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Sample records for gas basis biomethane

  1. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol, biomethane and limonene production from citrus waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbafrani, Mohammad; McKechnie, Jon; MacLean, Heather L.; Saville, Bradley A.

    2013-03-01

    The production of biofuel from cellulosic residues can have both environmental and financial benefits. A particular benefit is that it can alleviate competition for land conventionally used for food and feed production. In this research, we investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate from citrus waste, a byproduct of the citrus processing industry. The study represents the first life cycle-based evaluations of citrus waste biorefineries. Two biorefinery configurations are studied—a large biorefinery that converts citrus waste into ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate, and a small biorefinery that converts citrus waste into biomethane, limonene and digestate. Ethanol is assumed to be used as E85, displacing gasoline as a light-duty vehicle fuel; biomethane displaces natural gas for electricity generation, limonene displaces acetone in solvents, and digestate from the anaerobic digestion process displaces synthetic fertilizer. System expansion and two allocation methods (energy, market value) are considered to determine emissions of co-products. Considerable GHG reductions would be achieved by producing and utilizing the citrus waste-based products in place of the petroleum-based or other non-renewable products. For the large biorefinery, ethanol used as E85 in light-duty vehicles results in a 134% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles when applying a system expansion approach. For the small biorefinery, when electricity is generated from biomethane rather than natural gas, GHG emissions are reduced by 77% when applying system expansion. The life cycle GHG emissions vary substantially depending upon biomethane leakage rate, feedstock GHG emissions and the method to determine emissions assigned to co-products. Among the process design parameters, the biomethane leakage rate is critical, and the ethanol produced in the large biorefinery would not meet EISA

  2. Potential development of compressed bio-methane gas production from pig farms and elephant grass silage for transportation in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Dussadee, Natthawud; Reansuwan, Kamoldara; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu

    2014-03-01

    This research project evaluated biogas production using anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and elephant grass silage in large scale to delivered transportation directly for cars. Anaerobic co-digestion was estimated in three full-scale continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) at 40°C. In the form of compressed bio-methane gas (CBG) production was 14,400m(3)/day (CH4 60-70%) amount of CBG was 9600m(3)/day. The procedure was enhanced by using molecular sieve, activated carbon for removal of moisture and CO2 membrane H2S and CO2 respectively. The results were demonstrated the amount of CO2, H2S gas was reduced along with CH4 was improved up to 90% by volume and compressed to 250bar tank pressure gauge to the fuel for cars. The CBG production, methane gas improvement and performance were evaluated before entering the delivered systems according to the energy standards. The production of CBG is advantageous to strengthen the Thailand biogas market.

  3. A feasibility study on the bioconversion of CO2 and H2 to biomethane by gas sparging through polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Díaz, I; Pérez, C; Alfaro, N; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the potential of a pilot hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor for the conversion of H2 and CO2 to CH4 was evaluated. The system transformed 95% of H2 and CO2 fed at a maximum loading rate of 40.2 [Formula: see text] and produced 0.22m(3) of CH4 per m(3) of H2 fed at thermophilic conditions. H2 mass transfer to the liquid phase was identified as the limiting step for the conversion, and kLa values of 430h(-1) were reached in the bioreactor by sparging gas through the membrane module. A simulation showed that the bioreactor could upgrade biogas at a rate of 25m(3)/mR(3)d, increasing the CH4 concentration from 60 to 95%v. This proof-of-concept study verified that gas sparging through a membrane module can efficiently transfer H2 from gas to liquid phase and that the conversion of H2 and CO2 to biomethane is feasible on a pilot scale at noteworthy load rates.

  4. A feasibility study on the bioconversion of CO2 and H2 to biomethane by gas sparging through polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Díaz, I; Pérez, C; Alfaro, N; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the potential of a pilot hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor for the conversion of H2 and CO2 to CH4 was evaluated. The system transformed 95% of H2 and CO2 fed at a maximum loading rate of 40.2 [Formula: see text] and produced 0.22m(3) of CH4 per m(3) of H2 fed at thermophilic conditions. H2 mass transfer to the liquid phase was identified as the limiting step for the conversion, and kLa values of 430h(-1) were reached in the bioreactor by sparging gas through the membrane module. A simulation showed that the bioreactor could upgrade biogas at a rate of 25m(3)/mR(3)d, increasing the CH4 concentration from 60 to 95%v. This proof-of-concept study verified that gas sparging through a membrane module can efficiently transfer H2 from gas to liquid phase and that the conversion of H2 and CO2 to biomethane is feasible on a pilot scale at noteworthy load rates. PMID:25770473

  5. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-10-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema and hydrogenotrophic genus Methanoculleus in the liquid, which indicated that H2 were converted to methane by both direct (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis) and indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) pathways in the liquid. However, the aceticlasitic genus Methanosaeta was dominant for archaea in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm.

  6. Analysis on Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by the Introduction of a Bio-methane Production Plant Using Dairy Cow Slurry as the Main Ingredient, and Management Balance of the Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Takashi; Hideshima, Yoshiaki; Shudo, Yukoh; Ohmiya, Kazuhiko

    A study was conducted on a system to refine biogas generated from a biogas plant, which uses cow slurry as its main ingredient, and use the bio-methane as a regional energy supply source. Based on the data obtained by the demonstrative operation of the biogas plant and bio-methane production experiments, a bio-methane production plant that can process waste from 1,000 dairy cows was assumed, and optimization of plant operation was attempted using the linear programming method with maximum environmental friendliness (reduction of greenhouse gas emissions) and economic efficiency (management balance of the plant) as the target functions. The results revealed that plant operation methods varied according to the target of optimization. Environmental friendliness and economic efficiency were in a trade-off relationship with each other, but in the case where the greatest importance was placed on economic efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions were equivalent to that in the case where the greatest importance was placed on environmental friendliness itself. However, the values of economic efficiency were negative in both cases, indicating that it is difficult to make the plant management economically feasible under the current circumstances. To make the plant management balance positive, it is necessary to take measures, such as reduction of plant construction costs and exemption from interest costs. In addition, as a future direction for such regional bio-methane use, a micro grid system with a dispersed power source using bio-methane as raw fuel was presented.

  7. Potential of wastewater-treating anaerobic granules for biomethanation of synthesis gas.

    PubMed

    Guiot, Serge R; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Carayon, Gaël

    2011-03-01

    Gasification of biomass produces a mixture of gas (mainly carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and hydrogen (H(2))) called synthesis gas, or syngas, by thermal degradation without combustion. Syngas can be used for heat or electricity production by thermochemical processes. This project aims at developing an alternative way to bioupgrade syngas into biogas (mainly methane), via anaerobic fermentation. Nonacclimated industrial granular sludge to be used as reactor inoculum was initially evaluated for mesophilic carboxydotrophic methanogenesis potential in batch tests at 4 and 8 mmol CO/g VSS.d, in the absence and presence of H(2) and CO(2), respectively. Granular sludge was then introduced into a 30 L gas-lift reactor and supplied with CO, to study the production of methane and other metabolites, at different gas dilutions as well as feeding and recirculation rates. A maximal CO conversion efficiency of 75%, which was gas-liquid mass transfer limited, occurred at a CO partial pressure of 0.6 atm combined with a gas recirculation ratio of 20:1. The anaerobic granule potential for methanogenesis from CO was likely hydrogenotrophic, combined with CO-dependent H(2) formation, either under mesophilic or thermophilic conditions. Thermophilic conditions provide the anaerobic granules with a CO-bioconversion potential significantly larger (5-fold) than under mesophilic conditions, so long as the gas-liquid transfer is alleviated.

  8. Flammable Gas Technical Basis Document

    SciTech Connect

    CARRO, C.A.

    2003-07-30

    This document qualitatively evaluates the frequency and consequences of DST and SST representative flammable gas accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions without controls. Based on the evaluation, it was determined that safety-significant SSCs and/or TSRs were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Controls were selected and the accidents re-evaluated taking credit for the controls. Revision 1 incorporates comments received from ORP.

  9. H2A Biomethane Model Documentation and a Case Study for Biogas From Dairy Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, G.; Jalalzadeh, A.

    2010-12-01

    The new H2A Biomethane model was developed to estimate the levelized cost of biomethane by using the framework of the vetted original H2A models for hydrogen production and delivery. For biomethane production, biogas from sources such as dairy farms and landfills is upgraded by a cleanup process. The model also estimates the cost to compress and transport the product gas via the pipeline to export it to the natural gas grid or any other potential end-use site. Inputs include feed biogas composition and cost, required biomethane quality, cleanup equipment capital and operations and maintenance costs, process electricity usage and costs, and pipeline delivery specifications.

  10. Conceptual schematic for capture of biomethane released from hydroelectric power facilities.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, R; Amaral, P Bingre do

    2008-09-01

    Though dam-related biomethane was identified in the 1960s, its capture has not been sufficiently discussed. Captured biomethane could be burned to produce energy, and the burning of biomethane turns the carbon in it into CO(2) that is far less potent as a greenhouse gas; this paper therefore aims to technically discuss the capture/use of dam-related biomethane. A great amount of bubbles would be formed by the rapid drop in water pressure (i.e. cavitation) after turbine passage, so it is proposed to capture methane-bearing bubbles by means of a flow tube for adjusting residence time and hydrophilic screens for trapping these bubbles. The results from the performed calculation show that biomethane can be trapped in a yield of 60%.

  11. Liquid-to-Gas Mass Transfer in Anaerobic Processes: Inevitable Transfer Limitations of Methane and Hydrogen in the Biomethanation Process

    PubMed Central

    Pauss, André; Andre, Gérald; Perrier, Michel; Guiot, Serge R.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid-to-gas mass transfer in anaerobic processes was investigated theoretically and experimentally. By using the classical definition of kLa, the global volumetric mass transfer coefficient, theoretical development of mass balances in such processes demonstrates that the mass transfer of highly soluble gases is not limited in the usual conditions occurring in anaerobic fermentors (low-intensity mixing). Conversely, the limitation is important for poorly soluble gases, such as methane and hydrogen. The latter could be overconcentrated to as much as 80 times the value at thermodynamic equilibrium. Such overconcentrations bring into question the biological interpretations that have been deduced solely from gaseous measurements. Experimental results obtained in three different methanogenic reactors for a wide range of conditions of mixing and gas production confirmed the general existence of low mass transfer coefficients and consequently of large overconcentrations of dissolved methane and hydrogen (up to 12 and 70 times the equilibrium values, respectively). Hydrogen mass transfer coefficients were obtained from the direct measurements of dissolved and gaseous concentrations, while carbon dioxide coefficients were calculated from gas phase composition and calculation of related dissolved concentration. Methane transfer coefficients were based on calculations from the carbon dioxide coefficients. From mass balances performed on a gas bubble during its simulated growth and ascent to the surface of the liquid, the methane and carbon dioxide contents in the gas bubble appeared to be controlled by the bubble growth process, while the bubble ascent was largely responsible for a slight enrichment in hydrogen. PMID:16348206

  12. Microbial ecophysiology of whey biomethanation

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrain, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The biodegradation of lactose into methane was investigated in a chemostat ecosystem under steady state conditions in order to understand the intermediary metabolism and the responsible bacterial species; and, to model the anaerobic digestion of whey in a continuous contact process. Radioactive carbon tracer studies showed that lactose biomethanation occurred in three distinct but simultaneous metabolic steps with lactate, acetate and hydrogen/carbon dioxide as the major intermediary metabolites. Mixed culture studies on the ecosystem composition demonstrated that multiple species of well described anaerobic bacteria were participating in each of three trophic groups: hydrolytic, acetogenic, and methanogenic. Biomethanation performance studies analyzed the dynamics of bacterial species composition and competition in relation to dilution rate. These results demonstrated that the hydrolytic and acetogenic bacteria were coupled to the methanogenic bacteria by interspecies hydrogen transfer; that species competition and dominance for a given carbon metabolite or for hydrogen was related to specific substrate transformation kinetic properties; and that the data was useful for describing biomethanation with a mechanistic model. Starter cultures were developed by employing freeze drying techniques to preserve either a defined culture comprised of four prevalent digestor species or an adapted chemostat sludge. Both of these starter cultures were shown to effectively degrade lactose using either a defined medium or raw whey as biomethanation starting substrate.

  13. Life cycle assessment of biomethane use in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morero, Betzabet; Groppelli, Eduardo; Campanella, Enrique A

    2015-04-01

    Renewable substitutes for natural gas, such as biogas, require adequate treatment to remove impurities. This paper presents the life cycle and environmental impact of upgrading biogas using absorption-desorption process with three different solvents: water, diglycolamine and polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether. The results showed that water produces a minor impact in most of the considered categories, and an economic analysis showed that water is the most feasible solvent for obtaining the lowest payback period. This analysis includes three different sources for biogas production and two end uses for biomethane. The use of different wastes as sources results in different environmental impacts depending on the type of energy used in the anaerobic digestion. The same situation occurs when considering the use of biomethane as a domestic fuel or for power generation. Using energy from biogas to replace conventional energy sources in production and upgrading biogas significantly reduce the environmental impacts of processes. PMID:25700340

  14. The potential of bio-methane as bio-fuel/bio-energy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions: a qualitative assessment for Europe in a life cycle perspective.

    PubMed

    Tilche, Andrea; Galatola, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a well known process that (while still capable of showing new features) has experienced several waves of technological development. It was "born" as a wastewater treatment system, in the 1970s showed promise as an alternative energy source (in particular from animal waste), in the 1980s and later it became a standard for treating organic-matter-rich industrial wastewater, and more recently returned to the market for its energy recovery potential, making use of different biomasses, including energy crops. With the growing concern around global warming, this paper looks at the potential of anaerobic digestion in terms of reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The potential contribution of anaerobic digestion to GHG reduction has been computed for the 27 EU countries on the basis of their 2005 Kyoto declarations and using life cycle data. The theoretical potential contribution of anaerobic digestion to Kyoto and EU post-Kyoto targets has been calculated. Two different possible biogas applications have been considered: electricity production from manure waste, and upgraded methane production for light goods vehicles (from landfill biogas and municipal and industrial wastewater treatment sludges). The useful heat that can be produced as by-product from biogas conversion into electricity has not been taken into consideration, as its real exploitation depends on local conditions. Moreover the amount of biogas already produced via dedicated anaerobic digestion processes has also not been included in the calculations. Therefore the overall gains achievable would be even higher than those reported here. This exercise shows that biogas may considerably contribute to GHG emission reductions in particular if used as a biofuel. Results also show that its use as a biofuel may allow for true negative GHG emissions, showing a net advantage with respect to other biofuels. Considering also energy crops that will become available in the next few years as a

  15. Durable titania films for solar treatment of biomethanated spent wash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, Rokhsareh; S. Ghole, Vikram; Javadpour, Sirus

    2016-10-01

    The use of TiO2 films for treatment of biomethanated spent wash is reported. The films of TiO2 were formed and photocatalytic performance of the prepared films in degradation of methylene blue and biomethanated spent wash were studied. Photocatalytic use of these films was found to be effective for degradation of biomethanated spent wash. The photocatalyst was used up for 20 cycles without significant reduction in activities showing long life of the catalyst.

  16. Waste-to-biomethane Concept Application: A Case Study of Valmiera City in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisa, Aiga; Dzene, Ilze; Rosa, Marika; Dobraja, Kristine

    2015-12-01

    The current needs of sustainable urban development are rising. As the transport sector expands, emissions continue to rise. Due to their negative impact on human health and the environment, air quality requirements are becoming more and more stringent. At the same time, the amount of waste is increasing. Europe Union policies attempt to relieve the pressure that these two stressors place on urban systems as they themselves expand. Today different solutions are available to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, increase air quality and improve waste management systems. Among them, waste-to-biomethane for use in urban systems deserves more attention. The paper focuses on application of the concept of waste-to-biomethane and the case study of Valmiera is evaluated. The results show that the application of the waste-to-biomethane strategy can contribute to a complete substitution of diesel fuel in urban buses and gives savings of around 1,000 tCO2/year. The price of the biomethane was found to be the most sensitive input factor. It is suggested that it should not exceed 0.40 EUR/Nm3 for a fuel conversion project of a fleet of 10 vehicles. Such a price can be ensured, if dry fermentation technology is chosen for biogas production. However, from the sustainability perspective, wet fermentation is more preferable due to the introduction of a source-separated organic waste management system in the region and higher gas yields. Introduction of this alternative requires additional funds which is a question of policy-level decisions.

  17. Recent neurochemical basis of inert gas narcosis and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Rostain, J C; Balon, N

    2006-01-01

    Compressed air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture produces from 0.3 MPa nitrogen narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurs when the volume of a hydrophobic site is caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect on general anaesthesia has for a long time supported the lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories are in increasing consideration since results have been interpreted as evidence for a direct anaesthetic-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases act by binding processes on proteins of neurotransmitter receptors. Compression with breathing mixtures where nitrogen is replaced by helium which has a low narcotic potency induces from 1 MPa, the high pressure nervous syndrome which is related to neurochemical disturbances including changes of the amino-acid and monoamine neurotransmissions. The use of narcotic gas (nitrogen or hydrogen) added to a helium-oxygen mixture, reduced some symptoms of the HPNS but also had some effects due to an additional effect of the narcotic potency of the gas. The researches performed at the level of basal ganglia of the rat brain and particularly the nigro-striatal pathway involved in the control of the motor, locomotor and cognitive functions, disrupted by narcosis or pressure, have indicated that GABAergic neurotransmission is implicated via GABAa receptors.

  18. A Critical Assessment of Microbiological Biogas to Biomethane Upgrading Systems.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Simon K-M R

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological biogas upgrading could become a promising technology for production of methane (CH(4)). This is, storage of irregular generated electricity results in a need to store electricity generated at peak times for use at non-peak times, which could be achieved in an intermediate step by electrolysis of water to molecular hydrogen (H(2)). Microbiological biogas upgrading can be performed by contacting carbon dioxide (CO(2)), H(2) and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic Archaea either in situ in an anaerobic digester, or ex situ in a separate bioreactor. In situ microbiological biogas upgrading is indicated to require thorough bioprocess development, because only low volumetric CH(4) production rates and low CH(4) fermentation offgas content have been achieved. Higher volumetric production rates are shown for the ex situ microbiological biogas upgrading compared to in situ microbiological biogas upgrading. However, the ex situ microbiological biogas upgrading currently suffers from H(2) gas liquid mass transfer limitation, which results in low volumetric CH(4) productivity compared to pure H(2)/CO(2) conversion to CH(4). If waste gas utilization from biological and industrial sources can be shown without reduction in volumetric CH(4) productivity, as well as if the aim of a single stage conversion to a CH(4) fermentation offgas content exceeding 95 vol% can be demonstrated, ex situ microbiological biogas upgrading with pure or enrichment cultures of methanogens could become a promising future technology for almost CO(2)-neutral biomethane production.

  19. Modelling a demand driven biogas system for production of electricity at peak demand and for production of biomethane at other times.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, R; Wall, D; Murphy, J D

    2016-09-01

    Four feedstocks were assessed for use in a demand driven biogas system. Biomethane potential (BMP) assays were conducted for grass silage, food waste, Laminaria digitata and dairy cow slurry. Semi-continuous trials were undertaken for all feedstocks, assessing biogas and biomethane production. Three kinetic models of the semi-continuous trials were compared. A first order model most accurately correlated with gas production in the pulse fed semi-continuous system. This model was developed for production of electricity on demand, and biomethane upgrading. The model examined a theoretical grass silage digester that would produce 435kWe in a continuous fed system. Adaptation to demand driven biogas required 187min to produce sufficient methane to run a 2MWe combined heat and power (CHP) unit for 60min. The upgrading system was dispatched 71min following CHP shutdown. Of the biogas produced 21% was used in the CHP and 79% was used in the upgrading system. PMID:27240240

  20. Thermo-Acidic Pretreatment of Beach Macroalgae from Rügen to Optimize Biomethane Production—Double Benefit with Simultaneous Bioenergy Production and Improvement of Local Beach and Waste Management

    PubMed Central

    Barbot, Yann Nicolas; Thomsen, Laurenz; Benz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Eutrophication is a phenomenon which can rapidly generate masses of marine macroalgae, particularly in areas with high nutrient pollution. Washed ashore, this biomass impairs coastal tourism and negatively affects the coastal ecosystem. The present study evaluates the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of a macroalgae mix (Rügen-Mix, RM (RM = Rügen-Mix)) originating from Rügen, Germany. To improve biomethane recovery, thermo-acidic pretreatment was applied to the biomass prior to biomethanation to disintegrate the biomass macrostructure. Acid hydrolysis was successfully triggered with 0.2 M industry-grade HCl at 80 °C for a 2 h period, increasing biomethane recovery by +39%, with a maximum BMP of 121 mL·g−1 volatile solids (VS). To reduce the necessity for input material, HCl was replaced by the acidic waste product flue gas condensate (FGC). Improved performance was achieved by showing an increase in biomethane recovery of +24% and a maximum BMP of 108 mL·g−1 VS. Continuous anaerobic digestion trials of RM were conducted for three hydraulic retention times, showing the feasibility of monodigestion. The biomethane recovery was 60 mL and 65 mL·g−1 VS·d−1 for thermophilic and mesophilic operation, respectively. The quality of biomethanation performance aligned to the composition of the source material which exhibited a low carbon/nitrogen ratio and an increased concentration of sulfur compounds. PMID:26404327

  1. Pilot plant for biomethanation of dairy-industry wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Fukushi, K.; Liu, T.

    1994-12-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the application of two-phase anaerobic digestion (TPAD) for simultaneous stabilization and biomethanation of high-COD cheese-waste-dairy-manure mixtures by a pilot-plant operation in Wellsville, Utah. The TPAD system exhibited a total COD (TCOD) reduction of up to 97% with feed COD concentration of 60,000 to 45,000 mg/l. The TCOD reduction decreased as the variability as well as the strength of the feed increased. A quick surge of the feed TCOD concentration to 125,000 mg/l effected a large drop in TCOD reduction, but the integrity of the methane digester, which produced 78 {approximately}87 mol% methane-content gas, was measured and TPAD system performance could be restored to normal levels by diluting the feed to obtain TCOD concentrations below 70,000 mg/l. The TPAD system exhibited a methane yield of 0.27 m{sup 3}/kg TCOD charged (0.36 m{sup 3}/kg TCOD removed).

  2. Site-specific economic and ecological analysis of enhanced production, upgrade and feed-in of biomethane from organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Lindorfer, J; Schwarz, M M

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyses the cost structure and ecological performance of biomethane production and feed-in from organic wastes and manure in a site-specific approach for Upper Austria. The theoretically available quantities of biowaste and manure can feed representative biogas plant capacities resulting in relatively high biomethane full costs in the natural gas grid of at least 9.0 €-cents/kWh, which shows strong economies of scale when feed-in flows of methane from 30 to 120 Nm(3)/h are considered. From the ecological point of view small plant capacities are to be preferred since the environmental effect, i.e. the global warming potential (up to -22% of CO(2eq)), is lower in comparison to higher capacities as a consequence of reduced transport in the evaluated scenarios. To enforce the combined energetic use of the biowaste fraction, co-operation between compost facility, gas grid and biogas plant operators is necessary to use existing infrastructure, logistics and knowledge to promote the production, upgrade and feed-in of biomethane from biowastes at attractive locations in Upper Austria and in the whole of Europe. PMID:23202576

  3. Impact of biological treatments of bio-waste for nutrients, energy and bio-methane recovery in a life cycle perspective.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Contini, Stefano; Morettini, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Composting of the source-segregated organic fraction of municipal solid waste was compared in a life cycle perspective with conventional anaerobic digestion (AD), aimed at electricity substitution, and with AD aimed at biogas upgrading into bio-methane. Three different uses of the bio-methane were considered: injection in the natural gas grid for civil heating needs; use as fuel for high efficiency co-generation; use as fuel for vehicles. Scenarios with biogas upgrading showed quite similar impact values, generally higher than those of composting and conventional AD, for which there was a lower impact. A decisive contribution to the higher impact of the scenarios with bio-methane production was by the process for biogas upgrading. In any case the substitution of natural gas with bio-methane resulted in higher avoided impacts compared to electricity substitution by conventional AD. The uncertainty analysis confirmed the positive values for eutrophication, acidification and particulate matter. Large uncertainty was determined for global warming and photochemical ozone formation. PMID:27095293

  4. Impact of biological treatments of bio-waste for nutrients, energy and bio-methane recovery in a life cycle perspective.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Contini, Stefano; Morettini, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Composting of the source-segregated organic fraction of municipal solid waste was compared in a life cycle perspective with conventional anaerobic digestion (AD), aimed at electricity substitution, and with AD aimed at biogas upgrading into bio-methane. Three different uses of the bio-methane were considered: injection in the natural gas grid for civil heating needs; use as fuel for high efficiency co-generation; use as fuel for vehicles. Scenarios with biogas upgrading showed quite similar impact values, generally higher than those of composting and conventional AD, for which there was a lower impact. A decisive contribution to the higher impact of the scenarios with bio-methane production was by the process for biogas upgrading. In any case the substitution of natural gas with bio-methane resulted in higher avoided impacts compared to electricity substitution by conventional AD. The uncertainty analysis confirmed the positive values for eutrophication, acidification and particulate matter. Large uncertainty was determined for global warming and photochemical ozone formation.

  5. Biohydrogen and biomethane production sustained by untreated matrices and alternative application of compost waste.

    PubMed

    Arizzi, Mariaconcetta; Morra, Simone; Pugliese, Massimo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Valetti, Francesca

    2016-10-01

    Biohydrogen and biomethane production offers many advantages for environmental protection over the fossil fuels or the existing physical-chemical methods for hydrogen and methane synthesis. The aim of this study is focused on the exploitation of several samples from the composting process: (1) a mixture of waste vegetable materials ("Mix"); (2) an unmatured compost sample (ACV15); and (3) three types of green compost with different properties and soil improver quality (ACV1, ACV2 and ACV3). These samples were tested for biohydrogen and biomethane production, thus obtaining second generation biofuels and resulting in a novel possibility to manage renewable waste biomasses. The ability of these substrates as original feed during dark fermentation was assayed anaerobically in batch, in glass bottles, in order to determine the optimal operating conditions for hydrogen and/or methane production using "Mix" or ACV1, ACV2 or ACV3 green compost and a limited amount of water. Hydrogen could be produced with a fast kinetic in the range 0.02-2.45mLH2g(-1)VS, while methane was produced with a slower kinetic in the range 0.5-8mLCH4g(-1)VS. It was observed that the composition of each sample influenced significantly the gas production. It was also observed that the addition of different water amounts play a crucial role in the development of hydrogen or methane. This parameter can be used to push towards the alternative production of one or another gas. Hydrogen and methane production was detected spontaneously from these matrices, without additional sources of nutrients or any pre-treatment, suggesting that they can be used as an additional inoculum or feed into single or two-stage plants. This might allow the use of compost with low quality as soil improver for alternative and further applications. PMID:27422046

  6. Biohydrogen and biomethane production sustained by untreated matrices and alternative application of compost waste.

    PubMed

    Arizzi, Mariaconcetta; Morra, Simone; Pugliese, Massimo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Valetti, Francesca

    2016-10-01

    Biohydrogen and biomethane production offers many advantages for environmental protection over the fossil fuels or the existing physical-chemical methods for hydrogen and methane synthesis. The aim of this study is focused on the exploitation of several samples from the composting process: (1) a mixture of waste vegetable materials ("Mix"); (2) an unmatured compost sample (ACV15); and (3) three types of green compost with different properties and soil improver quality (ACV1, ACV2 and ACV3). These samples were tested for biohydrogen and biomethane production, thus obtaining second generation biofuels and resulting in a novel possibility to manage renewable waste biomasses. The ability of these substrates as original feed during dark fermentation was assayed anaerobically in batch, in glass bottles, in order to determine the optimal operating conditions for hydrogen and/or methane production using "Mix" or ACV1, ACV2 or ACV3 green compost and a limited amount of water. Hydrogen could be produced with a fast kinetic in the range 0.02-2.45mLH2g(-1)VS, while methane was produced with a slower kinetic in the range 0.5-8mLCH4g(-1)VS. It was observed that the composition of each sample influenced significantly the gas production. It was also observed that the addition of different water amounts play a crucial role in the development of hydrogen or methane. This parameter can be used to push towards the alternative production of one or another gas. Hydrogen and methane production was detected spontaneously from these matrices, without additional sources of nutrients or any pre-treatment, suggesting that they can be used as an additional inoculum or feed into single or two-stage plants. This might allow the use of compost with low quality as soil improver for alternative and further applications.

  7. Biomethane Production as an Alternative Bioenergy Source from Codigesters Treating Municipal Sludge and Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Ersahin, M. Evren; Yangin Gomec, Cigdem; Dereli, R. Kaan; Arikan, Osman; Ozturk, Izzet

    2011-01-01

    Energy recovery potential of a mesophilic co-digester treating OFMSW and primary sludge at an integrated biomethanization plant was investigated based on feasibility study results. Since landfilling is still the main solid waste disposal method in Turkey, land scarcity will become one of the most important obstacles. Restrictions for biodegradable waste disposal to sanitary landfills in EU Landfill Directive and uncontrolled long-term contamination with gas emissions and leachate necessitate alternative management strategies due to rapid increase in MSW production. Moreover, since energy contribution from renewable resources will be required more in the future with increasing oil prices and dwindling supplies of conventional energy sources, the significance of biogas as a renewable fuel has been increased in the last decade. Results indicated that almost 93% of annual total cost can be recovered if 100% renewable energy subsidy is implemented. Besides, considering the potential revenue when replacing transport fuels, about 26 heavy good vehicles or 549 cars may be powered per year by the biogas produced from the proposed biomethanization plant (PE = 100,000; XPS = 61 g TS/PE·day; XSS-OFMSW = 50 g TS/PE·day). PMID:21274432

  8. Biomethane production system: Energetic analysis of various scenarios.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Xiangping; Bao, Di; Xu, Yajing; Zhang, Suojiang; Deng, Liyuan

    2016-04-01

    The energy consumption models of biomethane production system were established, which are more rigorous and universal than the empirical data reported by previous biomethane system energetic assessment work. The energy efficiencies of different scenarios considering factors such as two digestion modes, two heating modes of digester, with or without heat exchange between slurry and feedstock, and four crude biogas upgrading technologies were evaluated. Results showed the scenario employing thermophilic digestion and high pressure water scrubbing technology, with heat exchange between feedstock and slurry, and heat demand of digester supplied by the energy source outside the system has the highest energy efficiency (46.5%) and lowest energy consumption (13.46 MJth/Nm(3) CH4), while scenario employing mesophilic digestion and pressure swing adsorption technology, without heat exchange and heat demand of digester supplied by combusting the biogas produced inside the system has the lowest energy efficiency (15.8%) and highest energy consumption (34.90 MJth/Nm(3) CH4).

  9. Biomethane production system: Energetic analysis of various scenarios.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Xiangping; Bao, Di; Xu, Yajing; Zhang, Suojiang; Deng, Liyuan

    2016-04-01

    The energy consumption models of biomethane production system were established, which are more rigorous and universal than the empirical data reported by previous biomethane system energetic assessment work. The energy efficiencies of different scenarios considering factors such as two digestion modes, two heating modes of digester, with or without heat exchange between slurry and feedstock, and four crude biogas upgrading technologies were evaluated. Results showed the scenario employing thermophilic digestion and high pressure water scrubbing technology, with heat exchange between feedstock and slurry, and heat demand of digester supplied by the energy source outside the system has the highest energy efficiency (46.5%) and lowest energy consumption (13.46 MJth/Nm(3) CH4), while scenario employing mesophilic digestion and pressure swing adsorption technology, without heat exchange and heat demand of digester supplied by combusting the biogas produced inside the system has the lowest energy efficiency (15.8%) and highest energy consumption (34.90 MJth/Nm(3) CH4). PMID:26855289

  10. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  11. [Bioenergy production from waste: examples of biomethane and biohydrogen].

    PubMed

    Aceves-Lara, César Arturo; Trably, Eric; Bastidas-Oyenadel, Juan-Rodrigo; Ramirez, Ivan; Latrille, Eric; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This new century addresses several environmental challenges among which distribution of drinking water, global warming and availability of novel renewable energy sources to substitute for fossil fuels are of utmost importance. The last two concerns are closely related because the major part of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), considered as the main cause of the greenhouse effect, is widely produced from fossil fuel combustion. Renewable energy sources fully balanced in CO(2) are therefore of special interest, especially the issue of biological production from organic wastes. Among the possibilities of bioenergy production from wastes, two approaches are particularly interesting: The first one is relatively old and related to the production of biomethane by anaerobic digestion while the second one, more recent and innovative, relies on biohydrogen production by microbial ecosystems.

  12. The potential for biomethane from grass and slurry to satisfy renewable energy targets.

    PubMed

    Wall, David M; O'Kiely, Padraig; Murphy, Jerry D

    2013-12-01

    A biomethane potential (BMP) assessment of grass silage yielded 107 m(3)CH4 t(-1). Long term mono-digestion of grass silage can suffer due to a deficiency in essential nutrients; this may be overcome by co-digesting with slurry. Mono-digestion of slurry achieved a low yield of 16 m(3)CH4 t(-1). BMP assessments at a range of co-digestion ratios indicated methane yields were between 4% and 11% lower than the values calculated from mono-digestion. This paper suggests that co-digestion of the majority of slurry produced from dairy cows in Ireland with grass silage quantities equivalent to 1.1% of grassland on a 50:50 volatile solids basis would generate over 10% renewable energy supply in transport (RES-T). The industry proposed would equate to 170 digesters each treating 10,000 t a(-1) of grass silage and 40,000 t a(-1) of slurry from dairy cows.

  13. The physical basis for gas transport through polar firn: a case study at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, A. C.; Albert, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Compared to other natural porous materials, relatively little is known about the physical nature of polar firn. This intricate network of ice and pore space that comprises the top 60-100 m of the polar ice sheets is the framework that forms the natural archive of past climate information. Despite the many implications for ice core interpretation, direct measurements of physical properties throughout the firn column are limited. Models of gas transport through firn are used to interpret in-situ chemical data which is retrieved to analyze past atmospheric composition. These traditional models treat the firn as a "black box," with gas transport parameters tuned to match gas concentrations with depth to known atmospheric histories. Though this method has been largely successful and provided very useful insights, there are still many questions and uncertainties to be addressed. This work seeks to understand the impact of firn structure on gas transport in firn from a first principles standpoint through direct measurements of permeability, gas diffusivity and microstructure. The relationships between gas transport properties and microstructure will be characterized and compared to existing relationships for general porous media. Direct measurements of gas diffusivity are compared to diffusivities deduced from models based on firn air chemical sampling. Our comparison illuminates the primary importance of including microstructural parameters, beyond just porosity or density, in mass transport modeling, and it provides insights about the nature of gas transport throughout the firn column. Guidance is provided for development of next-generation firn air transport models.

  14. Modelling and simulation of heavy gas dispersion on the basis of modifications in plume path theory.

    PubMed

    Khan, F I; Abbasi, S A

    2000-12-30

    An analytical model for heavy gas dispersion based on the modifications in plume path theory has been developed. The model takes into account the variations in temperature, density, and specific heat during the movement of heavy gas plume. The model has been tested for three hazardous gases - chlorine, natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas. The results have been compared with the recently generated experimental data as also with the outputs of other models. A good agreement is observed qualitatively as well as quantitatively. A study has also been carried out to simulate the effect of the wind speed, density of the gas, and venting speed on dispersion. Based on the simulation study a set of empirical equations has been developed. The equations are validated by theoretical as well as experimental studies. PMID:11080566

  15. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting agricultural management for climate change in developing countries: providing the basis for action.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Stephen M; Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Lini; Rosenstock, Todd; Tubiello, Francesco; Paustian, Keith; Buendia, Leandro; Nihart, Alison; Smith, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture in developing countries has attracted increasing attention in international negotiations within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change for both adaptation to climate change and greenhouse gas mitigation. However, there is limited understanding about potential complementarity between management practices that promote adaptation and mitigation, and limited basis to account for greenhouse gas emission reductions in this sector. The good news is that the global research community could provide the support needed to address these issues through further research linking adaptation and mitigation. In addition, a small shift in strategy by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and ongoing assistance from agricultural organizations could produce a framework to move the research and development from concept to reality. In turn, significant progress is possible in the near term providing the basis for UNFCCC negotiations to move beyond discussion to action for the agricultural sector in developing countries.

  16. Flammable gas deflagration consequence calculations for the tankwaste remediation system basis for interim operation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vleet, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-23

    This paper calculates the radiological dose consequences and the toxic exposures for deflagration accidents at various Tank Waste Remediation System facilities. These will be used in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation.

  17. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Gas Hydrates by α-Helical Antifreeze Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tianjun; Davies, Peter L.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are used commercially to inhibit gas hydrate formation and growth in pipelines. However, improvement of these polymers has been constrained by the lack of verified molecular models. Since antifreeze proteins (AFPs) act as KHIs, we have used their solved x-ray crystallographic structures in molecular modeling to explore gas hydrate inhibition. The internal clathrate water network of the fish AFP Maxi, which extends to the protein’s outer surface, is remarkably similar to the {100} planes of structure type II (sII) gas hydrate. The crystal structure of this water web has facilitated the construction of in silico models for Maxi and type I AFP binding to sII hydrates. Here, we have substantiated our models with experimental evidence of Maxi binding to the tetrahydrofuran sII model hydrate. Both in silico and experimental evidence support the absorbance-inhibition mechanism proposed for KHI binding to gas hydrates. Based on the Maxi crystal structure we suggest that the inhibitor adsorbs to the gas hydrate lattice through the same anchored clathrate water mechanism used to bind ice. These results will facilitate the rational design of a next generation of effective green KHIs for the petroleum industry to ensure safe and efficient hydrocarbon flow. PMID:26488661

  18. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Gas Hydrates by α-Helical Antifreeze Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Davies, Peter L; Walker, Virginia K

    2015-10-20

    Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are used commercially to inhibit gas hydrate formation and growth in pipelines. However, improvement of these polymers has been constrained by the lack of verified molecular models. Since antifreeze proteins (AFPs) act as KHIs, we have used their solved x-ray crystallographic structures in molecular modeling to explore gas hydrate inhibition. The internal clathrate water network of the fish AFP Maxi, which extends to the protein's outer surface, is remarkably similar to the {100} planes of structure type II (sII) gas hydrate. The crystal structure of this water web has facilitated the construction of in silico models for Maxi and type I AFP binding to sII hydrates. Here, we have substantiated our models with experimental evidence of Maxi binding to the tetrahydrofuran sII model hydrate. Both in silico and experimental evidence support the absorbance-inhibition mechanism proposed for KHI binding to gas hydrates. Based on the Maxi crystal structure we suggest that the inhibitor adsorbs to the gas hydrate lattice through the same anchored clathrate water mechanism used to bind ice. These results will facilitate the rational design of a next generation of effective green KHIs for the petroleum industry to ensure safe and efficient hydrocarbon flow. PMID:26488661

  19. Ecoengineering high rate anaerobic digestion systems: analysis of improved syntrophic biomethanation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Thiele, J H; Wu, W M; Jain, M K; Zeikus, J G

    1990-04-25

    High performance biomethanation granules with operational specific COD removal rates of 7 kg COD removed/kg SS/d were obtained by ecoengineering conventional, granular, UASB digester sludge using a designed protocol of starvation and selection on a defined volatile fatty acid (VFA) based mineral medium. Addition of low (0.15 mM) sulfate levels to this VFA medium increased the maximum shock-load COD removal rate of the ecoengineered biomethanation granules to 9 kg COD/kg SS/d with specific acetate, propionate, and butyrate removal rates of 111, 28, and 64 mol/g SS/d. Addition of moderate (26 mM) calcium levels inhibited growth and altered the structure of granules. The general cellular, growth, stability, and performance features of these ecoengineered granules are described and discussed in relation to their use as improved biomethanation starter cultures. PMID:18588244

  20. Ammonia stripping for enhanced biomethanization of piggery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Lee, Yong-Woo; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-01-15

    In this study, the effects of ammonia removal by air stripping as a pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of piggery wastewater were investigated. Ammonia stripping results indicated that ammonia removal was strongly dependent on pH and aeration rate, and the ammonia removal rate followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics. A significant enhancement of biomethanization was observed for wastewaters of which ammonia was air-stripped at pH 9.5 and pH 10.0. The methane productivity increased from 0.23 ± 0.08 L CH(4)/Ld of the control (raw piggery wastewater) to 0.75 ± 0.11 L CH(4)/Ld (ammonia-stripped at pH 9.5) and 0.57 ± 0.04 L CH(4)/Ld (ammonia-stripped at pH 10.0). However, the improvement of methane production from the piggery wastewater pretreated at pH 11.0 was negligible compared to the control, which was thought to be due to the high concentration of sodium ions supplied from sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment. From these results, it was concluded that ammonia removal through air stripping at the alkaline pH could be a viable option for preventing the failure of anaerobic digestion of the raw piggery wastewater. Additionally, it was also found that a high concentration of sodium ion originated from sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment inhibited methane production.

