves partitioning transmembrane domains into contiguous segments of equal length along the primary sequence. For the coarsest (lowest-resolution) mappings, it turns out to be most important to satisfy the symmetry in a coarse-grained model. As the resolution is increased to capture more detail, however, it becomes gradually more important to match modular repeats in the secondary structure (such as helix-loop repeats) instead. A set of eight TMPs of various complexity, functionality, structural topology, and internal symmetry, representing different classes of TMPs (ion channels, transporters, receptors, adhesion, and invasion proteins), has been examined. The present approach can be generalized to other systems possessing exact or approximate symmetry, allowing for reliable and fast creation of multiscale, highly coarse-grained mappings of large biomolecular assemblies. PMID:28043122

  8. Transmembrane semaphorin signalling controls laminar stratification in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ryota L; Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim T; Parray, Aijaz; Badea, Tudor C; Chédotal, Alain; Kolodkin, Alex L

    2011-02-10

    In the vertebrate retina, establishment of precise synaptic connections among distinct retinal neuron cell types is critical for processing visual information and for accurate visual perception. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), amacrine cells and bipolar cells establish stereotypic neurite arborization patterns to form functional neural circuits in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), a laminar region that is conventionally divided into five major parallel sublaminae. However, the molecular mechanisms governing distinct retinal subtype targeting to specific sublaminae within the IPL remain to be elucidated. Here we show that the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A signals through its receptor PlexinA4 (PlexA4) to control lamina-specific neuronal stratification in the mouse retina. Expression analyses demonstrate that Sema6A and PlexA4 proteins are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing retina: Sema6A in most ON sublaminae and PlexA4 in OFF sublaminae of the IPL. Mice with null mutations in PlexA4 or Sema6A exhibit severe defects in stereotypic lamina-specific neurite arborization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing dopaminergic amacrine cells, intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) and calbindin-positive cells in the IPL. Sema6A and PlexA4 genetically interact in vivo for the regulation of dopaminergic amacrine cell laminar targeting. Therefore, neuronal targeting to subdivisions of the IPL in the mammalian retina is directed by repulsive transmembrane guidance cues present on neuronal processes.

  9. Transmembrane semaphorin signaling controls laminar stratification in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Ryota L.; Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim T.; Parray, Aijaz; Badea, Tudor C.; Chédotal, Alain; Kolodkin, Alex L.

    2010-01-01

    In the vertebrate retina, establishment of precise synaptic connections among distinct retinal neuron cell types is critical for processing visual information and for accurate visual perception. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), amacrine cells, and bipolar cells establish stereotypic neurite arborization patterns to form functional neural circuits in the inner plexiform layer (IPL)1–3: a laminar region that is conventionally divided into five major parallel sublaminae1,2. However, the molecular mechanisms governing distinct retinal subtype targeting to specific sublaminae within the IPL remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A signals through its receptor PlexinA4 (PlexA4) to control lamina-specific neuronal stratification in the mouse retina. Expression analyses demonstrate that Sema6A and PlexA4 proteins are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing retina: Sema6A in most ON sublaminae and PlexA4 in OFF sublaminae of the IPL. Mice with null mutations in PlexA4 or Sema6A exhibit severe defects in stereotypic lamina-specific neurite arborization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing dopaminergic amacrine cells, intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs), and calbindin-positive cells in the IPL. Sema6A and PlexA4 genetically interact in vivo with respect to the regulation of dopaminergic amacrine cell laminar targeting. Therefore, neuronal targeting to subdivisions of the IPL in the mammalian retina is directed by repulsive transmembrane guidance cues present on neuronal processes. PMID:21270798

  10. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  11. Multiscale envelope manifold for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-02-01

    The wavelet transform has been widely used in the field of machinery fault diagnosis for its good property of band-pass filtering. However, the filtered signal still faces the contamination of in-band noise. This paper focuses on wavelet enveloping, and proposes a new method, called multiscale envelope manifold (MEM), to extract the envelope information of fault impacts with in-band noise suppression. The MEM addresses manifold learning on the wavelet envelopes at multiple scales. Specifically, the proposed method is conducted by three following steps. First, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) with complex Morlet wavelet base is introduced to obtain the wavelet envelopes at all scales. Second, the wavelet envelopes are restricted in one or more narrow scale bands to simply include the envelope information of fault impacts. The scale band is determined through a smoothness index-based (SI-based) selection method by considering the impulsiveness inside the power spectrum. Third, the manifold learning algorithm is conducted on the wavelet envelopes at selected scales to extract the intrinsic envelope manifold of fault-related impulses. The MEM combines the envelope information at multiple scales in a nonlinear approach, and may thus preserve the factual envelope structure of machinery fault. Simulation studies and experimental verifications confirm that the new method is effective for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machines.

  12. Antiviral Activity of Graphene–Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chang, Pai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag) against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV) with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses. PMID:27104546

  13. Senseless Extravagance, Shocking Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissbourd, Richard; Dodge, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Although most people in the United States believe, at least theoretically, in educational equality, fewer and fewer appear to care about the resource gaps between affluent and poor schools, says Weissbourd. He illustrates these gaps with vivid descriptions of what he calls an "opulence arms race" among affluent independent schools, but…

  14. Information Gap Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicekdag, Mehmet Ali

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on a real world technique used to teach language proficiency in the classroom. This method involves creating deliberate information and opinion gaps by administering pop quizzes and other communicative games and filling those gaps through cooperative action. Use of this technique generated heated discussion among students. (nine…

  15. Bridging a Cultural Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Talma

    2008-01-01

    There has been a broad wave of change in tertiary calculus courses in the past decade. However, the much-needed change in tertiary pre-calculus programmes--aimed at bridging the gap between high-school mathematics and tertiary mathematics--is happening at a far slower pace. Following a discussion on the nature of the gap and the objectives of a…

  16. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  17. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  18. The National "Expertise Gap"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's report, "Diversity and the Ph.D.," released in May, which documents in troubling detail the exact dimensions of what the foundation's president, Dr. Robert Weisbuch, is calling the national "expertise gap." Weisbuch states that the expertise gap extends beyond the…

  19. The Parenting Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Richard V.; Howard, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The parenting gap is a big factor in the opportunity gap. The chances of upward social mobility are lower for children with parents struggling to do a good job--in terms of creating a supportive and stimulating home environment. Children lucky enough to have strong parents are more likely to succeed at all the critical life stages, which means…

  20. Which Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sharon; Medrich, Elliott; Fowler, Donna

    2007-01-01

    From the halls of Congress to the local elementary school, conversations on education reform have tossed around the term "achievement gap" as though people all know precisely what that means. As it's commonly used, "achievement gap" refers to the differences in scores on state or national achievement tests between various…

  1. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  2. Static envelope patterns in composite resonances generated by level crossing in optical toroidal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Carmon, Tal; Schwefel, Harald G L; Yang, Lan; Oxborrow, Mark; Stone, A Douglas; Vahala, Kerry J

    2008-03-14

    We study level crossing in the optical whispering-gallery (WG) modes by using toroidal microcavities. Experimentally, we image the stationary envelope patterns of the composite optical modes that arise when WG modes of different wavelengths coincide in frequency. Numerically, we calculate crossings of levels that correspond with the observed degenerate modes, where our method takes into account the not perfectly transverse nature of their field polarizations. In addition, we analyze anticrossing with a large avoidance gap between modes of the same azimuthal number.

  3. Metal bridges illuminate transmembrane domain movements during gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-10

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd(2+) bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd(2+) bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd(2+) bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd(2+) bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd(2+) bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close.

  4. Metal Bridges Illuminate Transmembrane Domain Movements during Gating of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd2+ bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd2+ bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd2+ bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd2+ bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd2+ bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close. PMID:25143385

  5. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  6. Modeling pollutant penetration across building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, De-Ling; Nazaroff, William W.

    2001-04-01

    As air infiltrates through unintentional openings in building envelopes, pollutants may interact with adjacent surfaces. Such interactions can alter human exposure to air pollutants of outdoor origin. We present modeling explorations of the proportion of particles and reactive gases (e.g., ozone) that penetrate building envelopes as air enters through cracks and wall cavities. Calculations were performed for idealized rectangular cracks, assuming regular geometry, smooth inner crack surface and steady airflow. Particles of 0.1-1.0 {micro}m diameter are predicted to have the highest penetration efficiency, nearly unity for crack heights of 0.25 mm or larger, assuming a pressure difference of 4 Pa or greater and a flow path length of 3 cm or less. Supermicron and ultrafine particles are significantly removed by means of gravitational settling and Brownian diffusion, respectively. In addition to crack geometry, ozone penetration depends on its reactivity with crack surfaces, as parameterized by the reaction probability. For reaction probabilities less than {approx}10{sup -5}, penetration is complete for cracks heights greater than 1 mm. However, penetration through mm scale cracks is small if the reaction probability is {approx}10{sup -4} or greater. For wall cavities, fiberglass insulation is an efficient particle filter, but particles would penetrate efficiently through uninsulated wall cavities or through insulated cavities with significant airflow bypass. The ozone reaction probability on fiberglass fibers was measured to be 10{sup -7} for fibers previously exposed to high ozone levels and 6 x 10{sup -6} for unexposed fibers. Over this range, ozone penetration through fiberglass insulation would vary from >90% to {approx}10-40%. Thus, under many conditions penetration is high; however, there are realistic circumstances in which building envelopes can provide substantial pollutant removal. Not enough is yet known about the detailed nature of pollutant penetration

  7. The protein translocon of the plastid envelopes.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Alavi, Marcel; Becker, Thomas; Hörmann, Friederike; Küchler, Michael; Soll, Jürgen; Thomson, Rowena; Schleiff, Enrico

    2004-05-14

    The Toc and Tic translocon facilitate import of preproteins into chloroplasts. In the past, it was speculated that several translocon subunits act specifically for different types of precursor proteins or in different tissues. To generate a comprehensive picture of the expression and tissue-specific localization of the translocon subunits, their transcript levels were analyzed in roots and leaves. Certain Tocs and Tics were found to be tissue-specific. The protein composition of the transloci in the envelope membranes of chloroplasts was analyzed to describe the function and possible stoichiometry. In contrast to Tic subunits, several Toc subunits seem to have a high turnover.

  8. Surface area coefficients for airship envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    In naval architecture, it is customary to determine the wetted surface of a ship by means of some formula which involves the principal dimensions of the design and suitable constants. These formulas of naval architecture may be extended and applied to the calculation of the surface area of airship envelopes by the use of new values of the constants determined for this purpose. Surface area coefficients were calculated from the actual dimensions, surfaces, and volumes of 52 streamline bodies, which form a series covering the entire range of shapes used in the present aeronautical practice.

  9. Low heat-leak cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    DeHaan, James R.

    1976-10-19

    A plurality of cryogenic envelope sections are joined together to form a power transmission line. Each of the sections is comprised of inner and outer tubes having multilayer metalized plastic spirally wrapped within a vacuum chamber formed between the inner and outer tubes. A refrigeration tube traverses the vacuum chamber, but exits one section and enters another through thermal standoffs for reducing heat-leak from the outer tube to the refrigeration tube. The refrigeration tube passes through a spirally wrapped shield within each section's vacuum chamber in a manner so that the refrigeration tube is in close thermal contact with the shield, but is nevertheless slideable with respect thereto.

  10. Functional relevance of transmembrane domains in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Jörg; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Membrane fusion is ubiquitous in life. Fusion of biological membranes is mediated by specialized fusion proteins anchored to the bilayers destined to fuse. Here we describe these proteins as being instrumental in viral, intracellular and developmental fusion. Next, we review experimental and theoretical evidence that points to fusion in the different systems as following a common 'fusion through hemifusion' pathway. We also focus on the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane segment that anchors the fusion proteins to the bilayer, and its role in driving fusion. In particular, we highlight the influence of this single segment on the surrounding membrane lipids and on the overall shape of the membrane along the way to fusion.

  11. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins’ large ionic conductance. PMID:27504755

  12. Hkat, a novel nutritionally regulated transmembrane protein in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren

    2012-01-01

    White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ regulating many aspects of whole body physiology and pathology. Adipogenesis, a process in which premature cells differentiate into adipocytes, is a complex process that includes orchestrated changes in gene expression and cell morphology in response to various nutritional and hormonal stimuli. To profile transcriptome changes in response to nutritional stimulation, we performed RNA-seq on fat in mice treated with either a high-fat diet or fasting. We identified a novel nutritionally regulated gene, Gm12824, named Hkat (heart, kidney, adipose-enriched transmembrane protein). We show that both fasting and obesity dramatically reduce Hkat in white adipose tissue, and that fasting reduces while obesity increases its expression in brown fat. Hkat is localized to the plasma membrane and induced during adipogenesis. Therefore, Hkat is a novel nutritionally regulated gene that is potentially involved in metabolism.

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression in human hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Mulberg, A E; Weyler, R T; Altschuler, S M; Hyde, T M

    1998-01-05

    We have previously characterized the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) gene, mRNA and protein in rat brain with reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR amplification, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. We now report that the CFTR mRNA is expressed in the human anterior hypothalamus, an area involved in regulation of appetite, resting energy expenditure and sexual differentiation. Expression of CFTR in neurons localized to this region may elucidate the pathogenesis of other non-pulmonary manifestations of cystic fibrosis which commonly are observed in children with CF, including congenital absence of the vas deferens. Neuron-specific expression of CFTR in brain may be involved in the regulation of homeostatic functions including reproductive function and fertility through effects on neurosecretion, i.e. GnRH release. Dysregulation of normal neuropeptide vesicle trafficking by mutant CFTR in brain my lead to alteration in physiological function.

  14. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Li, Chen-Yu; Ricci, Maria; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Yoo, Jejoong; Gyenes, Bertalan; Ohmann, Alexander; Winterhalter, Mathias; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-09-27

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins' large ionic conductance.

  15. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Retrieval of transmembrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A COOH-terminal double lysine motif maintains type I transmembrane proteins in the ER. Proteins tagged with this motif, eg., CD8/E19 and CD4/E19, rapidly receive post-translational modifications characteristic of the intermediate compartment and partially colocalized to this organelle. These proteins also received modifications characteristic of the Golgi but much more slowly. Lectin staining localized these Golgi modified proteins to ER indicating that this motif is a retrieval signal. Differences in the subcellular distribution and rate of post-translational modification of CD8 maintained in the ER by sequences derived from a variety of ER resident proteins suggested that the efficiency of retrieval was dependent on the sequence context of the double lysine motif and that retrieval may be initiated from multiple positions along the exocytotic pathway. PMID:8468349

  17. ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Ramjeesingh, M; Wang, W; Garami, E; Hewryk, M; Lee, D; Rommens, J M; Galley, K; Bear, C E

    1996-11-08

    The gene mutated in cystic fibrosis codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cyclic AMP-activated chloride channel thought to be critical for salt and water transport by epithelial cells. Plausible models exist to describe a role for ATP hydrolysis in CFTR channel activity; however, biochemical evidence that CFTR possesses intrinsic ATPase activity is lacking. In this study, we report the first measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis by purified, reconstituted CFTR. The mutation CFTRG551D resides within a motif conserved in many nucleotidases and is known to cause severe human disease. Following reconstitution the mutant protein exhibited both defective ATP hydrolysis and channel gating, providing direct evidence that CFTR utilizes ATP to gate its channel activity.

  18. A functional protein pore with a "retro" transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cheley, S.; Braha, O.; Lu, X.; Conlan, S.; Bayley, H.

    1999-01-01

    Extended retro (reversed) peptide sequences have not previously been accommodated within functional proteins. Here, we show that the entire transmembrane portion of the beta-barrel of the pore-forming protein alpha-hemolysin can be formed by retrosequences comprising a total of 175 amino acid residues, 25 contributed by the central sequence of each subunit of the heptameric pore. The properties of wild-type and retro heptamers in planar bilayers are similar. The single-channel conductance of the retro pore is 15% less than that of the wild-type heptamer and its current-voltage relationship denotes close to ohmic behavior, while the wild-type pore is weakly rectifying. Both wild-type and retro pores are very weakly anion selective. These results and the examination of molecular models suggest that beta-barrels may be especially accepting of retro sequences compared to other protein folds. Indeed, the ability to form a retro domain could be diagnostic of a beta-barrel, explaining, for example, the activity of the retro forms of many membrane-permeabilizing peptides. By contrast with the wild-type subunits, monomeric retro subunits undergo premature assembly in the absence of membranes, most likely because the altered central sequence fails to interact with the remainder of the subunit, thereby initiating assembly. Despite this difficulty, a technique was devised for obtaining heteromeric pores containing both wild-type and retro subunits. Most probably as a consequence of unfavorable interstrand side-chain interactions, the heteromeric pores are less stable than either the wild-type or retro homoheptamers, as judged by the presence of subconductance states in single-channel recordings. Knowledge about the extraordinary plasticity of the transmembrane beta-barrel of alpha-hemolysin will be very useful in the de novo design of functional membrane proteins based on the beta-barrel motif. PMID:10386875

  19. Transmembrane potentials during high voltage shocks in ischemic cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Holley, L K; Knisley, S B

    1997-01-01

    Transmembrane, voltage sensitive fluorescent dye (TMF) recording techniques have shown that high voltage shocks (HVS), typically used in defibrillation, produce either hyper- or depolarization of the transmembrane potential (TMP) when delivered in the refractory period of an action potential (AP) in normal cardiac tissue (NT). Further, HVS produce an extension of the AP, which has been hypothesized as a potential mechanism for electrical defibrillation. We examined whether HVS modify TMP of ischemic tissue (IT) in a similar manner. In seven Langendorff rabbit hearts, recordings of APs were obtained in both NT and IT with TMF using di-4-ANEPPS, and diacetylmonoxime (23 microM) to avoid motion artifacts. Local ischemia was produced by occlusion of the LAD, HVS of either biphasic (5 + 5 ms) or (3 + 2 ms) or monophasic shapes (5 ms) were delivered at varying times (20%-90%) of the paced AP. Intracardiac ECG and TMF recordings of the TMP were each amplified, recorded, and digitized at a frequency of 1 kHz. The paced AP in IT was triangular in shape with no obvious phase 3 plateau, typically seen in NT. There was normally a reduced AP amplitude (expressed as fractional fluorescence) in IT (2.6% +/- 1.79%) compared to 3.8% +/- 0.66% in NT, and shortened AP duration (137 +/- 42 vs 171 +/- 11 ms). One hundred-Volt HVS delivered during the refractory period of paced AP in IT in five rabbits, elicited a depolarization response of the TMP with an amplitude up to three times greater than the paced AP. This is in contrast to NT where the 100-V HVS produced hyperpolarization in four hearts, and only a slight depolarization response in one heart. These results suggest that HVS, typically delivered by a defibrillation shock, modify TMPs in a significantly different manner for ischemic cells, which may influence success in defibrillation.

  20. Roles of carboxyl groups in the transmembrane insertion of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Francisco N.; Weerakkody, Dhammika; Anderson, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used the pHLIP® peptide to study the roles of carboxyl groups in transmembrane peptide insertion. The pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) binds to the surface of a lipid bilayer as a disordered peptide at neutral pH, and when the pH is lowered it inserts across the membrane to form a transmembrane helix. Peptide insertion is reversed when the pH is raised above the characteristic pKa (6.0). A key event facilitating the membrane insertion is the protonation of aspartic (Asp) and/or glutamic (Glu) acid residues, since at neutral pH their negatively charged side chains hinder membrane insertion. In order to gain mechanistic understanding, we studied the membrane insertion and exit of a series of pHLIP variants where the four Asp residues were sequentially mutated to nonacidic residues, including histidine (His). Our results show that the presence of His residues does not prevent the pH-dependent peptide membrane insertion at ~pH 4 driven by the protonation of carboxyl groups at the inserting end of the peptide. A further pH drop leads to the protonation of His residues in the TM part of peptide, which induces peptide exit from the bilayer. We also find that the number of ionizable residues that undergo a change in protonation during membrane insertion correlates with the pH-dependent insertion into and exit from the lipid bilayer, and that cooperativity increases with their number. We expect that our understanding will be used to improve the targeting of acidic diseased tissue by pHLIP peptides. PMID:21888917

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Membranes and a Transmembrane Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tap Ha; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    1999-05-01

    Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1.5-ns length were carried out on fully hydrated patches of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase. The simulations were performed using different ensembles and electrostatic conditions: a microcanonical ensemble or constant pressure-temperature ensemble, with or without truncated electrostatic interactions. Calculated properties of the membrane patches from the three different protocols were compared to available data from experiments. These data include the resulting overall geometrical dimensions, the order characteristics of the lipid hydrocarbon chains, as well as various measures of the conformations of the polar head groups. The comparisons indicate that the simulation carried out within the microcanonical ensemble with truncated electrostatic interactions yielded results closest to the experimental data, provided that the initial equilibration phase preceding the production run was sufficiently long. The effects of embedding a non-ideal helical protein domain in the membrane patch were studied with the same MD protocols. This simulation was carried out for 2.5 ns. The protein domain corresponds to the seventh transmembrane segment (TMS7) of the human serotonin 5HT 2Areceptor. The peptide is composed of two α-helical segments linked by a hinge domain around a perturbing Asn-Pro motif that produces at the end of the simulation a kink angle of nearly 80° between the two helices. Several aspects of the TMS7 structure, such as the bending angle, backbone Φ and Ψ torsion angles, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and the overall conformation, were found to be very similar to those determined by NMR for the corresponding transmembrane segment of the tachykinin NK-1 receptor. In general, the simulations were found to yield structural and dynamic characteristics that are in good agreement with experiment. These findings support the application of simulation methods to the study

  2. Analysis of Structured and Intrinsically Disordered Regions of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; Li, Liwei; Meroueh, Samy O.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins display two major types of transmembrane structures, helical bundles and beta barrels. The main functional roles of transmembrane proteins are the transport of small molecules and cell signaling, and sometimes these two roles are coupled. For cytosolic, water-soluble proteins, signaling and regulatory functions are often carried out by intrinsically disordered regions. Our long range goal is to determine whether integral membrane proteins likewise often use disordered regions for signaling and regulation. Here we carried out a systematic bioinformatics investigation of intrinsically disordered regions obtained from integral membrane proteins for which crystal structures have been determined, and for which the intrinsic disorder was identified as missing electron density. We found 120 disorder-containing integral membrane proteins having a total of 33,675 residues, with 3209 of the residues distributed among 240 different disordered regions. These disordered regions were compared with those obtained from water-soluble proteins with regard to their amino acid compositional biases, and with regard to accuracies of various disorder predictors. The results of these analyses show that the disordered regions from helical bundle integral membrane proteins, those from beta barrel integral membrane proteins, and those from water soluble proteins all exhibit statistically distinct amino acid compositional biases. Despite these differences in composition, current algorithms make reasonably accurate predictions of disorder for these membrane proteins. Although the small size of the current data sets are limiting, these results suggest that developing new predictors that make use of data from disordered regions in helical bundles and beta barrels, especially as these datasets increase in size, will likely lead to significantly more accurate disorder predictions for these two classes of integral membrane proteins. PMID:19585006

  3. Transmembrane Pores Formed by Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional cathelicidin peptide that has shown a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity by permeabilizing microbial membranes similar to other antimicrobial peptides; however, its molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Two independent experiments revealed LL-37 bound to membranes in the {alpha}-helical form with the axis lying in the plane of membrane. This led to the conclusion that membrane permeabilization by LL-37 is a nonpore carpet-like mechanism of action. Here we report the detection of transmembrane pores induced by LL-37. The pore formation coincided with LL-37 helices aligning approximately normal to the plane of the membrane. We observed an unusual phenomenon of LL-37 embedded in stacked membranes, which are commonly used in peptide orientation studies. The membrane-bound LL-37 was found in the normal orientation only when the membrane spacing in the multilayers exceeded its fully hydrated value. This was achieved by swelling the stacked membranes with excessive water to a swollen state. The transmembrane pores were detected and investigated in swollen states by means of oriented circular dichroism, neutron in-plane scattering, and x-ray lamellar diffraction. The results are consistent with the effect of LL-37 on giant unilamellar vesicles. The detected pores had a water channel of radius 2333 {angstrom}. The molecular mechanism of pore formation by LL-37 is consistent with the two-state model exhibited by magainin and other small pore-forming peptides. The discovery that peptide-membrane interactions in swollen states are different from those in less hydrated states may have implications for other large membrane-active peptides and proteins studied in stacked membranes.

  4. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  5. Impact of histidine residues on the transmembrane helices of viroporins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Park, Sang Ho; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-11-01

    Abstract The role of histidine in channel-forming transmembrane (TM) helices was investigated by comparing the TM helices from Virus protein 'u' (Vpu) and the M2 proton channel. Both proteins are members of the viroporin family of small membrane proteins that exhibit ion channel activity, and have a single TM helix that is capable of forming oligomers. The TM helices from both proteins have a conserved tryptophan towards the C-terminus. Previously, alanine 18 of Vpu was mutated to histidine in order to artificially introduce the same HXXXW motif that is central to the proton channel activity of M2. Interestingly, the mutated Vpu TM resulted in an increase in helix tilt angle of 11° in lipid bilayers compared to the wild-type Vpu TM. Here, we find the reverse, when histidine 37 of the HXXXW motif in M2 was mutated to alanine, it decreased the helix tilt by 10° from that of wild-type M2. The tilt change is independent of both the helix length and the presence of tryptophan. In addition, compared to wild-type M2, the H37A mutant displayed lowered sensitivity to proton concentration. We also found that the solvent accessibility of histidine-containing M2 is greater than without histidine. This suggests that the TM helix may increase the solvent exposure by changing its tilt angle in order to accommodate a polar/charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane region. The comparative results of M2, Vpu and their mutants demonstrated the significance of histidine in a transmembrane helix and the remarkable plasticity of the function and structure of ion channels stemming from changes at a single amino acid site.

  6. Prediction of transmembrane helices from hydrophobic characteristics of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnuswamy, P K; Gromiha, M M

    1993-10-01

    Membrane proteins, requiring to be embedded into the lipid bilayers, have evolved to have amino acid sequences that will fold with a hydrophobic surface in contact with the alkane chains of the lipids and polar surface in contact with the aqueous phases on both sides of the membrane and the polar head groups of the lipids. It is generally assumed that the characteristics of the aqueous parts of the membrane proteins are similar to those of normal globular proteins, and the embedded parts are highly hydrophobic. In our earlier works, we introduced the concept of 'surrounding hydrophobicity' and developed a hydrophobicity scale for the 20 amino acid residues, and applied it successfully to the study of the family of globular proteins. In this work we use the concept of surrounding hydrophobicity to indicate quantitatively how the aqueous parts of membrane proteins compare with the normal globular proteins, and how rich the embedded parts are in their hydrophobic activity. We then develop a surrounding hydrophobicity scale applicable to membrane proteins, by mixing judicially the surrounding hydrophobicities observed in the crystals of the membrane protein, photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus and a set of 64 globular proteins. A predictive scheme based on this scale predicts from amino acid sequence, transmembrane segments in PRC and randomly selected 26 membrane proteins to 80% level of accuracy. This is a much higher predictive power when compared to the existing popular methods. A new procedure to measure the amphipathicity of sequence segments is proposed, and it is used to characterize the transmembrane parts of the sample membrane proteins.

