Science.gov

Sample records for gas cell catcher

  1. The CARIBU gas catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, G.; Levand, A. F.; Zabransky, B. J.

    2016-06-01

    The CARIBU upgrade of the ATLAS facility provides radioactive beams of neutron-rich isotopes for experiments at low and Coulomb barrier energies. It creates these beam using a large RF gas catcher that collects and cools fission fragments from an intense 252 Cf fission source and transforms them into a low-emittance monoenergetic beam. This beam can then be purified, reaccelerated and delivered to experiments. This technique is fast and universal, providing access to all fission fragment species independently of their chemical properties. The CARIBU gas catcher has been built to operate at high ionization density and in the presence of the contamination from the source. A brief overview of the CARIBU concept is given below, together with a more detailed description of the CARIBU gas catcher and the performance it has now achieved.

  2. On a cryogenic noble gas ion catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.

    2006-03-01

    In situ purification of the gas used as stopping medium in a noble gas ion catcher by operating the device at low temperatures of 60-150 K was investigated. Alpha-decay recoil ions from a 223Ra source served as energetic probes. The combined ion survival and transport efficiencies for 219Rn ions saturated below about 90 K, reaching 28.7(17)% in helium, 22.1(13)% in neon, and 17.0(10)% in argon. These values may well reflect the charge exchange and stripping cross-sections during the slowing down of the ions, and thus represent a fundamental upper limit for the efficiency of noble gas ion catcher devices. We suggest the cryogenic noble gas ion catcher as a technically simpler alternative to the ultra-high purity noble gas ion catcher operating at room temperature.

  3. Radioactive Beams from 252Cf Fission Using a Gas Catcher and an ECR Charge Breeder at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Savard, Guy; Pardo, Richard C.; Moore, E. Frank; Hecht, Adam A.; Baker, Sam

    2005-03-15

    A proposed upgrade to the radioactive beam capability of the ATLAS facility has been proposed using 252Cf fission fragments thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam using a helium gas catcher. In order to reaccelerate these beams the ATLAS ECR-I will be reconfigured as a charge breeder source. A 1Ci 252Cf source is expected to provide sufficient yield to deliver beams of up to {approx}103 far from stability ions per second on target. A brief facility description and the expected performance information are provided in this report.

  4. Restoration of RI-beams from a projectile fragment separator by Laser Ionization gas Catcher-PALIS-

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Takamine, A.; Schury, P.; Yamazaki, Y.; Wada, M.; Okada, K.; Yoshida, A.; Kubo, T.; Matsuo, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Wakui, T.; Shinozuka, T.; Iimura, H.; Katayama, I.; Ohtani, S.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.; Huyse, M.

    2009-03-17

    A fragment separator at heavy ion accelerator facilities is a versatile instrument to provide wide variety of radioactive isotope (RI) beams. However, more than 99.99% of precious RI-ions are simply dumped in the slits or elsewhere in the fragment separator. A novel concept to restore such RI-ions for parasitic slow RI-beams is proposed. Installation of a laser ionization gas catcher in the vicinity of the first or second focal point of the fragment separator enables to collect dead isotopes in the slits. The design concept and expected performance are discussed.

  5. Ion Surfing: A new ion transport method for cryogenic gas catchers, simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Bollen, Georg; Brodeur, Maxime; Morrissey, Dave; Pang, Gregory

    2011-10-01

    Gas cells are the tool of choice to thermalize fast rare ion beams produced at projectile fragmentation facilities. After passing through solid degraders, the residual kinetic energy of the ions is dissipated through collisions with the gas atoms and ionization. Previously, ions were directed through a gas cell along a descending electrostatic potential gradient called a ``drag field.'' Some cells apply a drag field over electrodes with alternating (RF) fields to prevent the rare ions from colliding with the walls. ``Ion surfing'' is a new method proposed by Bollen which replaces the drag field with a traveling wave superimposed with RF on numerous, thin electrodes. Large potential differences are no longer required for transport over long distances, and the traveling wave can transport ions at a greater speed. This method is being tested for the new cryogenic linear gas cell of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. We will present the concept and simulation results. Work supported by the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy.

  6. Paint-Overspray Catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus to catch paint overspray has been proposed. Overspray is an unavoidable parasitic component of spray that occurs because the flow of air or other gas in the spray must turn at the sprayed surface. Very small droplets are carried away in this turning flow, and some land on adjacent surfaces not meant to be painted. The basic principle of the paint-spray catcher is to divert the overspray into a suction system at the boundary of the area to be painted. The paint-spray catcher (see figure) would include a toroidal plenum connected through narrow throat to a nozzle that would face toward the center of the torus, which would be positioned over the center of the area to be spray-painted. The plenum would be supported by four tubes that would also serve as suction exhaust ducts. The downstream ends of the tubes (not shown in the figure) would be connected to a filter on a suction pump. The pump would be rated to provide a suction mass flow somewhat greater than that of the directed spray gas stream, so that the nozzle would take in a small excess of surrounding gas and catch nearly all of the overspray. A small raised lip at the bottom edge of the nozzle would catch paint that landed inside the nozzle. Even if the paint is directly piston pumped, the droplets entrain an air flow by time they approach the wall, so there is always a gas stream to carry the excess droplets to the side. For long-duration spraying operations, it could be desirable to include a suction-drain apparatus to prevent overflowing and dripping of paint from inside the lip. A version without an external contraction and with the throat angled downward would be a more compact version of catcher, although it might be slightly less efficient.

  7. Ion surfing: a new mode for cryogenic gas catchers, experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeur, Maxime; Bollen, Georg; Gehring, Amanda; Morrissey, David; Pang, Gregory

    2011-10-01

    A new mode of ion-transport and collection for low-energy precision experiments at projectile fragmentation facilities was recently proposed by Bollen. Present beam thermalization methods use gas-filled linear chambers equipped with sets of electrodes that provide an electrostatic gradient and/or alternating electric fields to transport the ions towards an extraction orifice. A new cryogenic linear gas cell of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University will transport ions using only electrodynamic RF fields imposed on a series of linear conductive stripes. Traditionally, the ions migrate along a descending electrostatic potential gradient applied on the individual stripes, called the drag field, which requires a large potential difference to be applied in the gas for transport over long distances. The new method to transport the ions, called ``ion surfing,'' replaces the drag field with a traveling wave. The new method can transport ions at greater speed while simplifying the overall system. We will present the results of recent measurements for the transport of 85-Rb ions over distances up to 40 cm with various gas pressures at room temperature. US Department of Energy and the US National Science Foundation.

  8. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S.

    2013-03-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of 14O (71 s), 42K (12.4 h), 43K (22.2 h), and 41Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 103 particles per second (pps). About 3.2 × 103 pps of 1.4 MeV 14O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  9. Performance of Ion Surfing Rf-carpets for High-Energy RI Beam Gas Catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Fumiya; Ito, Yuta; Katayama, Ichiro; Schury, Peter; Sonoda, Tetsu; Wada, Michiharu; Wollnik, Hermann

    A new concept for the transport of ions in gas by means of a traveling potential wave super-imposed on an rf-carpet (RFC), known as ion surfing, has recently been proposed. We demonstrated, for the first time, the transport and extraction of K+ and Cs+ ions using a circular rf-carpet in high pressure He gas. An efficiency of nearly 100% was obtained . In addition, we compared an RFC of a fine pitch (0.16 mm) and the one of a rough pitch (0.32 mm). For higher pressure, the fine RFC was found to be better than the rough RFC.

  10. Development of fast-release solid catchers for rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Jerry; Greene, John; Song, Jeong-Seog; Elam, Jeffrey; Mane, Anil; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Winter, Raymond; Hess, David; Mushfiq, Mohammad; Stracener, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Porous solid catchers of rare isotopes produced at high energies via in-flight reactions can play an important role in high power heavy ion accelerator facilities such as RIKEN, FRIB, and RISP. Such catchers can be complementary to helium gas catchers especially for parasitic harvesting of rare isotopes in the in-flight separators at such facilities. Materials for solid catchers are being developed by Innosense, LLC, under the DOE ONP SBIR program. The role of the catchers at high energy heavy ion facilities is to stop and quickly release rare isotopes for research with these isotopes either with stopped-beam instruments or as reaccelerated beams. Solid catchers can operate effectively with high intensity secondary beams, e.g. >> 1E10 atoms/s with release times as short as 10-100 milliseconds. A new method for characterizing the release curves of such catchers is being developed at Argonne under this SBIR program. The method will utilize a very efficient and sensitive commercial residual gas analyzer for rapid measurements following implantation of stable isotopes delivered as energetic heavy ion beams. Research supported through the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under the SBIR Program.

  11. Development of fast-release solid catchers for rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Jerry; Greene, John; Elam, Jeffrey; Mane, Anil; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Winter, Raymond; Hess, David; Mushfiq, Mohammad; Stracener, Daniel; Wiendenhoever, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Porous solid catchers of rare isotopes are being developed for use at high power heavy ion accelerator facilities such as RIKEN, FRIB, and RISP. Compact solid catchers are complementary to helium gas catchers for parasitic harvesting of rare isotopes in the in-flight separators. They are useful for short lived isotopes for basic nuclear physics research and longer-lived isotopes for off-line applications. Solid catchers can operate effectively with high intensity secondary beams, e.g. >> 1E10 atoms/s with release times as short as 10-100 milliseconds. A new method using a very sensitive and efficient RGA has been commissioned off-line at Argonne and is currently being shipped to Florida State University for in-beam measurements of the release curves using stable beams. The same porous solid catcher technology is also being evaluated for use in targets for the production of medical isotopes such as 211-At. Research supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under the SBIR Program and Contract # DE-AC02-06CH11357 and a University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center/ANL Pilot Project.

  12. Numerical and Experimental Simulation of a Vertical High Speed Motorcompressor Rotor Drop onto Catcher Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, David; Masala, Andrea; Moore, Jeffrey; Vannini, Giuseppe; Camatti, Massimo

    A new research program was jointly set up between GE Oil&Gas and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), to predict and test the dynamics of a vertical rotor drop on catcher bearings. A numerical tool able to account for flexible rotor and stator dynamics, catcher bearing stiffness and damping mechanism was developed. An experimental activity on a new vertical rotor test rig was carried out. A first analysis of numerical simulations and experimental analysis is presented in this paper.

  13. Engineering Protein Hydrogels Using SpyCatcher-SpyTag Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoye; Fang, Jie; Xue, Bin; Fu, Linglan; Li, Hongbin

    2016-09-12

    Constructing hydrogels from engineered proteins has attracted significant attention within the material sciences, owing to their myriad potential applications in biomedical engineering. Developing efficient methods to cross-link tailored protein building blocks into hydrogels with desirable mechanical, physical, and functional properties is of paramount importance. By making use of the recently developed SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, we successfully engineered protein hydrogels on the basis of engineered tandem modular elastomeric proteins. Our resultant protein hydrogels are soft but stable, and show excellent biocompatibility. As the first step, we tested the use of these hydrogels as a drug carrier, as well as in encapsulating human lung fibroblast cells. Our results demonstrate the robustness of the SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, even when the SpyTag (or SpyCatcher) is flanked by folded globular domains. These results demonstrate that SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry can be used to engineer protein hydrogels from tandem modular elastomeric proteins that can find applications in tissue engineering, in fundamental mechano-biological studies, and as a controlled drug release vehicle. PMID:27477779

  14. Engineering Protein Hydrogels Using SpyCatcher-SpyTag Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoye; Fang, Jie; Xue, Bin; Fu, Linglan; Li, Hongbin

    2016-09-12

    Constructing hydrogels from engineered proteins has attracted significant attention within the material sciences, owing to their myriad potential applications in biomedical engineering. Developing efficient methods to cross-link tailored protein building blocks into hydrogels with desirable mechanical, physical, and functional properties is of paramount importance. By making use of the recently developed SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, we successfully engineered protein hydrogels on the basis of engineered tandem modular elastomeric proteins. Our resultant protein hydrogels are soft but stable, and show excellent biocompatibility. As the first step, we tested the use of these hydrogels as a drug carrier, as well as in encapsulating human lung fibroblast cells. Our results demonstrate the robustness of the SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, even when the SpyTag (or SpyCatcher) is flanked by folded globular domains. These results demonstrate that SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry can be used to engineer protein hydrogels from tandem modular elastomeric proteins that can find applications in tissue engineering, in fundamental mechano-biological studies, and as a controlled drug release vehicle.

  15. Secrets of a covalent interaction for biomaterials and biotechnology: SpyTag and SpyCatcher.

    PubMed

    Reddington, Samuel C; Howarth, Mark

    2015-12-01

    SpyTag is a short peptide that forms an isopeptide bond upon encountering its protein partner SpyCatcher. This covalent peptide interaction is a simple and powerful tool for bioconjugation and extending what protein architectures are accessible. Here we review the origin and mechanism of SpyTag/SpyCatcher, focusing on recent innovative applications. Ligation of targeting-antibody with antigen provided a simple route to vaccine generation. SpyRings, from head-to-tail cyclisation, gave major enhancements in enzyme resilience. Linking multiple SpyCatchers gave dendrimers for T-cell activation or Spy networks forming hydrogels for stem cell culture. Synthetic biology applications include integrating amyloid biomaterials with living bacteria, for irreversible derivatisation of biofilms with enzymes or nanoparticles. We also discuss further opportunities to apply and enhance SpyTag/SpyCatcher technology.

  16. Secrets of a covalent interaction for biomaterials and biotechnology: SpyTag and SpyCatcher.

    PubMed

    Reddington, Samuel C; Howarth, Mark

    2015-12-01

    SpyTag is a short peptide that forms an isopeptide bond upon encountering its protein partner SpyCatcher. This covalent peptide interaction is a simple and powerful tool for bioconjugation and extending what protein architectures are accessible. Here we review the origin and mechanism of SpyTag/SpyCatcher, focusing on recent innovative applications. Ligation of targeting-antibody with antigen provided a simple route to vaccine generation. SpyRings, from head-to-tail cyclisation, gave major enhancements in enzyme resilience. Linking multiple SpyCatchers gave dendrimers for T-cell activation or Spy networks forming hydrogels for stem cell culture. Synthetic biology applications include integrating amyloid biomaterials with living bacteria, for irreversible derivatisation of biofilms with enzymes or nanoparticles. We also discuss further opportunities to apply and enhance SpyTag/SpyCatcher technology. PMID:26517567

  17. The FRS Ion Catcher - A facility for high-precision experiments with stopped projectile and fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaß, W. R.; Dickel, T.; Purushothaman, S.; Dendooven, P.; Geissel, H.; Ebert, J.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Ranjan, M.; Reiter, M. P.; Weick, H.; Amjad, F.; Ayet, S.; Diwisch, M.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Greiner, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lang, J.; Moore, I.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Petrick, M.; Pfützner, M.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rink, A.-K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Schäfer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Winfield, J. S.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    At the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI, projectile and fission fragments are produced at relativistic energies, separated in-flight, range-focused, slowed down and thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell. A multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) is used to perform direct mass measurements and to provide an isobarically clean beam for further experiments, such as mass-selected decay spectroscopy. A versatile RF quadrupole transport and diagnostics unit guides the ions from the stopping cell to the MR-TOF-MS, provides differential pumping, ion identification and includes reference ion sources. The FRS Ion Catcher serves as a test facility for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), where the cryogenic stopping cell and the MR-TOF-MS will be key devices for the research with stopped projectile and fission fragments that will be performed with the experiments MATS and LaSpec. Off-line tests of the stopping cell yield a combined ion survival and extraction efficiency for 219Rn ions of about 30% and an extraction time of about 25 ms. The stopping cell and the MR-TOF-MS were commissioned on-line as part of the FRS Ion Catcher. For the first time, a stopping cell for exotic nuclei was operated on-line at cryogenic temperatures. Using a gas density almost two times higher than ever reached before for a stopping cell with RF ion repelling structures, various 238U projectile fragments were thermalized and extracted with very high efficiency. Direct mass measurements of projectile fragments were performed with the MR-TOF-MS, among them the nuclide 213Rn with a half-life of 19.5 ms only.

  18. Thermohydraulics of LMFBR core catchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turland, B. D.

    Characterization of the likely form of fuel debris after an accident, following interaction with sodium in the primary vessel and mechanisms controlling the location of the debris in the primary system is discussed. Heat transfer from particulate to liquid sodium and the development of models predicting the amount of debris that may be retained in a coolable form on a structure are considered. The evaluation of the coolability of the structure itself in post accident conditions, particularly the cooling provided by natural convection alone is treated. The response of structures at elevated temperatures and under high thermal loads is considered. The potential for vessel failure if significant quantities of debris accumulate at the bottom of the vessel is shown. The performance of a flat plate core catcher, or similar structure with good cooling from underneath is evaluated.

  19. Ocular fixation using a baseball catcher's mask for postoperative prone positioning.

    PubMed

    Kobari, Y; Tokoi, Y; Hara, T; Hara, T

    1993-01-01

    1. The optimal ocular position after vitreoretinal surgery with intravitreous gas tamponade is with the axis of the eye pointed downward. 2. Careless prone fixation may cause accidents of eyeball depression. 3. To help patients keep the proper prone facial and ocular positions, a modified catcher's mask was developed for use as a facial support.

  20. Effect of Ca2+ on the Steady-State and Time-Resolved Emission Properties of the Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Sensor CatchER

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously designed a calcium sensor CatchER (a GFP-based Calcium sensor for detecting high concentrations in the high calcium concentration environment such as ER) with a capability for monitoring calcium ion responses in various types of cells. Calcium binding to CatchER induces the ratiometric changes in the absorption spectra, as well as an increase in fluorescence emission at 510 nm upon excitation at both 395 and 488 nm. Here, we have applied the combination of the steady-state and time-resolved optical methods and Hydrogen/Deuterium isotope exchange to understand the origin of such calcium-induced optical property changes of CatchER. We first demonstrated that calcium binding results in a 44% mean fluorescence lifetime increase of the indirectly excited anionic chromophore. Thus, CatchER is the first protein-based calcium indicator with the single fluorescent moiety to show the direct correlation between the lifetime and calcium binding. Calcium exhibits a strong inhibition on the excited-state proton transfer nonadiabatic geminate recombination in protic (vs deuteric) medium. Analysis of CatchER crystal structures and the MD simulations reveal the proton transfer mechanism in which the disrupted proton migration path in CatchER is rescued by calcium binding. Our finding provides important insights for a strategy to design calcium sensors and suggests that CatchER could be a useful probe for FLIM imaging of calcium in situ. PMID:24836743

  1. Fuel cell gas management system

    DOEpatents

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur

    2000-01-11

    A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  2. Metal-gas fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1984-10-16

    A metal-gas fuel cell comprising an anode chamber filled with a base anolyte solution, a metallic anode plate immersed in the anolyte; an ion exchange chamber filled with a base ionolyte solution adjacent the anode chamber; a cationic membrane between the anode and ion exchange chambers separating the anolyte and ionolyte; a cathode plate adjacent the ion exchange chamber remote from the cationic membrane with one surface in contact with the ionolyte and another surface in contact with a cathode fuel gas. The cathode plate is a laminated structure including a layer of hydrophyllic material in contact with the ionolyte, a layer of gas permeable hydrophobic material in contact with the gas and a gas and liquid permeable current collector of inert material with catalytic surfaces within the layer of hydrophyllic material. The anode and cathode plates are connected with an external electric circuit which effects the flow of electrons from the anode plate to the cathode plate.

  3. DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

    2002-03-01

    GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

  4. 76 FR 79764 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel DREAM CATCHER; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel DREAM CATCHER... the vessel DREAM CATCHER is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Passenger charter.''...

  5. Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy

    DOEpatents

    Salomon, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus and method for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine.

  6. Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy

    DOEpatents

    Salomon, R.E.

    1987-06-30

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine. 4 figs.

  7. Landfill gas cleanup for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    EPRI is to test the feasibility of using a carbonate fuel cell to generate electricity from landfill gas. Landfills produce a substantial quantity of methane gas, a natural by-product of decaying organic wastes. Landfill gas, however, contains sulfur and halogen compounds, which are known contaminants to fuel cells and their fuel processing equipment. The objective of this project is to clean the landfill gas well enough to be used by the fuel cell without making the process prohibitively expensive. The cleanup system tested in this effort could also be adapted for use with other fuel cells (e.g., solid oxide, phosphoric acid) running on landfill gas.