  1. Screening of biomethane production potential from dominant microalgae.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, Fernando G; Beltran, Carolina; Jimenez, Antonia; Fernández, María José; Rincón, Bárbara; Borja, Rafael; Jeison, David

    2016-10-14

    The use of microalgae for biomethane production has been considerably increasing during the recent years. In this study, four dominant species belonging to the genera Scenedesmus, Chlorella, Dunaliella and Nostoc were selected. The influence of different genera with several morphological, structural and physicochemical characteristics on methane production was assessed in biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests. The ultimate methane yield values were 332 ± 24, 211 ± 2, 63 ± 17 and 28 ± 10 mL CH4/g VSadded for Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlorella sorokiniana, Dunaliella salina and Nostoc sp., respectively. The highest methane production was achieved by microalga species that had no complex cell wall or wall basically composed by proteins and simple sugars such as in S. obliquus, whereas lower methane yields were found for D. salina and Nostoc sp., due to the salinity effects and cell wall composition in terms of complex polysaccharide and glycolipid layers, respectively. Kinetic constant values obtained in the BMP tests ranged between 1.00 ± 0.08 and 0.097 ± 0.005 days(-1) for D. salina and S. obliquus, respectively.

  2. Screening of biomethane production potential from dominant microalgae.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, Fernando G; Beltran, Carolina; Jimenez, Antonia; Fernández, María José; Rincón, Bárbara; Borja, Rafael; Jeison, David

    2016-10-14

    The use of microalgae for biomethane production has been considerably increasing during the recent years. In this study, four dominant species belonging to the genera Scenedesmus, Chlorella, Dunaliella and Nostoc were selected. The influence of different genera with several morphological, structural and physicochemical characteristics on methane production was assessed in biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests. The ultimate methane yield values were 332 ± 24, 211 ± 2, 63 ± 17 and 28 ± 10 mL CH4/g VSadded for Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlorella sorokiniana, Dunaliella salina and Nostoc sp., respectively. The highest methane production was achieved by microalga species that had no complex cell wall or wall basically composed by proteins and simple sugars such as in S. obliquus, whereas lower methane yields were found for D. salina and Nostoc sp., due to the salinity effects and cell wall composition in terms of complex polysaccharide and glycolipid layers, respectively. Kinetic constant values obtained in the BMP tests ranged between 1.00 ± 0.08 and 0.097 ± 0.005 days(-1) for D. salina and S. obliquus, respectively. PMID:27409043

  3. Technical Basis for Gas-Phase Vadose Zone Remediation Technologies at Hanford: A Review - 12186

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, M.J.; Oostrom, M.; Szecsody, J.E.; Strickland, C.E.; Chronister, G.B.; Benecke, M.W.

    2012-07-01

    In situ vadose zone remediation approaches are being evaluated as potential options to mitigate the transport of inorganic and radionuclide contaminants from the vadose zone to the groundwater. Some of the candidate approaches are based on changing the contaminant or subsurface conditions in a way that slows downward migration of the contaminants through the vadose zone using amendments delivered in the gas-phase. Two promising approaches that have undergone testing at Hanford include soil desiccation to address technetium-99 contamination and ammonia-induced sequestration of uranium. For soil desiccation, a dry gas is injected to desiccate a targeted portion of the subsurface and thereby decrease contaminant movement by removing moisture and decreasing the hydraulic conductivity of the desiccated zone. Ammonia-induced sequestration of uranium relies on changing the pore water chemistry, primarily through pH changes, to induce dissolution and precipitation processes that decrease the amount of mobile uranium in the vadose zone. (authors)

  4. Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Kadam, K. L.

    2001-06-22

    Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

  5. Alkaline Pretreatment of Sugarcane Bagasse and Filter Mud Codigested to Improve Biomethane Production

    PubMed Central

    Mehryar, Esmaeil; Bi, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the codigestion of degradation and improve biomethane production potential, sugarcane bagasse and filter mud were pretreated by sodium hydroxide NaOH 1 N at 100°C for 15, 30, and 45 minutes, respectively. Biomethane generation from 1-liter batch reactor was studied at mesophilic temperature (37 ± 1)°C, solid concentrations of 6%, and five levels of mixing proportion with and without pretreatment. The results demonstrate that codigestion of filter mud with bagasse produces more biomethane than fermentation of filter mud as single substrate; even codigested substrate composition presented a better balance of nutrients (C/N ratio of 24.70) when codigestion ratio between filter mud and bagasse was 25 : 75 in comparison to filter mud as single substrate (C/N ratio 9.68). All the pretreatments tested led to solubilization of the organic matter, with a maximum lignin reduction of 86.27% and cumulative yield of biomethane (195.8 mL·gVS−1, digestion of pretreated bagasse as single substrate) obtained after 45 minutes of cooking by NaOH 1 N at 100°C. Under this pretreatment condition, significant increase in cumulative methane yield was observed (126.2 mL·gVS−1) at codigestion ratio of 25 : 75 between filter mud and bagasse by increase of 81.20% from untreated composition. PMID:27738635

  6. Effect of lipase addition on hydrolysis and biomethane production of Chinese food waste.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Li, Sang; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Liu, Yanping; Zhu, Baoning; Li, Xiujin

    2015-03-01

    The lipase obtained from Aspergillums niger was applied to promote the hydrolysis of food waste for achieving high biomethane production. Two strategies of lipase additions were investigated. One (Group A) was to pre-treat food waste to pre-decompose lipid to fatty acids before anaerobic digestion, and another one (Group B) was to add lipase to anaerobic digester directly to degrade lipid inside digester. The lipase was used at the concentrations of 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1.0% (w/v). The results showed that Group A achieved higher biomethane production, TS and VS reductions than those of Group B. At 0.5% lipase concentration, Group A obtained experimental biomethane yield of 500.1 mL/g VS(added), 4.97-26.50% higher than that of Group B. The maximum Bd of 73.8% was also achieved in Group A. Therefore, lipase pre-treatment strategy is recommended. This might provide one of alternatives for efficient biomethane production from food waste and mitigating environmental impact associated.

  7. Technical basis for extending storage of the UK's advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hambley, D.I.

    2013-07-01

    The UK Nuclear Decommissioning Agency has recently declared a date for cessation of reprocessing of oxide fuel from the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). This will fundamentally change the management of AGR fuel: from short term storage followed by reprocessing to long term fuel storage followed, in all likelihood, by geological disposal. In terms of infrastructure, the UK has an existing, modern wet storage asset that can be adapted for centralised long term storage of dismantled AGR fuel under the required pond water chemistry. No AGR dry stores exist, although small quantities of fuel have been stored dry as part of experimental programmes in the past. These experimental programmes have shown concerns about corrosion rates.

  8. TWODEE: the Health and Safety Laboratory's shallow layer model for heavy gas dispersion. Part 1. Mathematical basis and physical assumptions.

    PubMed

    Hankin, R K; Britter, R E

    1999-05-14

    The Major Hazard Assessment Unit of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) provides advice to local planning authorities on land use planning in the vicinity of major hazard sites. For sites with the potential for large scale releases of toxic heavy gases such as chlorine this advice is based on risk levels and is informed by use of the computerised risk assessment tool RISKAT [C. Nussey, M. Pantony, R. Smallwood, HSE's risk assessment tool RISKAT, Major Hazards: Onshore and Offshore, October, 1992]. At present RISKAT uses consequence models for heavy gas dispersion that assume flat terrain. This paper is the first part of a three part paper. Part 1 describes the mathematical basis of TWODEE, the Health and Safety Laboratory's shallow layer model for heavy gas dispersion. The shallow layer approach used by TWODEE is a compromise between the complexity of CFD models and the simpler integral models. Motivated by the low aspect ratio of typical heavy gas clouds, shallow layer models use depth-averaged variables to describe the flow behaviour. This approach is particularly well suited to assess the effect of complex terrain because the downslope buoyancy force is easily included. Entrainment may be incorporated into a shallow layer model by the use of empirical formulae. Part 2 of this paper presents the numerical scheme used to solve the TWODEE mathematical model, and validated against theoretical results. Part 3 compares the results of the TWODEE model with the experimental results taken at Thorney Island [J. McQuaid, B. Roebuck, The dispersion of heavier-than-air gas from a fenced enclosure. Final report to the US Coast Guard on contract with the Health and Safety Executive, Technical Report RPG 1185, Safety Engineering Laboratory, Research and Laboratory Services Division, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ, UK, 1985].

  9. Interpreting the corneal response to oxygen: Is there a basis for re-evaluating data from gas-goggle studies?

    PubMed

    Papas, Eric B; Sweeney, Deborah F

    2016-10-01

    When anoxia (0% oxygen) is created within a gas-tight goggle, ocular physiological responses, including corneal swelling, limbal hyperaemia and pH change, are known to vary, depending on the presence or absence of a low, oxygen transmissibility contact lens. A new theory is proposed to account for this discrepancy based on the concept of lid derived oxygen, whereby oxygen originating from the vascular plexus of the palpebral conjunctiva supplements that available to the ocular surface in an open, normally blinking eye, even when the surrounding gaseous atmosphere is anoxic. The effect of a lid derived contribution to corneal oxygenation was assessed by using existing experimental data to model open-eye, corneal swelling behavior as a function of atmospheric oxygen content, both with and without the presence of a contact lens. These models predict that under atmospheric anoxia, contact lens wear results in 13.2% corneal swelling compared with only 5.4% when the lens was absent. Lid derived oxygen acts to provide the ocular surface in the non-contact lens wearing, normally blinking, open-eye with up to 4.7% equivalent oxygen concentration, even within the anoxic environment of a nitrogen filled goggle. Correcting for lid derived oxygen eliminates previously observed discrepancies in corneal swelling behavior and harmonizes the models for the contact lens wearing and gas-goggle cases. On this basis it is proposed that true anoxia at the ocular surface cannot be achieved by atmospheric manipulation (i.e. a gas-goggle) alone but requires an additional presence, e.g. a low, oxygen transmissibility contact lens, to prevent access to oxygen from the eyelids. Data from previously conducted experiments in which the gas-goggle paradigm was used, may have been founded on underestimates of the real oxygen concentration acting on the ocular surface at the time and if so, will require re-interpretation. Future work in this area should consider if a correction for lid derived

  10. Statistical optimization of thermal pretreatment conditions for enhanced biomethane production from defatted algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Chandra, T Sarat; Suvidha, G; Mukherji, S; Chauhan, V S; Vidyashankar, S; Krishnamurthi, K; Sarada, R; Mudliar, S N

    2014-06-01

    The present study analyzes the effect of thermal pretreatment for enhancing the biomethane potential of defatted algal biomass of Scenedesmus dimorphus through statistically guided experimental design. To this end, defatted microalgal biomass at various concentrations (1, 3 and 5 g L(-1)) was pretreated at elevated temperatures (100, 120 and 150°C) for 20, 40 and 60 min. The solubilised TOC was favourably enhanced up to 71 mg L(-1) after pretreatment at a temperature of 150°C for reaction time of 60 min. The methane yield was substantially enhanced (up to 60%) and could be correlated with an increase in organic matter solubilisation and enhanced biodegradability via thermal pretreatment. The optimisation of the integrated thermal pretreatment-biomethanation process resulted in up to 1.6-fold increase in methane yield.

  11. Biomethane production and physicochemical characterization of anaerobically digested teff (Eragrostis tef) straw pretreated by sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chufo, Akiber; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Pang, Yunzhi; Li, Xiujin

    2015-04-01

    The biogas production potential and biomethane content of teff straw through pretreatment by NaOH was investigated. Different NaOH concentrations (1%, 2%, 4% and 6%) were used for each four solid loadings (50, 65, 80 and 95 g/L). The effects of NaOH as pretreatment factor on the biodegradability of teff straw, changes in main compositions and enhancement of anaerobic digestion were analyzed. The result showed that, using 4% NaOH for pretreatment in 80 g/L solid loading produced 40.0% higher total biogas production and 48.1% higher biomethane content than the untreated sample of teff straw. Investigation of changes in chemical compositions and physical microstructure indicated that there was 4.3-22.1% total lignocellulosic compositions removal after three days pretreatment with NaOH. The results further revealed that NaOH pretreatment changed the structural compositions and lignin network, and improved biogas production from teff straw.

  12. Fundamentals of methanogenic pathways that are key to the biomethanation of complex biomass

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, James G

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to CH4 (biomethanation) involves an anaerobic microbial food chain composed of at least three metabolic groups of which the first two decompose the complex biomass primarily to acetate, formate, and H2. The thermodynamics of these conversions are unfavorable requiring a symbiosis with the CH4-producing group (methanogens) that metabolize the decomposition products to favorable concentrations. The methanogens produce CH4 by two major pathways, conversion of the methyl group of acetate and reduction of CO2 coupled to the oxidation of formate or H2. This review covers recent advances in the fundamental understanding of both methanogenic pathways with the view of stimulating research towards improving the rate and reliability of the overall biomethanation process. PMID:21555213

  13. Comparison of different pretreatments for the production of bioethanol and biomethane from corn stover and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Papa, G; Rodriguez, S; George, A; Schievano, A; Orzi, V; Sale, K L; Singh, S; Adani, F; Simmons, B A

    2015-05-01

    In this study the efficiency of mild ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment and pressurized hot water (PHW) is evaluated and compared in terms of bioethanol and biomethane yields, with corn stover (CS) and switchgrass (SG) as model bioenergy crops. Both feedstocks pretreated with the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [C2C1Im][OAc] at 100°C for 3h exhibited lower glucose yield that those treated with harsher pretreatment conditions previously used. Compared to PHW, IL pretreatment demonstrated higher bioethanol yields; moreover IL pretreatment enhanced biomethane production. Taking into consideration both bioethanol and biomethane productions, results indicated that when using IL pretreatment, the total energy produced per kg of total solids was higher compared to untreated biomasses. Specifically energy produced from CS and SG was +18.6% and +34.5% respectively, as compared to those obtained by hot water treatment, i.e. +2.3% and +23.4% for CS and SG, respectively. PMID:25725408

  14. Using feature objects aided strategy to evaluate the biomethane production of food waste and corn stalk anaerobic co-digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Yuan, Hairong; Liu, Yanping; Zou, Dexun; Zhu, Baoning; Chufo, Wachemo A; Jaffar, Muhammad; Li, Xiujin

    2015-03-01

    Feature objects aided strategy was used to predict and evaluate the biomethane production of food waste and corn stalk anaerobic co-digestion. The kinetics of co-digestion and mono-digestion of food waste and/or corn stalk was also analyzed. The results indicated that the compositions of food waste and corn stalk were significantly different. The anaerobic digestion of three feature objects at different mixing ratios showed the different biomethane yields and kinetic constants. Food waste and corn stalk co-digestion enhanced the digestion rate and achieved 22.48% and 41.55% higher biomethane production than those of food waste and corn stalk mono-digestion, respectively.

  15. The biostimulation of anaerobic digestion with (semi)conductive ferric oxides: their potential for enhanced biomethanation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Cho, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyokwan; Lee, Changsoo

    2015-12-01

    The effect of biostimulation with ferric oxides, semiconductive ferric oxyhydroxide, and conductive magnetite on the anaerobic digestion of dairy wastewater was examined in a batch mode. The reactors supplemented with ferric oxyhydroxide (R2) and magnetite (R3) showed significantly enhanced biomethanation performance compared with the control (R1). The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) after 30 days was 31.9, 59.3, and 82.5% in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The consumed COD was almost fully recovered as biogas in R2 and R3, while only 79% was recovered in R1. The total energy production as biogas was accordingly 32.2, 71.0, and 97.7 kJ in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The reactors also differed in the acid formation profile with more propionate and butyrate found in R1 and more acetate found in R3. The enhanced biomethanation seems to be associated with variations in the bacterial community structure supposedly induced by the ferric oxides added. In contrast, no evident variation was observed in the archaeal community structure among the reactors. The potential electric syntrophy formed between Methanosaeta concilii-like methanogens and electroactive iron-reducing bacteria, particularly Trichococcus, was likely responsible for the enhanced performance. The stimulated growth of fermentative iron reducers may also have contributed by altering the metabolic characteristics of the bacterial communities to produce more favorable acidogenic products for methanogenesis. The overall results suggest the potential of biostimulation with (semi)conductive ferric oxides to enhance the rate and efficiency of the biomethanation of organic wastes. This seems to be potentially attractive, as increasing attention is being paid to the energy self-sufficiency of waste/wastewater treatment processes today. PMID:26272096

  16. Biomethane production in an AnSBBR treating wastewater from biohydrogen process.

    PubMed

    Lullio, T G; Souza, L P; Ratusznei, S M; Rodrigues, J A D; Zaiat, M

    2014-11-01

    An anaerobic sequencing batch reactor containing immobilized biomass (AnSBBR) was used to produce biomethane by treating the effluent from another AnSBBR used to produce biohydrogen from glucose- (AR-EPHG) and sucrose-based (AR-EPHS) wastewater. In addition, biomethane was also produced from sucrose-based synthetic wastewater (AR-S) in a single AnSBBR to compare the performance of biomethane production in two steps (acidogenic and methanogenic) in relation to a one-step operation. The system was operated at 30 °C and at a fixed stirring rate of 300 rpm. For AR-EPHS treatment, concentrations were 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1) and cycle lengths were 6 and 8 h. The applied volumetric organic loads were 2.15, 4.74, 5.44, and 8.22 g COD L(-1) day(-1). For AR-EPHG treatment, concentration of 4,000 mg COD L(-1) and 4-h cycle length (7.21 g COD L(-1) day(-1)) were used. For AR-S treatment, concentration was 4,000 mg COD L(-1) day(-1) and cycle lengths were 8 (7.04 g COD L(-1) day(-1)) and 12 h (4.76 g COD L(-1) day(-1)). The condition of 8.22 g COD L(-1) day(-1) (AR-EPHS) showed the best performance with respect to the following parameters: applied volumetric organic load of 7.56 g COD L(-1) day(-1), yield between produced methane and removed organic material of 0.016 mol CH4 g COD(-1), CH4 content in the produced biogas of 85 %, and molar methane productivity of 127.9 mol CH4 m(-3) day(-1). In addition, a kinetic study of the process confirmed the trend that, depending on the biodegradability characteristics of the wastewaters used, the two-step treatment (acidogenic for biohydrogen production and methanogenic for biomethane production) has potential advantages over the single-step process.

  17. Hydrological modelling as a basis for the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions from organic soils in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Frahm, Enrico; Dechow, Rene; Freibauer, Annette

    2010-05-01

    Although covering only around 5 % of the country, peatlands are the largest single source of greenhouse gas emissions besides the energy sector in Germany. Thus, the compilation of the national greenhouse gas inventory according to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change requires the application of country-specific emission factors depending on climate region, soil type and land use as well as a complete set of activity data (e.g. management, soil type or groundwater level). To develop scaling methods and emission factors for greenhouse gas emissions, hydrological models specifically designed for peatlands and other organic soils (Histosols) are required to deliver input data for gas exchange modelling. The implementation of both a hydrological monitoring programme and an adequate model is part of a large project with 11 catchments with more than 60 gas flux measurement sites all over Germany aiming at the improvement of the greenhouse gas inventory. Greenhouse gas emissions from peatlands are very sensitive to changes in the - usually very shallow - groundwater level and soil moisture, which poses an enormous challenge when attempting to upscale hydrological and gas exchange models to the national scale. At the catchment scale, geohydrological models are used to develop modelling approaches for different peatlands types (bottom-up approach). At the same time, a conceptual model is developed for the national scale, which is based on a newly compiled Histosol map, official survey data, a digital elevation model and regional information from peatland inventories. Using this data, a rule-base system will be developed to identify hydrological peatland types and boundary conditions for which specific modelling approaches - e.g. for rain-fed bogs - will be applied (top-down approach). Monitoring data from the test sites as well as from conservation programmes will be used for calibration and uncertainty analysis. Finally, management scenarios will be implemented to

  18. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Final report, May 1, 1990--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    ARCTECH has developed a novel process (MicGAS) for direct, anaerobic biomethanation of coals. Biomethanation potential of coals of different ranks (Anthracite, bitumious, sub-bitumious, and lignites of different types), by various microbial consortia, was investigated. Studies on biogasification of Texas Lignite (TxL) were conducted with a proprietary microbial consortium, Mic-1, isolated from hind guts of soil eating termites (Zootermopsis and Nasutitermes sp.) and further improved at ARCTECH. Various microbial populations of the Mic-1 consortium carry out the multi-step MicGAS Process. First, the primary coal degraders, or hydrolytic microbes, degrade the coal to high molecular weight (MW) compounds. Then acedogens ferment the high MW compounds to low MW volatile fatty acids. The volatile fatty acids are converted to acetate by acetogens, and the methanogens complete the biomethanation by converting acetate and CO{sub 2} to methane.

  19. Electroporation of Chlorella vulgaris to enhance biomethane production.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Shackelford, Trevor

    2014-10-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of using electroporation (EP) as a pretreatment method for algal biomass used as feedstock for anaerobic digestion. The results showed that pretreating algal biomass with EP significantly improved the soluble COD (SCOD), increasing it to more than 830% at 28 kWh/m(3) treatment intensity (TI). Besides TI, culture conditions also affected the performance of the EP process. On the basis of SCOD, a sample pH of 7.0 and cell concentration of 13.2g/L were found to be optimal for the EP process. Despite a direct relationship between TI and ionic strength (IS), SCOD decreased with increasing IS. At 35 kWh/m(3) TI, bio-CH4 production increased by as high as 110%. It was also observed that lower TI levels resulted in high rates of gain per energy input compared to higher degrees of treatment. PMID:25066903

  20. Estimation of trace gas fluxes with objectively determined basis functions using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Mark F.; Rigby, Matt; Ganesan, Anita L.; Manning, Alistair J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric trace gas inversions often attempt to attribute fluxes to a high-dimensional grid using observations. To make this problem computationally feasible, and to reduce the degree of under-determination, some form of dimension reduction is usually performed. Here, we present an objective method for reducing the spatial dimension of the parameter space in atmospheric trace gas inversions. In addition to solving for a set of unknowns that govern emissions of a trace gas, we set out a framework that considers the number of unknowns to itself be an unknown. We rely on the well-established reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to use the data to determine the dimension of the parameter space. This framework provides a single-step process that solves for both the resolution of the inversion grid, as well as the magnitude of fluxes from this grid. Therefore, the uncertainty that surrounds the choice of aggregation is accounted for in the posterior parameter distribution. The posterior distribution of this transdimensional Markov chain provides a naturally smoothed solution, formed from an ensemble of coarser partitions of the spatial domain. We describe the form of the reversible-jump algorithm and how it may be applied to trace gas inversions. We build the system into a hierarchical Bayesian framework in which other unknown factors, such as the magnitude of the model uncertainty, can also be explored. A pseudo-data example is used to show the usefulness of this approach when compared to a subjectively chosen partitioning of a spatial domain. An inversion using real data is also shown to illustrate the scales at which the data allow for methane emissions over north-west Europe to be resolved.

  1. PHYSICAL BASIS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Statistics of an ideal homogeneous Bose gas with a fixed number of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Vladimir A.

    2001-05-01

    The distribution function w0(n0) of the number n0 of particles is found for the condensate of an ideal gas of free bosons with a fixed total number N of particles. It is shown that above the critical temperature (T > Tc) this function has the usual form w0(n0) = (1 — eμ)eμn0, where μ is the chemical potential in temperature units. In a narrow vicinity of the critical temperature |T/Tc — 1| <= N-1/3, this distribution changes and at T < Tc acquires the form of a resonance. The width of the resonance depends on the shape of the volume occupied by the gas and it has exponential (but not the Gaussian) wings. As the temperature is lowered, the resonance maximum shifts to larger values of n0 and its width tends to zero, which corresponds to the suppression of fluctuations. For N → ∞, this change occurs abruptly. The distribution function of the number of particles in excited states for the systems with a fixed and a variable number of particles (when only a mean number of particles is fixed) prove to be identical and have the usual form.

  2. Microbial Ecophysiology of Whey Biomethanation: Comparison of Carbon Transformation Parameters, Species Composition, and Starter Culture Performance in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chartrain, M.; Bhatnagar, L.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in lactose concentration and feed rate altered bacterial growth and population levels in a whey-processing chemostat. The bacterial population and methane production levels increased in relation to increased lactose concentrations comparable to those in raw whey (6%) and converted over 96% of the substrate to methane, carbon dioxide, and cells. Sequential increases in the chemostat dilution rate demonstrated excellent biomethanation performance at retention times as low as 25 h. Retention times shorter than 25 h caused prevalent bacterial populations and methane production to decrease, and intermediary carbon metabolites accumulated in the following order: acetate, butyrate, propionate, lactate, ethanol, and lactose. Bacterial species dominated in the chemostat as a function of their enhanced substrate uptake and growth kinetic properties. The substrate uptake kinetic properties displayed by the mixed chemostat population were equivalent to those of individual species measured in pure culture, whereas the growth kinetic properties of species in mixed culture were better than those measured in pure culture. A designed starter culture consisting of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanobacterium formicicum displayed biomethanation performance, which was similar to that of a diverse adapted mixed-culture inoculum, in a continuous contact digestor system to which 10 g of dry whey per liter was added. Preserved starter cultures were developed and used as inocula for the start-up of a continuous anaerobic digestion process that was effective for biomethanation of raw whey at a retention time of 100 h. Images PMID:16347341

  3. Improving Biomethane Production and Mass Bioconversion of Corn Stover Anaerobic Digestion by Adding NaOH Pretreatment and Trace Elements.

    PubMed

    Liu, ChunMei; Yuan, HaiRong; Zou, DeXun; Liu, YanPing; Zhu, BaoNing; Li, XiuJin

    2015-01-01

    This research applied sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment and trace elements to improve biomethane production when using corn stover for anaerobic digestion. Full-factor experimental tests identified the best combination of trace elements with the NaOH pretreatment, indicating that the best combination was with 1.0, 0.4, and 0.4 mg·L(-1)·d(-1) of elements Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively. The cumulative biomethane production adding NaOH pretreatment and trace elements was 11,367 mL; total solid bioconversion rate was 55.7%, which was 41.8%-62.2% higher than with NaOH-pretreatment alone and 22.2%-56.3% higher than with untreated corn stover. The best combination was obtained 5-9 days shorter than T90 and maintained good system operation stability. Only a fraction of the trace elements in the best combination was present in the resulting solution; more than 85% of the total amounts added were transferred into the solid fraction. Adding 0.897 g of Fe, 0.389 g of Co, and 0.349 g of Ni satisfied anaerobic digestion needs and enhanced biological activity at the beginning of the operation. The results showed that NaOH pretreatment and adding trace elements improve corn stover biodegradability and enhance biomethane production.

  4. Improving Biomethane Production and Mass Bioconversion of Corn Stover Anaerobic Digestion by Adding NaOH Pretreatment and Trace Elements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, ChunMei; Yuan, HaiRong; Zou, DeXun; Liu, YanPing; Zhu, BaoNing; Li, XiuJin

    2015-01-01

    This research applied sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment and trace elements to improve biomethane production when using corn stover for anaerobic digestion. Full-factor experimental tests identified the best combination of trace elements with the NaOH pretreatment, indicating that the best combination was with 1.0, 0.4, and 0.4 mg·L−1·d−1 of elements Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively. The cumulative biomethane production adding NaOH pretreatment and trace elements was 11,367 mL; total solid bioconversion rate was 55.7%, which was 41.8%–62.2% higher than with NaOH-pretreatment alone and 22.2%–56.3% higher than with untreated corn stover. The best combination was obtained 5–9 days shorter than T90 and maintained good system operation stability. Only a fraction of the trace elements in the best combination was present in the resulting solution; more than 85% of the total amounts added were transferred into the solid fraction. Adding 0.897 g of Fe, 0.389 g of Co, and 0.349 g of Ni satisfied anaerobic digestion needs and enhanced biological activity at the beginning of the operation. The results showed that NaOH pretreatment and adding trace elements improve corn stover biodegradability and enhance biomethane production. PMID:26137469

  5. Effect of protective release coatings on the basis of superdispersersed zirconium oxide powder on the formation of gas defects in bronze casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, Nikita V.; Risto, Nikolay A.

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the use of nanopowders in the composition of foundry coatings when casting leaded tin bronzes. Influence of the composition of the applied protective coating on surface finish is studied. The effects of the coatings of the following compositions are compared: non-stick coating (a mixture of low-dispersed chromium oxide powder and heat-treated vegetable oil); non-stick lubricant ASPF-2/RgU on the basis of low- dispersed graphite powder and heat-treated vegetable oil; patent #2297300 (a mixture of superdispersed zirconium dioxide powder with industrial oil). It is demonstrated that application of foundry coatings containing superdispersed metal oxide powders with low thermal conductivity makes it possible to significantly reduce irregularities and eliminate gas porosity on the surface of tin-leaded bronze castings.

  6. Numerical modeling of the sound propagation through a rarefied gas in a semi-infinite space on the basis of linearized kinetic equation.

    PubMed

    Sharipov, Felix; Kalempa, Denize

    2008-10-01

    The sound propagation through a rarefied gas is investigated on the basis of the linearized kinetic equation. A plate oscillating in the direction normal to its own plane is considered as a sound wave source. It is assumed a fully established oscillation so that the solution of the kinetic equation depends on time harmonically, while its dependence on the spatial coordinates is obtained numerically. The problem is solved over a wide range of the oscillation speed parameter defined as a ratio of the intermolecular collision frequency to the sound frequency. In order to evaluate the influence of the momentum and energy accommodation coefficients on the solution of the problem, the Cercignani-Lampis scattering kernel is applied as the boundary condition. An analysis of wave characteristics near the source surface shows that they are significantly different from those far from the surface even if the oscillation is slow, i.e., the solution is not harmonic in the space. PMID:19062839

  7. Enhanced biohydrogen and subsequent biomethane production from sugarcane bagasse using nano-titanium dioxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Omid; Zilouei, Hamid

    2016-08-01

    Nano-titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2) under ultraviolet irradiation (UV) followed by dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse was used to enhance the production of biohydrogen and biomethane in a consecutive dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion. Different concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1g nanoTiO2/L under different UV times of 30, 60, 90 and 120min were used. Sulfuric acid (2%v/v) at 121°C was used for 15, 30 and 60min to hydrolyze the pretreated bagasse. For acidic hydrolysis times of 15, 30 and 60min, the highest total free sugar values were enhanced by 260%, 107%, and 189%, respectively, compared to samples without nanoTiO2 pretreatment. The highest hydrogen production samples for the same acidic hydrolysis times showed 88%, 127%, and 25% enhancement. The maximum hydrogen production of 101.5ml/g VS (volatile solids) was obtained at 1g nanoTiO2/L and 120min UV irradiation followed by 30min acid hydrolysis. PMID:27208737

  8. A Review on the Valorization of Macroalgal Wastes for Biomethane Production

    PubMed Central

    Barbot, Yann Nicolas; Al-Ghaili, Hashem; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of terrestrial crops for biofuel production and the associated environmental, social and ethical issues have led to a search for alternative biomass materials. Terrestrial crops offer excellent biogas recovery, but compete directly with food production, requiring farmland, fresh water and fertilizers. Using marine macroalgae for the production of biogas circumvents these problems. Their potential lies in their chemical composition, their global abundance and knowledge of their growth requirements and occurrence patterns. Such a biomass industry should focus on the use of residual and waste biomass to avoid competition with the biomass requirements of the seaweed food industry, which has occurred in the case of terrestrial biomass. Overabundant seaweeds represent unutilized biomass in shallow water, beach and coastal areas. These eutrophication processes damage marine ecosystems and impair local tourism; this biomass could serve as biogas feedstock material. Residues from biomass processing in the seaweed industry are also of interest. This is a rapidly growing industry with algae now used in the comestible, pharmaceutical and cosmetic sectors. The simultaneous production of combustible biomethane and disposal of undesirable biomass in a synergistic waste management system is a concept with environmental and resource-conserving advantages. PMID:27338422

  9. New Strategy for a Suitable Fast Stabilization of the Biomethanization Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Güelfo, L. A.; Álvarez-Gallego, C. J.; Sales Márquez, D.; Romero García, L. I.

    2012-01-01

    The start-up strategies for thermophilic anaerobic reactors usually consist of an initial mesophilic stage (35°C), with an approximate duration of 185 days, and a subsequent thermophilic stage (55°C), which normally requires around 60 days to achieve the system stabilizatio. During the first 8–10 days of the mesophilic stage, the reactor is not fed so that the inoculum, which is generally a mesophilic anaerobic sludge, may be adapted to the organic solid waste. Between mesophilic and thermophilic conditions the reactor is still not fed in an effort to prevent possible imbalances in the proces. As a consequence, the start-up and stabilization of the biomethanization performance described in the literature require, at least, around 245 days. In this sense, a new strategy for the start-up and stabilization phases is presented in this study. This approach allows an important reduction in the overall time necessary for these stages in an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated at thermophilic-dry conditions for treating the organic fraction of the municipal solid waste (OFMSW): 60 days versus 245 days of conventional strategies. The new strategy uses modified SEBAC technology to adapt an inoculum to the OFMSW and the operational conditions prior to seeding the CSTR. PMID:23193374

  10. Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Microalgae Scenedesmus sp. and TWAS for Biomethane Production.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Nguyen, Don

    2016-01-01

    The paper investigated the feasibility of biomethane (bio-CH4) production from the anaerobic co-digestion of the microalgae Scenedesmus quadricauda (S. quadricauda) and thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS). The concept was tested in bench-scale anaerobic digesters by varying the proportions of volatile solids (VS) loading from S. quadricauda and TWAS and two critical operational parameters, temperature and alkalinity. The CH(4) production for the various S. quadricauda and TWAS proportions ranged from 234 to 318 mL/g of chemical oxygen demand (COD) digested and 329 to 530 mL/g of VS digested at 35 °C. The reductions in total solids (TS), COD, and VS ranged from 25 to 44%, 46 to 53%, and 40 to 53%, respectively. Temperature had a significant effect on CH(4) production, lower temperatures greatly reduced CH(4) production. No significant difference in CH(4) production was observed for experiments conducted at alkalinity levels of 70, 1630, and 3200 mg/L as CaCO(3).

  11. A Review on the Valorization of Macroalgal Wastes for Biomethane Production.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Yann Nicolas; Al-Ghaili, Hashem; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of terrestrial crops for biofuel production and the associated environmental, social and ethical issues have led to a search for alternative biomass materials. Terrestrial crops offer excellent biogas recovery, but compete directly with food production, requiring farmland, fresh water and fertilizers. Using marine macroalgae for the production of biogas circumvents these problems. Their potential lies in their chemical composition, their global abundance and knowledge of their growth requirements and occurrence patterns. Such a biomass industry should focus on the use of residual and waste biomass to avoid competition with the biomass requirements of the seaweed food industry, which has occurred in the case of terrestrial biomass. Overabundant seaweeds represent unutilized biomass in shallow water, beach and coastal areas. These eutrophication processes damage marine ecosystems and impair local tourism; this biomass could serve as biogas feedstock material. Residues from biomass processing in the seaweed industry are also of interest. This is a rapidly growing industry with algae now used in the comestible, pharmaceutical and cosmetic sectors. The simultaneous production of combustible biomethane and disposal of undesirable biomass in a synergistic waste management system is a concept with environmental and resource-conserving advantages. PMID:27338422

  12. Use of a marine microbial community as inoculum for biomethane production.

    PubMed

    Fistarol, Giovana O; Rosato, Mario; Thompson, Fabiano L; do Valle, Rogerio de A B; Garcia-BlairsyReina, Guillermo; Salomon, Paulo S

    2016-01-01

    Marine substrates are prominent candidates for the production of biofuels, especially for biogas, which is a well-established technology that accepts different types of substrates for its production. However, the use of marine substrates in bioreactors may cause inhibition of methanogenic bacteria due to the addition of seasalts. Here, we explore a simple and economically viable way to circumvent the problem of inoculum inhibition. Based on the current knowledge of the diversity of microorganisms in marine sediments, we tested the direct use of methanogenic bacteria from an anoxic marine environment as inoculum for biomethane production. Both marine and freshwater substrates were added to this inoculum. No pretreatment (that may have enhanced methane production, but would have made the process more expensive) was applied either to the inoculum or to the substrates. For comparison, the same substrates were added to a standard inoculum (cow manure). Both the marine inoculum and cow manure produced methane by anaerobic digestion of the substrates added. The highest methane production (0.299 m(3) kg VS(-1)) was obtained by adding marine microalgae biomass (Chlorella sp. and Synechococcus sp.) to the marine inoculum. No inhibitory effects were observed due to differences in salinity between the inocula and substrates. Our results indicate the potential of using both marine inoculum and substrates for methane production.

  13. Enhanced biohydrogen and subsequent biomethane production from sugarcane bagasse using nano-titanium dioxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Omid; Zilouei, Hamid

    2016-08-01

    Nano-titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2) under ultraviolet irradiation (UV) followed by dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse was used to enhance the production of biohydrogen and biomethane in a consecutive dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion. Different concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1g nanoTiO2/L under different UV times of 30, 60, 90 and 120min were used. Sulfuric acid (2%v/v) at 121°C was used for 15, 30 and 60min to hydrolyze the pretreated bagasse. For acidic hydrolysis times of 15, 30 and 60min, the highest total free sugar values were enhanced by 260%, 107%, and 189%, respectively, compared to samples without nanoTiO2 pretreatment. The highest hydrogen production samples for the same acidic hydrolysis times showed 88%, 127%, and 25% enhancement. The maximum hydrogen production of 101.5ml/g VS (volatile solids) was obtained at 1g nanoTiO2/L and 120min UV irradiation followed by 30min acid hydrolysis.

  14. Suitability of different containers for the sampling and storage of biogas and biomethane for the determination of the trace-level impurities--A review.

    PubMed

    Arrhenius, Karine; Brown, Andrew S; van der Veen, Adriaan M H

    2016-01-01

    The traceable and accurate measurement of biogas impurities is essential in order to robustly assess compliance with the specifications for biomethane being developed by CEN/TC408. An essential part of any procedure aiming to determinate the content of impurities is the sampling and the transfer of the sample to the laboratory. Key issues are the suitability of the sample container and minimising the losses of impurities during the sampling and analysis process. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art in biogas sampling with the focus on trace impurities. Most of the vessel suitability studies reviewed focused on raw biogas. Many parameters need to be studied when assessing the suitability of vessels for sampling and storage, among them, permeation through the walls, leaks through the valves or physical leaks, sorption losses and adsorption effects to the vessel walls, chemical reactions and the expected initial concentration level. The majority of these studies looked at siloxanes, for which sampling bags, canisters, impingers and sorbents have been reported to be fit-for-purpose in most cases, albeit with some limitations. We conclude that the optimum method requires a combination of different vessels to cover the wide range of impurities commonly found in biogas, which have a wide range of boiling points, polarities, water solubilities, and reactivities. The effects from all the parts of the sampling line must be considered and precautions must be undertaken to minimize these effects. More practical suitability tests, preferably using traceable reference gas mixtures, are needed to understand the influence of the containers and the sampling line on sample properties and to reduce the uncertainty of the measurement.

  15. Suitability of different containers for the sampling and storage of biogas and biomethane for the determination of the trace-level impurities--A review.