  7. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  8. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  9. Envelope as Climate Negotiator: Evaluating adaptive building envelope's capacity to moderate indoor climate and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, James

    Through manipulation of adaptable opportunities available within a given environment, individuals become active participants in managing personal comfort requirements, by exercising control over their comfort without the assistance of mechanical heating and cooling systems. Similarly, continuous manipulation of a building skin's form, insulation, porosity, and transmissivity qualities exerts control over the energy exchanged between indoor and outdoor environments. This research uses four adaptive response variables in a modified software algorithm to explore an adaptive building skin's potential in reacting to environmental stimuli with the purpose of minimizing energy use without sacrificing occupant comfort. Results illustrate that significant energy savings can be realized with adaptive envelopes over static building envelopes even under extreme summer and winter climate conditions; that the magnitude of these savings are dependent on climate and orientation; and that occupant thermal comfort can be improved consistently over comfort levels achieved by optimized static building envelopes. The resulting adaptive envelope's unique climate-specific behavior could inform designers in creating an intelligent kinetic aesthetic that helps facilitate adaptability and resiliency in architecture.

  10. On-Line Safe Flight Envelope Determination for Impaired Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombaerts, Thomas; Schuet, Stefan; Acosta, Diana; Kaneshige, John

    2015-01-01

    The design and simulation of an on-line algorithm which estimates the safe maneuvering envelope of aircraft is discussed in this paper. The trim envelope is estimated using probabilistic methods and efficient high-fidelity model based computations of attainable equilibrium sets. From this trim envelope, a robust reachability analysis provides the maneuverability limitations of the aircraft through an optimal control formulation. Both envelope limits are presented to the flight crew on the primary flight display. In the results section, scenarios are considered where this adaptive algorithm is capable of computing online changes to the maneuvering envelope due to impairment. Furthermore, corresponding updates to display features on the primary flight display are provided to potentially inform the flight crew of safety critical envelope alterations caused by the impairment.

  11. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair Rw; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution.

  12. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair RW; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution. PMID:24213376

  13. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Thomas J; Hernandez, Rosmel E; Noriega, Vanessa M; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-03-30

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV.

  14. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Ying; Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Qihan

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  15. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Thomas J.; Hernandez, Rosmel E.; Noriega, Vanessa M.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV. PMID:27026399

  16. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Howitz, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of (/sup 14/C)glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H/sup +/ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on (1-/sup 14/C)D-glycerate transport.

  17. Envelope Modes of Beams with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Losic, B

    2000-08-21

    For a particle beam propagating in an alternating gradient focusing system, envelope equations are often employed to describe the evolution of the beam radii in the two directions transverse to the direction of propagation, and aligned with the principle axes of the alternating gradient system. When the beams have zero net angular momentum and when the alternating gradient focusing is approximated by a continuous focusing system, there are two normal modes to the envelope equations: the 'breathing' mode and a 'quadrupole' mode. In the former, the two radii oscillate in phase, and in the latter the radii oscillate 180 degrees out of phase. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include beams that have a finite angular momentum. We perturb the moment equations of ref. [1], wherein it was assumed that space charge is a distributed in a uniform density ellipse. Two additional modes are obtained. The breathing mode remains, but the quadrupole mode is split into two modes, and a new low frequency mode appears. We calculate the frequencies and eigenmodes of these four modes as a function of tune depression and a dimensionless net angular momentum. These modes can be excited by rotational errors of the quadrupoles in an alternating gradient focusing channel.

  18. Precision envelope detector and linear rectifier circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for the precise linear rectification and envelope detection of oscillatory signals. The signal is applied to a voltage-to-current converter which supplies current to a constant current sink. The connection between the converter and the sink is also applied through a diode and an output load resistor to a ground connection. The connection is also connected to ground through a second diode of opposite polarity from the diode in series with the load resistor. Very small amplitude voltage signals applied to the converter will cause a small change in the output current of the converter, and the difference between the output current and the constant current sink will be applied either directly to ground through the single diode, or across the output load resistor, dependent upon the polarity. Disclosed also is a full-wave rectifier utilizing constant current sinks and voltage-to-current converters. Additionally, disclosed is a combination of the voltage-to-current converters with differential integrated circuit preamplifiers to boost the initial signal amplitude, and with low pass filtering applied so as to obtain a video or signal envelope output.

  19. Functional organization of the HIV lipid envelope

    PubMed Central

    Huarte, Nerea; Carravilla, Pablo; Cruz, Antonio; Lorizate, Maier; Nieto-Garai, Jon A.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Nieva, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) membrane is critical for fusion and entry into target cells, suggesting that preservation of a functional lipid bilayer organization may be required for efficient infection. HIV-1 acquires its envelope from the host cell plasma membrane at sites enriched in raft-type lipids. Furthermore, infectious particles display aminophospholipids on their surface, indicative of dissipation of the inter-leaflet lipid asymmetry metabolically generated at cellular membranes. By combining two-photon excited Laurdan fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy, we have obtained unprecedented insights into the phase state of membranes reconstituted from viral lipids (i.e., extracted from infectious HIV-1 particles), established the role played by the different specimens in the mixtures, and characterized the effects of membrane-active virucidal agents on membrane organization. In determining the molecular basis underlying lipid packing and lateral heterogeneity of the HIV-1 membrane, our results may help develop compounds with antiviral activity acting by perturbing the functional organization of the lipid envelope. PMID:27678107

  20. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  1. Sensitivity to changes in amplitude envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallun, Erick; Hafter, Ervin R.; Bonnel, Anne-Marie

    2002-05-01

    Detection of a brief increment in a tonal pedestal is less well predicted by energy-detection (e.g., Macmillan, 1973; Bonnel and Hafter, 1997) than by sensitivity to changes in the stimulus envelope. As this implies a mechanism similar to an envelope extractor (Viemeister, 1979), sinusoidal amplitude modulation was used to mask a single ramped increment (10, 45, or 70 ms) added to a 1000-ms pedestal with carrier frequency (cf)=477 Hz. As in informational masking (Neff, 1994) and ``modulation-detection interference'' (Yost and Sheft, 1989), interference occurred with masker cfs of 477 and 2013 Hz. While slight masking was found with modulation frequencies (mfs) from 16 to 96 Hz, masking grew inversely with still lower mfs, being greatest for mf=4 Hz. This division is reminiscent of that said to separate sensations of ``roughness'' and ``beats,'' respectively (Terhardt, 1974), with the latter also being related to durations associated with auditory groupings in music and speech. Importantly, this result held for all of the signal durations and onset-offset ramps tested, suggesting that an increment on a pedestal is treated as a single auditory object whose detection is most difficult in the presence of other objects (in this case, ``beats'').

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of two major envelope proteins from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xuhua; Hew, Choy Leong

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of the N-terminal transmembrane region-truncated VP26 and VP28 of white spot syndrome virus is described. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 Å resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 Å. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 Å, and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution.

  3. Bilayer mechanical properties regulate transmembrane helix mobility and enzymatic state of CD39†

    PubMed Central

    Grinthal, Alison; Guidotti, Guido

    2008-01-01

    CD39 can exist in at least two distinct functional states depending on the presence and intact membrane integration of its two transmembrane helices. In native membranes, the transmembrane helices undergo dynamic rotational motions that are required for enzymatic activity and are regulated by substrate binding. In the present study we show that bilayer mechanical properties regulate conversion between the two enzymatic functional states by modulating transmembrane helix dynamics. Alteration of membrane properties by insertion of cone shaped or inverse cone shaped amphiphiles or by cholesterol removal switches CD39 to the same enzymatic state as does removing or solubilizing the transmembrane domains. The same membrane alterations increase the propensity of both transmembrane helices to rotate within the packed structure, resulting in a structure with greater mobility but not an altered primary conformation. Membrane alteration also abolishes the ability of substrate to stabilize the helices in their primary conformation, indicating a loss of coupling between substrate binding and transmembrane helix dynamics. Removal of either transmembrane helix mimics the effect of membrane alteration on the mobility and substrate sensitivity of the remaining helix, suggesting that the ends of the extracellular domain have intrinsic flexibility. We suggest that a mechanical bilayer property, potentially elasticity, regulates CD39 by altering the balance between stability and flexibility of its transmembrane helices and, in turn, of its active site. PMID:17198399

  4. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called "open mitosis." In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed "closed mitosis" in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called "anaphase II") when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This "virtual" nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis.

  5. A specific interface between integrin transmembrane helices and affinity for ligand.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bing-Hao; Springer, Timothy A; Takagi, Junichi

    2004-06-01

    Conformational communication across the plasma membrane between the extracellular and intracellular domains of integrins is beginning to be defined by structural work on both domains. However, the role of the alpha and beta subunit transmembrane domains and the nature of signal transmission through these domains have been elusive. Disulfide bond scanning of the exofacial portions of the integrin alpha(IIbeta) and beta(3) transmembrane domains reveals a specific heterodimerization interface in the resting receptor. This interface is lost rather than rearranged upon activation of the receptor by cytoplasmic mutations of the alpha subunit that mimic physiologic inside-out activation, demonstrating a link between activation of the extracellular domain and lateral separation of transmembrane helices. Introduction of disulfide bridges to prevent or reverse separation abolishes the activating effect of cytoplasmic mutations, confirming transmembrane domain separation but not hinging or piston-like motions as the mechanism of transmembrane signaling by integrins.

  6. Identification of Extracellular Segments by Mass Spectrometry Improves Topology Prediction of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Langó, Tamás; Róna, Gergely; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Turiák, Lilla; Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Várady, György; Drahos, László; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins play crucial role in signaling, ion transport, nutrient uptake, as well as in maintaining the dynamic equilibrium between the internal and external environment of cells. Despite their important biological functions and abundance, less than 2% of all determined structures are transmembrane proteins. Given the persisting technical difficulties associated with high resolution structure determination of transmembrane proteins, additional methods, including computational and experimental techniques remain vital in promoting our understanding of their topologies, 3D structures, functions and interactions. Here we report a method for the high-throughput determination of extracellular segments of transmembrane proteins based on the identification of surface labeled and biotin captured peptide fragments by LC/MS/MS. We show that reliable identification of extracellular protein segments increases the accuracy and reliability of existing topology prediction algorithms. Using the experimental topology data as constraints, our improved prediction tool provides accurate and reliable topology models for hundreds of human transmembrane proteins. PMID:28211907

  7. Identification of Extracellular Segments by Mass Spectrometry Improves Topology Prediction of Transmembrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Langó, Tamás; Róna, Gergely; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Turiák, Lilla; Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Várady, György; Drahos, László; Vértessy, Beáta G; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2017-02-13

    Transmembrane proteins play crucial role in signaling, ion transport, nutrient uptake, as well as in maintaining the dynamic equilibrium between the internal and external environment of cells. Despite their important biological functions and abundance, less than 2% of all determined structures are transmembrane proteins. Given the persisting technical difficulties associated with high resolution structure determination of transmembrane proteins, additional methods, including computational and experimental techniques remain vital in promoting our understanding of their topologies, 3D structures, functions and interactions. Here we report a method for the high-throughput determination of extracellular segments of transmembrane proteins based on the identification of surface labeled and biotin captured peptide fragments by LC/MS/MS. We show that reliable identification of extracellular protein segments increases the accuracy and reliability of existing topology prediction algorithms. Using the experimental topology data as constraints, our improved prediction tool provides accurate and reliable topology models for hundreds of human transmembrane proteins.

  8. Swine interferon-induced transmembrane protein, sIFITM3, inhibits foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinfang; Qian, Ping; Wu, Qunfeng; Liu, Shasha; Fan, Wenchun; Zhang, Keshan; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2014-09-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) is a widely expressed potent antiviral effector of the host innate immune system. It restricts a diverse group of pathogenic, enveloped viruses, by interfering with endosomal fusion. In this report, the swine IFITM3 (sIFITM3) gene was cloned. It shares the functionally conserved CD225 domain and multiple critical amino acid residues (Y19, F74, F77, R86 and Y98) with its human ortholog, which are essential for antiviral activity. Ectopic expression of sIFITM3 significantly inhibited non-enveloped foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in BHK-21 cells. Furthermore, sIFITM3 blocked FMDV infection at early steps in the virus life cycle by disrupting viral attachment to the host cell surface. Importantly, inoculation of 2-day-old suckling mice with a plasmid expressing sIFITM3 conferred protection against lethal challenge with FMDV. These results suggest that sIFITM3 is a promising antiviral agent and that can safeguard the host from infection with FMDV.

  9. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  10. Defining the Core Proteome of the Chloroplast Envelope Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Müller, Bernd; Schorge, Tobias; Karas, Michael; Mirus, Oliver; Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput protein localization studies require multiple strategies. Mass spectrometric analysis of defined cellular fractions is one of the complementary approaches to a diverse array of cell biological methods. In recent years, the protein content of different cellular (sub-)compartments was approached. Despite of all the efforts made, the analysis of membrane fractions remains difficult, in that the dissection of the proteomes of the envelope membranes of chloroplasts or mitochondria is often not reliable because sample purity is not always warranted. Moreover, proteomic studies are often restricted to single (model) species, and therefore limited in respect to differential individual evolution. In this study we analyzed the chloroplast envelope proteomes of different plant species, namely, the individual proteomes of inner and outer envelope (OE) membrane of Pisum sativum and the mixed envelope proteomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago sativa. The analysis of all three species yielded 341 identified proteins in total, 247 of them being unique. 39 proteins were genuine envelope proteins found in at least two species. Based on this and previous envelope studies we defined the core envelope proteome of chloroplasts. Comparing the general overlap of the available six independent studies (including ours) revealed only a number of 27 envelope proteins. Depending on the stringency of applied selection criteria we found 231 envelope proteins, while less stringent criteria increases this number to 649 putative envelope proteins. Based on the latter we provide a map of the outer and inner envelope core proteome, which includes many yet uncharacterized proteins predicted to be involved in transport, signaling, and response. Furthermore, a foundation for the functional characterization of yet unidentified functions of the inner and OE for further analyses is provided. PMID:23390424

  11. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus type K envelope glycoprotein in insect and mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, R R; Limbach, C; Löwer, R; Kurth, R

    1997-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) family codes for the human teratocarcinoma-derived retrovirus (HTDV) particles. The existence of the envelope protein (ENV) of HERV-K encoded by the subgenomic env mRNA has not yet been demonstrated. To study the genetic requirements for successful expression of ENV, we have constructed a series of recombinant HERV-K env expression vectors for infection and transfection experiments in insect cells and mammalian cells, respectively. Six baculovirus constructs bearing full-length or truncated HERV-K env with or without homologous or heterologous signal peptides were used for infections of insect cells. All recombinant baculoviruses yielded ENV proteins with the expected molecular masses. The full-length 80- to 90-kDa HERV-K ENV protein including the cORF leader sequence was glycosylated in insect cells. In addition, the 14-kDa cORF protein was expressed due to splicing of the full-length env mRNA. The ENV precursor protein is not cleaved to the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) glycoproteins; it does not appear on the surface of infected insect cells and is not secreted into the medium. For ENV expression in COS cells, plasmid vectors harboring the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/intron A element and the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) signal peptide or the homologous HERV-K signal peptide upstream of the env gene were employed. Glycosylated and uncleaved ENV was expressed as in GH teratocarcinoma cells but at higher levels. The heterologous t-PA signal sequence was instrumental for expression of HERV-K ENV on the cell surface. Hence, we have shown for the first time that the HERV-K env gene has the potential to be expressed as a full-length envelope protein with appropriate glycosylation. In addition, our data provide explanations for the lack of infectivity of HERV-K/HTDV particles. PMID:9060628

  12. Fullerenes and fulleranes in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun; Sadjadi, SeyedAbdolreza

    2016-07-01

    Three decades of search have recently led to convincing discoveries of cosmic fullerenes. The presence of C60 and C+ 60 in both circumstellar and interstellar environments suggests that these molecules and their derivatives can be efficiently formed in circumstellar envelopes and survive in harsh conditions. Detailed analysis of the infrared bands from fullerenes and their connections with the local properties can provide valuable information on the physical conditions and chemical processes that occurred in the late stages of stellar evolution. The identification of C+ 60 as the carrier of four diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) suggests that fullerene- related compounds are abundant in interstellar space and are essential for resolving the DIB mystery. Experiments have revealed a high hydrogenation rate when C60 is exposed to atomic hydrogen, motivating the attempt to search for cosmic fulleranes. In this paper, we present a short review of current knowledge of cosmic fullerenes and fulleranes and briefly discuss the implications on circumstellar chemistry.

  13. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  14. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  15. ASYMMETRIC ACCRETION FLOWS WITHIN A COMMON ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-04-10

    This paper examines flows in the immediate vicinity of stars and compact objects dynamically inspiralling within a common envelope (CE). Flow in the vicinity of the embedded object is gravitationally focused, leading to drag and potentially to gas accretion. This process has been studied numerically and analytically in the context of Hoyle–Lyttleton accretion (HLA). Yet, within a CE, accretion structures may span a large fraction of the envelope radius, and in so doing sweep across a substantial radial gradient of density. We quantify these gradients using detailed stellar evolution models for a range of CE encounters. We provide estimates of typical scales in CE encounters that involve main sequence stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes with giant-branch companions of a wide range of masses. We apply these typical scales to hydrodynamic simulations of three-dimensional HLA with an upstream density gradient. This density gradient breaks the symmetry that defines HLA flow, and imposes an angular momentum barrier to accretion. Material that is focused into the vicinity of the embedded object thus may not be able to accrete. As a result, accretion rates drop dramatically, by one to two orders of magnitude, while drag rates are only mildly affected. We provide fitting formulae to the numerically derived rates of drag and accretion as a function of the density gradient. The reduced ratio of accretion to drag suggests that objects that can efficiently gain mass during CE evolution, such as black holes and neutron stars, may grow less than implied by the HLA formalism.

  16. Diversity in the fertilization envelopes of echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Reich, Adrian; Wong, Julian L; Ramos, Isabela; Wessel, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface changes in an egg at fertilization are essential to begin development and for protecting the zygote. Most fertilized eggs construct a barrier around themselves by modifying their original extracellular matrix. This construction usually results from calcium-induced exocytosis of cortical granules, the contents of which in sea urchins function to form the fertilization envelope (FE), an extracellular matrix of cortical granule contents built upon a vitelline layer scaffold. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism of this process in sea stars, a close relative of the sea urchins, and analyze the evolutionary changes that likely occurred in the functionality of this structure between these two organisms. We find that the FE of sea stars is more permeable than in sea urchins, allowing diffusion of molecules in excess of 2 megadaltons. Through a proteomic and transcriptomic approach, we find that most, but not all, of the proteins present in the sea urchin envelope are present in sea stars, including SFE9, proteoliaisin, and rendezvin. The mRNAs encoding these FE proteins accumulated most densely in early oocytes, and then beginning with vitellogenesis, these mRNAs decreased in abundance to levels nearly undetectable in eggs. Antibodies to the SFE9 protein of sea stars showed that the cortical granules in sea star also accumulated most significantly in early oocytes, but different from sea urchins, they translocated to the cortex of the oocytes well before meiotic initiation. These results suggest that the preparation for cell surface changes in sea urchins has been shifted to later in oogenesis, and perhaps reflects the meiotic differences among the species-sea star oocytes are stored in prophase of meiosis and fertilized during the meiotic divisions, as in most animals, whereas sea urchins are one of the few taxons in which eggs have completed meiosis prior to fertilization.

  17. Enhanced conformational sampling using enveloping distribution sampling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-14

    To lessen the problem of insufficient conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations is still a major challenge in computational biochemistry. In this article, an application of the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is proposed that addresses this challenge and its sampling efficiency is demonstrated in simulations of a hexa-β-peptide whose conformational equilibrium encompasses two different helical folds, i.e., a right-handed 2.7(10∕12)-helix and a left-handed 3(14)-helix, separated by a high energy barrier. Standard MD simulations of this peptide using the GROMOS 53A6 force field did not reach convergence of the free enthalpy difference between the two helices even after 500 ns of simulation time. The use of soft-core non-bonded interactions in the centre of the peptide did enhance the number of transitions between the helices, but at the same time led to neglect of relevant helical configurations. In the simulations of a two-state EDS reference Hamiltonian that envelops both the physical peptide and the soft-core peptide, sampling of the conformational space of the physical peptide ensures that physically relevant conformations can be visited, and sampling of the conformational space of the soft-core peptide helps to enhance the transitions between the two helices. The EDS simulations sampled many more transitions between the two helices and showed much faster convergence of the relative free enthalpy of the two helices compared with the standard MD simulations with only a slightly larger computational effort to determine optimized EDS parameters. Combined with various methods to smoothen the potential energy surface, the proposed EDS application will be a powerful technique to enhance the sampling efficiency in biomolecular simulations.

  18. Dissection of the role of the stable signal peptide of the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Messina, Emily L; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H

    2012-06-01

    The arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) retains a stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential subunit in the mature complex. The 58-amino-acid residue SSP comprises two membrane-spanning hydrophobic regions separated by a short ectodomain loop that interacts with the G2 fusion subunit to promote pH-dependent membrane fusion. Small-molecule compounds that target this unique SSP-G2 interaction prevent arenavirus entry and infection. The interaction between SSP and G2 is sensitive to the phylogenetic distance between New World (Junín) and Old World (Lassa) arenaviruses. For example, heterotypic GPC complexes are unable to support virion entry. In this report, we demonstrate that the hybrid GPC complexes are properly assembled, proteolytically cleaved, and transported to the cell surface but are specifically defective in their membrane fusion activity. Chimeric SSP constructs reveal that this incompatibility is localized to the first transmembrane segment of SSP (TM1). Genetic changes in TM1 also affect sensitivity to small-molecule fusion inhibitors, generating resistance in some cases and inhibitor dependence in others. Our studies suggest that interactions of SSP TM1 with the transmembrane domain of G2 may be important for GPC-mediated membrane fusion and its inhibition.

  19. Functional expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in rat oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minhui; Du, Jianyang; Jiang, Weijian; Zuo, Wulin; Wang, Fang; Li, Manhui; Chan, Hsiaochang; Zhou, Wenliang

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with electrophysiological and molecular technique in rat oviduct epithelium. In whole-cell patch clamp, oviduct epithelial cells responded to 100 microM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) with a rise in inward current in Gap-free mode, which was inhibited successively by 5 microM CFTR(inh)-172, a CFTR specific inhibitor, and 1 mM diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), the Cl- channel blocker. The cAMP-activated current exhibited a linear current-voltage (I-V) relationship and time- and voltage-independent characteristics. The reversal potentials of the cAMP-activated currents in symmetrical Cl- solutions were close to the Cl- equilibrium, 0.5+/-0.2 mV (n=4). When Cl- concentration in the bath solution was changed from 140 mM to 70 mM and a pipette solution containing 140 mM Cl- was used, the reversal potential shifted to a value close to the new equilibrium for Cl-, 20+/-0.6 mV (n=4), as compared with the theoretic value of 18.7 mV. In addition, mRNA expression of CFTR was also detected in rat oviduct epithelium. Western blot analysis showed that CFTR protein is found in the oviduct throughout the cycle with maximal expression at estrus, and immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that CFTR is located at the apical membrane of the epithelial cells. These results showed that the cAMP-activated Cl- current in the oviduct epithelium was characteristic of CFTR, which provided direct evidence for the functional expression of CFTR in the rat oviduct epithelium. CFTR may play a role in modulating fluid transport in the oviduct.

  20. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin.

    PubMed

    Franks, Tobias M; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C N; Young, Janet M; Malik, Harmit S; Gage, Fred H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for "soluble Pom121") that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components.

  1. A human phospholipid phosphatase activated by a transmembrane control module.

    PubMed

    Halaszovich, Christian R; Leitner, Michael G; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Le, Audrey; Frezza, Ludivine; Feuer, Anja; Schreiber, Daniela N; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Oliver, Dominik

    2012-11-01

    In voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), a transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) controls an intracellular phosphoinositide phosphatase domain, thereby enabling immediate initiation of intracellular signals by membrane depolarization. The existence of such a mechanism in mammals has remained elusive, despite the presence of VSP-homologous proteins in mammalian cells, in particular in sperm precursor cells. Here we demonstrate activation of a human VSP (hVSP1/TPIP) by an intramolecular switch. By engineering a chimeric hVSP1 with enhanced plasma membrane targeting containing the VSD of a prototypic invertebrate VSP, we show that hVSP1 is a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase whose predominant substrate is PI(4,5)P(2). In the chimera, enzymatic activity is controlled by membrane potential via hVSP1's endogenous phosphoinositide binding motif. These findings suggest that the endogenous VSD of hVSP1 is a control module that initiates signaling through the phosphatase domain and indicate a role for VSP-mediated phosphoinositide signaling in mammals.

  2. Insertion of short transmembrane helices by the Sec61 translocon.

    PubMed

    Jaud, Simon; Fernández-Vidal, Mónica; Nilsson, Ingmarie; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M; Hübner, Nadja C; Tobias, Douglas J; von Heijne, Gunnar; White, Stephen H

    2009-07-14

    The insertion efficiency of transmembrane (TM) helices by the Sec61 translocon depends on helix amino acid composition, the positions of the amino acids within the helix, and helix length. We have used an in vitro expression system to examine systematically the insertion efficiency of short polyleucine segments (L(n), n = 4 ... 12) flanked at either end by 4-residue sequences of the form XXPX-L(n)-XPXX with X = G, N, D, or K. Except for X = K, insertion efficiency (p) is <10% for n < 8, but rises steeply to 100% for n = 12. For X = K, p is already close to 100% for n = 10. A similar pattern is observed for synthetic peptides incorporated into oriented phospholipid bilayer arrays, consistent with the idea that recognition of TM segments by the translocon critically involves physical partitioning of nascent peptide chains into the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that insertion efficiency is determined primarily by the energetic cost of distorting the bilayer in the vicinity of the TM helix. Very short lysine-flanked leucine segments can reduce the energetic cost by extensive hydrogen bonding with water and lipid phosphate groups (snorkeling) and by partial unfolding.

  3. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in rat ovary.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Tang, Ruiling

    2008-10-01

    The protein expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel, in ovarian stimulated premature female rat ovary during a cycle of follicle development and corpus luteum formation was investigated. Animals were injected with 10 U pregnant Mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and subsequently 10 U hCG 48 h later. Time-dependent immunohistochemistry and Western blotting experiments were performed before and 24, 48, 72 h after hCG treatment. The immunohistochemistry revealed that administration of PMSG stimulated the CFTR expression in thecal cell layer and granulosa cell layer of mature follicles 48 h post injection, coincident with the PMSG-induced peak in follicular estradiol. However, the expression of CFTR in the granulose lutein cell layer and thecal lutein cell layer was time-dependently reduced following hCG injection, in accordance with the gradually increased progestogen level during luteum corpus formation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that rat ovarian tissue expressed the special CFTR band at 170 kD. It is concluded that cAMP-dependent Cl(-) channels are involved in regulation of follicle development and luteum formation.

  4. Beta-arrestin-biased ligands at seven-transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), the most common molecular targets of modern drug therapy, are critically regulated by beta-arrestins, which both inhibit classic G-protein signaling and initiate distinct beta-arrestin signaling. The interplay of G-protein and beta-arrestin signals largely determines the cellular consequences of 7TMR-targeted drugs. Until recently, a drug's efficacy for beta-arrestin recruitment was believed to be proportional to its efficacy for G-protein activities. This paradigm restricts 7TMR drug effects to a linear spectrum of responses, ranging from inhibition of all responses to stimulation of all responses. However, it is now clear that 'biased ligands' can selectively activate G-protein or beta-arrestin functions and thus elicit novel biological effects from even well-studied 7TMRs. Here, we discuss the current state of beta-arrestin-biased ligand research and the prospects for beta-arrestin bias as a therapeutic target. Consideration of ligand bias might have profound influences on the way scientists approach 7TMR-targeted drug discovery.