  8. The Independent School Admissions Director as Tim Wakefield's Catcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachow, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Bob Uecker, the Milwaukee Brewers' quipping radio broadcaster, makes his brief and lackluster career as a major league catcher the subject of much of his humor. About catching the knuckleball, Uecker famously said, "I always thought the knuckleball was the easiest pitch to catch." Of course, there is an even better way to catch a knuckleball, and…

  9. Novel Approaches: Teaching "The Catcher in the Rye"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draffan, Robert A.

    1973-01-01

    Argues that the novel should bear examination from four directions and that not only would each route illumine certain aspects of "The Catcher in the Rye" but also that each would suggest general principles applicable to all reading. (Author/RB)

  10. SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE VERTICAL TEST HOLES AT THE TOP OF THE MTR. CONTROL ROD DRIVES ARE BEHIND HIM TOWARDS LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-513. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 2/13/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. 50 CFR Table 41 to Part 679 - BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA...) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 41 Table 41 to Part 679—BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels For the following crab species in...

  12. 50 CFR Table 41 to Part 679 - BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA...) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 41 Table 41 to Part 679—BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels For the following crab species in...

  13. 50 CFR Table 41 to Part 679 - BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA...) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 41 Table 41 to Part 679—BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels For the following crab species in...

  14. 50 CFR Table 41 to Part 679 - BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA...) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 41 Table 41 to Part 679—BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels For the following crab species in...

  15. 50 CFR Table 41 to Part 679 - BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA...) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 41 Table 41 to Part 679—BSAI Crab PSC Sideboard Limits for AFA Catcher/Processors and AFA Catcher Vessels For the following crab species in...

  16. Gas recombination assembly for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Isaac; Charkey, Allen

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for recombining gases generated in electrochemical cells wherein a catalyst strip is enveloped within a hydrophobic, gas-porous film which, in turn, is encased between gas-porous, metallic layers. The sandwich construction of metallic layers and film is formed into a spiral with a tab for connection to the cell.

  17. Kinetic Controlled Tag-Catcher Interactions for Directed Covalent Protein Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lee Ling; Hoon, Shawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, a number of different protein assembly strategies have been developed, greatly expanding the toolbox for controlling macromolecular assembly. One of the most promising developments is a rapid protein ligation approach using a short polypeptide SpyTag and its partner, SpyCatcher derived from Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein, FbaB. To extend this technology, we have engineered and characterized a new Tag-Catcher pair from a related fibronectin-binding protein in Streptococcus dysgalactiae. The polypeptide Tag, named SdyTag, was constructed based on the native Cna protein B-type (CnaB) domain and was found to be highly unreactive to SpyCatcher. SpyCatcher has 320-fold specificity for its native SpyTag compared to SdyTag. Similarly, SdyTag has a 75-fold specificity for its optimized Catcher, named SdyCatcherDANG short, compared to SpyCatcher. These Tag-Catcher pairs were used in combination to demonstrate specific sequential assembly of tagged proteins in vitro. We also demonstrated that the in vivo generation of circularized proteins in a Tag-Catcher specific manner where specific Tags can be left unreacted for use in subsequent ligation reactions. From the success of these experiments, we foresee the application of SdyTags and SpyTags, not only, for multiplexed control of protein assembly but also for the construction of novel protein architectures. PMID:27783674

  18. New sacrificial material for ex-vessel core catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlev, Andrei A.; Almjashev, Vyacheslav I.; Bechta, Sevostian V.; Khabensky, Vladimir B.; Granovsky, Vladimir S.; Gusarov, Victor V.

    2015-12-01

    A new functional (sacrificial) material has been developed in the Fe2O3-SrO-Al2O3-CaO system based on strontium hexaferrite ceramic in concrete matrix. The method of producing SM has been advanced technologically; this technological effectiveness allows the SM to be used in ex-vessel core catchers with corium spreading as well as in crucible-type core catchers. Critical properties regarding the efficiency of SM in ex-vessel core catchers, such as porosity, pycnometric density, apparent density, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and water content have been measured. Suitable fractions of SrFe12O19 and high alumina cement (HAC) were found in the SM based on thermodynamic analysis of the SM/corium interaction. The use of sacrificial steel as an additional heat adsorption component in the core catcher allowed us to increase the mass fraction range of SrFe12O19 in the SM from 0.3-0.5 to 0.3-0.85. The activation temperature of the SM/corium interaction has been shown to correspond to the liquidus temperature of the local composition at the SM/corium interface. The calculated value of this temperature was 1716 °C. Analysis of phase transformations in the SrO-Fe2O3 system revealed advantages of the SrFe12O19-based sacrificial material compared with the Fe2O3-contained material owing to the time proximity of SrFe12O19 decomposition and corium interaction activation.

  19. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D. Pohjalainen, I.; Savonen, M.; Voss, A.; Rothe, S.; Sonnenschein, V.

    2015-12-15

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary {sup 107}Ag{sup 21+} ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z {sup 94}Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  20. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Reponen, M; Moore, I D; Pohjalainen, I; Rothe, S; Savonen, M; Sonnenschein, V; Voss, A

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary (107)Ag(21+) ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z (94)Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined. PMID:26724021

  1. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rothe, S.; Savonen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A.

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary 107Ag21+ ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z 94Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  2. 76 FR 12606 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 Feet (18.3 m) Length Overall Using... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels less than 60 feet (18.3 m) length overall (LOA) using jig or...

  3. 75 FR 8841 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 feet (18.3 m) Length Overall Using... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels less than 60 feet (18.3 m) length overall (LOA) using jig or hook... fishing for Pacific cod by catcher vessels less than 60 ft (18.3 m) LOA using jig or hook- and-line...

  4. 76 FR 40838 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels Participating in the Rockfish Entry Level...; modification of a closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is opening directed fishing for Pacific ocean perch by trawl catcher... Pacific ocean perch for trawl catcher vessels participating in the rockfish entry level fishery in...

  5. 76 FR 46207 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels Participating in the Rockfish Entry Level...; modification of a closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is opening directed fishing for Pacific ocean perch by trawl catcher... Pacific ocean perch for trawl catcher vessels participating in the rockfish entry level fishery in...

  6. FUEL CELL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    International Fuel Cells Corporation is conducting a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored program to demonstrate energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The US EPA is interested in fuel cells for this application b...

  7. Descriptive analysis of kinematics and kinetics of catchers throwing to second base from their knees.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Hillary A; Oliver, Gretchen D

    2016-08-01

    In order to decrease the amount of time that it takes the catcher to throw the ball, a catcher may chose to throw from the knees. Upper extremity kinematics may play a significant role in the kinetics about the elbow observed in catchers throwing from the knees. If relationships between kinematics and kinetics exist then the development of training and coaching instruction may help in reduced upper extremity injury risk. Twenty-two baseball and softball catchers (14.36±3.86years; 165.11±17.54cm; 65.67±20.60kg) volunteered. The catchers exhibited a less trunk rotation (5.6±16.2°), greater elbow flexion (87.9±21.4°) and decreased humeral elevation (71.1±12.3°) at the event of maximum shoulder external rotation as compared to what has previously reported in catchers. These variables are important, as they have previously been established as potential injury risk factors in pitchers, however it is not yet clear the role these variables play in catchers' risk of injury. A positive relationship between elbow varus torque during the deceleration phase and elbow flexion at MIR was observed (r=0.609; p=0.003). Throwing from the knees reduces a catcher's ability to utilize the proximal kinetic chain and this may help to explain why their kinematics and kinetics differ from what has previously been presented in the literature.

  8. Response of Coptotermes curvignathus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) to formaldehyde catcher-treated particleboard.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; H'ng, P S; Peng, T L; Lum, W C

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of formaldehyde catcher as termites repellent. Single-layered UF-bonded particleboard was post-treated with formaldehyde catcher and heat respectively. Besides that, some boards were also produced with the formaldehyde catcher was added into the resin during the blending process, called add-in method. Particleboard post-treated with formaldehyde catcher reported the most severe attack. Heat-treated particleboard showed slightly better durability than the control blocks while the add-in catcher showed the best durability among three methods. A valid test was obtained as the termites survived the first week of the test. However, all the termites were found dead at the end of the test. PMID:24511759

  9. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Wright, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  10. LANDFILL GAS PRETREATMENT FOR FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the U.S. EPA's program, underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation, to demonstrate landfill methane control and the fuel cell energy recovery concept. In this program, two critical issues are being addressed: (1) a landfill gas cleanup method that would ...

  11. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  12. Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-03-04

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

  13. Operating a fuel cell using landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Trippel, C.E.; Preston, J.L. Jr.; Trocciola, J.; Spiegel, R.

    1996-12-31

    An ONSI PC25{trademark}, 200 kW (nominal capacity) phosphoric acid fuel cell operating on landfill gas is installed at the Town of Groton Flanders Road landfill in Groton, Connecticut. This joint project by the Connecticut Light & Power Company (CL&P) which is an operating company of Northeast Utilities, the Town of Groton, International Fuel Cells (IFC), and the US EPA is intended to demonstrate the viability of installing, operating and maintaining a fuel cell operating on landfill gas at a landfill site. The goals of the project are to evaluate the fuel cell and gas pretreatment unit operation, test modifications to simplify the GPU design and demonstrate reliability of the entire system.

  14. Quantitative analysis of kinematics and kinetics of catchers throwing to second base.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Hillary; Oliver, Gretchen Dawn

    2013-01-01

    The catcher has the most demanding position in the games of baseball and softball with no regulations on how many throws they make during game. It was the purpose of this study to describe the kinematics and kinetics of the throwing motion in catchers when throwing down to second base. It was hypothesised that younger and older catchers would display significantly different throwing kinematics and kinetics. Thirty-eight baseball and softball catchers volunteered to participate. Twenty participants were considered younger (aged 9-14, 10.95 ± 1.76 years, 151.11 ± 15.64 cm, 47.94 ± 18.84 kg) and 18 were deemed the older group (aged 15-23, 18.11 ± 2.61 years, 170.91 ± 8.67 cm, 74.88 ± 10.74 kg). Participants received a pitch and completed five accurate throws to second base in full catching gear. The average ball speed of the older catchers was 21 ± 3.58 meters per second (47 ± 8.02 mph) while the younger catchers averaged 17.2 ± 4.0 meters per second (38.6 ± 8.96 mph). Older catchers had greater shoulder elevation at ball release and significantly greater shoulder external rotation at foot contact and shoulder maximum external rotation than younger catchers. It is clear that chronological age plays a role in the throwing mechanics observed in catchers throwing down to second base, however the effects of these differences are not fully understood (i.e., skeletal maturity, experience, strength).

  15. The cryogenic gas stopping cell of SHIPTRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droese, C.; Eliseev, S.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lautenschläger, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Schweikhard, L.; Simon, V. V.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2014-11-01

    The overall efficiency of the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt, employed for high-precision mass measurements of exotic nuclei in the mass region above fermium, is presently mostly limited by the stopping and extraction of fusion-evaporation products in the SHIPTRAP gas cell. To overcome this limitation a second-generation gas cell with increased stopping volume was designed. In addition, its operation at cryogenic temperatures leads to a higher gas density at a given pressure and an improved cleanliness of the helium buffer gas. Here, the results of experiments with a 219Rn recoil ion source are presented. An extraction efficiency of 74(3)% was obtained, a significant increase compared to the extraction efficiency of 30% of the present gas stopping cell operated at room temperature. The optimization of electric fields and other operating parameters at room as well as cryogenic temperatures is described in detail. Furthermore, the extraction time of 219Rn ions was determined for several operating parameters.

  16. SpyTag/SpyCatcher Cyclization Enhances the Thermostability of Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Si, Meng; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    SpyTag can spontaneously form a covalent isopeptide bond with its protein partner SpyCatcher. Firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis was cyclized in vivo by fusing SpyCatcher at the N terminus and SpyTag at the C terminus. Circular LUC was more thermostable and alkali-tolerant than the wild type, without compromising the specific activity. Structural analysis indicated that the cyclized LUC increased the thermodynamic stability of the structure and remained more properly folded at high temperatures when compared with the wild type. We also prepared an N-terminally and C-terminally shortened form of the SpyCatcher protein and cyclization using this truncated form led to even more thermostability than the original form. Our findings suggest that cyclization with SpyTag and SpyCatcher is a promising and effective strategy to enhance thermostability of enzymes. PMID:27658030

  17. Multiple-reflection optical gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Thomas G.

    1983-01-01

    A multiple-reflection optical cell for Raman or fluorescence gas analysis consists of two spherical mirrors positioned transverse to a multiple-pass laser cell in a confronting plane-parallel alignment. The two mirrors are of equal diameter but possess different radii of curvature. The spacing between the mirrors is uniform and less than half of the radius of curvature of either mirror. The mirror of greater curvature possesses a small circular portal in its center which is the effective point source for conventional F1 double lens collection optics of a monochromator-detection system. Gas to be analyzed is flowed into the cell and irradiated by a multiply-reflected composite laser beam centered between the mirrors of the cell. Raman or fluorescence radiation originating from a large volume within the cell is (1) collected via multiple reflections with the cell mirrors, (2) partially collimated and (3) directed through the cell portal in a geometric array compatible with F1 collection optics.

  18. Hayabusa2 Sample Catcher and Container: Metal-Seal System for Vacuum Encapsulation of Returned Samples with Volatiles and Organic Compounds Recovered from C-Type Asteroid Ryugu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Sawada, Hirotaka; Yamanouchi, Shinji; Tachibana, Shogo; Miura, Yayoi N.; Sakamoto, Kanako; Takano, Yoshinori; Abe, Masanao; Itoh, Shoichi; Yamada, Keita; Yabuta, Hikaru; Okamoto, Chisato; Yano, Hajime; Noguchi, Takaaki; Nakamura, Tomoki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2016-10-01

    The spacecraft Hayabusa2 was launched on December 3, 2014, to collect and return samples from a C-type asteroid, 162173 Ryugu (provisional designation, 1999 JU3). It is expected that the samples collected contain organic matter and water-bearing minerals and have key information to elucidate the origin and history of the Solar System and the evolution of bio-related organics prior to delivery to the early Earth. In order to obtain samples with volatile species without terrestrial contamination, based on lessons learned from the Hayabusa mission, the sample catcher and container of Hayabusa2 were refined from those used in Hayabusa. The improvements include (1) a mirror finish of the inner wall surface of the sample catcher and the container, (2) adoption of an aluminum metal sealing system, and (3) addition of a gas-sampling interface for gas collection and evacuation. The former two improvements were made to limit contamination of the samples by terrestrial atmosphere below 1 Pa after the container is sealed. The gas-sampling interface will be used to promptly collect volatile species released from the samples in the sample container after sealing of the container. These improvements maintain the value of the returned samples.

  19. Electrochemical Cell with Improved Water or Gas Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William F. (Inventor); McElroy, James F. (Inventor); LaGrange, Jay W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a water/gas porous separator prepared from a polymeric material and one or more conductive cell components that pass through, or are located in close proximity to, the water/gas porous separator, is provided. The inventive cell provides a high level of in-cell electrical conductivity.

  20. Design and Evaluation of an Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01

    An enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated as part of a joint United States (U.S.) - Korean International Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (INERI) investigating methods to insure In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of core materials that may relocate under severe accident conditions in advanced reactors. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary): a base material, which has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; an oxide coating material on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to prevent any potential oxidation of the base material during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes the status of core catcher design and evaluation efforts, including analyses, materials interaction tests, and prototypic testing efforts.

  1. Assessing pitcher and catcher influences on base stealing in Major League Baseball.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Thomas M; Bargen, Jason L

    2008-01-01

    A formal statistical analysis is performed to determine the extent to which pitchers and catchers can influence stolen-base attempts and successes. Two response proportions, attempt/opportunity and success/attempt, are modelled separately using mixed-effects logistic regression models applied to situations with a runner on first and other bases empty. Data include the first innings of all Major League Baseball games played between 1978 and 1990, which encompasses over 48,000 opportunities and 9000 attempts. Pitchers and catchers are entered as random effects and various other factors thought to influence stolen-base attempts and successes are entered as fixed effects. Variance components are estimated and hypotheses tests indicate that the population variance components for both pitchers and catchers are significant for both response proportions. The presence of variation among players at the respective positions is interpreted as evidence that stolen-base defence is a real skill exhibited to varying extents by different players. Furthermore, the variance component for pitchers is greater than that for catchers for both response proportions, indicating that pitchers have greater potential to affect stolen-base attempts and successes. Under usual conditions, it is estimated that 95% of pitchers have first-inning stolen-base success/attempt probabilities between 0.50 and 0.84, while 95% of catchers have probabilities between 0.59 and 0.79.

  2. 77 FR 19564 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... established by the final 2012 and 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Central Regulatory Area of... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels (CVs) using trawl gear in the Central Regulatory Area of the...

  3. 77 FR 23159 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (77 FR 10669, February 23, 2012). In accordance with Sec... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  4. 78 FR 23864 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Hook...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013). In accordance with Sec... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Hook-and-line Gear in the Western... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher/processors (C/Ps) using hook-and-line gear in the...

  5. 76 FR 20891 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... April 4, 2011 (76 FR 18663, April 5, 2011). As of April 6, 2011, NMFS has determined that approximately... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

  6. 77 FR 19147 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... February 29, 2012 (77 FR 13013, March 5, 2012). As of March 21, 2012, NMFS has determined that... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

  7. 76 FR 18663 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  8. 78 FR 54592 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... final 2013 and 2014 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Trawl Gear in the Central Regulatory Area... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher/processors (C/Ps) using trawl gear in the Central...

  9. 75 FR 16359 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11788, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  10. 76 FR 22057 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... April 14, 2011 (76 FR 20891). As of April 13, 2011, NMFS has determined that approximately 2,000 metric... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

  11. 77 FR 13013 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (77 FR 10669, February 23, 2012). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  12. 78 FR 23683 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Trawl Gear in the Central Regulatory Area... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher/processors (C/Ps) using trawl gear in the Central...

  13. 77 FR 21683 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/processors Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/processors Using Trawl Gear in the Central Regulatory Area... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher/processors (C/Ps) using trawl gear in the Central...

  14. 78 FR 15643 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... and 2014 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (78 FR 13813, March 1, 2013). In accordance... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  15. 78 FR 25004 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Hook...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... specifications for groundfish of the GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Hook-and-Line Gear in the Western Regulatory... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher vessels (CVs) using hook-and-line gear in the...

  16. 77 FR 54837 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... final 2012 and 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012). In... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Trawl Gear in the Western Regulatory Area... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher/processors (C/Ps) using trawl gear in the Western...

  17. 77 FR 20571 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Hook...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... groundfish of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Hook-and-Line Gear in the Western Regulatory... directed fishing for Pacific cod by catcher vessels (CVs) using hook-and-line gear in the...

  18. 76 FR 17569 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels using trawl gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  19. 76 FR 39790 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... GOA (76 FR 11111, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.82(d)(9)(i)(B), the Administrator... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher Vessels in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY... the deep-water species fishery for catcher vessels subject to sideboard limits established under...

  20. 75 FR 59157 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by pot catcher/processors in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands management area...

  1. 76 FR 66195 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... groundfish in the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... for Pacific cod by pot catcher/processors in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands management area...

  2. 75 FR 42337 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher/Processors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher/Processors Participating in the Rockfish Limited...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific ocean perch by catcher/processors...). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2010 total allowable catch (TAC) of Pacific...

  3. 75 FR 38936 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels Participating in the Rockfish Entry Level...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific ocean perch by trawl catcher vessels...). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2010 directed fishing allowance of Pacific...

  4. 75 FR 41999 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels Participating in the Rockfish Entry Level...; modification of closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is reopening directed fishing for Pacific ocean perch by trawl catcher... Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the 2010 directed fishing allowance of Pacific...

  5. 76 FR 43934 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher/Processors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher/Processors Participating in the Rockfish Limited...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific ocean perch by catcher/processors...). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2011 total allowable catch (TAC) of Pacific...