    PubMed

    Arrhenius, Karine; Brown, Andrew S; van der Veen, Adriaan M H

    2016-01-01

    The traceable and accurate measurement of biogas impurities is essential in order to robustly assess compliance with the specifications for biomethane being developed by CEN/TC408. An essential part of any procedure aiming to determinate the content of impurities is the sampling and the transfer of the sample to the laboratory. Key issues are the suitability of the sample container and minimising the losses of impurities during the sampling and analysis process. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art in biogas sampling with the focus on trace impurities. Most of the vessel suitability studies reviewed focused on raw biogas. Many parameters need to be studied when assessing the suitability of vessels for sampling and storage, among them, permeation through the walls, leaks through the valves or physical leaks, sorption losses and adsorption effects to the vessel walls, chemical reactions and the expected initial concentration level. The majority of these studies looked at siloxanes, for which sampling bags, canisters, impingers and sorbents have been reported to be fit-for-purpose in most cases, albeit with some limitations. We conclude that the optimum method requires a combination of different vessels to cover the wide range of impurities commonly found in biogas, which have a wide range of boiling points, polarities, water solubilities, and reactivities. The effects from all the parts of the sampling line must be considered and precautions must be undertaken to minimize these effects. More practical suitability tests, preferably using traceable reference gas mixtures, are needed to understand the influence of the containers and the sampling line on sample properties and to reduce the uncertainty of the measurement. PMID:26703250

  16. Phenotypic plasticity of gas exchange pattern and water loss in Scarabaeus spretus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): deconstructing the basis for metabolic rate variation.

    PubMed

    Terblanche, John S; Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Chown, Steven L

    2010-09-01

    Investigation of gas exchange patterns and modulation of metabolism provide insight into metabolic control systems and evolution in diverse terrestrial environments. Variation in metabolic rate in response to environmental conditions has been explained largely in the context of two contrasting hypotheses, namely metabolic depression in response to stressful or resource-(e.g. water) limited conditions, or elevation of metabolism at low temperatures to sustain life in extreme conditions. To deconstruct the basis for metabolic rate changes in response to temperature variation, here we undertake a full factorial study investigating the longer- and short-term effects of temperature exposure on gas exchange patterns. We examined responses of traits of gas exchange [standard metabolic rate (SMR); discontinuous gas exchange (DGE) cycle frequency; cuticular, respiratory and total water loss rate (WLR)] to elucidate the magnitude and form of plastic responses in the dung beetle, Scarabaeus spretus. Results showed that short- and longer-term temperature variation generally have significant effects on SMR and WLR. Overall, acclimation to increased temperature led to a decline in SMR (from 0.071+/-0.004 ml CO(2) h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 0.039+/-0.004 ml CO(2) h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 20 degrees C) modulated by reduced DGE frequency (15 degrees C acclimation: 0.554+/-0.027 mHz, 20 degrees C acclimation: 0.257+/-0.030 mHz, 25 degrees C acclimation: 0.208+/-0.027 mHz recorded at 20 degrees C), reduced cuticular WLRs (from 1.058+/-0.537 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 0.900+/-0.400 mg h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 20 degrees C) and reduced total WLR (from 4.2+/-0.5 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 3.1+/-0.5 mg h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 25 degrees C). Respiratory WLR was reduced from 2.25+/-0.40 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 1.60+/-0.40 mg h

  17. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Grassland Ecosystems of the Central Lithuania: Multi-Criteria Evaluation on a Basis of the ARAS Method

    PubMed Central

    Balezentiene, Ligita; Kusta, Albinas

    2012-01-01

    N2O, CH4, and CO2 are potential greenhouse gas (GHG) contributing to climate change; therefore, solutions have to be sought to reduce their emission from agriculture. This work evaluates GHG emission from grasslands submitted to different mineral fertilizers during vegetation period (June–September) in two experimental sites, namely, seminatural grassland (8 treatments of mineral fertilizers) and cultural pasture (intensively managed) in the Training Farm of the Lithuanian University of Agriculture. Chamber method was applied for evaluation of GHG emissions on the field scale. As a result, soil chemical composition, compactness, temperature, and gravimetric moisture as well as biomass yield of fresh and dry biomass and botanical composition, were assessed during the research. Furthermore, a simulation of multi-criteria assessment of sustainable fertilizers management was carried out on a basis of ARAS method. The multicriteria analysis of different fertilizing regimes was based on a system of environmental and productivity indices. Consequently, agroecosystems of cultural pasture (N180P120K150) and seminatural grassland fertilizing rates N180P120K150 and N60P40K50 were evaluated as the most sustainable alternatives leading to reduction of emissions between biosphere-atmosphere and human-induced biogenic pollution in grassland ecosystems, thus contributing to improvement of countryside environment. PMID:22645463

  18. Biomethane production from vinasse in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors inoculated with granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Barros, Valciney Gomes de; Duda, Rose Maria; Oliveira, Roberto Alves de

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the anaerobic conversion of vinasse into biomethane with gradual increase in organic loading rate (OLR) in two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, R1 and R2, with volumes of 40.5 and 21.5L in the mesophilic temperature range. The UASB reactors were operated for 230 days with a hydraulic detection time (HDT) of 2.8d (R1) and 2.8-1.8d (R2). The OLR values applied in the reactors were 0.2-7.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R1 and 0.2-11.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R2. The average total chemical oxygen demand (totalCOD) removal efficiencies ranged from 49% to 82% and the average conversion efficiencies of the removed totalCOD into methane were 48-58% in R1 and 39-65% in R2. The effluent recirculation was used for an OLR above 6gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R1 and 8gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R2 and was able to maintain the pH of the influent in R1 and R2 in the range from 6.5 to 6.8. However, this caused a decrease for 53-39% in the conversion efficiency of the removed totalCOD into methane in R2 because of the increase in the recalcitrant COD in the influent. The largest methane yield values were 0.181 and 0.185 (L) CH4 (gtotalCOD removed)(-1) in R1 and R2, respectively. These values were attained after 140 days of operation with an OLR of 5.0-7.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) and totalCOD removal efficiencies around 70 and 80%. PMID:27289246

  19. Biohydrogen, biomethane and bioelectricity as crucial components of biorefinery of organic wastes: a review.

    PubMed

    Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Munoz-Paez, Karla M; Escamilla-Alvarado, Carlos; Robledo-Narváez, Paula N; Ponce-Noyola, M Teresa; Calva-Calva, Graciano; Ríos-Leal, Elvira; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Estrada-Vázquez, Carlos; Ortega-Clemente, Alfredo; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemí F

    2014-05-01

    the inverse cascade. Finally, biohydrogen, biomethane and bioelectricity could contribute to significant improvements for solid organic waste management in agricultural regions, as well as in urban areas.

  20. Review of the integrated process for the production of grass biomethane.

    PubMed

    Nizami, Abdul-Sattar; Korres, Nicholas E; Murphy, Jerry D

    2009-11-15

    Production of grass biomethane is an integrated process which involves numerous stages with numerous permutations. The grass grown can be of numerous species, and it can involve numerous cuts. The lignocellulosic content of grass increases with maturity of grass; the first cut offers more methane potential than the later cuts. Water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) are higher (and as such methane potential is higher) for grass cut in the afternoon as opposed to that cut in the morning. The method of ensiling has a significant effect on the dry solids content of the grass silage. Pit or clamp silage in southern Germany and Austria has a solids content of about 40%; warm dry summers allow wilting of the grass before ensiling. In temperate oceanic climates like Ireland, pit silage has a solids content of about 21% while bale silage has a solids content of 32%. Biogas production is related to mass of volatile solids rather than mass of silage; typically one ton of volatile solid produces 300 m(3) of methane. The dry solids content of the silage has a significant impact on the biodigester configuration. Silage with a high solids content would lend itself to a two-stage process; a leach bed where volatile solids are converted to a leachate high in chemical oxygen demand (COD), followed by an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket where the COD can be converted efficiently to CH(4). Alternative configurations include wet continuous processes such as the ubiquitous continuously stirred tank reactor; this necessitates significant dilution of the feedstock to effect a solids content of 12%. Various pretreatment methods may be employed especially if the hydrolytic step is separated from the methanogenic step. Size reduction, thermal, and enzymatic methodologies are used. Good digester design is to seek to emulate the cow, thus rumen fluid offers great potential for hydrolysis.

  1. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maria, Francesco Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup −1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup −1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation

  2. Effect of cobalt supplementation and fractionation on the biological response in the biomethanization of Olive Mill Solid Waste.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Ibieta, F; Serrano, A; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2016-07-01

    Due to the low trace metals concentration in the Olive Mill Solid Waste (OMSW), a proposed strategy to improve its biomethanization is the supplementation of key metals to enhance the microorganism activity. Among essential trace metals, cobalt has been reported to have a crucial role in anaerobic degradation. This study evaluates the effect of cobalt supplementation to OMSW, focusing on the connection between fractionation of cobalt in the system and the biological response. The highest biological responses was found in a range from 0.018 to 0.035mg/L of dissolved cobalt (0.24-0.65mg total cobalt/L), reaching improvements up to 23% and 30% in the methane production rate and the methane yield coefficient, respectively. It was found that the dissolved cobalt fraction is more accurately related with the biological response than the total cobalt. The total cobalt is distorted by the contribution of dissolved and non-dissolved inert fractions. PMID:26998798

  3. Effect of cobalt supplementation and fractionation on the biological response in the biomethanization of Olive Mill Solid Waste.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Ibieta, F; Serrano, A; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2016-07-01

    Due to the low trace metals concentration in the Olive Mill Solid Waste (OMSW), a proposed strategy to improve its biomethanization is the supplementation of key metals to enhance the microorganism activity. Among essential trace metals, cobalt has been reported to have a crucial role in anaerobic degradation. This study evaluates the effect of cobalt supplementation to OMSW, focusing on the connection between fractionation of cobalt in the system and the biological response. The highest biological responses was found in a range from 0.018 to 0.035mg/L of dissolved cobalt (0.24-0.65mg total cobalt/L), reaching improvements up to 23% and 30% in the methane production rate and the methane yield coefficient, respectively. It was found that the dissolved cobalt fraction is more accurately related with the biological response than the total cobalt. The total cobalt is distorted by the contribution of dissolved and non-dissolved inert fractions.

  4. High rate biomethanation technology for solid waste management and rapid biogas production: An emphasis on reactor design parameters.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shikha; Joseph, Johny

    2015-01-01

    A high rate biomethanation digester was designed and fabricated to study its real field treatment efficiency and simultaneous biogas generation. The major design parameters like self mixing, delinking hydraulic retention time and solid retention time etc. were considered for efficient performance. It was operated with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.5kg/m(3)d(-1) with composite food waste for about one year. The maximum treatment efficiency achieved with respect to total solid (TS) reduction and volatile solids (VS) reduction was 94.5% and 89.7%, respectively. Annual mean biogas of about 0.16m(3)/kgVSd(-1) was observed with methane content varying from 56% to 60% (v/v). The high competence of high rate digester is attributed to its specific design features and intermittent mixing of the digester contents and also due to the hydrodynamic principles involved in its operation.

  5. The effect of storage conditions on microbial community composition and biomethane potential in a biogas starter culture.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Live Heldal; Vivekanand, Vivekanand; Pope, Phillip B; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Horn, Svein J

    2015-07-01

    A new biogas process is initiated by adding a microbial community, typically in the form of a sample collected from a functional biogas plant. This inoculum has considerable impact on the initial performance of a biogas reactor, affecting parameters such as stability, biogas production yields and the overall efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, we have analyzed changes in the microbial composition and performance of an inoculum during storage using barcoded pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and determination of the biomethane potential, respectively. The inoculum was stored at room temperature, 4 and -20 °C for up to 11 months and cellulose was used as a standard substrate to test the biomethane potential. Storage up to 1 month resulted in similar final methane yields, but the rate of methane production was reduced by storage at -20 °C. Longer storage times resulted in reduced methane yields and slower production kinetics for all storage conditions, with room temperature and frozen samples consistently giving the best and worst performance, respectively. Both storage time and temperature affected the microbial community composition and methanogenic activity. In particular, fluctuations in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes were observed. Interestingly, a shift from hydrogenotrophic methanogens to methanogens with the capacity to perform acetoclastic methanogensis was observed upon prolonged storage. In conclusion, this study suggests that biogas inocula may be stored up to 1 month with low loss of methanogenic activity, and identifies bacterial and archaeal species that are affected by the storage.

  6. Suitability of giant reed (Arundo donax L.) for anaerobic digestion: effect of harvest time and frequency on the biomethane yield potential.

    PubMed

    Ragaglini, Giorgio; Dragoni, Federico; Simone, Marco; Bonari, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential of giant reed for biomethane production by examining the influence of harvest time and frequency on the Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP), the kinetics of biomethane accumulation in batch reactors and the expected methane yield per hectare. The crop was cut at five different times, regrowths from early cuts were harvested in autumn and BMP of each cut was assessed. The highest BMP (392 NL kg VS(-1)) and the best kinetics of methane production were associated to juvenile traits of the crop. By coupling the early cuts with the corresponding regrowths (double harvest), the dry biomass (from 35 to 40 Mg ha(-1)) equaled that obtained by a single cut at end of the season (38 Mg ha(-1)), while the methane yield per hectare (11,585-12,981 Nm(3) ha(-1)) exceeded up to 35% the methane produced with a single harvest at crop maturity (9452 Nm(3) ha(-1)).

  7. Gas-Solid Interaction, Flow Behavior analysis and Development of a Design Basis equation for the Dense Entry Region of an Asymmetrically Loaded Cold Flow CFB Riser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastane, Rajiv

    The dispersion of a gas tracer was used to indicate the effectiveness of the mixing process of an injected flow of solids into the dense bed region of NETL's cold flow CFB riser in three distinctly different fluidization regimes. NETL's cold flow test facility mimics commercial scale transport reactors with side entry of solids into the vertical riser. Pure CO2 was used as the tracer gas and was introduced continuously into the injected flow of solids and it was assumed to essentially remain in the injected flow stream. The tracer gas would be released from the injected flow stream as the as the flow stream begins to disintegrate. As the stream loses its identity the remaining tracer gas would be released. The tracer gas distribution was measured using inline IR CO2 detectors across the cross-sectional area of the riser at four different elevations, two near the injection point and two further downstream. Due to the high solids hold up and high reactant concentrations, a significant portion of the reaction can take place in the dense bed region. The effectiveness of a Transport Reactor depends on its ability to adequately mix the incoming flows of reactants: fuel, sorbent and air. These reactants have to be dispersed across the reactor's cross-sectional area by the different mixing mechanisms. A good description of the flow behavior is also essential in developing and validating predictor reactor models as well as in developing crucial gas and solids mixing relationships that will can be incorporated and validated for CFD codes (MFIX). In addition there are several operational variables (independent variables) that influence this mixing behavior. Multivariable analysis of variance (MANOVA) model were developed for the NETL cold flow CFB riser based on the dispersion data. The mixing process as a function of the operating parameters is empirically proposed outlining the independent variables (operating and system parameters) which significantly influenced the

  8. Evaluating biomethane production from anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of food waste and floatable oil (FO) skimmed from food waste.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Li, Sang; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Liu, Yanping; Zhu, Baoning; Chufo, Akiber; Jaffar, Muhammad; Li, Xiujin

    2015-06-01

    Batch anaerobic digestion was employed to investigate the performance of the floatable oil (FO) skimmed from food waste (FW) and the effect of different FO concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50g/L) on biomethane production and system stability. FO and FO+FW were mono-digested and co-digested. The results showed that FO and FO+FW could be well anaerobically converted to biomethane in appropriate loads. For the mono-digestions of FO, the biomethane yield, TS and VS reduction achieved 607.7-846.9mL/g, 69.7-89% and 84.5-92.8%, respectively, when FO concentration was 5-40g/L. But the mono-digestion appeared instability when FO concentration was 50g/L. For the co-digestions of FW+FO, TS and VS reductions reached 70.7-86.1% and 87.5-91.4%, respectively, when FO concentration was 5-30g/L. However, the inhibition occurred when FO concentrations increased to 40-50g/L. The maximal FO loads of 40g/L and 30g/L were hence suggested for efficient mono-digestions and co-digestions of FO and FO+FW.

  9. Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-30

    Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump

  10. Hybrid solid anaerobic digestion batch: biomethane production and mass recovery from the organic fraction of solid waste.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Gigliotti, Giovanni; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina; Zadra, Claudia; Massaccesi, Luisa

    2013-08-01

    An experimental apparatus was constructed to perform hybrid solid anaerobic digestion batch processing of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. The preliminary process was carried out with a high total solids concentration of about 33% w w(-1) and with an initial organic load of about 340 kg VS kg(-1). The fresh organic fraction to inoculum ratio used to enhance the anaerobic process start-up was 0.910 kg VS kg VS(-1). The process was conducted by spreading the percolate on top of the mixture. The percolate was stored in a separate section of the apparatus with a mean hydraulic retention time of about 1 day. During the process, acetate, butyrate and propionate in the percolate reached concentrations ranging from 3000 to 11 000 mg L(-1). In spite of these high concentrations, the biomethane produced from both the solid and the percolate was quite high, at about 210 NL kg VS(-1). The digestate obtained at the end of the run showed rather good features for being classified as an organic fertilizer according to Italian law. However, a residual phytotoxicity level was detected by a standardized test showing a germination index of about 50%. PMID:23444150

  11. Bio-hydrogen and bio-methane potentials of skim latex serum in batch thermophilic two-stage anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Jariyaboon, Rattana; O-Thong, Sompong; Kongjan, Prawit

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion by two-stage process, containing hydrogen-producing (acidogenic) first stage and methanogenic second stage, has been proposed to degrade substrates which are difficult to be treated by single stage anaerobic digestion process. This research was aimed to evaluate the bio-hydrogen and the bio-methane potentials (BHP and BMP) of skim latex serum (SLS) by using sequential batch hydrogen and methane cultivations at thermophilic conditions (55°C) and with initial SLS concentrations of 37.5-75.0% (v/v). The maximal 1.57 L H2/L SLS for BHP and 12.2L CH4/L SLS for BMP were both achieved with 60% (v/v) SLS. The dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria in the H2 batch reactor were Thermoanaerobacterium sp. and Clostrdium sp. Meanwhile, the CH4 batch reactor was dominated by the methanogens Methanosarcina mazei and Methanothermobacter defluvii. The results demonstrate that SLS can be degraded by conversion to form hydrogen and methane, waste treatment and bioenergy production are thus combined.

  12. Hybrid solid anaerobic digestion batch: biomethane production and mass recovery from the organic fraction of solid waste.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Gigliotti, Giovanni; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina; Zadra, Claudia; Massaccesi, Luisa

    2013-08-01

    An experimental apparatus was constructed to perform hybrid solid anaerobic digestion batch processing of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. The preliminary process was carried out with a high total solids concentration of about 33% w w(-1) and with an initial organic load of about 340 kg VS kg(-1). The fresh organic fraction to inoculum ratio used to enhance the anaerobic process start-up was 0.910 kg VS kg VS(-1). The process was conducted by spreading the percolate on top of the mixture. The percolate was stored in a separate section of the apparatus with a mean hydraulic retention time of about 1 day. During the process, acetate, butyrate and propionate in the percolate reached concentrations ranging from 3000 to 11 000 mg L(-1). In spite of these high concentrations, the biomethane produced from both the solid and the percolate was quite high, at about 210 NL kg VS(-1). The digestate obtained at the end of the run showed rather good features for being classified as an organic fertilizer according to Italian law. However, a residual phytotoxicity level was detected by a standardized test showing a germination index of about 50%.

  13. Surfactants in anaerobic digestion of cheese whey, poultry waste, and cattle dung for improved biomethanation

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.; Madamwar, D.

    1994-05-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve the anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cattle dung, poultry waste and cheese whey, with enriched methane content, the effect of various surfactants was studied. Among the surfactants tested, Tween 80 and sodium lauryl sulphate showed the maximum enhancement in gas production as well as methane content, indicating better process performance. The Tween 80 dosed digester (300 {mu}L/L) produced about 3.5 L gas/L of digester/d with 70% methane. Results also indicated increased percent COD reduction in the presence of Tween 80. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Regularities of heat transfer in the gas layers of a steam boiler furnace flame. Part II. Gas layer radiation laws and the procedure for calculating heat transfer in furnaces, fire boxes, and combustion chambers developed on the basis of these laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    The article presents the results stemming from the scientific discovery of laws relating to radiation from the gas layers generated during flame combustion of fuel and when electric arc burns in electric-arc steel-melting furnaces. The procedure for calculating heat transfer in electric-arc and torch furnaces, fire-boxes, and combustion chambers elaborated on the basis of this discovery is described.

  15. Upgraded biogas from municipal solid waste for natural gas substitution and CO{sub 2} reduction – A case study of Austria, Italy, and Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, Katherine; Villalba, Gara; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Biogas can be upgraded to create biomethane, a substitute to natural gas. • Biogas upgrading was applied to landfills and anaerobic digestors in 3 countries. • Up to 0.6% of a country’s consumption of natural gas could be replaced by biomethane. • Italy could save 46% of the national CO{sub 2} emissions attributed to the waste sector. • Scenarios were created to increase biomethane production. - Abstract: Biogas is rich in methane and can be further purified through biogas upgrading technologies, presenting a viable alternative to natural gas. Landfills and anaerobic digestors treating municipal solid waste are a large source of such biogas. They therefore offer an attractive opportunity to tap into this potential source of natural gas while at the same time minimizing the global warming impact resulting from methane emissions in waste management schemes (WMS) and fossil fuel consumption reduction. This study looks at the current municipal solid waste flows of Spain, Italy, and Austria over one year (2009), in order to determine how much biogas is generated. Then it examines how much natural gas could be substituted by using four different biogas upgrading technologies. Based on current waste generation rates, exploratory but realistic WMS were created for each country in order to maximize biogas production and potential for natural gas substitution. It was found that the potential substitution of natural gas by biogas resulting from the current WMS seems rather insignificant: 0.2% for Austria, 0.6% for Italy and 0.3% for Spain. However, if the WMS is redesigned to maximize biogas production, these figures can increase to 0.7% for Austria, 1% for Italy and 2% for Spain. Furthermore, the potential CO{sub 2} reduction as a consequence of capturing the biogas and replacing fossil fuel can result in up to a 93% reduction of the annual national waste greenhouse gas emissions of Spain and Italy.

  16. Ammonia-LCFA synergetic co-inhibition effect in manure-based continuous biomethanation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-06-01

    In the current study it has been hypothesized that, when organic loading of an anaerobic reactor is increased, the additional cell biomass biosynthesis would capture more ammonia nitrogen and thereby reduce the ammonia toxicity. Therefore, the alleviation of the toxicity of high ammonia levels using lipids (glycerol trioleate-GTO) or carbohydrates (glucose-GLU) as co-substrates in manure-based thermophilic continuous stirred-tank reactors (R(GTO) and R(GLU), respectively) was tested. At 5gNH4(+)-NL(-1), relative methane production of R(GTO) and R(GLU), was 10.5% and 41% compared to the expected uninhibited production, respectively. At the same time control reactor (R(CTL)), only fed with manure, reached 32.7% compared to the uninhibited basis production. Therefore, it seems that using lipids to counteract the ammonia effect in CSTR reactors creates an "ammonia-LCFA (long chain fatty acids) synergetic co-inhibition" effect. Moreover, co-digestion with glucose in R(GLU) was more robust to ammonia toxicity compared to R(CTL).

  17. Ammonia-LCFA synergetic co-inhibition effect in manure-based continuous biomethanation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-06-01

    In the current study it has been hypothesized that, when organic loading of an anaerobic reactor is increased, the additional cell biomass biosynthesis would capture more ammonia nitrogen and thereby reduce the ammonia toxicity. Therefore, the alleviation of the toxicity of high ammonia levels using lipids (glycerol trioleate-GTO) or carbohydrates (glucose-GLU) as co-substrates in manure-based thermophilic continuous stirred-tank reactors (R(GTO) and R(GLU), respectively) was tested. At 5gNH4(+)-NL(-1), relative methane production of R(GTO) and R(GLU), was 10.5% and 41% compared to the expected uninhibited production, respectively. At the same time control reactor (R(CTL)), only fed with manure, reached 32.7% compared to the uninhibited basis production. Therefore, it seems that using lipids to counteract the ammonia effect in CSTR reactors creates an "ammonia-LCFA (long chain fatty acids) synergetic co-inhibition" effect. Moreover, co-digestion with glucose in R(GLU) was more robust to ammonia toxicity compared to R(CTL). PMID:26985628

  18. [Optimization on slow-release inhibition of biomethane and the kinetics model of diffusion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-jie; Zhao, Tian-tao; Zhao, You-cai; Deng, Yu-ping

    2010-07-01

    The diffusion mechanism of acetylene,which can inhibit the activity of methanogens, was studied. Paraffin wax and rosin were used as matrix of slow-release and calcium carbide was used as inhibition material. Based on the T. Higuchi equation and the characteristics of slow-release inhibitors, a mechanism model was derived. Moreover, the effective diffusion coefficients (De) can be acquired by this model. During the diffusion process, the reaction heat of calcium carbide and water could make acetylene gas expansion and caused the slow-release inhibitors expansion if the hardness of the slow-release inhibitors is inadequate. The hardness and compactness were enhanced and the effective diffusion coefficients reached 2.2849 x 10(-8) cm2/min (R2 = 0.9901) when the mass faction of rosin was 20% and the mass ratio of matrix to calcium carbide was 1/1. Hence,the mitigation the methane generation with municipal solid waste (MSW) can be achieved by the technology of slow-release inhibition.

  19. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically-biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R(2)), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year(-1)) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308year(-1) and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12Nm(3)/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90kWh per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions. PMID:23910244

  20. NREL Biomethane GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Milbrandt, Anelia

    2016-06-15

    This dataset contains information about the biomass resources generated by county in the United States. It includes the following feedstock categories: crop residues, forest residues, primary mill residues, secondary mill residues, and urban wood waste. The estimates are based on county-level statistics and/or point-source data gathered from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), USDA Forest Service, EPA and other organizations, which are further processed using relevant assumptions and conversions.

  1. Evaluation of anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure with food wastes via bio-methane potential assay and CSTR reactor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yulin; Zamalloa, Carlos; Lin, Hongjian; Yan, Mi; Schmidt, David; Hu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of food wastes into anaerobic digestion (AD) brings a promising scenario of increasing feedstock availability and overall energy production from AD. This study evaluated the biodegradability and methane potential from co-digestion of two typical food wastes, kitchen waste and chicken fat, with dairy manure. For single substrate, the bio-methane potential assays showed that kitchen waste had the highest methane yield of 352 L-CH4 kg(-1)-VS added, 92% more than dairy manure alone. Chicken fat at the same Volatile Solid (VS) level (2 g L(-1)) inhibited bio-methane production. Addition of kitchen waste and chicken fat to a VS percentage of up to 40% improved overall methane yield by 44% and 34%, respectively. Synergistic effect was observed when either combining two or three substrates as AD feedstock, possibly as a result of increased biodegradability of organic materials in chicken fat and kitchen waste compared with dairy manure. Addition of chicken fat improved methane yield more than kitchen waste. However, addition of chicken fat VS over 0.8 g L(-1) should be cautiously done because it may cause reactor failure due to decrease in pH. The maximum methane yield was 425 L-CH4 kg(-1)-VS, achieved at a VS ratio of 2:2:1 for kitchen waste, chicken fat, and dairy manure. Results from batch AD experiment demonstrated that supplementing dairy manure to chicken fat and/or kitchen waste improved alkalinity of substrate due to the inclusion of more titratable bases in dairy manure, and therefore stabilized the methanogenesis and substantially improved biogas yield. A mixture of substrates of kitchen waste, chicken fat, and dairy manure at a ratio of 1:1:3 was fed to a continuously stirred tank reactor operated at organic loading rates of 3.28, 6.55, and 2.18 g-COD L(-1)-day (hydraulic retention time of 20, 10, and 30 days, respectively) under mesophilic condition, and methane production rate reached 0.65, 0.95, and 0.34 L-CH4 L(-1)-reactor-day.

  2. Safety Basis Report

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Garrett

    2002-01-14

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

  3. BASIS9. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Allsman, R.; Barrett, K.; Busby, L.; Chiu, Y.; Crotinger, J.; Dubois, B.; Dubois, P.F.; Langdon, B.; Motteler, Z.C.; Takemoto, J.; Taylor, S.; Willmann, P.; Wilson, S. )

    1993-08-01

    BASIS9.4 is a system for developing interactive computer programs in Fortran, with some support for C and C++ as well. Using BASIS9.4 you can create a program that has a sophisticated programming language as its user interface so that the user can set, calculate with, and plot, all the major variables in the program. The program author writes only the scientific part of the program; BASIS9.4 supplies an environment in which to exercise that scientific programming which includes an interactive language, an interpreter, graphics, terminal logs, error recovery, macros, saving and retrieving variables, formatted I/O, and online documentation.

  4. Study on the bio-methane yield and microbial community structure in enzyme enhanced anaerobic co-digestion of cow manure and corn straw.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Li, Zifu; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Qiqi; Wu, Yanga; Saino, Mayiani; Bai, Xue

    2016-11-01

    The use of enzymes to improve anaerobic co-digestion (AcoD) of cow manure and corn straw was explored in this study, including cellulase pretreatment and direct additions of amylase and protease. The effects of enzymes on microbial community structure were investigated though PCR-DGGE method. Results showed that AcoD with amylase achieved the highest methane yield of 377.63ml·CH4/g·VS, which was an increase of 110.79%. The methane increment consumed the amylase of 4.18×10(-5)g/ml·CH4. Enzymes mainly affected the bacteria in the hydrolysis stage rather than the bacteria in the hydrogenesis and acetogenesis stage and the archaea in the methanogenesis stage. However, the experimental results demonstrated that enzymes had no negative influence on microbial communities; the predominant microbial communities were similar. Therefore, AcoD with amylase was an effective way to improve the bio-methane yield of cow manure and corn straw. PMID:27484671

  5. Co-generation of biohydrogen and biomethane through two-stage batch co-fermentation of macro- and micro-algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lingkan; Cheng, Jun; Xia, Ao; Jacob, Amita; Voelklein, Markus; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-10-01

    Aquatic micro-algae can be used as feedstocks for gaseous biofuel production via biological fermentation. However, micro-algae usually have low C/N ratios, which are not advantageous for fermentation. In this study, carbon-rich macro-algae (Laminaria digitata) mixed with nitrogen-rich micro-algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Nannochloropsis oceanica) were used to maintain a suitable C/N ratio of 20 for a two-stage process combining hydrogen and methane fermentation. Co-fermentation of L. digitata and micro-algae facilitated hydrolysis and acidogenesis, resulting in hydrogen yields of 94.5-97.0mL/gVS; these values were 15.5-18.5% higher than mono-fermentation using L. digitata. Through the second stage of methane co-fermentation, a large portion of energy remaining in the hydrogenogenic effluents was recovered in the form of biomethane. The two-stage batch co-fermentation markedly increased the energy conversion efficiencies (ECEs) from 4.6-6.6% during the hydrogen fermentation to 57.0-70.9% in the combined hydrogen and methane production. PMID:27371795

  6. Co-generation of biohydrogen and biomethane through two-stage batch co-fermentation of macro- and micro-algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lingkan; Cheng, Jun; Xia, Ao; Jacob, Amita; Voelklein, Markus; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-10-01

    Aquatic micro-algae can be used as feedstocks for gaseous biofuel production via biological fermentation. However, micro-algae usually have low C/N ratios, which are not advantageous for fermentation. In this study, carbon-rich macro-algae (Laminaria digitata) mixed with nitrogen-rich micro-algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Nannochloropsis oceanica) were used to maintain a suitable C/N ratio of 20 for a two-stage process combining hydrogen and methane fermentation. Co-fermentation of L. digitata and micro-algae facilitated hydrolysis and acidogenesis, resulting in hydrogen yields of 94.5-97.0mL/gVS; these values were 15.5-18.5% higher than mono-fermentation using L. digitata. Through the second stage of methane co-fermentation, a large portion of energy remaining in the hydrogenogenic effluents was recovered in the form of biomethane. The two-stage batch co-fermentation markedly increased the energy conversion efficiencies (ECEs) from 4.6-6.6% during the hydrogen fermentation to 57.0-70.9% in the combined hydrogen and methane production.

  7. CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

    1960-02-16

    A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

  8. Neuromechanical Basis of Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enoka, Roger M.

    This textbook provides a scientific basis for the study of human motion. The eight chapters are organized under three major sections. Part One--The Force-Motion Relationship--contains chapters on (1) motion; (2) force; (3) types of movement analysis. In Part Two--The Simple Joint System--chapters concern (4) simple joint system components; (5)…

  9. Anaerobic digestion of agricultural and other substrates--implications for greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Pucker, J; Jungmeier, G; Siegl, S; Pötsch, E M

    2013-06-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, expressed in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2-eq), of different Austrian biogas systems were analyzed and evaluated using life-cycle assessment (LCA) as part of a national project. Six commercial biogas plants were investigated and the analysis included the complete process chain: viz., the production and collection of substrates, the fermentation of the substrates in the biogas plant, the upgrading of biogas to biomethane (if applicable) and the use of the biogas or biomethane for heat and electricity or as transportation fuel. Furthermore, the LCA included the GHG emissions of construction, operation and dismantling of the major components involved in the process chain, as well as the use of by-products (e.g. fermentation residues used as fertilizers). All of the biogas systems reduced GHG emissions (in CO2-eq) compared with fossil reference systems. The potential for GHG reduction of the individual biogas systems varied between 60% and 100%. Type of feedstock and its reference use, agricultural practices, coverage of storage tanks for fermentation residues, methane leakage at the combined heat and power plant unit and the proportion of energy used as heat were identified as key factors influencing the GHG emissions of anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:23739470

  10. Biomethanation of a mixture of salty cheese whey and poultry waste or cattle dung - a study of effect of temperature and retention time

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, C.; Madamwar, D.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a study aimed at improving the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of salty cheese whey in combination with poultry waste or cattle dung. Best results were obtained when salty cheese whey was mixed with poultry waste in the ratio of 7:3, or cattle dung in the ratio of 1:1, both on dry weight basis giving maximum gas production of 1.2 L/L of digester/d with enriched methane content of 64% and 1.3 L/L of digester/d having methane content of 63% respectively. Various conditions such as temperature and retention time have been optimized for maximum process performance. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Tegoprens in anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cheese whey, poultry waste, and cattle dung for improved biomethanation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, C.; Sastry, V.; Madamwar, D.

    1996-01-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve the anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cattle dung, poultry waste, and cheese whey, the effect of various doses of Tegoprens: T-3012, T-3099, T-5842, T-5843, T-5851, T-5852 has been studied, in bench-scale digesters. Among them, Tegoprens 3022 showed more than a 45% increase in gas production with higher methane content. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Opportunities for Switzerland to Contribute to the Production of Algal Biofuels: the Hydrothermal Pathway to Bio-Methane.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud-Velásquez, Mariluz; Refardt, Dominik; Vuille, François; Ludwig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have a significant potential to be a sustainable source of fuel and thus are of interest in the transition to a sustainable energy system, in particular for resource-dependent countries such as Switzerland. Independence of fossil fuels, considerable reduction of CO(2) emissions, and abandoning nuclear energy may be possible with an integrated system approach including the sourcing of biofuels from different types of biomass. Today, a full carbon-to-fuel conversion is possible, and has been recently demonstrated with an advanced hydrothermal technology. The potential to develop algal biofuels is viewed as high thanks to the possibility they offer to uncouple bioenergy from food production. Nevertheless, technological breakthroughs must take place before commercial production becomes a reality, especially to meet the necessary cost savings and efficiency gains in the algae cultivation structure. In addition, an integrated management of waste resources to promote the nutrient recovery appears today as imperative to further improve the economic viability and the environmental sustainability of algal production. We provide here a review that includes the global technological status of both algae production and their conversion into biofuels in order to understand first the added value of algal energy in general before we focus on the potential of algae to contribute specifically to the Swiss energy system to the horizon 2050. In this respect, the hydrothermal conversion pathway of microalgal biomass into synthetic natural gas (SNG) is emphasized, as research into this technology has received considerable attention in Switzerland during the last decade. In addition, SNG is a particularly relevant fuel in the Swiss context due to the existing gas grid and to the opportunity it offers to cover a wide spectrum of energy applications, in particular cogeneration of heat and electricity or use as a transport fuel in the growing gas car fleet. PMID:26598406

  13. Opportunities for Switzerland to Contribute to the Production of Algal Biofuels: the Hydrothermal Pathway to Bio-Methane.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud-Velásquez, Mariluz; Refardt, Dominik; Vuille, François; Ludwig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have a significant potential to be a sustainable source of fuel and thus are of interest in the transition to a sustainable energy system, in particular for resource-dependent countries such as Switzerland. Independence of fossil fuels, considerable reduction of CO(2) emissions, and abandoning nuclear energy may be possible with an integrated system approach including the sourcing of biofuels from different types of biomass. Today, a full carbon-to-fuel conversion is possible, and has been recently demonstrated with an advanced hydrothermal technology. The potential to develop algal biofuels is viewed as high thanks to the possibility they offer to uncouple bioenergy from food production. Nevertheless, technological breakthroughs must take place before commercial production becomes a reality, especially to meet the necessary cost savings and efficiency gains in the algae cultivation structure. In addition, an integrated management of waste resources to promote the nutrient recovery appears today as imperative to further improve the economic viability and the environmental sustainability of algal production. We provide here a review that includes the global technological status of both algae production and their conversion into biofuels in order to understand first the added value of algal energy in general before we focus on the potential of algae to contribute specifically to the Swiss energy system to the horizon 2050. In this respect, the hydrothermal conversion pathway of microalgal biomass into synthetic natural gas (SNG) is emphasized, as research into this technology has received considerable attention in Switzerland during the last decade. In addition, SNG is a particularly relevant fuel in the Swiss context due to the existing gas grid and to the opportunity it offers to cover a wide spectrum of energy applications, in particular cogeneration of heat and electricity or use as a transport fuel in the growing gas car fleet.

  14. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  15. Estimated CO2, SO2 and H2S emission to the atmosphere from the 2011 El Hierro submarine eruption (Canary Islands) on the basis of helicopter gas surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos, J.; Padilla, G.; Padrón, E.; Hernández, P. A.; Calvo, D.; Marquez, A.; Pérez, N. M.; Melian, G.; Dionis, S.; Rodríguez, F.; Nolasco, D.; Hernández, I.

    2012-04-01

    An accurate estimation of SO2 emission rates is an important issue to elucidate the activity of volcanoes, moreover the monitoring of its temporal evolution might help to predict a possible eruption and thus, save the loss of human's lives in cities nearby volcanoes. In the lasts years new instruments have been developed and improved, in order to be more portable, cheaper and lighter. The miniDOAS consist of a small spectrometer with a lens for collecting scattered UV light, and are controlled/powered via USB with a laptop. Recently, new technical developments have allowed monitoring the emission of other gas species such as CO2, H2S, etc from volcanic plumes by means of portable multisensor system. With both devices we were able to evaluate the SO2 emission rates and the molar ratios of major volcanic gas components, respectively. Multiplying the observed SO2 emission rate times the observed (gas)i/SO2 mass ratios (CO2/SO2 and H2S/SO2) allowed us to estimate other volatiles emission rates. Between November 11, 2011, and January 16, 2012, and as a consequence of the submarine volcanic eruption started on October 10, 2011, south off shore El Hierro, Canary Islands, a regularly monitoring of the volcanic plume from the submarine volcano has been performed with remote sensors, always depending of helicopter availability. The instruments are mounted aboard on a helicopter belonged to the Helicopter Unit of Spanish Civil Guard. The SO2 flux measured during this period showed a maximum SO2 emission of 109 ± 19 t/d on November 6, just two days before the occurrence of a intense bubbling at the sea surface on November 8, producing a water, gas and ash column of about 15 meters over the sea surface. That day, CO2 and H2S emission also reached the maximum measured, with 5400 t/d and 3.6 t/d, respectively. Since then, SO2, CO2 and H2S emission rates have declined to values close to detection limit (~ 2 t/d for SO2). These results report the first SO2 emission rates measured

  16. WEST Physics Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Bécoulet, M.; Brémond, S.; Bucalossi, J.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Colas, L.; Corre, Y.; Courtois, X.; Decker, J.; Delpech, L.; Devynck, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Doerner, R. P.; Douai, D.; Dumont, R.; Ekedahl, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Fenzi, C.; Firdaouss, M.; Garcia, J.; Ghendrih, P.; Gil, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Goniche, M.; Grisolia, C.; Grosman, A.; Guilhem, D.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hennequin, P.; Hillairet, J.; Hoang, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Joffrin, E.; Kallenbach, A.; Linke, J.; Loarer, T.; Lotte, P.; Maget, P.; Marandet, Y.; Mayoral, M. L.; Meyer, O.; Missirlian, M.; Mollard, P.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Moreau, P.; Nardon, E.; Pégourié, B.; Peysson, Y.; Sabot, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Schneider, M.; Travère, J. M.; Tsitrone, E.; Vartanian, S.; Vermare, L.; Yoshida, M.; Zagorski, R.; Contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    With WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady State Tokamak) (Bucalossi et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 907-12), the Tore Supra facility and team expertise (Dumont et al 2014 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56 075020) is used to pave the way towards ITER divertor procurement and operation. It consists in implementing a divertor configuration and installing ITER-like actively cooled tungsten monoblocks in the Tore Supra tokamak, taking full benefit of its unique long-pulse capability. WEST is a user facility platform, open to all ITER partners. This paper describes the physics basis of WEST: the estimated heat flux on the divertor target, the planned heating schemes, the expected behaviour of the L-H threshold and of the pedestal and the potential W sources. A series of operating scenarios has been modelled, showing that ITER-relevant heat fluxes on the divertor can be achieved in WEST long pulse H-mode plasmas.