  5. Modeling of Transmembrane Potential in Realistic Multicellular Structures before Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Murovec, Tomo; Sweeney, Daniel C; Latouche, Eduardo; Davalos, Rafael V; Brosseau, Christian

    2016-11-15

    Many approaches for studying the transmembrane potential (TMP) induced during the treatment of biological cells with pulsed electric fields have been reported. From the simple analytical models to more complex numerical models requiring significant computational resources, a gamut of methods have been used to recapitulate multicellular environments in silico. Cells have been modeled as simple shapes in two dimensions as well as more complex geometries attempting to replicate realistic cell shapes. In this study, we describe a method for extracting realistic cell morphologies from fluorescence microscopy images to generate the piecewise continuous mesh used to develop a finite element model in two dimensions. The preelectroporation TMP induced in tightly packed cells is analyzed for two sets of pulse parameters inspired by clinical irreversible electroporation treatments. We show that high-frequency bipolar pulse trains are better, and more homogeneously raise the TMP of tightly packed cells to a simulated electroporation threshold than conventional irreversible electroporation pulse trains, at the expense of larger applied potentials. Our results demonstrate the viability of our method and emphasize the importance of considering multicellular effects in the numerical models used for studying the response of biological tissues exposed to electric fields.

  6. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S.; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F.; Göpfert, Martin C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC’s roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  7. Loss of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Impairs Intestinal Oxalate Secretion.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Felix; Thomson, Robert B; Heneghan, John F; Jiang, Zhirong; Adebamiro, Adedotun; Thomson, Claire L; Barone, Christina; Asplin, John R; Egan, Marie E; Alper, Seth L; Aronson, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have an increased incidence of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Net intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate results from passive paracellular oxalate absorption as modified by oxalate back secretion mediated by the SLC26A6 oxalate transporter. We used mice deficient in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (Cftr) to test the hypothesis that SLC26A6-mediated oxalate secretion is defective in cystic fibrosis. We mounted isolated intestinal tissue from C57BL/6 (wild-type) and Cftr(-/-) mice in Ussing chambers and measured transcellular secretion of [(14)C]oxalate. Intestinal tissue isolated from Cftr(-/-) mice exhibited significantly less transcellular oxalate secretion than intestinal tissue of wild-type mice. However, glucose absorption, another representative intestinal transport process, did not differ in Cftr(-/-) tissue. Compared with wild-type mice, Cftr(-/-) mice showed reduced expression of SLC26A6 in duodenum by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, coexpression of CFTR stimulated SLC26A6-mediated Cl(-)-oxalate exchange in Xenopus oocytes. In association with the profound defect in intestinal oxalate secretion, Cftr(-/-) mice had serum and urine oxalate levels 2.5-fold greater than those of wild-type mice. We conclude that defective intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by SLC26A6 may contribute to the hyperoxaluria observed in this mouse model of cystic fibrosis. Future studies are needed to address whether similar mechanisms contribute to the increased risk for calcium oxalate stone formation observed in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  8. Hydrodynamics of bilayer membranes with diffusing transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Callan-Jones, Andrew; Durand, Marc; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-02-14

    We consider the hydrodynamics of lipid bilayers containing transmembrane proteins of arbitrary shape. This biologically-motivated problem is relevant to the cell membrane, whose fluctuating dynamics play a key role in phenomena ranging from cell migration, intercellular transport, and cell communication. Using Onsager's variational principle, we derive the equations that govern the relaxation dynamics of the membrane shape, of the mass densities of the bilayer leaflets, and of the diffusing proteins' concentration. With our generic formalism, we obtain several results on membrane dynamics. We find that proteins that span the bilayer increase the intermonolayer friction coefficient. The renormalization, which can be significant, is in inverse proportion to the protein's mobility. Second, we find that asymmetric proteins couple to the membrane curvature and to the difference in monolayer densities. For practically all accessible membrane tensions (σ > 10(-8) N m(-1)) we show that the protein density is the slowest relaxing variable. Furthermore, its relaxation rate decreases at small wavelengths due to the coupling to curvature. We apply our formalism to the large-scale diffusion of a concentrated protein patch. We find that the diffusion profile is not self-similar, owing to the wavevector dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient.

  9. Putative transmembrane transporter modulates higher-level aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Budhaditya; Chan, Yick-Bun; Kravitz, Edward A

    2017-02-28

    By selection of winners of dyadic fights for 35 generations, we have generated a hyperaggressive Bully line of flies that almost always win fights against the parental wild-type Canton-S stock. Maintenance of the Bully phenotype is temperature dependent during development, with the phenotype lost when flies are reared at 19 °C. No similar effect is seen with the parent line. This difference allowed us to carry out RNA-seq experiments and identify a limited number of genes that are differentially expressed by twofold or greater in the Bullies; one of these was a putative transmembrane transporter, CG13646, which showed consistent and reproducible twofold down-regulation in Bullies. We examined the causal effect of this gene on the phenotype with a mutant line for CG13646, and with an RNAi approach. In all cases, reduction in expression of CG13646 by approximately half led to a hyperaggressive phenotype partially resembling that seen in the Bully flies. This gene is a member of a very interesting family of solute carrier proteins (SLCs), some of which have been suggested as being involved in glutamine/glutamate and GABA cycles of metabolism in excitatory and inhibitory nerve terminals in mammalian systems.

  10. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tobias M.; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Young, Janet M.; Malik, Harmit S.; Gage, Fred H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo–cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for “soluble Pom121”) that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  11. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  12. Orphan Missense Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Fresquet, Fleur; Clement, Romain; Norez, Caroline; Sterlin, Adélaïde; Melin, Patricia; Becq, Frédéric; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent; Bilan, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    More than 1860 mutations have been found within the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene sequence. These mutations can be classified according to their degree of severity in CF disease. Although the most common mutations are well characterized, few data are available for rare mutations. Thus, genetic counseling is particularly difficult when fetuses or patients with CF present these orphan variations. We describe a three-step in vitro assay that can evaluate rare missense CFTR mutation consequences to establish a correlation between genotype and phenotype. By using a green fluorescent protein–tagged CFTR construct, we expressed mutated proteins in COS-7 cells. CFTR trafficking was visualized by confocal microscopy, and the cellular localization of CFTR was determined using intracellular markers. We studied the CFTR maturation process using Western blot analysis and evaluated CFTR channel activity by automated iodide efflux assays. Of six rare mutations that we studied, five have been isolated in our laboratory. The cellular and functional impact that we observed in each case was compared with the clinical data concerning the patients in whom we encountered these mutations. In conclusion, we propose that performing this type of analysis for orphan CFTR missense mutations can improve CF genetic counseling. PMID:21708286

  13. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; ...

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  14. Structure-based statistical analysis of transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Mingarro, Ismael

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in determination of the high-resolution structure of membrane proteins now enable analysis of the main features of amino acids in transmembrane (TM) segments in comparison with amino acids in water-soluble helices. In this work, we conducted a large-scale analysis of the prevalent locations of amino acids by using a data set of 170 structures of integral membrane proteins obtained from the MPtopo database and 930 structures of water-soluble helical proteins obtained from the protein data bank. Large hydrophobic amino acids (Leu, Val, Ile, and Phe) plus Gly were clearly prevalent in TM helices whereas polar amino acids (Glu, Lys, Asp, Arg, and Gln) were less frequent in this type of helix. The distribution of amino acids along TM helices was also examined. As expected, hydrophobic and slightly polar amino acids are commonly found in the hydrophobic core of the membrane whereas aromatic (Trp and Tyr), Pro, and the hydrophilic amino acids (Asn, His, and Gln) occur more frequently in the interface regions. Charged amino acids are also statistically prevalent outside the hydrophobic core of the membrane, and whereas acidic amino acids are frequently found at both cytoplasmic and extra-cytoplasmic interfaces, basic amino acids cluster at the cytoplasmic interface. These results strongly support the experimentally demonstrated biased distribution of positively charged amino acids (that is, the so-called the positive-inside rule) with structural data.

  15. Modeling Protostar Envelopes and Disks Seen With ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, Susan; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Willacy, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Thermal continuum emission from protostars comes from both the envelope and circumstellar disk. The dust emits on a variety of spatial scales, ranging from sub-arcseconds for disks to roughly 10 arcseconds for envelopes for nearby protostars. We present models of what ALMA should detect that incorporate a self-consistent collapse solution, radiative transfer, and realistic dust properties.

  16. Computer-Based Instruction on Skills for Addressing Envelopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Ann

    The approach to computer-based instruction for third and fourth grade elementary students which is sketched teaches component placement, capitalization, and punctuation skills of addressing envelopes within the context of a simulated envelope. Part of a larger design for a complete program of composition instruction, this program comprises a set…

  17. Data Envelopment Analysis: Measurement of Educational Efficiency in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lacy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of Texas public school districts through Data Envelopment Analysis. The Data Envelopment Analysis estimation method calculated and assigned efficiency scores to each of the 931 school districts considered in the study. The efficiency scores were utilized in two phases. First, the school…

  18. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.516 Building exterior envelope....

  19. Rolling bearing feature frequency extraction using extreme average envelope decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Kunju; Liu, Shulin; Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Hongli

    2016-09-01

    The vibration signal contains a wealth of sensitive information which reflects the running status of the equipment. It is one of the most important steps for precise diagnosis to decompose the signal and extracts the effective information properly. The traditional classical adaptive signal decomposition method, such as EMD, exists the problems of mode mixing, low decomposition accuracy etc. Aiming at those problems, EAED(extreme average envelope decomposition) method is presented based on EMD. EAED method has three advantages. Firstly, it is completed through midpoint envelopment method rather than using maximum and minimum envelopment respectively as used in EMD. Therefore, the average variability of the signal can be described accurately. Secondly, in order to reduce the envelope errors during the signal decomposition, replacing two envelopes with one envelope strategy is presented. Thirdly, the similar triangle principle is utilized to calculate the time of extreme average points accurately. Thus, the influence of sampling frequency on the calculation results can be significantly reduced. Experimental results show that EAED could separate out single frequency components from a complex signal gradually. EAED could not only isolate three kinds of typical bearing fault characteristic of vibration frequency components but also has fewer decomposition layers. EAED replaces quadratic enveloping to an envelope which ensuring to isolate the fault characteristic frequency under the condition of less decomposition layers. Therefore, the precision of signal decomposition is improved.

  20. Planet formation with envelope enrichment: new insights on planetary diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Julia; Alibert, Yann; Benz, Willy

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We compute for the first time self-consistent models of planet growth that include the effect of envelope enrichment. The change in envelope metallicity is assumed to be the result of planetesimal disruption or icy pebble sublimation. Methods: We solved internal structure equations taking into account global energy conservation for the envelope to compute in situ planetary growth. We considered different opacities and equations of state suited for a wide range of metallicities. Results: We find that envelope enrichment speeds up the formation of gas giants. It also explains naturally the formation of low- and intermediate-mass objects with large fractions of H-He ( 20-30% in mass). High-opacity models explain the metallicity of the giant planets of the solar system well, while low-opacity models are suited to explain the formation of low-mass objects with thick H-He envelopes and gas giants with sub-solar envelope metallicities. We find good agreement between our models and the estimated water abundance for WASP-43b. For HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-12b we predict fractions of water higher than what is estimated from observations by at least a factor 2. Conclusions: Envelope enrichment by icy planetesimals is the natural scenario to explain the formation of a wide variety of objects, ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants. We predict that the total and envelope metallicity decrease with planetary mass.

  1. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  2. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  3. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  4. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  5. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  6. An Inside Look at the Two Envelopes Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Nickerson, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    When two sealed envelopes contain money, one twice as much as the other, a player should be indifferent between them. But when one envelope is opened, one's decision should vary as a function of the observed value and one's subjective probabilities.

  7. A Spectral Algorithm for Envelope Reduction of Sparse Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Stephen T.; Pothen, Alex; Simon, Horst D.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of reordering a sparse symmetric matrix to reduce its envelope size is considered. A new spectral algorithm for computing an envelope-reducing reordering is obtained by associating a Laplacian matrix with the given matrix and then sorting the components of a specified eigenvector of the Laplacian. This Laplacian eigenvector solves a continuous relaxation of a discrete problem related to envelope minimization called the minimum 2-sum problem. The permutation vector computed by the spectral algorithm is a closest permutation vector to the specified Laplacian eigenvector. Numerical results show that the new reordering algorithm usually computes smaller envelope sizes than those obtained from the current standard algorithms such as Gibbs-Poole-Stockmeyer (GPS) or SPARSPAK reverse Cuthill-McKee (RCM), in some cases reducing the envelope by more than a factor of two.

  8. Rho GAPs and GEFs

    PubMed Central

    van Buul, Jaap D; Geerts, Dirk; Huveneers, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Within blood vessels, endothelial cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions are crucial to preserve barrier function, and these adhesions are tightly controlled during vascular development, angiogenesis, and transendothelial migration of inflammatory cells. Endothelial cellular signaling that occurs via the family of Rho GTPases coordinates these cell adhesion structures through cytoskeletal remodelling. In turn, Rho GTPases are regulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). To understand how endothelial cells initiate changes in the activity of Rho GTPases, and thereby regulate cell adhesion, we will discuss the role of Rho GAPs and GEFs in vascular biology. Many potentially important Rho regulators have not been studied in detail in endothelial cells. We therefore will first overview which GAPs and GEFs are highly expressed in endothelium, based on comparative gene expression analysis of human endothelial cells compared with other tissue cell types. Subsequently, we discuss the relevance of Rho GAPs and GEFs for endothelial cell adhesion in vascular homeostasis and disease. PMID:24622613

  9. Closing the Performance Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Cheryl G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the principal of a K-2, 400-student suburban elementary school near Flint, Michigan, worked with her staff and superintendent to develop and implement a strategic plan to close the student achievement gap. Reports significant improvement in reading and math scores after 1 year. (PKP)

  10. STEMMING the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Jim; Valentine, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    America has a gap when it comes to youth pursuing science and technology careers. In an effort to improve the knowledge and application of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), after-school programs can work in conjunction with formal in-school curriculum to improve science education. One organization that actively addresses this…

  11. Confronting the Autonomy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamowski, Steven; Petrilli, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    "The Autonomy Gap," a recent study by the American Institute for Research and the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, found that many public elementary school principals feel constrained by a bureaucracy that impedes their ability to raise student achievement. Unfortunately, those principals are still held accountable for their school's results--even…

  12. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  13. Structuring the Information Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian

    1984-01-01

    Describes an information gap procedure to teach a new structure which requires students to look for and exchange information in order to complete a task in an English as a second language class. Illustrates the method with a set of materials and suggests ways for teachers to produce similar materials. (SED)

  14. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  15. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  16. California: Emigrant Gap

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of the Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada Mountains show several smoke plumes from wildfires ... from the Emigrant Gap Fire, located about 40 kilometers west of Lake Tahoe. The animated panorama uses different MISR cameras to enable ...

  17. Bridging a Communication Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Ethel

    1972-01-01

    Description of a community program in cooperation with a regional extension service. The goals were to explore the generation gap, and conflict in life values, understand family role, increase self awareness, improve adult-youth communication, and understand the individual and his relationship to basic social principles. (Author/JB)

  18. Bridging the Development Gap.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    Bridging the Development Gap is contractual cooperative agreement between Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. and DARPA. This program was developed...processing, interfacing with I/O devices, memory constraints, as well as real-time throughput and latency challenges. Mercury has bridged the indicated

  19. Envelope Enhancement Increases Cortical Sensitivity to Interaural Envelope Delays with Acoustic and Electric Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Douglas E. H.; Isaiah, Amal

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from human psychophysical and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that sensitivity to interaural time delay (ITD) in the modulating envelope of a high-frequency carrier can be enhanced using half-wave rectified stimuli. Recent evidence has shown potential benefits of equivalent electrical stimuli to deaf individuals with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). In the current study we assessed the effects of envelope shape on ITD sensitivity in the primary auditory cortex of normal-hearing ferrets, and profoundly-deaf animals with bilateral CIs. In normal-hearing animals, cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±1 ms in 0.1-ms steps) was assessed in response to dichotically-presented i) sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) and ii) half-wave rectified (HWR) tones (100-ms duration; 70 dB SPL) presented at the best-frequency of the unit over a range of modulation frequencies. In separate experiments, adult ferrets were deafened with neomycin administration and bilaterally-implanted with intra-cochlear electrode arrays. Electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs) were recorded in response to bipolar electrical stimulation of the apical pair of electrodes with singe biphasic current pulses (40 µs per phase) over a range of current levels to measure hearing thresholds. Subsequently, we recorded cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±800 µs in 80-µs steps) within the envelope of SAM and HWR biphasic-pulse trains (40 µs per phase; 6000 pulses per second, 100-ms duration) over a range of modulation frequencies. In normal-hearing animals, nearly a third of cortical neurons were sensitive to envelope-ITDs in response to SAM tones. In deaf animals with bilateral CI, the proportion of ITD-sensitive cortical neurons was approximately a fifth in response to SAM pulse trains. In normal-hearing and deaf animals with bilateral CI the proportion of ITD sensitive units and neural sensitivity to ITDs increased in response to HWR, compared with SAM stimuli. Consequently

  20. Common-envelope ejection in massive binary stars. Implications for the progenitors of GW150914 and GW151226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruckow, M. U.; Tauris, T. M.; Langer, N.; Szécsi, D.; Marchant, P.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The recently detected gravitational wave signals (GW150914 and GW151226) of the merger event of a pair of relatively massive stellar-mass black holes (BHs) calls for an investigation of the formation of such progenitor systems in general. Aims: We analyse the common-envelope (CE) stage of the traditional formation channel in binaries where the first-formed compact object undergoes an in-spiral inside the envelope of its evolved companion star and ejects the envelope in this process. Methods: We calculated envelope binding energies of donor stars with initial masses between 4 and 115M⊙ for metallicities of Z = ZMilky Way ≃ Z⊙/ 2 and Z = Z⊙/ 50, and derived minimum masses of in-spiralling objects needed to eject these envelopes. Results: In addition to producing double white dwarf and double neutron star binaries, CE evolution may also produce massive BH-BH systems with individual BH component masses of up to 50 - 60M⊙, in particular for donor stars evolved to giants beyond the Hertzsprung gap. However, the physics of envelope ejection of massive stars remains uncertain. We discuss the applicability of the energy-budget formalism, the location of the bifurcation point, the recombination energy, and the accretion energy during in-spiral as possible energy sources, and also comment on the effect of inflated helium cores. Conclusions: Massive stars in a wide range of metallicities and with initial masses of up to at least 115M⊙ may shed their envelopes and survive CE evolution, depending on their initial orbital parameters, similarly to the situation for intermediate- and low-mass stars with degenerate cores. In addition to being dependent on stellar radius, the envelope binding energies and λ-values also depend on the applied convective core-overshooting parameter, whereas these structure parameters are basically independent of metallicity for stars with initial masses below 60M⊙. Metal-rich stars ≳60M⊙ become luminous blue variables and do

  1. The comparison of genetic variation in the envelope protein between various immunodeficiency viruses and equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Liu, Chang; Liang, Zhipin; Chen, Xueqing; Diao, Danhong; Kong, Xiaohong

    2012-08-01

    The envelope protein (Env) of lentiviruses such as HIV, SIV, FIV and EIAV is larger than that of other retroviruses. The Chinese EIAV attenuated vaccine is based on Env and has helped to successfully control this virus, demonstrating that envelope is crucial for vaccine. We compared Env variation of the four kinds of lentiviruses. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the evolutionary relationship of Env between HIV and SIV was the closest and they appeared to descend from a common ancestor, and the relationship of HIV and EIAV was the furthest. EIAV had the shortest Env length and the least number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) as well as glycosylation density compared to various immunodeficiency viruses. However, HIV had the longest Env length and the most PNGS. Moreover, the alignment of HIV and SIV showed that PNGS were primarily distributed within extracellular membrane protein gp120 rather than transmembrane gp41. It implies that the size difference among these viruses is associated with a lentivirus specific function and also the diversity of env. There are low levels of modification of glycosylation sites of Env and selection of optimal protective epitopes might be useful for development of an effective vaccine against HIV/AIDS.

  2. A mitotic nuclear envelope tether for Gle1 also affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Chemudupati, Mahesh; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    During Aspergillus nidulans mitosis, peripheral nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (Nups) disperse from the core NPC structure. Unexpectedly, one predicted peripheral Nup, Gle1, remains at the mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) via an unknown mechanism. Gle1 affinity purification identified mitotic tether for Gle1 (MtgA), which tethers Gle1 to the NE during mitosis but not during interphase when Gle1 is at NPCs. MtgA is the orthologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomere-anchoring inner nuclear membrane protein Bqt4. Like Bqt4, MtgA has meiotic roles, but it is functionally distinct from Bqt4 because MtgA is not required for tethering telomeres to the NE. Domain analyses showed that MtgA targeting to the NE requires its C-terminal transmembrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. Of importance, MtgA functions beyond Gle1 mitotic targeting and meiosis and affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture when deleted or overexpressed. Deleting MtgA generates small, round nuclei, whereas overexpressing MtgA generates larger nuclei with altered nuclear compartmentalization resulting from NE expansion around the nucleolus. The accumulation of MtgA around the nucleolus promotes a similar accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein Erg24, reducing its levels in the ER. This study extends the functions of Bqt4-like proteins to include mitotic Gle1 targeting and modulation of nuclear and nucleolar architecture. PMID:27630260

  3. Envelope protein VP24 from White spot syndrome virus: expression, purification and crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifang; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major shrimp pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP24 is one of the major envelope proteins of WSSV. In order to facilitate purification, crystallization and structure determination, the predicted N-terminal transmembrane region of approximately 26 amino acids was truncated from VP24 and several mutants were prepared to increase the proportion of selenomethionine (SeMet) residues for subsequent structural determination using the SAD method. Truncated VP24, its mutants and the corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified, and the native and SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of VP24 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5, 2.75 M ammonium acetate with a drop volume ratio of two parts protein solution to one part reservoir solution. Notably, ATP was added as a critical additive to the drop with a final concentration of 10 mM. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP24 mutant diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution and those of the native diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; the crystals belonged to space group I213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 140 Å.

  4. Choristoneura fumiferana Granulovirus p74 protein, a highly conserved baculoviral envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Rashidan, Kianoush Khajeh; Nassoury, Nasha; Tazi, Samia; Giannopoulos, Paresa N; Guertin, Claude

    2003-09-30

    A gene that encodes a homologue to baculoviral p74, an envelope-associated viral structural protein, has been identified and sequenced on the genome of Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus (ChfuGV). A part of the ChfuGV p74 gene was located on an 8.9 kb BamHI subgenomic fragment using different sets of degenerated primers. These were designed using the results of the protein sequencing of a major 74 kDa structural protein that is associated with the occlusion-derived virus (ODV). The gene has a 1992 nucleotide (nt) open-reading frame (ORF) that encodes a protein with 663 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 74,812 Da. Comparative studies revealed the presence of two major conserved regions in the ChfuGV p74 protein. This study also shows that all of the p74 proteins contain two putative transmembrane domains at their C-terminal segments. At the nucleotide sequence level, two late promoter motifs (TAAG and GTAAG) were located upstream of the first ATG of the p74 gene. The gene contained a canonical poly(A) signal, AATAAA, at its 3 non-translated region. A phylogenetic tree for baculoviral p74 was constructed using a maximum parsimony analysis. The phylogenetic estimation demonstrated that ChfuGV p74 is related the closest to those of Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) and Phthorimaea operculella granulovirus (PhopGV).

  5. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  6. Corrector VX-809 stabilizes the first transmembrane domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Bartlett, M Claire; Clarke, David M

    2013-09-01

    Processing mutations that inhibit folding and trafficking of CFTR are the main cause of cystic fibrosis (CF). A potential CF therapy would be to repair CFTR processing mutants. It has been demonstrated that processing mutants of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), CFTR's sister protein, can be efficiently repaired by a drug-rescue mechanism. Many arginine suppressors that mimic drug-rescue have been identified in the P-gp transmembrane (TM) domains (TMDs) that rescue by forming hydrogen bonds with residues in adjacent helices to promote packing of the TM segments. To test if CFTR mutants could be repaired by a drug-rescue mechanism, we used truncation mutants to test if corrector VX-809 interacted with the TMDs. VX-809 was selected for study because it is specific for CFTR, it is the most effective corrector identified to date, but it has limited clinical benefit. Identification of the VX-809 target domain will help to develop correctors with improved clinical benefits. It was found that VX-809 rescued truncation mutants lacking the NBD2 and R domains. When the remaining domains (TMD1, NBD1, TMD2) were expressed as separate polypeptides, VX-809 only increased the stability of TMD1. We then performed arginine mutagenesis on TM6 in TMD1. Although the results showed that TM6 had distinct lipid and aqueous faces, CFTR was different from P-gp as no arginine promoted maturation of CFTR processing mutants. The results suggest that TMD1 contains a VX-809 binding site, but its mechanism differed from P-gp drug-rescue. We also report that V510D acts as a universal suppressor to rescue CFTR processing mutants.

  7. Mechanisms of Hop Inhibition Include the Transmembrane Redox Reaction▿

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under “highly reducing” conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and “antioxidative” hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of

  8. Visualizing Water Molecules in Transmembrane Proteins Using Radiolytic Labeling Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, T.; Gupta, S; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2010-01-01

    Essential to cells and their organelles, water is both shuttled to where it is needed and trapped within cellular compartments and structures. Moreover, ordered waters within protein structures often colocalize with strategically placed polar or charged groups critical for protein function, yet it is unclear if these ordered water molecules provide structural stabilization, mediate conformational changes in signaling, neutralize charged residues, or carry out a combination of all these functions. Structures of many integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), reveal the presence of ordered water molecules that may act like prosthetic groups in a manner quite unlike bulk water. Identification of 'ordered' waters within a crystalline protein structure requires sufficient occupancy of water to enable its detection in the protein's X-ray diffraction pattern, and thus, the observed waters likely represent a subset of tightly bound functional waters. In this review, we highlight recent studies that suggest the structures of ordered waters within GPCRs are as conserved (and thus as important) as conserved side chains. In addition, methods of radiolysis, coupled to structural mass spectrometry (protein footprinting), reveal dynamic changes in water structure that mediate transmembrane signaling. The idea of water as a prosthetic group mediating chemical reaction dynamics is not new in fields such as catalysis. However, the concept of water as a mediator of conformational dynamics in signaling is just emerging, because of advances in both crystallographic structure determination and new methods of protein footprinting. Although oil and water do not mix, understanding the roles of water is essential to understanding the function of membrane proteins.

  9. Transmembrane helices in "classical" nuclear reproductive steroid receptors: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2015-01-01

    Steroid receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily are proposed to be either: 1) located in the cytosol and moved to the cell nucleus upon activation, 2) tethered to the inside of the plasma membrane, or 3) retained in the nucleus until free steroid hormone enters and activates specific receptors. Using computational methods to analyze peptide receptor topology, we find that the "classical" nuclear receptors for progesterone (PRB/PGR), androgen (ARB/AR) and estrogen (ER1/ESR1) contain two transmembrane helices (TMH) within their ligand-binding domains (LBD).The MEMSAT-SVM algorithm indicates that ARB and ER2 (but not PRB or ER1) contain a pore-lining (channel-forming) region which may merge with other pore-lining regions to form a membrane channel. ER2 lacks a TMH, but contains a single pore-lining region. The MemBrain algorithm predicts that PRB, ARB and ER1 each contain one TMH plus a half TMH separated by 51 amino acids.ER2 contains two half helices. The TM-2 helices of ARB, ER1 and ER2 each contain 9-13 amino acid motifs reported to translocate the receptor to the plasma membrane, as well as cysteine palmitoylation sites. PoreWalker analysis of X-ray crystallographic data identifies a pore or channel within the LBDs of ARB and ER1 and predicts that 70 and 72 residues are pore-lining residues, respectively. The data suggest that (except for ER2), cytosolic receptors become anchored to the plasma membrane following synthesis. Half-helices and pore-lining regions in turn form functional ion channels and/or facilitate passive steroid uptake into the cell. In perspective, steroid-dependent insertion of "classical" receptors containing pore-lining regions into the plasma membrane may regulate permeability to ions such as Ca(2+), Na(+) or K(+), as well as facilitate steroid translocation into the nucleus.