  6. 76 FR 39790 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Ocean Perch for Catcher Vessels Participating in the Rockfish Entry Level...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific ocean perch by trawl catcher vessels...). This action is necessary ] to prevent exceeding the 2011 directed fishing allowance of Pacific...

  7. Metal-gas cell with electrolyte reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.E.; Carr, D.D.

    1984-10-16

    A metal-gas electrochemical cell is disclosed wherein electrolyte is progressively supplied from a reservoir into the electrode or cell stack as needed, so as to maintain each stack component with adequate electrolyte, as the plates ''grow'' and absorb electrolyte with repeated cycling. The reservoir preferably is a compressible bladder positioned between on end of the plate stack and a retaining plate. As the plate stack ''grows'' with repeated cycling, the bladder is slowly compressed, forcing electrolyte from the bladder through an electrolyte distribution tube located within the plate stack. One end of the electrolyte distribution tube is fixed to an end plate of the plate stack and the second end of the distribution tube may be connected to a Belleville washer or other spring which acts through the distribution tube to compress the plate stack. The elasticity of the spring permits the stack to expand as the electrodes grow.

  8. Distributed Computing and MEMS Accelerometers: The Quake Catcher Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Christensen, C.; Jakka, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    Recent advances in distributed computing provide exciting opportunities for seismic data collection. We are in the early stages of implementing a high density, low cost strong-motion network for rapid response and early warning by placing accelerometers in schools, homes, offices, government buildings, fire houses and more. The Quake Catcher Network (QCN) employs existing networked laptops and desktops to form a dense, distributed computing seismic network. Costs for this network are minimal because the QCN uses 1) strong motion sensors (accelerometers) already internal to many laptops and 2) low-cost universal serial bus (USB) accelerometers for use with desktops. The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC!) provides a free, proven paradigm for involving the public in large-scale computational research projects. The QCN leverages public participation to fully implement the seismic network. As such engaging the public to participate in seismic data collection is not only an integral part of the project, but an added value to the QCN. The software provides the client-user with a screen-saver displaying seismic data recorded on their laptop or recently detected earthquakes. Furthermore, this project installs sensors in K-12 classrooms as an educational tool for teaching science. Through a variety of interactive experiments students can learn about earthquakes and the hazards earthquakes pose. In the first six months of limited release of the QCN software, we successfully received triggers and waveforms from laptops near the M 4.7 April 25, 2008 earthquake in Reno, Nevada and the M 5.4 July 29, 2008 earthquake in Chino, California (as well as a few 3.6 and higher events). This fall we continued to expand the network further by installing seismometers in K-12 schools, museums, and government buildings in the greater Los Angeles basin and the San Francisco Bay Area. By summer 2009 we expect to have 1000 USB sensors deployed in California, in addition

  9. Thin gas cell with GRIN fiber lens for intra-cavity fiber laser gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo; Dai, Jing-min; Peng, Gang-ding

    2009-07-01

    Fiber laser gas sensors based on the intra-cavity absorption spectroscopy require the use of gas cells. We propose a simple and reliable gas cell using graded-index fiber lens (GFL) based all-fiber collimator. Conventional gas cells usually utilize direct fiber-to-fiber coupling without collimators or graded-index (GRIN) lens as collimators. Direct fiberto- fiber gas cell has simple configuration, but it suffers from high coupling loss and stray light interference. Gas cells applying fiber pigtailed GRIN lens are advantageous to achieve low coupling loss. However, fiber pigtailed GRIN lens requires accurate and complicated alignment and glue packaging which could compromise long term reliability and thermal stability. The proposed technique fabricates all-fiber collimators by simply splicing a short section of gradedindex fiber to single mode fiber which is both compact and durable. With that collimator, the gas cell can be fabricated very thin and are suitable for extreme environments with high temperature and vibration. In this paper, we have carried out experiment and analysis to evaluate the proposed technique. The coupling efficiency is studied versus different GFL gradient parameter profiles using ray matrix transformation of the complex beam parameter. Experiments are also done to prove the practical feasibility of the collimator. The analysis indicates that gas cell using GFLs can overcome the disadvantages of traditional design; it may replace the conventional gas cells in practical applications.

  10. Gas diffusion cell removes carbon dioxide from occupied airtight enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Small, lightweight permeable cell package separates and removes carbon dioxide from respiratory gas mixtures. The cell is regenerative while chemically inert in the presence of carbon dioxide so that only adsorption takes place.

  11. The Dream Catcher Meditation: a therapeutic technique used with American Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robbins, R

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a short-term treatment insight-oriented model for American Indian adolescents, called Dream Catcher Meditation. It is aimed at helping clients' express unconscious conflicts and to facilitate differentiation and healthy mutuality. Though its duration can vary, twelve sessions are outlined here. Session descriptions include goals and sample questions. Also included are anecdotal material and reflections about cultural relevancy.

  12. The Quake-Catcher Network: An Innovative Community-Based Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, J.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J. F.; Christensen, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) is a volunteer computing seismic network that engages citizen scientists, teachers, and museums to participate in the detection of earthquakes. In less than two years, the network has grown to over 1000 participants globally and continues to expand. QCN utilizes Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) accelerometers, in laptops and external to desktop computers, to detect moderate to large earthquakes. One goal of the network is to involve K-12 classrooms and museums by providing sensors and software to introduce participants to seismology and community-based scientific data collection. The Quake-Catcher Network provides a unique opportunity to engage participants directly in the scientific process, through hands-on activities that link activities and outcomes to their daily lives. Partnerships with teachers and museum staff are critical to growth of the Quake Catcher Network. Each participating institution receives a MEMS accelerometer to connect, via USB, to a computer that can be used for hands-on activities and to record earthquakes through a distributed computing system. We developed interactive software (QCNLive) that allows participants to view sensor readings in real time. Participants can also record earthquakes and download earthquake data that was collected by their sensor or other QCN sensors. The Quake-Catcher Network combines research and outreach to improve seismic networks and increase awareness and participation in science-based research in K-12 schools.

  13. Understanding "The Catcher in the Rye": A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsker, Sanford; Pinsker, Ann

    The social, cultural, and historical documents and commentary in this casebook illuminate the reading of "The Catcher in the Rye," a novel that has become an important rite of passage for many young adults. In addition to a literary analysis, the casebook acquaints students with the larger world in which Holden Caulfield, the protagonist, moves:…

  14. Dealing with the Controversial Elements in "The Catcher in the Rye."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frangedis, Helen

    1988-01-01

    Explains that J. D. Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye" contains an underlying moral code which predominates the controversial elements of the novel. States that a close textual analysis and candid discussion are necessary to appreciate the novel's literary merits and to understand its controversial elements. (MM)

  15. Adolescent Journeys: Finding Female Authority in "The Rain Catchers" and "The House on Mango Street"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubb, Christina Rose

    2007-01-01

    This article compares the first-person narratives of two adolescent girls in the novels "The Rain Catchers" and "The House on Mango Street". I propose that adolescent girls can use literacy to read the world around them as a text and therefore help them to form their own identities enough to ultimately find authority in telling their own stories.…

  16. 50 CFR Figure 2 to Part 679 - BSAI Catcher Vessel Operational Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false BSAI Catcher Vessel Operational Area 2 Figure 2 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE...

  17. The Dream Catcher Meditation: A Therapeutic Technique Used with American Indian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Rockey

    2001-01-01

    A short-term, insight-oriented intervention for American Indian adolescents--the Dream Catcher Meditation--aims to help clients express unconscious conflicts and facilitate differentiation and healthy mutuality. Twelve sessions, including goals and sample questions, are described, during which the steps in making a dream maker are linked with key…

  18. False aneurysm of a digital artery in a softball catcher evaluated by sonography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Takeda, R

    1996-07-01

    A rare injury, a traumatic false aneurysm of ulnar proper digital artery of the left thumb in a softball catcher, is described. Noninvasive ultrasonographic evaluation led to an accurate diagnosis of the aneurysm, which was caused by blunt trauma by a softball.

  19. The relationship between gluteal muscle activation and throwing kinematics in baseball and softball catchers.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Hillary A; Oliver, Gretchen D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between gluteal muscle activation and pelvis and trunk kinematics when catchers throw to second base. Forty-two baseball and softball catchers (14.74 ± 4.07 years; 161.85 ± 15.24 cm; 63.38 ± 19.98 kg) participated in this study. Muscle activity of the bilateral gluteus maximus and medius as well as pelvis and trunk kinematics throughout the throwing motion were analyzed. It was discovered that at foot contact, there were 2 significant inverse relationships between stride leg gluteus maximus activity and pelvis axial rotation (r = -0.31, r2 = 0.10, p = 0.05), and between trunk axial rotation and pelvis lateral flexion (r = -0.34, r2= 0.12, p = 0.03). In addition, at foot contact, a significant positive relationship between the drive leg (throwing arm side) and trunk flexion (r = 0.33, r2 = 0.11, p = 0.04) was present. The results of this study provide evidence of gluteal activation both concentrically and eccentrically, in attempt to control the pelvis and trunk during the throwing motion of catchers. The gluteal muscles play a direct role in maintaining the stability of the pelvis, and catchers should incorporate strengthening of the entire lumbopelvic-hip complex into their training regimen. Incorporating concentric and eccentric gluteal exercises will help to improve musculoskeletal core stability, thereby assisting in upper extremity injury prevention.

  20. SpyTag/SpyCatcher cyclization confers resilience to boiling on a mesophilic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schoene, Christopher; Fierer, Jacob O; Bennett, S Paul; Howarth, Mark

    2014-06-10

    SpyTag is a peptide that spontaneously forms an amide bond with its protein partner SpyCatcher. SpyTag was fused at the N terminus of β-lactamase and SpyCatcher at the C terminus so that the partners could react to lock together the termini of the enzyme. The wild-type enzyme aggregates above 37 °C, with irreversible loss of activity. Cyclized β-lactamase was soluble even after heating at 100 °C; after cooling, the catalytic activity was restored. SpyTag/SpyCatcher cyclization led to a much larger increase in stability than that achieved through point mutation or alternative approaches to cyclization. Cyclized dihydrofolate reductase was similarly resilient. Analyzing unfolding through calorimetry indicated that cyclization did not increase the unfolding temperature but rather facilitated refolding after thermal stress. SpyTag/SpyCatcher sandwiching represents a simple and efficient route to enzyme cyclization, with potential to greatly enhance the robustness of biocatalysts.

  1. A gas cell for stopping, storing and polarizing radioactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytema, A.; van den Berg, J. E.; Böll, O.; Chernowitz, D.; Dijck, E. A.; Grasdijk, J. O.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mathavan, S. C.; Meinema, C.; Mohanty, A.; Müller, S. E.; Nuñez Portela, M.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pijpker, C.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2016-06-01

    A radioactive beam of 20Na is stopped in a gas cell filled with Ne gas. The stopped particles are polarized by optical pumping. The degree of polarization that can be achieved is studied. A maximum polarization of 50% was found. The dynamic processes in the cell are described with a phenomenological model.

  2. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  3. 75 FR 38938 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010), and as posted as the Catcher/Processor... species fishery for the sideboard limit are shallow-water flatfish and flathead sole. After the...

  4. Wind tunnel data of the analysis of heat pipe and wind catcher technology for the built environment.

    PubMed

    Calautit, John Kaiser; Chaudhry, Hassam Nasarullah; Hughes, Ben Richard

    2015-12-01

    The data presented in this article were the basis for the study reported in the research articles entitled 'Climate responsive behaviour heat pipe technology for enhanced passive airside cooling' by Chaudhry and Hughes [10] which presents the passive airside cooling capability of heat pipes in response to gradually varying external temperatures and related to the research article "CFD and wind tunnel study of the performance of a uni-directional wind catcher with heat transfer devices" by Calautit and Hughes [1] which compares the ventilation performance of a standard roof mounted wind catcher and wind catcher incorporating the heat pipe technology. Here, we detail the wind tunnel test set-up and inflow conditions and the methodologies for the transient heat pipe experiment and analysis of the integration of heat pipes within the control domain of a wind catcher design. PMID:26958604

  5. 76 FR 21705 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Catch Accounting in the Longline Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Alaska; Catch Accounting in the Longline Catcher/Processor Pacific Cod Fishery AGENCY: National Marine... Islands to support different catch accounting methods for Pacific cod catch. NMFS is considering...

  6. Wind tunnel data of the analysis of heat pipe and wind catcher technology for the built environment

    PubMed Central

    Calautit, John Kaiser; Chaudhry, Hassam Nasarullah; Hughes, Ben Richard

    2015-01-01

    The data presented in this article were the basis for the study reported in the research articles entitled ‘Climate responsive behaviour heat pipe technology for enhanced passive airside cooling’ by Chaudhry and Hughes [10] which presents the passive airside cooling capability of heat pipes in response to gradually varying external temperatures and related to the research article “CFD and wind tunnel study of the performance of a uni-directional wind catcher with heat transfer devices” by Calautit and Hughes [1] which compares the ventilation performance of a standard roof mounted wind catcher and wind catcher incorporating the heat pipe technology. Here, we detail the wind tunnel test set-up and inflow conditions and the methodologies for the transient heat pipe experiment and analysis of the integration of heat pipes within the control domain of a wind catcher design. PMID:26958604

  7. Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) gas cell life test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, E. M.; Thompson, R. E.; Harvey, G. A.; Park, J. H.; Richardson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) will use gas filter correlation radiometry to measure the atmospheric concentration profiles of HCl, HF, NO, and CH4 from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The need to contain the gases for the gas filter measurements has resulted in the development of gas cells and the need for a life test program to demonstrate that the gas cells will perform their functions for extended periods (several years) of time. This report describes the tests in the life test program, the test apparatus used, and the analysis techniques developed. The report also presents data obtained during the first 14 months of the test program.

  8. Structural basis for a hand-like site in the calcium sensor CatchER with fast kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Reddish, Florence; Tang, Shen; Zhuo, You; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yang, Jenny J.; Weber, Irene T.

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution crystal structures of the designed calcium sensor CatchER revealed snapshots of calcium and gadolinium ions binding within the designed site in agreement with its fast kinetics. Calcium ions, which are important signaling molecules, can be detected in the endoplasmic reticulum by an engineered mutant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) designated CatchER with a fast off-rate. High resolution (1.78–1.20 Å) crystal structures were analyzed for CatchER in the apo form and in complexes with calcium or gadolinium to probe the binding site for metal ions. While CatchER exhibits a 1:1 binding stoichiometry in solution, two positions were observed for each of the metal ions bound within the hand-like site formed by the carboxylate side chains of the mutated residues S147E, S202D, Q204E, F223E and T225E that may be responsible for its fast kinetic properties. Comparison of the structures of CatchER, wild-type GFP and enhanced GFP confirmed that different conformations of Thr203 and Glu222 are associated with the two forms of Tyr66 of the chromophore which are responsible for the absorbance wavelengths of the different proteins. Calcium binding to CatchER may shift the equilibrium for conformational population of the Glu222 side chain and lead to further changes in its optical properties.

  9. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

  10. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOEpatents

    Phillion, Donald W.

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  11. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  12. Concussions experienced by Major League Baseball catchers and umpires: field data and experimental baseball impacts.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jeffrey A; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2012-01-01

    Some reports have shown that head injuries in baseball may comprise up to 18.5% of all competitive sports-related head injuries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of catcher and umpire masks to impacts at these different regions to discover the impact conditions that represent the greatest risk of injury. A series of 10 events in which a catcher or umpire in Major League Baseball, who experienced a foul ball to the mask that resulted in a concussion, were analyzed through video and data on pitch characteristics. It was found that the impacts were distributed across the face, and the median plate speed was approximately 38 m/s (84 mph). To determine the relative severity of each identified impact location, an instrumented Hybrid III head outfitted with a catcher or umpire mask was impacted with baseballs. Testing at 27 and 38 m/s (60 and 84 mph) suggested that impacts to the center-eyebrow and chin locations were the most severe. Peak linear and rotational accelerations were found to be lower than the suggested injury thresholds. While impacts to a mask result in head accelerations which are near or below levels commonly associated with the lower limits for head injury, the exact injury mechanism is unclear, as concussions are still experienced by the mask wearers. PMID:22012084

  13. Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Concepts for LEO Small Debris Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Most Low Earth Orbit (LEO) debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with launch latitudes, or with specific useful orbit inclinations (such as polar orbits). Such narrow inclination bands generally have a uniform spread over all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. This complicates concept of rendezvous and capture for debris removal. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a base can serve as a single space-based launch facility (a "mother ship") that can tend and then send tiny individual catcher devices for each debris object, as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as the higher object. This presentation will highlight characteristic system requirements of such an architecture, including structural and navigation requirements, power, mass and dV budgets for both the mother ship and the mass-produced common catcher devices that would clean out selected inclination bands. The altitude and inclination regime over which a band is to be cleared, the size distribution of the debris, and the inclusion of additional mission priorities all affect the sizing of the system. It is demonstrated that major LEO hazardous debris reductions can be realized in each band with a single LEO launch of a single mother ship, with simple attached catchers of total mass less than typical commercial LEO launch capability.

  14. Concussions experienced by Major League Baseball catchers and umpires: field data and experimental baseball impacts.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jeffrey A; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2012-01-01

    Some reports have shown that head injuries in baseball may comprise up to 18.5% of all competitive sports-related head injuries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of catcher and umpire masks to impacts at these different regions to discover the impact conditions that represent the greatest risk of injury. A series of 10 events in which a catcher or umpire in Major League Baseball, who experienced a foul ball to the mask that resulted in a concussion, were analyzed through video and data on pitch characteristics. It was found that the impacts were distributed across the face, and the median plate speed was approximately 38 m/s (84 mph). To determine the relative severity of each identified impact location, an instrumented Hybrid III head outfitted with a catcher or umpire mask was impacted with baseballs. Testing at 27 and 38 m/s (60 and 84 mph) suggested that impacts to the center-eyebrow and chin locations were the most severe. Peak linear and rotational accelerations were found to be lower than the suggested injury thresholds. While impacts to a mask result in head accelerations which are near or below levels commonly associated with the lower limits for head injury, the exact injury mechanism is unclear, as concussions are still experienced by the mask wearers.

  15. Radon measurement of natural gas using alpha scintillation cells.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E; Torres, Miguel A; Haines, Douglas K; Semkow, Thomas M

    2014-12-01

    Due to their sensitivity and ease of use, alpha-scintillation cells are being increasingly utilized for measurements of radon ((222)Rn) in natural gas. Laboratory studies showed an average increase of 7.3% in the measurement efficiency of alpha-scintillation cells when filled with less-dense natural gas rather than regular air. A theoretical calculation comparing the atomic weight and density of air to that of natural gas suggests a 6-7% increase in the detection efficiency when measuring radon in the cells. A correction is also applicable when the sampling location and measurement laboratory are at different elevations. These corrections to the measurement efficiency need to be considered in order to derive accurate concentrations of radon in natural gas.

  16. Fuel cell/gas turbine integration

    SciTech Connect

    Knickerbocker, T.

    1995-10-19

    The Allison Engine Company`s very high efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle program is discussed. The power cycle has the following advantages: high system efficiency potential, reduced emissions inherent to fuel cells, unmanned operation(no boiler) particularly suited for distributed power, and existing product line matches fuel cell operating environment. Cost effectiveness, estimates, and projections are given.

  17. Pockels-effect cell for gas-flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A Pockels effect cell using a 75 cu cm DK*P crystal was developed and used as a gas flow simulator. Index of refraction gradients were produced in the cell by the fringing fields of parallel plate electrodes. Calibration curves for the device were obtained for index of refraction gradients in excess of .00025 m.

  18. Miniature fuel cells relieve gas pressure in sealed batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Miniature fuel cells within sealed silver zinc batteries consume evolved hydrogen and oxygen rapidly, preventing pressure rupturing. They do not significantly increase battery weight and they operate in all battery life phases. Complete gas pressure control requires two fuel cells during all phases of operation of silver zinc batteries.

  19. Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel; Jenkins, James

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a microgravity flow cell in which to study the interaction of a flowing gas with relatively massive particles that collide with each other and with the moving boundaries of the cell. The absence of gravity makes possible the independent control of the relative motion of the boundaries and the flow of the gas. The cell will permit gas-particle interactions to be studied over the entire range of flow conditions over which the mixture is not turbulent. Within this range, we shall characterize the viscous dissipation of the energy of the particle fluctuations, measure the influence of particle-phase viscosity on the pressure drop along the cell, and observe the development of localized inhomogeneities that are likely to be associated with the onset of clusters. These measurements and observations should contribute to an understanding of the essential physics of pneumatic transport.