  17. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    SciTech Connect

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600/sup 0/C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660/sup 0/C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents.

  18. Biomethanation of Syngas Using Anaerobic Sludge: Shift in the Catabolic Routes with the CO Partial Pressure Increase.

    PubMed

    Sancho Navarro, Silvia; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Bruant, Guillaume; Guiot, Serge R

    2016-01-01

    Syngas generated by thermal gasification of biomass or coal can be steam reformed and purified into methane, which could be used locally for energy needs, or re-injected in the natural gas grid. As an alternative to chemical catalysis, the main components of the syngas (CO, CO2, and H2) can be used as substrates by a wide range of microorganisms, to be converted into gas biofuels, including methane. This study evaluates the carboxydotrophic (CO-consuming) methanogenic potential present in an anaerobic sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor treating waste water, and elucidates the CO conversion routes to methane at 35 ± 3°C. Kinetic activity tests under CO at partial pressures (pCO) varying from 0.1 to 1.5 atm (0.09-1.31 mmol/L in the liquid phase) showed a significant carboxydotrophic activity potential for growing conditions on CO alone. A maximum methanogenic activity of 1 mmol CH4 per g of volatile suspended solid and per day was achieved at 0.2 atm of CO (0.17 mmol/L), and then the rate decreased with the amount of CO supplied. The intermediary metabolites such as acetate, H2, and propionate started to accumulate at higher CO concentrations. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES), fluoroacetate, and vancomycin showed that in a mixed culture CO was converted mainly to acetate by acetogenic bacteria, which was further transformed to methane by acetoclastic methanogens, while direct methanogenic CO conversion was negligible. Methanogenesis was totally blocked at high pCO in the bottles (≥1 atm). However it was possible to achieve higher methanogenic potential under a 100% CO atmosphere after acclimation of the sludge to CO. This adaptation to high CO concentrations led to a shift in the archaeal population, then dominated by hydrogen-utilizing methanogens, which were able to take over acetoclastic methanogens, while syntrophic acetate oxidizing (SAO) bacteria oxidized acetate into CO2 and H2. The disaggregation of the

  19. Biomethanation of Syngas Using Anaerobic Sludge: Shift in the Catabolic Routes with the CO Partial Pressure Increase.

    PubMed

    Sancho Navarro, Silvia; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Bruant, Guillaume; Guiot, Serge R

    2016-01-01

    Syngas generated by thermal gasification of biomass or coal can be steam reformed and purified into methane, which could be used locally for energy needs, or re-injected in the natural gas grid. As an alternative to chemical catalysis, the main components of the syngas (CO, CO2, and H2) can be used as substrates by a wide range of microorganisms, to be converted into gas biofuels, including methane. This study evaluates the carboxydotrophic (CO-consuming) methanogenic potential present in an anaerobic sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor treating waste water, and elucidates the CO conversion routes to methane at 35 ± 3°C. Kinetic activity tests under CO at partial pressures (pCO) varying from 0.1 to 1.5 atm (0.09-1.31 mmol/L in the liquid phase) showed a significant carboxydotrophic activity potential for growing conditions on CO alone. A maximum methanogenic activity of 1 mmol CH4 per g of volatile suspended solid and per day was achieved at 0.2 atm of CO (0.17 mmol/L), and then the rate decreased with the amount of CO supplied. The intermediary metabolites such as acetate, H2, and propionate started to accumulate at higher CO concentrations. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES), fluoroacetate, and vancomycin showed that in a mixed culture CO was converted mainly to acetate by acetogenic bacteria, which was further transformed to methane by acetoclastic methanogens, while direct methanogenic CO conversion was negligible. Methanogenesis was totally blocked at high pCO in the bottles (≥1 atm). However it was possible to achieve higher methanogenic potential under a 100% CO atmosphere after acclimation of the sludge to CO. This adaptation to high CO concentrations led to a shift in the archaeal population, then dominated by hydrogen-utilizing methanogens, which were able to take over acetoclastic methanogens, while syntrophic acetate oxidizing (SAO) bacteria oxidized acetate into CO2 and H2. The disaggregation of the

  20. Biomethanation of Syngas Using Anaerobic Sludge: Shift in the Catabolic Routes with the CO Partial Pressure Increase

    PubMed Central

    Sancho Navarro, Silvia; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Bruant, Guillaume; Guiot, Serge R.

    2016-01-01

    Syngas generated by thermal gasification of biomass or coal can be steam reformed and purified into methane, which could be used locally for energy needs, or re-injected in the natural gas grid. As an alternative to chemical catalysis, the main components of the syngas (CO, CO2, and H2) can be used as substrates by a wide range of microorganisms, to be converted into gas biofuels, including methane. This study evaluates the carboxydotrophic (CO-consuming) methanogenic potential present in an anaerobic sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor treating waste water, and elucidates the CO conversion routes to methane at 35 ± 3°C. Kinetic activity tests under CO at partial pressures (pCO) varying from 0.1 to 1.5 atm (0.09–1.31 mmol/L in the liquid phase) showed a significant carboxydotrophic activity potential for growing conditions on CO alone. A maximum methanogenic activity of 1 mmol CH4 per g of volatile suspended solid and per day was achieved at 0.2 atm of CO (0.17 mmol/L), and then the rate decreased with the amount of CO supplied. The intermediary metabolites such as acetate, H2, and propionate started to accumulate at higher CO concentrations. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES), fluoroacetate, and vancomycin showed that in a mixed culture CO was converted mainly to acetate by acetogenic bacteria, which was further transformed to methane by acetoclastic methanogens, while direct methanogenic CO conversion was negligible. Methanogenesis was totally blocked at high pCO in the bottles (≥1 atm). However it was possible to achieve higher methanogenic potential under a 100% CO atmosphere after acclimation of the sludge to CO. This adaptation to high CO concentrations led to a shift in the archaeal population, then dominated by hydrogen-utilizing methanogens, which were able to take over acetoclastic methanogens, while syntrophic acetate oxidizing (SAO) bacteria oxidized acetate into CO2 and H2. The disaggregation of the

  1. Production of Renewable Natural Gas from Waste Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Suresh, S.; Arisutha, S.

    2013-03-01

    Biomass energy is expected to make a major contribution to the replacement of fossil fuels. Methane produced from biomass is referred to as bio-methane, green gas, bio-substitute natural gas or renewable natural gas (RNG) when it is used as a transport fuel. Research on upgrading of the cleaned producer gas to RNG is still ongoing. The present study deals with the conversion of woody biomass into fuels, RNG using gasifier. The various effects of parameters like temperature, pressure, and tar formation on conversion were also studied. The complete carbon conversion was observed at 480 °C and tar yield was significantly less. When biomass was gasified with and without catalyst at about 28 s residence time, ~75 % (w/w) and 88 % (w/w) carbon conversion for without and with catalyst was observed. The interest in RNG is growing; several initiatives to demonstrate the thermal-chemical conversion of biomass into methane and/or RNG are under development.

  2. Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brenkert, A.L.; Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Fung, I. |; Matthews, E. |

    1997-03-01

    Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

  3. Basis Selection for Wavelet Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A wavelet basis selection procedure is presented for wavelet regression. Both the basis and the threshold are selected using cross-validation. The method includes the capability of incorporating prior knowledge on the smoothness (or shape of the basis functions) into the basis selection procedure. The results of the method are demonstrated on sampled functions widely used in the wavelet regression literature. The results of the method are contrasted with other published methods.

  4. [Basis of radiation protection].

    PubMed

    Roth, J; Schweizer, P; Gückel, C

    1996-06-29

    After an introduction, three selected contributions to the 10th Course on Radiation Protection held at the University Hospital of Basel are presented. The principles of radiation protection and new Swiss legislation are discussed as the basis for radiological protection. Ways are proposed of reducing radiation exposure while optimizing the X-ray picture with a minimum dose to patient and personnel. Radiation effects from low doses. From the beginning, life on this planet has been exposed to ionizing radiation from natural sources. For about one century additional irradiation has reached us from man-made sources as well. In Switzerland the overall annual radiation exposure from ambient and man-made sources amounts to about 4 mSv. The terrestrial and cosmic radiation and natural radionuclids in the body cause about 1.17 mSv (29%). As much as 1.6 mSv (40%) results from exposure to radon and its progenies, primarily inside homes. Medical applications contribute approximately 1 mSv (26%) to the annual radiation exposure and releases from atomic weapons, nuclear facilities and miscellaneous industrial operations yield less than 0.12 mSv (< 5%) to the annual dose. Observations of detrimental radiation effects from intermediate to high doses are challenged by observations of biopositive adaptive responses and hormesis following low dose exposure. The important question, whether cellular adaptive response or hormesis could cause beneficial effects to the human organism that would outweigh the detrimental effects attributed to low radiation doses, remains to be resolved. Whether radiation exerts a detrimental, inhibitory, modifying or even beneficial effect is likely to result from identical molecular lesions but to depend upon their quantity, localization and time scale of initiation, as well as the specific responsiveness of the cellular systems involved. For matters of radiation protection the bionegative radiation effects are classified as deterministic effects or

  5. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  6. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  7. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  8. BASIS9.4. The Basis Code Development System

    SciTech Connect

    Allsman, R.; Barrett, K.; Busby, L.; Chiu, Y.; Crotinger, J.; Dubois, B.; Dubois, P.F.; Langdon, B.; Motteler, Z.C.; Takemoto, J.; Taylor, S.; Willmann, P.; Wilson, S.

    1993-08-01

    BASIS9.4 is a system for developing interactive computer programs in Fortran, with some support for C and C++ as well. Using BASIS9.4 you can create a program that has a sophisticated programming language as its user interface so that the user can set, calculate with, and plot, all the major variables in the program. The program author writes only the scientific part of the program; BASIS9.4 supplies an environment in which to exercise that scientific programming which includes an interactive language, an interpreter, graphics, terminal logs, error recovery, macros, saving and retrieving variables, formatted I/O, and online documentation.

  9. Biomethanization of orange peel waste.

    PubMed

    Martín, M A; Siles, J A; Chica, A F; Martín, A

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that orange peel waste is a potentially valuable resource that can be developed into high value products such as methane. Following a pre-treatment to extract D-limonene, the anaerobic digestion of orange peel waste was evaluated at laboratory and pilot scale under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. D-limonene removals of 70% were reached with pre-treatment. The results showed the convenience of thermophilic conditions for treating this waste as the methane production rate and biodegradability were higher than at mesophilic temperature. At pilot scale, a thermophilic continuously stirred-tank reactor working in semi-continuous mode was employed. The OLR was found to be in the range of 1.20-3.67 kg COD/m(3) d; the most appropriate range for working under stable conditions at SRT of 25 d. The methane yield coefficient was found to be 0.27-0.29 L(STP)CH(4)/g added COD and the biodegradability 84-90% under these conditions. However, acidification occurred at the highest OLR.

  10. Neurocybernetic basis of semantic processes.

    PubMed

    Restian, A

    1984-11-01

    Although semantics cannot be reduced to neurophysiology, it must have however a certain neurophysiologic basis and this paper deals with, that neurophysiologic basis which, in fact, has a neurocybernetic basis. The paper first approaches the relations between information and signification and their part within the nervous system's work. Then, it analyses semantic function discoverying neurocybernetic mechanisms which can be proper not only to the conventional signs but also to the objects and phenomena which in turn can play the sign's part. Finally, semantic levels of the nervous system, beginning with the most elementary level of unity, as letters are, and up to the level of the highest ideas and concepts the brain is working with, are described.

  11. The Basis Code Development System

    1994-03-15

    BASIS9.4 is a system for developing interactive computer programs in Fortran, with some support for C and C++ as well. Using BASIS9.4 you can create a program that has a sophisticated programming language as its user interface so that the user can set, calculate with, and plot, all the major variables in the program. The program author writes only the scientific part of the program; BASIS9.4 supplies an environment in which to exercise that scientificmore » programming which includes an interactive language, an interpreter, graphics, terminal logs, error recovery, macros, saving and retrieving variables, formatted I/O, and online documentation.« less

  12. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal and ozonation pretreatment methods.

    PubMed

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Frunzo, Luigi; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2014-12-15

    Treatment of food waste by anaerobic digestion can lead to an energy production coupled to a reduction of the volume and greenhouse gas emissions from this waste type. According to EU Regulation EC1774/2002, food waste should be pasteurized/sterilized before or after anaerobic digestion. With respect to this regulation and also considering the slow kinetics of the anaerobic digestion process, thermal and chemical pretreatments of food waste prior to mesophilic anaerobic digestion were studied. A series of batch experiments to determine the biomethane potential of untreated as well as pretreated food waste was carried out. All tested conditions of both thermal and ozonation pretreatments resulted in an enhanced biomethane production. The kinetics of the anaerobic digestion process were, however, accelerated by thermal pretreatment at lower temperatures (<120 °C) only. The best result of 647.5 ± 10.6 mlCH4/gVS, which is approximately 52% higher as compared to the specific biomethane production of untreated food waste, was obtained with thermal pretreatment at 80 °C for 1.5 h. On the basis of net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production could cover the energy requirement of the thermal pretreatment. In contrast, the enhanced biomethane production with ozonation pretreatment is insufficient to supply the required energy for the ozonator.

  13. Detection of Gaseous Plumes using Basis Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Lawrence; Walsh, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. There are several methods currently being used to detect plumes. They can be grouped into two categories: those that use a chemical spectral library and those that don’t. The approaches that use chemical libraries include least squares methods and physics-based approaches. They are "optimal" only if the plume chemical is actually in the search set but risk missing chemicals not in the library. The methods that don’t use a chemical spectral library are based on a statistical or data analytical transformation applied to the data. These include principle components, independent components, entropy, Fourier transform, and others. These methods do not explicitly take advantage of the physics of the signal formulation process and therefore don’t exploit all available information in the data. This paper presents initial results of employing basis vectors as a tool for plume detection. It describes the standard generalized least squares approach using gas spectra, presents the detection approach using basis vectors, and compares detection images resulting from applying both methods to synthetic hyperspectral images.

  14. GASB's Basis of Accounting Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovlak, Daniel L.

    1986-01-01

    In July 1984, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board began its "Measurement Focus/Basis of Accounting" project, which addresses measurement issues and revenue and expenditure recognition problems involving governmental funds. This article explains the project's background, alternatives discussed by the board, and tentative conclusions and…

  15. Reflection Relations and Fermionic Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negro, S.; Smirnov, F.

    2013-12-01

    There are two approaches to computing the one-point functions for sine-Gordon model in infinite volume. One is based on the use of the reflection relations, this is a bootstrap type procedure. Another is based on using the fermionic basis which originated in the study of lattice model. We show that the two procedures are deeply interrelated.

  16. A Molecular Basis of Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the molecular basis of cancer, focusing on genetics of the disease. Indicates that human cancers are initiated by oncogenes (altered versions of normal genes) and that in one case the critical alteration is a single point mutation that changes one amino acid in the protein encoded by the gene. (JN)

  17. Grobner Basis Representations of Sudoku

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taalman, Laura; Arnold, Elizabeth; Lucas, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses Grobner bases to explore the inherent structure of Sudoku puzzles and boards. In particular, we develop three different ways of representing the constraints of Sudoku puzzles with a system of polynomial equations. In one case, we explicitly show how a Grobner basis can be used to obtain a more meaningful representation of the…

  18. Retained gas inventory comparison

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON, W.B.

    1999-05-18

    Gas volume data derived from four different analytical methods were collected and analyzed for comparison to volumes originally used in the technical basis for the Basis for Interim Operations (BIO). The original volumes came from Hodgson (1996) listed in the reference section of this document. Hodgson (1996) screened all 177 single and double-shell tanks for the presence of trapped gas in waste via two analytical methods: Surface Level Rise (SLR), and Barometric Pressure Effect (BPE). More recent gas volume projections have been calculated using different analytical techniques along with updates to the parameters used as input to the SLR and BPE models. Gas volumes derived from new analytical instruments include those as measured by the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI) and Retained Gas Sampler (RGS). The results of this comparison demonstrate that the original retained gas volumes of Hodgson (1996) used as a technical basis in developing the BIO were conservative, and were conservative from a safety analysis standpoint. These results represent only comparisons to the original reported volumes using the limited set of newly acquired data that is available.

  19. Authorization basis requirements comparison report

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, W.M.

    1997-08-18

    The TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) consists of a set of documents identified by TWRS management with the concurrence of DOE-RL. Upon implementation of the TWRS Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), the AB list will be revised to include the BIO and TSRs. Some documents that currently form part of the AB will be removed from the list. This SD identifies each - requirement from those documents, and recommends a disposition for each to ensure that necessary requirements are retained when the AB is revised to incorporate the BIO and TSRs. This SD also identifies documents that will remain part of the AB after the BIO and TSRs are implemented. This document does not change the AB, but provides guidance for the preparation of change documentation.

  20. Perceptual basis for reactive teleoperation.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S.; Ewing, T. F.; Boyle, J. M.; Yule, T. J.

    2001-08-28

    To enhance task performance in partially structured environment, enhancement of teleoperation was proposed by introducing autonomous behaviors. Such autonomy is implemented based on reactive robotic architecture, where reactive motor agents that directly couples sensory inputs and motor actions become the building blocks. To this end, presented in this paper is a perceptual basis for the motor agents. The perceptual basis consists of perceptual agents that extracts environmental information from a structured light vision system and provide action oriented perception for the corresponding motor agents. Rather than performing general scene reconstruction, a perceptual agent directly provides the motion reference for the motor behavior. Various sensory mechanisms--sensor fission, fusion, and fashion--becomes basic building blocks of the perception process. Since perception is a process deeply intertwined with the motor actions, active perception may also incorporate motor behaviors as an integral perceptual process.

  1. Hanford Generic Interim Safety Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.C.

    1994-09-09

    The purpose of this document is to identify WHC programs and requirements that are an integral part of the authorization basis for nuclear facilities that are generic to all WHC-managed facilities. The purpose of these programs is to implement the DOE Orders, as WHC becomes contractually obligated to implement them. The Hanford Generic ISB focuses on the institutional controls and safety requirements identified in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  2. Performance Basis for Airborne Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Emerging applications of Airborne Separation Assistance System (ASAS) technologies make possible new and powerful methods in Air Traffic Management (ATM) that may significantly improve the system-level performance of operations in the future ATM system. These applications typically involve the aircraft managing certain components of its Four Dimensional (4D) trajectory within the degrees of freedom defined by a set of operational constraints negotiated with the Air Navigation Service Provider. It is hypothesized that reliable individual performance by many aircraft will translate into higher total system-level performance. To actually realize this improvement, the new capabilities must be attracted to high demand and complexity regions where high ATM performance is critical. Operational approval for use in such environments will require participating aircraft to be certified to rigorous and appropriate performance standards. Currently, no formal basis exists for defining these standards. This paper provides a context for defining the performance basis for 4D-ASAS operations. The trajectory constraints to be met by the aircraft are defined, categorized, and assessed for performance requirements. A proposed extension of the existing Required Navigation Performance (RNP) construct into a dynamic standard (Dynamic RNP) is outlined. Sample data is presented from an ongoing high-fidelity batch simulation series that is characterizing the performance of an advanced 4D-ASAS application. Data of this type will contribute to the evaluation and validation of the proposed performance basis.

  3. The Gas Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, V. V.

    1973-01-01

    Inquires into the individual names and dates which are associated with the various perfect gas laws on the basis of published and historically researched works. Indicates the presence of eight features in giving a scientist credit for a scientific discovery. (CC)

  4. Rarefied gas dynamics - Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Belotserkouskii, O.M.; Kogan, M.N.; Kutateladze, S.S.; Rebrov, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The volume (1) presents information on the following topics: the problems of kinetic theory of gases; asymptotic methods of the Boltzmann equation solution; kinetic theory and turbulence; Onsager's principle for the stationary Boltzmann equation; the stochastic theory of thermal fluctuations in nonequilibrium systems; kinetic equations of high nonequilibrium dense gas; kinetic theory of irreversible processes in two-temperature and two-velocity gas mixtures; physical models of gas dynamics with relaxational effects; modern problems of relaxation gas dynamics; methods of obtaining hydrodynamic equations of motion of complicated media and their boundary conditions on the basis of kinetic equations; and high energy molecules in gas dynamics.

  5. The Basis version of LASNEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, P. F.

    1990-10-01

    We have made major changes to the computer science aspects of our laser fusion simulation program LASNEX. LASNEX is now using the Basis system, a FORTRAN development system developed over the last six years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This has given users greatly increased power and flexibility. We have eliminated all non-standard usage and macros, enabling us to begin the port of LASNEX to workstations. At the same time, we have completely redone the system used to maintain the source and create new versions of LASNEX, resulting in major gains in capability and productivity.

  6. The Basis version of LASNEX

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, P.F.

    1990-10-26

    We have made major changes to the computer science aspects of our laser fusion simulation program LASNEX. LASNEX is now using the Basis system, a Fortran development system developed over the last six years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This has given users greatly increased power and flexibility. We have eliminated all non-standard usage and macros, enabling us to begin the port of LASNEX to workstations. At the same time, we have completely redone the system used to maintain the source and create new versions of LASNEX, resulting in major gains in capability and productivity. 5 refs.

  7. Value basis for conservation policy

    SciTech Connect

    Leiss, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a case study in attempting to apply a particular value (caring) to the domain of social policy, specifically resource conservation policy. The argument is that our consumer society erodes the social basis for the development by individuals of a sense of well-being and personal identity, and that a conservation ethic based on the concept of caring could provide a foundation in practical morality and public policy for a viable sense of well-being. Conservation, then, goes beyond eliminating wasteful consumption to encompass a public commitment that can further economic and social goals. 11 references.

  8. OSR encapsulation basis -- 100-KW

    SciTech Connect

    Meichle, R.H.

    1995-01-27

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis for a change in the Operations Safety Requirement (OSR) encapsulated fuel storage requirements in the 105 KW fuel storage basin which will permit the handling and storing of encapsulated fuel in canisters which no longer have a water-free space in the top of the canister. The scope of this report is limited to providing the change from the perspective of the safety envelope (bases) of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Operations Safety Requirements (OSR). It does not change the encapsulation process itself.

  9. PARFUME Theory and Model basis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Darrell L. Knudson; Gregory K Miller; G.K. Miller; D.A. Petti; J.T. Maki; D.L. Knudson

    2009-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The fuel performance modeling code PARFUME simulates the mechanical, thermal and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation. This report documents the theory and material properties behind vari¬ous capabilities of the code, which include: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) an analytical solution for stresses in the coating layers that accounts for irradiation-induced creep and swelling of the pyrocarbon layers, 3) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 4) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, and kernel migration (or amoeba effect), 5) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 6) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 7) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. The accident condi¬tion entails diffusion of fission products through the particle coating layers and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. This document represents the initial version of the PARFUME Theory and Model Basis Report. More detailed descriptions will be provided in future revisions.

  10. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline.

  11. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  12. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Luk, Adriana; Rao, Vivek; Butany, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis. PMID:24447924

  13. The Chemical Basis of Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Molecular biology now dominates pharmacology so thoroughly that it is difficult to recall that only a generation ago the field was very different. To understand drug action today, we characterize the targets through which they act and new drug leads are discovered on the basis of target structure and function. Until the mid-1980s the information often flowed in reverse: investigators began with organic molecules and sought targets, relating receptors not by sequence or structure but by their ligands. Recently, investigators have returned to this chemical view of biology, bringing to it systematic and quantitative methods of relating targets by their ligands. This has allowed the discovery of new targets for established drugs, suggested the bases for their side effects, and predicted the molecular targets underlying phenotypic screens. The bases for these new methods, some of their successes and liabilities, and new opportunities for their use are described. PMID:21058655

  14. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:17623380

  15. Gas sensing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, M A; Hallem, E A

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all animals are capable of sensing changes in environmental oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, which can signal the presence of food, pathogens, conspecifics, predators, or hosts. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model system for the study of gas sensing. C. elegans detects changes in O2 and CO2 levels and integrates information about ambient gas levels with other internal and external cues to generate context-appropriate behavioral responses. Due to its small nervous system and amenability to genetic and genomic analyses, the functional properties of its gas-sensing microcircuits can be dissected with single-cell resolution, and signaling molecules and natural genetic variations that modulate gas responses can be identified. Here, we discuss the neural basis of gas sensing in C. elegans, and highlight changes in gas-evoked behaviors in the context of other sensory cues and natural genetic variations. We also discuss gas sensing in other free-living nematodes and parasitic nematodes, focusing on how gas-sensing behavior has evolved to mediate species-specific behavioral requirements. PMID:24906953

  16. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). αβ T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  17. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

    2007-04-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

  18. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2008-03-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  19. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2009-12-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  20. Structural basis of spectrin elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, B.W.; Stevens, F.J.; Luthi, U.; Goldin, S.B.

    1991-10-17

    A new model of human erythrocyte {alpha}-spectrin is proposed. The secondary structure of human erythrocyte {alpha}-spectrin and its folding into a condensed structure that can convert reversibly in situ, into an elongated configuration is predicted from its deduced protein sequence. Results from conformational and amphipathicity analyses suggest that {alpha}-spectrin consists mainly of short amphipathicity helices interconnected by flexible turns and/or coils. The distribution of charges and amphipathicity of the helices can facilitate their folding into stable domains of 4 and 3 helices surrounding a hydrophobic core. The association between adjacent four- and three-helix domains further organize them into recurring seven-helix motifs that might constitute the basic structural units of the extended {alpha}-spectrin. The elongated spectrin molecule packs, in a sinusoidal fashion, through interactions between neighboring motifs into a compact structure. We suggest that the reversible extension and contraction of this sigmoidally packed structure is the molecular basis of the mechanism by which spectrin contributes to the elasticity of the red cell membrane.

  1. Structural basis for selectin mechanochemistry.

    PubMed

    Springer, Timothy A

    2009-01-01

    Selectins are adhesion molecules that resist large tensile forces applied by hydrodynamic forces to leukocytes binding to vessel walls. In crystals, the liganded (high-affinity) and unliganded (low-affinity) conformations differ in orientation between their tandem lectin and EGF domains. I examine how tensile force exerted on a selectin-ligand complex in vivo could favor the more extended, high-affinity conformation. Allostery is transmitted from the EGF-lectin domain interface to the ligand-binding interface on the lectin domain, 30 A away. Trp-1 of the lectin domain and the long axis of the EGF domain form an L-shaped prybar that is welded together by hydrogen bonds to the Trp-1 alpha-amino group. Pivoting of the prybar induced by force demolishes an interface between the Trp-1 side chain and the lectin domain at a switch1 region. These changes are transmitted by rigid body movement of the switch2 region to rearrangements in the switch3 region at the ligand binding site. Another switch region corresponds to a single residue in the EGF domain with large effects on ligand binding and rolling adhesion. Allostery in selectins, and the alignment of tensile force on a selectin-ligand complex with the transition pathway for conformational change, explain much of the structural basis for selectin mechanochemistry.

  2. The autoimmune basis of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Mahlios, Josh; De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-10-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagonic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (orexin)-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Evidence, such as a strong association with HLA DQB1*06:02, strongly suggests an autoimmune basis targeting hypocretin neurons. Genome-wide association studies have strengthened the association between narcolepsy and immune system gene polymorphisms, including the identification of polymorphisms in the T cell receptor alpha locus, TNFSF4 (also called OX40L), Cathepsin H (CTSH) the purinergic receptor P2RY11, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Recently, attention has been raised regarding a spike in cases of childhood narcolepsy in 2010 following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1) in China and vaccination with Pandemrix, an adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine that was used in Europe. How the immune system may be involved in disease initiation and/or progression remains a challenge to researchers. Potential immunological pathways that could lead to the specific elimination of hypocretin producing neurons include molecular mimicry or bystander activation, and are likely a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as upper airway infections. PMID:23725858

  3. BASIS: A GRB mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Teegarden, B.; Barbier, L.; Cline, T.; Parsons, A.; Tueller, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Palmer, D.; Krizmanic, J.; Fenimore, E.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Hurley, K.; Paciesas, W.; van Paradijs, J.; Woosley, S.; Leventhal, M.; McCammon, D.; Sanders, W.; Schaefer, B.

    1996-08-01

    We are studying a gamma-ray burst mission concept called the Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) as part of NASA's New Mission Concepts for Astrophysics program. The scientific objectives are to accurately locate bursts, determine their distance scale, and measure the physical characteristics of the emission region. Arcsecond burst positions (angular resolution ~30 arcsec, source positions ~3 arcsec for >10-6 erg/cm2 bursts) would be obtained for ~100 bursts per year using the 10-200 keV emission. This would allow the first deep, unconfused counterpart searches at other wavelengths. The key technological breakthrough that makes such measurements possible is the development of CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor detectors with fine (~100 micron) spatial resolution. Fine spectroscopy would be obtained between 0.2 and 200 keV. The 0.2 keV threshold would allow the first measurements of absorption in our Galaxy and possible host galaxies, constraining the distance scale and host environment.

  4. BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

    The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 500 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

  5. The genetic basis of cognition.

    PubMed

    Flint, J

    1999-11-01

    The molecular characterization of single-gene disorders or chromosomal abnormalities that result in a cognitive abnormality (predominantly mental retardation) and of the genetic variants responsible for variation in intellectual abilities (such as IQ, language impairment and dyslexia) is expected to provide new insights into the biology of human cognitive processes. To date this hope has not been realized. Success in finding mutations that give rise to mental retardation has not been matched by advances in our understanding of how genes influence cognition. In contrast, the use of engineered mutations in mice to study models of learning and memory has cast new light on the molecular basis of memory. A comparison of studies of human and mouse mutations indicates the limitations of current genetic approaches to the understanding of human cognition. It is essential to interpret a mutation's effect within a well-characterized neural system; mutations can be used to define gene function only when the mutation has an effect on a system whose constituents form a serial causal chain, such as the molecular components of a signal transduction pathway. Typically, however, genetic mutations with a cognitive and behavioural phenotype are characterized by specific effects on different systems whose inter-relationships are unknown. Genetic approaches are currently limited to exploring neuronal function; it is not yet clear whether they will throw light on how neuronal connections give rise to cognitive processes. We need a much greater integration of different levels of understanding of cognition in order to exploit the genetic discoveries. In short, a rapprochement between molecular and systems neuroscience is required.

  6. 10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for a hazard category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must establish and maintain the safety...

  7. 10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for a hazard category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must establish and maintain the safety...

  8. 10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for a hazard category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must establish and maintain the safety...

  9. 10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for a hazard category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must establish and maintain the safety...

  10. 10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for a hazard category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must establish and maintain the safety...

  11. Natural gas monthly, August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

  12. Gas gangrene

    MedlinePlus

    Tissue infection - Clostridial; Gangrene - gas; Myonecrosis; Clostridial infection of tissues; Necrotizing soft tissue infection ... Gas gangrene is most often caused by bacteria called Clostridium perfringens. It also can be caused by ...

  13. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  14. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z. [Newton, MA

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  15. Authorization basis for the 209-E Building

    SciTech Connect

    TIFFANY, M.S.

    1999-02-23

    This Authorization Basis document is one of three documents that constitute the Authorization Basis for the 209-E Building. Per the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) letter 98-WSD-074, this document, the 209-E Building Preliminary Hazards Analysis (WHC-SD-WM-TI-789), and the 209-E Building Safety Evaluation Report (97-WSD-074) constitute the Authorization Basis for the 209-E Building. This Authorization Basis and the associated controls and safety programs will remain in place until safety documentation addressing deactivation of the 209-E Building is developed by the contractor and approved by RL.

  16. BASIS FOR DETERMINATION OF CHEMICAL STABILITY & COMPATIBILITY OF SOLID WASTE CHEMICAL COMPATIBILITY TECHNICAL BASIS

    SciTech Connect

    STEELE, S.M.

    2004-11-01

    Solid wastes must be managed to prevent inadvertent reactions, explosion and degradation of waste containers per the ''Washington State Department of Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations'' (WAC 173-303). An understanding of chemical compatibility principles and a consistent approach for implementing compatibility requirements is essential for complying with the regulations. This document explains the technical basis for ensuring chemical compatibility for solid wastes that are stored on site at on-site TSD facilities and for solid waste that will go to off-site TSD facilities. The document applies directly to the following aspects of chemical compatibility: (1) Ensuring that hazardous waste is not chemically reactive or unstable such that it cannot be safely transported or stored; (2) Ensuring that lab packs (i.e., drums containing multiple inner containers of differing types of hazardous waste) are packaged such that incompatible chemicals are not placed into the same drum; (3) Selecting containers and liners that are compatible with the waste they contain. This document does not cover individual TSD requirements, or specific offsite TSD requirements. This document does not cover chemical compatibility and segregation requirements for shipping wastes on-site or off-site. This document does not cover radiological hazards associated with radioactive waste or mixed wastes. Evaluation of compatibility for comingling and treating solid waste is beyond the scope of this document. In addition, heat generation and gas generation as they apply to the Hanford waste acceptance criteria are not covered in this document.

  17. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir

    2015-05-01

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/Lα two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol-1. The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol-1.

  18. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir

    2015-05-15

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/L{sup α} two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}. The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}.

  19. Gas evolution from geopressured brines

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    The process of gas evolution from geopressured brine is examined using as a basis the many past studies of gas evolution from liquids in porous media. A discussion of a number of speculations that have been made concerning gas evolution from geopressured brines is provided. According to one, rapid pressure reduction will cause methane gas to evolve as when one opens a champagne bottle. It has been further speculated that evolved methane gas would migrate up to form an easily producible cap. As a result of detailed analyses, it can be concluded that methane gas evolution from geopressured brines is far too small to ever form a connected gas saturation except very near to the producing well. Thus, no significant gas cap could ever form. Because of the very low solubility of methaned in brine, the process of methane gas evolution is not at all analogous to evolution of carbon dioxide from champagne. A number of other speculations and questions on gas evolution are analyzed, and procedures for completing wells and testing geopressured brine reservoirs are discussed, with the conclusion that presently used procedures will provide adequate data to enable a good evaluation of this resource.

  20. Two petroleum systems in the Sacramento Basin, California - A basis for new discoveries

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B. ); Castano, J.R. ); Lillis, P. ); Mackevett, N.H.; Naeser, N. )

    1994-04-01

    The Sacramento basin is a north-trending fore-arc basin that contains Lat Jurassic to Holocene sedimentary rocks that become thicker to the south and are overpressured at depth. The basin fill is about 300 km long, 80 km wide, and as much as 16 km thick. Two petroleum systems occur in the Sacramento basin. The Dobbins-Forbes( ) gas system, which contained about 2.25 tcf (10[sup 12]ft[sup 3]) of recoverable gas, underlies the Winters-Domingine( ) gas system, which contained about 6.89 tcf of recoverable gas. Gas migrated laterally and to the north as much as 200 km in the Dobbins-Forbes( ) system, whereas in the Winters-Domingine( ) system, gas first migrated vertically and then crossed the Midland fault to the east for up to 40 km. For both systems, depth of gas production from reservoir rocks of Lake Cretaceous to Oligocene in different trap types is less than 3 km. By applying the petroleum-system concept and information about the geology and geochemistry available for this province, this study- provides a new testable hypthesis for the origin, migration, and accumulation of gas in the Sacramento basin. By reinterpreting some of the natural gas information, gas wetness, gas-oil ratio, vectors of migration, hydrocarbon volume, and thermal history, two petroleum systems are identified. Understanding of the origin of known accumulations in this province provides a basis for new plays that should lead to discoveries with substantial reserves.

  1. Energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions, and profitability of thermobarical pretreatment of cattle waste in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Budde, Jörn; Prochnow, Annette; Plöchl, Matthias; Suárez Quiñones, Teresa; Heiermann, Monika

    2016-03-01

    In this study modeled full scale application of thermobarical hydrolysis of less degradable feedstock for biomethanation was assessed in terms of energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions, and economy. Data were provided whether the substitution of maize silage as feedstock for biogas production by pretreated cattle wastes is beneficial in full-scale application or not. A model device for thermobarical treatment has been suggested for and theoretically integrated in a biogas plant. The assessment considered the replacement of maize silage as feedstock with liquid and/or solid cattle waste (feces, litter, and feed residues from animal husbandry of high-performance dairy cattle, dry cows, and heifers). The integration of thermobarical pretreatment is beneficial for raw material with high contents of organic dry matter and ligno-cellulose: Solid cattle waste revealed very short payback times, e.g. 9 months for energy, 3 months for greenhouse gases, and 3 years 3 months for economic amortization, whereas, in contrast, liquid cattle waste did not perform positive replacement effects in this analysis. PMID:26709050

  2. Energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions, and profitability of thermobarical pretreatment of cattle waste in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Budde, Jörn; Prochnow, Annette; Plöchl, Matthias; Suárez Quiñones, Teresa; Heiermann, Monika

    2016-03-01

    In this study modeled full scale application of thermobarical hydrolysis of less degradable feedstock for biomethanation was assessed in terms of energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions, and economy. Data were provided whether the substitution of maize silage as feedstock for biogas production by pretreated cattle wastes is beneficial in full-scale application or not. A model device for thermobarical treatment has been suggested for and theoretically integrated in a biogas plant. The assessment considered the replacement of maize silage as feedstock with liquid and/or solid cattle waste (feces, litter, and feed residues from animal husbandry of high-performance dairy cattle, dry cows, and heifers). The integration of thermobarical pretreatment is beneficial for raw material with high contents of organic dry matter and ligno-cellulose: Solid cattle waste revealed very short payback times, e.g. 9 months for energy, 3 months for greenhouse gases, and 3 years 3 months for economic amortization, whereas, in contrast, liquid cattle waste did not perform positive replacement effects in this analysis.

  3. 47 CFR 10.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis. 10.1 Section 10.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS General Information § 10.1 Basis. The rules in this part are issued pursuant to the authority contained in the Warning, Alert, and...

  4. 47 CFR 10.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis. 10.1 Section 10.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS General Information § 10.1 Basis. The rules in this part are issued pursuant to the authority contained in the Warning, Alert, and...

  5. 29 CFR 552.5 - Casual basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Casual basis. 552.5 Section 552.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO DOMESTIC SERVICE General Regulations § 552.5 Casual basis. As used...

  6. 29 CFR 552.5 - Casual basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Casual basis. 552.5 Section 552.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO DOMESTIC SERVICE General Regulations § 552.5 Casual basis. As used...

  7. 29 CFR 552.5 - Casual basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Casual basis. 552.5 Section 552.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO DOMESTIC SERVICE General Regulations § 552.5 Casual basis. As used...

  8. 29 CFR 552.5 - Casual basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Casual basis. 552.5 Section 552.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO DOMESTIC SERVICE General Regulations § 552.5 Casual basis. As used...

  9. 29 CFR 552.5 - Casual basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Casual basis. 552.5 Section 552.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO DOMESTIC SERVICE General Regulations § 552.5 Casual basis. As used...

  10. 42 CFR 406.1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statutory basis. 406.1 Section 406.1 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE ELIGIBILITY AND ENTITLEMENT General Provisions § 406.1 Statutory basis. Sections...

  11. 21 CFR 120.9 - Legal basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Legal basis. 120.9 Section 120.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS General Provisions § 120.9 Legal basis. Failure of a processor to have and...

  12. 42 CFR 408.200 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statutory basis. 408.200 Section 408.200 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... § 408.200 Statutory basis. This subpart implements provisions of section 1839(e) of the Social...

  13. 42 CFR 460.2 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis. 460.2 Section 460.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Basis,...