  10. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  11. Neural coding of echo-envelope disparities in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Borina, Frank; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2011-05-01

    The effective use of echolocation requires not only measuring the delay between the emitted call and returning echo to estimate the distance of an ensonified object. To locate an object in azimuth and elevation, the bat's auditory system must analyze the returning echoes in terms of their binaural properties, i.e., the echoes' interaural intensity and time differences (IIDs and ITDs). The effectiveness of IIDs for echolocation is undisputed, but when bats ensonify complex objects, the temporal structure of echoes may facilitate the analysis of the echo envelope in terms of envelope ITDs. Using extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain of the bat, Phyllostomus discolor, we found a population of neurons that are sensitive to envelope ITDs of echoes of their sonar calls. Moreover, the envelope-ITD sensitivity improved with increasing temporal fluctuations in the echo envelopes, a sonar parameter related to the spatial statistics of complex natural reflectors like vegetation. The data show that in bats envelope ITDs may be used not only to locate external, prey-generated rustling sounds but also in the context of echolocation. Specifically, the temporal fluctuations in the echo envelope, which are created when the sonar emission is reflected from a complex natural target, support ITD-mediated echolocation.

  12. Vitelline envelope, chorion, and micropyle of Fundulus heteroclitus eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, J.N.; Brummet, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The architecture and transformation of the vitelline envelope of the developing oocyte into the chorion of the mature egg of Fundulus heteroclitus have been examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The mature vitelline envelope is structurally complex and consists of about nine strata. The envelope is penetrated by pore canals that contain microvilli arising from the oocyte and macrovilli from follicle cells. During the envelope's transformation into the chorion, the pore canals are lost and the envelope becomes more fibrous and compact and its stratified nature less apparent. The micropyle, or pore, through which the sperm gains access to the enclosed egg is located at the bottom of a small funnel-shaped depression in the envelope. Internally, the micropyle opens on the apex of a cone-like elevation of the chorion. During the development of the envelope, structured chorionic fibrils, the components of which are presumed to be synthesized by the follicle cells, become attached to its surface. These chorionic fibrils are thought to aid in the attachment of the egg to the substratum and perhaps to help prevent water loss during low tides when the egg may be exposed.

  13. Cell Walls and the Convergent Evolution of the Viral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Why some viruses are enveloped while others lack an outer lipid bilayer is a major question in viral evolution but one that has received relatively little attention. The viral envelope serves several functions, including protecting the RNA or DNA molecule(s), evading recognition by the immune system, and facilitating virus entry. Despite these commonalities, viral envelopes come in a wide variety of shapes and configurations. The evolution of the viral envelope is made more puzzling by the fact that nonenveloped viruses are able to infect a diverse range of hosts across the tree of life. We reviewed the entry, transmission, and exit pathways of all (101) viral families on the 2013 International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) list. By doing this, we revealed a strong association between the lack of a viral envelope and the presence of a cell wall in the hosts these viruses infect. We were able to propose a new hypothesis for the existence of enveloped and nonenveloped viruses, in which the latter represent an adaptation to cells surrounded by a cell wall, while the former are an adaptation to animal cells where cell walls are absent. In particular, cell walls inhibit viral entry and exit, as well as viral transport within an organism, all of which are critical waypoints for successful infection and spread. Finally, we discuss how this new model for the origin of the viral envelope impacts our overall understanding of virus evolution. PMID:26378223

  14. CLOSE STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS BY GRAZING ENVELOPE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Soker, Noam

    2015-02-20

    I suggest a spiral-in process in which a stellar companion grazes the envelope of a giant star while both the orbital separation and the giant radius shrink simultaneously, forming a close binary system. The binary system might be viewed as evolving in a constant state of 'just entering a common envelope (CE) phase.' In cases where this process takes place, it can be an alternative to CE evolution where the secondary star is immersed in the giant's envelope. Grazing envelope evolution (GEE) is made possible only if the companion manages to accrete mass at a high rate and launches jets that remove the outskirts of the giant envelope, hence preventing the formation of a CE. The high accretion rate is made possible by the accretion disk launching jets which efficiently carry the excess angular momentum and energy from the accreted mass. The orbital decay itself is caused by the gravitational interaction of the secondary star with the envelope inward of its orbit, i.e., dynamical friction (gravitational tide). Mass loss through the second Lagrangian point can carry additional angular momentum and envelope mass. The GEE lasts for tens to hundreds of years. The high accretion rate, with peaks lasting from months to years, might lead to a bright object referred to as the intermediate luminosity optical transient (Red Novae; Red Transients). A bipolar nebula and/or equatorial ring are formed around the binary remnant.

  15. Hymenolepis nana: the fine structure of the embryonic envelopes.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, I; Threadgold, L T

    1981-06-01

    The fine structure of the envelopes surrounding hatched and unhatched oncospheres of Hymenolepis nana has been investigated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), together with light microscope histochemical observations of JB-4 embedded material. The oncosphere is surrounded by 3 layers--the capsule, the outer envelope and the inner envelope, the latter giving rise to the embryophore and the 'oncospheral membrane'. An additional layer--the polar filament layer--lies between the 'oncospheral membrane' and the oncosphere. Shell material is deposited on the capsule as a thin layer. It is secreted by the outer envelope, which degenerates once shell formation is complete. The uterus may also contribute to shell formation. The embryophore forms a thin incomplete and peripheral layer within the inner envelope. In the basal region of this envelope, partial development of an 'oncospheral membrane' takes place, but it does not become detached as a separate layer. The polar filaments, which are characteristic of the oncosphere of H. nana, are derived from the epithelial covering of the oncosphere itself, which delaminates to form a separate polar filament layer. The filaments arise from knob-like projections at opposite poles of this layer. The design of the embryonic envelopes in H. nana show a number of modifications from the basic cyclophyllidean pattern, and these can be related to the demands of its 'direct' life-cycle.

  16. Real-Time Flight Envelope Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerho, Michael; Bragg, Michael B.; Ansell, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to show that real-time aircraft control-surface hinge-moment information could be used to provide a robust and reliable prediction of vehicle performance and control authority degradation. For a given airfoil section with a control surface -- be it a wing with an aileron, rudder, or elevator -- the control-surface hinge moment is sensitive to the aerodynamic characteristics of the section. As a result, changes in the aerodynamics of the section due to angle-of-attack or environmental effects such as icing, heavy rain, surface contaminants, bird strikes, or battle damage will affect the control surface hinge moment. These changes include both the magnitude of the hinge moment and its sign in a time-averaged sense, and the variation of the hinge moment with time. The current program attempts to take the real-time hinge moment information from the aircraft control surfaces and develop a system to predict aircraft envelope boundaries across a range of conditions, alerting the flight crew to reductions in aircraft controllability and flight boundaries.

  17. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Kusdiantara, Rudy; Puspita, Dila; Sidarto, Kuntjoro A.; Siagian, Ucok W. R.; Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y.

    2014-03-01

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  18. Aeroelastic Model Structure Computation for Envelope Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2007-01-01

    Structure detection is a procedure for selecting a subset of candidate terms, from a full model description, that best describes the observed output. This is a necessary procedure to compute an efficient system description which may afford greater insight into the functionality of the system or a simpler controller design. Structure computation as a tool for black-box modeling may be of critical importance in the development of robust, parsimonious models for the flight-test community. Moreover, this approach may lead to efficient strategies for rapid envelope expansion that may save significant development time and costs. In this study, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique is investigated for computing efficient model descriptions of non-linear aeroelastic systems. The LASSO minimises the residual sum of squares with the addition of an l(Sub 1) penalty term on the parameter vector of the traditional l(sub 2) minimisation problem. Its use for structure detection is a natural extension of this constrained minimisation approach to pseudo-linear regression problems which produces some model parameters that are exactly zero and, therefore, yields a parsimonious system description. Applicability of this technique for model structure computation for the F/A-18 (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) Active Aeroelastic Wing project using flight test data is shown for several flight conditions (Mach numbers) by identifying a parsimonious system description with a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  19. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  20. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R.; Kusdiantara, Rudy Puspita, Dila Sidarto, Kuntjoro A. Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y.

    2014-03-24

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  1. Localization of phosphatidylcholine in outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effects of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on the extent of phospholipid hydrolysis in envelope membrane vesicles and in intact chloroplasts. When isolated envelope vesicles were incubated in presence of phospholipase C, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol, but not phosphatidylinositol, were totally converted into diacylglycerol if they were available to the enzyme (i.e., when the vesicles were sonicated in presence of phospholipase C). These experiments demonstrate that phospholipase C can be used to probe the availability of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in the cytosolic leaflet of the outer envelope membrane from spinach chloroplasts. When isolated, purified, intact chloroplasts were incubated with low amounts of phospholipase C (0.3 U/mg chlorophyll) under very mild conditions (12 degrees C for 1 min), greater than 80% of phosphatidylcholine molecules and almost none of phosphatidylglycerol molecules were hydrolyzed. Since we have also demonstrated, by using several different methods (phase-contrast and electron microscopy, immunochemical and electrophoretic analyses) that isolated spinach chloroplasts, and especially their outer envelope membrane, remained intact after mild treatment with phospholipase C, we can conclude that there is a marked asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. Phosphatidylcholine, the major polar lipid of the outer envelope membrane, is almost entirely accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane and therefore is probably localized in the outer leaflet of the outer envelope bilayer. On the contrary, phosphatidylglycerol, the major polar lipid in the inner envelope membrane and the thylakoids, is probably not accessible to phospholipase C from the cytosol and therefore is probably localized mostly in the inner leaflet of the outer envelope membrane and in the other chloroplast membranes. PMID:3988805

  2. Juxta-terminal Helix Unwinding as a Stabilizing Factor to Modulate the Dynamics of Transmembrane Helices.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Armin; Rajagopalan, Venkatesan; Sparks, Kelsey A; Greathouse, Denise V; Koeppe, Roger E

    2016-03-15

    Transmembrane helices of integral membrane proteins often are flanked by interfacial aromatic residues that can serve as anchors to aid the stabilization of a tilted transmembrane orientation. Yet, physical factors that govern the orientation or dynamic averaging of individual transmembrane helices are not well understood and have not been adequately explained. Using solid-state (2) H NMR spectroscopy to examine lipid bilayer-incorporated model peptides of the GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW(LA)6 LWLAGA-amide) family, we observed substantial unwinding at the terminals of several tilted helices spanning the membranes of DLPC, DMPC, or DOPC lipid bilayers. The fraying of helix ends might be vital for defining the dynamics and orientations of transmembrane helices in lipid bilayer membranes.

  3. Transmembrane chemokines act as receptors in a novel mechanism termed inverse signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Gebhardt, Henrike; Krossa, Sebastian; Ludwig, Andreas; Lucius, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1/fractalkine and CXCL16 are widely expressed in different types of tumors, often without an appropriate expression of their classical receptors. We observed that receptor-negative cancer cells could be stimulated by the soluble chemokines. Searching for alternative receptors we detected that all cells expressing or transfected with transmembrane chemokine ligands bound the soluble chemokines with high affinity and responded by phosphorylation of intracellular kinases, enhanced proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This activity requires the intracellular domain and apparently the dimerization of the transmembrane chemokine ligand. Thus, shed soluble chemokines can generate auto- or paracrine signals by binding and activating their transmembrane forms. We term this novel mechanism “inverse signaling”. We suppose that inverse signaling is an autocrine feedback and fine-tuning system in the communication between cells that in tumors supports stabilization and proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10820.001 PMID:26796342

  4. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-01

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation. PMID:28028215

  5. Highly effective yet simple transmembrane anion transporters based upon ortho-phenylenediamine bis-ureas.

    PubMed

    Karagiannidis, Louise E; Haynes, Cally J E; Holder, Katie J; Kirby, Isabelle L; Moore, Stephen J; Wells, Neil J; Gale, Philip A

    2014-10-18

    Simple, highly fluorinated receptors are shown to function as highly effective transmembrane anion antiporters with the most active transporters rivalling the transport efficacy of natural anion transporter prodigiosin for bicarbonate.

  6. Advantages of combined transmembrane topology and signal peptide prediction--the Phobius web server.

    PubMed

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2007-07-01

    When using conventional transmembrane topology and signal peptide predictors, such as TMHMM and SignalP, there is a substantial overlap between these two types of predictions. Applying these methods to five complete proteomes, we found that 30-65% of all predicted signal peptides and 25-35% of all predicted transmembrane topologies overlap. This impairs predictions of 5-10% of the proteome, hence this is an important issue in protein annotation. To address this problem, we previously designed a hidden Markov model, Phobius, that combines transmembrane topology and signal peptide predictions. The method makes an optimal choice between transmembrane segments and signal peptides, and also allows constrained and homology-enriched predictions. We here present a web interface (http://phobius.cgb.ki.se and http://phobius.binf.ku.dk) to access Phobius.

  7. Minding the Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Millicent Anne

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  8. Variable Gap Conjugated Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    conducting gold interfacial layer interjected between the ITO glass electrode and the PEDOT/PSS hole transport layer . A family of low band gap, and near IR...which can be used as both electrochromics and as the hole transport layers in light emitting diodes. Hybrid electrochromic and electroluminescent (EC...MEH-PPV, P3HT, etc.) in order to blanket the solar spectrum. Initial device results on these multi-component blends are promising. In addition, we

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E1 Forms Trimers at the Surface of the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Falson, Pierre; Bartosch, Birke; Alsaleh, Khaled; Tews, Birke Andrea; Loquet, Antoine; Ciczora, Yann; Riva, Laura; Montigny, Cédric; Montpellier, Claire; Duverlie, Gilles; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; le Maire, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells, the envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 assemble as a heterodimer. To investigate potential changes in the oligomerization of virion-associated envelope proteins, we performed SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions but without thermal denaturation. This revealed the presence of SDS-resistant trimers of E1 in the context of cell-cultured HCV (HCVcc) as well as in the context of HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp). The formation of E1 trimers was found to depend on the coexpression of E2. To further understand the origin of E1 trimer formation, we coexpressed in bacteria the transmembrane (TM) domains of E1 (TME1) and E2 (TME2) fused to reporter proteins and analyzed the fusion proteins by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. As expected for strongly interacting TM domains, TME1–TME2 heterodimers resistant to SDS were observed. These analyses also revealed homodimers and homotrimers of TME1, indicating that such complexes are stable species. The N-terminal segment of TME1 exhibits a highly conserved GxxxG sequence, a motif that is well documented to be involved in intramembrane protein-protein interactions. Single or double mutations of the glycine residues (Gly354 and Gly358) in this motif markedly decreased or abrogated the formation of TME1 homotrimers in bacteria, as well as homotrimers of E1 in both HCVpp and HCVcc systems. A concomitant loss of infectivity was observed, indicating that the trimeric form of E1 is essential for virus infectivity. Taken together, these results indicate that E1E2 heterodimers form trimers on HCV particles, and they support the hypothesis that E1 could be a fusion protein. IMPORTANCE HCV glycoproteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry into liver cells as well as in virion morphogenesis. In infected cells, these two proteins form a complex in which E2 interacts with cellular receptors, whereas the function of E1 remains poorly understood. However, recent structural data suggest that E1

  10. Nuclear envelope rupture drives genome instability in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghee; Quinton, Ryan J.; Ganem, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope, composed of two lipid bilayers and numerous accessory proteins, has evolved to house the genetic material of all eukaryotic cells. In so doing, the nuclear envelope provides a physical barrier between chromosomes and the cytoplasm. Once believed to be highly stable, recent studies demonstrate that the nuclear envelope is prone to rupture. These rupture events expose chromosomal DNA to the cytoplasmic environment and have the capacity to promote DNA damage. Thus nuclear rupture may be an unappreciated mechanism of mutagenesis. PMID:27799497

  11. The absolute energy flux envelopes of B type stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute energy flux envelopes covering the region of 1100 to 6000 A for main-sequence stars of types B3, B7 and A0 derived from published, ground-based observations and from spectrum scans with OAO-II are presented. These flux envelopes are compared with the predicted flux envelopes from lightly line-blanketed model atmospheres. The line blanketing at wavelengths shorter than 3000 A is severe, about one-half the predicted light being observed at 1600 A. These results demonstrate that a model which represents well the observed visible spectrum of a star may fail seriously for representing the ultraviolet spectrum.

  12. Structure of the integrin beta3 transmembrane segment in phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Lau, Tong-Lay; Partridge, Anthony W; Ginsberg, Mark H; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2008-04-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors transduce bidirectional signals across the plasma membrane, with the integrin transmembrane domains acting as conduits in this process. Here, we report the first high-resolution structure of an integrin transmembrane domain. To assess the influence of the membrane model system, structure determinations of the beta3 integrin transmembrane segment and flanking sequences were carried out in both phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles. In bicelles, a 30-residue linear alpha-helix, encompassing residues I693-H772, is adopted, of which I693-I721 appear embedded in the hydrophobic bicelle core. This relatively long transmembrane helix implies a pronounced helix tilt within a typical lipid bilayer, which facilitates the snorkeling of K716's charged side chain out of the lipid core while simultaneously immersing hydrophobic L717-I721 in the membrane. A shortening of bicelle lipid hydrocarbon tails does not lead to the transfer of L717-I721 into the aqueous phase, suggesting that the reported embedding represents the preferred beta3 state. The nature of the lipid headgroup affected only the intracellular part of the transmembrane helix, indicating that an asymmetric lipid distribution is not required for studying the beta3 transmembrane segment. In the micelle, residues L717-I721 are also embedded but deviate from linear alpha-helical conformation in contrast to I693-K716, which closely resemble the bicelle structure.

  13. The role of transmembrane proteins on force transmission in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Gao, Yingxin

    2014-09-22

    Lateral transmission of force from myofibers laterally to the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) via the transmembrane proteins between them is impaired in old muscles. Changes in geometrical and mechanical properties of ECM of skeletal muscle do not fully explain the impaired lateral transmission with aging. The objective of this study was to determine the role of transmembrane proteins on force transmission in skeletal muscle. In this study, a 2D finite element model of single muscle fiber composed of myofiber, ECM, and the transmembrane proteins between them was developed to determine how changes in spatial density and mechanical properties of transmembrane proteins affect the force transmission in skeletal muscle. We found that force transmission and stress distribution are not affected by mechanical stiffness of the transmembrane proteins due to its non-linear stress-strain relationship. Results also showed that the muscle fiber with insufficient transmembrane proteins near the end of muscle fiber transmitted less force than that with more proteins does. Higher stress was observed in myofiber, ECM, and proteins in the muscle fiber with fewer proteins.

  14. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  15. Stability, orientation and position preference of the stem region (residues 689-703) in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Jusoh, Siti Azma

    2013-01-01

    Envelope glycoproteins of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) play an important role in the virus assembly and initial entry into host cells. Conserved charged residues of the E2 transmembrane (TM) domain were shown to be responsible for the heterodimerization with envelope glycoprotein E1. Despite intensive research on both envelope glycoproteins, the structural information is still not fully understood. Recent findings have revealed that the stem (ST) region of E2 also functions in the initial stage of the viral life cycle. We have previously shown the effect of the conserved charged residues on the TM helix monomer of E2. Here, we extended the model of the TM domain by adding the adjacent ST segment. Explicit molecular dynamics simulations were performed for the E2 amphiphilic segment of the ST region connected to the putative TM domain (residues 683-746). Structural conformation and behavior are studied and compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-derived segment of E2 ( 2KQZ.pdb). We observed that the central helix of the ST region (residues 689 - 703) remained stable as a helix in-plane to the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the TM domain appeared to provide minimal contribution to the structural stability of the amphipathic region. This study also provides insight into the orientation and positional preferences of the ST segment with respect to the membrane lipid-water interface. PMID:24555044

  16. Differentiating founder and chronic HIV envelope sequences.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M; Maher, Stephen; Mota, Talia; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelleher, Anthony D; Center, Rob J; Purcell, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in characterizing broadly neutralizing antibodies against the HIV envelope glycoprotein Env, but an effective vaccine has proven elusive. Vaccine development would be facilitated if common features of early founder virus required for transmission could be identified. Here we employ a combination of bioinformatic and operations research methods to determine the most prevalent features that distinguish 78 subtype B and 55 subtype C founder Env sequences from an equal number of chronic sequences. There were a number of equivalent optimal networks (based on the fewest covarying amino acid (AA) pairs or a measure of maximal covariance) that separated founders from chronics: 13 pairs for subtype B and 75 for subtype C. Every subtype B optimal solution contained the founder pairs 178-346 Asn-Val, 232-236 Thr-Ser, 240-340 Lys-Lys, 279-315 Asp-Lys, 291-792 Ala-Ile, 322-347 Asp-Thr, 535-620 Leu-Asp, 742-837 Arg-Phe, and 750-836 Asp-Ile; the most common optimal pairs for subtype C were 644-781 Lys-Ala (74 of 75 networks), 133-287 Ala-Gln (73/75) and 307-337 Ile-Gln (73/75). No pair was present in all optimal subtype C solutions highlighting the difficulty in targeting transmission with a single vaccine strain. Relative to the size of its domain (0.35% of Env), the α4β7 binding site occurred most frequently among optimal pairs, especially for subtype C: 4.2% of optimal pairs (1.2% for subtype B). Early sequences from 5 subtype B pre-seroconverters each exhibited at least one clone containing an optimal feature 553-624 (Ser-Asn), 724-747 (Arg-Arg), or 46-293 (Arg-Glu).

  17. Differentiating founder and chronic HIV envelope sequences

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Stephen; Mota, Talia; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelleher, Anthony D.

    2017-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in characterizing broadly neutralizing antibodies against the HIV envelope glycoprotein Env, but an effective vaccine has proven elusive. Vaccine development would be facilitated if common features of early founder virus required for transmission could be identified. Here we employ a combination of bioinformatic and operations research methods to determine the most prevalent features that distinguish 78 subtype B and 55 subtype C founder Env sequences from an equal number of chronic sequences. There were a number of equivalent optimal networks (based on the fewest covarying amino acid (AA) pairs or a measure of maximal covariance) that separated founders from chronics: 13 pairs for subtype B and 75 for subtype C. Every subtype B optimal solution contained the founder pairs 178–346 Asn-Val, 232–236 Thr-Ser, 240–340 Lys-Lys, 279–315 Asp-Lys, 291–792 Ala-Ile, 322–347 Asp-Thr, 535–620 Leu-Asp, 742–837 Arg-Phe, and 750–836 Asp-Ile; the most common optimal pairs for subtype C were 644–781 Lys-Ala (74 of 75 networks), 133–287 Ala-Gln (73/75) and 307–337 Ile-Gln (73/75). No pair was present in all optimal subtype C solutions highlighting the difficulty in targeting transmission with a single vaccine strain. Relative to the size of its domain (0.35% of Env), the α4β7 binding site occurred most frequently among optimal pairs, especially for subtype C: 4.2% of optimal pairs (1.2% for subtype B). Early sequences from 5 subtype B pre-seroconverters each exhibited at least one clone containing an optimal feature 553–624 (Ser-Asn), 724–747 (Arg-Arg), or 46–293 (Arg-Glu). PMID:28187204

  18. Solubilization and reconstitution of vesicular stomatitis virus envelope using octylglucoside.

    PubMed Central

    Paternostre, M; Viard, M; Meyer, O; Ghanam, M; Ollivon, M; Blumenthal, R

    1997-01-01

    Reconstituted vesicular stomatitis virus envelopes or virosomes are formed by detergent removal from solubilized intact virus. We have monitored the solubilization process of the intact vesicular stomatitis virus by the nonionic surfactant octylglucoside at various initial virus concentrations by employing turbidity measurements. This allowed us to determine the phase boundaries between the membrane and the mixed micelles domains. We have also characterized the lipid and protein content of the solubilized material and of the reconstituted envelope. Both G and M proteins and all of the lipids of the envelope were extracted by octylglucoside and recovered in the reconstituted envelope. Fusion activity of the virosomes tested either on Vero cells or on liposomes showed kinetics and pH dependence similar to those of the intact virus. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:9083672

  19. Envelope Protection and Recovery Guidance for Upset Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombaerts, Thomas; Schuet, Stefan; Acosta, Diana; Kaneshige, John; Shish, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The slides are an overview and summary of past and current research projects in the field of envelope protection, upset prevention and upset recovery, with the aim to avoid loss of control accidents and improve safety in air transportation.

  20. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  1. A Systematic Approach to Evaluating the Building Envelope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, Jon F.; Stewart, Edward J.; Morand, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process for evaluating a building's envelope (roof, walls, windows, waterproofing, and structure). Steps are grouped into the following categories: building history, field inspection, access methods, identifying defects, testing methods, and engineering analysis. (EV)

  2. Evolution of Space Shuttle Range Safety Ascent Flight Envelope Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Joan; Davis, Jerel; Glenn, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    For every space vehicle launch from the Eastern Range in Florida, the range user must provide specific Range Safety (RS) data products to the Air Force's 45th Space Wing in order to obtain flight plan approval. One of these data products is a set of RS ascent flight envelope trajectories that define the normal operating region of the vehicle during powered flight. With the Shuttle Program launching 135 manned missions over a 30-year period, 135 envelope sets were delivered to the range. During this time, the envelope methodology and design process evolved to support mission changes, maintain high data quality, and reduce costs. The purpose of this document is to outline the shuttle envelope design evolution and capture the lessons learned that could apply to future spaceflight endeavors.

  3. Testing Common Envelopes on Double White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, Jose L. A.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lombardi, James C., Jr.

    2015-06-01

    The formation of a double white dwarf binary likely involves a common envelope (CE) event between a red giant and a white dwarf (WD) during the most recent episode of Roche lobe overflow mass transfer. We study the role of recombination energy with hydrodynamic simulations of such stellar interactions. We find that the recombination energy helps to expel the common envelope entirely, while if recombination energy is not taken into account, a significant fraction of the common envelope remains bound. We apply our numerical methods to constrain the progenitor system for WD 1101+364 - a double WD binary that has well-measured mass ratio of q=0.87±0.03 and an orbital period of 0.145 days. Our best-fit progenitor for the pre-common envelope donor is a 1.5 ⊙ red giant.

  4. Laboratory simulation of graphite formation in stellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfeld, W. G.; Hudson, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A technique has been developed which permits laboratory simulation of graphite condensation in the envelopes of cool, late sequence stars. Processes in the stellar envelope were simulated by allowing hydrogen-carbon mixtures of typical circumstellar composition and temperature to expand freely into vacuum, cooling and supersaturating the vapor. Expansion products were determined mass spectrometrically through the use of molecular beam techniques. The results of laboratory expansions were scaled to those occurring near M and N stars by comparing the number of collisional events in each case. Kinetic considerations indicate that the important rate process in rarefied envelopes will be C2 formation; consequently scaling by termolecular collisions was employed. Results of this study imply that envelope expansions near M giants contribute at most .01 of the observed interstellar grain density. In the case of pulsating N stars, on the other hand, the results are not inconsistent with previous predictions of essentially complete carbon condensation.