  20. First use of SAM onboard calibration gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malespin, C.; Trainer, M. G.; Manning, H. L.; Franz, H. B.; Conrad, P. G.; Raaen, E.; Webster, C. R.; Flesch, G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument (Mahaffy et al 2012) suite on Curiosity completed its first measurement of the onboard calibration gas cell on MSL Mission Sol 1042. The cell consists of a gas mixture of four primary gases, along with trace fluorinated hydrocarbon high mass calibrants. The mix is comprised of approximately 25% CO2, N2, Xe and Ar, where the 129Xe has been given a three times enrichment relative to terrestrial xenon in order to distinguish it isotopically from Martian atmospheric Xe. Analysis of the calibration cell is intended to identify changes in instrument performance between pre-launch calibrations and operations on Mars, for any of the three main subsystems in SAM: the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and Gas Chromatograph (GC). Here we present the experimental approach, results, and implications for instrument performance after almost three years of measurements on Mars.

  1. Gas block mechanism for water removal in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Issacci, Farrokh; Rehg, Timothy J.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention is directed to apparatus and method for cathode-side disposal of water in an electrochemical fuel cell. There is a cathode plate. Within a surface of the plate is a flow field comprised of interdigitated channels. During operation of the fuel cell, cathode gas flows by convection through a gas diffusion layer above the flow field. Positioned at points adjacent to the flow field are one or more porous gas block mediums that have pores sized such that water is sipped off to the outside of the flow field by capillary flow and cathode gas is blocked from flowing through the medium. On the other surface of the plate is a channel in fluid communication with each porous gas block mediums. The method for water disposal in a fuel cell comprises installing the cathode plate assemblies at the cathode sides of the stack of fuel cells and manifolding the single water channel of each of the cathode plate assemblies to the coolant flow that feeds coolant plates in the stack.

  2. Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feret, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The first phase of a planned multiphase program to develop a Phosphoric is addressed. This report describes the efforts performed that culminated in the: (1) Establishment of the preliminary design requirements and system conceptual design for the nominally rated 375 kW PAFC module and is interfacing power plant systems; (2) Establishment of PAFC component and stack performance, endurance, and design parameter data needed for design verification for power plant application; (3) Improvement of the existing PAFC materials data base and establishment of materials specifications and process procedes for the cell components; and (4) Testing of 122 subscale cell atmospheric test for 110,000 cumulative test hours, 12 subscale cell pressurized tests for 15,000 cumulative test hours, and 12 pressurized stack test for 10,000 cumulative test hours.

  3. First Measurements with the Gas Cell for SHIPTRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, O.; Beck, L.; Bollen, G.; Habs, D.; Marx, G.; Neumayr, J.; Schramm, U.; Schwarz, S.; Thirolf, P.; Varentsov, V.

    2001-01-01

    SHIPTRAP is an electromagnetic transport and trapping system to provide very clean and cold beams of singly-charged recoil ions from the SHIP facility at GSI. The different components of the system are currently under development in Munich (gas cell and extraction RFQ) and GSI (Buncher RFQ and Penning traps)[1]. Design and manufacturing of the prototype buffer gas cell and the extraction RFQ based on a wide range of simulations have been completed. The results of these simulations together with the first measurements will be reported.

  4. Performance of the Linear Gas Cell at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kortney; Morrissey, David; Ringle, Ryan; Schwarz, Stefan; Sumithrarachchi, Chandana; Savard, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Beam thermalization allows projectile fragmentation facilities to produce low-energy ion beams. The beam thermalization technique employed by the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) involves high-energy ion beams first passing through solid degraders to remove the bulk of the beam's kinetic energy. The remaining kinetic energy is then dissipated through collisions with the buffer gas atoms of a linear gas cell constructed by Argonne National Lab (ANL). Numerous experiments have been performed for the commissioning and online operation of the gas cell. These experiments used incident ions that ranged from 29Mg, 29P, 33Cl, 37K, 40S, 46Ar, to 76Ga at incoming rates ranging from 102 pps to 107 pps. The extraction efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the system has been analyzed for each experiment. LISE + + , particle-in-cell (PIC), and SIMION simulations have been carried out for the data obtained with 76Ga ions. Both the experimental and simulated results for the gas cell's performance will be presented and discussed. Beam thermalization allows projectile fragmentation facilities to produce low-energy ion beams. The beam thermalization technique employed by the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) involves high-energy ion beams first passing through solid degraders to remove the bulk of the beam's kinetic energy. The remaining kinetic energy is then dissipated through collisions with the buffer gas atoms of a linear gas cell constructed by Argonne National Lab (ANL). Numerous experiments have been performed for the commissioning and online operation of the gas cell. These experiments used incident ions that ranged from 29Mg, 29P, 33Cl, 37K, 40S, 46Ar, to 76Ga at incoming rates ranging from 102 pps to 107 pps. The extraction efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the system has been analyzed for each experiment. LISE + + , particle-in-cell (PIC), and SIMION simulations have been carried out for the data obtained

  5. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, T; Tsubota, T; Wada, M; Katayama, I; Kojima, T M; Reponen, M

    2016-06-01

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method. PMID:27370494

  6. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, T.; Tsubota, T.; Wada, M.; Katayama, I.; Kojima, T. M.; Reponen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method.

  7. Dynamic responses of rotor drops onto double-decker catcher bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yili; Jin, Chaowu; Xu, Longxiang

    2013-01-01

    In an active magnetic bearing (AMB) system, the catcher bearings (CBs) are indispensable to protect the rotor and stator in case the magnetic bearings fail. Most of the former researches associated with CBs are mainly focused on the dynamic responses of the rotor drops onto traditional single-decker catcher bearings (SDCBs). But because of the lower limited speed of SDCB, it cannot withstand the ultra high speed rotation after rotor drop. In this paper, based on the analysis of the disadvantages of SDCBs, a new type of double-decker catcher bearings (DDCBs) is proposed to enhance the CB work performance in AMB system. In order to obtain the accurate rotor movements before AMB failure, the dynamic characteristics of AMB are theoretically derived. Detailed simulation models containing rigid rotor model, contact model between rotor and inner race, DDCB force model as well as heating model after rotor drop are established. Then, using those established models the dynamic responses of rotor drops onto DDCBs and SDCBs are respectively simulated. The rotor orbits, contact forces, spin speeds of various parts and heat energies after AMB failure are mainly analyzed. The simulation results show that DDCBs can effectively improve the CBs limit rotational speed and reduce the following vibrations, impacts and heating. Finally, rotor drop experiments choosing different types of CBs are carried out on the established AMB test bench. Rotor orbits, inner race temperatures as well as the rotating speeds of both inner race and intermediate races after rotor drop are synchronously measured. The experiment results verify the advantages of DDCB and the correctness of theoretical analysis. The studies provide certain theoretical and experimental references for the application of DDCBs in AMB system.

  8. The Quake-Catcher Network: Bringing Seismology to Homes and Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Christensen, C. M.; Saltzman, J.; Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) is a collaborative initiative for developing the world's largest, low-cost strong-motion seismic network by utilizing sensors in and attached to volunteer internet-connected computers. QCN is not only a research tool, but provides an educational tool for teaching earthquake science in formal and informal environments. A central mission of the Quake-Catcher Network is to provide scientific educational software and hardware so that K-12 teachers, students, and the general public can better understand and participate in the science of earthquakes and earthquake hazards. With greater understanding, teachers, students, and interested individuals can share their new knowledge, resulting in continued participation in the project, and better preparation for earthquakes in their homes, businesses, and communities. The primary educational outreach goals are 1) to present earthquake science and earthquake hazards in a modern and exciting way, and 2) to provide teachers and educators with seismic sensors, interactive software, and educational modules to assist in earthquake education. QCNLive (our interactive educational computer software) displays recent and historic earthquake locations and 3-axis real-time acceleration measurements. This tool is useful for demonstrations and active engagement for all ages, from K-college. QCN provides subsidized sensors at 49 for the general public and 5 for K-12 teachers. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes to a broader audience. Academics are taking QCN to classrooms across the United States and around the world. The next time you visit a K-12 classroom or teach a college class on interpreting seismograms, bring a QCN sensor and QCNLive software with you! To learn how, visit http://qcn.stanford.edu.

  9. Circular paraboloid reflection cell for laser spectroscopic trace gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Markus; Tuzson, Béla; Hundt, Morten; Jágerská, Jana; Looser, Herbert; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2016-05-01

    Absorption cells with circular geometry are a class of multipass reflection cells consisting of a single, circular mirror. They can be particularly favorable for trace gas measurements because of their mechanical robustness, simplicity, and their optical versatility. In this article, we present detailed theoretical considerations and ray tracing simulations for the optimization of the optical design of circular multipass reflection cells. A parabolic mirror shape in a confocal arrangement is found to be most suitable for long optical paths in a small volume. We experimentally demonstrate more than 12 m optical path in a 14.5 cm diameter gas cell and NO2 concentration measurements in ambient air with a measurement precision better than 0.1 ppb. PMID:27140888

  10. Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feret, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The work performed during the Second Logical Unit of Work of a multi-year program designed to develop a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) for electric utility power plant application is discussed. The Second Logical Unit of Work, which covers the period May 14, 1983 through May 13, 1984, was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, and managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  11. Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W; Granite, E.J.; Luebke, D.R; Kitchin, J.R; Landon, J.; Weiland, L.M.

    2010-06-01

    ABSTRACT Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation, However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e" sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area, Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO 2 and 02 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effiuent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide, A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent.

  12. Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline HW, Granite EJ, Luebke DR,

    2010-06-01

    Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation. However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e., sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area. Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO2 and O2 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effluent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide. A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent

  13. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  14. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

    1995-09-12

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes. 1 fig.

  15. FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT PENROSE POWER STATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This demonstration test successfully demonstrated operation of a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell (FC) on landfill gas (LG) at the Penrose Power Station in Sun Valley, CA. Demonstration output included operation up to 137 kW; 37.1% efficiency at 120 kW; exceptionally low sec...

  16. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Parsons, Edward L.

    1995-01-01

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

  17. Flexible fuel cell gas manifold system

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, Michael; Shah, Jagdish; Hayes, Richard P.; Kelley, Dana A.

    2005-05-03

    A fuel cell stack manifold system in which a flexible manifold body includes a pan having a central area, sidewall extending outward from the periphery of the central area, and at least one compound fold comprising a central area fold connecting adjacent portions of the central area and extending between opposite sides of the central area, and a sidewall fold connecting adjacent portions of the sidewall. The manifold system further includes a rail assembly for attachment to the manifold body and adapted to receive pins by which dielectric insulators are joined to the manifold assembly.

  18. 78 FR 4346 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012) and inseason adjustment to the final 2013 harvest specifications for Pacific cod (78 FR 267, January 3, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Trawl Gear in the Western Regulatory...

  19. 75 FR 12463 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (74 FR 7359, February 17, 2009) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68717, December 29, 2009). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and...

  20. 78 FR 17884 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... specifications for groundfish of the GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than or Equal to 50 Feet (15.2 Meters... vessels (CVs) greater than or equal to 50 feet (15.2 meters (m)) in length overall (LOA) using...

  1. 78 FR 5144 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... established by the final 2012 and 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (77 FR 10669, February 23, 2012) and inseason adjustment (78 FR 270, January 3, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than or Equal To 60 Feet (18.3...

  2. 75 FR 15626 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... by the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specification for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11788, March 12... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 feet (18.3 m) Length Overall Using... less than 60 feet (18.3 m) length overall (LOA) using hook-and-line or pot gear in the Bering Sea...

  3. 78 FR 17885 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 50...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... of the GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 50 Feet (15.2 Meters) Length Overall... (CVs) less than 50 feet (15.2 meters (m)) in length overall (LOA) using hook-and-line gear in...

  4. 50 CFR 600.1108 - Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock groundfish fishery program. 600.1108 Section 600.1108 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 50 CFR 600.1108 - Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Longline catcher processor subsector of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock groundfish fishery program. 600.1108 Section 600.1108 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. catcher: A Software Program to Detect Answer Copying in Multiple-Choice Tests Based on Nominal Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalender, Ilker

    2012-01-01

    catcher is a software program designed to compute the [omega] index, a common statistical index for the identification of collusions (cheating) among examinees taking an educational or psychological test. It requires (a) responses and (b) ability estimations of individuals, and (c) item parameters to make computations and outputs the results of…

  7. 78 FR 18528 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... established by the final 2012 and 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012) and inseason adjustment to the final 2013 harvest specifications for Pacific cod (78 FR 267... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Central Regulatory Area...

  8. 78 FR 11790 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012) and inseason adjustment to the final 2013 harvest specifications for Pacific cod (78 FR 267, January 3, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Western Regulatory Area...

  9. 78 FR 7280 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (77 FR 10669, February 23, 2012) and inseason adjustment (78 FR 270, January 3, 2013). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot Gear in the Bering Sea and...

  10. 75 FR 70614 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... in the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than or Equal to 60 Feet (18.3 Meters... vessels greater than or equal to 60 feet (18.3 meters (m)) length overall (LOA) in the Bering Sea...

  11. 78 FR 9328 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... the final 2012 and 2013 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (77 FR 10669, February 23, 2012), inseason adjustment (78 FR 270, January 3, 2013), and one reallocation from the jig vessel... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 Feet (18.3 Meters) Length...

  12. 77 FR 10400 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... the final 2011 and 2012 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011) and inseason adjustment (76 FR 81875, December 29, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 Feet (18.3 Meters) Length...

  13. 76 FR 13098 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 Feet (18.3 m) Length Overall Using... less than 60 feet (18.3 m) length overall (LOA) using hook-and-line or pot gear in the Bering Sea...

  14. 76 FR 4081 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... established by the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010) and inseason adjustment (76 FR 467, January 5, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than or Equal to 60 Feet (18.3...

  15. 75 FR 5251 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (74 FR 7359, February 17, 2010) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68717, December 29, 2009). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Greater Than or Equal to 60 Feet (18.3...

  16. 77 FR 3638 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... 2012 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011) and inseason adjustment (76 FR 81875, December 29, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot Gear in the Bering Sea and...

  17. 75 FR 8840 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... 2010 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (74 FR 7359, February 17, 2009) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68717, December 29, 2009)). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot Gear in the Bering Sea and...

  18. 76 FR 4552 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010) and inseason adjustment (76 FR 467, January 5, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher/Processors Using Pot Gear in the Bering Sea and...

  19. Method of making gas diffusion layers for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Frisk, Joseph William; Boand, Wayne Meredith; Larson, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for making a gas diffusion layer for an electrochemical cell comprising the steps of: a) combining carbon particles and one or more surfactants in a typically aqueous vehicle to make a preliminary composition, typically by high shear mixing; b) adding one or more highly fluorinated polymers to said preliminary composition by low shear mixing to make a coating composition; and c) applying the coating composition to an electrically conductive porous substrate, typically by a low shear coating method.

  20. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; George, R.A.

    1999-07-27

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

  1. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; George, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

  2. The Quake-Catcher Network: A Seismic Network for the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Christensen, C. M.; Chung, A. I.

    2012-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) is a collaborative initiative for developing the world's largest, low-cost strong-motion seismic network by utilizing sensors in and attached to volunteer internet-connected computers. QCN is not only a research tool, but provides an educational tool for teaching earthquake science in formal and informal environments. A central mission of the QCN is to provide scientific educational software and hardware so that K-12 teachers, students, and the general public can better understand and participate in the science of earthquakes and earthquake hazards. The QCN now has over 2000 volunteers worldwide, with concentrations in various earthquake-prone metropolitan areas. The sensors have recorded earthquakes with magnitudes between Ml2.5 (Christchurch, New Zealand - 2010) and Mw8.8 (Maule, Chile - 2010). The peak ground accelerations (PGAs) exhibit the same distribution of scatter as traditional seismic sensors (e.g. the Kinemetrics Epicensor) but with poor resolution at the bottom end. Real-time distributed computing allows for rapid earthquake location and characterization, including magnitude estimation and AlertMap generation. The network is installed and maintained by volunteer seismologists around the world. Because the volunteer provides a free computational platform (a personal computer), internet access, and shelter, the costs of the Quake-Catcher Network are minimal. QCN provides free sensors for individuals and organizations in key regions of interest. QCN provides subsidized sensors (5) for K-12 teachers in the US. QCN provides subsidized sensor at 49 for the general public and $5 for K-12 teachers in the United States. International collaborators are expanding the regions of coverage around the world. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes for scientists and the general public. To learn more, visit http://qcn.stanford.edu.arthquake detected near Los Angeles, California on the

  3. First European fuel cell installation with anaerobic digester gas in a molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbeck, M.; Klinge, T.; Döding, B.

    The City of Ahlen in North Rhine Westphalia, Germany and RWE Fuel Cells GmbH, Essen, cooperate in order to install a molten carbonate fuel cell in the municipal sewage works of Ahlen in May/June 2005. The MCFC unit, a so-called HotModule made by MTU CFC Solutions, Ottobrunn operates on anaerobic digester gas and provides power and heat for the sewage works. This is the first project of its kind in Europe. This article outlines the experiences of RWE Fuel Cells with planning, installation and operation of MCFC systems and is focussing on the use of digester gas. The engineering and installation phase is described regarding to the special features of digester gas, for example variation in gas composition and impurities as well as different flow rates. The results of the first months of operation are interpreted and influences to the performance of the fuel cell on digester gas composition are compared. One focus of the recent RWE Fuel Cells projects is the use of MCFC systems using different biofuels. With the results from planning, installation and operation of the MCFC in Ahlen a system design for the application of different fuels can be validated and tested.

  4. SIMPLE TRANSIENT CALCULATIONS OF CELL FLAMMABLE GAS CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    , J; David Allison , D; John Mccord, J

    2009-05-06

    The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) mixes low-level radiological liquid waste with grout for permanent disposal as cement in vault cells. The grout mixture is poured into each cell in approximately 17 batches (8 to 10 hours duration). The grout mixture contains ten flammable gases of concern that are released from the mixture into the cell. Prior to operations, simple parametric transient calculations were performed to develop batch parameters (including schedule of batch pours) to support operational efficiency while ensuring that a flammable gas mixture does not develop in the cell vapor space. The analysis demonstrated that a nonflammable vapor space environment can be achieved, with workable operational constraints, without crediting the ventilation flow as a safety system control. Isopar L was identified as the primary flammable gas of concern. The transient calculations balanced inflows of the flammable gases into the vapor space with credited outflows of diurnal breathing through vent holes and displacement from new grout pours and gases generated. Other important features of the analyses included identifying conditions that inhibited a well-mixed vapor space, the expected frequency and duration of such conditions, and the estimated level of stratification that could develop.

  5. Helium Gas Regulation System for the Light-Ion Guide Gas Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Bryan; Clark, Henry; Chen, Lixin

    2013-10-01

    This is a proof-of-concept project to show that it is possible to construct a cost-effective helium gas regulation system for TAMU Cyclotron Institute's light-ion guide gas cell, using store ordered components. By purchasing the individual necessary parts, we designed and constructed a system that was less expensive than purchasing a pre-constructed system from a manufacturer, and could easily be scaled larger or smaller to accommodate any number of gas bottles. Utilizing LabVIEW software, I was able to write a program that allows the system to be controlled remotely, and an automation program that causes the system to change immediately between bottles, whenever one is almost empty, allowing the system to supply a constant flow of helium gas for several days. Although both the construction and the programming of the system can be seen as rough and unrefined, due to the time-restraints placed on me, the project adequately proves that the concept is valid and entirely possible, as the system is fully functional and able to fulfill its intended purpose. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  6. PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2000-02-01

    Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

  7. Method of fabricating an integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1988-03-22

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  8. Integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-03-19

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  9. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Gillett, James E.; Basel, Richard A.; Antenucci, Annette B.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

  10. Reactant gas composition for fuel cell potential control

    DOEpatents

    Bushnell, Calvin L.; Davis, Christopher L.