  14. 42 CFR 460.2 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis. 460.2 Section 460.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Basis,...

  15. 42 CFR 460.2 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Basis. 460.2 Section 460.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Basis,...

  16. 42 CFR 460.2 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis. 460.2 Section 460.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Basis,...

  17. 42 CFR 460.2 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis. 460.2 Section 460.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Basis,...

  18. 20 CFR 900.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Basis. 900.1 Section 900.1 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.1 Basis. This statement is issued by the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries (the Joint Board) pursuant to...

  19. 42 CFR 418.1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statutory basis. 418.1 Section 418.1 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE General Provision and Definitions § 418.1 Statutory basis. This part...

  20. 42 CFR 418.1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Statutory basis. 418.1 Section 418.1 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE General Provision and Definitions § 418.1 Statutory basis. This...

  1. 42 CFR 418.1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Statutory basis. 418.1 Section 418.1 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE General Provision and Definitions § 418.1 Statutory basis. This...

  2. 42 CFR 418.1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Statutory basis. 418.1 Section 418.1 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE General Provision and Definitions § 418.1 Statutory basis. This...

  3. 42 CFR 418.1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Statutory basis. 418.1 Section 418.1 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE General Provision and Definitions § 418.1 Statutory basis. This part...

  4. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there.

  5. Elements of gas contracts

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neal, J.

    1995-12-01

    The gas marketing scene has taken on a new look from the days of the {open_quotes}Long Term{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Life of Lease{close_quotes} Contracts. In the past natural gas was of ten sold direct from the wellhead or a producer-owned facility to a pipeline company at a flat rate price and the only parties involved were producer or seller and buyer. Today, the parties involved in the marketing process might include a gathering entity to gather gas at a central point and provide gathering, compression and/or dehydration services; multiple pipeline companies for transportation; sales representatives or marketing brokers to negotiate a sale of the available gas on a monthly basis; and purchasers or end users. New terms have also been introduced in the process such as: {open_quotes}LDC{close_quotes} (local distribution company), {open_quotes}FERC Order 636{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}Price Delivered-to-Pipeline{close_quotes} and the various {open_quotes}levels of Service{close_quotes} under Gas Sales and Purchase Agreements. Four common levels of service are: {open_quotes}Firm{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}Baseload{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}Swing{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Baseload/Operational{close_quotes}. It is evident that current marketing plans often require a separate contract for each service or commitment. Contract contents vary greatly, but most contain the following elements.

  6. Expanding Canadian natural gas production will strengthen growth of LP-gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.J. )

    1994-01-01

    In 1992, over 86% of Canadian propane and 70% of Canadian butane production originated in gas plants. Propane and butane production not recovered at gas plants is recovered in other processing facilities, primarily refineries and heavy oil upgraders. As a result, supplies of both products are largely tied to natural gas production, and the outlook for natural gas therefore provides the basis for any discussion on the outlook for gas processing and NGL industry infrastructure. The paper discusses gas processing, economies of scale, NGL supply, expected declines, industry structure and infrastructure, the two major centers of the Canadian NGL industry, new shippers, and required pipeline expansion.

  7. The Barents Sea impact study (BASIS): methodology and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Manfred; Basis Consortium

    2003-11-01

    Global and climate changes are subject to scientific, societal and political debates. Recent observational evidence and results of global climate models have identified the circumpolar North as a region particularly susceptible to future climate change. To understand and assess the consequences of these changes for environmental and societal components of the European Arctic, the Barents Sea Impact Study (BASIS), an EU-funded integrated regional impact study (IRIS) has been carried out (ENV4-CT-97-0637). In common with global integrated assessments (IAs), IRISs also take a holistic view on climate change and its impact. Contrary to IAs, however, IRISs adopt a regional to sub-regional spatial scale. BASIS was carried out by an interdisciplinary team of specialists from 13 institutions in 6 countries. Major results pertain to impacts of possible climate change on marine and terrestrial ecosystems, freshwater hydrology, marine trace gas budgets, forestry and fishery. However, in this paper we focus on the major methodological aspects of an IRIS in general and on methods applied in BASIS in particular.

  8. 17 CFR 229.1204 - (Item 1204) Oil and gas production, production prices and production costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... noted. Instruction 2 to Item 1204: Production of natural gas should include only marketable production of natural gas on an “as sold” basis. Production will include dry, residue, and wet gas, depending on whether liquids have been extracted before the registrant transfers title. Flared gas, injected gas,...

  9. 17 CFR 229.1204 - (Item 1204) Oil and gas production, production prices and production costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... noted. Instruction 2 to Item 1204: Production of natural gas should include only marketable production of natural gas on an “as sold” basis. Production will include dry, residue, and wet gas, depending on whether liquids have been extracted before the registrant transfers title. Flared gas, injected gas,...

  10. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  11. Gas magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of a precessional rate of a gas, such as an alkali gas, in a magnetic field is made by promoting a non-uniform precession of the gas in which substantially no net magnetic field affects the gas during a majority of the precession cycle. This allows sensitive gases that would be subject to spin-exchange collision de-phasing to be effectively used for extremely sensitive measurements in the presence of an environmental magnetic field such as the Earth's magnetic field.

  12. Gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiochon, Georges; Guillemin, Claude L.

    1990-11-01

    Gas chromatography is a powerful separation technique for gas and vapor mixtures. Combining separation and on-line detection permits accurate quantitative analysis of complex mixtures, including traces of compounds down to parts per trillions in some particular cases. The importance of gas chromatography in quality control and process control in the chemical and drug industry, in environmental pollution investigations and in clinical analysis is critical. The principles of the technique are discussed, the main components of a gas chromatograph are described and some idea of the importance of the applications is given.

  13. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  14. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  15. 42 CFR 405.2400 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL... Services § 405.2400 Basis. Subpart X is based on the provisions of the following sections of the Act... covered by the Medicare program....

  16. Generalized multiscale radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Billings, Stephen A; Wei, Hua-Liang; Balikhin, Michael A

    2007-12-01

    A novel modelling framework is proposed for constructing parsimonious and flexible multiscale radial basis function networks (RBF). Unlike a conventional standard single scale RBF network, where all the basis functions have a common kernel width, the new network structure adopts multiscale Gaussian functions as the bases, where each selected centre has multiple kernel widths, to provide more flexible representations with better generalization properties for general nonlinear dynamical systems. As a direct extension of the traditional single scale Gaussian networks, the new multiscale network is easy to implement and is quick to learn using standard learning algorithms. A k-means clustering algorithm and an improved orthogonal least squares (OLS) algorithm are used to determine the unknown parameters in the network model including the centres and widths of the basis functions, and the weights between the basis functions. It is demonstrated that the new network can lead to a parsimonious model with much better generalization property compared with the traditional single width RBF networks.

  17. Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

    1980-03-28

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  18. Gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Maxey, David V.; Carter, James G.

    1982-01-05

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  19. Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

    Improved binary and tertiary gas mixture for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below about 0.5 eV; whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  20. Gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Maxey, David V.; Carter, James G.

    1980-01-01

    Improved binary and tertiary gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below aout 0.5 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  1. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasek, Francis W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review covers fundamental developments in gas chromatography during 1982 and 1983. Literature is considered under these headings: columns; liguid phases; solid supports; sorption processes and solvents; open tubular column gas chromatography; instrumentation; high-resolution columns and applications; other techniques; qualitative and…

  2. Nanoplasmonics simulations at the basis set limit through completeness-optimized, local numerical basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Tuomas P. Sakko, Arto; Puska, Martti J.; Lehtola, Susi; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2015-03-07

    We present an approach for generating local numerical basis sets of improving accuracy for first-principles nanoplasmonics simulations within time-dependent density functional theory. The method is demonstrated for copper, silver, and gold nanoparticles that are of experimental interest but computationally demanding due to the semi-core d-electrons that affect their plasmonic response. The basis sets are constructed by augmenting numerical atomic orbital basis sets by truncated Gaussian-type orbitals generated by the completeness-optimization scheme, which is applied to the photoabsorption spectra of homoatomic metal atom dimers. We obtain basis sets of improving accuracy up to the complete basis set limit and demonstrate that the performance of the basis sets transfers to simulations of larger nanoparticles and nanoalloys as well as to calculations with various exchange-correlation functionals. This work promotes the use of the local basis set approach of controllable accuracy in first-principles nanoplasmonics simulations and beyond.

  3. Nanoplasmonics simulations at the basis set limit through completeness-optimized, local numerical basis sets.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Tuomas P; Lehtola, Susi; Sakko, Arto; Puska, Martti J; Nieminen, Risto M

    2015-03-01

    We present an approach for generating local numerical basis sets of improving accuracy for first-principles nanoplasmonics simulations within time-dependent density functional theory. The method is demonstrated for copper, silver, and gold nanoparticles that are of experimental interest but computationally demanding due to the semi-core d-electrons that affect their plasmonic response. The basis sets are constructed by augmenting numerical atomic orbital basis sets by truncated Gaussian-type orbitals generated by the completeness-optimization scheme, which is applied to the photoabsorption spectra of homoatomic metal atom dimers. We obtain basis sets of improving accuracy up to the complete basis set limit and demonstrate that the performance of the basis sets transfers to simulations of larger nanoparticles and nanoalloys as well as to calculations with various exchange-correlation functionals. This work promotes the use of the local basis set approach of controllable accuracy in first-principles nanoplasmonics simulations and beyond. PMID:25747068

  4. Natural gas imports and exports, first quarter report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-01

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent reporting quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

  5. Natural gas imports and exports, third quarter report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

  6. Natural gas imports and exports, fourth quarter report 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-01

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

  7. Chemical basis of rough and smooth variation in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Belisle, J T; Brennan, P J

    1989-01-01

    Rough and smooth colony variants of Mycobacterium kansasii were compared with respect to surface glycolipid composition. Thin-layer chromatography of the native glycolipid antigens, gas chromatography of the constituent sugars, and in situ probing with an appropriate monoclonal antibody by colony dot blot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunogold labeling demonstrated that all M. kansasii strains of smooth colony morphology contain on their surfaces the recently described trehalose-containing lipooligosaccharides, whereas all rough variants were devoid of such surface antigens. Yet all strains, rough and smooth, contained another glycolipid, the M. kansasii-specific phenolic glycolipid. Previous studies by others had shown that the rough forms of M. kansasii persist longer than smooth variants in experimentally infected mice. Therefore, this study may provide some insight into the question of the chemical basis of pathogenesis in certain mycobacteria. Images PMID:2722755

  8. TMD PDFs in the Laguerre polynomial basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    We suggest the modified matching procedure for TMD PDF to the integrated PDF aimed to increase the amount of perturbative information in the TMD PDF expression. The procedure consists in the selection and usage of the non-minimal operator basis, which restricts the expansion to desired general behavior. The implication of OPE allows to systematic account of the higher order corrections. In the case of TMD PDF we assume the Gaussian behavior, which suggests Laguerre polynomial basis as the best for the convergence of OPE. We present the leading and next-to-leading expression of TMD PDF in this basis. The obtained perturbative expression for the TMD PDF is valid in the wide region of b T (we estimate this region as b T ≲ 2 - 3 GeV-1 depending on x).

  9. Full Waveform Inversion with Optimal Basis Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Chang, Qianshun; Sheng, Ping

    2003-03-01

    Based on the approach suggested by Tarantola, and Gauthier etal., we show that the alternate use of the step (linear) function basis and the block function (quasi-δ function) basis can give accurate full waveform inversion results for the layered acoustic systems, starting from a uniform background. Our method is robust against additive white noise (up to 20% of the signal) and can resolve layers that are comparable to or smaller than a wavelength in thickness. The physical reason for the success of our approach is illustrated through a simple example.

  10. Full waveform inversion with optimal basis functions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gang; Chang, Qianshun; Sheng, Ping

    2003-03-14

    Based on the approach suggested by Tarantola, and Gauthier et al., we show that the alternate use of the step (linear) function basis and the block function (quasi-delta function) basis can give accurate full waveform inversion results for the layered acoustic systems, starting from a uniform background. Our method is robust against additive white noise (up to 20% of the signal) and can resolve layers that are comparable to or smaller than a wavelength in thickness. The physical reason for the success of our approach is illustrated through a simple example.

  11. The Q field, a variable quaternion basis

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.P.

    1986-06-01

    The author introduces the concept of the Q field as a 2 x 2 matrix representation of the variable basis of vectors satisfying the rule of multiplication of quaternion imaginary numbers and as an element of the group of transformations of the basis preserving the invariance of this multiplication rule. The rule for projecting such matrices on a given direction is determined with the help of the characteristic functions of the matrices-vectors of the Q field. The differential structure of Q fields is studied and the theory developed is illustrated by an example of a model-topological classification of particles according to the magnitude of their spin.

  12. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties.

  13. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties. PMID:22432618

  14. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Patrick; Whisnant, C. Steven

    2010-02-01

    To prepare frozen-spin HD targets for photonuclear physics at JLab, high purity HD is required. Commercially available gas is only ˜98% HD. To reach the purity required to make nuclear targets, the gas is distilled at low temperature to remove the H2 and D2 impurities. To monitor the distillation process and correlate the gas purity with the spin relaxation times, a low temperature gas chromatograph system has been developed that produces good separation of H2, HD and D2. The system uses a PLOT 5A column in a mixture of LN2 and i-pentane at temperatures between 110K and 135K. With this system, the relative concentrations can be determined with uncertainties of ˜10%. The chromatography process and the resulting chromatograms will be discussed. )

  15. Volcanic Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards Tephra/Ash Lava Flows Lahars Volcanic Gas Climate Change Pyroclastic Flows Volcanic Landslides Preparedness Volcano Hazard Zones ... Please see our discussion of volcanic gases and climate change for additional information. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is ...

  16. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cram, Stuart P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Selects fundamental developments in theory, methodology, and instrumentation in gas chromatography (GC). A special section reviews GC in the People's Republic of China. Over 1,000 references are cited. (CS)

  17. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-01-01

    The M200 originated in the 1970's under an Ames Research Center/Stanford University contract to develop a small, lightweight gas analyzer for Viking Landers. Although the unit was not used on the spacecraft, it was further developed by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Three researchers from the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. (MTI) to commercialize the analyzer. The original version (Micromonitor 500) was introduced in 1982, and the M200 in 1988. The M200, a more advanced version, features dual gas chromatograph which separate a gaseous mixture into components and measure concentrations of each gas. It is useful for monitoring gas leaks, chemical spills, etc. Many analyses are completed in less than 30 seconds, and a wide range of mixtures can be analyzed.

  18. System Dynamic Model for the Accumulation of Renewable Electricity using Power-to-Gas and Power-to-Liquid Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumberga, Andra; Timma, Lelde; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2015-12-01

    When the renewable energy is used, the challenge is match the supply of intermittent energy with the demand for energy therefore the energy storage solutions should be used. This paper is dedicated to hydrogen accumulation from wind sources. The case study investigates the conceptual system that uses intermitted renewable energy resources to produce hydrogen (power-to-gas concept) and fuel (power-to-liquid concept). For this specific case study hydrogen is produced from surplus electricity generated by wind power plant trough electrolysis process and fuel is obtained by upgrading biogas to biomethane using hydrogen. System dynamic model is created for this conceptual system. The developed system dynamics model has been used to simulate 2 different scenarios. The results show that in both scenarios the point at which the all electricity needs of Latvia are covered is obtained. Moreover, the methodology of system dynamics used in this paper is white-box model that allows to apply the developed model to other case studies and/or to modify model based on the newest data. The developed model can be used for both scientific research and policy makers to better understand the dynamic relation within the system and the response of system to changes in both internal and external factors.

  19. 23 CFR 140.904 - Reimbursement basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reimbursement basis. 140.904 Section 140.904 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... program. (2) Incurred subsequent to the date of authorization by the Federal Highway Administration...

  20. 23 CFR 140.904 - Reimbursement basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reimbursement basis. 140.904 Section 140.904 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... program. (2) Incurred subsequent to the date of authorization by the Federal Highway Administration...

  1. 23 CFR 140.904 - Reimbursement basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reimbursement basis. 140.904 Section 140.904 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... program. (2) Incurred subsequent to the date of authorization by the Federal Highway Administration...

  2. 23 CFR 140.904 - Reimbursement basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reimbursement basis. 140.904 Section 140.904 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... program. (2) Incurred subsequent to the date of authorization by the Federal Highway Administration...

  3. 23 CFR 140.904 - Reimbursement basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reimbursement basis. 140.904 Section 140.904 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... program. (2) Incurred subsequent to the date of authorization by the Federal Highway Administration...

  4. Salary basis of payment for overtime exemption.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, J C

    1994-07-01

    Often employers' problems in complying with the Fair Labor Standards Act salary basis of payment rules arise from their paid time off policies. Although it is possible to write policies that apply to both exempt and nonexempt employees, such policies are complex, and agencies may need to review their compliance with these rules.

  5. 42 CFR 405.500 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis. 405.500 Section 405.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.500...

  6. 340 waste handling facility interim safety basis

    SciTech Connect

    VAIL, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

  7. 14 CFR 400.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Space Launch Act of 1984, and applicable treaties and international agreements to which the United... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Basis. 400.1 Section 400.1 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 14 CFR 400.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Space Launch Act of 1984, and applicable treaties and international agreements to which the United... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Basis. 400.1 Section 400.1 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  9. 14 CFR 400.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Space Launch Act of 1984, and applicable treaties and international agreements to which the United... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Basis. 400.1 Section 400.1 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  10. 14 CFR 400.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Space Launch Act of 1984, and applicable treaties and international agreements to which the United... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Basis. 400.1 Section 400.1 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  11. 14 CFR 400.1 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Space Launch Act of 1984, and applicable treaties and international agreements to which the United... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis. 400.1 Section 400.1 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. 340 Waste handling facility interim safety basis

    SciTech Connect

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1996-10-04

    This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

  13. The molecular basis of peanut allergy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures, and discusses how modif...

  14. 42 CFR 433.300 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Providers § 433.300 Basis. This subpart implements— (a) Section 1903(d)(2)(A) of the Act, which directs that quarterly Federal payments to the States under title XIX (Medicaid) of the Act are to be reduced or... made. (b) Section 1903(d)(2) (C) and (D) of the Act, which provides that a State has 60 days...

  15. 29 CFR 541.602 - Salary basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... quantity of the work performed. Subject to the exceptions provided in paragraph (b) of this section, an exempt employee must receive the full salary for any week in which the employee performs any work without... they perform no work. An employee is not paid on a salary basis if deductions from the...

  16. 42 CFR 405.2400 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL... Services § 405.2400 Basis. Subpart X is based on the provisions of the following sections of the Act: (a... health clinic services and Federally qualified health center services covered by the Medicare program....

  17. 42 CFR 436.2 - Basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... than 65 years; State residence requirements excluding individuals who reside in the State; and... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM, PUERTO RICO, AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS General Provisions and Definitions § 436.2 Basis. This part implements the following sections of the Act and public laws that...

  18. 42 CFR 438.600 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statutory basis. 438.600 Section 438.600 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... This subpart is based on sections 1902(a)(4), 1902(a)(19), 1903(m), and 1932(d)(1) of the Act....

  19. 21 CFR 120.9 - Legal basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS General Provisions § 120.9 Legal basis. Failure of a processor to have and to implement a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system that complies with §§ 120.6, 120.7, and 120.8, or otherwise to operate in accordance with...

  20. 21 CFR 120.9 - Legal basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS General Provisions § 120.9 Legal basis. Failure of a processor to have and to implement a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system that complies with §§ 120.6, 120.7, and 120.8, or otherwise to operate in accordance with...

  1. The Biological Basis of Learning and Individuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the biological basis of learning and individuality. Presents an overview of recent discoveries that suggest learning engages a simple set of rules that modify the strength of connection between neurons in the brain. The changes are cited as playing an important role in making each individual unique. (MCO)

  2. THE METABOLIC BASIS OF ARSENIC TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metabolic Basis of Arsenic Toxicity

    David J. Thomas, Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Methylati...

  3. PRELIMINARY SELECTION OF MGR DESIGN BASIS EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Kappes

    1999-09-16

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify the preliminary design basis events (DBEs) for consideration in the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). For external events and natural phenomena (e.g., earthquake), the objective is to identify those initiating events that the MGR will be designed to withstand. Design criteria will ensure that radiological release scenarios resulting from these initiating events are beyond design basis (i.e., have a scenario frequency less than once per million years). For internal (i.e., human-induced and random equipment failures) events, the objective is to identify credible event sequences that result in bounding radiological releases. These sequences will be used to establish the design basis criteria for MGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs) design basis criteria in order to prevent or mitigate radiological releases. The safety strategy presented in this analysis for preventing or mitigating DBEs is based on the preclosure safety strategy outlined in ''Strategy to Mitigate Preclosure Offsite Exposure'' (CRWMS M&O 1998f). DBE analysis is necessary to provide feedback and requirements to the design process, and also to demonstrate compliance with proposed 10 CFR 63 (Dyer 1999b) requirements. DBE analysis is also required to identify and classify the SSCs that are important to safety (ITS).

  4. The Contextualist Basis of Scientific Explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guichun

    2014-03-01

    From perspectives of contextual structure, elements and features, this paper analyses the contextualist basis of scientific explanation. It is articulated that contextual analysis specifies the boundary conditions of syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics, clarifies the essence and value-orientation, constructs a conversational platform, and unveils the progress condition and historical continuity of scientific explanation.

  5. [Neurocybernetic basis of hallucinations and related illusions].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, A

    1977-03-01

    Present concepts of circuits of neurons involved in the development of regular perception are used as a basis for discussing possible processes proceeding in these circuits and producing hallucinations and other illusions and false perceptions in mental patients or normal subjects.

  6. 42 CFR 408.200 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... § 408.200 Statutory basis. This subpart implements provisions of section 1839(e) of the Social Security Act that allow State or local government agencies to enter into an agreement with the Secretary to...

  7. The Emotional and Moral Basis of Rationality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boostrom, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the basis of rationality, arguing that critical thinking tends to be taught in schools as a set of skills because of the failure to recognize that choosing to think critically depends on the prior development of stable sentiments or moral habits that nourish a rational self. Primary among these stable sentiments are the…

  8. Natural-gas price puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.

    1983-02-01

    Rectifying natural-gas underpricing and distortions in production has benefited the overall economy, but transition costs are large, and problems and strains continue. The natural-gas price story began with the 1954 price controls that developed into a wasteful, inefficient, and unfair system of too-low gas prices that resulted in the 1978 Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA). While meeting a number of goals, NGPA has also led to current large increases in gas prices, ironically at a time when producers complain of more gas than they can sell. This glut, however, may be a surplus of short-run deliverability rather than an increase in supply. Prices have not fallen even temporarily because long-term contracts common between pipelines and producers typically prevent downward adjustment of prices to meet demand fluctuations, and the economy (hence the consumer) cannot escape the costof sustaining capacity through up-and-down demand. Transportation and delivery costs that, while getting smaller in relation to wellhead prices, are rising, and inflation, higher interest rates, and costs of uncollectables add to the price. In addition, while a straightforward supply, demand, and cost explanation of the price picture is accurate enough on a national basis, the average cost of gas as it enters a particular pipeline is affected by such complexities as historical accident, location, timing, bargaining power, and management decisions.

  9. System Design and the Safety Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, Darrel

    2008-05-06

    The objective of this paper is to present the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) Lessons Learned for system design as it relates to safety basis documentation. BJC has had to reconcile incomplete or outdated system description information with current facility safety basis for a number of situations in recent months. This paper has relevance in multiple topical areas including documented safety analysis, decontamination & decommissioning (D&D), safety basis (SB) implementation, safety and design integration, potential inadequacy of the safety analysis (PISA), technical safety requirements (TSR), and unreviewed safety questions. BJC learned that nuclear safety compliance relies on adequate and well documented system design information. A number of PIS As and TSR violations occurred due to inadequate or erroneous system design information. As a corrective action, BJC assessed the occurrences caused by systems design-safety basis interface problems. Safety systems reviewed included the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Fluorination System, K-1065 fire alarm system, and the K-25 Radiation Criticality Accident Alarm System. The conclusion was that an inadequate knowledge of system design could result in continuous non-compliance issues relating to nuclear safety. This was especially true with older facilities that lacked current as-built drawings coupled with the loss of 'historical knowledge' as personnel retired or moved on in their careers. Walkdown of systems and the updating of drawings are imperative for nuclear safety compliance. System design integration with safety basis has relevance in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the BJC Lessons Learned in this area. It will be of benefit to DOE contractors that manage and operate an aging population of nuclear facilities.

  10. Greenhouse gas impacts of natural gas: Influence of deployment choice, methane leak rate, and methane GWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohan, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Growing supplies of natural gas have heightened interest in the net impacts of natural gas on climate. Although its production and consumption result in greenhouse gas emissions, natural gas most often substitutes for other fossil fuels whose emission rates may be higher. Because natural gas can be used throughout the sectors of the energy economy, its net impacts on greenhouse gas emissions will depend not only on the leak rates of production and distribution, but also on the use for which natural gas is substituted. Here, we present our estimates of the net greenhouse gas emissions impacts of substituting natural gas for other fossil fuels for five purposes: light-duty vehicles, transit buses, residential heating, electricity generation, and export for electricity generation overseas. Emissions are evaluated on a fuel cycle basis, from production and transport of each fuel through end use combustion, based on recent conditions in the United States. We show that displacement of existing coal-fired electricity and heating oil furnaces yield the largest reductions in emissions. The impact of compressed natural gas replacing petroleum-based vehicles is highly uncertain, with the sign of impact depending on multiple assumptions. Export of liquefied natural gas for electricity yields a moderate amount of emissions reductions. We further show how uncertainties in upstream emission rates for natural gas and in the global warming potential of methane influence the net greenhouse gas impacts. Our presentation will make the case that how natural gas is deployed is crucial to determining how it will impact climate.

  11. 75 FR 75896 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR 1 RIN 1545-BI66 Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock Correction In rule document 2010-25504 beginning on page 64072 in the issue of...

  12. 75 FR 6166 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts, 1, 31, and 301 RIN 1545-Bl66 Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock Correction In proposed rule document E9-29855 beginning on...

  13. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  14. Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2011-08-31

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  15. Genetic basis of human brain evolution

    PubMed Central

    Vallender, Eric J.; Mekel-Bobrov, Nitzan; Lahn, Bruce T.

    2009-01-01

    Human evolution is characterized by a rapid increase in brain size and complexity. Decades of research have made important strides in identifying anatomical and physiological substrates underlying the unique features of the human brain. By contrast, it has become possible only very recently to examine the genetic basis of human brain evolution. Through comparative genomics, tantalizing insights regarding human brain evolution have emerged. The genetic changes that potentially underlie human brain evolution span a wide range from single nucleotide substitutions to large-scale structural alterations of the genome. Similarly, the functional consequences of these genetic changes vary greatly, including protein-sequence alterations, cis-regulatory changes and even the emergence of new genes and the extinction of existing ones. Here, we provide a general review of recent findings into the genetic basis of human brain evolution, highlight the most notable trends that have emerged and caution against overinterpretation of current data. PMID:18848363

  16. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2006-07-31

    This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  17. High Scores at BASIS Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2014-01-01

    While U.S. schools struggled to reach even an average score on a key international exam for 15-year-olds in 2012, BASIS Tucson North, an economically modest, ethnically diverse charter school in Arizona, outperformed every country in the world, and left even Shanghai, China's academic gem in the dust. With the U.S. frantic about its place in…

  18. Minimal Basis for Gauge Theory Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2009-10-16

    Identities based on monodromy for integrations in string theory are used to derive relations between different color-ordered tree-level amplitudes in both bosonic and supersymmetric string theory. These relations imply that the color-ordered tree-level n-point gauge theory amplitudes can be expanded in a minimal basis of (n-3)exclamation amplitudes. This result holds for any choice of polarizations of the external states and in any number of dimensions.

  19. A Genetic Basis for Motivated Exercise.

    PubMed

    Good, Deborah J; Li, Mengjiao; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2015-10-01

    Prior research has demonstrated a genetic basis for motivated exercise, with evidence of a role for nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2/Nhlh2). Nhlh2 transcriptionally regulates the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene. This article examines the evidence for the hypothesis that polymorphisms in NHLH2 or MAO-A contribute to differences in the human motivation for exercise and physical activity. The genetic pathways that link exercise and motivation are discussed. PMID:26196864

  20. The basis spline method and associated techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We outline the Basis Spline and Collocation methods for the solution of Partial Differential Equations. Particular attention is paid to the theory of errors, and the handling of non-self-adjoint problems which are generated by the collocation method. We discuss applications to Poisson's equation, the Dirac equation, and the calculation of bound and continuum states of atomic and nuclear systems. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  1. The molecular basis for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jethro; Kesari, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted therapy for glioblastoma has arrived, but results have been modest thus far. This review highlights the challenges inherent to treating glioblastoma with targeted therapy and delves into the complex signaling networks that form the molecular basis of novel therapies. Past failures, current challenges, and future possibilities are discussed in the context of the classic "oncogenic" signaling network, as well as the "nononcogenic" stress response network.

  2. A Genetic Basis for Motivated Exercise.

    PubMed

    Good, Deborah J; Li, Mengjiao; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2015-10-01

    Prior research has demonstrated a genetic basis for motivated exercise, with evidence of a role for nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2/Nhlh2). Nhlh2 transcriptionally regulates the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene. This article examines the evidence for the hypothesis that polymorphisms in NHLH2 or MAO-A contribute to differences in the human motivation for exercise and physical activity. The genetic pathways that link exercise and motivation are discussed.

  3. Neurons with radial basis like rate functions.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt László

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural networks constructed with "locally tuned processing units" and more generally referred to as "radial basis function networks" have been proposed by a number of workers. In this communication, I submit a conjecture, based on indirect experimental and direct computational evidence of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, that there may be biological neurons in nervous systems for which the rate function is locally tuned. If proved to be valid, this conjecture may simplify neurodynamic models of some functions of nervous systems.

  4. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  5. Biological basis for protection of the environment.

    PubMed

    Larsson, C-M

    2012-01-01

    The approach to protection of the environment may vary considerably depending on ethical basis, methodological approach, and identification of endpoints and protective targets. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reviewed these issues in Publication 91, 'A framework for assessing the impact of ionising radiation on non-human species', published in 2003. At the same time, ICRP proposed that a possible future ICRP system addressing environmental assessment and protection would focus on biota, that the system should be effect-based so that any reasoning about adequate protection would be derived from firm understanding of harm at different exposure levels, and that the system should be based on data sets for Reference Animals and Plants. ICRP has thus chosen to approach environmental protection on the basis of biology, and further developed the approach in Publications 103, 108 and 114. This paper explores the biological basis for the ICRP system of environmental protection from the viewpoints of: the effects endpoints of concern; the hierarchy of biological organisation; adequate and appropriate protective targets; and the derivation of benchmark dose (rates) to guide protective efforts.

  6. Physics basis for MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.; Simonen, T.C.

    1980-01-16

    The physics topics included here are the following: (1) adiabaticity, (2) MHD stability, (3) radial transport, (4) barrier physics, (5) loss-cone instability, (6) effect of gas recycling and secondary electron emission, (7) Monte Carlo simulations of tandem mirror physics, (8) charge-exchange pumping of thermal barriers, (9) vacuum pumping in the A-cell, and (10) microstability in the central cell. (MOW)

  7. Mud/gas separator sizing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, G.R. )

    1991-12-01

    Recent wellsite disasters have led to an increased emphasis on properly sized mud/gas separators. This paper reviews and analyzes existing mud/gas separator technology and recommends separator configuration, components, design considerations, and a sizing procedure. A simple method of evaluating mud/gas separation within the separator vessel has been developed as a basis for the sizing procedure. A mud/gas separator sizing worksheet will assist drilling personnel with the sizing calculations. The worksheet provides a quick and easy evaluation of most mud/gas separators for a specific well application. A brief discussion of other mud/gas separator considerations is provided, including separator components, testing, materials, and oil-based-mud considerations.

  8. Gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  9. 40 CFR 791.40 - Basis for the proposed order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.40 Basis for the proposed order... other basis for allocation if necessary. Additional factors that may be taken into account include,...

  10. Toward a relativistic gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Solovev, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    Macroscopic gas dynamics on the basis of general-relativity equations is examined. An additional equation is derived which provides for completeness of the system of relativistic gasdynamic equations. Relativistic equations of two-fluid electromagnetic gas dynamics are obtained. The introduction of appropriate energy-momentum tensors makes it possible to allow for dissipative processes conditioned by viscosity, thermal conductivity, radiative thermal conductivity, ohmic resistance, and ion-electron temperature difference. The problem of generalizing the Friedmann cosmological model in the case of particle production and annihilation is considered. Also, considered are gas equilibrium in a spherically symmetric gravitational field and a two-fluid relativistic stream in an intrinsic electromagnetic field. 16 references.

  11. Neurobiological Basis of Language Learning Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Saloni; Watkins, Kate E; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we highlight why there is a need to examine subcortical learning systems in children with language impairment and dyslexia, rather than focusing solely on cortical areas relevant for language. First, behavioural studies find that children with these neurodevelopmental disorders perform less well than peers on procedural learning tasks that depend on corticostriatal learning circuits. Second, fMRI studies in neurotypical adults implicate corticostriatal and hippocampal systems in language learning. Finally, structural and functional abnormalities are seen in the striatum in children with language disorders. Studying corticostriatal networks in developmental language disorders could offer us insights into their neurobiological basis and elucidate possible modes of compensation for intervention. PMID:27422443

  12. Anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tröbs, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Wilms tumor surgery requires meticulous planning and sophisticated surgical technique. Detailed anatomical knowledge can facilitate the uneventful performance of tumor nephrectomy and cannot be replaced by advanced and sophisticated imaging techniques. We can define two main goals for surgery: (1) exact staging as well as (2) safe and complete resection of tumor without spillage. This review aims to review the anatomical basis for Wilms tumor surgery. It focuses on the surgical anatomy of retroperitoneal space, aorta, vena cava and their large branches with lymphatics. Types and management of vascular injuries are discussed. PMID:20671845

  13. Chopped random-basis quantum optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Caneva, Tommaso; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2011-08-15

    In this work, we describe in detail the chopped random basis (CRAB) optimal control technique recently introduced to optimize time-dependent density matrix renormalization group simulations [P. Doria, T. Calarco, and S. Montangero, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 190501 (2011)]. Here, we study the efficiency of this control technique in optimizing different quantum processes and we show that in the considered cases we obtain results equivalent to those obtained via different optimal control methods while using less resources. We propose the CRAB optimization as a general and versatile optimal control technique.

  14. Tests for Wavelets as a Basis Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Thomas; Evenbly, Glen; White, Steven

    A wavelet transformation is a special type of filter usually reserved for image processing and other applications. We develop metrics to evaluate wavelets for general problems on test one-dimensional systems. The goal is to eventually use a wavelet basis in electronic structure calculations. We compare a variety of orthogonal wavelets such as coiflets, symlets, and daubechies wavelets. We also evaluate a new type of orthogonal wavelet with dilation factor three which is both symmetric and compact in real space. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award #DE-SC008696.

  15. The Cellular Basis of a Corollary Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2006-01-01

    How do animals discriminate self-generated from external stimuli during behavior and prevent desensitization of their sensory pathways? A fundamental concept in neuroscience states that neural signals, termed corollary discharges or efference copies, are forwarded from motor to sensory areas. Neurons mediating these signals have proved difficult to identify. We show that a single, multisegmental interneuron is responsible for the pre- and postsynaptic inhibition of auditory neurons in singing crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). Therefore, this neuron represents a corollary discharge interneuron that provides a neuronal basis for the central control of sensory responses.

  16. The cellular basis of a corollary discharge.

    PubMed

    Poulet, James F A; Hedwig, Berthold

    2006-01-27

    How do animals discriminate self-generated from external stimuli during behavior and prevent desensitization of their sensory pathways? A fundamental concept in neuroscience states that neural signals, termed corollary discharges or efference copies, are forwarded from motor to sensory areas. Neurons mediating these signals have proved difficult to identify. We show that a single, multisegmental interneuron is responsible for the pre- and postsynaptic inhibition of auditory neurons in singing crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). Therefore, this neuron represents a corollary discharge interneuron that provides a neuronal basis for the central control of sensory responses.

  17. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  18. Reduced Basis Method for Nanodevices Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, George Shu Heng

    2008-05-23

    Ballistic transport simulation in nanodevices, which involves self-consistently solving a coupled Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations, is usually computationally intensive. Here, we propose coupling the reduced basis method with the subband decomposition method to improve the overall efficiency of the simulation. By exploiting a posteriori error estimation procedure and greedy sampling algorithm, we are able to design an algorithm where the computational cost is reduced significantly. In addition, the computational cost only grows marginally with the number of grid points in the confined direction.

  19. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  20. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  1. RAETRAD MODEL OF RADON GAS GENERATION, TRANSPORT, AND INDOOR ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the theoretical basis, implementation, and validation of the Radon Emanation and Transport into Dwellings (RAETRAD) model, a conceptual and mathematical approach for simulating radon (222Rn) gas generation and transport from soils and building foundations to ...

  2. The scientific basis of generalist medicine.

    PubMed

    Pruessner, H T; Hensel, W A; Rasco, T L

    1992-04-01

    The authors state that one of the reasons medical students favor specialist medicine over generalist medicine (i.e., primary care) is that they see generalist medicine as existing in a nebulous world of non-science. Students often feel that the scope of knowledge in generalist disciplines is so broad and unbounded that these fields cannot be approached with sufficient scientific rigor. Students hold this view in part because they are unable to see the shortcomings of the reductionist thinking that dominates medical education and specialty medical care. But now a new field, chaos science, reveals the intellectual basis for generalist medicine, because it finds patterns and order in the behavior of whole, complex systems (such as human beings) and explains the necessity for the experiential, holistic, and intuitive processes that are essential in generalist care. This intellectual basis is neither greater nor lesser than that of specialist medicine--just different. To explain these contentions, the history, strengths, and limits of reductionist thinking are discussed, and aspects of chaos science, such as the butterfly effect and strange attractors, are described. The authors close by emphasizing the importance of striking a balance between reductionist and whole-systems thinking, and challenge students who "have an eye for pattern and a taste for complexity, jagged edges, and sudden leaps" to consider a career in primary care medicine, where they will be, in effect, the chaos scientists of human beings. PMID:1558590

  3. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  4. Genetic basis of human reproductive endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Fauser, B C; Hsueh, A J

    1995-04-01

    Disturbed human reproductive function may be caused by environmental and/or genetic factors. Much information related to single gene defects underlying reproductive failure has become available in recent years due to advances in molecular biology. In this review, techniques currently applied for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis are addressed. We also highlight underlying molecular mechanisms and the corresponding clinical presentation of single gene defects affecting (i) the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in disturbed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron migration, or leading to defective gonadotrophins, gonadotrophin receptors and the Gs alpha protein; (ii) gonadal and adrenal steroid biosynthesis and (iii) steroid and insulin receptors. The potential genetic basis of polycystic ovary syndrome is also discussed. Although disease states caused by well-defined genetic abnormalities appear to represent only a small proportion of those found in the patient population, it should be considered that these affected individuals represent only the most severe cases in a wide spectrum of genetic abnormalities underlying disturbed fertility. Comprehension of these extreme cases will provide the basis for the elucidation of more common reproductive disorders as the result of subtle genetic changes or increased susceptibility to environmental factors.

  5. The genetic basis of white tigers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Dong, Gui-Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Xue-Li; Zhang, De-Lu; Yang, Han-Dong; Zhang, Tian-You; Zou, Zheng-Ting; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhuang, Yan; Bhak, Jong; Cho, Yun Sung; Dai, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Tai-Jiao; Xie, Can; Li, Ruiqiang; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2013-06-01

    The white tiger, an elusive Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) variant with white fur and dark stripes, has fascinated humans for centuries ever since its discovery in the jungles of India. Many white tigers in captivity are inbred in order to maintain this autosomal recessive trait and consequently suffer some health problems, leading to the controversial speculation that the white tiger mutation is perhaps a genetic defect. However, the genetic basis of this phenotype remains unknown. Here, we conducted genome-wide association mapping with restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) in a pedigree of 16 captive tigers segregating at the putative white locus, followed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of the three parents. Validation in 130 unrelated tigers identified the causative mutation to be an amino acid change (A477V) in the transporter protein SLC45A2. Three-dimensional homology modeling suggests that the substitution may partially block the transporter channel cavity and thus affect melanogenesis. We demonstrate the feasibility of combining RAD-seq and WGS to rapidly map exotic variants in nonmodel organisms. Our results identify the basis of the longstanding white tiger mystery as the same gene underlying color variation in human, horse, and chicken and highlight its significance as part of the species' natural polymorphism that is viable in the wild.