  5. SIRT2 regulates nuclear envelope reassembly through ANKLE2 deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Tanja; Kukolj, Eva; Brachner, Andreas; Beltzung, Etienne; Bruno, Melania; Kostrhon, Sebastian; Opravil, Susanne; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Warren, Graham

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD-dependent deacetylase known to regulate microtubule dynamics and cell cycle progression. SIRT2 has also been implicated in the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and progeria. Here, we show that SIRT2 depletion or overexpression causes nuclear envelope reassembly defects. We link this phenotype to the recently identified regulator of nuclear envelope reassembly ANKLE2. ANKLE2 acetylation at K302 and phosphorylation at S662 are dynamically regulated throughout the cell cycle by SIRT2 and are essential for normal nuclear envelope reassembly. The function of SIRT2 therefore extends beyond the regulation of microtubules to include the regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics. PMID:27875273

  6. Periodic envelopes of waves over non-uniform depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Girish K.; Bayram, Saziye; Henderson, Diane M.

    2016-04-01

    The envelope of narrow-banded, periodic, surface-gravity waves propagating in one dimension over water of finite, non-uniform depth may be modeled by the Djordjević and Redekopp ["On the development of packets of surface gravity waves moving over an uneven bottom," Z. Angew. Math. Phys. 29, 950-962 (1978)] equation (DRE). Here we find five approximate solutions of the DRE that are in the form of Jacobi-elliptic functions and discuss them within the framework of ocean swell. We find that in all cases, the maximum envelope-amplitude decreases/increases when the wave group propagates on water of decreasing/increasing depth. In the limit of the elliptic modulus approaching one, three of the solutions reduce to the envelope soliton solution. In the limit of the elliptic modulus approaching zero, two of the solutions reduce to an envelope-amplitude that is uniform in an appropriate reference frame.

  7. Envelope Protection for In-Flight Ice Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingras, David R.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Ranaudo, Richard J.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    Fatal loss-of-control (LOC) accidents have been directly related to in-flight airframe icing. The prototype system presented in this paper directly addresses the need for real-time onboard envelope protection in icing conditions. The combinations of a-priori information and realtime aerodynamic estimations are shown to provide sufficient input for determining safe limits of the flight envelope during in-flight icing encounters. The Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system has been designed and implemented to identify degradations in airplane performance and flying qualities resulting from ice contamination and provide safe flight-envelope cues to the pilot. Components of ICEPro are described and results from preliminary tests are presented.

  8. Beam envelope calculations in general linear coupled lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Moses; Qin, Hong; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2015-01-15

    The envelope equations and Twiss parameters (β and α) provide important bases for uncoupled linear beam dynamics. For sophisticated beam manipulations, however, coupling elements between two transverse planes are intentionally introduced. The recently developed generalized Courant-Snyder theory offers an effective way of describing the linear beam dynamics in such coupled systems with a remarkably similar mathematical structure to the original Courant-Snyder theory. In this work, we present numerical solutions to the symmetrized matrix envelope equation for β which removes the gauge freedom in the matrix envelope equation for w. Furthermore, we construct the transfer and beam matrices in terms of the generalized Twiss parameters, which enables calculation of the beam envelopes in arbitrary linear coupled systems.

  9. Border safety: quality control at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Brant M.; Lusk, C. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The unique biochemical identity of the nuclear envelope confers its capacity to establish a barrier that protects the nuclear compartment and directly contributes to nuclear function. Recent work uncovered quality control mechanisms employing the ESCRT machinery and a new arm of ERAD to counteract the unfolding, damage or misassembly of nuclear envelope proteins and ensure the integrity of the nuclear envelope membranes. Moreover, cells have the capacity to recognize and triage defective nuclear pore complexes in order to prevent their inheritance and preserve the longevity of progeny. These mechanisms serve to highlight the diverse strategies used by cells to maintain nuclear compartmentalization; we suggest they mitigate the progression and severity of diseases associated with nuclear envelope malfunction like the laminopathies. PMID:26437591

  10. A domain unique to plant RanGAP is responsible for its targeting to the plant nuclear rim

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Annkatrin; Meier, Iris

    2001-01-01

    Ran is a small signaling GTPase that is involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Two additional functions of animal Ran in the formation of spindle asters and the reassembly of the nuclear envelope in mitotic cells have been recently reported. In contrast to Ras or Rho, Ran is not associated with membranes. Instead, the spatial sequestering of its accessory proteins, the Ran GTPase-activating protein RanGAP and the nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, appears to define the local concentration of RanGTP vs. RanGDP involved in signaling. Mammalian RanGAP is bound to the nuclear pore by a mechanism involving the attachment of small ubiquitin-related modifier protein (SUMO) to its C terminus and the subsequent binding of the SUMOylated domain to the nucleoporin Nup358. Here we show that plant RanGAP utilizes a different mechanism for nuclear envelope association, involving a novel targeting domain that appears to be unique to plants. The N-terminal WPP domain is highly conserved among plant RanGAPs and the small, plant-specific nuclear envelope-associated protein MAF1, but not present in yeast or animal RanGAP. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins showed that it is necessary for RanGAP targeting and sufficient to target the heterologous protein GFP to the plant nuclear rim. The highly conserved tryptophan and proline residues of the WPP motif are necessary for its function. The 110-aa WPP domain is the first nuclear-envelope targeting domain identified in plants. Its fundamental difference to its mammalian counterpart implies that different mechanisms have evolved in plants and animals to anchor RanGAP at the nuclear surface. PMID:11752475

  11. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP LAND COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national inter-agency program that maps the distribution

    of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land

    stewardship to identify gaps in biodiversity protection. GAP uses remote satellite imag...

  12. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  13. RMS ENVELOPE BACK-PROPAGATION IN THE XAL ONLINE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Christopher K; Sako, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    The ability to back-propagate RMS envelopes was added to the J-PARC XAL online model. Specifically, given an arbitrary downstream location, the online model can propagate the RMS envelopes backward to an arbitrary upstream location. This feature provides support for algorithms estimating upstream conditions from downstream data. The upgrade required significant refactoring, which we outline. We also show simulations using the new feature.

  14. Advances in Understanding Durability of the Building Envelope: ORNL Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kehrer, Manfred; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-01-01

    Moisture, and its accompanying outriders things like mold, corrosion, freeze damage, and decay present powerful threats to the durability and long-term performance of a building envelope. Miscalculating the impact of environmental factors like rain, solar radiation, temperature, humidity, and indoor sources of moisture can cause significant damage to many types of building envelope components and materials, and also can lead to unhealthy indoor living environments.

  15. Universal enveloping crossed module of Leibniz crossed modules and representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Rafael F.; García-Martínez, Xabier; Ladra, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The universal enveloping algebra functor UL: Lb → Alg, defined by Loday and Pirashvili [1], is extended to crossed modules. Then we construct an isomorphism between the category of representations of a Leibniz crossed module and the category of left modules over its universal enveloping crossed module of algebras. Note that the procedure followed in the proof for the Lie case cannot be adapted, since the actor in the category of Leibniz crossed modules does not always exist.

  16. A Partial Differential Equation for the Rank One Convex Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberman, Adam M.; Ruan, Yuanlong

    2017-02-01

    A partial differential equation (PDE) for the rank one convex envelope is introduced. The existence and uniqueness of viscosity solutions to the PDE is established. Elliptic finite difference schemes are constructed and convergence of finite difference solutions to the viscosity solution of the PDE is proven. Computational results are presented and laminates are computed from the envelopes. Results include the Kohn-Strang example, the classical four gradient example, and an example with eight gradients which produces nontrivial laminates.

  17. An Approach for Zika Virus Inhibition Using Homology Structure of the Envelope Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Sandun; Fernando, Teshan; Stefanik, Michal; Eyer, Ludek; Ruzek, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    To find an effective drug for Zika virus, it is important to understand how numerous proteins which are critical for the virus' structure and function interact with their counterparts. One approach to inhibiting the flavivirus is to deter its ability to bind onto glycoproteins; however, the crystal structures of envelope proteins of the ever-evolving viral strains that decipher glycosidic or drug-molecular interactions are not always available. To fill this gap, we are reporting a holistic, simulation-based approach to predict compounds that will inhibit ligand binding onto a structurally unresolved protein, in this case the Zika virus envelope protein (ZVEP), by developing a three-dimensional general structure and analyzing sites at which ligands and small drug-like molecules interact. By examining how glycan molecules and small-molecule probes interact with a freshly resolved ZVEP homology model, we report the susceptibility of ZVEP to inhibition via two small molecules, ZINC33683341 and ZINC49605556-by preferentially binding onto the primary receptor responsible for the virus' virulence. Antiviral activity was confirmed when ZINC33683341 was tested in cell culture. We anticipate the results to be a starting point for drug discovery targeting Zika virus and other emerging pathogens.

  18. The global drug gap.

    PubMed

    Reich, M R

    2000-03-17

    Global inequities in access to pharmaceutical products exist between rich and poor countries because of market and government failures as well as huge income differences. Multiple policies are required to address this global drug gap for three categories of pharmaceutical products: essential drugs, new drugs, and yet-to-be-developed drugs. Policies should combine "push" approaches of subsidies to support targeted drug development, "pull" approaches of financial incentives such as market guarantees, and "process" approaches aimed at improved institutional capacity. Constructive solutions are needed that can both protect the incentives for research and development and reduce the inequities of access.

  19. Mind the gap.

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Krassnigg, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.; Physics; Univ. Graz; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    2007-03-01

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  20. Disassembly of the cystovirus ϕ6 envelope by montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Block, Karin A; Trusiak, Adrianna; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul; Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Morales, Jorge; Rice, William J; Steiner, Jeffrey C

    2014-02-01

    Prior studies of clay-virus interactions have focused on the stability and infectivity of nonenveloped viruses, yielding contradictory results. We hypothesize that the surface charge distribution of the clay and virus envelope dictates how the components react and affect aggregation, viral stability, and infectivity. The bacteriophage Cystoviridae species φ6 used in this study is a good model for enveloped pathogens. The interaction between φ6 and montmorillonite (MMT) clay (the primary component of bentonite) is explored by transmission electron microscopy. The analyses show that MMT-φ6 mixtures undergo heteroaggregation, forming structures in which virtually all the virions are either sequestered between MMT platelet layers or attached to platelet edges. The virions swell and undergo disassembly resulting in partial or total envelope loss. Edge-attached viral envelopes distort to increase contact area with the positively charged platelet edges indicating that the virion surface is negatively charged. The nucleocapsid (NCs) remaining after envelope removal also exhibit distortion, in contrast to detergent-produced NCs which exhibit no distortion. This visually discernible disassembly is a mechanism for loss of infectivity previously unreported by studies of nonenveloped viruses. The MMT-mediated sequestration and disassembly result in reduced infectivity, suggesting that clays may reduce infectivity of enveloped pathogenic viruses in soils and sediments.

  1. Preserving Envelope Efficiency in Performance Based Code Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Brian A.; Sullivan, Greg P.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2015-06-20

    The City of Seattle 2012 Energy Code (Seattle 2014), one of the most progressive in the country, is under revision for its 2015 edition. Additionally, city personnel participate in the development of the next generation of the Washington State Energy Code and the International Energy Code. Seattle has pledged carbon neutrality by 2050 including buildings, transportation and other sectors. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Seattle in order to understand the implications of one potential direction for its code development, limiting trade-offs of long-lived building envelope components less stringent than the prescriptive code envelope requirements by using better-than-code but shorter-lived lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) components through the total building performance modeled energy compliance path. Weaker building envelopes can permanently limit building energy performance even as lighting and HVAC components are upgraded over time, because retrofitting the envelope is less likely and more expensive. Weaker building envelopes may also increase the required size, cost and complexity of HVAC systems and may adversely affect occupant comfort. This report presents the results of this technical assistance. The use of modeled energy code compliance to trade-off envelope components with shorter-lived building components is not unique to Seattle and the lessons and possible solutions described in this report have implications for other jurisdictions and energy codes.

  2. Name that percussive tune: Associative memory and amplitude envelope.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Michael; Stefanucci, Jeanine K; H Baum, Sarah; Roth, Amber

    2017-07-01

    A series of experiments demonstrated novel effects of amplitude envelope on associative memory, with tones exhibiting naturally decaying amplitude envelopes (e.g., those made by two wine glasses clinking) better associated with target objects than amplitude-invariant tones. In Experiment 1 participants learned associations between household objects and 4-note tone sequences constructed of spectrally matched pure tones with either "flat" or "percussive" amplitude envelopes. Those hearing percussive tones correctly recalled significantly more sequence-object associations. Experiment 2 demonstrated that participants hearing percussive tones learned the associations more quickly. Experiment 3 used "reverse percussive" tones (percussive tones played backwards) to test whether differences in overall energy might account for this effect, finding they did not lead to the same level of performance as percussive tones. Experiment 4 varied the envelope at encoding and retrieval to determine which stage of the task was most affected by the envelope manipulation. Participants hearing percussive tones at both encoding and retrieval performed significantly better than the other three groups (i.e., flat at encoding/percussive at retrieval, etc.). We conclude that amplitude envelope plays an important role in learning and memory, a finding with relevance to psychological research on audition and associative memory, as well as practical relevance for improving human-computer interface design.

  3. Disassembly of the cystovirus ϕ6 envelope by montmorillonite clay

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karin A; Trusiak, Adrianna; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul; Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Morales, Jorge; Rice, William J; Steiner, Jeffrey C

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies of clay–virus interactions have focused on the stability and infectivity of nonenveloped viruses, yielding contradictory results. We hypothesize that the surface charge distribution of the clay and virus envelope dictates how the components react and affect aggregation, viral stability, and infectivity. The bacteriophage Cystoviridae species φ6 used in this study is a good model for enveloped pathogens. The interaction between φ6 and montmorillonite (MMT) clay (the primary component of bentonite) is explored by transmission electron microscopy. The analyses show that MMT–φ6 mixtures undergo heteroaggregation, forming structures in which virtually all the virions are either sequestered between MMT platelet layers or attached to platelet edges. The virions swell and undergo disassembly resulting in partial or total envelope loss. Edge-attached viral envelopes distort to increase contact area with the positively charged platelet edges indicating that the virion surface is negatively charged. The nucleocapsid (NCs) remaining after envelope removal also exhibit distortion, in contrast to detergent-produced NCs which exhibit no distortion. This visually discernible disassembly is a mechanism for loss of infectivity previously unreported by studies of nonenveloped viruses. The MMT-mediated sequestration and disassembly result in reduced infectivity, suggesting that clays may reduce infectivity of enveloped pathogenic viruses in soils and sediments. PMID:24357622

  4. DOUBLE COMPACT OBJECTS. I. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE COMMON ENVELOPE ON MERGER RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Fryer, Christopher; Holz, Daniel E.; Berti, Emanuele; Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The last decade of observational and theoretical developments in stellar and binary evolution provides an opportunity to incorporate major improvements to the predictions from population synthesis models. We compute the Galactic merger rates for NS-NS, BH-NS, and BH-BH mergers with the StarTrack code. The most important revisions include updated wind mass-loss rates (allowing for stellar-mass black holes up to 80 M {sub Sun }), a realistic treatment of the common envelope phase (a process that can affect merger rates by 2-3 orders of magnitude), and a qualitatively new neutron star/black hole mass distribution (consistent with the observed {sup m}ass gap{sup )}. Our findings include the following. (1) The binding energy of the envelope plays a pivotal role in determining whether a binary merges within a Hubble time. (2) Our description of natal kicks from supernovae plays an important role, especially for the formation of BH-BH systems. (3) The masses of BH-BH systems can be substantially increased in the case of low metallicities or weak winds. (4) Certain combinations of parameters underpredict the Galactic NS-NS merger rate and can be ruled out. (5) Models incorporating delayed supernovae do not agree with the observed NS/BH 'mass gap', in accordance with our previous work. This is the first in a series of three papers. The second paper will study the merger rates of double compact objects as a function of redshift, star formation rate, and metallicity. In the third paper, we will present the detection rates for gravitational-wave observatories, using up-to-date signal waveforms and sensitivity curves.

  5. Envelope proteins of spleen necrosis virus form infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 pseudotype vector particles, but fail to incorporate upon substitution of the cytoplasmic domain with that of Gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Stitz, Jörn; Wolfrum, Nina; Buchholz, Christian J; Cichutek, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    The wild-type (wt) envelope (Env) proteins of spleen necrosis virus (SNV), together with the transmembrane (TM) protein fused to antibody domains (scFv), have been used for the generation of stable packaging cell lines releasing pseudotyped cell targeting vectors derived from SNV and Murine leukemia virus (MLV). As a first step towards assessing whether HIV-1(SNV/TM-scFv) packaging cells could be established for the production of lentiviral cell targeting vectors, it is reported here that infectious HIV-1-derived particles pseudotyped with wt SNV Env proteins could be generated. Using novel chimeric SNV-derived Env proteins encompassing wt and engineered cytoplasmic domains (C-tail) of the Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) TM protein, it was further shown that the wt C-tail not only excludes the GaLV TM protein from incorporation into HIV-1 particles, but confers this phenotype to other retroviral envelopes upon C-terminal fusion.

  6. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  7. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  8. Phenylalanines at positions 88 and 159 of Ebolavirus envelope glycoprotein differentially impact envelope function

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Wu; King, Harlan; Delisle, Josie; Shi Dashuang; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-05

    The envelope glycoprotein (GP) of Ebolavirus (EBOV) mediates viral entry into host cells. Through mutagenesis, we and other groups reported that two phenylalanines at positions 88 and 159 of GP are critical for viral entry. However, it remains elusive which steps of viral entry are impaired by F88 or F159 mutations and how. In this study, we further characterized these two phenylalanines through mutagenesis and examined the impact on GP expression, function, and structure. Our data suggest that F159 plays an indirect role in viral entry by maintaining EBOV GP's overall structure. In contrast, we did not detect any evidence for conformational differences in GP with F88 mutations. The data suggest that F88 influences viral entry during a step after cathepsin processing, presumably impacting viral fusion.

  9. Gap Opening in 3D: Single-planet Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Giant planets can clear deep gaps when embedded in 2D (razor-thin) viscous circumstellar disks. We show by direct simulation that giant planets are just as capable of carving out gaps in 3D. Surface density maps are similar between 2D and 3D, even in detail. In particular, the scaling {{{Σ }}}{gap}\\propto {q}-2 of gap surface density with planet mass, derived from a global “zero-dimensional” balance of Lindblad and viscous torques, applies equally well to results obtained at higher dimensions. Our 3D simulations reveal extensive, near-sonic, meridional flows both inside and outside the gaps; these large-scale circulations might bear on disk compositional gradients, in dust or other chemical species. At high planet mass, gap edges are mildly Rayleigh unstable and intermittently shed streams of material into the gap—less so in 3D than in 2D.

  10. The transmembrane transporter domain of glutamate transporters is a process tip localizer

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mariko Kato; Yasui, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate transporters in the central nervous system remove glutamate released from neurons to terminate the signal. These transporters localize to astrocyte process tips approaching neuronal synapses. The mechanisms underlying the localization of glutamate transporters to these processes, however, are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the trimeric transmembrane transporter domain fragment of glutamate transporters, lacking both N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions, localized to filopodia tips. This is a common property of trimeric transporters including a neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. Astrocyte specific proteins are not required for the filopodia tip localization. An extracellular loop at the centre of the 4th transmembrane helices, unique for metazoans, is required for the localization. Moreover, a C186S mutation at the 4th transmembrane region of EAAT1, found in episodic ataxia patients, significantly decreased its process tip localization. The transmembrane transporter domain fragments of glutamate transporters also localized to astrocyte process tips in cultured hippocampal slice. These results indicate that the transmembrane transporter domain of glutamate transporters have an additional function as a sorting signal to process tips. PMID:25761899

  11. HMMpTM: improving transmembrane protein topology prediction using phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction.

    PubMed

    Tsaousis, Georgios N; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2014-02-01

    During the last two decades a large number of computational methods have been developed for predicting transmembrane protein topology. Current predictors rely on topogenic signals in the protein sequence, such as the distribution of positively charged residues in extra-membrane loops and the existence of N-terminal signals. However, phosphorylation and glycosylation are post-translational modifications (PTMs) that occur in a compartment-specific manner and therefore the presence of a phosphorylation or glycosylation site in a transmembrane protein provides topological information. We examine the combination of phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction with transmembrane protein topology prediction. We report the development of a Hidden Markov Model based method, capable of predicting the topology of transmembrane proteins and the existence of kinase specific phosphorylation and N/O-linked glycosylation sites along the protein sequence. Our method integrates a novel feature in transmembrane protein topology prediction, which results in improved performance for topology prediction and reliable prediction of phosphorylation and glycosylation sites. The method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/HMMpTM.

  12. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Jérôme; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP) are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs). Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-11-26

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO(3)(-) transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala(800)-Lys(967). Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met(858) accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr(926)-Ala(929) only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met(813)-Gly(828)) region and a cryptic (Met(887)-Arg(904)) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp(960). Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro(868)-Leu(967) (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1.

  14. Multiple site-specific infrared dichroism of CD3-zeta, a transmembrane helix bundle.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaume; Briggs, John A G; Arkin, Isaiah T

    2002-02-15

    The structure of the transmembrane domain of CD3-zeta a component of the T-cell receptor involved in signal transduction, has been studied in its native state (a lipid bilayer) by multiple site-specific infrared dichroism. For the first time, the transmembrane domain has been labelled at multiple positions along the sequence, representing a total of 11 samples, each labelled at a different residue with an isotopically modified carbonyl group, (13)C [double bond] (18)O. A strategy is outlined that, based on the above data, can yield the rotational orientation and the local helix tilt for each labelled residue, giving a detailed description of helix geometry. The results obtained indicate that the transmembrane segment is in an alpha-helical conformation throughout, with an average helix tilt of 12 degrees. The N-terminal side of the helix is more tilted than the C-terminal. In an accompanying paper we describe the implementation of the infrared data in a model-building study of the CD3-zeta transmembrane complex. The model obtained is entirely consistent with results based on evolutionary conservation data. Taken together, this study represents the first step towards elucidation of the backbone structure of a transmembrane alpha-helical bundle by infrared spectroscopy.

  15. Methods for studying transmembrane peptides in bicelles: consequences of hydrophobic mismatch and peptide sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiles, Jennifer A.; Glover, Kerney J.; Vold, Regitze R.; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2002-09-01

    We have shown that bicelles prepared from dilauryl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) align in a magnetic field under conditions similar to the more common dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bicelles. In addition, a model transmembrane peptide, P16, with a hydrophobic stretch of 24 Å, and specific alanine-d 3 labels, was incorporated into all of the different bicelles. The long-chain phospholipid (DLPC, DMPC, or DPPC) remained unperturbed upon incorporation of the peptide while the quadrupolar splitting of the short-chain phospholipid along the bicelle rim increased by varying degrees in the different bicelle systems. The change in quadrupolar splitting of the short-chain phospholipids was attributed to changes in either fluidity of the planar region of the bicelle or differences in overall lipid packing. When the hydrophobic stretch of the bilayer was 22.8 (DMPC) or 26.3 Å (DPPC), the peptide tilt was found to be transmembrane (33-35° with respect to the bicelle normal). When the hydrophobic stretch of the bilayer was 19.5 Å (DLPC), the peptide quadrupolar splittings suggested a loss of transmembrane orientation. When tryptophan was incorporated in the middle of the transmembrane region, the transmembrane orientation was also lost.

  16. Presenilin-mediated transmembrane cleavage is required for Notch signal transduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, Gary; Greenwald, Iva

    2001-01-01

    The cleavage model for signal transduction by receptors of the LIN-12/Notch family posits that ligand binding leads to cleavage within the transmembrane domain, so that the intracellular domain is released to translocate to the nucleus and activate target gene expression. The familial Alzheimer's disease-associated protein Presenilin is required for LIN-12/Notch signaling, and several lines of evidence suggest that Presenilin mediates the transmembrane cleavage event that releases the LIN-12/Notch intracellular domain. However, doubt was cast on this possibility by a report that Presenilin is not required for the transducing activity of NECN, a constitutively active transmembrane form of Notch, in Drosophila. Here, we have reassessed this finding and show instead that Presenilin is required for activity of NECN for all cell fate decisions examined. Our results indicate that transmembrane cleavage and signal transduction are strictly correlated, supporting the cleavage model for signal transduction by LIN-12/Notch and a role for Presenilin in mediating the ligand-induced transmembrane cleavage. PMID:11134525

  17. Types of gaseous envelopes of "hot Jupiter" exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisikalo, D. V.; Kaigorodov, P. V.; Ionov, D. E.; Shematovich, V. I.

    2013-10-01

    As a rule, the orbital velocities of "hot Jupiters," i.e., exoplanets with masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and orbital semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU, are supersonic relative to the stellar wind, resulting in the formation of a bow shock. Gas-dynamical modeling shows that the gaseous envelopes around hot Jupiters can belong to two classes, depending on the position of the collision point. if the collision point is inside the Roche lobe of the planet, the envelopes have the almost spherical shapes of classical atmospheres, slightly distorted by the influence of the star and interactions with the stellar-wind gas; if the collision point is located outside the Roche lobe, outflows from the vicinity of the Lagrangian points L1 and L2 arise, and the envelope becomes substantially asymmetrical. The latter class of objects can also be divided into two types. If the dynamical pressure of the stellar-wind gas is high enough to stop the most powerful outflow from the vicinity of the inner Lagrangian point L1, a closed quasi-spherical envelope with a complex shape forms in the system. If the wind is unable to stop the outflow from L1, an open aspherical envelope forms. The possible existence of atmospheres of these three types is confirmed by 3D numerical modeling. Using the typical hot Jupiter HD 209458b as an example, it is shown that all three types of atmospheres could exist within the range of estimated parameters of this planet. Since different types of envelopes have different observational manifestations, determining the type of envelope in HD 209458b could apply additional constrains on the parameters of this exoplanet.

  18. Metallicity dependence of envelope inflation in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, D.; Langer, N.; Szécsi, D.; -C Yoon, S.; Grassitelli, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Recently it has been found that models of massive stars reach the Eddington limit in their interior, which leads to dilute extended envelopes. Aims: We perform a comparative study of the envelope properties of massive stars at different metallicities, with the aim to establish the impact of the stellar metallicity on the effect of envelope inflation. Methods: We analysed published grids of core-hydrogen burning massive star models computed with metallicities appropriate for massive stars in the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud, and the Small Magellanic Cloud, the very metal poor dwarf galaxy I Zwicky 18, and for metal-free chemical composition. Results: Stellar models of all the investigated metallicities reach and exceed the Eddington limit in their interior, aided by the opacity peaks of iron, helium, and hydrogen, and consequently develop inflated envelopes. Envelope inflation leads to a redward bending of the zero-age main sequence and a broadening of the main-sequence band in the upper part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We derive the limiting L/M-values as a function of the stellar surface temperature above which inflation occurs, and find them to be higher for lower metallicity. While Galactic models show inflation above 29 M⊙, the corresponding mass limit for Population III stars is 150 M⊙. While the masses of the inflated envelopes are generally low, we find that they can reach 1-100 M⊙ in models with effective temperatures below 8000 K, with higher masses reached by models of lower metallicity. Conclusions: Envelope inflation is expected to occur in sufficiently massive stars at all metallicities, and is expected to lead to rapidly growing pulsations, high macroturbulent velocities, and might well be related to the unexplained variability observed in luminous blue variables such as S Doradus and η Carina.