    1991-01-01

    A fuel cell (10) system in which a nitrogen (N.sub.2) gas is used on the anode section (11) and a nitrogen/oxygen (N.sub.2 /O.sub.2) gaseous mix is used on the cathode section (12) to maintain the cathode at an acceptable voltage potential during adverse conditions occurring particularly during off-power conditions, for example, during power plant shutdown, start-up and hot holds. During power plant shutdown, the cathode section is purged with a gaseous mixture of, for example, one-half percent (0.5%) oxygen (O.sub.2) and ninety-nine and a half percent (99.5%) nitrogen (N.sub.2) supplied from an ejector (21) bleeding in air (24/28) into a high pressure stream (27) of nitrogen (N.sub.2) as the primary or majority gas. Thereafter the fuel gas in the fuel processor (31) and the anode section (11) is purged with nitrogen gas to prevent nickel (Ni) carbonyl from forming from the shift catalyst. A switched dummy electrical load (30) is used to bring the cathode potential down rapidly during the start of the purges. The 0.5%/99.5% O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 mixture maintains the cathode potential between 0.3 and 0.7 volts, and this is sufficient to maintain the cathode potential at 0.3 volts for the case of H.sub.2 diffusing to the cathode through a 2 mil thick electrolyte filled matrix and below 0.8 volts for no diffusion at open circuit conditions. The same high pressure gas source (20) is used via a "T" juncture ("T") to purge the anode section and its associated fuel processor (31).

  11. Processes to Open the Container and the Sample Catcher of the Hayabusa Returned Capsule in the Planetary Material Sample Curation Facility of JAXA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, A.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Ishibashi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okada, T.; Yano, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Sandford, S.; Ueno, M.; Mukai, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kawaguchi, J.

    2011-01-01

    Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa, which returned from near-Earth-asteroid Itokawa, successfully returned its reentry capsule to the Earth, the Woomera Prohibited Area in Australia in Jun 13th, 2010, as detailed in another paper [1]. The capsule introduced into the Planetary Material Sample Curation Facility in the Sagamihara campus of JAXA in the early morning of June 18th. Hereafter, we describe a series of processes for the returned capsule and the container to recover gas and materials in there. A transportation box of the recovered capsule was cleaned up on its outer surface beforehand and introduced into the class 10,000 clean room of the facility. Then, the capsule was extracted from the box and its plastic bag was opened and checked and photographed the outer surface of the capsule. The capsule was composed of the container, a backside ablator, a side ablator, an electronic box and a supporting frame. The container consists of an outer lid, an inner lid, a frame for latches, a container and a sample catcher, which is composed of room A and B and a rotational cylinder. After the first check, the capsule was packed in a plastic bag with N2 again, and transferred to the Chofu campus in JAXA, where the X-ray CT instrument is situated. The first X-ray CT analysis was performed on the whole returned capsule for confirming the conditions of latches and O-ring seal of the container. The analysis showed that the latches of the container should have worked normally, and that the double Orings of the container seemed to be sealed its sample catcher with no problem. After the first X-ray CT, the capsule was sent back to Sagamihara and introduced in the clean room to exclude the electronic box and the side ablator from the container by hand tools. Then the container with the backside ablator was set firmly to special jigs to fix the lid of container tightly to the container and set to a milling machine. The backside ablator was drilled by the machine to expose heads of bolts

  12. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

    1996-11-12

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

  13. Anode materials for sour natural gas solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovic, Nemanja

    Novel anode catalysts have been developed for sour natural gas solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Sour natural gas comprises light hydrocarbons, and typically also contains H2S. An alternative fuel SOFC that operates directly on sour natural gas would reduce the overall cost of plant construction and operation for fuel cell power generation. The anode for such a fuel cell must have good catalytic and electrocatalytic activity for hydrocarbon conversion, sulfur-tolerance, resistance to coking, and good electronic and ionic conductivity. The catalytic activity and stability of ABO3 (A= La, Ce and/or Sr, B=Cr and one or more of Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Mn, or Co) perovskites as SOFC anode materials depends on both A and B, and are modified by substituents. The materials have been prepared by both solid state and wet-chemical methods. The physical and chemical characteristics of the materials have been fully characterized using electron microscopy, XRD, calorimetry, dilatometry, particle size and area, using XPS and TGA-DSC-MS. Electrochemical performance was determined using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic cell testing, electrochemical impedance analysis, and conductivity measurements. Neither Ce0.9Sr0.1VO3 nor Ce0.9 Sr0.1Cr0.5V0.5O3 was an active anode for oxidation of H2 and CH4 fuels. However, active catalysts comprising Ce0:9Sr0:1V(O,S)3 and Ce0.9Sr 0.1Cr0.5V0.5(O,S)3 were formed when small concentrations of H2S were present in the fuels. The oxysulfides formed in-situ were very active for conversion of H2S. The maximum performance improved from 50 mW cm-2 to 85 mW cm -2 in 0.5% H2S/CH4 at 850°C with partial substitution of V by Cr in Ce0.9Sr0.1V(O,S)3. Selective conversion of H2S offers potential for sweetening of sour gas without affecting the hydrocarbons. Perovskites La0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5X 0.5O3--delta, (henceforth referred to as LSCX, X=Ti, Mn, Fe, Co) are active for conversion of H2, CH4 and 0.5% H2S/CH4. The order of activity in the different fuels depends on

  14. Molecular catchers for pharmacologically active substances in wastewaters, a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Valencia, P. J.; Pérez Merchancano, S. T.; Paredes, H.; Bolívar Marinez, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    A basic and pressing need in the treatment of residual waste waters for urban and rural centers is the removal of pharmacological active residues from them, these resides are originated in a wide array of domestic, agricultural and industrial sources and can't be removed in the residual waters treatment plants by conventional methods, the result is the incorporation of them into the ecosystem altering the physiology and behavior of living organisms. Among the most active pharmacological substances found in very high concentration in residual waters is paracetamol, an analgesic of very wide excessive use due to its ease of access and low cost [1]. No pharmacological substance is entirely absorbed by the human organism and therefore a wide family of molecular residues is excreted by the urinary tract. In this work we have used the AM1 (Austin Model 1), PM3 (Parametric Method 3) and ZINDO/CI semiempirical methods, from the NDO (Neglect Differential Overlap) family [2] to study and observe the structural, electronic and optical characteristics of paracetamol while immersed in different basic and acidic aqueous environments, either alone or interacting with lignosulphonates. We have previously found that lignosulphonates, a lignin derivatives of wide industrial applications, can be engineered as a binding and flocculant agent and acts as molecular catchers therefore showing the potential to be used as a mean to filter and eliminate molecular residues from the residual waters [3].

  15. Crowd-Sourcing Seismic Data: Lessons Learned from the Quake-Catcher Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, E. S.; Sumy, D. F.; DeGroot, R. M.; Clayton, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Quake Catcher Network (QCN; qcn.caltech.edu) uses low cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors hosted by volunteers to collect seismic data. Volunteers use accelerometers internal to laptop computers, phones, tablets or small (the size of a matchbox) MEMS sensors plugged into desktop computers using a USB connector to collect scientifically useful data. Data are collected and sent to a central server using the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) distributed computing software. Since 2008, when the first citizen scientists joined the QCN project, sensors installed in museums, schools, offices, and residences have collected thousands of earthquake records. We present and describe the rapid installations of very dense sensor networks that have been undertaken following several large earthquakes including the 2010 M8.8 Maule Chile, the 2010 M7.1 Darfield, New Zealand, and the 2015 M7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake. These large data sets allowed seismologists to develop new rapid earthquake detection capabilities and closely examine source, path, and site properties that impact ground shaking at a site. We show how QCN has engaged a wide sector of the public in scientific data collection, providing the public with insights into how seismic data are collected and used. Furthermore, we describe how students use data recorded by QCN sensors installed in their classrooms to explore and investigate earthquakes that they felt, as part of 'teachable moment' exercises.

  16. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  17. Commercial ballard PEM fuel cell natural gas power plant development

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.S.; Dunnison, D.; Cohen, R.

    1996-12-31

    The electric utility industry is in a period of rapid change. Deregulation, wholesale and retail wheeling, and corporate restructuring are forcing utilities to adopt new techniques for conducting their business. The advent of a more customer oriented service business with tailored solutions addressing such needs as power quality is a certain product of the deregulation of the electric utility industry. Distributed and dispersed power are fundamental requirements for such tailored solutions. Because of their modularity, efficiency and environmental benefits, fuel cells are a favored solution to implement distributed and dispersed power concepts. Ballard Power Systems has been working to develop and commercialize Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants for stationary power markets. PEM`s capabilities of flexible operation and multiple market platforms bodes well for success in the stationary power market. Ballard`s stationary commercialization program is now in its second phase. The construction and successful operation of a 10 kW natural gas fueled, proof-of-concept power plant marked the completion of phase one. In the second phase, we are developing a 250 kW market entry power plant. This paper discusses Ballard`s power plant development plan philosophy, the benefits from this approach, and our current status.

  18. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  19. Premixed-Gas Flame Propagation in Hele-Shaw Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharif, J.; Abid, M.; Ronney, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that buoyancy and thermal expansion affect the propagation ra and shapes of premixed gas flames. The understanding of such effects is complicated by the large density ratio between the reactants and products, which induces a baroclinic production of vorticity due to misalignment of density and pressure gradients at the front, which in turn leads to a complicated multi-dimensional flame/flow interaction. The Hele-Shaw cell, i.e., the region between closely-spaced flat parallel plates, is probably the simplest system in which multi-dimensional convection is presents consequently, the behavior of fluids in this system has been studied extensively (Homsy, 1987). Probably the most important characteristic of Hele-Shaw flows is that when the Reynolds number based on gap width is sufficiently small, the Navier-Stokes equations averaged over the gap reduce to a linear relation, namely a Laplace equation for pressure (Darcy's law). In this work, flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells is studied to obtain a better understanding of buoyancy and thermal expansion effects on premixed flames. This work is also relevant to the study of unburned hydrocarbon emissions produced by internal combustion engines since these emissions are largely a result of the partial burning or complete flame quenching in the narrow, annular gap called the "crevice volume" between the piston and cylinder walls (Heywood, 1988). A better understanding of how flames propagate in these volumes through experiments using Hele-Shaw cells could lead to identification of means to reduce these emissions.

  20. Non-negligible collisions of alkali atoms with background gas in buffer-gas-free cells coated with paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Naota; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    We measured the rate of velocity-changing collisions (VCCs) between alkali atoms and background gas in buffer-gas-free anti-relaxation-coated cells. The average VCC rate in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells prepared in this work was 1× 106 hbox {s}^{-1}, which corresponds to 1 mm in the mean free path of rubidium atoms. This short mean free path indicates that the background gas is not negligible in the sense that alkali atoms do not travel freely between the cell walls. In addition, we found that a heating process known as "ripening" increases the VCC rate, and also confirmed that ripening improves the anti-relaxation performance of the coatings.

  1. Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylak, Aimy Ming Jii

    Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC provides pathways for mass, heat, and electronic transport to and from the catalyst layers and bipolar plates. When the GDL becomes flooded with liquid water, the PEMFC undergoes mass transport losses that can lead to decreased performance and durability. The work presented in this thesis includes contributions that provide insight into liquid water transport behaviour in and on the surface of the GDL, as well as insight into how future GDLs could be designed to enhance water management. The effects of compression on liquid water transport in the GDL and on the microstructure of the GDL are presented. It was found that compressed regions of the GDL provided preferential locations for water breakthrough, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging revealed irreversible damage to the GDL due to compression at typical fuel cell assembly pressures. The dynamic behaviour of droplet emergence and detachment in a simulated gas flow channel are also presented. It was found that on an initially dry and hydrophobic GDL, small droplets emerged and detached quickly from the GDL surface. However, over time, this water transport regime transitioned into that of slug formation and channel flooding. It was observed that after being exposed to a saturated environment, the GDL surface became increasingly prone to droplet pinning, which ultimately hindered droplet detachment and encouraged slug formation. A pore network model featuring invasion percolation with trapping was employed to evaluate the breakthrough pattern predictions of designed porous media. These designed pore networks consisted of randomized porous media with applied diagonal and radial gradients. Experimental microfluidic pore networks provided validation for the designed networks. Diagonal biasing provided a means of directing water

  2. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Seya, A.; Asano, A.

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  3. On the powerful use of simulations in the quake-catcher network to efficiently position low-cost earthquake sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, K.; Estrada, T.; Taufer, M.; Lawrence, J.; Cochran, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) uses low-cost sensors connected to volunteer computers across the world to monitor seismic events. The location and density of these sensors' placement can impact the accuracy of the event detection. Because testing different special arrangements of new sensors could disrupt the currently active project, this would best be accomplished in a simulated environment. This paper presents an accurate and efficient framework for simulating the low cost QCN sensors and identifying their most effective locations and densities. Results presented show how our simulations are reliable tools to study diverse scenarios under different geographical and infrastructural constraints. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  4. Evaluation of gas cooling for pressurized phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooque, M.; Skok, A. J.; Maru, H. C.; Kothmann, R. E.; Harry, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas cooling has already been demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. This paper presents theoretical and experimental investigation of gas cooling for pressurized PAFC. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  5. Evaluation of Gas-Cooled Pressurized Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells for Electric Utility Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faroque, M.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas-cooling was already demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. Theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-cooling for pressurized PAFC are presented. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas-Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas-Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  6. Lower Extremity Muscle Activation and Kinematics of Catchers When Throwing Using Various Squatting and Throwing Postures.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi-Chien; Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Wang, Lin-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the differences in joint motions and muscle activities of the lower extremities involved in various squatting postures. The motion capture system with thirty-one reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the quadriceps, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles of the pivot and stride leg. The joint extension and flexion in wide squatting are greater than in general squatting (p = 0.005). Knee joint extension and flexion in general squatting are significantly greater than in wide squatting (p = 0.001). The adduction and abduction of the hip joint in stride passing are significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). Furthermore, the adduction and abduction of the knee joint in stride passing are also significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). When stride passing is performed, the muscle activation of the hamstring of the pivot foot in general squatting is significantly greater than in wide squatting (p < 0.05), and this difference continues to the stride period. Most catchers use a general or wide squatting width, exclusive of a narrow one. Therefore, the training design for strengthening the lower extremity muscles should consider the appropriateness of the common squat width to enhance squat-up performance. For lower limb muscle activation, wide squatting requires more active gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Baseball players should extend the knee angle of the pivot foot before catching the ball. Key pointsCommon squatting width can enhance squat-up performance through strengthening lower body muscle.Wide squatting width might improve lower body muscle activation, leading to more effective communication between the brain and the muscle group. The benefit might be improved coordination of lower body muscle.Common and wide squatting width might be cycled through training to enhance the strengthen and

  7. Experiments and theoretical modelling for a core catcher concept for future light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tromm, W.; Alsmeyer, H.; Buerger, M.; Widmann, W.; Buck, M.

    1996-12-31

    The COMET concept of corium cooling is proposed to be integrated into future reactors. The concept is based on spreading of the ex-vessel core-melt on a sacrificial concrete layer and, after erosion of this layer, flooding the melt by totally passive water ingression from below through a multitude of melt plugs. The resulting evaporation and interaction processes should lead to a fragmented and porously solidified melt, rapidly coolable through open flow channels. The important processes of melt fragmentation and heat transfer from the melt at direct water contact are investigated with thermite melts in medium scale experiments, and with decay heat simulation in large scale experiments in the modified BETA facility. The experiments show fast cool-down of the melt and solidification of the metallic and oxidic fraction of the melt as a porous structure which, due to its high permeability for the steam-water flow, ensures short-term and long-term coolability. As the experiments are 1-dimensional representations of the central section of the core catcher in the characteristic scale, they should be directly applicable to reactor conditions. Specific tests on the possibility of steam explosions at the initial melt water contact showed very low mechanical loads. The conceptual and experimental work at FZK is accompanied by theoretical investigations at IKE, Stuttgart. Main aims are to optimize the cooling behavior and to evaluate the possible threat by strong steam explosions. Penetration of water jets into an overlying melt layer and resulting phenomena of fragmentation, coolant channel and porous medium formation constitute the key physical processes. Basic models have been developed and applied to the experiments.

  8. Why do lie-catchers fail? A lens model meta-analysis of human lie judgments.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Maria; Bond, Charles F

    2011-07-01

    Decades of research has shown that people are poor at detecting lies. Two explanations for this finding have been proposed. First, it has been suggested that lie detection is inaccurate because people rely on invalid cues when judging deception. Second, it has been suggested that lack of valid cues to deception limits accuracy. A series of 4 meta-analyses tested these hypotheses with the framework of Brunswik's (1952) lens model. Meta-Analysis 1 investigated perceived cues to deception by correlating 66 behavioral cues in 153 samples with deception judgments. People strongly associate deception with impressions of incompetence (r = .59) and ambivalence (r = .49). Contrary to self-reports, eye contact is only weakly correlated with deception judgments (r = -.15). Cues to perceived deception were then compared with cues to actual deception. The results show a substantial covariation between the 2 sets of cues (r = .59 in Meta-Analysis 2, r = .72 in Meta-Analysis 3). Finally, in Meta-Analysis 4, a lens model analysis revealed a very strong matching between behaviorally based predictions of deception and behaviorally based predictions of perceived deception. In conclusion, contrary to previous assumptions, people rarely rely on the wrong cues. Instead, limitations in lie detection accuracy are mainly attributable to weaknesses in behavioral cues to deception. The results suggest that intuitive notions about deception are more accurate than explicit knowledge and that lie detection is more readily improved by increasing behavioral differences between liars and truth tellers than by informing lie-catchers of valid cues to deception.

  9. Lower Extremity Muscle Activation and Kinematics of Catchers When Throwing Using Various Squatting and Throwing Postures.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi-Chien; Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Wang, Lin-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the differences in joint motions and muscle activities of the lower extremities involved in various squatting postures. The motion capture system with thirty-one reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the quadriceps, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles of the pivot and stride leg. The joint extension and flexion in wide squatting are greater than in general squatting (p = 0.005). Knee joint extension and flexion in general squatting are significantly greater than in wide squatting (p = 0.001). The adduction and abduction of the hip joint in stride passing are significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). Furthermore, the adduction and abduction of the knee joint in stride passing are also significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). When stride passing is performed, the muscle activation of the hamstring of the pivot foot in general squatting is significantly greater than in wide squatting (p < 0.05), and this difference continues to the stride period. Most catchers use a general or wide squatting width, exclusive of a narrow one. Therefore, the training design for strengthening the lower extremity muscles should consider the appropriateness of the common squat width to enhance squat-up performance. For lower limb muscle activation, wide squatting requires more active gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Baseball players should extend the knee angle of the pivot foot before catching the ball. Key pointsCommon squatting width can enhance squat-up performance through strengthening lower body muscle.Wide squatting width might improve lower body muscle activation, leading to more effective communication between the brain and the muscle group. The benefit might be improved coordination of lower body muscle.Common and wide squatting width might be cycled through training to enhance the strengthen and

  10. Lower Extremity Muscle Activation and Kinematics of Catchers When Throwing Using Various Squatting and Throwing Postures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi-Chien; Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Wang, Lin-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the differences in joint motions and muscle activities of the lower extremities involved in various squatting postures. The motion capture system with thirty-one reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the quadriceps, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles of the pivot and stride leg. The joint extension and flexion in wide squatting are greater than in general squatting (p = 0.005). Knee joint extension and flexion in general squatting are significantly greater than in wide squatting (p = 0.001). The adduction and abduction of the hip joint in stride passing are significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). Furthermore, the adduction and abduction of the knee joint in stride passing are also significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). When stride passing is performed, the muscle activation of the hamstring of the pivot foot in general squatting is significantly greater than in wide squatting (p < 0.05), and this difference continues to the stride period. Most catchers use a general or wide squatting width, exclusive of a narrow one. Therefore, the training design for strengthening the lower extremity muscles should consider the appropriateness of the common squat width to enhance squat-up performance. For lower limb muscle activation, wide squatting requires more active gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Baseball players should extend the knee angle of the pivot foot before catching the ball. Key points Common squatting width can enhance squat-up performance through strengthening lower body muscle. Wide squatting width might improve lower body muscle activation, leading to more effective communication between the brain and the muscle group. The benefit might be improved coordination of lower body muscle. Common and wide squatting width might be cycled through training to enhance the strengthen and

  11. Gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Kazuma; Miyashiro, Hajime; Kobayashi, Yo; Takei, Katsuhito; Ishikawa, Rikio

    To elucidate the gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cells after long cycling, we developed a device which can accurately determine the volume of generated gas in the cell. Experiments on Li xC 6/Li 1- xCoO 2 cells using electrolytes such as 1 M LiPF 6 in propylene carbonate (PC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and diethyl carbonate (DEC) are presented and discussed. In the nominal voltage range (4.2-2.5 V), compositional change due mainly to ester exchange reaction occurs, and gaseous products in the cell are little. Generated gas volume and compositional change in the electrolyte are detected largely in overcharged cells, and we discussed that gas generation due to electrolyte decomposition involves different decomposition reactions in overcharged and overdischarged cells.