  6. The genetic basis of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Tafti, Mehdi

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of genes, environment and gene-environment interactions to sleep disorders is increasingly recognized. Well-documented familial and twin sleep disorder studies suggest an important influence of genetic factors. However, only few sleep disorders have an established genetic basis including four rare diseases that may result from a single gene mutation: fatal familial insomnia, familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome, chronic primary insomnia, and narcolepsy with cataplexy. However, most sleep disorders are complex in terms of their genetic susceptibility together with the variable expressivity of the phenotype even within a same family. Recent linkage, genome-wide and candidate gene association studies resulted in the identification of gene mutations, gene localizations, or evidence for susceptibility genes and/or loci in several sleep disorders. Molecular techniques including mainly genome-wide linkage and association studies are further required to identify the contribution of new genes. These identified susceptibility genetic determinants will provide clues to better understand pathogenesis of sleep disorders, to assess the risk for diseases and also to find new drug targets to treat and to prevent the underlying conditions. We reviewed here the role of genetic basis in most of key sleep disorders. PMID:19075715

  7. The genetic basis of white tigers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Dong, Gui-Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Xue-Li; Zhang, De-Lu; Yang, Han-Dong; Zhang, Tian-You; Zou, Zheng-Ting; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhuang, Yan; Bhak, Jong; Cho, Yun Sung; Dai, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Tai-Jiao; Xie, Can; Li, Ruiqiang; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2013-06-01

    The white tiger, an elusive Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) variant with white fur and dark stripes, has fascinated humans for centuries ever since its discovery in the jungles of India. Many white tigers in captivity are inbred in order to maintain this autosomal recessive trait and consequently suffer some health problems, leading to the controversial speculation that the white tiger mutation is perhaps a genetic defect. However, the genetic basis of this phenotype remains unknown. Here, we conducted genome-wide association mapping with restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) in a pedigree of 16 captive tigers segregating at the putative white locus, followed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of the three parents. Validation in 130 unrelated tigers identified the causative mutation to be an amino acid change (A477V) in the transporter protein SLC45A2. Three-dimensional homology modeling suggests that the substitution may partially block the transporter channel cavity and thus affect melanogenesis. We demonstrate the feasibility of combining RAD-seq and WGS to rapidly map exotic variants in nonmodel organisms. Our results identify the basis of the longstanding white tiger mystery as the same gene underlying color variation in human, horse, and chicken and highlight its significance as part of the species' natural polymorphism that is viable in the wild. PMID:23707431

  8. Technical basis for establishing residual radioactive concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr. ); Meck, R.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates the release of slightly radioactive property for unrestricted use. On July 3, 1990, the NRC published a Policy Statement concerning slightly radioactive materials that are below regulatory concern (BRC). The BRC Policy Statement establishes the framework within which the Commission will formulate rules or make licensing decisions to exempt from some or all regulatory controls certain practices involving small quantities of radioactive material.'' The heart of the NRC Policy Statement on BRC material is its individual and collective radiation dose limits. To ensure a uniform approach and consistent regulatory decisions, the NRC authorized the development of a comprehensive technical basis that considers the translation of residual contamination levels to annual dose. Radiation doses from residual contamination in buildings and soil are derived from a generic radiation exposure scenario analysis. This paper describes the development of the comprehensive technical basis for translating residual contamination levels to annual dose, provides the modeling details of an example scenario, and presents a comparison of results with existing guidance in Regulatory Guide 1.86. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. The entropic basis of collective behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Richard P.; Garnett, Roman

    2015-01-01

    We identify a unique viewpoint on the collective behaviour of intelligent agents. We first develop a highly general abstract model for the possible future lives these agents may encounter as a result of their decisions. In the context of these possibilities, we show that the causal entropic principle, whereby agents follow behavioural rules that maximize their entropy over all paths through the future, predicts many of the observed features of social interactions among both human and animal groups. Our results indicate that agents are often able to maximize their future path entropy by remaining cohesive as a group and that this cohesion leads to collectively intelligent outcomes that depend strongly on the distribution of the number of possible future paths. We derive social interaction rules that are consistent with maximum entropy group behaviour for both discrete and continuous decision spaces. Our analysis further predicts that social interactions are likely to be fundamentally based on Weber's law of response to proportional stimuli, supporting many studies that find a neurological basis for this stimulus–response mechanism and providing a novel basis for the common assumption of linearly additive ‘social forces’ in simulation studies of collective behaviour. PMID:25833243

  10. Modelling erosion on a daily basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikha Shrestha, Dhruba; Jetten, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Effect of soil erosion causing negative impact on ecosystem services and food security is well known. To assess annual erosion rates various empirical models have been extensively used in all the climatic regions. While these models are simple to operate and do not require lot of input data, the effect of extreme rain is not taken into account in the annual estimations. For analysing the effects of extreme rain the event- based models become handy. These models can simulate detail erosional processes including particle detachment, transportation and deposition of sediments during a storm. But they are not applicable for estimating annual erosion rates. Moreover storm event data may not be available everywhere which prohibits their extensive use. In this paper we describe a method by adapting the revised MMF model to assess erosion on daily basis so that the effects of extreme rains are taken into account. We couple it to a simple surface soil moisture balance on a daily basis and include estimation of daily vegetation cover changes. Annual soil loss is calculated by adding daily erosion rates. We compare the obtained results with that obtained from applying the revised MMF model in a case study in the Mamora plateau in northwest Morocco which is affected by severe gully formation. The results show clearly the effects of exceptional rain in erosional processes which cannot be captured in an annual model.

  11. The entropic basis of collective behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mann, Richard P; Garnett, Roman

    2015-05-01

    We identify a unique viewpoint on the collective behaviour of intelligent agents. We first develop a highly general abstract model for the possible future lives these agents may encounter as a result of their decisions. In the context of these possibilities, we show that the causal entropic principle, whereby agents follow behavioural rules that maximize their entropy over all paths through the future, predicts many of the observed features of social interactions among both human and animal groups. Our results indicate that agents are often able to maximize their future path entropy by remaining cohesive as a group and that this cohesion leads to collectively intelligent outcomes that depend strongly on the distribution of the number of possible future paths. We derive social interaction rules that are consistent with maximum entropy group behaviour for both discrete and continuous decision spaces. Our analysis further predicts that social interactions are likely to be fundamentally based on Weber's law of response to proportional stimuli, supporting many studies that find a neurological basis for this stimulus-response mechanism and providing a novel basis for the common assumption of linearly additive 'social forces' in simulation studies of collective behaviour. PMID:25833243

  12. GAS SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

    1961-07-11

    A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

  13. Uniform quantized electron gas.

    PubMed

    Høye, Johan S; Lomba, Enrique

    2016-10-19

    In this work we study the correlation energy of the quantized electron gas of uniform density at temperature T  =  0. To do so we utilize methods from classical statistical mechanics. The basis for this is the Feynman path integral for the partition function of quantized systems. With this representation the quantum mechanical problem can be interpreted as, and is equivalent to, a classical polymer problem in four dimensions where the fourth dimension is imaginary time. Thus methods, results, and properties obtained in the statistical mechanics of classical fluids can be utilized. From this viewpoint we recover the well known RPA (random phase approximation). Then to improve it we modify the RPA by requiring the corresponding correlation function to be such that electrons with equal spins can not be on the same position. Numerical evaluations are compared with well known results of a standard parameterization of Monte Carlo correlation energies. PMID:27546166

  14. Uniform quantized electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Johan S.; Lomba, Enrique

    2016-10-01

    In this work we study the correlation energy of the quantized electron gas of uniform density at temperature T  =  0. To do so we utilize methods from classical statistical mechanics. The basis for this is the Feynman path integral for the partition function of quantized systems. With this representation the quantum mechanical problem can be interpreted as, and is equivalent to, a classical polymer problem in four dimensions where the fourth dimension is imaginary time. Thus methods, results, and properties obtained in the statistical mechanics of classical fluids can be utilized. From this viewpoint we recover the well known RPA (random phase approximation). Then to improve it we modify the RPA by requiring the corresponding correlation function to be such that electrons with equal spins can not be on the same position. Numerical evaluations are compared with well known results of a standard parameterization of Monte Carlo correlation energies.

  15. Volcanic gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  16. 14 CFR 152.315 - Reporting on accrual basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.315 Reporting on accrual basis. (a... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting on accrual basis. 152.315 Section... financial reports on an accrual basis. (b) If records are not maintained on an accrual basis by a sponsor...

  17. 47 CFR 13.1 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis and purpose. 13.1 Section 13.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS General § 13.1 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. The basis for the rules contained in this part is the Communications Act of 1934,...

  18. Gas Detector LCLS Engineering Specifications Document

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2007-02-09

    There are two Gas Detectors, located upstream and downstream of the FEL attenuation materials, which provide a non-intrusive measure of the FEL pulse energy in the fundamental, in real-time, on a pulse-by-pulse basis. The FEL operators and the users will use this information to monitor the performance of the FEL and the Attenuator and to cross-calibrate other detectors. The Gas Detectors measure the FEL pulse energy by measuring the fluorescence induced in a small volume of N{sub 2} gas by the passage of the FEL.

  19. A neural basis for social cooperation.

    PubMed

    Rilling, James; Gutman, David; Zeh, Thorsten; Pagnoni, Giuseppe; Berns, Gregory; Kilts, Clinton

    2002-07-18

    Cooperation based on reciprocal altruism has evolved in only a small number of species, yet it constitutes the core behavioral principle of human social life. The iterated Prisoner's Dilemma Game has been used to model this form of cooperation. We used fMRI to scan 36 women as they played an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma Game with another woman to investigate the neurobiological basis of cooperative social behavior. Mutual cooperation was associated with consistent activation in brain areas that have been linked with reward processing: nucleus accumbens, the caudate nucleus, ventromedial frontal/orbitofrontal cortex, and rostral anterior cingulate cortex. We propose that activation of this neural network positively reinforces reciprocal altruism, thereby motivating subjects to resist the temptation to selfishly accept but not reciprocate favors.

  20. Technical basis for chemical stockpile emergency planning

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, D.E.; Madore, M.A.; Paddock, R.A.; Absil, M.J.G.

    1995-06-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program, an Accident Planning Base Review Group (APBRG) was convened in December 1992. The APBRG`s mission was to update the accident basis for protective action strategy planning in the vicinity of eight US chemical agent stockpile sites. The results of the APBRG`s work are being issued as site-specific Emergency Planning Guides (EPGs). The EPGs give emergency planners--Army, State, and local--updated assessment of the chemical hazard and guidance on how to plan for a broad range of accidents by planning for a manageable number of accident categories. This paper addresses: (1) the rationale for updating the accident planning base; (2) the modeling methodology used to assess the chemical hazard; and (3) strategies that are advocated in the EPGs for the use of models by planners.

  1. Physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W; Charkoudian, Nisha; Sawka, Michael N

    2013-03-01

    Dehydration (body water deficit) is a physiologic state that can have profound implications for human health and performance. Unfortunately, dehydration can be difficult to assess, and there is no single, universal gold standard for decision making. In this article, we review the physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment. We highlight how phenomenologic interpretations of dehydration depend critically on the type (dehydration compared with volume depletion) and magnitude (moderate compared with severe) of dehydration, which in turn influence the osmotic (plasma osmolality) and blood volume-dependent compensatory thresholds for antidiuretic and thirst responses. In particular, we review new findings regarding the biological variation in osmotic responses to dehydration and discuss how this variation can help provide a quantitative and clinically relevant link between the physiology and phenomenology of dehydration. Practical measures with empirical thresholds are provided as a starting point for improving the practice of dehydration assessment.

  2. A brain basis for musical hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sukhbinder; Sedley, William; Barnes, Gareth R; Teki, Sundeep; Friston, Karl J; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2014-03-01

    The physiological basis for musical hallucinations (MH) is not understood. One obstacle to understanding has been the lack of a method to manipulate the intensity of hallucination during the course of experiment. Residual inhibition, transient suppression of a phantom percept after the offset of a masking stimulus, has been used in the study of tinnitus. We report here a human subject whose MH were residually inhibited by short periods of music. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) allowed us to examine variation in the underlying oscillatory brain activity in different states. Source-space analysis capable of single-subject inference defined left-lateralised power increases, associated with stronger hallucinations, in the gamma band in left anterior superior temporal gyrus, and in the beta band in motor cortex and posteromedial cortex. The data indicate that these areas form a crucial network in the generation of MH, and are consistent with a model in which MH are generated by persistent reciprocal communication in a predictive coding hierarchy.

  3. Attachment theory: a biological basis for psychotherapy?

    PubMed

    Holmes, J

    1993-10-01

    John Bowlby bemoaned the separation between the biological and psychological approaches in psychiatry, and hoped that attachment theory, which brings together psychoanalysis and the science of ethology, would help bridge the rift between them. Recent findings in developmental psychology have delineated features of parent-infant interaction, especially responsiveness, attunement, and modulation of affect, which lead to either secure or insecure attachment. Similar principles can be applied to the relationship between psychotherapist and patient--the provision of a secure base, the emergence of a shared narrative ('autobiographical competence'), the processing of affect, coping with loss--these are common to most effective psychotherapies and provide the basis for a new interpersonal paradigm within psychotherapy. Attachment theory suggests they rest on a sound ethological and hence biological foundation.

  4. The genetic basis of complex human behaviors.

    PubMed

    Plomin, R; Owen, M J; McGuffin, P

    1994-06-17

    Quantitative genetic research has built a strong case for the importance of genetic factors in many complex behavioral disorders and dimensions in the domains of psychopathology, personality, and cognitive abilities. Quantitative genetics can also provide an empirical guide and a conceptual framework for the application of molecular genetics. The success of molecular genetics in elucidating the genetic basis of behavioral disorders has largely relied on a reductionistic one gene, one disorder (OGOD) approach in which a single gene is necessary and sufficient to develop a disorder. In contrast, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) approach involves the search for multiple genes, each of which is neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of a trait. The OGOD and QTL approaches have both advantages and disadvantages for identifying genes that affect complex human behaviors.

  5. Molecular basis of thalassemia in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidli, Aisha; Hamodat, Mowafak; Fawzi, Zainab; Abu-Laban, Mohamed; Gerard, Nathalie; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal

    2007-01-01

    There is a paucity of information on the molecular basis of beta-thalassemia (thal) in Qatar, a country in the southern part of the Arabian Gulf. To decipher the molecular spectrum of beta- thalassemic alleles present in Qatar, we studied 31 clinically recognized patients, including three with sickle cell disease and beta-thal, and an additional six cases referred for unexplained microcytic anemia. We found 12 different beta-thalassemic alleles and two yet to be defined alleles, mutations likely occurring elsewhere than in the beta-globin gene per se. This is quite striking, given the small size of the study population, and highlights not only the ethnic diversity, but also the necessity of further investigating the thalassemic spectrum. PMID:17486492

  6. [Centralized biobanks: a basis for medical research].

    PubMed

    Bernemann, Inga; Kersting, Markus; Prokein, Jana; Hummel, Michael; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Biobanks are the basis for a substantial part of biomedical research. The development, establishment and operation of biobanks are connected to a broad range of aspects, mainly concerning the preparation, storage, usage and dissemination of samples and associated data, in addition to the social and public involvement of these processes. These complex requirements can often only be managed in large centralized biobanks. In recent years, centralized clinical biobanks have been established in several university clinics in Germany. Similar activities take place in other European countries and worldwide. This article highlights the requirements and main tasks of centralized clinical biobanks: high-quality pre-analytics and sample storage, the creation of professional IT structures, data protection, ethical issues, in addition to quality and project management.

  7. Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Huwiler, Simona G; Kung, Johannes W; Weidenweber, Sina; Hellwig, Petra; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Biskup, Till; Weber, Stefan; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Ermler, Ulrich; Boll, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    In chemical synthesis, the widely used Birch reduction of aromatic compounds to cyclic dienes requires alkali metals in ammonia as extremely low-potential electron donors. An analogous reaction is catalyzed by benzoyl-coenzyme A reductases (BCRs) that have a key role in the globally important bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds at anoxic sites. Because of the lack of structural information, the catalytic mechanism of enzymatic benzene ring reduction remained obscure. Here, we present the structural characterization of a dearomatizing BCR containing an unprecedented tungsten cofactor that transfers electrons to the benzene ring in an aprotic cavity. Substrate binding induces proton transfer from the bulk solvent to the active site by expelling a Zn(2+) that is crucial for active site encapsulation. Our results shed light on the structural basis of an electron transfer process at the negative redox potential limit in biology. They open the door for biological or biomimetic alternatives to a basic chemical synthetic tool.

  8. The molecular basis of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Geoffrey A; Maleki, Soheila J; Pedersen, Lars C

    2014-05-01

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures and discusses how modifications both enzymatic and non-enzymatic affect digestion, innate immune recognition, and IgE interactions. The allergen structures help explain cross-reactivity among allergens from different sources, which is useful in improving patient diagnostics. Surprisingly, it was recently noted that similar short peptide sequences among unrelated peanut allergens could also be a source of cross-reactivity. The molecular features of peanut allergens continue to inform predictions and provide new research directions in the study of allergic disease. PMID:24633613

  9. Basis Function Sampling for Material Property Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; Joshi, Abhijeet A.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-03-01

    Wang-Landau sampling, and the associated class of flat histogram simulation methods, have been particularly successful for free energy calculations in a wide array of physical systems. Practically, the convergence of these calculations to a target free energy surface is hampered by reliance on parameters which are unknown a priori. We derive and implement a method based on orthogonal (basis) functions which is fast, parameter-free, and geometrically robust. An important feature of this method is its ability to achieve arbitrary levels of description for the free energy. It is thus ideally suited to in silico measurement of elastic moduli and other quantities related to free energy perturbations. We demonstrate the utility of such applications by applying our method to calculation of the Frank elastic constants of the Lebwohl-Lasher model.

  10. Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, S S

    2011-08-31

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  11. Generalization performance of radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunwen; Ding, Lixin; Zhang, Wensheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper studies the generalization performance of radial basis function (RBF) networks using local Rademacher complexities. We propose a general result on controlling local Rademacher complexities with the L1 -metric capacity. We then apply this result to estimate the RBF networks' complexities, based on which a novel estimation error bound is obtained. An effective approximation error bound is also derived by carefully investigating the Hölder continuity of the lp loss function's derivative. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the RBF network minimizing an appropriately constructed structural risk admits a significantly better learning rate when compared with the existing results. An empirical study is also performed to justify the application of our structural risk in model selection.

  12. The molecular basis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are caused by dermal injuries such as trauma and burns to the deep dermis, which are red, raised, itchy and painful. They can cause cosmetic disfigurement or contractures if craniofacial areas or mobile region of the skin are affected. Abnormal wound healing with more extracellular matrix deposition than degradation will result in HTS formation. This review will introduce the physiology of wound healing, dermal HTS formation, treatment and difference with keloids in the skin, and it also review the current advance of molecular basis of HTS including the involvement of cytokines, growth factors, and macrophages via chemokine pathway, to bring insights for future prevention and treatment of HTS. PMID:27574672

  13. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  14. Many-Body Basis Set Superposition Effect.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, John F; Bettens, Ryan P A

    2015-11-10

    The basis set superposition effect (BSSE) arises in electronic structure calculations of molecular clusters when questions relating to interactions between monomers within the larger cluster are asked. The binding energy, or total energy, of the cluster may be broken down into many smaller subcluster calculations and the energies of these subsystems linearly combined to, hopefully, produce the desired quantity of interest. Unfortunately, BSSE can plague these smaller fragment calculations. In this work, we carefully examine the major sources of error associated with reproducing the binding energy and total energy of a molecular cluster. In order to do so, we decompose these energies in terms of a many-body expansion (MBE), where a "body" here refers to the monomers that make up the cluster. In our analysis, we found it necessary to introduce something we designate here as a many-ghost many-body expansion (MGMBE). The work presented here produces some surprising results, but perhaps the most significant of all is that BSSE effects up to the order of truncation in a MBE of the total energy cancel exactly. In the case of the binding energy, the only BSSE correction terms remaining arise from the removal of the one-body monomer total energies. Nevertheless, our earlier work indicated that BSSE effects continued to remain in the total energy of the cluster up to very high truncation order in the MBE. We show in this work that the vast majority of these high-order many-body effects arise from BSSE associated with the one-body monomer total energies. Also, we found that, remarkably, the complete basis set limit values for the three-body and four-body interactions differed very little from that at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level for the respective subclusters embedded within a larger cluster. PMID:26574311

  15. The neural basis of human tool use.

    PubMed

    Orban, Guy A; Caruana, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we propose that the neural basis for the spontaneous, diversified human tool use is an area devoted to the execution and observation of tool actions, located in the left anterior supramarginal gyrus (aSMG). The aSMG activation elicited by observing tool use is typical of human subjects, as macaques show no similar activation, even after an extensive training to use tools. The execution of tool actions, as well as their observation, requires the convergence upon aSMG of inputs from different parts of the dorsal and ventral visual streams. Non-semantic features of the target object may be provided by the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) for tool-object interaction, paralleling the well-known PPC input to anterior intraparietal (AIP) for hand-object interaction. Semantic information regarding tool identity, and knowledge of the typical manner of handling the tool, could be provided by inferior and middle regions of the temporal lobe. Somatosensory feedback and technical reasoning, as well as motor and intentional constraints also play roles during the planning of tool actions and consequently their signals likewise converge upon aSMG. We further propose that aSMG may have arisen though duplication of monkey AIP and invasion of the duplicate area by afferents from PPC providing distinct signals depending on the kinematics of the manipulative action. This duplication may have occurred when Homo Habilis or Homo Erectus emerged, generating the Oldowan or Acheulean Industrial complexes respectively. Hence tool use may have emerged during hominid evolution between bipedalism and language. We conclude that humans have two parietal systems involved in tool behavior: a biological circuit for grasping objects, including tools, and an artifactual system devoted specifically to tool use. Only the latter allows humans to understand the causal relationship between tool use and obtaining the goal, and is likely to be the basis of all technological developments. PMID

  16. Molecular Basis of KELnull Phenotype in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Boturão-Neto, Edmir; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Kimura, Elisa Yuriko Sugano; de Oliveira, Maria do Carmo Valgueiro Costa; do Monte Barretto, Cláudia Lumack; Nunes, Mércia Maria Alves; Albuquerque, Sérgio Roberto Lopes; de Deus Santos, Marcos Daniel; Bordin, José Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background KELnull (K0) persons can produce clinically significant anti-KEL5 antibody after transfusion and/or pregnancy, requiring K0 blood transfusion when indicated. 37 K0 alleles have been reported in studies over different populations, but none in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular basis of K0 phenotype in Brazilians. Methods We investigated three K0 samples from different Brazilian blood banks (Recife, Manaus, and Vila Velha) in women with anti-KEL5. KEL antigen typing was performed by serologic techniques, and the K0 status was confirmed by flow cytometry. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing of the KEL coding and exon-intron regions were also performed. Results RBCs of the 3 patients were phenotyped as KEL:-1,−2,−3,−4,−7. The 3 patients had the same KEL*02/02 genotype and were negative for KEL*02.03 and KEL*02.06 alleles. The Recife K0 patient was homozygous for IVS16 + 1g>a mutation (KEL*02N.31 allele). The flow cytometry with anti-KEL1, anti-KEL2, anti-KEL3, anti-KEL4, and anti-CD238 confirmed the K0 phenotype. In addition, we found the c.10423C>T mutation (KEL*02N.04 allele) in both the Manaus K0 and the Vila Velha K0 patients. Conclusion This report represents the first study of K0 molecular basis performed in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. PMID:25960716

  17. The neural basis of human tool use

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Guy A.; Caruana, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we propose that the neural basis for the spontaneous, diversified human tool use is an area devoted to the execution and observation of tool actions, located in the left anterior supramarginal gyrus (aSMG). The aSMG activation elicited by observing tool use is typical of human subjects, as macaques show no similar activation, even after an extensive training to use tools. The execution of tool actions, as well as their observation, requires the convergence upon aSMG of inputs from different parts of the dorsal and ventral visual streams. Non-semantic features of the target object may be provided by the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) for tool-object interaction, paralleling the well-known PPC input to anterior intraparietal (AIP) for hand-object interaction. Semantic information regarding tool identity, and knowledge of the typical manner of handling the tool, could be provided by inferior and middle regions of the temporal lobe. Somatosensory feedback and technical reasoning, as well as motor and intentional constraints also play roles during the planning of tool actions and consequently their signals likewise converge upon aSMG. We further propose that aSMG may have arisen though duplication of monkey AIP and invasion of the duplicate area by afferents from PPC providing distinct signals depending on the kinematics of the manipulative action. This duplication may have occurred when Homo Habilis or Homo Erectus emerged, generating the Oldowan or Acheulean Industrial complexes respectively. Hence tool use may have emerged during hominid evolution between bipedalism and language. We conclude that humans have two parietal systems involved in tool behavior: a biological circuit for grasping objects, including tools, and an artifactual system devoted specifically to tool use. Only the latter allows humans to understand the causal relationship between tool use and obtaining the goal, and is likely to be the basis of all technological developments. PMID

  18. The neural basis of human tool use.

    PubMed

    Orban, Guy A; Caruana, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we propose that the neural basis for the spontaneous, diversified human tool use is an area devoted to the execution and observation of tool actions, located in the left anterior supramarginal gyrus (aSMG). The aSMG activation elicited by observing tool use is typical of human subjects, as macaques show no similar activation, even after an extensive training to use tools. The execution of tool actions, as well as their observation, requires the convergence upon aSMG of inputs from different parts of the dorsal and ventral visual streams. Non-semantic features of the target object may be provided by the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) for tool-object interaction, paralleling the well-known PPC input to anterior intraparietal (AIP) for hand-object interaction. Semantic information regarding tool identity, and knowledge of the typical manner of handling the tool, could be provided by inferior and middle regions of the temporal lobe. Somatosensory feedback and technical reasoning, as well as motor and intentional constraints also play roles during the planning of tool actions and consequently their signals likewise converge upon aSMG. We further propose that aSMG may have arisen though duplication of monkey AIP and invasion of the duplicate area by afferents from PPC providing distinct signals depending on the kinematics of the manipulative action. This duplication may have occurred when Homo Habilis or Homo Erectus emerged, generating the Oldowan or Acheulean Industrial complexes respectively. Hence tool use may have emerged during hominid evolution between bipedalism and language. We conclude that humans have two parietal systems involved in tool behavior: a biological circuit for grasping objects, including tools, and an artifactual system devoted specifically to tool use. Only the latter allows humans to understand the causal relationship between tool use and obtaining the goal, and is likely to be the basis of all technological developments.

  19. PREFACE: Progress in the ITER Physics Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.

    2007-06-01

    I would firstly like to congratulate all who have contributed to the preparation of the `Progress in the ITER Physics Basis' (PIPB) on its publication and express my deep appreciation of the hard work and commitment of the many scientists involved. With the signing of the ITER Joint Implementing Agreement in November 2006, the ITER Members have now established the framework for construction of the project, and the ITER Organization has begun work at Cadarache. The review of recent progress in the physics basis for burning plasma experiments encompassed by the PIPB will be a valuable resource for the project and, in particular, for the current Design Review. The ITER design has been derived from a physics basis developed through experimental, modelling and theoretical work on the properties of tokamak plasmas and, in particular, on studies of burning plasma physics. The `ITER Physics Basis' (IPB), published in 1999, has been the reference for the projection methodologies for the design of ITER, but the IPB also highlighted several key issues which needed to be resolved to provide a robust basis for ITER operation. In the intervening period scientists of the ITER Participant Teams have addressed these issues intensively. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) has provided an excellent forum for scientists involved in these studies, focusing their work on the high priority physics issues for ITER. Significant progress has been made in many of the issues identified in the IPB and this progress is discussed in depth in the PIPB. In this respect, the publication of the PIPB symbolizes the strong interest and enthusiasm of the plasma physics community for the success of the ITER project, which we all recognize as one of the great scientific challenges of the 21st century. I wish to emphasize my appreciation of the work of the ITPA Coordinating Committee members, who are listed below. Their support and encouragement for the preparation of the PIPB were

  20. Climate Change: The Physical Basis and Latest Results

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes: "Warming in the climate system is unequivocal." Without the contribution of Physics to climate science over many decades, such a statement would not have been possible. Experimental physics enables us to read climate archives such as polar ice cores and so provides the context for the current changes. For example, today the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, the second most important greenhouse gas, is 28% higher than any time during the last 800,000 years. Classical fluid mechanics and numerical mathematics are the basis of climate models from which estimates of future climate change are obtained. But major instabilities and surprises in the Earth System are still unknown. These are also to be considered when the climatic consequences of proposals for geo-engineering are estimated. Only Physics will permit us to further improve our understanding in order to provide the foundation for policy decisions facing the global climate change challenge.

  1. Gas reburning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, M.

    1996-11-01

    Natural gas reburning technologies are outlined. The following topics are discussed: the reburning process, EER gas reburning experience, gas reburning NOx control overview, Hennepin (tangential) long term test, second generation gas reburning, integrating gas reburning and SNCR, advanced gas reburning process, second generation advanced reburning improvements, and second generation advanced reburning configurations.

  2. The physiological basis of bird flight.

    PubMed

    Butler, Patrick J

    2016-09-26

    Flapping flight is energetically more costly than running, although it is less costly to fly a given body mass a given distance per unit time than it is for a similar mass to run the same distance per unit time. This is mainly because birds can fly faster than they can run. Oxygen transfer and transport are enhanced in migrating birds compared with those in non-migrators: at the gas-exchange regions of the lungs the effective area is greater and the diffusion distance smaller. Also, migrating birds have larger hearts and haemoglobin concentrations in the blood, and capillary density in the flight muscles tends to be higher. Species like bar-headed geese migrate at high altitudes, where the availability of oxygen is reduced and the energy cost of flapping flight increased compared with those at sea level. Physiological adaptations to these conditions include haemoglobin with a higher affinity for oxygen than that in lowland birds, a greater effective ventilation of the gas-exchange surface of the lungs and a greater capillary-to-muscle fibre ratio. Migrating birds use fatty acids as their source of energy, so they have to be transported at a sufficient rate to meet the high demand. Since fatty acids are insoluble in water, birds maintain high concentrations of fatty acid-binding proteins to transport fatty acids across the cell membrane and within the cytoplasm. The concentrations of these proteins, together with that of a key enzyme in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, increase before migration.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'.

  3. The physiological basis of bird flight.

    PubMed

    Butler, Patrick J

    2016-09-26

    Flapping flight is energetically more costly than running, although it is less costly to fly a given body mass a given distance per unit time than it is for a similar mass to run the same distance per unit time. This is mainly because birds can fly faster than they can run. Oxygen transfer and transport are enhanced in migrating birds compared with those in non-migrators: at the gas-exchange regions of the lungs the effective area is greater and the diffusion distance smaller. Also, migrating birds have larger hearts and haemoglobin concentrations in the blood, and capillary density in the flight muscles tends to be higher. Species like bar-headed geese migrate at high altitudes, where the availability of oxygen is reduced and the energy cost of flapping flight increased compared with those at sea level. Physiological adaptations to these conditions include haemoglobin with a higher affinity for oxygen than that in lowland birds, a greater effective ventilation of the gas-exchange surface of the lungs and a greater capillary-to-muscle fibre ratio. Migrating birds use fatty acids as their source of energy, so they have to be transported at a sufficient rate to meet the high demand. Since fatty acids are insoluble in water, birds maintain high concentrations of fatty acid-binding proteins to transport fatty acids across the cell membrane and within the cytoplasm. The concentrations of these proteins, together with that of a key enzyme in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, increase before migration.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528774

  4. Review of Polarized Internal Gas Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rathmann, Frank

    2000-12-31

    Experiments utilizing polarized internal gas targets are reviewed. For a few years now these targets have been used at electron and proton machines, and the progress made in operating these targets on a routine basis has been pronounced. The focus in this paper is on experimental aspects, such as the design and construction of storage cells and different methods employed for polarimetry.

  5. Preparing for successful gas negotiations

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, D.

    1998-12-31

    The task of understanding and managing all the variables required to optimize the reliability and cost of gas purchases is not an easy one. The following list of recommended steps may help. Study your gas requirements and bills thoroughly. Evaluate all of your options and risks in detail. Set specific goals for your gas needs and management. Negotiate each contract on both a short-term and long-term basis. With increased competition, suppliers have even more incentive to make their clients happy. Make sure that you understand all the details of your new contract including expiration dates, automatic rollover dates, notice requirements for changes and force majeure limitations. Monitor the results of the pricing index that you select to assure that it will provide you the results that you have in mind. Cautiously shop around for the best prices, but keep in mind that it is a small world and price shoppers may find it increasingly hard to get a quote if you change suppliers too often. Don`t forget to compare your local LDC with other suppliers. They may have become more competitive and ready to offer more services at less cost than before. Keep in touch with the market changes on a regular basis. Assign the daily management responsibility to a staff person, or outside firm, that has demonstrated a complete understanding of the gas industry and your specific needs. The bottom line is clear when one compares the cost of industrial gas 10 years ago to the current price today. The average burner tip price to industrials/mcf was in a range from $4.50 to $7.00 in the mid-1980`s. The mid-1990`s average price is in a range from $2.60 to $3.60. This proves that the additional management that is required is well worth the additional effort.

  6. Natural gas imports and exports: First quarter report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Office of Fuels Programs prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports with the OFP. This quarter`s focus is market penetration of gas imports into New England. Attachments show the following: % takes to maximum firm contract levels and weighted average per unit price for the long-term importers, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters, volumes and prices for gas imported on short-term or spot market basis, and gas exported short-term to Canada and Mexico.

  7. Determination of gas volume trapped in a closed fluid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. F.; Jolley, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Technique involves extracting known volume of fluid and measuring system before and after extraction, volume of entrapped gas is then computed. Formula derived from ideal gas laws is basis of this method. Technique is applicable to thermodynamic cycles and hydraulic systems.

  8. Natural gas imports and exports. Fourth quarter report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report summarizes the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Data includes volume and price for long term and short term, and gas exported to Canada and Mexico on a short term or spot market basis.

  9. 75 FR 64071 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... FR 67010) proposed regulations (REG-101896- 09) relating to information reporting by brokers... mark-to-market method of accounting) when reporting adjusted basis and whether any gain or loss on the... commentator asked whether brokers must apply section 1296 (regarding mark-to-market accounting for...

  10. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders.

  11. The neural basis of tactile motion perception.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yu-Cheng; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2014-12-15

    The manipulation of objects commonly involves motion between object and skin. In this review, we discuss the neural basis of tactile motion perception and its similarities with its visual counterpart. First, much like in vision, the perception of tactile motion relies on the processing of spatiotemporal patterns of activation across populations of sensory receptors. Second, many neurons in primary somatosensory cortex are highly sensitive to motion direction, and the response properties of these neurons draw strong analogies to those of direction-selective neurons in visual cortex. Third, tactile speed may be encoded in the strength of the response of cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferents and of a subpopulation of speed-sensitive neurons in cortex. However, both afferent and cortical responses are strongly dependent on texture as well, so it is unclear how texture and speed signals are disambiguated. Fourth, motion signals from multiple fingers must often be integrated during the exploration of objects, but the way these signals are combined is complex and remains to be elucidated. Finally, visual and tactile motion perception interact powerfully, an integration process that is likely mediated by visual association cortex. PMID:25253479

  12. A brain basis for musical hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sukhbinder; Sedley, William; Barnes, Gareth R; Teki, Sundeep; Friston, Karl J; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2014-03-01

    The physiological basis for musical hallucinations (MH) is not understood. One obstacle to understanding has been the lack of a method to manipulate the intensity of hallucination during the course of experiment. Residual inhibition, transient suppression of a phantom percept after the offset of a masking stimulus, has been used in the study of tinnitus. We report here a human subject whose MH were residually inhibited by short periods of music. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) allowed us to examine variation in the underlying oscillatory brain activity in different states. Source-space analysis capable of single-subject inference defined left-lateralised power increases, associated with stronger hallucinations, in the gamma band in left anterior superior temporal gyrus, and in the beta band in motor cortex and posteromedial cortex. The data indicate that these areas form a crucial network in the generation of MH, and are consistent with a model in which MH are generated by persistent reciprocal communication in a predictive coding hierarchy. PMID:24445167

  13. Quantitative microbiology: a basis for food safety.

    PubMed Central

    McMeekin, T. A.; Brown, J.; Krist, K.; Miles, D.; Neumeyer, K.; Nichols, D. S.; Olley, J.; Presser, K.; Ratkowsky, D. A.; Ross, T.; Salter, M.; Soontranon, S.

    1997-01-01

    Because microorganisms are easily dispersed, display physiologic diversity, and tolerate extreme conditions, they are ubiquitous and may contaminate and grow in many food products. The behavior of microbial populations in foods (growth, survival, or death) is determined by the properties of the food (e.g., water activity and pH) and the storage conditions (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, and atmosphere). The effect of these properties can be predicted by mathematical models derived from quantitative studies on microbial populations. Temperature abuse is a major factor contributing to foodborne disease; monitoring temperature history during food processing, distribution, and storage is a simple, effective means to reduce the incidence of food poisoning. Interpretation of temperature profiles by computer programs based on predictive models allows informed decisions on the shelf life and safety of foods. In- or on-package temperature indicators require further development to accurately predict microbial behavior. We suggest a basis for a "universal" temperature indicator. This article emphasizes the need to combine kinetic and probability approaches to modeling and suggests a method to define the bacterial growth/no growth interface. Advances in controlling foodborne pathogens depend on understanding the pathogens' physiologic responses to growth constraints, including constraints conferring increased survival capacity. PMID:9366608

  14. Electromagnetic Basis of Metabolism and Heredity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Stolc, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms control their cellular biological clocks to maintain functional oscillation of the redox cycle, also called the "metabolic cycle" or "respiratory cycle". Organization of cellular processes requires parallel processing on a synchronized time-base. These clocks coordinate the timing of all biochemical processes in the cell, including energy production, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. When this universal time keeping function is perturbed by exogenous induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the rate of metabolism changes. This causes oxidative stress, aging and mutations. Therefore, good temporal coordination of the redox cycle not only actively prevents chemical conflict between the reductive and oxidative partial reactions; it also maintains genome integrity and lifespan. Moreover, this universal biochemical rhythm can be disrupted by ROS induction in vivo. This in turn can be achieved by blocking the electron transport chain either endogenously or exogenously by various metabolites, e.g. hydrogen sulfide (H2S), highly diffusible drugs, and carbon monoxide (CO). Alternatively, the electron transport in vivo can be attenuated via a coherent or interfering transfer of energy from exogenous ultralow frequency (ULF) and extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic (EM) fields, suggesting that-on Earth-such ambient fields are an omnipresent (and probably crucially important) factor for the time-setting basis of universal biochemical reactions in living cells. Our work demonstrated previously un-described evidence for quantum effects in biology by electromagnetic coupling below thermal noise at the universal electron transport chain (ETC) in vivo.