  19. Rotavirus protein rearrangements in purified membrane-enveloped intermediate particles.

    PubMed Central

    Poruchynsky, M S; Atkinson, P H

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus, a double-shelled nonenveloped member of the REoviridae family, becomes transiently membrane enveloped during its maturation process, as single-shelled particles bud from cytoplasmic viroplasm structures into the adjacent endoplasmic reticulum. The present study describes the isolation of these membrane-enveloped viral intermediates from rotavirus SA11-infected Ma104 cells. The enveloped intermediates comprised the proteins VP1, VP2, VP4, VP6, VP7, and NS28 and small amounts of NS35 and NS34. VP7 in the intermediate particles was recognized by either a polyclonal antibody to VP7, which previous studies had shown recognizes the membrane-associated form of VP7, or a monoclonal antibody which recognizes VP7 on mature virus. NS28, VP7, and VP4 could be complexed to a higher-molecular-weight form when the membrane-permeable cross-linker dithiobis(succinimidylproprionate) was used. However, when an impermeable cross-linker was used, the structural proteins, including VP7, were not accessible to cross-linking. Velocity sedimentation of cross-linked immunoisolated enveloped virus particles showed that VP7 and VP4 were located in the same fractions only when the membrane-permeable cross-linker was used, implying their heterooligomeric association during outer capsid formation. When intermediate enveloped virus particles were treated with protease, VP6 and VP7 were protected, but not in the presence of detergent. Taken together, these results support the idea that in the membrane-enveloped intermediate, VP7 is repositioned from its location in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen back across the viral membrane envelope to the inferior of the virus particle during the maturation process. Images PMID:1651404

  20. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  1. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  2. Optically thick envelopes around ULXs powered by accreating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Ingram, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Magnetized neutron stars power at least some ultra-luminous X-ray sources. The accretion flow in these cases is interrupted at the magnetospheric radius and then reaches the surface of a neutron star following magnetic field lines. Accreting matter moving along magnetic field lines forms the accretion envelope around the central object. We show that, in case of high mass accretion rates ≳ 1019 g s-1 the envelope becomes closed and optically thick, which influences the dynamics of the accretion flow and the observational manifestation of the neutron star hidden behind the envelope. Particularly, the optically thick accretion envelope results in a multi-color black-body spectrum originating from the magnetospheric surface. The spectrum and photon energy flux vary with the viewing angle, which gives rise to pulsations characterized by high pulsed fraction and typically smooth pulse profiles. The reprocessing of radiation due to interaction with the envelope leads to the disappearance of cyclotron scattering features from the spectrum. We speculate that the super-orbital variability of ultra-luminous X-ray sources powered by accreting neutron stars can be attributed to precession of the neutron star due to interaction of magnetic dipole with the accretion disc.

  3. Molecular biology of the baculovirus occlusion-derived virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, Sharon C; Summers, Max D

    2007-10-01

    Study of the biology of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of the baculovirus Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus provides opportunities to reveal new discoveries into the mechanism of several cellular pathways. The synchronous pulse of multiple ODV envelope proteins that integrate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and traffic to the nuclear membranes on their way to the ODV envelope provide a unique tool to study the mechanisms of integral membrane protein trafficking from the ER to the outer and inner nuclear membrane. Studies of the formation of virus-induced, intranuclear membrane microvesicles provide insight on mechanisms that alter fluidity and regulate budding of the inner nuclear membrane. Since ODV is specially adapted for primary infection of the insect gut, studies of the structure and function of ODV envelope proteins reveals insights on the mechanism of viral invasion of the gut and this knowledge is fundamental for the development of new strategies for insect control. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the source of the ODV envelope and the molecular events that sort and traffic integral membrane proteins from the ER to the ODV envelope. The composition of ODV is reviewed, however it is worth noting that the function of many ODV proteins are currently unknown.

  4. The ionization structure of the circumstellar envelope of Alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The physical processes which affect the ionization of the outer circumstellar envelope of Alpha Ori are analyzed and evaluated. The ultraviolet radiation fields of the chromosphere and the interstellar medium dominate the envelope, and the most common forms of all species are neutral atoms and first ions. Hydrogen recombines just outside the chromosphere, where atoms with smaller ionization potential are essentially fully ionized. The heavier ions gradually recombine with increasing distance from the star, until the interstellar radiation field reverses this trend. The electron fraction in the outer envelope is approximately equal to the abundance of all such heavy atoms, i.e., of the order of 0.0001. The analysis is applied to the case of neutral K, whose density in the envelope has been determined by scattering experiments. The theory predicts that the slope of the K I density distribution should decrease from -1.5 to -3.5 in the outer envelope. The mass loss rate of Alpha Ori implied by the K I scattering experiments is 4 x 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr.

  5. The South Carolina bridge-scour envelope curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Feaster, Toby D.; Caldwell, Andral

    2016-09-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a series of three field investigations to evaluate historical, riverine bridge scour in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of South Carolina. These investigations included data collected at 231 riverine bridges, which lead to the development of bridge-scour envelope curves for clear-water and live-bed components of scour. The application and limitations of the South Carolina bridge-scour envelope curves were documented in four reports, each report addressing selected components of bridge scour. The current investigation (2016) synthesizes the findings of these previous reports into a guidance manual providing an integrated procedure for applying the envelope curves. Additionally, the investigation provides limited verification for selected bridge-scour envelope curves by comparing them to field data collected outside of South Carolina from previously published sources. Although the bridge-scour envelope curves have limitations, they are useful supplementary tools for assessing the potential for scour at riverine bridges in South Carolina.

  6. Solar envelope concepts: moderate density building applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, R.L.; Berry, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Solar energy utilization in urban areas requires public guarantees that all property owners have direct access to the sun. The study examines the implications of this premise in relation to the need for cities to also encourage or accommodate rebuilding and future development. The public policy mechanism for guaranteeing solar access is conceptualized as a solar zoning envelope that allows the largest possible building bulk on a land parcel without shadowing neighboring properties during specified times. Step-by-step methods for generating solar envelopes are described with extensive drawings, showing a variety of urban platting and lot configurations. Development and design possibilities are examined on a selected set of Los Angeles sites with typically diverse urban characteristics. Envelope attributes suitable for encouraging moderate-density commercial and residential building are examined in the context of two hypothetical but realistic development programs: one for speculative office buildings and one for condominium housing. Numerous illustrations of envelope forms and prototypical building designs are provided. The results of development simulation studies on all test sites are tabulated to show building bulk, density, land-coverage and open space characteristics obtainable under the hypothesized envelopes.

  7. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES. III. VELOCITY GRADIENTS IN NON-AXISYMMETRIC ENVELOPES, INFALL, OR ROTATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Bergin, Edwin; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W.; Maret, Sebastien

    2012-03-20

    We present an interferometric kinematic study of morphologically complex protostellar envelopes based on observations of the dense gas tracers N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The strong asymmetric nature of most envelopes in our sample leads us to question the common interpretation of velocity gradients as rotation, given the possibility of projection effects in the observed velocities. Several 'idealized' sources with well-ordered velocity fields and envelope structures are now analyzed in more detail. We compare the interferometric data to position-velocity (PV) diagrams of kinematic models for spherical rotating collapse and filamentary rotating collapse. For this purpose, we developed a filamentary parameterization of the rotating collapse model to explore the effects of geometric projection on the observed velocity structures. We find that most envelopes in our sample have PV structures that can be reproduced by an infalling filamentary envelope projected at different angles within the plane of the sky. The infalling filament produces velocity shifts across the envelope that can mimic rotation, especially when viewed at single-dish resolutions and the axisymmetric rotating collapse model does not uniquely describe any data set. Furthermore, if the velocities are assumed to reflect rotation, then the inferred centrifugal radii are quite large in most cases, indicating significant fragmentation potential or more likely another component to the line-center velocity. We conclude that ordered velocity gradients cannot be interpreted as rotation alone when envelopes are non-axisymmetric and that projected infall velocities likely dominate the velocity field on scales larger than 1000 AU.

  8. The Role of the Transmembrane RING Finger Proteins in Cellular and Organelle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    A large number of RING finger (RNF) proteins are present in eukaryotic cells and the majority of them are believed to act as E3 ubiquitin ligases. In humans, 49 RNF proteins are predicted to contain transmembrane domains, several of which are specifically localized to membrane compartments in the secretory and endocytic pathways, as well as to mitochondria and peroxisomes. They are thought to be molecular regulators of the organization and integrity of the functions and dynamic architecture of cellular membrane and membranous organelles. Emerging evidence has suggested that transmembrane RNF proteins control the stability, trafficking and activity of proteins that are involved in many aspects of cellular and physiological processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mammalian transmembrane RNF proteins, focusing on their roles and significance. PMID:24957874

  9. Hydrophobic Mismatch Drives the Interaction of E5 with the Transmembrane Segment of PDGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Dirk; Ziegler, Colin; Grage, Stephan L.; Bürck, Jochen; Zeitler, Marcel; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic E5 protein from bovine papillomavirus is a short (44 amino acids long) integral membrane protein that forms homodimers. It activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β in a ligand-independent manner by transmembrane helix-helix interactions. The nature of this recognition event remains elusive, as numerous mutations are tolerated in the E5 transmembrane segment, with the exception of one hydrogen-bonding residue. Here, we examined the conformation, stability, and alignment of the E5 protein in fluid lipid membranes of substantially varying bilayer thickness, in both the absence and presence of the PDGFR transmembrane segment. Quantitative synchrotron radiation circular dichroism analysis revealed a very long transmembrane helix for E5 of ∼26 amino acids. Oriented circular dichroism and solid-state 15N-NMR showed that the alignment and stability of this unusually long segment depend critically on the membrane thickness. When reconstituted alone in exceptionally thick DNPC lipid bilayers, the E5 helix was found to be inserted almost upright. In moderately thick bilayers (DErPC and DEiPC), it started to tilt and became slightly deformed, and finally it became aggregated in conventional DOPC, POPC, and DMPC membranes due to hydrophobic mismatch. On the other hand, when E5 was co-reconstituted with the transmembrane segment of PDGFR, it was able to tolerate even the most pronounced mismatch and was stabilized by binding to the receptor, which has the same hydrophobic length. As E5 is known to activate PDGFR within the thin membranes of the Golgi compartment, we suggest that the intrinsic hydrophobic mismatch of these two interaction partners drives them together. They seem to recognize each other by forming a closely packed bundle of mutually aligned transmembrane helices, which is further stabilized by a specific pair of hydrogen-bonding residues. PMID:26287626

  10. Peptide microarray analysis of substrate specificity of the transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase KPI-2 reveals reactivity with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2006-11-01

    Human lemur (Lmr) kinases are predicted to be Tyr kinases based on sequences and are related to neurotrophin receptor Trk kinases. This study used homogeneous recombinant KPI-2 (Lmr2, LMTK2, Cprk, brain-enriched protein kinase) kinase domain and a library of 1,154 peptides on a microarray to analyze substrate specificity. We found that KPI-2 is strictly a Ser/Thr kinase that reacts with Ser either preceded by or followed by Pro residues but unlike other Pro-directed kinases does not strictly require an adjacent Pro residue. The most reactive peptide in the library corresponds to Ser-737 of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, and the recombinant R domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was a preferred substrate. Furthermore the KPI-2 kinase phosphorylated peptides corresponding to the single site in phosphorylase and purified phosphorylase b, making this only the second known phosphorylase b kinase. Phosphorylase was used as a specific substrate to show that KPI-2 is inhibited in living cells by addition of nerve growth factor or serum. The results demonstrate the utility of the peptide library to probe specificity and discover kinase substrates and offer a specific assay that reveals hormonal regulation of the activity of this unusual transmembrane kinase.

  11. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1984-02-16

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  12. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  13. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  14. Use of Membrane Potential to Achieve Transmembrane Modification with an Artificial Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Wataru; Kawaguchi, Miki; Sun, Xizheng; Nagao, Yusuke; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashida, Mitsuru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Kishimura, Akihiro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Mori, Takeshi

    2017-02-15

    We developed a strategy to modify cell membranes with an artificial transmembrane receptor. Coulomb force on the receptor, caused by the membrane potential, was used to achieve membrane penetration. A hydrophobically modified cationic peptide was used as a membrane potential sensitive region that was connected to biotin through a transmembrane oligoethylene glycol (OEG) chain. This artificial receptor gradually disappeared from the cell membrane via penetration despite the presence of a hydrophilic OEG chain. However, when the receptor was bound to streptavidin (SA), it remained on the cell membrane because of the large and hydrophilic nature of SA.

  15. Simulating the onset of grazing envelope evolution of binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiber, Sagiv; Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2017-02-01

    We present the first three-dimensional gas-dynamical simulations of the grazing envelope evolution (GEE) of stars, with the goal of exploring the basic flow properties and the role of jets at the onset of the GEE. In the simulated runs, a secondary main-sequence star grazes the envelope of the primary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star. The orbit is circular at the radius of the AGB primary star on its equator. We inject two opposite jets perpendicular to the equatorial plane from the location of the secondary star, and follow the evolution for several orbital periods. We explore the flow pattern by which the jets eject the outskirts of the AGB envelope. After one orbit, the jets start to interact with gas ejected in previous orbits and inflate hot low-density bubbles.

  16. Second-order envelope equation of graphene electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji

    2014-10-01

    A treatment of graphene's electronic states based on the tight-binding method is presented. Like Dirac equation, this treatment uses envelope functions to eliminate crystal potential. Besides, a density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham (KS) orbital of an isolated carbon atom is employed. By locally expanding envelope functions into second-order polynomials and by involving up to third-nearest atoms in calculating orbital integrals, the second-order envelope equation is obtained. This equation does not contain any experimental data except graphene's crystal structure, and its coefficients are determined through several kinds of integrals of the carbon KS orbital. As an improvement, it leads to more accurate energy dispersion than Dirac equation including the triangular warping effect and asymmetry for electrons and holes, and gives the Fermi velocity which is in good agreement with the experimental value.

  17. Classification of oscillometric envelope shape using frequent sequence mining.

    PubMed

    Diao, Hung-Wen; Hu, Weichih; Lan, Gong-Yau; Shyu, Liang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The shape of the oscillometric envelope is known to affect the accuracy of automatic noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurement devices that use the oscillometric principle to determine systolic and diastolic blood pressures. This study proposes a novel shape classification method that uses data mining techniques to determine the characteristic sequences for different envelope shapes. The results indicate that the proposed method effectively determines the characteristic sequences for different subject groups. Subjects in the high- score group and in the low- score group tend to have an envelope with a broader plateau and are bell-shaped, respectively. This information about shape can be used for future determination of the correct algorithm for systolic and diastolic blood pressures determination in NIBP devices.

  18. Structure of Phage P22 Cell Envelope-Penetrating Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Olia,A.; Casjens, S.; Cingolani, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage P22 infects Salmonella enterica by injecting its genetic material through the cell envelope. During infection, a specialized tail needle, gp26, is injected into the host, likely piercing a hole in the host cell envelope. The 2.1-Angstroms crystal structure of gp26 reveals a 240-Angstroms elongated protein fiber formed by two trimeric coiled-coil domains interrupted by a triple beta-helix. The N terminus of gp26 plugs the portal protein channel, retaining the genetic material inside the virion. The C-terminal tip of the fiber exposes beta-hairpins with hydrophobic tips similar to those seen in class II fusion peptides. The alpha-helical core connecting these two functionally polarized tips presents four trimerization octads with consensus sequence IXXLXXXV. The slender conformation of the gp26 fiber minimizes the surface exposed to solvent, which is consistent with the idea that gp26 traverses the cell envelope lipid bilayers.

  19. The envelope Hamiltonian for electron interaction with ultrashort pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Koudai; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan M.

    2015-07-01

    For ultrashort VUV pulses with a pulse length comparable to the orbital time of the bound electrons they couple to, we propose a simplified envelope Hamiltonian. It is based on the Kramers-Henneberger representation in connection with a Floquet expansion of the strong-field dynamics but keeps the time dependence of the pulse envelope explicit. Thereby, the envelope Hamiltonian captures the essence of the physics—light-induced shifts of bound states, single-photon absorption, and non-adiabatic electronic transitions. It delivers quantitatively accurate ionization dynamics and allows for a physical insight into the processes occurring. Its minimal requirements for construction in terms of laser parameters make it ideally suited for a large class of atomic and molecular problems.

  20. Structure of Phage P22 Cell Envelope-Penetrating Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Olia, A.S.; Casjens, S.; Cingolani, G.

    2009-06-02

    Bacteriophage P22 infects Salmonella enterica by injecting its genetic material through the cell envelope. During infection, a specialized tail needle, gp26, is injected into the host, likely piercing a hole in the host cell envelope. The 2.1-{angstrom} crystal structure of gp26 reveals a 240-{angstrom} elongated protein fiber formed by two trimeric coiled-coil domains interrupted by a triple {beta}-helix. The N terminus of gp26 plugs the portal protein channel, retaining the genetic material inside the virion. The C-terminal tip of the fiber exposes {beta}-hairpins with hydrophobic tips similar to those seen in class II fusion peptides. The {alpha}-helical core connecting these two functionally polarized tips presents four trimerization octads with consensus sequence IXXLXXXV. The slender conformation of the gp26 fiber minimizes the surface exposed to solvent, which is consistent with the idea that gp26 traverses the cell envelope lipid bilayers.

  1. Method and apparatus for controlling carrier envelope phase

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Zenghu [Manhattan, KS; Li, Chengquan [Sunnyvale, CA; Moon, Eric [Manhattan, KS

    2011-12-06

    A chirped pulse amplification laser system. The system generally comprises a laser source, a pulse modification apparatus including first and second pulse modification elements separated by a separation distance, a positioning element, a measurement device, and a feedback controller. The laser source is operable to generate a laser pulse and the pulse modification apparatus operable to modify at least a portion of the laser pulse. The positioning element is operable to reposition at least a portion of the pulse modification apparatus to vary the separation distance. The measurement device is operable to measure the carrier envelope phase of the generated laser pulse and the feedback controller is operable to control the positioning element based on the measured carrier envelope phase to vary the separation distance of the pulse modification elements and control the carrier envelope phase of laser pulses generated by the laser source.

  2. Autopresentation of hepatitis B virus envelope antigens by T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, C; Pilli, M; Penna, A; Bertoletti, A; Valli, A; Cavalli, A; Pasetti, G; Fiaccadori, F

    1992-01-01

    Processing and presentation by T cells appear to be limited to antigens that can directly interact with the T-cell surface, thereby overcoming the T-cell inefficiency in antigen capture and internalization. Our study provides evidence that the hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins can also be efficiently processed and presented by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to other T cells in a human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted fashion. This phenomenon suggests a receptor-mediated interaction between T cells and the HBV envelope and defines a system that can, we hope, be exploited for the identification of the receptor binding site within the HBV envelope and for the characterization of the putative cellular HBV receptor. PMID:1548778

  3. Nuclear envelope fission is linked to cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Li, R

    2000-11-01

    We have investigated the relationship between nuclear envelope fission and cytokinesis during mitotic cell division in budding yeast. By carrying out time-lapse and optical sectioning video microscopy analysis of cells that express green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged nuclear envelope and actomyosin ring components, we found that nuclear division is temporally coupled to cytokinesis. Light and electron microscopy analysis also showed that nuclear envelope fission and the division of the nucleoplasm are severely delayed in cytokinesis mutants, resulting in discoupling between the nuclear division cycle and the budding cycle. These results suggest that homotypic membrane fusion may be activated by components or the mechanical action of cytokinetic structures and presents a mechanism for the equal partitioning of the nucleus and the temporal coordination of this event with chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  4. Photochemistry and molecular ions in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Omont, A.; Lucas, R.

    1987-01-01

    An earlier theory of ionization of C-rich circumstellar envelopes based on the photochemical model is extended to include the temperature dependence of ion-molecule reactions with polar molecules, particularly HCN, and line self-shielding of CO dissociating radiation. The results are applied to the abundances of HCO(+) and HNC in C-rich circumstellar envelopes. With standard parameters for IRC + 10216, the model is found to be consistent with the new upper limit to the antenna temperature of the J = 1-0 line of HCO(+) obtained with the IRAM 30-m telescope. The photochemical model provides a natural explanation of the relatively large ratio of HCN to HNC observed for C-rich circumstellar envelopes, and good agreement is obtained for the H(C-13)N/HNC antenna temperature ratio measured for IRC + 10216.

  5. PAH formation in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Frenklach, Michael

    1989-01-01

    While there is growing observational evidence that some fraction of interstellar carbon is in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), the mechanisms by which these molecules might be formed have not been extensively studied. A detailed investigation of PAH production in the outflowing molecular envelopes of carbon-rich red giant star is presented. The gasphase kinetics of a chemical reaction mechanism developed to study soot production in hydrocarbon flames is modified to apply in circumstellar environments. It was found that astrophysically significant quantities of PAH's can be formed in carbon star envelopes provided the gas is sufficiently dense and resides for a long time in the temperature range of 900 to 1100 k. The precise yield of PAH's is very sensitive to astronomical parameters of the envelope (e.g., mass loss rate, outflow velocity, and acetylene abundance) and certain poorly determined chemical reaction rates.

  6. Expression, Purification, Crystallization of Two Major Envelope Proteins from White Spot Syndrome Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,X.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 {angstrom}. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 {angstrom}, and diffracts to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution.

  7. Primary care efficiency measurement using data envelopment analysis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pelone, Ferruccio; Kringos, Dionne Sofia; Romaniello, Alessandro; Archibugi, Monica; Salsiri, Chiara; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    There is a gap between the demand and supply of efficiency analyses within primary care (PC), despite the threatening financial sustainability of health care systems. This paper provides a systematic literature review on PC efficiency analysis using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). We reviewed 39 DEA applications in PC, to understand how methodological frameworks impact results and influence the information provided to decision makers. Studies were combined using qualitative narrative synthesis. This paper reports data for each efficiency analysis on the: 1) evaluation context; 2) model specifications; 3) application of methods to test the robustness of findings; 4) presentation of results. Even though a consistent number of analyses aim to support policymakers and practice managers in improving the efficiency of their PC organizations, the results indicate that DEA--at least when applied to PC--is a methodology still in progress; it needs to be further advanced to meet the complexity that characterizes the production of PC outcomes. Future studies are needed to fill some gaps in this particular domain of research, such as on the standardization of methodologies and the improvement of outcome research in PC. Most importantly, further studies should include extensive uncertainty analyses and be based on good evidence-based rationales. We suggest a number of considerations to academics and researchers to foster the utility of efficiency measurement for the decision making purposes in PC.

  8. Efficiency of planetesimal ablation in giant planetary envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinhas, Arazi; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Clarke, Cathie

    2016-12-01

    Observations of exoplanetary spectra are leading to unprecedented constraints on their atmospheric elemental abundances, particularly O/H, C/H, and C/O ratios. Recent studies suggest that elemental ratios could provide important constraints on formation and migration mechanisms of giant exoplanets. A fundamental assumption in such studies is that the chemical composition of the planetary envelope represents the sum-total of compositions of the accreted gas and solids during the formation history of the planet. We investigate the efficiency with which accreted planetesimals ablate in a giant planetary envelope thereby contributing to its composition rather than sinking to the core. From considerations of aerodynamic drag causing `frictional ablation' and the envelope temperature structure causing `thermal ablation', we compute mass ablations for impacting planetesimals of radii 30 m to 1 km for different compositions (ice to iron) and a wide range of velocities and impact angles, assuming spherical symmetry. Icy impactors are fully ablated in the outer envelope for a wide range of parameters. Even for Fe impactors substantial ablation occurs in the envelope for a wide range of sizes and velocities. For example, iron impactors of sizes below ˜0.5 km and velocities above ˜30 km s-1 are found to ablate by ˜60-80 per cent within the outer envelope at pressures below 103 bar due to frictional ablation alone. For deeper pressures (˜107 bar), substantial ablation happens over a wider range of parameters. Therefore, our exploratory study suggests that atmospheric abundances of volatile elements in giant planets reflect their accretion history during formation.

  9. The dynamic nature of the nuclear envelope: lessons from closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Arnone, James T; Walters, Alison D; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosomes are encased by a dynamic nuclear envelope. In contrast to metazoans, where the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis, many fungi including budding yeast undergo "closed mitosis," where the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout the cell cycle. Consequently, during closed mitosis the nuclear envelope must expand to accommodate chromosome segregation to the two daughter cells. A recent study by Witkin et al. in budding yeast showed that if progression through mitosis is delayed, for example due to checkpoint activation, the nuclear envelope continues to expand despite the block to chromosome segregation. Moreover, this expansion occurs at a specific region of the nuclear envelope- adjacent to the nucleolus- forming an extension referred to as a "flare." These observations raise questions regarding the regulation of nuclear envelope expansion both in budding yeast and in higher eukaryotes, the mechanisms confining mitotic nuclear envelope expansion to a particular region and the possible consequences of failing to regulate nuclear envelope expansion during the cell cycle.

  10. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. G.; Markley, F. Landis

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum which the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical implementation strategies for specific wheel configurations are also considered.

  11. Intracranial treatment envelope mapping of transcranial focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.; Snell, John W.

    2012-11-01

    Presented here are the results of a volumetric, thermal treatment envelope map for transcranial focused ultrasound. The aim was to determine the treatable volume of the intracranial cavity in order to identify potential clinical applications and direct future research efforts. It was determined that thalamic targets are optimal for both transcranical MRg-FUS systems used in this work, which operate at 220 kHz and 650 kHz, respectively. It is hoped that future research efforts will focus on expanding these treatment envelopes in order to expand the possible neurosurgical applications for this technology.

  12. Planetesimal dissolution in the envelopes of the forming, giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Podolak, M.; Bodenheimer, P.; Christofferson, B.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the capacity of planetesimals to penetrate the envelopes of giant planets during their growth phase, by means of a core instability mechanism in which the growing core becomes gradually more adept in the gravitational concentration of gas from its solar nebula environment, until a runaway gas accretion occurs. If most of the accreted mass is contained in planetesimals larger that about 1 km, the critical core mass for runaway accretion will not significantly change when planetesimal dissolution is taken into account; it is accordingly suggested that giant planet envelopes should contain above-solar proportions of virtually all elements, relative to hydrogen.

  13. Role of Envelopment in the HEV Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Li, Xinlei; Feng, Zongdi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an enterically transmitted hepatotropic virus, was thought to be non-enveloped for decades. However, recent studies have revealed that the virus circulating in the patient’s blood is completely cloaked in host membranes and resistant to neutralizing antibodies. The discovery of this novel enveloped form of HEV has raised a series of questions about the fundamental biology of HEV and the way this virus, which has been understudied in the past, interacts with its host. Here, we review recent advances towards understanding this phenomenon and discuss its potential impact on various aspects of the HEV life cycle and immunity. PMID:27548201

  14. Photochemistry and molecular ions in oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, G. A.; Glassgold, A. E.; Omont, A.

    1987-01-01

    A theory for the ionization of the circumstellar envelopes around O-rich red giants is developed from the photochemical model. The main source of ionization is photoionization of H2O, OH, and C by the interstellar UV radiation field, supplemented by cosmic-ray ionization of hydrogen. Significant amounts of H3O(+) and HCO(+) are produced, with peak abundances of about 10 to the -7th at intermediate distances from the star. Although H3O(+) may be difficult to detect with current instrumentation, HCO(+) is probably detectable in nearby O-rich envelopes with large millimeter-wave telescopes.

  15. A Phase-Change Composite for Use in Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Ron S.

    1992-06-15

    The objective of this project is to develop composite thermal insulations containing phase-change materials for use in the building envelope. The use of a phase-change insulation composite in the building envelope could result in a significant increase in energy efficiency. PhD Research provided candidate phase-change composites, and ORNL performed analytical and experimental evaluations of their thermal performance. The thermal resistance of the prototype panels was somewhat less than that of commercial products, although their thermal capacity was greater. Using these results, PhD Research has been working to modify the design and to produce practical building elements that incorporate phase-change material.