  12. Effect of gas composition and gas utilisation on the dynamic response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weydahl, Helge; Møller-Holst, Steffen; Børresen, Børre

    The transient response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was measured for various cathode gas compositions and gas utilisations (fraction of supplied reactant gas which is consumed in the fuel cell reaction). For a PEMFC operated on pure hydrogen and oxygen, the cell voltage response to current steps was fast, with response times in the range 0.01-1 s, depending on the applied current. For a PEMFC supplied with air as cathode gas, an additional relaxation process related to oxygen transport caused a slower response (approximately 0.1-2 s depending on the applied current). Response curves up to approximately 0.01 s were apparently unaffected by gas composition and utilisation and were most likely dominated by capacitive discharge of the double layer and reaction with surplus oxygen residing in the cathode. The utilisation of hydrogen had only a minor effect on the response curves, while the utilisation of air severely influenced the PEMFC dynamics. Results suggested that air flow rates should be high to obtain rapid PEMFC response.

  13. Investigation of gas generation in regenerative fuel cells by low-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamet, Omer Faruk; Deevanhxay, Phengxay; Tsushima, Shohji; Hirai, Shuichiro

    2015-11-01

    Gas generation and discharge behaviors in an operating regenerative fuel cell (RFC) are investigated using low-energy X-ray radiography. In situ visualization at high spatial and temporal resolution reveal dynamic and inhomogeneous behaviors of the gas generation in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) in the RFC. Temporal and spatial variation of the gas thickness in the MEA is quantitatively discussed and shows an intermittent and periodic discharge processes of the gas generated by electrolysis, suggesting that the reaction sites in the catalyst layer and the discharging path of gas bubbles are well established in the MEA for the electrolysis. Larger gas accumulation and discharge in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) under the ribs are identified in comparison with those under the channels, which is attributed to the relatively longer path for accumulated gas under the ribs to be discharged into the flow channels.

  14. Ztek`s ultra high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine combination

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, M.; Nathanson, D.

    1995-10-19

    Ztek is proceeding on development of an ultra-high efficiency hybrid system of its Planar SOFC with a gas turbine, realizing shared cost and performance benefits. The gas turbine as the Balance-of-Plant was a logical selection from a fuel cell system perspective because of (1) the high-power-density energy conversion of gas turbines; (2) the unique compatibility of the Ztek Planar SOFC with gas turbines, and (3) the availability of low-cost commercial gas turbine systems. A Tennessee Valley Authority/Ztek program is ongoing, which addresses operation of the advanced Planar SOFC stacks and design scale-up for utility power generation applications.

  15. Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means

    DOEpatents

    Makiel, Joseph M.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator.

  16. Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means

    DOEpatents

    Makiel, J.M.

    1987-02-03

    A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator. 5 figs.

  17. Integrated gas analyzer for complete monitoring of turbine engine test cells.

    PubMed

    Markham, James R; Bush, Patrick M; Bonzani, Peter J; Scire, James J; Zaccardi, Vincent A; Jalbert, Paul A; Bryant, M Denise; Gardner, Donald G

    2004-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is proving to be reliable and economical for the quantification of many gas-phase species during testing and development of gas turbine engines in ground-based facilities such as sea-level test cells and altitude test cells. FT-IR measurement applications include engine-generated exhaust gases, facility air provided as input to engines, and ambient air in and around test cells. Potentially, the traditionally used assembly of many gas-specific single gas analyzers will be eliminated. However, the quest for a single instrument capable of complete gas-phase monitoring at turbine engine test cells has previously suffered since the FT-IR method cannot measure infrared-inactive oxygen molecules, a key operational gas to both air-breathing propulsion systems and test cell personnel. To further the quest, the FT-IR sensor used for the measurements presented in this article was modified by integration of a miniature, solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. Embedded in the FT-IR unit at a location near the long-effective-optical-path-length gas sampling cell, the amperometric oxygen sensor provides simultaneous, complementary information to the wealth of spectroscopic data provided by the FT-IR method.

  18. Power and temperature control of fluctuating biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    This paper addresses how the power and temperature are controlled in a biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and micro gas turbine (MGT) hybrid system. A SOFC and MGT dynamic model are developed and used to simulate the hybrid system performance operating on biomass gas. The transient behavior of both the SOFC and MGT are discussed in detail. An unstable power output is observed when the system is fed biomass gas. This instability is due to the fluctuation of gas composition in the fuel. A specially designed fuel controller succeeded not only in allowing the hybrid system to follow a step change of power demand from 32 to 35 kW, but also stably maintained the system power output at 35 kW. In addition to power control, fuel cell temperature is controlled by introduction and use of a bypass valve around the recuperator. By releasing excess heat to the exhaust, the bypass valve provided the control means to avoid the self-exciting behavior of system temperature and stabilized the temperature of SOFC at 850 °C.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of core catcher samples from the ICDP deep drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Mayr*, Christoph; Oehlerich, Markus; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    The ICDP project PASADO aims to develop a detailed paleoclimatic record for the southern part of the South American continent from sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58'S, 70°23'W), situated in the Patagonian steppe east of the Andean cordillera and north of the Street of Magellan. The precursor project SALSA recovered the Holocene and Late Glacial sediment infill of Laguna Potrok Aike and developed the environmental history of the semi-arid Patagonian steppe by a consequent interdisciplinary multi-proxy approach (e.g. Haberzettl et al., 2007). From September to November 2008 the ICDP deep drilling took place and successfully recovered in total 510 m of sediments from two sites resulting in a composite depth of 106 m for the selected main study Site 2. A preliminary age model places the record within the last 50.000 years. During the drilling campaign, the core catcher content of each drilled core run (3 m) was taken as separate sample to be shared and distributed between involved laboratories long before the main sampling party. A total of 70 core catcher samples describe the sediments of Site 2 and will form the base for more detailed investigations on the palaeoclimatic history of Patagonia. We here report on the organic carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of bulk sediment and plant debris of the core catcher samples. Similar investigations were performed for Holocene and Late Glacial sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike revealing insights into the organic matter dynamics of the lake and its catchment as well as into climatically induced hydrological variations with related lake level fluctuations (Mayr et al., 2009). The carbon and nitrogen content of the core catcher fine sediment fraction (<200 µm) is low to very low (around 1 % and 0.1 %, respectively) and requires particular attention in isotope analysis. The carbon isotope composition shows comparably little variation around a value of -26.0 per mil. The positive values of the Holocene and the Late

  20. Censorship of High School Literature: A Study of the Incidents of Censorship Involving J. D. Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symula, James Francis

    An examination of the omnipresent problem of censorship, especially as it affects public high school literature programs, emphasizes the need for book selection policies and formal procedures for handling a complaint against a book. This study concerning censorship of "The Catcher in the Rye" may prove useful to school personnel in combatting or…

  1. Endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling regulate prostate cancer stem cells in bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Decker, Ann M.; Wang, Jingcheng; Lee, Eunsohl; Kana, Lulia A.; Yumoto, Kenji; Cackowski, Frank C.; Rhee, James; Carmeliet, Peter; Buttitta, Laura; Morgan, Todd M.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    GAS6 and its receptors (Tryo 3, Axl, Mer or “TAM”) are known to play a role in regulating tumor progression in a number of settings. Previously we have demonstrated that GAS6 signaling regulates invasion, proliferation, chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We have also demonstrated that GAS6 secreted from osteoblasts in the bone marrow environment plays a critical role in establishing prostate tumor cell dormancy. Here we investigated the role that endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling plays in establishing prostate cancer stem cells in the bone marrow microenvironment. We first observed that high levels of endogenous GAS6 are expressed by disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow, whereas relatively low levels of endogenous GAS6 are expressed in PCa tumors grown in a s.c. setting. Interestingly, elevated levels of endogenous GAS6 were identified in putative cancer stem cells (CSCs, CD133+/CD44+) compared to non-CSCs (CD133–/CD44–) isolated from PCa/osteoblast cocultures in vitro and in DTCs isolated from the bone marrow 24 hours after intracardiac injection. Moreover, we found that endogenous GAS6 expression is associated with Mer receptor expression in growth arrested (G1) PCa cells, which correlates with the increase of the CSC populations. Importantly, we found that overexpression of GAS6 activates phosphorylation of Mer receptor signaling and subsequent induction of the CSC phenotype in vitro and in vivo. Together these data suggest that endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling contribute to the establishment of PCa CSCs in the bone marrow microenvironment, which may have important implications for targeting metastatic disease. PMID:27028863

  2. Water Transport Characteristics of Gas Diffusion Layer in a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, Ashok S; Cole, J Vernon

    2008-11-01

    A presentation addressing the following: Water transport in PEM Fuel Cells - a DoE Project 1. Gas Diffusion Layer--Role and Characteristics 2. Capillary Pressure Determinations of GDL Media 3. Gas Permeability Measurements of GDL Media 4. Conclusions and Future Activities

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  4. The Quake-Catcher Network: Improving Earthquake Strong Motion Observations Through Community Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J. F.; Christensen, C. M.; Chung, A. I.; Neighbors, C.; Saltzman, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) involves the community in strong motion data collection by utilizing volunteer computing techniques and low-cost MEMS accelerometers. Volunteer computing provides a mechanism to expand strong-motion seismology with minimal infrastructure costs, while promoting community participation in science. Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) triaxial accelerometers can be attached to a desktop computer via USB and are internal to many laptops. Preliminary shake table tests show the MEMS accelerometers can record high-quality seismic data with instrument response similar to research-grade strong-motion sensors. QCN began distributing sensors and software to K-12 schools and the general public in April 2008 and has grown to roughly 1500 stations worldwide. We also recently tested whether sensors could be quickly deployed as part of a Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP) following the 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake. Volunteers are recruited through media reports, web-based sensor request forms, as well as social networking sites. Using data collected to date, we examine whether a distributed sensing network can provide valuable seismic data for earthquake detection and characterization while promoting community participation in earthquake science. We utilize client-side triggering algorithms to determine when significant ground shaking occurs and this metadata is sent to the main QCN server. On average, trigger metadata are received within 1-10 seconds from the observation of a trigger; the larger data latencies are correlated with greater server-station distances. When triggers are detected, we determine if the triggers correlate to others in the network using spatial and temporal clustering of incoming trigger information. If a minimum number of triggers are detected then a QCN-event is declared and an initial earthquake location and magnitude is estimated. Initial analysis suggests that the estimated locations and magnitudes are

  5. Evaluation of a 2-MW carbonate fuel cell power plant fueled by landfill gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.B.; Selander, S.; Rastler, D.M.

    1991-11-01

    This project assessed the technical and economic feasibility of operating an atmospheric pressure 2 MW carbonate fuel cell power plant on landfill gas. A commercially available low pressure gas pre-treatment system was identified for this application. System simulation studies were performed to identify component bottle-necks which would limit power production, or preclude system operation. An economic assessment was conducted to assess the competitiveness of the fuel cell system. The analysis confirmed the technical feasibility of operating Energy Research Corporation`s 2MW fuel cell system on landfill gas. Resulting net electrical efficiency was 50% based on the fuel`s lower heating value. Plant capital cost increased by {approximately}$180/kw; this was primarily for gas cleanup. Bus bar power costs for market entry and commercial fuel cell plants were found to be competitive with power produced from baseload coal plants in Minnesota.

  6. Evaluation of a 2-MW carbonate fuel cell power plant fueled by landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.B. ); Selander, S. ); Rastler, D.M. )

    1991-11-01

    This project assessed the technical and economic feasibility of operating an atmospheric pressure 2 MW carbonate fuel cell power plant on landfill gas. A commercially available low pressure gas pre-treatment system was identified for this application. System simulation studies were performed to identify component bottle-necks which would limit power production, or preclude system operation. An economic assessment was conducted to assess the competitiveness of the fuel cell system. The analysis confirmed the technical feasibility of operating Energy Research Corporation's 2MW fuel cell system on landfill gas. Resulting net electrical efficiency was 50% based on the fuel's lower heating value. Plant capital cost increased by {approximately}$180/kw; this was primarily for gas cleanup. Bus bar power costs for market entry and commercial fuel cell plants were found to be competitive with power produced from baseload coal plants in Minnesota.

  7. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, W. S.; Kortright, J. B.

    2014-07-15

    A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available components, enables in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials in contact with gas at ambient temperature. The cell has a minimum X-ray path length of 1 mm and can hold gas pressures up to ∼300 Torr, and could support higher pressures with simple modifications. The design enables cycling between vacuum and gas environments without interrupting the X-ray beam, and can be fully sealed to allow for measurements of air-sensitive samples. The cell can attach to the downstream port of any appropriate synchrotron beamline, and offers a robust and versatile method for in situ measurements of certain materials. The construction and operation of the cell are discussed, as well as sample preparation and proper spectral analysis, illustrated by examples of spectral measurements. Potential areas for improvement and modification for specialized applications are also mentioned.

  8. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for refilling and connectorization of hollow core photonic crystal fiber gas reference cells. Thees hollow-core photonic crystal fiber allow optical propagation in air or vacuum and are for use as gas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  9. Edge seal for a porous gas distribution plate of a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Singh, Rajindar

    1984-01-01

    In an improved seal for a gas distribution plate of a fuel cell, a groove is provided extending along an edge of the plate. A member of resinous material is arranged within the groove and a paste comprising an immobilized acid is arranged surrounding the member and substantially filling the groove. The seal, which is impervious to the gas being distributed, is resistant to deterioration by the electrolyte of the cell.

  10. Closed system cell culture protocol using HYPERStack vessels with gas permeable material technology.

    PubMed

    Titus, Kim; Klimovich, Vitaly; Rothenberg, Mark; Pardo, Pilar; Tanner, Allison; Martin, Greg

    2010-11-29

    Large volume adherent cell culture is currently standardized on stacked plate cell growth products when microcarrier beads are not an optimal choice. HYPERStack vessels allow closed system scale up from the current stacked plate products and delivers >2.5X more cells in the same volumetric footprint. The HYPERStack vessels function via gas permeable material which allows gas exchange to occur, therefore eliminating the need for internal headspace within a vessel. The elimination of headspace allows the compartment where cell growth occurs to be minimized to reduce space, allowing more layers of cell growth surface area within the same volumetric footprint. For many applications such as cell therapy or vaccine production, a closed system is required for cell growth and harvesting. The HYPERStack vessel allows cell and reagent addition and removal via tubing from media bags or other methods. This protocol will explain the technology behind the gas permeable material used in the HYPERStack vessels, gas diffusion results to meet the metabolic needs of cells, closed system cell growth protocols, and various harvesting methods.

  11. Closed System Cell Culture Protocol Using HYPERStack Vessels with Gas Permeable Material Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Mark; Martin, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Large volume adherent cell culture is currently standardized on stacked plate cell growth products when microcarrier beads are not an optimal choice. HYPERStack vessels allow closed system scale up from the current stacked plate products and delivers >2.5X more cells in the same volumetric footprint. The HYPERStack vessels function via gas permeable material which allows gas exchange to occur, therefore eliminating the need for internal headspace within a vessel. The elimination of headspace allows the compartment where cell growth occurs to be minimized to reduce space, allowing more layers of cell growth surface area within the same volumetric footprint. For many applications such as cell therapy or vaccine production, a closed system is required for cell growth and harvesting. The HYPERStack vessel allows cell and reagent addition and removal via tubing from media bags or other methods. This protocol will explain the technology behind the gas permeable material used in the HYPERStack vessels, gas diffusion results to meet the metabolic needs of cells, closed system cell growth protocols, and various harvesting methods. PMID:21189467

  12. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    of: (1) comparison to an analytical solution for the dam break problem, (2) water spreading tests in a 1/10 linear scale model of the Mark I containment by Theofanous et al., and (3) steel spreading tests by Suzuki et al. that were also conducted in a geometry similar to the Mark I. The objective of this work was to utilize the MELTSPREAD code to check the assumption of uniform melt spreading in the EPR core catcher design. As a starting point for the project, the code was validated against the worldwide melt spreading database that emerged after the code was originally written in the very early 1990's. As part of this exercise, the code was extensively modified and upgraded to incorporate findings from these various analytical and experiment programs. In terms of expanding the ability of the code to analyze various melt simulant experiments, the options to input user-specified melt and/or substrate material properties was added. The ability to perform invisicid and/or adiabatic spreading analysis was also added so that comparisons with analytical solutions and isothermal spreading tests could be carried out. In terms of refining the capability to carry out reactor material melt spreading analyses, the code was upgraded with a new melt viscosity model; the capability was added to treat situations in which solid fraction buildup between the liquidus-solidus is non-linear; and finally, the ability to treat an interfacial heat transfer resistance between the melt and substrate was incorporated. This last set of changes substantially improved the predictive capability of the code in terms of addressing reactor material melt spreading tests. Aside from improvements and upgrades, a method was developed to fit the model to the various melt spreading tests in a manner that allowed uncertainties in the model predictions to be statistically characterized. With these results, a sensitivity study was performed to investigate the assumption of uniform spreading in the EPR core

  13. Gas-cell measurements for evaluating longwave-infrared passive-sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Alan S.; Combs, Roger J.; Thomas, Mark J.; Curry, Timothy; Kroutil, Robert T.

    2006-10-01

    A longwave-infrared (LWIR) passive-spectrometer performance was evaluated with a short-pathlength gas cell. This cell was accurately positioned between the sensor and a NIST-traceable blackbody radiance source. Cell contents were varied over the Beer's Law absorbance range from the limit of detection to saturation for the gas analytes of sulfur hexafluoride and hexafluoroethane. The spectral impact of saturation on infrared absorbance was demonstrated for the passive sensor configuration. The gas-cell contents for all concentration-pathlength products was monitored with an active traditional-laboratory Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and was verified by comparison with the established PNNL/DOE vapor-phase infrared (IR) spectral database. For the passive FTIR measurements, the blackbody source employed a range of background temperatures from 5 °C to 50 °C. The passive measurements without the presence of a gas cell permitted a determination of the noise equivalent spectral noise (NESR) for each set of passive gas-cell measurements. In addition, the no-cell condition allowed the evaluation of the effect of gas cell window materials of low density poly(ethylene), potassium chloride, potassium bromide, and zinc selenide. The components of gas cell, different window materials, temperature differentials, and absorbances of target-analyte gases supplied the means of evaluating the LWIR performance of a passive FTIR spectrometer. The various LWIR-passive measurements were found to simulate those often encountered in open-air scenarios important to both industrial and environmental monitoring applications.

  14. Integrating cavity based gas cells: a multibeam compensation scheme for pathlength variation.

    PubMed

    Bergin, S; Hodgkinson, J; Francis, D; Tatam, R P

    2016-06-13

    We present a four beam ratiometric setup for an integrating sphere based gas cell, which can correct for changes in pathlength due to sphere wall contamination. This allows for the gas absorption coefficient to be determined continuously without needing to recalibrate the setup. We demonstrate the technique experimentally, measuring methane gas at 1651nm. For example, contamination covering 1.2% of the sphere wall resulted in an uncompensated error in gas absorption coefficient of ≈41%. With the ratiometric scheme, this error was reduced to ≈2%. Potential limitations of the technique, due to subsequent deviations from mathematical assumptions are discussed, including severe sphere window contamination. PMID:27410380

  15. Cigarette Smoke Analysis Using an Inexpensive Gas-Phase IR Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garizi, N.; Macias, A.; Furch, Toran; Fan, R.; Wagenknecht, Paul S.; Singmaster, K. A.