  15. The neural basis of the imitation drive.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, Sugiko; Sugiura, Motoaki; Nozawa, Takayuki; Kotozaki, Yuka; Yomogida, Yukihito; Ihara, Mizuki; Akimoto, Yoritaka; Thyreau, Benjamin; Izumi, Shinichi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous imitation is assumed to underlie the acquisition of important skills by infants, including language and social interaction. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the neural basis of 'spontaneously' driven imitation, which has not yet been fully investigated. Healthy participants were presented with movie clips of meaningless bimanual actions and instructed to observe and imitate them during an fMRI scan. The participants were subsequently shown the movie clips again and asked to evaluate the strength of their 'urge to imitate' (Urge) for each action. We searched for cortical areas where the degree of activation positively correlated with Urge scores; significant positive correlations were observed in the right supplementary motor area (SMA) and bilateral midcingulate cortex (MCC) under the imitation condition. These areas were not explained by explicit reasons for imitation or the kinematic characteristics of the actions. Previous studies performed in monkeys and humans have implicated the SMA and MCC/caudal cingulate zone in voluntary actions. This study also confirmed the functional connectivity between Urge and imitation performance using a psychophysiological interaction analysis. Thus, our findings reveal the critical neural components that underlie spontaneous imitation and provide possible reasons why infants imitate spontaneously. PMID:26168793

  16. The genetic basis of myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Skoda, Radek

    2007-01-01

    For many decades, myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) were largely neglected orphan diseases. The conceptual work of William Dameshek in 1951 provided the basis for understanding MPD as a continuum of related syndromes, possibly with a common pathogenetic cause. Recognition of the clonal origin of peripheral blood cells in MPD in 1976 and the ability to grow erythroid colonies in vitro in the absence of added growth factors in 1974 initiated the search for genetic alterations that might be responsible for myeloproliferation. Mutations in the genes for the erythropoietin receptor, thrombopoietin and the von Hippel-Lindau protein were found to cause familial syndromes resembling MPD, but despite their phenotypic similarities, none of these mutations were later found in patients with the sporadic form of MPD. The discovery of activating mutations in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in most patients with MPD has fully transformed and energized the MPD field. Sensitive assays for detecting the JAK2-V617F mutation have become an essential part of the diagnostic work-up, and JAK2 now constitutes a prime target for developing specific inhibitors for the treatment of patients with MPD. Despite this progress, many questions remain unsolved, including how a single JAK2 mutation causes three different MPD phenotypes, what other genes might be involved in the pathogenesis, and what are the factors determining the progression to acute leukemia.

  17. Genetic Basis for Red Coloration in Birds.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ricardo J; Johnson, James D; Toomey, Matthew B; Ferreira, Mafalda S; Araujo, Pedro M; Melo-Ferreira, José; Andersson, Leif; Hill, Geoffrey E; Corbo, Joseph C; Carneiro, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The yellow and red feather pigmentation of many bird species [1] plays pivotal roles in social signaling and mate choice [2, 3]. To produce red pigments, birds ingest yellow carotenoids and endogenously convert them into red ketocarotenoids via an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a previously unknown ketolase [4-6]. We investigated the genetic basis for red coloration in birds using whole-genome sequencing of red siskins (Spinus cucullata), common canaries (Serinus canaria), and "red factor" canaries, which are the hybrid product of crossing red siskins with common canaries [7]. We identified two genomic regions introgressed from red siskins into red factor canaries that are required for red coloration. One of these regions contains a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP2J19. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that CYP2J19 is significantly upregulated in the skin and liver of red factor canaries, strongly implicating CYP2J19 as the ketolase that mediates red coloration in birds. Interestingly, a second introgressed region required for red feathers resides within the epidermal differentiation complex, a cluster of genes involved in development of the integument. Lastly, we present evidence that CYP2J19 is involved in ketocarotenoid formation in the retina. The discovery of the carotenoid ketolase has important implications for understanding sensory function and signaling mediated by carotenoid pigmentation. PMID:27212400

  18. Emotional manifestations of PD: Neurobiological basis.

    PubMed

    Castrioto, Anna; Thobois, Stéphane; Carnicella, Sebastien; Maillet, Audrey; Krack, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common and disabling in PD. Their neurobiological bases are complex, partly because of the disease itself and partly because of the dopaminergic treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the emotional manifestations stemming from the neurodegenerative process itself. We focus on depression, anxiety, apathy, and fatigue, which can all be part of the clinical spectrum of premotor disease and may be improved or masked by medications targeting parkinsonian motor signs or psychiatric symptoms as the disease progresses. Findings from clinical, neuroimaging, and animal studies are reviewed, showing a major contribution of the dopaminergic system to the pathophysiology of these disabling symptoms. Degeneration of noradrenergic and serotonergic projection systems also has an impact on psychiatric symptoms of PD. The available literature is reviewed, but at present there is a lack of studies that would allow disentangling the separate contribution of each of the monoaminergic systems. The use of a pragmatic classification of all these symptoms under the umbrella of hypodopaminergic behavioral syndrome seems clinically useful, as it emphasizes the crucial, although not exclusive, nature of their dopaminergic neurobiological basis, which has important implications in the clinical management of PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Toward a Neural Basis for Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Damian A.; Adolphs, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, the shared interests of psychologists and biologists in understanding the neural basis of social behavior led to the inception of social neuroscience. In the past decade, this field has exploded, in large part due to the infusion of studies that use fMRI. At the same time, tensions have arisen about how to prioritize a diverse range of questions and about the authority of neurobiological data in answering them. The field is now poised to tackle some of the most interesting and important questions about human and animal behavior but at the same time faces uncertainty about how to achieve focus in its research and cohesion among the scientists who tackle it. The next 25 years offer the opportunity to alleviate some of these growing pains, as well as the challenge of answering large questions that encompass the nature and bounds of diverse social interactions (in humans, including interactions through the internet); how to characterize, and treat, social dysfunction in psychiatric illness; and how to compare social cognition in humans with that in other animals. PMID:24183030

  20. The structural basis for cancer treatment decisions

    PubMed Central

    Nussinov, Ruth; Jang, Hyunbum; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Cancer treatment decisions rely on genetics, large data screens and clinical pharmacology. Here we point out that genetic analysis and treatment decisions may overlook critical elements in cancer development, progression and drug resistance. Two critical structural elements are missing in genetics-based decision-making: the mechanisms of oncogenic mutations and the cellular network which is rewired in cancer. These lay the foundation for the structural basis for cancer treatment decisions, which is rooted in the physical principles of the molecular conformational behavior of single molecules and their interactions. Improved tumor mutational analysis platforms and knowledge of the redundant pathways which can take over in cancer, may not only supplement known actionable findings, but forecast possible cancer progression and resistance. Such forward-looking can be powerful, endowing the oncologist with mechanistic insight and cancer prognosis, and consequently more informed treatment options. Examples include redundant pathways taking over after inhibition of EGFR constitutive activation, mutations in PIK3CA p110α and p85, and the non-hotspot AKT1 mutants conferring constitutive membrane localization. PMID:25277176

  1. Emotional manifestations of PD: Neurobiological basis.

    PubMed

    Castrioto, Anna; Thobois, Stéphane; Carnicella, Sebastien; Maillet, Audrey; Krack, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common and disabling in PD. Their neurobiological bases are complex, partly because of the disease itself and partly because of the dopaminergic treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the emotional manifestations stemming from the neurodegenerative process itself. We focus on depression, anxiety, apathy, and fatigue, which can all be part of the clinical spectrum of premotor disease and may be improved or masked by medications targeting parkinsonian motor signs or psychiatric symptoms as the disease progresses. Findings from clinical, neuroimaging, and animal studies are reviewed, showing a major contribution of the dopaminergic system to the pathophysiology of these disabling symptoms. Degeneration of noradrenergic and serotonergic projection systems also has an impact on psychiatric symptoms of PD. The available literature is reviewed, but at present there is a lack of studies that would allow disentangling the separate contribution of each of the monoaminergic systems. The use of a pragmatic classification of all these symptoms under the umbrella of hypodopaminergic behavioral syndrome seems clinically useful, as it emphasizes the crucial, although not exclusive, nature of their dopaminergic neurobiological basis, which has important implications in the clinical management of PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27041545

  2. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2009-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  3. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Daniel P; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-07-16

    Retroviral integration is catalysed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration.

  4. Physicochemical and physiological basis of dichromatic colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Samo; Kreft, Marko

    2007-11-01

    Out of three perceptual characteristics of the colour of any substance, the hue depends mostly on the spectral properties of a substance, while the brightness and saturation depend also on the concentration of a substance and its thickness. Here, we report that evident change of the hue of the colour (i.e., from green to red) is due to a change in concentration or the thickness of a layer in some exceptional substances such as pumpkin seed oil or an aqueous solution of bromophenol blue. In some regions of Central Europe, salad dressing is made preferably with the pumpkin seed oil, which has a strong characteristic nut-like taste and remarkable properties of the colour: it appears red in a bottle, but green when served as a salad dressing. The colour of the pumpkin seed oil was previously described as brownish yellow, dark green, dark green to red ochre or dark reddish brown to light yellow green. We elucidated the physicochemical and physiological basis of such dichromatism by Beer-Lambert law and by the characteristics of human colour perception. Our concept was corroborated by the outcome of calculations of colour from spectral properties using colour matching functions. We found that dichromatism is observed if the absorption spectrum of any substance has at least two local minima: one wide but shallow and one narrow but deep local minimum.

  5. Molecular basis of environmentally induced birth defects.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Richard H; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Eudy, James D; Rosenquist, Thomas H

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of the developing conceptus to selected environmental agents can lead to deleterious and often times lethal birth defects. These malformations result in serious emotional and financial consequences to families and societies worldwide. As we continue to progress technologically, we face challenges from the introduction of new pharmacological agents and chemical compounds into the environment. This results in a concomitant need to more fully understand the relationship between in utero exposure to environmental teratogens and the risk of congenital malformations. The goal of this review is to provide a current perspective of the major concepts related to the molecular basis of environmentally induced birth defects. Starting with a discussion of commonly occurring birth defects, we consider important fundamental facets of embryonic development, teratology, and gene-environment interactions. The review then summarizes our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in selected birth defects following exposure to pharmacological compounds, including thalidomide, retinoids, and valproic acid. Understanding these signaling pathways may lead to the development of safer pharmaceutical compounds and a reduction in the number of infants born with preventable birth defects.

  6. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Liver Development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Donghun; Singh Monga, Satdarshan Pal

    2015-01-01

    Liver is a prime organ responsible for synthesis, metabolism, and detoxification. The organ is endodermal in origin and its development is regulated by temporal, complex, and finely balanced cellular and molecular interactions that dictate its origin, growth, and maturation. We discuss the relevance of endoderm patterning, which truly is the first step toward mapping of domains that will give rise to specific organs. Once foregut patterning is completed, certain cells within the foregut endoderm gain competence in the form of expression of certain transcription factors that allow them to respond to certain inductive signals. Hepatic specification is then a result of such inductive signals, which often emanate from the surrounding mesenchyme. During hepatic specification bipotential hepatic stem cells or hepatoblasts become apparent and undergo expansion, which results in a visible liver primordium during the stage of hepatic morphogenesis. Hepatoblasts next differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. The expansion and differentiation is regulated by cellular and molecular interactions between hepatoblasts and mesenchymal cells including sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells, and also innate hematopoietic elements. Further maturation of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes continues during late hepatic development as a function of various growth factors. At this time, liver gains architectural novelty in the form of zonality and at cellular level acquires polarity. A comprehensive elucidation of such finely tuned developmental cues have been the basis of transdifferentiation of various types of stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells for purposes of understanding health and disease and for therapeutic applications. PMID:23720330

  7. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Maskell, Daniel P.; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N.; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integration is catalyzed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome1,2. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM) reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location (SHL) ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration. PMID:26061770

  8. Scientific basis for the Precautionary Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Vineis, Paolo . E-mail: p.vineis@imperial.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    The Precautionary Principle is based on two general criteria: (a) appropriate public action should be taken in response to limited, but plausible and credible, evidence of likely and substantial harm; (b) the burden of proof is shifted from demonstrating the presence of risk to demonstrating the absence of risk. Not much has been written about the scientific basis of the precautionary principle, apart from the uncertainty that characterizes epidemiologic research on chronic disease, and the use of surrogate evidence when human evidence cannot be provided. It is proposed in this paper that a new scientific paradigm, based on the theory of evolution, is emerging; this might offer stronger support to the need for precaution in the regulation of environmental risks. Environmental hazards do not consist only in direct attacks to the integrity of DNA or other macromolecules. They can consist in changes that take place already in utero, and that condition disease risks many years later. Also, environmental exposures can act as 'stressors', inducing hypermutability (the mutator phenotype) as an adaptive response. Finally, environmental changes should be evaluated against a background of a not-so-easily modifiable genetic make-up, inherited from a period in which humans were mainly hunters-gatherers and had dietary habits very different from the current ones.

  9. The genetic basis of Haldane's rule.

    PubMed

    Coyne, J A

    'Haldane's rule', formulated by J. B. S. Haldane in 1922, states that: "When in the F1 offspring of two different animal races one sex is absent, rare, or sterile, that sex is the heterozygous [heterogametic] sex". His rule is now known to apply in mammals, lepidopterans, birds, orthopterans and dipterans. In Drosophila, for example, Bock cites 142 cases of interspecific hybridizations that produce one sterile and one fertile sex in the offspring, all but one of these crosses yielding sterile XY males and fertile XX females. Despite much speculation, however, the genetic basis of Haldane's rule remains unknown. Haldane himself rejected the simple explanation that males are innately more sensitive than females to the effects of hybridization because groups with heterogametic females (such as birds and butterflies) usually show female sterility in hybrids, so that heterogamety itself is the critical feature. He and others suggested that heterogametic infertility or inviability in hybrids arises by a genetic imbalance between X chromosomes and autosomes. An alternative explanation is that this syndrome is caused by a mismatch of X and Y chromosomes. Here I show that in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, Haldane's rule for fertility apparently arises from a genetic interaction between X and Y chromosomes and not from an imbalance between sex chromosomes and autosomes. This finding has important implications for understanding the evolution of interspecific reproductive isolation. PMID:3921852

  10. Gravitational Lens Modeling with Basis Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrer, Simon; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2015-11-01

    We present a strong lensing modeling technique based on versatile basis sets for the lens and source planes. Our method uses high performance Monte Carlo algorithms, allows for an adaptive build up of complexity, and bridges the gap between parametric and pixel based reconstruction methods. We apply our method to a Hubble Space Telescope image of the strong lens system RX J1131-1231 and show that our method finds a reliable solution and is able to detect substructure in the lens and source planes simultaneously. Using mock data, we show that our method is sensitive to sub-clumps with masses four orders of magnitude smaller than the main lens, which corresponds to about {10}8{M}⊙ , without prior knowledge of the position and mass of the sub-clump. The modeling approach is flexible and maximizes automation to facilitate the analysis of the large number of strong lensing systems expected in upcoming wide field surveys. The resulting search for dark sub-clumps in these systems, without mass-to-light priors, offers promise for probing physics beyond the standard model in the dark matter sector.

  11. Basis for Synthesis of Spiral Lattice Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursill, L. A.; Ryan, George; Fan, Xudong; Rouse, J. L.; Peng, Julin; Perkins, Anne

    Observations of the sunflower Helianthus tuberosus reveal the occurrence of both Fibonacci and Lucas numbers of visible spirals (parastichies). This species is multi-headed, allowing a quantitative study of the relative abundance of these two types of phyllotaxis. The florets follow a spiral arrangement. It is remarkable that the Lucas series occurred, almost invariably, in the first-flowering heads of individual plants. The occurrence of left-and right-handed chirality was found to be random, within experimental error, using an appropriate chirality convention. Quantitative crystallographic studies allow the average growth law to be derived (r = alτ-1 θ = 2πl/(τ + 1), where a is a constant, l is the seed cell number and τ is the golden mean (1 +√ {5})/2). They also reveal departures from classical theoretical models of phyllotaxis, taking the form of persistent oscillations in both divergence angle and radius. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a new theoretical model for the close-packing of growing discs. Finally, a basis for synthesis of (inorganic) spiral lattice structures is proposed.

  12. Nutraceuticals and headache: the biological basis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2011-03-01

    Nutrition must affect the structure and functioning of the brain. Since the brain has very high metabolic activity, what we consume throughout the day is likely to dramatically influence both its structure and moment to moment function. It follows that nutritional approaches to all neurological disorders are being researched and entering medical practice, while nutraceutical use is a mainstay of public habits. This review discusses the biological basis for non-conventional or non-mainstream approaches to the treatment of migraine. This requires at least limited discussion of current migraine pathophysiologic theory. How nutrients and other chemicals and approaches are mechanistically involved within migraine pathways is the focus of this article. The nutraceuticals reviewed in detail are: magnesium, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, petasites, and feverfew with additional comments on marijuana and oxygen/hyperbaric oxygen. This article reviews the science when known related to the potential genetic susceptibility and sensitivity to these treatments. As we know, the basic science in this field is very preliminary, so whether to combine approaches and presumably mechanisms or use them alone or with or without conventional therapies is far from clear. Nonetheless, as more patients and providers participate in patient-centered approaches to care, knowledge of the science underpinning nutritional, nutraceutical, and complementary approaches to treatment for migraine will certainly benefit this interaction.

  13. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2005-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  14. Geometrical basis for the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, F. )

    1994-02-01

    The robust character of the Standard Model is confirmed. Examination of its geometrical basis in three equivalent internal symmetry spaces - the unitary plane C[sup 2], the quaternion space Q, and the real space R[sup 4] - as well as the real space R[sup 3] uncovers mathematical properties that predict the physical properties of leptons and quarks. The finite rotational subgroups of the gauge group SU(2)[sub L] [times] U(1)[sub Y] generate exactly three lepton families and four quark families and reveal how quarks and leptons are related. Among the physical properties explained are the mass ratios of the six leptons and eight quarks, the origin of the left-handed preference by the weak interaction, the geometrical source of color symmetry, and the zero neutrino masses. The (u,d) and (c,s) quark families team together to satisfy the triangle anomaly cancellation with the electron family, while the other families pair one-to-one for cancellation. The spontaneously broken symmetry is discrete and needs no Higgs mechanism. Predictions include all massless neutrinos, the top quark at 160 GeV/c[sup 2], the b[prime] quark at 80 GeV/c[sup 2], and the t[prime] quark at 2600 GeV/c[sup 2].

  15. Genetic Basis for Red Coloration in Birds.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ricardo J; Johnson, James D; Toomey, Matthew B; Ferreira, Mafalda S; Araujo, Pedro M; Melo-Ferreira, José; Andersson, Leif; Hill, Geoffrey E; Corbo, Joseph C; Carneiro, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The yellow and red feather pigmentation of many bird species [1] plays pivotal roles in social signaling and mate choice [2, 3]. To produce red pigments, birds ingest yellow carotenoids and endogenously convert them into red ketocarotenoids via an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a previously unknown ketolase [4-6]. We investigated the genetic basis for red coloration in birds using whole-genome sequencing of red siskins (Spinus cucullata), common canaries (Serinus canaria), and "red factor" canaries, which are the hybrid product of crossing red siskins with common canaries [7]. We identified two genomic regions introgressed from red siskins into red factor canaries that are required for red coloration. One of these regions contains a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP2J19. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that CYP2J19 is significantly upregulated in the skin and liver of red factor canaries, strongly implicating CYP2J19 as the ketolase that mediates red coloration in birds. Interestingly, a second introgressed region required for red feathers resides within the epidermal differentiation complex, a cluster of genes involved in development of the integument. Lastly, we present evidence that CYP2J19 is involved in ketocarotenoid formation in the retina. The discovery of the carotenoid ketolase has important implications for understanding sensory function and signaling mediated by carotenoid pigmentation.

  16. Biological Basis For Computer Vision: Some Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Madan M.

    1990-03-01

    Using biology as a basis for the development of sensors, devices and computer vision systems is a challenge to systems and vision scientists. It is also a field of promising research for engineering applications. Biological sensory systems, such as vision, touch and hearing, sense different physical phenomena from our environment, yet they possess some common mathematical functions. These mathematical functions are cast into the neural layers which are distributed throughout our sensory regions, sensory information transmission channels and in the cortex, the centre of perception. In this paper, we are concerned with the study of the biological vision system and the emulation of some of its mathematical functions, both retinal and visual cortex, for the development of a robust computer vision system. This field of research is not only intriguing, but offers a great challenge to systems scientists in the development of functional algorithms. These functional algorithms can be generalized for further studies in such fields as signal processing, control systems and image processing. Our studies are heavily dependent on the the use of fuzzy - neural layers and generalized receptive fields. Building blocks of such neural layers and receptive fields may lead to the design of better sensors and better computer vision systems. It is hoped that these studies will lead to the development of better artificial vision systems with various applications to vision prosthesis for the blind, robotic vision, medical imaging, medical sensors, industrial automation, remote sensing, space stations and ocean exploration.

  17. Accelerator production of tritium authorization basis strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.A.; Edwards, J.; Rose, S.

    1996-05-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project has proposed a strategy to develop the APT authorization basis and safety case based on DOE orders and fundamental requirements for safe operation. The strategy is viable regardless of whether the APT is regulated by DOE or by an external regulatory body. Currently the operation of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is authorized by DOE and regulated by DOE orders and regulations while meeting the environmental protection requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the states. In the spring of 1994, Congress proposed legislation and held hearings related to requiring all DOE operations to be subject to external regulation. On January 25, 1995, DOE, with the support of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, created the Advisory Committee on External Regulation of Department of Energy Nuclear Safety. This committee divided its recommendations into three areas: (1) facility safety, (2) worker safety, and (3) environmental protection. In the area of facility safety the committee recommended external regulation of DOE nuclear facilities by either the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or a restructured Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). In the area of worker safety, the committee recommended that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulate DOE nuclear facilities. In the environmental protection area, the committee did not recommend a change in the regulation by the EPA and the states of DOE nuclear facilities. If these recommendations are accepted, all DOE nuclear facilities will be impacted to some extent.

  18. The genetic basis of chronic mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Roy; Zhou, Dan; Bafna, Vineet; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-11-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is a disease that affects many high-altitude dwellers, particularly in the Andean Mountains in South America. The hallmark symptom of CMS is polycythemia, which causes increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke (among other symptoms). A prevailing hypothesis in high-altitude medicine is that CMS results from a population-specific "maladaptation" to the hypoxic conditions at high altitude. In contrast, the prevalence of CMS is very low in other high-altitude populations (e.g., Tibetans and Ethiopians), which are seemingly well adapted to hypoxia. In recent years, concurrent with the advent of genomic technologies, several studies have investigated the genetic basis of adaptation to altitude. These studies have identified several candidate genes that may underlie the adaptation, or maladaptation. Interestingly, some of these genes are targeted by known drugs, raising the possibility of new treatments for CMS and other ischemic diseases. We review recent discoveries, alongside the methodologies used to obtain them, and outline some of the challenges remaining in the field.

  19. The neural basis of the imitation drive.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, Sugiko; Sugiura, Motoaki; Nozawa, Takayuki; Kotozaki, Yuka; Yomogida, Yukihito; Ihara, Mizuki; Akimoto, Yoritaka; Thyreau, Benjamin; Izumi, Shinichi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous imitation is assumed to underlie the acquisition of important skills by infants, including language and social interaction. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the neural basis of 'spontaneously' driven imitation, which has not yet been fully investigated. Healthy participants were presented with movie clips of meaningless bimanual actions and instructed to observe and imitate them during an fMRI scan. The participants were subsequently shown the movie clips again and asked to evaluate the strength of their 'urge to imitate' (Urge) for each action. We searched for cortical areas where the degree of activation positively correlated with Urge scores; significant positive correlations were observed in the right supplementary motor area (SMA) and bilateral midcingulate cortex (MCC) under the imitation condition. These areas were not explained by explicit reasons for imitation or the kinematic characteristics of the actions. Previous studies performed in monkeys and humans have implicated the SMA and MCC/caudal cingulate zone in voluntary actions. This study also confirmed the functional connectivity between Urge and imitation performance using a psychophysiological interaction analysis. Thus, our findings reveal the critical neural components that underlie spontaneous imitation and provide possible reasons why infants imitate spontaneously.

  20. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  1. The neural basis of temporal processing.

    PubMed

    Mauk, Michael D; Buonomano, Dean V

    2004-01-01

    A complete understanding of sensory and motor processing requires characterization of how the nervous system processes time in the range of tens to hundreds of milliseconds (ms). Temporal processing on this scale is required for simple sensory problems, such as interval, duration, and motion discrimination, as well as complex forms of sensory processing, such as speech recognition. Timing is also required for a wide range of motor tasks from eyelid conditioning to playing the piano. Here we review the behavioral, electrophysiological, and theoretical literature on the neural basis of temporal processing. These data suggest that temporal processing is likely to be distributed among different structures, rather than relying on a centralized timing area, as has been suggested in internal clock models. We also discuss whether temporal processing relies on specialized neural mechanisms, which perform temporal computations independent of spatial ones. We suggest that, given the intricate link between temporal and spatial information in most sensory and motor tasks, timing and spatial processing are intrinsic properties of neural function, and specialized timing mechanisms such as delay lines, oscillators, or a spectrum of different time constants are not required. Rather temporal processing may rely on state-dependent changes in network dynamics.

  2. The neural basis of monitoring goal progress

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L.; Chang, Betty P. I.; Sun, Yu-Hsuan; Wilkinson, Iain D.; Farrow, Tom F. D.

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of progress monitoring has received relatively little attention compared to other sub-processes that are involved in goal directed behavior such as motor control and response inhibition. Studies of error-monitoring have identified the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as a structure that is sensitive to conflict detection, and triggers corrective action. However, monitoring goal progress involves monitoring correct as well as erroneous events over a period of time. In the present research, 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imagining (fMRI) while playing a game that involved monitoring progress toward either a numerical or a visuo-spatial target. The findings confirmed the role of the dACC in detecting situations in which the current state may conflict with the desired state, but also revealed activations in the frontal and parietal regions, pointing to the involvement of processes such as attention and working memory (WM) in monitoring progress over time. In addition, activation of the cuneus was associated with monitoring progress toward a specific target presented in the visual modality. This is the first time that activation in this region has been linked to higher-order processing of goal-relevant information, rather than low-level anticipation of visual stimuli. Taken together, these findings identify the neural substrates involved in monitoring progress over time, and how these extend beyond activations observed in conflict and error monitoring. PMID:25309380

  3. Developmental basis of limb homology in lizards.

    PubMed

    Fabrezi, Marissa; Abdala, Virginia; Oliver, María Inés Martínez

    2007-07-01

    Shubin and Alberch (Evol Biol 1986;20:319-387) proposed a scheme of tetrapod limb development based on cartilage morphogenesis that provides the arguments to interpret the homologies of skeletal elements and sets the basis to explain limb specialization through later developmental modification. Morphogenetic evidence emerged from the study of some reptiles, but the availability of data for lizards is limited. Here, the study of adult skeletal variation in 41 lizard taxa and ontogeny in species of Liolaemus and Tupinambis attempts to fill in this gap and provides supporting evidence for the Shubin-Alberch scheme. Six questions are explored. Is there an intermedium in the carpus? Are there two centralia in the carpus? Is there homology among proximal tarsalia of reptiles? Does digit V belong to the digital arch? Is the pisiform an element of the autopodium plan? And should the ossification processes be similar to cartilage morphogenesis? We found the following answers. Some taxa exhibit an ossified element that could represent an intermedium. There is one centrale in the carpus. Development of proximal tarsalia seems to be equivalent with that observed among reptiles. Digit V could arise from the digital arch. Pisiform does not arise as part of the limb plan. And different patterns of ossification occur following a single and conservative cartilaginous configuration. Lizard limb development shows an early pattern common to other reptiles with clear primary axis and digital arch. The pattern then becomes lizard-specific with specialization involving some reduction in prechondrogenic elements. PMID:17415759

  4. Thermal Creep of a Rarefied Gas on the Basis of Non-linear Korteweg-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Jung; Lee, Min-Gi; Slemrod, Marshall

    2015-02-01

    The study of thermal transpiration, more commonly called thermal creep, is accomplished by use of Korteweg's theory of capillarity. Incorporation of this theory into the balance laws of continuum mechanics allows resolution of boundary value problems via solutions to systems of ordinary differential equations. The problem was originally considered by Maxwell in his classic 1879 paper M axwell (Phil Trans Roy Soc (London) 170:231-256, 1879). In that paper Maxwell derived what is now called the Burnett higher order contribution to the Cauchy stress, but was not able to solve his newly derived system of partial differential equations. In this paper the authors note that a more appropriate higher order contribution to the Cauchy stress follows from Korteweg's 1901 theory K orteweg (Arch Neerl Sci Exactes Nat Ser II 6:1-24, 1901). The appropriateness of Korteweg's theory is based on the exact summation of the Chapman-Enskog expansion given by Gorban and Karlin. The resulting balance laws are solved exactly, qualitatively, and numerically and the results are qualitatively similar to the numerical and exact results given by Aoki et al., Loyalka et al., and Struchtrup et al.

  5. Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Hicks

    2011-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

  6. A radial basis function Galerkin method for inhomogeneous nonlocal diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Rowe, Stephen T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a discretization for a nonlocal diffusion problem using a localized basis of radial basis functions. The stiffness matrix entries are assembled by a special quadrature routine unique to the localized basis. Combining the quadrature method with the localized basis produces a well-conditioned, sparse, symmetric positive definite stiffness matrix. We demonstrate that both the continuum and discrete problems are well-posed and present numerical results for the convergence behavior of the radial basis function method. As a result, we explore approximating the solution to anisotropic differential equations by solving anisotropic nonlocal integral equations using the radial basis function method.

  7. 77 FR 60430 - Brigham Oil & Gas, L.P.; Notice for Temporary Waiver of Filing and Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Brigham Oil & Gas, L.P.; Notice for Temporary Waiver of Filing and... Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.204 (2012), Brigham Oil & Gas, L.P., (Brigham Oil & Gas.... Brigham Oil & Gas requested review on an expedited basis and that a Commission order granting...

  8. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  9. 3D modeling of gas/water distribution in water-bearing carbonate gas reservoirs: the Longwangmiao gas field, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Chenghua; Li, ChaoChun; Ma, Zhonggao

    2016-10-01

    A water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir is an important natural gas resource being developed worldwide. Due to the long-term water/rock/gas interaction during geological evolution, complex gas/water distribution has formed under the superposed effect of sedimentary facies, reservoir space facies and gravity difference of fluid facies. In view of these challenges, on the basis of the conventional three-stage modeling method, this paper presents a modelling method controlled by four-stage facies to develop 3D model of a water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir. Key to this method is the reservoir property modelling controlled by two-stage facies, and the fluid property modelling controlled by another two-stage facies. The prerequisite of this method is a reliable database obtained from solid geological investigation. On the basis of illustrating the principles of the modelling method controlled by four-stage facies, this paper further implements systematically modeling of the heterogeneous gas/water distribution of the Longwangmiao carbonate formation in the Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan basin, China.

  10. Neural basis of economic bubble behavior.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, A; Onozaki, T; Mizuno, T; Asamizuya, T; Ueno, K; Cheng, K; Iriki, A

    2014-04-18

    Throughout human history, economic bubbles have formed and burst. As a bubble grows, microeconomic behavior ceases to be constrained by realistic predictions. This contradicts the basic assumption of economics that agents have rational expectations. To examine the neural basis of behavior during bubbles, we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants traded shares in a virtual stock exchange with two non-bubble stocks and one bubble stock. The price was largely deflected from the fair price in one of the non-bubble stocks, but not in the other. Their fair prices were specified. The price of the bubble stock showed a large increase and battering, as based on a real stock-market bust. The imaging results revealed modulation of the brain circuits that regulate trade behavior under different market conditions. The premotor cortex was activated only under a market condition in which the price was largely deflected from the fair price specified. During the bubble, brain regions associated with the cognitive processing that supports order decisions were identified. The asset preference that might bias the decision was associated with the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The activity of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) was correlated with the score of future time perspective, which would bias the estimation of future price. These regions were deemed to form a distinctive network during the bubble. A functional connectivity analysis showed that the connectivity between the DLPFC and the IPL was predominant compared with other connectivities only during the bubble. These findings indicate that uncertain and unstable market conditions changed brain modes in traders. These brain mechanisms might lead to a loss of control caused by wishful thinking, and to microeconomic bubbles that expand, on the macroscopic scale, toward bust.

  11. The genetic basis of music ability.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi Ting; McPherson, Gary E; Peretz, Isabelle; Berkovic, Samuel F; Wilson, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Music is an integral part of the cultural heritage of all known human societies, with the capacity for music perception and production present in most people. Researchers generally agree that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the broader realization of music ability, with the degree of music aptitude varying, not only from individual to individual, but across various components of music ability within the same individual. While environmental factors influencing music development and expertise have been well investigated in the psychological and music literature, the interrogation of possible genetic influences has not progressed at the same rate. Recent advances in genetic research offer fertile ground for exploring the genetic basis of music ability. This paper begins with a brief overview of behavioral and molecular genetic approaches commonly used in human genetic analyses, and then critically reviews the key findings of genetic investigations of the components of music ability. Some promising and converging findings have emerged, with several loci on chromosome 4 implicated in singing and music perception, and certain loci on chromosome 8q implicated in absolute pitch and music perception. The gene AVPR1A on chromosome 12q has also been implicated in music perception, music memory, and music listening, whereas SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q has been associated with music memory and choir participation. Replication of these results in alternate populations and with larger samples is warranted to confirm the findings. Through increased research efforts, a clearer picture of the genetic mechanisms underpinning music ability will hopefully emerge. PMID:25018744

  12. The genetic basis of music ability

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yi Ting; McPherson, Gary E.; Peretz, Isabelle; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Music is an integral part of the cultural heritage of all known human societies, with the capacity for music perception and production present in most people. Researchers generally agree that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the broader realization of music ability, with the degree of music aptitude varying, not only from individual to individual, but across various components of music ability within the same individual. While environmental factors influencing music development and expertise have been well investigated in the psychological and music literature, the interrogation of possible genetic influences has not progressed at the same rate. Recent advances in genetic research offer fertile ground for exploring the genetic basis of music ability. This paper begins with a brief overview of behavioral and molecular genetic approaches commonly used in human genetic analyses, and then critically reviews the key findings of genetic investigations of the components of music ability. Some promising and converging findings have emerged, with several loci on chromosome 4 implicated in singing and music perception, and certain loci on chromosome 8q implicated in absolute pitch and music perception. The gene AVPR1A on chromosome 12q has also been implicated in music perception, music memory, and music listening, whereas SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q has been associated with music memory and choir participation. Replication of these results in alternate populations and with larger samples is warranted to confirm the findings. Through increased research efforts, a clearer picture of the genetic mechanisms underpinning music ability will hopefully emerge. PMID:25018744

  13. Cellular basis of memory for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Nestler, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of numerous psychosocial factors, at its core, drug addiction involves a biological process: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of “cellular or molecular memory.” Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of “behavioral memory,” perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  14. Explicitly correlated atomic orbital basis second order Møller-Plesset theory.

    PubMed

    Hollman, David S; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Schaefer, Henry F

    2013-02-14

    The scope of problems treatable by ab initio wavefunction methods has expanded greatly through the application of local approximations. In particular, atomic orbital (AO) based wavefunction methods have emerged as powerful techniques for exploiting sparsity and have been applied to biomolecules as large as 1707 atoms [S. A. Maurer, D. S. Lambrecht, D. Flaig, and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)]. Correlated wavefunction methods, however, converge notoriously slowly to the basis set limit and, excepting the use of large basis sets, will suffer from a severe basis set incompleteness error (BSIE). The use of larger basis sets is prohibitively expensive for AO basis methods since, for example, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) scales linearly with the number of atoms, but still scales as O(N(5)) in the number of functions per atom. Explicitly correlated F12 methods have been shown to drastically reduce BSIE for even modestly sized basis sets. In this work, we therefore explore an atomic orbital based formulation of explicitly correlated MP2-F12 theory. We present working equations for the new method, which produce results identical to the widely used molecular orbital (MO) version of MP2-F12 without resorting to a delocalized MO basis. We conclude with a discussion of several possible approaches to a priori screening of contraction terms in our method and the prospects for a linear scaling implementation of AO-MP2-F12. The discussion includes concrete examples involving noble gas dimers and linear alkane chains.

  15. The basis and basics of mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bone, R C; Eubanks, D H

    1991-06-01

    The development of mechanical ventilators and the procedures for their application began with the simple foot pump developed by Fell O'Dwyer in 1888. Ventilators have progressed through three generations, beginning with intermittent positive pressure breathing units such as the Bird and Bennett device in the 1960s. These were followed by second-generation units--represented by the Bennett MA-2 ventilator--in the 1970s, and the third-generation microprocessor-controlled units of today. During this evolutionary process clinicians recognized Types I and II respiratory failure as being indicators for mechanical ventilatory support. More recently investigators have expanded, clarified, and clinically applied the physiology of the work of breathing (described by Julius Comroe and other pioneers) to muscle fatigue, requiring ventilatory support. A ventilator classification system can help the clinician understand how ventilators function and under what conditions they may fail to operate as desired. Pressure-support ventilation is an example of how industry has responded to a clinical need--that is, to unload the work of breathing. All positive pressure ventilators generate tidal volumes by using power sources such as medical gas cylinders, air compressors, electrically driven turbines, or piston driven motors. Positive end-expiratory pressures, synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure support ventilation, pressure release ventilation, and mandatory minute ventilation, are examples of the special functions available on modern ventilators. Modern third-generation ventilators use microprocessors to control operational functions and monitors. Because these units have incorporated the experience learned from earlier ventilators, it is imperative that clinicians understand basic ventilator operation and application in order to most effectively prescribe and assess their use. PMID:2036934

  16. 7 CFR 810.303 - Basis of determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for under the general provisions are made on the basis of the sample as a whole, except the determination of odor is made on either the basis of the sample as a whole or the sample when free from...

  17. 42 CFR 457.700 - Basis, scope, and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Strategic Planning, Reporting, and Evaluation § 457.700 Basis, scope, and applicability. (a) Statutory basis... strategic planning, monitoring, reporting and evaluation under title XXI. (c) Applicability....

  18. 42 CFR 457.700 - Basis, scope, and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Strategic Planning, Reporting, and Evaluation § 457.700 Basis, scope, and applicability. (a) Statutory basis... strategic planning, monitoring, reporting and evaluation under title XXI. (c) Applicability....

  19. 42 CFR 457.700 - Basis, scope, and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Strategic Planning, Reporting, and Evaluation § 457.700 Basis, scope, and applicability. (a) Statutory basis... strategic planning, monitoring, reporting and evaluation under title XXI. (c) Applicability....

  20. 42 CFR 457.700 - Basis, scope, and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Strategic Planning, Reporting, and Evaluation § 457.700 Basis, scope, and applicability. (a) Statutory basis... strategic planning, monitoring, reporting and evaluation under title XXI. (c) Applicability....

  1. 42 CFR 411.110 - Basis for determination of nonconformance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... covered or seeks to be covered under the plan is entitled to Medicare on the basis of ESRD, age, or disability, or eligible on the basis of ESRD. (2) The nondifferentiation clause for individuals with ESRD....

  2. 42 CFR 411.110 - Basis for determination of nonconformance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... covered or seeks to be covered under the plan is entitled to Medicare on the basis of ESRD, age, or disability, or eligible on the basis of ESRD. (2) The nondifferentiation clause for individuals with ESRD....

  3. 42 CFR 411.110 - Basis for determination of nonconformance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... covered or seeks to be covered under the plan is entitled to Medicare on the basis of ESRD, age, or disability, or eligible on the basis of ESRD. (2) The nondifferentiation clause for individuals with ESRD....

  4. 42 CFR 411.110 - Basis for determination of nonconformance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... covered or seeks to be covered under the plan is entitled to Medicare on the basis of ESRD, age, or disability, or eligible on the basis of ESRD. (2) The nondifferentiation clause for individuals with ESRD....

  5. 42 CFR 411.110 - Basis for determination of nonconformance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... covered or seeks to be covered under the plan is entitled to Medicare on the basis of ESRD, age, or disability, or eligible on the basis of ESRD. (2) The nondifferentiation clause for individuals with ESRD....

  6. Demonstration of landfill gas enhancement techniques in landfill simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. J.; Vogt, W. G.

    1982-02-01

    Various techniques to enhance gas production in sanitary landfills were applied to landfill simulators. These techniques include (1) accelerated moisture addition, (2) leachate recycling, (3) buffer addition, (4) nutrient addition, and (5) combinations of the above. Results are compiled through on-going operation and monitoring of sixteen landfill simulators. These test cells contain about 380 kg of municipal solid waste. Quantities of buffer and nutrient materials were placed in selected cells at the time of loading. Water is added to all test cells on a monthly basis; leachate is withdrawn from all cells (and recycled on selected cells) also on a monthly basis. Daily monitoring of gas volumes and refuse temperatures is performed. Gas and leachate samples are collected and analyzed on a monthly basis. Leachate and gas quality and quantity reslts are presented for the first 18 months of operation.

  7. Preliminary report on the commercial viability of gas production from natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, M.R.; Hancock, S.H.; Wilson, S.J.; Patil, S.L.; Moridis, G.J.; Boswell, R.; Collett, T.S.; Koh, C.A.; Sloan, E.D.