  16. HIV envelope: challenges and opportunities for development of entry inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The HIV envelope proteins gp120 and gp41 play critical roles in HIV entry and thus are of extreme interest for the development of novel therapeutics. Study by diverse methods, including structural biology and mutagenesis, has resulted in a detailed model for envelope-mediated entry, which consists of multiple conformations, each a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the challenges, strategies and progress to date for developing novel entry inhibitors directed at disrupting HIV gp120 and gp41 function. PMID:21377881

  17. Selective Gammatone Envelope Feature for Robust Sound Event Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Yi Ren; Tran, Huy Dat; Kitaoka, Norihide; Li, Haizhou

    Conventional features for Automatic Speech Recognition and Sound Event Recognition such as Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs) have been shown to perform poorly in noisy conditions. We introduce an auditory feature based on the gammatone filterbank, the Selective Gammatone Envelope Feature (SGEF), for Robust Sound Event Recognition where channel selection and the filterbank envelope is used to reduce the effect of noise for specific noise environments. In the experiments with Hidden Markov Model (HMM) recognizers, we shall show that our feature outperforms MFCCs significantly in four different noisy environments at various signal-to-noise ratios.

  18. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Robert M.; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; ...

    2015-08-20

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ~700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ~40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is a pertinent step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  19. Formation of Jupiter's Core and Early Stages of Envelope Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Weidenschilling, S.; Lissauer, J. J.; Bodenheimer, P.; Hubickyj, O.

    2012-12-01

    We are performing calculations of the formation of Jupiter via core nucleated accretion and gas capture. The core starts as a seed body of a few hundred kilometers in radius and orbits within a swarm of planetesimals whose initial size distribution ranges from ~10 m to ~100 km. The planetesimals are immersed in a gaseous disk, representative of an early solar nebula. The evolution of the swarm of planetesimals accounts for collisions and gravitational stirring due to mutual interactions among bodies, and for migration and velocity damping due to interactions with the nebula gas. Collisions among planetesimals lead to growth and/or fragmentation, altering the size distribution of the swarm over time. Collisions of planetesimals with the seed body lead to its growth, resulting in the formation of a planetary core. Gas capture by the core leads to the accumulation of a tenuous atmosphere, which later becomes a massive envelope, increasing the size-dependent effective cross-section of the planet for planetesimals' accretion. Planetesimals that travel through the core's envelope release energy, affecting the thermal budget of the envelope, and deliver mass, affecting the opacity of the envelope. The calculation of dust opacity, which is especially important for envelope contraction, is performed self-consistently, accounting for coagulation and sedimentation of dust and small particles that are released in the envelope as passing planetesimals are ablated. We find that, in a disk of planetesimals with a surface density of about 10 g/cm2 at 5.2 AU, a one Earth mass core accumulates in less than 1e5 years, and that it takes over 1.5e6 years to accumulate a core of 3 Earth masses, when the core's geometrical cross-section is used for the accretion of planetesimals. Gas drag in the core's envelope increases the ability of the planet to accrete planetesimals. Smaller planetesimals are affected to a greater extent than are larger planetesimals. We find that the effective

  20. Refractive index dispersion measurement using carrier-envelope phasemeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansinger, Peter; Töpfer, Philipp; Dimitrov, Nikolay; Adolph, Daniel; Hoff, Dominik; Rathje, Tim; Sayler, A. Max; Dreischuh, Alexander; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a novel method for direct and accurate measurement of refractive index dispersion based on carrier-envelope phase detection of few-cycle laser pulses, exploiting the difference between phase and group velocity in a dispersive medium. In a layout similar to an interferometer, two carrier-envelope phasemeters are capable of measuring the dispersion of a transparent or reflective sample, where one phasemeter serves as the reference and the other records the influence of the sample. Here we report on proof-of-principle measurements that already reach relative uncertainties of a few 10‑4. Further development is expected to allow for unprecedented precision.

  1. Inhibition of connexin43 gap junction channels by the endocrine disruptor ioxynil

    SciTech Connect

    Leithe, Edward; Kjenseth, Ane; Bruun, Jarle; Sirnes, Solveig; Rivedal, Edgar

    2010-08-15

    Gap junctions are intercellular plasma membrane domains containing channels that mediate transport of ions, metabolites and small signaling molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junctions play important roles in a variety of cellular processes, including regulation of cell growth and differentiation, maintenance of tissue homeostasis and embryogenesis. The constituents of gap junction channels are a family of trans-membrane proteins called connexins, of which the best-studied is connexin43. Connexin43 functions as a tumor suppressor protein in various tissue types and is frequently dysregulated in human cancers. The pesticide ioxynil has previously been shown to act as an endocrine disrupting chemical and has multiple effects on the thyroid axis. Furthermore, both ioxynil and its derivative ioxynil octanoate have been reported to induce tumors in animal bioassays. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the possible tumorigenic effects of these compounds are unknown. In the present study we show that ioxynil and ioxynil octanoate are strong inhibitors of connexin43 gap junction channels. Both compounds induced rapid loss of connexin43 gap junctions at the plasma membrane and increased connexin43 degradation. Ioxynil octanoate, but not ioxynil, was found to be a strong activator of ERK1/2. The compounds also had different effects on the phosphorylation status of connexin43. Taken together, the data show that ioxynil and ioxynil octanoate are potent inhibitors of intercellular communication via gap junctions.

  2. Measuring the Gap

    PubMed Central

    She, Xinshu; Zhao, Deqing; Scholnick, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    China is a large country where rapid development is accompanied by growing inequalities. How economic inequalities translate to health inequalities is unknown. Baseline health assessment is lacking among rural Chinese children. We aimed at assessing baseline student health of rural Chinese children and comparing them with those of urban children of similar ages. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2003 Global School-Based Student Health Survey among 100 students Grade 4 to 6 from rural Guizhou, China. Results were summarized and compared with public data from urban Beijing using multivariate logistic regression models. Rural children are more likely to not wash their hands before a meal (odds ratio [OR] = 5.71, P < .01) and after using the toilet (OR = 5.41, P < .01). They are more likely to feel sick or to get into trouble after drinking (OR = 7.28, P < .01). They are more likely to have used drugs (OR = 8.54, P < .01) and to have no close friends (OR = 8.23, P < .01). An alarming percentage of rural (8.22%) and urban (14.22%) children have had suicidal ideation in the past year (OR = 0.68, P > .05). Rural parents are more likely to not know their children’s whereabouts (OR = 1.81, P < .05). Rural children are more than 4 times likely to have serious injuries (OR = 4.64, P < .01) and to be bullied (OR = 4.01, P < .01). In conclusion, school-age rural Chinese children exhibit more health risk behaviors and fewer protective factors at baseline compared to their urban counterparts. Any intervention aimed at improving child health should take this distributive gap into consideration. PMID:27335999

  3. GAP Analysis Bulletin Number 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, Jill; Gergely, Kevin; Aycrigg, Jocelyn; Canonico, Gabrielle; Davidson, Anne; Coffey, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    The Mission of the Gap Analysis Program (GAP) is to promote conservation by providing broad geographic information on biological diversity to resource managers, planners, and policy makers who can use the information to make informed decisions. As part of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) ?a collaborative program to provide increased access to data and information on the nation?s biological resources--GAP data and analytical tools have been used in hundreds of applications: from basic research to comprehensive state wildlife plans; from educational projects in schools to ecoregional assessments of biodiversity. The challenge: keeping common species common means protecting them BEFORE they become threatened. To do this on a state or regional basis requires key information such as land cover descriptions, predicted distribution maps for native animals, and an assessment of the level of protection currently given to those plants and animals. GAP works cooperatively with Federal, state, and local natural resource professionals and academics to provide this kind of information. GAP activities focus on the creation of state and regional databases and maps that depict patterns of land management, land cover, and biodiversity. These data can be used to identify ?gaps? in conservation--instances where an animal or plant community is not adequately represented on the existing network of conservation lands. GAP is administered through the U.S. Geological Survey. Through building partnerships among disparate groups, GAP hopes to foster the kind of collaboration that is needed to address conservation issues on a broad scale. For more information, contact: John Mosesso National GAP Director 703-648-4079 Kevin Gergely National GAP Operations Manager 208-885-3565

  4. A subdomain in the transmembrane domain is necessary for p185neu* activation.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, H; Bangalore, L; Bormann, B J; Stern, D F

    1992-01-01

    The neu proto-oncogene encodes a protein highly homologous to the epidermal growth factor receptor. The neu protein (p185) has a molecular weight of 185,000 Daltons and, like the EGF receptor, possesses tyrosine kinase activity. neu is activated in chemically induced rat neuro/glioblastomas by substitution of valine 664 with glutamic acid within the transmembrane domain. The activated neu* protein (p185*) has an elevated tyrosine kinase activity and a higher propensity to dimerize, but the mechanism of this activation is still unknown. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to explore the role of specific amino acids within the transmembrane domain in this activation. We found that the lateral position and rotational orientation of the glutamic acid in the transmembrane domain does not correlate with transformation. However, the primary structure in the vicinity of Glu664 plays a significant role in this activation. Our results suggest that the Glu664 activation involves highly specific interactions in the transmembrane domain of p185. Images PMID:1347745

  5. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory.

  6. Novel germline mutation in the transmembrane domain of HER2 in familial lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Higasa, Koichiro; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Shien, Kazuhiko; Soh, Junichi; Ichimura, Koichi; Furukawa, Masashi; Hashida, Shinsuke; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Takigawa, Nagio; Matsuo, Keitaro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    We encountered a family of Japanese descent in which multiple members developed lung cancer. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel germline mutation in the transmembrane domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene (G660D). A novel somatic mutation (V659E) was also detected in the transmembrane domain of HER2 in one of 253 sporadic lung adenocarcinomas. Because the transmembrane domain of HER2 is considered to be responsible for the dimerization and subsequent activation of the HER family and downstream signaling pathways, we performed functional analyses of these HER2 mutants. Mutant HER2 G660D and V659E proteins were more stable than wild-type protein. Both the G660D and V659E mutants activated Akt. In addition, they activated p38, which is thought to promote cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma. Our findings strongly suggest that mutations in the transmembrane domain of HER2 may be oncogenic, causing hereditary and sporadic lung adenocarcinomas.

  7. Common Extracellular Sensory Domains in Transmembrane Receptors for Diverse Signal Transduction Pathways in Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Zhulin, Igor B.; Nikolskaya, Anastasia N.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2003-01-01

    Transmembrane receptors in microorganisms, such as sensory histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, are molecular devices for monitoring environmental changes. We report here that sensory domain sharing is widespread among different classes of transmembrane receptors. We have identified two novel conserved extracellular sensory domains, named CHASE2 and CHASE3, that are found in at least four classes of transmembrane receptors: histidine kinases, adenylate cyclases, predicted diguanylate cyclases, and either serine/threonine protein kinases (CHASE2) or methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (CHASE3). Three other extracellular sensory domains were shared by at least two different classes of transmembrane receptors: histidine kinases and either diguanylate cyclases, adenylate cyclases, or phosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that microorganisms use similar conserved domains to sense similar environmental signals and transmit this information via different signal transduction pathways to different regulatory circuits: transcriptional regulation (histidine kinases), chemotaxis (methyl-accepting proteins), catabolite repression (adenylate cyclases), and modulation of enzyme activity (diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases). The variety of signaling pathways using the CHASE-type domains indicates that these domains sense some critically important extracellular signals. PMID:12486065

  8. Detergent properties influence the stability of the glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer in lysophosphatidylcholine micelles.

    PubMed

    Stangl, Michael; Veerappan, Anbazhagan; Kroeger, Anja; Vogel, Peter; Schneider, Dirk

    2012-12-19

    Detergents might affect membrane protein structures by promoting intramolecular interactions that are different from those found in native membrane bilayers, and fine-tuning detergent properties can be crucial for obtaining structural information of intact and functional transmembrane proteins. To systematically investigate the influence of the detergent concentration and acyl-chain length on the stability of a transmembrane protein structure, the stability of the human glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer has been analyzed in lyso-phosphatidylcholine micelles of different acyl-chain length. While our results indicate that the transmembrane protein is destabilized in detergents with increasing chain-length, the diameter of the hydrophobic micelle core was found to be less crucial. Thus, hydrophobic mismatch appears to be less important in detergent micelles than in lipid bilayers and individual detergent molecules appear to be able to stretch within a micelle to match the hydrophobic thickness of the peptide. However, the stability of the GpA TM helix dimer linearly depends on the aggregation number of the lyso-PC detergents, indicating that not only is the chemistry of the detergent headgroup and acyl-chain region central for classifying a detergent as harsh or mild, but the detergent aggregation number might also be important.

  9. Helix packing in polytopic membrane proteins: role of glycine in transmembrane helix association.

    PubMed Central

    Javadpour, M M; Eilers, M; Groesbeek, M; Smith, S O

    1999-01-01

    The nature and distribution of amino acids in the helix interfaces of four polytopic membrane proteins (cytochrome c oxidase, bacteriorhodopsin, the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and the potassium channel of Streptomyces lividans) are studied to address the role of glycine in transmembrane helix packing. In contrast to soluble proteins where glycine is a noted helix breaker, the backbone dihedral angles of glycine in transmembrane helices largely fall in the standard alpha-helical region of a Ramachandran plot. An analysis of helix packing reveals that glycine residues in the transmembrane region of these proteins are predominantly oriented toward helix-helix interfaces and have a high occurrence at helix crossing points. Moreover, packing voids are generally not formed at the position of glycine in folded protein structures. This suggests that transmembrane glycine residues mediate helix-helix interactions in polytopic membrane proteins in a fashion similar to that seen in oligomers of membrane proteins with single membrane-spanning helices. The picture that emerges is one where glycine residues serve as molecular notches for orienting multiple helices in a folded protein complex. PMID:10465772

  10. L-selectin transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains are monomeric in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Deng, Wei; Li, Renhao

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant protein termed CLS, which corresponds to the C-terminal portion of human L-selectin and contains its entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains (residues Ser473-Arg542), has been produced and its oligomeric state in detergents characterized. CLS migrates in the SDS polyacrylamide gel at a pace that is typically expected from a complex twice of its molecular weight. Additional studies revealed however that this is due to residues in the cytoplasmic domain, as mutations in this region or its deletion significantly increased the electrophoretic rate of CLS. Analytical ultracentrifugation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies indicated that CLS reconstituted in dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles is monomeric. When the transmembrane domain of L-selectin is inserted into the inner membrane of Escherichia coli as a part of a chimeric protein in the TOXCAT assay, little oligomerization of the chimeric protein is observed. Overall, these results suggest that transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin lack the propensity to self-associate in membranes, in contrast to the previously documented dimerization of the transmembrane domain of closely related P-selectin. This study will provide constraints for future investigations on the interaction of L-selectin and its associating proteins. PMID:21316337

  11. Interfacial Interaction between Transmembrane Ocular Mucins and Adhesive Polymers and Dendrimers Analyzed by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Noiray, M.; Briand, E.; Woodward, A. M.; Argüeso, P.; Molina Martínez, I. T.; Herrero-Vanrell, R.; Ponchel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Development of the first in vitro method based on biosensor chip technology designed for probing the interfacial interaction phenomena between transmembrane ocular mucins and adhesive polymers and dendrimers intended for ophthalmic administration. Methods The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used. A transmembrane ocular mucin surface was prepared on the chip surface and characterized by QCM-D (Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The mucoadhesive molecules tested were: hyaluronic acid (HA), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), chitosan (Ch) and polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM). Results While Ch originated interfacial interaction with ocular transmembrane mucins, for HA, CMC and HPMC, chain interdiffusion seemed to be mandatory for bioadherence at the concentrations used in ophthalmic clinical practise. Interestingly, PAMAM dendrimers developed permanent interfacial interactions with transmembrane ocular mucins whatever their surface chemical groups, showing a relevant importance of co-operative effect of these multivalent systems. Polymers developed interfacial interactions with ocular membrane-associated mucins in the following order: Ch(1 %) > G4PAMAM-NH2(2 %) = G4PAMAM-OH(2 %) > G3.5PAMAM-COOH(2 %)≫ CMC(0.5 %) = HA(0.2 %) = HPMC(0.3 %). Conclusions The method proposed is useful to discern between the mucin-polymer chemical interactions at molecular scale. Results reinforce the usefulness of chitosan and den-drimers as polymers able to increase the retention time of drugs on the ocular surface and hence their bioavailability. PMID:22565639

  12. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... default assumptions for computing the Design Energy Consumption. The solar absorptivity of opaque elements... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH...

  13. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... default assumptions for computing the Design Energy Consumption. The solar absorptivity of opaque elements... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH...

  14. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... default assumptions for computing the Design Energy Consumption. The solar absorptivity of opaque elements... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH...

  15. Use and interpretation of climate envelope models: a practical guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watling, James I.; Brandt, Laura A.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Romañach, Stephanie S.

    2013-01-01

    This guidebook is intended to provide a practical overview of climate envelope modeling for conservation professionals and natural resource managers. The material is intended for people with little background or experience in climate envelope modeling who want to better understand and interpret models developed by others and the results generated by such models, or want to do some modeling themselves. This is not an exhaustive review of climate envelope modeling, but rather a brief introduction to some key concepts in the discipline. Readers interested in a more in-depth treatment of much of the material presented here are referred to an excellent book, Mapping Species Distributions: Spatial Inference and Prediction by Janet Franklin. Also, a recent review (Araújo & Peterson 2012) provides an excellent, though more technical, discussion of many of the issues dealt with here. Here we treat selected topics from a practical perspective, using minimal jargon to explain and illustrate some of the many issues that one has to be aware of when using climate envelope models. When we do introduce specialized terminology in the guidebook, we bold the term when it is first used; a glossary of these terms is included at the back of the guidebook.

  16. Preparation of privatization samples for envelopes `A` and `C`

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    As part of the TWRS Privatization process, the DOE has committed to provide each of the two contractors who submitted successful bids with ten 125 mL samples of Hanford tank waste meeting chemical and radionuclide criteria specified as Waste Envelope A, B, and C. This test plan describes how the samples will be prepared before shipment.

  17. 10 CFR 434.402 - Building envelope assemblies and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Design Requirements-Electric Systems and Equipment... Information. 402.1.1Material Properties. Information on thermal properties, building envelope system... RS-10 (incorporated by reference, see § 434.701). 402.2.1Air Barrier System. A barrier...

  18. 10 CFR 434.402 - Building envelope assemblies and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Design Requirements-Electric Systems and Equipment... Information. 402.1.1Material Properties. Information on thermal properties, building envelope system... RS-10 (incorporated by reference, see § 434.701). 402.2.1Air Barrier System. A barrier...

  19. New tools for the analysis and design of building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Papamichael, K.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Buhl, W.F.; Chauvet, H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe the integrated development of PowerDOE, a new version of the DOE-2 building energy analysis program, and the Building Design Advisor (BDA), a multimedia-based design tool that assists building designers with the concurrent consideration of multiple design solutions with respect to multiple design criteria. PowerDOE has a windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that makes it easier to use than DOE-2, while retaining DOE-2`s calculation power and accuracy. BDA, with a similar GUI, is designed to link to multiple analytical models and databases. In its first release it is linked to PowerDOE and a Daylighting Analysis Module, as well as to a Case Studies Database and a Schematic Graphic Editor. These allow building designers to set performance goals and address key building envelope parameters from the initial, schematic phases of building design to the detailed specification of building components and systems required by PowerDOE. The consideration of the thermal performance of building envelopes through PowerDOE and BDA is integrated with non-thermal envelope performance aspects, such as daylighting, as well as with the performance of non-envelope building components and systems, such as electric lighting and HVAC. Future versions of BDA will support links to CAD and electronic product catalogs, as well as provide context-dependent design advice to improve performance.

  20. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of... following power failure, the range of heights and its variation with forward speed must be...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of... following power failure, the range of heights and its variation with forward speed must be...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of... following power failure, the range of heights and its variation with forward speed must be...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of... following power failure, the range of heights and its variation with forward speed must be...

  4. Neural coding of sound envelope in reverberant environments.

    PubMed

    Slama, Michaël C C; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2015-03-11

    Speech reception depends critically on temporal modulations in the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. Reverberation encountered in everyday environments can substantially attenuate these modulations. To assess the effect of reverberation on the neural coding of amplitude envelope, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of unanesthetized rabbit using sinusoidally amplitude modulated (AM) broadband noise stimuli presented in simulated anechoic and reverberant environments. Although reverberation degraded both rate and temporal coding of AM in IC neurons, in most neurons, the degradation in temporal coding was smaller than the AM attenuation in the stimulus. This compensation could largely be accounted for by the compressive shape of the modulation input-output function (MIOF), which describes the nonlinear transformation of modulation depth from acoustic stimuli into neural responses. Additionally, in a subset of neurons, the temporal coding of AM was better for reverberant stimuli than for anechoic stimuli having the same modulation depth at the ear. Using hybrid anechoic stimuli that selectively possess certain properties of reverberant sounds, we show that this reverberant advantage is not caused by envelope distortion, static interaural decorrelation, or spectral coloration. Overall, our results suggest that the auditory system may possess dual mechanisms that make the coding of amplitude envelope relatively robust in reverberation: one general mechanism operating for all stimuli with small modulation depths, and another mechanism dependent on very specific properties of reverberant stimuli, possibly the periodic fluctuations in interaural correlation at the modulation frequency.

  5. Modification of selected South Carolina bridge-scour envelope curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2012-01-01

    Historic scour was investigated at 231 bridges in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces of South Carolina by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation. These investigations led to the development of field-derived envelope curves that provided supplementary tools to assess the potential for scour at bridges in South Carolina for selected scour components that included clear-water abutment, contraction, and pier scour, and live-bed pier and contraction scour. The envelope curves consist of a single curve with one explanatory variable encompassing all of the measured field data for the respective scour components. In the current investigation, the clear-water abutment-scour and live-bed contraction-scour envelope curves were modified to include a family of curves that utilized two explanatory variables, providing a means to further refine the assessment of scour potential for those specific scour components. The modified envelope curves and guidance for their application are presented in this report.

  6. Spectral Envelopes and Additive + Residual Analysis/Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodet, Xavier; Schwarz, Diemo

    The subject of this chapter is the estimation, representation, modification, and use of spectral envelopes in the context of sinusoidal-additive-plus-residual analysis/synthesis. A spectral envelope is an amplitude-vs-frequency function, which may be obtained from the envelope of a short-time spectrum (Rodet et al., 1987; Schwarz, 1998). [Precise definitions of such an envelope and short-time spectrum (STS) are given in Section 2.] The additive-plus-residual analysis/synthesis method is based on a representation of signals in terms of a sum of time-varying sinusoids and of a non-sinusoidal residual signal [e.g., see Serra (1989), Laroche et al. (1993), McAulay and Quatieri (1995), and Ding and Qian (1997)]. Many musical sound signals may be described as a combination of a nearly periodic waveform and colored noise. The nearly periodic part of the signal can be viewed as a sum of sinusoidal components, called partials, with time-varying frequency and amplitude. Such sinusoidal components are easily observed on a spectral analysis display (Fig. 5.1) as obtained, for instance, from a discrete Fourier transform.

  7. Modeling of heat and mass transfer in lateritic building envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meukam, Pierre; Noumowe, Albert

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the behavior of building envelopes made of local lateritic soil bricks subjected to different climatic conditions. The building envelopes studied in this work consist of lateritic soil bricks with incorporation of natural pozzolan or sawdust in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. In order to describe coupled heat and moisture transfer in wet porous materials, the coupled equations were solved by the introduction of diffusion coefficients. A numerical model HMtrans, developed for prediction of heat and moisture transfer in multi-layered building components, was used to simulate the temperature, water content and relative humidity profiles within the building envelopes. The results allow the prediction of the duration of the exposed building walls to the local weather conditions. They show that the durability of building envelopes made of lateritic soil bricks with incorporation of natural pozzolan or sawdust is not strongly affected by the climatic conditions in tropical and equatorial areas.

  8. Nuclear envelope reformation and chromosome decondensation are dissociable events.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Paweletz, N; Armas-Portela, R

    1988-06-01

    Cells treated with 2,4-dinitrophenol, a metabolic inhibitor, show a strong retardation of anaphase movement. At the ultrastructural level these cells reveal nuclear envelope reformation without concurrent decondensation of the chromosomes which indicates that these are possibly two dissociable late mitotic events.

  9. COMMON ENVELOPE EVOLUTION LEADING TO SUPERNOVAE WITH DENSE INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.

    2012-06-10

    A variety of supernova events, including Type IIn supernovae and ultraluminous supernovae, appear to have lost up to solar masses of their envelopes in tens to hundreds of years leading up to the explosion. In order to explain the close timing of the mass loss and supernova events, we explore the possibility that the mass loss is driven by common envelope evolution of a compact object (neutron star or black hole) in the envelope of a massive star and the supernova is triggered by the inspiral of the compact object to the central core of the companion star. The expected rate of such events is smaller than the observed rate of Type IIn supernovae but the rates may agree within the uncertainties. The mass loss velocity is related to the escape velocity from the common envelope system and is comparable to the observed velocity of hundreds of kilometers per second in Type IIn events. The mass loss is expected to be denser near the equatorial plane of the binary system and there is good evidence that the circumstellar media in Type IIn supernovae are asymmetric. Some of these supernova types show evidence for energies in excess of the canonical 10{sup 51} erg, which might be the result of explosions from rapid accretion onto a compact object through a disk.

  10. Effects of masker envelope coherence on intensity discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W.

    2009-01-01

    Masked detection threshold for a pure tone signal depends on the coherence of masker envelope fluctuation across frequency, with lower thresholds for coherent fluctuation under some conditions. The benefit of coherent masker modulation is larger for detection than for suprathreshold tasks, such as pure tone intensity discrimination [Hall, J. W. and Grose, J. H. (1995). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 847–852]. In the present study, sensitivity to increments in signal intensity was measured for a 1000-Hz signal, either a tone or a 20-Hz-wide narrowband noise. In one set of conditions the masker was one or more bands of noise, each 20 Hz wide, and in another set of conditions the masker was a single 1620-Hz-wide band of Gaussian noise or noise multiplied by the envelope of a 20-Hz bandpass noise. Coherent masker envelope fluctuation improved detection thresholds in all conditions. Intensity discrimination for a tonal standard in comodulated noise was elevated for standard levels near detection threshold and improved with increasing signal-to-noise ratio, whereas performance was uniformly poor across level for the noise standard. Results are most consistent with the interpretation that the reduced benefit of coherent masker modulation in suprathreshold intensity discrimination is due to the disruptive effects of envelope fluctuation. PMID:19894827

  11. Arms Race between Enveloped Viruses and the Host ERAD Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Frabutt, Dylan A.; Zheng, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Enveloped viruses represent a significant category of pathogens that cause serious diseases in animals. These viruses express envelope glycoproteins that are singularly important during the infection of host cells by mediating fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes. Despite low homology at protein levels, three classes of viral fusion proteins have, as of yet, been identified based on structural similarities. Their incorporation into viral particles is dependent upon their proper sub-cellular localization after being expressed and folded properly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, viral protein expression can cause stress in the ER, and host cells respond to alleviate the ER stress in the form of the unfolded protein response (UPR); the effects of which have been observed to potentiate or inhibit viral infection. One important arm of UPR is to elevate the capacity of the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, which is comprised of host quality control machinery that ensures proper protein folding. In this review, we provide relevant details regarding viral envelope glycoproteins, UPR, ERAD, and their interactions in host cells. PMID:27657106

  12. Infalling Envelopes and Pre-Main Sequence Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the observed infrared emission of young stellar objects, and explore the implications of this emission for the evolution of dusty envelopes and circumstellar disks. We are using sophisticated radiative transfer methods to compare models with observations, thereby making critical tests of the standard picture of low-mass star formation.