    2001-12-01

    An inexpensive, break-resistant IR gas cell has been constructed using a PVC compression tee. The cell allows for multiple experiments to be performed in freshman chemistry and advanced lab courses. The PVC cell can be assembled by the students and then dismantled and cleaned after their experiments are completed. This cell has been successfully used to analyze some of the components of cigarette smoke and car exhaust.

  16. Miniature galvanic cell construction providing gas channels between electrode compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Urry, L. F.

    1985-03-26

    An improved miniature galvanic cell construction having a sealing gasket with channels defined through the base of the gasket. The channels provide means for the exchange of gaseous products around the cell separator and between the electrode compartments so as to reduce the overall internal pressure of the cell.

  17. In-ground operation of Geothermic Fuel Cells for unconventional oil and gas recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Neal; Anyenya, Gladys; Haun, Buddy; Daubenspeck, Mark; Bonadies, Joseph; Kerr, Rick; Fischer, Bernhard; Wright, Adam; Jones, Gerald; Li, Robert; Wall, Mark; Forbes, Alan; Savage, Marshall

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents operating and performance characteristics of a nine-stack solid-oxide fuel cell combined-heat-and-power system. Integrated with a natural-gas fuel processor, air compressor, reactant-gas preheater, and diagnostics and control equipment, the system is designed for use in unconventional oil-and-gas processing. Termed a "Geothermic Fuel Cell" (GFC), the heat liberated by the fuel cell during electricity generation is harnessed to process oil shale into high-quality crude oil and natural gas. The 1.5-kWe SOFC stacks are packaged within three-stack GFC modules. Three GFC modules are mechanically and electrically coupled to a reactant-gas preheater and installed within the earth. During operation, significant heat is conducted from the Geothermic Fuel Cell to the surrounding geology. The complete system was continuously operated on hydrogen and natural-gas fuels for ∼600 h. A quasi-steady operating point was established to favor heat generation (29.1 kWth) over electricity production (4.4 kWe). Thermodynamic analysis reveals a combined-heat-and-power efficiency of 55% at this condition. Heat flux to the geology averaged 3.2 kW m-1 across the 9-m length of the Geothermic Fuel Cell-preheater assembly. System performance is reviewed; some suggestions for improvement are proposed.

  18. Extraction efficiency and extraction time of the SHIPTRAP gas-filled stopping cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, S. A.; Block, M.; Chaudhuri, A.; Di, Z.; Habs, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Neumayr, J. B.; Plaß, W. R.; Rauth, C.; Thirolf, P. G.; Vorobjev, G.; Wang, Z.

    2007-05-01

    The extraction efficiency and extraction time of the SHIPTRAP gas-filled stopping cell were measured and chemical processes occurring during extraction of the stopped ions were investigated. The measurements were performed using 219Rn recoil ions from the α-decay of a calibrated point-like 223Ra ion source. The extraction time was measured to be shorter than 10 ms at a helium gas pressure in the gas cell of 40 mbar. Thus, nuclides with half-lives on the order of a few milliseconds are accessible for the various precision experiments planned at SHIPTRAP. Extraction efficiencies of up to 30% were obtained at a helium pressure of 50 mbar. The estimated total efficiency of the gas cell, derived from the product of calculated stopping and measured extraction efficiency, amounts to about 10%. Factors limiting the efficiency are quantitatively understood. Under standard operating conditions, ion-molecule reactions in the gas cell do not seem to limit the efficiency of the gas cell significantly.

  19. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  20. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  1. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.

    1991-12-31

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  2. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 for designing a scale-down test facility for design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.; Revankar, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 is described, and the scaling criteria for reproducing the same steady state thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as a prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility are derived in terms of the down-comer pipe diameter and orifice resistance. (authors)

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

  4. Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Missions for LEO Small Debris and for GEO Large Object Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Most LEO debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with specific useful orbits. Objects in such narrow inclination bands have all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a low-orbiting base can serve as a "mother ship" that can tend and then send small, disposable common individual catcher/deboost devices--one for each debris object--as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as each higher object. The dV necessary to catch highly-eccentric orbit debris in the center of the band alternatively allows the capture of less-eccentric debris in a wider inclination range around the center. It is demonstrated that most LEO hazardous debris can be removed from orbit in three years, using a single LEO launch of one mother ship--with its onboard magazine of freeflying low-tech catchers--into each of ten identified bands, with second or potentially third launches into only the three highest-inclination bands. The nearly 1000 objects near the geostationary orbit present special challenges in mass, maneuverability, and ultimate disposal options, leading to a dramatically different architecture and technology suite than the LEO solution. It is shown that the entire population of near-GEO derelict objects can be gathered and tethered together within a 3 year period for future scrap-yard operations using achievable technologies and only two earth launches.

  5. Probabilistic Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Hybrid Gas Turbine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of fuel cell systems and hybrid fuel cell systems requires the evolution of analysis strategies for evaluating thermodynamic performance. A gas turbine thermodynamic cycle integrated with a fuel cell was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of the several uncertainties in the thermodynamic performance parameters. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for the overall thermal efficiency and net specific power output due to the uncertainties in the thermodynamic random variables. These results can be used to quickly identify the most critical design variables in order to optimize the design and make it cost effective. The analysis leads to the selection of criteria for gas turbine performance.

  6. Gas6 induces cancer cell migration and epithelial–mesenchymal transition through upregulation of MAPK and Slug

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Mira; Kim, Semi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cancer cell migration. •Gas6 treatment and subsequent Axl activation induce cell migration and EMT via upregulation of Slug. •Slug expression mediated by Gas6 is mainly through c-Jun and ATF-2 in an ERK1/2 and JNK-dependent manner. •The Gas6/Axl-Slug axis may be exploited as a target for anti-cancer metastasis therapy. -- Abstract: Binding of Gas6 to Axl (Gas6/Axl axis) alters cellular functions, including migration, invasion, proliferation, and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cell migration remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that Gas6 induced the activation of JNK and ERK1/2 signaling in cancer cells expressing Axl, resulting in the phosphorylation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors c-Jun and ATF-2, and induction of Slug. Depletion of c-Jun or ATF-2 by siRNA attenuated the Gas6-induced expression of Slug. Slug expression was required for cell migration and E-cadherin reduction/vimentin induction induced by Gas6. These results suggest that Gas6 induced cell migration via Slug upregulation in JNK- and ERK1/2-dependent mechanisms. These data provide an important insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating Gas6-induced cell migration.

  7. Observations from using models to fit the gas production of varying volume test cells and landfills.

    PubMed

    Lamborn, Julia

    2012-12-01

    Landfill operators are looking for more accurate models to predict waste degradation and landfill gas production. The simple microbial growth and decay models, whilst being easy to use, have been shown to be inaccurate. Many of the newer and more complex (component) models are highly parameter hungry and many of the required parameters have not been collected or measured at full-scale landfills. This paper compares the results of using different models (LANDGEM, HBM, and two Monod models developed by the author) to fit the gas production of laboratory scale, field test cell and full-scale landfills and discusses some observations that can be made regarding the scalability of gas generation rates. The comparison of these results show that the fast degradation rate that occurs at laboratory scale is not replicated at field-test cell and full-scale landfills. At small scale, all the models predict a slower rate of gas generation than actually occurs. At field test cell and full-scale a number of models predict a faster gas generation than actually occurs. Areas for future work have been identified, which include investigations into the capture efficiency of gas extraction systems and into the parameter sensitivity and identification of the critical parameters for field-test cell and full-scale landfill predication.

  8. Conceptional design of a novel next-generation cryogenic stopping cell for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Geissel, H.; Heiße, F.; Miskun, I.; Purushothman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2016-06-01

    The conceptual design of a next-generation cryogenic stopping cell (CSC) for the Low-Energy Branch (LEB) of the Super-FRS has been developed. It builds on advanced techniques implemented in the prototype version of the CSC, which has recently been commissioned as part of the FRS Ion Catcher with 238U projectile and fission fragments produced at 1000 MeV/u. These techniques include cryogenic operation to ensure a high purity of the stopping gas and high-density operation enabled using an RF carpet with a small electrode structure size. The next generation CSC implements several novel concepts (e.g. perpendicular extraction) which lead to enhanced performance compared to the prototype CSC: (i) extremely short extraction times, (ii) higher rate capability, (iii) increased areal density without deteriorating extraction times, efficiencies or rate capability, (iv) minimized RF power, (v) precise range measurement of the ions and (vii) improved cleanliness of the CSC.

  9. Versatile in situ powder X-ray diffraction cells for solid–gas investigations

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Torben R.; Nielsen, Thomas K.; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik; Cerenius, Yngve; Gray, Evan MacA.; Webb, Colin J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new sample cells and techniques for in situ powder X-ray diffraction specifically designed for gas absorption studies up to ca 300 bar (1 bar = 100 000 Pa) gas pressure. The cells are for multipurpose use, in particular the study of solid–gas reactions in dosing or flow mode, but can also handle samples involved in solid–liquid–gas studies. The sample can be loaded into a single-crystal sapphire (Al2O3) capillary, or a quartz (SiO2) capillary closed at one end. The advantages of a sapphire single-crystal cell with regard to rapid pressure cycling are discussed, and burst pressures are calculated and measured to be ∼300 bar. An alternative and simpler cell based on a thin-walled silicate or quartz glass capillary, connected to a gas source via a VCR fitting, enables studies up to ∼100 bar. Advantages of the two cell types are compared and their applications are illustrated by case studies. PMID:22477780

  10. Life-cycle assessment of diesel, natural gas and hydrogen fuel cell bus transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Jamie; Pryor, Trevor

    The Sustainable Transport Energy Programme (STEP) is an initiative of the Government of Western Australia, to explore hydrogen fuel cell technology as an alternative to the existing diesel and natural gas public transit infrastructure in Perth. This project includes three buses manufactured by DaimlerChrysler with Ballard fuel cell power sources operating in regular service alongside the existing natural gas and diesel bus fleets. The life-cycle assessment (LCA) of the fuel cell bus trial in Perth determines the overall environmental footprint and energy demand by studying all phases of the complete transportation system, including the hydrogen infrastructure, bus manufacturing, operation, and end-of-life disposal. The LCAs of the existing diesel and natural gas transportation systems are developed in parallel. The findings show that the trial is competitive with the diesel and natural gas bus systems in terms of global warming potential and eutrophication. Emissions that contribute to acidification and photochemical ozone are greater for the fuel cell buses. Scenario analysis quantifies the improvements that can be expected in future generations of fuel cell vehicles and shows that a reduction of greater than 50% is achievable in the greenhouse gas, photochemical ozone creation and primary energy demand impact categories.

  11. Digital recordings of gas-vesicle collapse used to measure turgor pressure and cell-water relations of cyanobacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Holland, Daryl P; Walsby, Anthony E

    2009-05-01

    The gas vesicles of the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. collapse under pressures ranging from 0.65-1.10 MPa, determined from turbidity changes in a pressure nephelometer. In turgid cells, collapse occurs at a lower range of pressures; the difference is equal to the cell turgor pressure. The turgor pressure decreases, however, as gas vesicles collapse; this decrease is minimised by calculating the turgor pressure in samples with few of their gas vesicles collapsed. Previously, pressure and turbidity were measured in discrete steps, using analogue meters, or continuously, using chart recorders: turgor pressure was calculated from the mean or median collapse pressures. We describe modifications allowing continuous digital recording; the output was modelled with polynomial or sigmoid functions, the latter providing the best fit over the full collapse-pressure curve; turgor pressure could then be calculated for any point on the collapse-pressure curve. The shape of the collapse-pressure curve was affected by the rate of pressure rise; curves were similar to those from step-wise methods when the pressure was raised at approximately 4 kPa s(-1). Under a rapid, almost instantaneous, rise in pressure there was a larger initial decrease in turgor and from the subsequent recovery the hydraulic conductivity of the cell surface could be calculated; the new method gave improved measurements of the cell volumetric elastic modulus. Following collapse of half the gas vesicles, cells recovered their full turgor pressure after 3 h. This suggests turgor homeostasis. These methods are applicable to other bacteria with gas vesicles, including Escherichia coli, if it could be genetically modified to express transgenic gas vesicles.

  12. Recent developments and applications with gas cell correlation spectrometer. [IR sensing of air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, A. R.; Davies, J. H.; Floyd, G.

    1978-01-01

    Gaspec, a gas filter correlation spectrometer, is described. Gaspec is a dual-gas three-channel instrument using two detectors which receive amplitude-shared source signals modulated at the frequency of the chopper. Several units for operation around the 3-5 micron and the 8-15 micron region have been constructed, and gases such as CO2, CO, CH4, HCl, NO, and hydrazines can be detected. Advantages of Gaspec are considered with reference to improvements developed for the basic Cospec (gas cell correlation spectrometer) instrument.

  13. A pressure cell for nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of gas phases

    SciTech Connect

    Minzer, M.; Bradley, J. A.; Musgrave, R.; Seidler, G. T.; Skilton, A.

    2008-08-15

    We report the design and performance of a gas-phase sample cell for measurements of momentum transfer (q) dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS). NRIXS measurements from He gas at 2 MPa (20 bars) readily demonstrate dipole-allowed and dipole-forbidden final states for two-electron excitations. Direct comparison of gas-phase NRIXS measurements with the corresponding nonresonant electron energy loss spectroscopy results (EELS) will be a valuable method for characterizing systematic errors in either technique for studies that require absolute normalization of the double differential cross section.

  14. CO2 permeability of cell membranes is regulated by membrane cholesterol and protein gas channels.

    PubMed

    Itel, Fabian; Al-Samir, Samer; Öberg, Fredrik; Chami, Mohamed; Kumar, Manish; Supuran, Claudiu T; Deen, Peter M T; Meier, Wolfgang; Hedfalk, Kristina; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations that some membrane proteins act as gas channels seem surprising in view of the classical concept that membranes generally are highly permeable to gases. Here, we study the gas permeability of membranes for the case of CO(2), using a previously established mass spectrometric technique. We first show that biological membranes lacking protein gas channels but containing normal amounts of cholesterol (30-50 mol% of total lipid), e.g., MDCK and tsA201 cells, in fact possess an unexpectedly low CO(2) permeability (P(CO2)) of ∼0.01 cm/s, which is 2 orders of magnitude lower than the P(CO2) of pure planar phospholipid bilayers (∼1 cm/s). Phospholipid vesicles enriched with similar amounts of cholesterol also exhibit P(CO2) ≈ 0.01 cm/s, identifying cholesterol as the major determinant of membrane P(CO2). This is confirmed by the demonstration that MDCK cells depleted of or enriched with membrane cholesterol show dramatic increases or decreases in P(CO2), respectively. We demonstrate, furthermore, that reconstitution of human AQP-1 into cholesterol-containing vesicles, as well as expression of human AQP-1 in MDCK cells, leads to drastic increases in P(CO2), indicating that gas channels are of high functional significance for gas transfer across membranes of low intrinsic gas permeability.

  15. Fabrication of uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds using a gas-in-liquid templating technique.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takayuki; Aokawa, Ryuta; Shigemitsu, Takamasa; Kawakami, Koei; Yoshida, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Design of porous scaffolds in tissue engineering field was challenging. Uniform immobilization of cells in the scaffolds with high porosity was essential for homogeneous tissue formation. The present study was aimed at fabricating uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds with porosity >74% using the gas-in-liquid foam templating technique. To this end, we used gelatin, microbial transglutaminase and argon gas as a scaffold material, cross-linker of the protein and porogen of scaffold, respectively. We confirmed that a porosity of >74% could be achieved by increasing the gas volume delivered to a gelatin solution. Pore size in the scaffold could be controlled by stirring speed, stirring time and the pore size of the filter through which the gas passed. The foaming technique enabled us to uniformly immobilize a human hepatoblastoma cell line in scaffold. Engraftment efficiency of the cell line entrapped within the scaffold in nude mice was higher than that of cells in free-form. These results showed that the uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds were promising for tissue engineering.

  16. Multi-pass gas cell designed for VOCs analysis by infrared spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junbo; Wang, Xin; Wei, Haoyun

    2015-10-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted from chemical, petrochemical, and other industries are the most common air pollutants leading to various environmental hazards. Regulations to control the VOCs emissions have been more and more important in China, which requires specific VOCs measurement systems to take measures. Multi-components analysis system, with an infrared spectrometer, a gas handling module and a multi-pass gas cell, is one of the most effective air pollution monitoring facilities. In the VOCs analysis system, the optical multi-pass cell is required to heat to higher than 150 degree Celsius to prevent the condensation of the component gas. Besides that, the gas cell needs to be designed to have an optical path length that matches the detection sensitivity requirement with a compact geometry. In this article, a multi-pass White cell was designed for the high temperature absorption measurements in a specified geometry requirement. The Aberration theory is used to establish the model to accurately calculate the astigmatism for the reflector system. In consideration of getting the optimum output energy, the dimensions of cell geometry, object mirrors and field mirror are optimized by the ray-tracing visible simulation. Then finite element analysis was used to calculate the thermal analysis for the structure of the external and internal elements for high stability. According to the simulation, the cell designed in this paper has an optical path length of 10 meters with an internal volume of 3 liters, and has good stability between room temperature to 227 degree Celsius.

  17. A NEW GAS CELL FOR HIGH-PRECISION DOPPLER MEASUREMENTS IN THE NEAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivielso, L.; Maukonen, D.; Peale, R. E.

    2010-06-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy in the near-infrared could become the leading method for discovering extra-solar planets around very low mass stars and brown dwarfs. In order to help to achieve an accuracy of {approx}m s{sup -1}, we are developing a gas cell which consists of a mixture of gases whose absorption spectral lines span all over the near-infrared region. We present the most promising mixture, made of acetylene, nitrous oxide, ammonia, chloromethanes, and hydrocarbons. The mixture is contained in a small size 13 cm long gas cell and covers most of the H and K bands. It also shows small absorptions in the J band, but they are few and not sharp enough for near-infrared wavelength calibration. We describe the working method and experiments, and compare our results with the state of the art for near-infrared gas cells.

  18. Gas detection with microelectromechanical Fabry-Perot interferometer technology in cell phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannila, Rami; Hyypiö, Risto; Korkalainen, Marko; Blomberg, Martti; Kattelus, Hannu; Rissanen, Anna

    2015-06-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a miniaturized optical sensor for gas detection in a cell phone. The sensor is based on a microelectromechanical (MEMS) Fabry-Perot interferometer, which is a structure with two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap. The MEMS FPI is a monolithic device, i.e. it is made entirely on one substrate in a batch process, without assembling separate pieces together. The gap is adjusted by moving the upper mirror with electrostatic force, so there are no actual moving parts. VTT has designed and manufactured a MEMS FPI based carbon dioxide sensor demonstrator which is integrated to a cell phone shield cover. The demonstrator contains light source, gas cell, MEMS FPI, detector, control electronics and two coin cell batteries as a power source. It is connected to the cell phone by Bluetooth. By adjusting the wavelength range and customizing the MEMS FPI structure, it is possible to selectively sense multiple gases.

  19. Water removal characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells using a dry gas purging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Uk; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyun; Oh, In-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ae; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Ko, Jaejun; Lim, Tae-Won; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lim, Tae-Hoon

    Water removal from proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is of great importance to improve start-up ability and mitigate cell degradation when the fuel cell operates at subfreezing temperatures. In this study, we report water removal characteristics under various shut down conditions including a dry gas-purging step. In order to estimate the dehydration level of the electrolyte membrane, the high frequency resistance of the fuel cell stack was observed. Also, a novel method for measuring the amount of residual water in the fuel cell was developed to determine the amount of water removal. The method used the phase change of liquid water and was successfully applied to examine the water removal characteristics. Based on these works, the effects of several parameters such as purging time, flow rate of purging gas, operation current, and stack temperature on the amount of residual water were investigated.