    2009-01-01

    Economic studies on simulated gas hydrate reservoirs have been compiled to estimate the price of natural gas that may lead to economically viable production from the most promising gas hydrate accumulations. As a first estimate, $CDN2005 12/Mscf is the lowest gas price that would allow economically viable production from gas hydrates in the absence of associated free gas, while an underlying gas deposit will reduce the viability price estimate to $CDN2005 7.50/Mscf. Results from a recent analysis of the simulated production of natural gas from marine hydrate deposits are also considered in this report; on an IROR basis, it is $US2008 3.50-4.00/Mscf more expensive to produce marine hydrates than conventional marine gas assuming the existence of sufficiently large marine hydrate accumulations. While these prices represent the best available estimates, the economic evaluation of a specific project is highly dependent on the producibility of the target zone, the amount of gas in place, the associated geologic and depositional environment, existing pipeline infrastructure, and local tariffs and taxes. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation.

    PubMed

    Heath, Garvin A; O'Donoughue, Patrick; Arent, Douglas J; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the recovery of unconventional natural gas, particularly shale gas, have served to dramatically increase domestic production and reserve estimates for the United States and internationally. This trend has led to lowered prices and increased scrutiny on production practices. Questions have been raised as to how greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the life cycle of shale gas production and use compares with that of conventionally produced natural gas or other fuel sources such as coal. Recent literature has come to different conclusions on this point, largely due to differing assumptions, comparison baselines, and system boundaries. Through a meta-analytical procedure we call harmonization, we develop robust, analytically consistent, and updated comparisons of estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for electricity produced from shale gas, conventionally produced natural gas, and coal. On a per-unit electrical output basis, harmonization reveals that median estimates of GHG emissions from shale gas-generated electricity are similar to those for conventional natural gas, with both approximately half that of the central tendency of coal. Sensitivity analysis on the harmonized estimates indicates that assumptions regarding liquids unloading and estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) of wells have the greatest influence on life cycle GHG emissions, whereby shale gas life cycle GHG emissions could approach the range of best-performing coal-fired generation under certain scenarios. Despite clarification of published estimates through harmonization, these initial assessments should be confirmed through methane emissions measurements at components and in the atmosphere and through better characterization of EUR and practices.

  9. The neural circuit basis of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Kaifosh William John

    The astounding capacity for learning ranks among the nervous system's most impressive features. This thesis comprises studies employing varied approaches to improve understanding, at the level of neural circuits, of the brain's capacity for learning. The first part of the thesis contains investigations of hippocampal circuitry -- both theoretical work and experimental work in the mouse Mus musculus -- as a model system for declarative memory. To begin, Chapter 2 presents a theory of hippocampal memory storage and retrieval that reflects nonlinear dendritic processing within hippocampal pyramidal neurons. As a prelude to the experimental work that comprises the remainder of this part, Chapter 3 describes an open source software platform that we have developed for analysis of data acquired with in vivo Ca2+ imaging, the main experimental technique used throughout the remainder of this part of the thesis. As a first application of this technique, Chapter 4 characterizes the content of signaling at synapses between GABAergic neurons of the medial septum and interneurons in stratum oriens of hippocampal area CA1. Chapter 5 then combines these techniques with optogenetic, pharmacogenetic, and pharmacological manipulations to uncover inhibitory circuit mechanisms underlying fear learning. The second part of this thesis focuses on the cerebellum-like electrosensory lobe in the weakly electric mormyrid fish Gnathonemus petersii, as a model system for non-declarative memory. In Chapter 6, we study how short-duration EOD motor commands are recoded into a complex temporal basis in the granule cell layer, which can be used to cancel Purkinje-like cell firing to the longer duration and temporally varying EOD-driven sensory responses. In Chapter 7, we consider not only the temporal aspects of the granule cell code, but also the encoding of body position provided from proprioceptive and efference copy sources. Together these studies clarify how the cerebellum-like circuitry of the

  10. Structural Basis for Catalysis by Onconase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. Eugene; Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, George N.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2007-01-01

    Onconase (ONC) is a homolog of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) from the frog Rana pipiens. ONC displays antitumoral activity and is in advanced clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report the first atomic structures of ONC·nucleic acid complexes: a T89N/E91A ONC·5′-AMP complex at 1.65 Å resolution and a wild-type ONC·d(AUGA) complex at 1.90 Å resolution. The latter structure and site-directed mutagenesis was used to reveal the atomic basis for substrate recognition and turnover by ONC. The residues in ONC that are proximal to the scissile phosphodiester bond (His10, Lys31, and His97) and uracil nucleobase (Thr35, Asp67, and Phe98) are conserved from RNase A and serve to generate a similar bell-shaped pH–kcat/KM profile for RNA cleavage. Glu91 of ONC forms two hydrogen bonds with the guanine nucleobase in d(AUGA), and Thr89 is in close proximity to that nucleobase. Installing a neutral or cationic residue at position 91 or an asparagine residue at position 89 virtually eliminated the 102-fold guanine:adenine preference of ONC. A variant that combined such substitutions, T89N/E91A ONC, actually preferred adenine over guanine. In contrast, installing an arginine residue at position 91 increased the guanine preference and afforded an ONC variant with the highest known kcat/KM value. These data indicate that ONC discriminates between guanine and adenine by using Coulombic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds. The structure of the ONC·d(AUGA) complex was also used to probe other aspects of catalysis. For example, the T5R substitution, designed to create a favorable Coulombic interaction between ONC and a phosphoryl group in RNA, increased ribonucleolytic activity by twofold. No variant, however, was more toxic to human cancer cells than wild-type ONC. Together, these findings provide a cynosure for understanding catalysis of RNA cleavage in a system of high medicinal relevance. PMID:18001769

  11. 45 CFR 157.10 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis and scope. 157.10 Section 157.10 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EMPLOYER INTERACTIONS WITH EXCHANGES AND SHOP PARTICIPATION General Provisions § 157.10 Basis and scope. (a) Basis....

  12. 45 CFR 157.10 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis and scope. 157.10 Section 157.10 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EMPLOYER INTERACTIONS WITH EXCHANGES AND SHOP PARTICIPATION General Provisions § 157.10 Basis and scope. (a) Basis....

  13. 45 CFR 157.10 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Basis and scope. 157.10 Section 157.10 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EMPLOYER INTERACTIONS WITH EXCHANGES AND SHOP PARTICIPATION General Provisions § 157.10 Basis and scope. (a) Basis....

  14. 10 CFR 830.207 - DOE approval of safety basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DOE approval of safety basis. 830.207 Section 830.207 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.207 DOE approval of safety basis. (a) By April 10, 2003, a contractor responsible for a hazard category 1, 2, or 3...

  15. 10 CFR 13.1 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Basis and purpose. 13.1 Section 13.1 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.1 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. This part implements the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986, Public Law No. 99-509, §§ 6101-6104, 100 Stat....

  16. 9 CFR 590.130 - Basis of billing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Basis of billing plants. 590.130... of Service § 590.130 Basis of billing plants. Overtime and/or holiday services shall be billed to the official plant on the basis of each 15 minutes of overtime and/or holiday service performed by...

  17. 42 CFR 413.330 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis and scope. 413.330 Section 413.330 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... Facilities § 413.330 Basis and scope. (a) Basis. This subpart implements section 1888(e) of the Act,...

  18. 16 CFR 1203.2 - Purpose and basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Purpose and basis. 1203.2 Section 1203.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.2 Purpose and basis. The purpose and basis of...

  19. 9 CFR 590.130 - Basis of billing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis of billing plants. 590.130... of Service § 590.130 Basis of billing plants. Overtime and/or holiday services shall be billed to the official plant on the basis of each 15 minutes of overtime and/or holiday service performed by...

  20. 10 CFR 72.92 - Design basis external natural events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Design basis external natural events. 72.92 Section 72.92... Evaluation Factors § 72.92 Design basis external natural events. (a) Natural phenomena that may exist or that... must be adopted for evaluating the design basis external natural events based on the characteristics...

  1. 47 CFR 51.1 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis and purpose. 51.1 Section 51.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION General Information § 51.1 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. These rules are issued pursuant to...

  2. 10 CFR 72.92 - Design basis external natural events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Design basis external natural events. 72.92 Section 72.92... Evaluation Factors § 72.92 Design basis external natural events. (a) Natural phenomena that may exist or that... must be adopted for evaluating the design basis external natural events based on the characteristics...

  3. 10 CFR 72.92 - Design basis external natural events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Design basis external natural events. 72.92 Section 72.92... Evaluation Factors § 72.92 Design basis external natural events. (a) Natural phenomena that may exist or that... must be adopted for evaluating the design basis external natural events based on the characteristics...

  4. 10 CFR 72.92 - Design basis external natural events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Design basis external natural events. 72.92 Section 72.92... Evaluation Factors § 72.92 Design basis external natural events. (a) Natural phenomena that may exist or that... must be adopted for evaluating the design basis external natural events based on the characteristics...

  5. 16 CFR 1203.2 - Purpose and basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose and basis. 1203.2 Section 1203.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.2 Purpose and basis. The purpose and basis of...

  6. 20 CFR 498.100 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Basis and purpose. 498.100 Section 498.100 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED EXCLUSIONS § 498.100 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. This part implements sections 1129 and 1140 of the...

  7. 20 CFR 498.100 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Basis and purpose. 498.100 Section 498.100 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED EXCLUSIONS § 498.100 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. This part implements sections 1129 and 1140 of the...

  8. 20 CFR 498.100 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Basis and purpose. 498.100 Section 498.100 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED EXCLUSIONS § 498.100 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. This part implements sections 1129 and 1140 of the...

  9. 20 CFR 498.100 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Basis and purpose. 498.100 Section 498.100 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED EXCLUSIONS § 498.100 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. This part implements sections 1129 and 1140 of the...

  10. 20 CFR 498.100 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Basis and purpose. 498.100 Section 498.100 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDED EXCLUSIONS § 498.100 Basis and purpose. (a) Basis. This part implements sections 1129 and 1140 of the...

  11. 42 CFR 485.900 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) § 485.900 Basis and scope. (a) Basis. This subpart is based on the... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis and scope. 485.900 Section 485.900 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. On the Superficial Gas Velocity in Deep Gas-Solid Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Grace, John; Shadle, Lawrence; Guenther, Chris

    2011-11-15

    The superficial gas velocity is one of the key parameters used to determine the flow hydrodynamics in gas–solids fluidized beds. However, the superficial velocity varies with height in practice, and there is no consistent basis for its specification. Different approaches to determine the superficial gas velocity in a deep gas–solids system are shown to cause difficulties in developing models and in comparing predictions with experimental results. In addition, the reference conditions for superficial gas velocity are important in modeling of deep gas–solids systems where there is a considerable pressure drop.

  13. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  14. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Ruiz, C L

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  15. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-15

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  16. Safety evaluation of MHTGR licensing basis accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1989-04-01

    The safety potential of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) was evaluated, based on the Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID), as submitted by the US Department of Energy to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The relevant reactor safety codes were extended for this purpose and applied to this new reactor concept, searching primarily for potential accident scenarios that might lead to fuel failures due to excessive core temperatures and/or to vessel damage, due to excessive vessel temperatures. The design basis accident scenario leading to the highest vessel temperatures is the depressurized core heatup scenario without any forced cooling and with decay heat rejection to the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). This scenario was evaluated, including numerous parametric variations of input parameters, like material properties and decay heat. It was found that significant safety margins exist, but that high confidence levels in the core effective thermal conductivity, the reactor vessel and RCCS thermal emissivities and the decay heat function are required to maintain this safety margin. Severe accident extensions of this depressurized core heatup scenario included the cases of complete RCCS failure, cases of massive air ingress, core heatup without scram and cases of degraded RCCS performance due to absorbing gases in the reactor cavity. Except for no-scram scenarios extending beyond 100 hr, the fuel never reached the limiting temperature of 1600/degree/C, below which measurable fuel failures are not expected. In some of the scenarios, excessive vessel and concrete temperatures could lead to investment losses but are not expected to lead to any source term beyond that from the circulating inventory. 19 refs., 56 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  18. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.

    Gas chromatography (GC) has many applications in the analysis of food products. GC has been used for the determination of fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, gases, water, alcohols, pesticides, flavor compounds, and many more. While GC has been used for other food components such as sugars, oligosaccharides, amino acids, peptides, and vitamins, these substances are more suited to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. GC is ideally suited to the analysis of volatile substances that are thermally stable. Substances such as pesticides and flavor compounds that meet these criteria can be isolated from a food and directly injected into the GC. For compounds that are thermally unstable, too low in volatility, or yield poor chromatographic separation due to polarity, a derivatization step must be done before GC analysis. The two parts of the experiment described here include the analysis of alcohols that requires no derivatization step, and the analysis of fatty acids which requires derivatization. The experiments specify the use of capillary columns, but the first experiment includes conditions for a packed column.

  19. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical basis for reconstructing paleotemperatures from the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases produced in minerals at Earth's surface. Experimentally-determined diffusion kinetics predicts diffusive loss of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at ambient temperatures; incomplete retention has also been observed empirically in field studies. We show that the theory of simultaneous production and diffusion that applies to radiogenic noble gases in minerals-the basis of thermochronology-can also be applied to cosmogenic noble gases to reconstruct past surface temperatures on Earth. We use published diffusion kinetics and production rates for 3He in quartz and 21Ne in orthoclase to demonstrate the resolving power of cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry with respect to exposure duration, temperature, and diffusion domain size. Calculations indicate that, when paired with a quantitatively retained cosmogenic nuclide such as 21Ne or 10Be, observations of cosmogenic 3He in quartz can constrain temperatures during surface exposure in polar and high altitude environments. Likewise, 21Ne retention in feldspars is sensitive to temperatures at lower latitudes and elevations, expanding the potential geographic applicability of this technique to most latitudes. As an example, we present paired measurements of 3He and 10Be in quartz from a suite of Antarctic sandstone erratics to test whether the abundances of cosmogenic 3He agree with what is predicted from first principles and laboratory-determined diffusion kinetics. We find that the amounts of cosmogenic 3He present in these samples are consistent with the known mean annual temperature (MAT) for this region of Antarctica between -25 and -30 °C. These results demonstrate the method's ability to record paleotemperatures through geologic time.

  20. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  1. The scientific basis for visible particle inspection.

    PubMed

    Knapp, J Z

    1999-01-01

    The following paper was presented at the 1999 PDA International Conference in Tokyo, Japan February 24, 1999. The paper was written in response to the recent well-publicized incidents in Japan in which the presence of visible particulates in injectable products was observed. These incidents should be considered a wake-up call to all concerned with injectable pharmaceutical products. The overview of visible particle inspection presented at the Tokyo PDA Meeting is reprinted here as a reminder that a global marketplace requires well-defined parameters and evaluation methods. In the absence of these basic requirements continuation of the present conflicting particle contamination evaluations will continue by default. At this time, visible particle inspection around the world lacks both direction and an accepted common language. The adoption of the probabalistic concepts introduced by Knapp and co-workers in 1980 can supply these basic requirements. The use of the probabalistic model and the statistically defined particle quality regions defined by Knapp and co-workers in 1980 was, at that time, a concept foreign to pharmaceutical quality. In the period since 1980, the methodology then introduced has been expanded and simplified. The analysis used by these workers was similar to that used in life insurance calculations and is just as reliable. The results obtained following the adoption of the framework and probabalistic concepts introduced by Pflug in sterile products since 1973 supports the use of tested and verified probabalistic concepts in the production of injectable products. Pflug's work has provided a basis for the secure communication of sterile production methods and results. This improvement in communication has potentiated a surge in sterile product improvement and a consequent reduction in product cost. The use of the probabalistic model and statistically defined particle contamination quality regions introduced by Knapp and co-workers in 1980 is believed

  2. Correlation consistent basis sets for the atoms In–Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, Andrew; Wilson, Angela K.

    2015-02-28

    In this work, the correlation consistent family of Gaussian basis sets has been expanded to include all-electron basis sets for In–Xe. The methodology for developing these basis sets is described, and several examples of the performance and utility of the new sets have been provided. Dissociation energies and bond lengths for both homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomics demonstrate the systematic convergence behavior with respect to increasing basis set quality expected by the family of correlation consistent basis sets in describing molecular properties. Comparison with recently developed correlation consistent sets designed for use with the Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian is provided.

  3. An improved choice of oscillator basis for banana shaped nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1994-03-01

    The question of the appropriate choice of oscillator basis functions for studying exotic nuclear shapes is raised. Difficulties with the conventional choice of oscillator basis states are noted for shapes having a large banana component. A prescription for an improved oscillator basis to study these shapes is given. It can be applied in a more general context. New calculations with this improved basis are presented for the banana deformation mode. The change of basis gives results that improve the prospects of finding states in the banana minimum for many isotopes of Tl, Pb and Bi.

  4. Systematically convergent basis sets with relativistic pseudopotentials. II. Small-core pseudopotentials and correlation consistent basis sets for the post-d group 16-18 elements

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kirk A.; Figgen, Detlev; Goll, Erich; Stoll, Hermann; Dolg, Michael F.

    2003-12-01

    Series of correlation consistent basis sets have been developed for the post-d group 16-18 elements in conjunction with small-core relativistic pseudopotentials (PPs) of the energy-consistent variety. The latter were adjusted to multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock data based on the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian. The outer-core (n-1)spd shells are explicitly treated together with the nsp valence shell with these PPs. The accompanying cc-pVnZ-PP and aug-cc-pVnZ-PP basis sets range in size from DZ to 5Z quality and yield systematic convergence of both Hartree-Fock and correlated total energies. In addition to the calculation of atomic electron affinities and dipole polarizabilities of the rare gas atoms, numerous molecular benchmark calculations (HBr, HI, HAt, Br2, I2, At2, SiSe, SiTe, SiPo, KrH+, XeH+, and RnH+) are also reported at the coupled cluster level of theory. For the purposes of comparison, all-electron calculations using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian have also been carried out for the halogen-containing molecules using basis sets of 5Z quality.

  5. Property-optimized Gaussian basis sets for molecular response calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Furche, Filipp

    2010-10-01

    With recent advances in electronic structure methods, first-principles calculations of electronic response properties, such as linear and nonlinear polarizabilities, have become possible for molecules with more than 100 atoms. Basis set incompleteness is typically the main source of error in such calculations since traditional diffuse augmented basis sets are too costly to use or suffer from near linear dependence. To address this problem, we construct the first comprehensive set of property-optimized augmented basis sets for elements H-Rn except lanthanides. The new basis sets build on the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets of split-valence to quadruple-zeta valence quality and add a small number of moderately diffuse basis functions. The exponents are determined variationally by maximization of atomic Hartree-Fock polarizabilities using analytical derivative methods. The performance of the resulting basis sets is assessed using a set of 313 molecular static Hartree-Fock polarizabilities. The mean absolute basis set errors are 3.6%, 1.1%, and 0.3% for property-optimized basis sets of split-valence, triple-zeta, and quadruple-zeta valence quality, respectively. Density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset polarizabilities show similar basis set convergence. We demonstrate the efficiency of our basis sets by computing static polarizabilities of icosahedral fullerenes up to C720 using hybrid density functional theory.

  6. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  7. Water alternating gas injection maximizes recoverable reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Opdal, S.T.

    1995-10-01

    In the North Sea, water alternating gas injection (WAG) can be an alternative to water flooding. The Gullfaks field is located in Block 34/10 in the Norwegian North Sea. Different methods have been investigated to improve the recovery from Gullfaks, including polymers, surfactants, WAG, hydraulic fracturing and horizontal wells. Several of these methods have been laboratory and field tested. Both horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing are used on a regular basis. In addition, an area in the Lower Brent Formation was selected in 1991 as a pilot for the WAG method. WAG was initially proposed for gas-flooded fields as a method of controlling gas fingering and improving vertical sweep, particularly for miscible CO{sub 2} displacements. Effective at improving immiscible gas injection, WAG can also be beneficiary to fields that are being water flooded. This paper reviews the design problems associated with the WAG operation. It discusses the performance and sweep efficiency which resulted from the WAG.

  8. Natural gas imports and exports. Second quarter report, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepared quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the second quarter of 1998 (April through June). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

  9. Natural gas imports and exports. First quarter report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico. 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Natural gas imports and exports. First quarter report, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the first quarter of 1998 (January through March). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

  11. Natural gas imports and exports: Third quarter report, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the third quarter of 1998 (July--September). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent calendar quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

  12. Natural gas imports and exports. Third quarter report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This quarterly report, prepared by The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities, summarizes the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Numerical data are presented in four attachments, each of which is comprised of a series of tables. Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent calendar quarters. Volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past year are given in Attachment B. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D lists gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico. Highlights of the report are very briefly summarized.

  13. Natural gas imports and exports. Fourth quarter report, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the fourth quarter of 1998 (October through December). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

  14. Radial basis function interpolation in the limit of increasingly flat basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindelan, Manuel; Moscoso, Miguel; González-Rodríguez, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new approach to study Radial Basis Function (RBF) interpolation in the limit of increasingly flat functions. The new approach is based on the semi-analytical computation of the Laurent series of the inverse of the RBF interpolation matrix described in a previous paper [3]. Once the Laurent series is obtained, it can be used to compute the limiting polynomial interpolant, the optimal shape parameter of the RBFs used for interpolation, and the weights of RBF finite difference formulas, among other things.

  15. Inferential determination of various properties of a gas mixture

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2007-03-27

    Methods for inferentially determining various properties of a gas mixture, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. The method can be applied to natural gas mixtures, where the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for heating value calculations. The method may also be applied to inferentially determine density and molecular weight for gas mixtures other than natural gases.

  16. Anaesthesia gas supply: gas cylinders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-09-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment.

  17. Anaesthesia Gas Supply: Gas Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment. PMID:24249883

  18. Predicting the detectability of thin gaseous plumes in hyperspectral images using basis vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kevin K.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Chilton, Lawrence

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a new method for predicting the detectability of thin gaseous plumes in hyperspectral images. The novelty of this method is the use of basis vectors for each of the spectral channels of a collection instrument to calculate noise-equivalent concentration-pathlengths instead of matching scene pixels to absorbance spectra of gases in a library. This method provides insight into regions of the spectrum where gas detection will be relatively easier or harder, as influenced by ground emissivity, temperature contrast, and the atmosphere. We relate a three-layer physics-based radiance model to basis vector noise-equivalent concentration-pathlengths, to signal-to-noise ratios, and finally to minimum detectable concentration-pathlengths. We illustrate the method using an Airborne Hyperspectral Imager image. Our results show that data collection planning could be in°uenced by information about when potential plumes are likely to be over background segments that are most conducive to detection.

  19. Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  1. Comparison of WAG (water-alternating-gas) and continuous enriched-gas injection as miscible processes in Sadlerochit core

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, A.P.; Ostrander, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Short core displacements were conducted to evaluate miscible condensing-gas drive for the Sadlerochit reservoir of the Prudhoe Bay field. The cores were from well No. DS 14-5. The enriched gas was a 60 to 40 blend on a mole basis of rich Sadlerochit gas and the liquids from the Field Fuel Gas Unit and the separators at Flow Station 3. The experimental program consisted of 4 floods conducted in each of 4 cores for a total of 16 displacements. The floods consisted of gravity-stabilized continuous gas injection displacements with the core (1) at connate water saturation or (2) at waterflood residual oil saturation; and simultaneous injection brine enriched-gas floods at a 4 to 1 brine-to-gas ratio with the core (1) at connate water saturation or (2) at waterflood residual oil saturation.

  2. Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-11-12

    A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

  3. Communication: Convergence of many-body wave-function expansions using a plane-wave basis in the thermodynamic limit.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, James J

    2016-07-21

    Basis set incompleteness error and finite size error can manifest concurrently in systems for which the two effects are phenomenologically well-separated in length scale. When this is true, we need not necessarily remove the two sources of error simultaneously. Instead, the errors can be found and remedied in different parts of the basis set. This would be of great benefit to a method such as coupled cluster theory since the combined cost of nocc (6)nvirt (4) could be separated into nocc (6) and nvirt (4) costs with smaller prefactors. In this Communication, we present analysis on a data set due to Baardsen and co-workers, containing 2D uniform electron gas coupled cluster doubles energies for rs = 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 a.u. at a wide range of basis set sizes and particle numbers. In obtaining complete basis set limit thermodynamic limit results, we find that within a small and removable error the above assertion is correct for this simple system. We then use this method to obtain similar results for the 3D electron gas at rs = 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 a.u. and make comparison to the Ceperley-Alder quantum Monte Carlo results. This approach allows for the combination of methods which separately address finite size effects and basis set incompleteness error. PMID:27448865

  4. Communication: Convergence of many-body wave-function expansions using a plane-wave basis in the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.

    2016-07-01

    Basis set incompleteness error and finite size error can manifest concurrently in systems for which the two effects are phenomenologically well-separated in length scale. When this is true, we need not necessarily remove the two sources of error simultaneously. Instead, the errors can be found and remedied in different parts of the basis set. This would be of great benefit to a method such as coupled cluster theory since the combined cost of nocc 6 nvirt 4 could be separated into nocc 6 and nvirt 4 costs with smaller prefactors. In this Communication, we present analysis on a data set due to Baardsen and co-workers, containing 2D uniform electron gas coupled cluster doubles energies for rs = 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 a.u. at a wide range of basis set sizes and particle numbers. In obtaining complete basis set limit thermodynamic limit results, we find that within a small and removable error the above assertion is correct for this simple system. We then use this method to obtain similar results for the 3D electron gas at rs = 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 a.u. and make comparison to the Ceperley-Alder quantum Monte Carlo results. This approach allows for the combination of methods which separately address finite size effects and basis set incompleteness error.

  5. 77 FR 14225 - Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Title V Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule Step 3, GHG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Sources of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Federal Implementation Plan; Final Rule,'' 75 FR 82246 (December 30... greenhouse gas (GHG)-emitting sources at the current levels. We are also proposing two streamlining...-basis (tpy) or a carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 e)-basis and to allow PALs to be used as an...

  6. Basis Set Exchange: A Community Database for Computational Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared M.; Li, Jun; Windus, Theresa L.

    2007-05-01

    Basis sets are one of the most important input data for computational models in the chemistry, materials, biology and other science domains that utilize computational quantum mechanics methods. Providing a shared, web accessible environment where researchers can not only download basis sets in their required format, but browse the data, contribute new basis sets, and ultimately curate and manage the data as a community will facilitate growth of this resource and encourage sharing both data and knowledge. We describe the Basis Set Exchange (BSE), a web portal that provides advanced browsing and download capabilities, facilities for contributing basis set data, and an environment that incorporates tools to foster development and interaction of communities. The BSE leverages and enables continued development of the basis set library originally assembled at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  7. Compressed gas manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  8. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  9. Anyonic quon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Stephen L.; Inomata, Akira

    1995-02-01

    A simple model of a quon gas which exhibits anyonic behavior is proposed. Quons are characterized by the q-mutator, aa † - qa †a = 1 with -1 ≤ q ≤ 1. The gas has the boson and fermion gas limits and can simulate an anyon gas to the second and third virial coefficients.

  10. 10 CFR 830.207 - DOE approval of safety basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false DOE approval of safety basis. 830.207 Section 830.207 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.207 DOE approval of safety basis. (a) By April 10, 2003, a contractor responsible for a hazard category 1, 2, or 3 existing DOE nuclear facility must submit for...

  11. Birman—Wenzl—Murakami Algebra and Topological Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cheng-Cheng; Xue, Kang; Wang, Gang-Cheng; Sun, Chun-Fang; Du, Gui-Jiao

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we use entangled states to construct 9 × 9-matrix representations of Temperley—Lieb algebra (TLA), then a family of 9 × 9-matrix representations of Birman—Wenzl—Murakami algebra (BWMA) have been presented. Based on which, three topological basis states have been found. And we apply topological basis states to recast nine-dimensional BWMA into its three-dimensional counterpart. Finally, we find the topological basis states are spin singlet states in special case.

  12. Differential Forms Basis Functions for Better Conditioned Integral Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D; Stowell, M; Rieben, R; Sharpe, R; Madsen, N; Rockway, J D; Champagne, N J; Jandhyala, V; Pingenot, J

    2005-01-13

    Differential forms offer a convenient way to classify physical quantities and set up computational problems. By observing the dimensionality and type of derivatives (divergence,curl,gradient) applied to a quantity, an appropriate differential form can be chosen for that quantity. To use these differential forms in a simulation, the forms must be discretized using basis functions. The 0-form through 2-form basis functions are formed for surfaces. Twisted 1-form and 2-form bases will be presented in this paper. Twisted 1-form (1-forms) basis functions ({Lambda}) are divergence-conforming edge basis functions with units m{sup -1}. They are appropriate for representing vector quantities with continuous normal components, and they belong to the same function space as the commonly used RWG bases [1]. They are used here to formulate the frequency-domain EFIE with Galerkin testing. The 2-form basis functions (f) are scalar basis functions with units m{sup -2} and with no enforced continuity between elements. At lowest order, the 2-form basis functions are similar to pulse basis functions. They are used here to formulate an electrostatic integral equation. It should be noted that the derivative of an n-form differential form basis function is an (n+1)-form, i.e. the derivative of a 1-form basis function is a 2-form. Because the basis functions are constructed such that they have spatial units, the spatial units are removed from the degrees of freedom, leading to a better-conditioned system matrix. In this conference paper, we look at the performance of these differential forms and bases by examining the conditioning of matrix systems for electrostatics and the EFIE. The meshes used were refined across the object to consider the behavior of these basis transforms for elements of different sizes.

  13. QUALITY: A program to assess basis set quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordo, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    A program to analyze in detail the quality of basis sets is presented. The information provided by the application of a wide variety of (atomic and/or molecular) quality criteria is processed by using a methodology that allows one to determine the most appropriate quality test to select a basis set to compute a given (atomic or molecular) property. Fuzzy set theory is used to choose the most adequate basis set to compute simultaneously a set of properties.

  14. 48 CFR 1426.7103-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7103-1 Statutory basis... qualified minority business enterprises in awarding contracts under the Act and report annually to...

  15. 48 CFR 1426.7102-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7102-1 Statutory basis...., MBDA) to collect information on acquisition and financial assistance awards to minority businesses,...

  16. 48 CFR 1426.7102-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7102-1 Statutory basis...., MBDA) to collect information on acquisition and financial assistance awards to minority businesses,...

  17. 48 CFR 1426.7103-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7103-1 Statutory basis... qualified minority business enterprises in awarding contracts under the Act and report annually to...

  18. 48 CFR 1426.7103-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7103-1 Statutory basis... qualified minority business enterprises in awarding contracts under the Act and report annually to...

  19. 48 CFR 1426.7102-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7102-1 Statutory basis...., MBDA) to collect information on acquisition and financial assistance awards to minority businesses,...

  20. 48 CFR 1426.7102-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7102-1 Statutory basis...., MBDA) to collect information on acquisition and financial assistance awards to minority businesses,...

  1. 48 CFR 1426.7103-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7103-1 Statutory basis... qualified minority business enterprises in awarding contracts under the Act and report annually to...

  2. 48 CFR 1426.7102-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7102-1 Statutory basis...., MBDA) to collect information on acquisition and financial assistance awards to minority businesses,...

  3. 48 CFR 1426.7103-1 - Statutory basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Minority Business Reports 1426.7103-1 Statutory basis... qualified minority business enterprises in awarding contracts under the Act and report annually to...

  4. 45 CFR 170.100 - Statutory basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General Provisions § 170.100 Statutory basis and purpose....

  5. Side effects of normalising radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Shorten, R; Murray-Smith, R

    1996-05-01

    Normalisation of the basis function activations in a Radial Basis Function (RBF) network is a common way of achieving the partition of unity often desired for modelling applications. It results in the basis functions covering the whole of the input space to the same degree. However, normalisation of the basis functions can lead to other effects which are sometimes less desirable for modelling applications. This paper describes some side effects of normalisation which fundamentally alter properties of the basis functions, e.g. the shape is no longer uniform, maxima of basis functions can be shifted from their centres, and the basis functions are no longer guaranteed to decrease monotonically as distance from their centre increases--in many cases basis functions can 'reactivate', i.e. re-appear far from the basis function centre. This paper examines how these phenomena occur, discusses their relevance for non-linear function approximation and examines the effect of normalisation on the network condition number and weights.

  6. Hazard assessments of double-shell flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.L.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1994-09-28

    This report is the fourth in a series of hazard assessments performed on the double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks. This report focuses on hazards associated with the double-shell watch list tanks (101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN). While a similar assessment has already been performed for tank 103-SY, it is also included here to incorporate a more representative slurry gas mixture and provide a consistent basis for comparing results for all the flammable gas tanks. This report is intended to provide an in-depth assessment by considering the details of the gas release event and slurry gas mixing as the gas is released from the waste. The consequences of postulated gas ignition are evaluated using a plume burn model and updated ignition frequency predictions. Tank pressurization which results from a gas burn, along with the structural response, is also considered. The report is intended to support the safety basis for work activities in flammable gas tanks by showing margins to safety limits that are available in the design and procedures.

  7. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  8. Apparatus Circulates Sterilizing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.; Schwarz, Ray P.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus circulates sterilizing gas containing ethylene oxide and chlorofluorocarbon through laboratory or medical equipment. Confines sterilizing gas, circulating it only through parts to be treated. Consists of two units. One delivers ethylene oxide/chlorofluorocarbon gas mixture and removes gas after treatment. Other warms, humidifies, and circulates gas through equipment to be treated. Process provides reliable sterilization with negligible residual toxicity from ethylene oxide. Particularly suitable for sterilization of interiors of bioreactors, heart/lung machines, dialyzers, or other equipment including complicated tubing.

  9. Advanced gas turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Zeh, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a program to develop fuel-efficient gas turbine-based power systems with low emissions. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EE) have initiated an 8-year program to develop high-efficiency, natural gas-fired advanced gas turbine power systems. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will support full-scale prototype demonstration of both industrial- and utility-scale systems that will provide commercial marketplace entries by the year 2000. When the program targets are met, power system emissions will be lower than from the best technology in use today. Efficiency of the utility-scale units will be greater than 60 percent on a lower heating value basis, and emissions of carbon dioxide will be reduced inversely with this increase. Industrial systems will also see an improvement of at least 15 percent in efficiency. Nitrogen oxides will be reduced by at least 10 percent, and carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions will each be kept below 20 parts per million, for both utility and industrial systems.

  10. Biomass energy: Sustainable solution for greenhouse gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrul Islam, A. K. M.; Ahiduzzaman, M.

    2012-06-01

    sustainable carbon sink will be developed. Clean energy production from biomass (such as ethanol, biodiesel, producer gas, bio-methane) could be viable option to reduce fossil fuel consumption. Electricity generation from biomass is increasing throughout the world. Co-firing of biomass with coal and biomass combustion in power plant and CHP would be a viable option for clean energy development. Biomass can produce less emission in the range of 14% to 90% compared to emission from fossil for electricity generation. Therefore, biomass could play a vital role for generation of clean energy by reducing fossil energy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The main barriers to expansion of power generation from biomass are cost, low conversion efficiency and availability of feedstock. Internationalization of external cost in power generation and effective policies to improve energy security and carbon dioxide reduction is important to boost up the bio-power. In the long run, bio-power will depend on technological development and on competition for feedstock with food production and arable land use.

  11. Gas hydrate prospecting using well cuttings and mud-gas geochemistry from 35 wells, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Collett, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are common on the North Slope of Alaska around Prudhoe Bay; however, the extent of these deposits is unknown outside of this area. As part of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Bureau of Land Management gas hydrate research collaboration, well-cutting and mud-gas samples have been collected and analyzed from mainly industry-drilled wells on the North Slope for the purpose of prospecting for gas hydrate deposits. On the Alaska North Slope, gas hydrates are now recognized as an element within a petroleum systems approach or "total petroleum system." Since 1979, 35 wells have been sampled from as far west as Wainwright to Prudhoe Bay in the east. Regionally, the USGS has assessed the gas hydrate resources of the North Slope and determined that there is about 85.4 trillion cubic feet of technically recoverable hydrate-bound gas within three assessment units. The assessment units are defined mainly by three separate stratigraphic sections and constrained by the physical temperatures and pressures where gas hydrate can form. Geochemical studies of known gas hydrate occurrences on the North Slope have shown a link between gas hydrate and more deeply buried conventional oil and gas deposits. The link is established when hydrocarbon gases migrate from depth and charge the reservoir rock within the gas hydrate stability zone. It is likely gases migrated into conventional traps as free gas and were later converted to gas hydrate in response to climate cooling concurrent with permafrost formation. Results from this study indicate that some thermogenic gas is present in 31 of the wells, with limited evidence of thermogenic gas in four other wells and only one well with no thermogenic gas. Gas hydrate is known to occur in one of the sampled wells, likely present in 22 others on the basis of gas geochemistry, and inferred by equivocal gas geochemistry in 11 wells, and one well was without gas hydrate. Gas migration routes are common in the North Slope and

  12. Extension of the basis set of linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method by using supplemented tight binding basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. V.; Lamoen, D.; Partoens, B.

    2016-07-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of the linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method, we present a new approach where the plane wave basis function is augmented by two different atomic radial components constructed at two different linearization energies corresponding to two different electron bands (or energy windows). We demonstrate that this case can be reduced to the standard treatment within the LAPW paradigm where the usual basis set is enriched by the basis functions of the tight binding type, which go to zero with zero derivative at the sphere boundary. We show that the task is closely related with the problem of extended core states which is currently solved by applying the LAPW method with local orbitals (LAPW+LO). In comparison with LAPW+LO, the number of supplemented basis functions in our approach is doubled, which opens up a new channel for the extension of the LAPW and LAPW+LO basis sets. The appearance of new supplemented basis functions absent in the LAPW+LO treatment is closely related with the existence of the u ˙ l -component in the canonical LAPW method. We discuss properties of additional tight binding basis functions and apply the extended basis set for computation of electron energy bands of lanthanum (face and body centered structures) and hexagonal close packed lattice of cadmium. We demonstrate that the new treatment gives lower total energies in comparison with both canonical LAPW and LAPW+LO, with the energy difference more pronounced for intermediate and poor LAPW basis sets.

  13. Application of BP Neural Network Based on Genetic Algorithm in Quantitative Analysis of Mixed GAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Wenzhen; Qu, Jian; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhibin

    Aiming at the problem of mixed gas detection in neural network and analysis on the principle of gas detection. Combining BP algorithm of genetic algorithm with hybrid gas sensors, a kind of quantitative analysis system of mixed gas is designed. The local minimum of network learning is the main reason which affects the precision of gas analysis. On the basis of the network study to improve the learning algorithms, the analyses and tests for CO, CO2 and HC compounds were tested. The results showed that the above measures effectively improve and enhance the accuracy of the neural network for gas analysis.

  14. 14 CFR 198.3 - Basis of insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Basis of insurance. 198.3 Section 198.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) WAR RISK INSURANCE AVIATION INSURANCE § 198.3 Basis of insurance. (a) Premium insurance may be issued by the FAA...

  15. Improved Algorithm For Finite-Field Normal-Basis Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Improved algorithm reduces complexity of calculations that must precede design of Massey-Omura finite-field normal-basis multipliers, used in error-correcting-code equipment and cryptographic devices. Algorithm represents an extension of development reported in "Algorithm To Design Finite-Field Normal-Basis Multipliers" (NPO-17109), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 12, No. 5, page 82.

  16. 47 CFR 64.2001 - Basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis and purpose. 64.2001 Section 64.2001 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Customer Proprietary Network Information § 64.2001 Basis and...

  17. 42 CFR 406.5 - Basis of eligibility and entitlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis of eligibility and entitlement. 406.5 Section 406.5 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE ELIGIBILITY AND ENTITLEMENT General Provisions § 406.5 Basis...

  18. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR A CANDIDATE BUILDING MATERIALS RADIUM STANDARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the technical basis for a candidate building materials radium standard. It contains the standard and a summary of the technical basis for the standard. (NOTE: The Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP), sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and the...

  19. 12 CFR 261b.1 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis and scope. 261b.1 Section 261b.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES REGARDING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS § 261b.1 Basis and scope. This part is issued by the Board...

  20. 9 CFR 590.130 - Basis of billing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of Service § 590.130 Basis of billing plants. Overtime and/or holiday services shall be billed to the official plant on the basis of each 15 minutes of overtime and/or holiday service performed by each... to duty on a day outside the established normal operating schedule or on a holiday, the...