  13. Envelopment technique and topographic overlays in bite mark analysis

    PubMed Central

    Djeapragassam, Parimala; Daniel, Mariappan Jonathan; Srinivasan, Subramanian Vasudevan; Ramadoss, Koliyan; Jimsha, Vannathan Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aims and objectives of our study were to compare four sequential overlays generated using the envelopment technique and to evaluate inter- and intraoperator reliability of the overlays obtained by the envelopment technique. Materials and Methods: Dental stone models were prepared from impressions made from healthy individuals; photographs were taken and computer-assisted overlays were generated. The models were then enveloped in a different-color dental stone. After this, four sequential cuts were made at a thickness of 1mm each. Each sectional cut was photographed and overlays were generated. Thus, 125 overlays were generated and compared. Results: The scoring was done based on matching accuracy and the data were analyzed. The Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used to compare four sequential overlays and Spearman's rank correlation tests were used to evaluate the inter- and intraoperator reliability of the overlays obtained by the envelopment technique. Conclusion: Through our study, we conclude that the third and fourth cuts were the best among the four cuts and inter- and intraoperator reliability were found to be statistically significant at 5% level that is 95% confidence interval (P < 0.05). PMID:26816458

  14. Causes and consequences of nuclear envelope alterations in tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Bell, Emily S; Lammerding, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Morphological changes in the size and shape of the nucleus are highly prevalent in cancer, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and the functional relevance remain poorly understood. Nuclear envelope proteins, which can modulate nuclear shape and organization, have emerged as key components in a variety of signalling pathways long implicated in tumourigenesis and metastasis. The expression of nuclear envelope proteins is altered in many cancers, and changes in levels of nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C are associated with poor prognosis in multiple human cancers. In this review we highlight the role of the nuclear envelope in different processes important for tumour initiation and cancer progression, with a focus on lamins A and C. Lamin A/C controls many cellular processes with key roles in cancer, including cell invasion, stemness, genomic stability, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, and resistance to mechanical stress. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms mediating the changes in lamin levels observed in many cancers. A better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships between lamin expression and tumour progression could reveal important mechanisms for coordinated regulation of oncogenic processes, and indicate therapeutic vulnerabilities that could be exploited for improved patient outcome.

  15. The Two Envelope Problem: There Is No Conundrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, S. L.; O'Brien, S. B. G.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the famous two envelope conundrum and show, in a very simple way, that there is no conundrum. Our discussion is supported by numerical simulations. We use the problem to raise the issue of disputes in mathematics, rarely touched upon in mathematics education. We suggest that it is worthwhile to expose students of mathematics to such…

  16. Edge envelope equation for a ballistically focused neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1980-11-01

    An envelope equation for a cold ion beam with overall charge and current neutralization provided by a coflowing electron gas obeying an adiabatic equation of state is derived. The derivation assumes the beam evolves self-similarly with the ion at the edge of a uniform density ion profile. Numerical and approximate analytical solutions are calculated.

  17. Species-Specific Activity of HIV-1 Vpu and Positive Selection of Tetherin Transmembrane Domain Variants

    PubMed Central

    McNatt, Matthew W.; Zang, Trinity; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bartlett, Mackenzie; Fofana, Ismael Ben; Johnson, Welkin E.; Neil, Stuart J. D.; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh), African green monkeys (agm) and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins. PMID:19214216

  18. Structural implications of a Val-->Glu mutation in transmembrane peptides from the EGF receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, S; Grant, C W; Barber, K R; Giusti, J; Morrow, M R

    2001-01-01

    Certain specific point mutations within the transmembrane domains of class I receptor tyrosine kinases are known to induce altered behavior in the host cell. An internally controlled pair of peptides containing the transmembrane portion of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (ErbB-1) was examined in fluid, fully hydrated lipid bilayers by wide-line 2H-NMR for insight into the physical basis of this effect. One member of the pair encompassed the native transmembrane sequence from ErbB-1, while in the other the valine residue at position 627 was replaced by glutamic acid to mimic a substitution that produces a transformed phenotype in cells. Heteronuclear probes having a defined relationship to the peptide backbone were incorporated by deuteration of the methyl side chains of natural alanine residues. 2H-NMR spectra were recorded in the range 35 degrees C to 65 degrees C in membranes composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine. Narrowed spectral components arising from species rotating rapidly and symmetrically within the membrane persisted to very high temperature and appeared to represent monomeric peptide. Probes at positions 623 and 629 within the EGF receptor displayed changes in quadrupole splitting when Val(627) was replaced by Glu, while probes downstream at position 637 were relatively unaffected. The results demonstrate a measurable spatial reorientation in the region of the 5-amino acid motif (residues 624-628) often suggested to be involved in side-to-side interactions of the receptor transmembrane domain. Spectral changes induced by the Val-->Glu mutation in ErbB-1 were smaller than those induced by the analogous oncogenic mutation in the homologous human receptor, ErbB-2 (Sharpe, S., K. R. Barber, and C. W. M. Grant. 2000. Biochemistry. 39:6572-6580). Quadrupole splittings at probe sites examined were only modestly sensitive to temperature, suggesting that each transmembrane peptide behaved as a motionally ordered unit possessing

  19. Detergent-mediated incorporation of transmembrane proteins in giant unilamellar vesicles with controlled physiological contents.

    PubMed

    Dezi, Manuela; Di Cicco, Aurelie; Bassereau, Patricia; Lévy, Daniel

    2013-04-30

    Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are convenient biomimetic systems of the same size as cells that are increasingly used to quantitatively address biophysical and biochemical processes related to cell functions. However, current approaches to incorporate transmembrane proteins in the membrane of GUVs are limited by the amphiphilic nature or proteins. Here, we report a method to incorporate transmembrane proteins in GUVs, based on concepts developed for detergent-mediated reconstitution in large unilamellar vesicles. Reconstitution is performed either by direct incorporation from proteins purified in detergent micelles or by fusion of purified native vesicles or proteoliposomes in preformed GUVs. Lipid compositions of the membrane and the ionic, protein, or DNA compositions in the internal and external volumes of GUVs can be controlled. Using confocal microscopy and functional assays, we show that proteins are unidirectionally incorporated in the GUVs and keep their functionality. We have successfully tested our method with three types of transmembrane proteins. GUVs containing bacteriorhodopsin, a photoactivable proton pump, can generate large transmembrane pH and potential gradients that are light-switchable and stable for hours. GUVs with FhuA, a bacterial porin, were used to follow the DNA injection by T5 phage upon binding to its transmembrane receptor. GUVs incorporating BmrC/BmrD, a bacterial heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter, were used to demonstrate the protein-dependent translocation of drugs and their interactions with encapsulated DNA. Our method should thus apply to a wide variety of membrane or peripheral proteins for producing more complex biomimetic GUVs.

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of the C-terminal Transmembrane Region of NBCe1-A*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO3− transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala800–Lys967. Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met858 accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr926–Ala929 only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met813–Gly828) region and a cryptic (Met887–Arg904) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp960. Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro868–Leu967 (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1. PMID:20837482

  1. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    PubMed

    McNatt, Matthew W; Zang, Trinity; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bartlett, Mackenzie; Fofana, Ismael Ben; Johnson, Welkin E; Neil, Stuart J D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2009-02-01

    Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh), African green monkeys (agm) and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  2. Dynamic Flight Envelope Assessment with Flight Safety Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandita, Rohit

    Aircraft have a manufacturer prescribed operating flight envelope for safe operation, exceeding these limits can result in unrecoverable departures or even structural failure. Numerous commercial aircraft accidents in the past have been attributed to loss-of-control (LOC) resulting from exceeding the safe operating flight envelope. Hence, real-time knowledge of the safe operating flight envelope is essential for safe flight operation, a problem known as dynamic flight envelope assessment. This dissertation explores dynamic flight envelope assessment from a control theoretic perspective. Two notions of the flight envelope, namely, the reachable sets and the region-of-attraction analysis are investigated. The NASA generic transport model (GTM) aircraft dynamics is used as an application problem. Linear and nonlinear techniques for flight envelope assessment are formulated in the linear matrix inequality (LMI) and sum-of-squares (SOS) framework, respectively. LMI and SOS problems are computationally tractable convex optimization problems for which many semi-definite programming solvers are available. This thesis also investigated fault detection and isolation strategies. Commercial jet transport aircrafts make extensive use of active controls. Faults or failures in the flight control system (FCS) elements like sensors or control effectors can lead to catastrophic failure. Model-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) filters can provide analytical redundancy by reliably detecting such faults in the system. Practical application of model-based FDI filters is limited so far due to poor performance, false alarms and missed detection arising out of uncertain dynamics of the aircraft, effect of nonlinearities in the system and the influence of closed-loop controllers. An application of closed-loop metrics to assess worst case FDI filter performance in the presence of a controller and uncertain dynamics is presented. Longitudinal GTM dynamics are considered. An Hinfinity

  3. Differentiation and ultrastructure of oncospheral and uterine envelopes in the nematotaeniid cestode, Nematotaenia dispar (Goeze, 1782).

    PubMed

    Swiderski, Z; Tkach, V

    1997-09-01

    The oncospheral envelopes of infective eggs in Nematotaenia dispar include the outer envelope with 2 sublayers, the inner envelope with a fibrillar embryophore and 2 cytoplasmic sublayers, and the oncospheral membrane. They differentiate from 3 primary embryonic envelopes, capsule, outer and inner envelope. The uterine envelopes are formed around the early embryos by processes of uterine epithelial cells, which surround the capsules. They degenerate rapidly in later stages; however, some structural components of the uterine envelopes were still visible in gravid proglottids as flattened perikarya with pyknotic, lobate nuclei, residual membranous structures and cellular debris situated usually between eggs. The following ultrastructural features of oncospheral envelopes differentiation appear to be characteristic for N. dispar: (1) lack of the outer capsule or shell in the fully mature eggs; (2) bi-layered structure of the outer envelope and tri-layered structure of the inner envelope; (3) absence of hook region membrane resulting probably from its early disintegration; (4) presence of small vesicles or "pits" incorporated into the inner envelope plasma membrane; (5) presence of densely packed microtubules in the external layer of the inner envelope; (6) changes in number of mitochondria and free ribosomes in the external and internal layers of inner envelope during egg maturation; and (7) probable "passage" of mitochondria and free ribosomes through the embryophoral pores in the developing eggs.

  4. Mycobacterium marinum MMAR_2380, a predicted transmembrane acyltransferase, is essential for the presence of the mannose cap on lipoarabinomannan.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Nicole N; Stoop, Esther J M; Ummels, Roy; Gurcha, Sudagur S; Mishra, Arun K; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Nigou, Jérôme; Gilleron, Martine; Puzo, Germain; Maaskant, Janneke J; Sparrius, Marion; Besra, Gurdyal S; Bitter, Wilbert; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Appelmelk, Ben J

    2010-11-01

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is a major glycolipid in the mycobacterial cell envelope. LAM consists of a mannosylphosphatidylinositol (MPI) anchor, a mannan core and a branched arabinan domain. The termini of the arabinan branches can become substituted with one to three α(1→2)-linked mannosyl residues, the mannose cap, producing ManLAM. ManLAM has been associated with a range of different immunomodulatory properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection of the host. In some of these effects, the presence of the mannose cap on ManLAM appears to be crucial for its activity. So far, in the biosynthesis of the mannose cap on ManLAM, two enzymes have been reported to be involved: a mannosyltransferase that adds the first mannosyl residue of the mannose caps to the arabinan domain of LAM, and another mannosyltransferase that elongates the mannose cap up to three mannosyl residues. Here, we report that a third gene is involved, MMAR_2380, which is the Mycobacterium marinum orthologue of Rv1565c. MMAR_2380 encodes a predicted transmembrane acyltransferase. In M. marinum ΔMMAR_2380, the LAM arabinan domain is still intact, but the mutant LAM lacks the mannose cap. Additional effects of mutation of MMAR_2380 on LAM were observed: a higher degree of branching of both the arabinan domain and the mannan core, and a decreased incorporation of [1,2-(14)C]acetate into the acyl chains in mutant LAM as compared with the wild-type form. This latter effect was also observed for related lipoglycans, i.e. lipomannan (LM) and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (PIMs). Furthermore, the mutant strain showed increased aggregation in liquid cultures as compared with the wild-type strain. All phenotypic traits of M. marinum ΔMMAR_2380, the deficiency in the mannose cap on LAM and changes at the cell surface, could be reversed by complementing the mutant strain with MMAR_2380. Strikingly, membrane preparations of the mutant strain still showed enzymic activity for the arabinan mannose

  5. Variable Constraints on the Principal Immunodominant Domain of the Transmembrane Glycoprotein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Merat, Rastine; Raoul, Herve; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Sonigo, Pierre; Pancino, Gianfranco

    1999-01-01

    Lentiviruses have in their transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) a highly immunogenic structure referred to as the principal immunodominant domain (PID). The PID forms a loop of 5 to 7 amino acids between two conserved cysteines. Previous studies showed that envelope (Env) glycoprotein functions of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) could be retained after extensive mutation of the PID loop sequence, in spite of its high conservation. In order to compare Env function in different lentiviruses, either random mutations were introduced in the PID loop sequence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) or the entire HIV-1 PID loop was replaced by the corresponding PID loop of FIV or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 ADA Env, mutations impaired the processing of the gp160 Env precursor, thereby abolishing viral infectivity. However, 6 of the 108 random Env mutants that were screened retained the capacity to induce cell membrane fusion. The SIV and FIV sequences and five random mutations were then introduced in the context of T-cell-line-adapted HIV-1 LAI which, although phenotypically distant from HIV-1 ADA, has an identical PID loop sequence. In contrast to the situation for HIV-1 ADA mutants, the cleavage of the Env precursor was unaffected in most HIV-1 LAI mutants. Such mutations, however, resulted in increased shedding of the gp120 surface glycoprotein (SU) from the gp41 TM. The HIV-1 LAI Env mutants showed high fusogenic efficiency. Three Env mutants retained the capacity to mediate virus entry in target cells, although less efficiently than the wild-type Env, and allowed the reconstitution of infectious molecular clones. These results indicated that in HIV-1, like FIV, the conserved PID sequence can be changed without impairing Env function. However, functional constraints on the PID of HIV-1 vary depending on the structural context of Env, presumably in relation to the role of the PID in the interaction of the SU and TM subunits

  6. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, Karl T.; King, Edward L.; Follstaedt, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment.

  7. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, K.T.; King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment. 6 figs.

  8. Envelope Glycoprotein Incorporation, Not Shedding of Surface Envelope Glycoprotein (gp120/SU), Is the Primary Determinant of SU Content of Purified Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chertova, Elena; Bess, Jr., Julian W.; Crise, Bruce J.; Sowder II, Raymond C.; Schaden, Terra M.; Hilburn, Joanne M.; Hoxie, James A.; Benveniste, Raoul E.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Henderson, Louis E.; Arthur, Larry O.

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles typically contain small amounts of the surface envelope protein (SU), and this is widely believed to be due to shedding of SU from mature virions. We purified proteins from HIV-1 and SIV isolates using procedures which allow quantitative measurements of viral protein content and determination of the ratios of gag- and env-encoded proteins in virions. All of the HIV-1 and most of the SIV isolates examined contained low levels of envelope proteins, with Gag:Env ratios of approximately 60:1. Based on an estimate of 1,200 to 2,500 Gag molecules per virion, this corresponds to an average of between 21 and 42 SU molecules, or between 7 and 14 trimers, per particle. In contrast, some SIV isolates contained levels of SU at least 10-fold greater than SU from HIV-1 isolates. Quantification of relative amounts of SU and transmembrane envelope protein (TM) provides a means to assess the impact of SU shedding on virion SU content, since such shedding would be expected to result in a molar excess of TM over SU on virions that had shed SU. With one exception, viruses with sufficient SU and TM to allow quantification were found to have approximately equivalent molar amounts of SU and TM. The quantity of SU associated with virions and the SU:TM ratios were not significantly changed during multiple freeze-thaw cycles or purification through sucrose gradients. Exposure of purified HIV-1 and SIV to temperatures of 55°C or greater for 1 h resulted in loss of most of the SU from the virus but retention of TM. Incubation of purified virus with soluble CD4 at 37°C resulted in no appreciable loss of SU from either SIV or HIV-1. These results indicate that the association of SU and TM on the purified virions studied is quite stable. These findings suggest that incorporation of SU-TM complexes into the viral membrane may be the primary factor determining the quantity of SU associated with SIV and

  9. Antigenic Properties of the HIV Envelope on Virions in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Lewis, George K.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The structural flexibility found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoproteins creates a complex relationship between antigenicity and sensitivity to antiviral antibodies. The study of this issue in the context of viral particles is particularly problematic as conventional virus capture approaches can perturb antigenicity profiles. Here, we employed a unique analytical system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which measures antibody-virion binding with all reactants continuously in solution. Panels of nine anti-envelope monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and five virus types were used to connect antibody binding profiles with neutralizing activities. Anti-gp120 MAbs against the 2G12 or b12 epitope, which marks functional envelope structures, neutralized viruses expressing CCR5-tropic envelopes and exhibited efficient virion binding in solution. MAbs against CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes considered hidden on functional envelope structures poorly bound these viruses and were not neutralizing. Anti-gp41 MAb 2F5 was neutralizing despite limited virion binding. Similar antigenicity patterns occurred on CXCR4-tropic viruses, except that anti-CD4i MAbs 17b and 19e were neutralizing despite little or no virion binding. Notably, anti-gp120 MAb PG9 and anti-gp41 MAb F240 bound to both CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic viruses without exerting neutralizing activity. Differences in the virus production system altered the binding efficiencies of some antibodies but did not enhance antigenicity of aberrant gp120 structures. Of all viruses tested, only JRFL pseudoviruses showed a direct relationship between MAb binding efficiency and neutralizing potency. Collectively, these data indicate that the antigenic profiles of free HIV particles generally favor the exposure of functional over aberrant gp120 structures. However, the efficiency of virion-antibody interactions in solution inconsistently predicts neutralizing activity in vitro. PMID:24284318

  10. Metal cladding envelope problems, retrofit solutions, and quality control investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    1992-04-01

    This paper deals with a case study of a building envelope retrofit of an insulated sheet steel and corrugated metal clad building. The building in discussion is a satellite testing facility which requires specific clean room conditions with controlled interior temperature (22 degree(s)C +/- 1 degree(s)C) and high relative humidity conditions (45% +/- 3%) to facilitate satellite testing programs. Preliminary mechanical system inspections indicated substantial increase in air intake to make up for air leakage losses. An infrared inspection along with an approximate air leakage test of the building envelope was requested by the client to determine the magnitude of the building envelope problem. This investigation concluded that significant air leakage was present throughout the building envelope and that existing mechanical systems did not have sufficient capacity to pressurize the building and negate wind and stack effect. Exfiltration particularly through openings on the top sections of the building were causing interior moisture to saturate wall insulation and render it ineffective. Concern for rusting of metal components was indicated. The subsequent envelope analysis discovered a number of typical metal building details that led to poor air tightness and wall insulation ineffectiveness. These were correlated to infrared investigation data. The retrofit solutions produced for this building not only apply to this building but to other similar building types. Further investigations indicated that air leakage and mechanical system performance were significant problems with buildings using metal cladding systems comparable to this building. Quality control before, during and after construction was identified as an important function of the architectural commissioning of the retrofit work and infrared investigations were used to verify locations of air leakage and insulation effectiveness.

  11. FILAMENTARY STAR FORMATION: OBSERVING THE EVOLUTION TOWARD FLATTENED ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Katherine; Looney, Leslie; Johnstone, Doug; Tobin, John E-mail: lwl@illinois.edu E-mail: jtobin@nrao.edu

    2012-12-20

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous from large-scale molecular clouds (a few parsecs) to small-scale circumstellar envelopes around Class 0 sources ({approx}1000 AU to {approx}0.1 pc). In particular, recent observations with the Herschel Space Observatory emphasize the importance of large-scale filaments (a few parsecs) and star formation. The small-scale flattened envelopes around Class 0 sources are reminiscent of the large-scale filaments. We propose an observationally derived scenario for filamentary star formation that describes the evolution of filaments as part of the process for formation of cores and circumstellar envelopes. If such a scenario is correct, small-scale filamentary structures (0.1 pc in length) with higher densities embedded in starless cores should exist, although to date almost all the interferometers have failed to observe such structures. We perform synthetic observations of filaments at the prestellar stage by modeling the known Class 0 flattened envelope in L1157 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We show that with reasonable estimates for the column density through the flattened envelope, the CARMA D array at 3 mm wavelengths is not able to detect such filamentary structure, so previous studies would not have detected them. However, the substructures may be detected with the CARMA D+E array at 3 mm and the CARMA E array at 1 mm as a result of more appropriate resolution and sensitivity. ALMA is also capable of detecting the substructures and showing the structures in detail compared to the CARMA results with its unprecedented sensitivity. Such detection will confirm the new proposed paradigm of non-spherical star formation.

  12. The Transmembrane Domain of CEACAM1-4S Is a Determinant of Anchorage Independent Growth and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Erica L.; Mills, David R.; Brilliant, Kate E.; Hixson, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    CEACAM1 is a multifunctional Ig-like cell adhesion molecule expressed by epithelial cells in many organs. CEACAM1-4L and CEACAM1-4S, two isoforms produced by differential splicing, are predominant in rat liver. Previous work has shown that downregulation of both isoforms occurs in rat hepatocellular carcinomas. Here, we have isolated an anchorage dependent clone, designated 253T-NT that does not express detectable levels of CEACAM1. Stable transfection of 253-NT cells with a wild type CEACAM1-4S expression vector induced an anchorage independent growth in vitro and a tumorigenic phenotype in vivo. These phenotypes were used as quantifiable end points to examine the functionality of the CEACAM1-4S transmembrane domain. Examination of the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain showed N-terminal GXXXG dimerization sequences and C-terminal tyrosine residues shown in related studies to stabilize transmembrane domain helix-helix interactions. To examine the effects of transmembrane domain mutations, 253-NT cells were transfected with transmembrane domain mutants carrying glycine to leucine or tyrosine to valine substitutions. Results showed that mutation of transmembrane tyrosine residues greatly enhanced growth in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of transmembrane dimerization motifs, in contrast, significantly reduced anchorage independent growth and tumorigenicity. 253-NT cells expressing CEACAM1-4S with both glycine to leucine and tyrosine to valine mutations displayed the growth-enhanced phenotype of tyrosine mutants. The dramatic effect of transmembrane domain mutations constitutes strong evidence that the transmembrane domain is an important determinant of CEACAM1-4S functionality and most likely by other proteins with transmembrane domains containing dimerization sequences and/or C-terminal tyrosine residues. PMID:22235309

  13. Glycine 105 as Pivot for a Critical Knee-like Joint between Cytoplasmic and Transmembrane Segments of the Second Transmembrane Helix in Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Daiho, Takashi; Yamasaki, Kazuo; Danko, Stefania; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-18

    The cytoplasmic actuator domain of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase undergoes large rotational movements that influence the distant transmembrane transport sites, and a long second transmembrane helix (M2) connected with this domain plays critical roles in transmitting motions between the cytoplasmic catalytic domains and transport sites. Here we explore possible structural roles of Gly(105) between the cytoplasmic (M2c) and transmembrane (M2m) segments of M2 by introducing mutations that limit/increase conformational freedom. Alanine substitution G105A markedly retards isomerization of the phosphoenzyme intermediate (E1PCa2 → E2PCa2 → E2P + 2Ca(2+)), and disrupts Ca(2+) occlusion in E1PCa2 and E2PCa2 at the transport sites uncoupling ATP hydrolysis and Ca(2+) transport. In contrast, this substitution accelerates the ATPase activation (E2 → E1Ca2). Introducing a glycine by substituting another residue on M2 in the G105A mutant (i.e. "G-shift substitution") identifies the glycine positions required for proper Ca(2+) handling and kinetics in each step. All wild-type kinetic properties, including coupled transport, are fully restored in the G-shift substitution at position 112 (G105A/A112G) located on the same side of the M2c helix as Gly(105) facing M4/phosphorylation domain. Results demonstrate that Gly(105) functions as a flexible knee-like joint during the Ca(2+) transport cycle, so that cytoplasmic domain motions can bend and strain M2 in the correct direction or straighten the helix for proper gating and coupling of Ca(2+) transport and ATP hydrolysis.

  14. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  15. Peripheral inflammation augments gap junction-mediated coupling among satellite glial cells in mouse sympathetic ganglia.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem; Caspi, Anna; Belzer, Vitali

    2010-02-01

    Intercellular coupling by gap junctions is one of the main features of glial cells, but very little is known about this aspect of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sympathetic ganglia. We used the dye coupling method to address this question in both a prevertebral ganglion (superior mesenteric) and a paravertebral ganglion (superior cervical) of mice. We found that in control ganglia, the incidence of dye coupling among SGCs that form the envelope around a given neuron was 10-20%, and coupling between SGCs around different envelopes was rare (1.5-3%). The dye injections also provided novel information on the structure of SGCs. Following peripheral inflammation, both types of coupling were increased, but most striking was the augmentation of coupling between SGCs forming envelopes around different neurons, which rose by 8-14.6-fold. This effect appeared to be non-systemic, and was blocked by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. These changes in SGCs may affect signal transmission and processing in sympathetic ganglia.

  16. The Consonant-Weighted Envelope Difference Index (cEDI): A Proposed Technique for Quantifying Envelope Distortion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric C.; Souza, Pamela E.; Gallun, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The benefits of amplitude compression in hearing aids may be limited by distortion resulting from rapid gain adjustment. To evaluate this, it is convenient to quantify distortion by using a metric that is sensitive to the changes in the processed signal that decrease consonant recognition, such as the Envelope Difference Index (EDI;…

  17. Hfq reduces envelope stress by controlling expression of envelope-localized proteins and protein complexes in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Stefanie L; Raivio, Tracy L

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess several envelope stress responses that detect and respond to damage to this critical cellular compartment. The σ(E) envelope stress response senses the misfolding of outer membrane proteins (OMPs), while the Cpx two-component system is believed to detect the misfolding of periplasmic and inner membrane proteins. Recent studies in several Gram-negative organisms found that deletion of hfq, encoding a small RNA chaperone protein, activates the σ(E) envelope stress response. In this study, we assessed the effects of deleting hfq upon activity of the σ(E) and Cpx responses in non-pathogenic and enteropathogenic (EPEC) strains of Escherichia coli. We found that the σ(E) response was activated in Δhfq mutants of all E. coli strains tested, resulting from the misregulation of OMPs. The Cpx response was activated by loss of hfq in EPEC, but not in E. coli K-12. Cpx pathway activation resulted in part from overexpression of the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) in EPEC Δhfq. We found that Hfq repressed expression of the BFP via PerA, a master regulator of virulence in EPEC. This study shows that Hfq has a more extensive role in regulating the expression of envelope proteins and horizontally acquired virulence genes in E. coli than previously recognized.

  18. 40 CFR 426.120 - Applicability; description of the incandescent lamp envelope manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... incandescent lamp envelope manufacturing subcategory. 426.120 Section 426.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Incandescent Lamp Envelope Manufacturing Subcategory § 426.120...

  19. 40 CFR 426.120 - Applicability; description of the incandescent lamp envelope manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incandescent lamp envelope manufacturing subcategory. 426.120 Section 426.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Incandescent Lamp Envelope Manufacturing Subcategory § 426.120...

  20. 40 CFR 426.120 - Applicability; description of the incandescent lamp envelope manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incandescent lamp envelope manufacturing subcategory. 426.120 Section 426.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Incandescent Lamp Envelope Manufacturing Subcategory § 426.120 Applicability; description of...