  20. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System Gas Dryer/Humidifier Analytical Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian

    2004-01-01

    A lightweight Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC) Energy Storage System concept is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System (URFCS) is unique in that it uses Regenerative Gas Dryers/Humidifiers (RGD/H) that are mounted on the surface of the gas storage tanks that act as the radiators for thermal control of the Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System (URFCS). As the gas storage tanks cool down during URFCS charging the RGD/H dry the hydrogen and oxygen gases produced by electrolysis. As the gas storage tanks heat up during URFCS discharging, the RGD/H humidify the hydrogen and oxygen gases used by the fuel cell. An analytical model was developed to simulate the URFCS RGD/H. The model is in the form of a Microsoft (registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation) Excel worksheet that allows the investigation of the RGD/H performance. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modeling of the RGD/H and the gas storage tank wall was also done to analyze spatial temperature distribution within the RGD/H and the localized tank wall. Test results obtained from the testing of the RGD/H in a thermal vacuum environment were used to corroborate the analyses.

  1. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin; Ya-Tang Cheng

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  2. WT1 targets Gas1 to maintain nephron progenitor cells by modulating FGF signals.

    PubMed

    Kann, Martin; Bae, Eunnyung; Lenz, Maximilian O; Li, Liangji; Trannguyen, BaoTran; Schumacher, Valerie A; Taglienti, Mary E; Bordeianou, Liliana; Hartwig, Sunny; Rinschen, Markus M; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Fan, Chen-Ming; Kreidberg, Jordan A

    2015-04-01

    Development of the metanephric kidney depends on tightly regulated interplay between self-renewal and differentiation of a nephron progenitor cell (NPC) pool. Several key factors required for the survival of NPCs have been identified, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling and the transcription factor Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 (WT1). Here, we present evidence that WT1 modulates FGF signaling by activating the expression of growth arrest-specific 1 (Gas1), a novel WT1 target gene and novel modulator of FGF signaling. We show that WT1 directly binds to a conserved DNA binding motif within the Gas1 promoter and activates Gas1 mRNA transcription in NPCs. We confirm that WT1 is required for Gas1 expression in kidneys in vivo. Loss of function of GAS1 in vivo results in hypoplastic kidneys with reduced nephron mass due to premature depletion of NPCs. Although kidney development in Gas1 knockout mice progresses normally until E15.5, NPCs show decreased rates of proliferation at this stage and are depleted as of E17.5. Lastly, we show that Gas1 is selectively required for FGF-stimulated AKT signaling in vitro. In summary, our data suggest a model in which WT1 modulates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling in NPCs by directing the expression of Gas1.

  3. Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching

    DOEpatents

    McElroy, James F.; Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation.

  4. Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching

    DOEpatents

    McElroy, J.F.; Chludzinski, P.J.; Dantowitz, P.

    1987-04-14

    This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation. 2 figs.

  5. Development of a gas cell-based laser ion source for RIKEN PALIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Tomita, H.; Sakamoto, C.; Takatsuka, T.; Noto, T.; Iimura, H.; Matsuo, Y.; Kubo, T.; Shinozuka, T.; Wakui, T.; Mita, H.; Naimi, S.; Furukawa, T.; Itou, Y.; Schury, P.; Miyatake, H.; Jeong, S.; Ishiyama, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Hirayama, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We developed a prototype laser ionization gas cell with a beam extraction system. This device is for use of PArasitic Laser Ion-Source (PALIS), which will be implemented into RIKEN's fragment separator, BigRIPS as a part of SLOWRI. Off-line resonant laser ionization for stable Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Ti, Nb, Sn, In and Pd inside the gas cell, ion extraction and transport to the high-vacuum region via SPIG and QMS have been confirmed (Sonoda et al, Nucl Instrum Meth B 295:1, 2013).

  6. Corneal endothelial cell damage associated with contact to gas bubbles during YAG laser application.

    PubMed

    Böhnke, M; Kellner, C; Winter, R

    1987-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cell damage was generated in freshly enucleated pig's eyes by multiple applications of YAG laser bursts in the anterior chamber focussed 2 mm behind the corneal endothelium. With 100 X 5 bursts at an energy of 5 mJ focussed 2 mm behind the endothelium, a considerable number of gas bubbles were generated at the site of optical breakdown in the aqueous humor. Variable areas of scattered endothelial cell damage or necrosis were observed. By selecting two different experimental settings, a possible harmful effect of the gas bubbles on the corneal endothelium could be demonstrated.

  7. Catalytically upgraded landfill gas as a cost-effective alternative for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, W.; Lohmann, H.; Gómez, J. I. Salazar

    The potential use of landfill gas as feeding fuel for the so-called molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) imposes the need for new upgrading technologies in order to meet the much tougher feed gas specifications of this type of fuel cells in comparison to gas engines. Nevertheless, MCFC has slightly lower purity demands than low temperature fuel cells. This paper outlines the idea of a new catalytic purification process for landfill gas conditioning, which may be supposed to be more competitive than state-of-the-art technologies and summarises some lab-scale results. This catalytic process transforms harmful landfill gas minor compounds into products that can be easily removed from the gas stream by a subsequent adsorption step. The optimal process temperature was found to be in the range 250-400 °C. After a catalyst screening, two materials were identified, which have the ability to remove all harmful minor compounds from landfill gas. The first material was a commercial alumina that showed a high activity towards the removal of organic silicon compounds. The alumina protects both a subsequent catalyst for the removal of other organic minor compounds and the fuel cell. Due to gradual deactivation caused by silica deposition, the activated alumina needs to be periodically replaced. The second material was a commercial V 2O 5/TiO 2-based catalyst that exhibited a high activity for the total oxidation of a broad spectrum of other harmful organic minor compounds into a simpler compound class "acid gases (HCl, HF and SO 2)", which can be easily removed by absorption with, e.g. alkalised alumina. The encouraging results obtained allow the scale-up of this LFG conditioning process to test it under real LFG conditions.

  8. Development of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for the utilization of coal mine gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, B.; Blum, L.; de Haart, L. G. J.; Dengel, A.

    Apart from natural gas there is another important natural source of methane. The so-called coal mine gas is a by-product of the geochemical process of the carbonization of sediments from marsh woods of the Earth's Carboniferous Period. Methane evaporates from the coal and has to be removed out of the active mines where it represents one of the main safety risks. Methane also evaporates in abandoned coal mines. In the federal state Saarland in Germany exists above ground a more than 110 km pipeline for the drained coal mine gas from 12 different sources. The content of methane varies between 25 and 90%, the oxygen content (from air) is in the range up to 10%. This wide range or variation, respectively, of fuel and oxygen content, causes a lot of problems for the use in conventional engines. Therefore the company Evonik New Energies GmbH is interested in using SOFC with coal mine gas as efficient as possible to produce electric power. For that purpose at Forschungszentrum Jülich the available SOFC technology was adapted to the use with coal mine gas and a test facility was designed to operate an SOFC stack (approximately 2 kW electrical power output) together with a pre-reformer. This paper presents the results of the coal mine gas analysis and the effect on the pre-reformer and the fuel cell. The composition of the coal mine gas was determined by means of micro-gas chromatography. The results obtained from preliminary tests using synthetic and real coal mine gas on the pre-reformer and on the fuel cell are discussed.

  9. Beta-cell Assembly for the Quad Gas Sampling Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Ripplinger, Michael D.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2008-05-05

    The beta-cells used in the beta-gamma detector have taken time to develop and to standardize the assembly of them. In making the assembly routine it is important to have step by step assembly instructions as well as a list of potential problems and their solutions. This document attempts to accomplish these goals.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold Flooding During Continuous Fuel Cell Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Majors, Paul D.; Wang, Li Q.; Rieke, Peter C.

    2006-10-27

    The methods, apparatus, and results are reported for in-situ, near real time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of MEA dehydration and gas manifold flooding in an operating PEM fuel cell. To acquire high-resolution, artifact-free images for visualizing water distribution, acquisition parameters for a standard, two-dimensional (2D), spin-echo sequence were first optimized for the measured magnetic field heterogeneity induced by fuel cell components. 2D images of water inside the fuel cell were then acquired every 128 seconds during 11.4 hours of continuous operation under constant load. Collected images revealed that MEA dehydration proceeded non-uniformly across its plane, starting from gas inlets and ending at gas outlets, and that upon completion of this dehydration process manifold flooding began. To understand these observations, acquired images were correlated to the current output and operating characteristics of the fuel cell. Results demonstrate the power of MRI for in-situ, near real-time imaging of water distribution and non-uniformity in operating PEM fuel cells, and highlight its utility for understanding PEM fuel cell operation, the causes of cell failure, and for developing new strategies of water management.

  11. Rate capability of a cryogenic stopping cell for uranium projectile fragments produced at 1000 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Dickel, T.; Haettner, E.; Heiße, F.; Plaß, W. R.; Purushothaman, S.; Amjad, F.; Ayet San Andrés, S.; Bergmann, J.; Blum, D.; Dendooven, P.; Diwisch, M.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Greiner, F.; Hornung, C.; Jesch, C.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Knöbel, R.; Lang, J.; Lippert, W.; Miskun, I.; Moore, I. D.; Nociforo, C.; Petrick, M.; Pietri, S.; Pfützner, M.; Pohjalainen, I.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.

    2016-06-01

    At the Low-Energy Branch (LEB) of the Super-FRS at FAIR, projectile and fission fragments will be produced at relativistic energies, separated in-flight, energy-bunched, slowed down and thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell (CSC) filled with ultra-pure He gas. The fragments are extracted from the stopping cell using a combination of DC and RF electric fields and gas flow. A prototype CSC for the LEB has been developed and successfully commissioned at the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI. Ionization of He buffer gas atoms during the stopping of energetic ions creates a region of high space charge in the stopping cell. The space charge decreases the extraction efficiency of stopping cells since the high amount of charge distorts the applied DC electric drag fields. Thus the understanding of space charge effects is of great importance to make full use of the high yields at future RIB facilities such as the Super-FRS at FAIR. For this purpose a detailed study of space charge effects in the CSC was performed using experiments and simulations. The dependence of the extraction efficiency, the extraction time and the temporal ion extraction profile on the intensity of the impinging beam and the electric field strength was studied for two different 238 U projectile fragments produced at 1000 MeV/u and separated with the FRS. Good agreement between experiments and simulations was found.

  12. In vitro surfactant mitigation of gas bubble contact-induced endothelial cell death

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Interactions of gas embolism bubbles with endothelial cells, as can occur during decompression events or other forms of intravascular gas entry, are poorly characterized. Endothelial cells respond to microbubble contact via mechanotransduction responses that can lead to cell death or aberrant cellular function. Cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells were individually contacted with microbubbles. Cells were loaded with fluorescent dyes indicating calcium- and nitric oxide signaling and cell viability. A surfactant, Pluronic F-127, and/or albumin were added to the culture media. Control experiments utilized calcium-free media as well as probe-poking in place of microbubble contact. We acquired fluorescence microscopy time-lapse images of cell responses to bubble and probe contact and determined contact effects on cell signaling and cell death. Calcium influx was essential for cell death to occur with bubble contact. Bubble contact stimulated extracellular calcium entry without altering nitric oxide levels unless cell death was provoked. Cell responses were independent of bubble contact duration lasting either one or 30 seconds. Microbubble contact provoked cell death over 7 times more frequently than micropipette poking. Albumin and the surfactant each attenuated the calcium response to bubble contact and also reduced the lethality of microbubble contact by 67.4% and 76.0%, respectively, when used alone, and by 91.2% when used together. This suggests that surface interactions between the bubble or probe interface and plasma- and cell surface-borne macromolecules differentially modulate the mechanism of calcium trafficking such that microbubble contact more substantially induces cell death or aberrant cellular function. The surfactant findings provide a cytoprotective approach to mitigate this form of mechanical injury. PMID:21384761

  13. Optimisation of photoacoustic resonant cells with commercial microphones for diode laser gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitanov, V. A.; Zeninari, V.; Parvitte, B.; Courtois, D.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.

    2002-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of the differential Helmholtz resonant (DHR) cell sensitivity under variation of the total gas pressure is made for various commercial microphones. Near-infrared lasers (room-temperature diode lasers) were used to measure the response of DHR cell versus pressure of the absorbing gas and frequency of the laser radiation modulation. Several molecular absorbers like H 2O, CH 4, mixed with molecular buffer gases were used to investigate the behavior of the photoacoustic (PA) signal characteristics with a DHR cell. The experimental data are compared with the results of computer simulation. The minimal detectable concentrations of gases were determined for the DHR cell for each commercial microphone.

  14. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System Gas Storage-Radiator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupta, Ian

    2005-01-01

    High-energy-density regenerative fuel cell systems that are used for energy storage require novel approaches to integrating components in order to preserve mass and volume. A lightweight unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) energy storage system concept is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This URFC system minimizes mass by using the surface area of the hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks as radiating heat surfaces for overall thermal control of the system. The waste heat generated by the URFC stack during charging and discharging is transferred from the cell stack to the surface of each tank by loop heat pipes, which are coiled around each tank and covered with a thin layer of thermally conductive carbon composite. The thin layer of carbon composite acts as a fin structure that spreads the heat away from the heat pipe and across the entire tank surface. Two different-sized commercial-grade composite tanks were constructed with integral heat pipes and tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to examine the feasibility of using the storage tanks as system radiators. The storage tank-radiators were subjected to different steady-state heat loads and varying heat load profiles. The surface emissivity and specific heat capacity of each tank were calculated. In the future, the results will be incorporated into a model that simulates the performance of similar radiators using lightweight, spacerated carbon composite tanks.

  15. Prevention of the water flooding by micronizing the pore structure of gas diffusion layer for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramitsu, Yusuke; Sato, Hitoshi; Hori, Michio

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells, high humidity must be established to maintain high proton conductivity in the polymer electrolyte. However, the water that is produced electrochemically at the cathode catalyst layer can condense in the cell and cause an obstruction to the diffusion of reaction gas in the gas diffusion layer and the gas channel. This leads to a sudden decrease of the cell voltage. To combat this, strict water management techniques are required, which usually focus on the gas diffusion layer. In this study, the use of specially treated carbon paper as a flood-proof gas diffusion layer under extremely high humidity conditions was investigated experimentally. The results indicated that flooding originates at the interface between the gas diffusion layer and the catalyst layer, and that such flooding could be eliminated by control of the pore size in the gas diffusion layer at this interface.

  16. Microbial electrolysis cells for high yield hydrogen gas production from organic matter.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce E; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W; Rozendal, René A

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (> 0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment.

  17. Gas6-mediated survival in NIH3T3 cells activates stress signalling cascade and is independent of Ras.

    PubMed

    Goruppi, S; Ruaro, E; Varnum, B; Schneider, C

    1999-07-22

    Gas6 is a growth factor membrane of the vitamin K-dependent family of proteins which is preferentially expressed in quiescent cells. Gas6 was identified as the ligand for Axl tyrosine kinase receptor family. Consistent with this, Gas6 was previously reported to induce cell cycle re-entry of serum-starved NIH3T3 cells and to prevent cell death after complete growth factor withdrawal, the survival effect being uncoupled from Gas6-induced mitogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that both Gas6 mitogenic and survival effects are mediated by Src and the phosphatidylinositol3-OH kinase (PI3K). Here we report that Ras is required for Gas6 mitogenesis but is dispensable for its survival effect. Gas6-induced survival requires the activity of the small GTPases of the Rho family, Rac and Rho, together with the downstream kinase Pak. Overexpression of the respective dominant negative constructs abrogates Gas6-mediated survival functions. Addition of Gas6 to serum starved cells results in the activation of AKT/PKB and in the phosphorylation of the Bcl-2 family member, Bad. By ectopic expression of a catalytically inactive form of AKT/PKB, we demonstrate that AKT/PKB is necessary for Gas6-mediated survival functions. We further show evidence that Gas6 stimulation of serum starved NIH3T3 cells results in a transient ERK, JNK/SAPK and p38 MAPK activation. Blocking ERK activation did not influence Gas6-induced survival, suggesting that such pathway is not involved in Gas6 protection from cell death. On the contrary we found that the late constitutive increase of p38 MAPK activity associated with cell death was downregulated in Gas6-treated NIH3T3 cells thus suggesting that Gas6 might promote survival by interfering with this pathway. Taken together the evidence here provided identity elements involved in Gas6 signalling more specifically elucidating the pathway responsible for Gas6-induced cell survival under conditions that do not allow cell proliferation.

  18. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus Shale gas drilling flow back water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max; Zelikoff, Judith

    2015-10-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation are known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these wastewaters, flow back waters from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found to be elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependent. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining.

  19. Gas cells for 3He hyperpolarized via spin-exchange optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Tan, J. A.; Woo, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a device for the production of hyperpolarized 3He, which is widely used in spinrelated nuclear physics research. Spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) is employed to polarize 3He enclosed in a circular borosilicate glass cell suitable not only for the production of polarized gas but also for its storage. The portable glass cell can, thus, be transported to any other research facility. The glass cell can be refilled several times. Special attention is given to the preparation and the filling of the cell to minimize the impurities on its walls and in the gas. We employ glass tubes with shorter lengths and larger diameters in the gas-filling system to achieve the improvement in the air flow necessary to obtain purer polarized 3He samples. The cell is prepared, and after it has been filled with rubidium (Rb) and 3He-N2 mixture, it is sealed under high vacuum conditions. The cell containing the mixture is exposed to circularly-polarized laser light with a wavelength of 795 nm at temperatures of 180 - 220 °C for SEOP. The polarization of 3He is measured via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We obtained 40% polarized 3He in less than 15 hours and 50% in about 25 hours. The longitudinal relaxation time T 1 of the polarized 3He we measured was about 58 hours.

  20. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus Shale gas drilling flow back water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max; Zelikoff, Judith

    2015-10-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation are known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these wastewaters, flow back waters from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found to be elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependent. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining. PMID:26210350

  1. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus shale gas drilling flow back water

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S.; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation is known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these waste waters, flow back water from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy / energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6 weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependant. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show a better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining. PMID:26210350

  2. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT THE GROTON, CT, LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the results from a seminal assessment conducted on a fuel cell technology which generates electrical power from waste landfill gas. This assessment/ demonstration was the second such project conducted by the EPA, the first being conducted at the Penrose Power...

  3. FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS: CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conceptual design of a fuel cell (FC) system for operation on anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is described and its economic and environmental feasibility is projected. ADG is produced at water treatment plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids....

  4. Hematopoietic progenitor cells grow on 3T3 fibroblast monolayers that overexpress growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6).

    PubMed

    Dormady, S P; Zhang, X M; Basch, R S

    2000-10-24

    Pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells grow in close association with bone marrow stromal cells, which play a critical role in sustaining hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures. The mechanisms through which stromal cells act to support pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells are largely unknown. This study demonstrates that growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6) plays an important role in this process. GAS6 is a ligand for the Axl (Ufo/Ark), Sky (Dtk/Tyro3/Rse/Brt/Tif), and Mer (Eyk) family of tyrosine kinase receptors and binds to these receptors via tandem G domains at its C terminus. After translation, GAS6 moves to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is extensively gamma-carboxylated. The carboxylation process is vitamin K dependent, and current evidence suggests that GAS6 must be gamma-carboxylated to bind and activate any of the cognate tyrosine kinase receptors. Here, we show that expression of GAS6 is highly correlated with the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells to support hematopoiesis in culture. Nonsupportive stromal cell lines express little to no GAS6, whereas supportive cell lines express high levels of GAS6. Transfection of the cDNA encoding GAS6 into 3T3 fibroblasts is sufficient to render this previously nonsupportive cell line capable of supporting long-term hematopoietic cultures. 3T3 cells, genetically engineered to stably express GAS6 (GAS6-3T3), produce a stromal layer that supports the generation of colony-forming units in culture (CFU-c) for up to 6 wk. Hematopoietic support by genetically engineered 3T3 is not vitamin K dependent, and soluble recombinant GAS6 does not substitute for coculturing the hematopoietic progenitors with genetically modified 3T3 cells. PMID:11050245

  5. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  6. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System Gas Storage/Radiator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakupca, Ian; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    The ancillary components for Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC) Energy Storage System are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This URFC system is unique in that it uses the surface area of the hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks as radiating heat surfaces for overall thermal control of the system. The waste heat generated by the URFC stack during charging and discharging is transferred from the cell stack to the surface of each tank by loop heat pipes. The heat pipes are coiled around each tank and covered with a thin layer of thermally conductive layer of carbon composite. The thin layer of carbon composite acts as a fin structure that spreads the heat away from the heat pipe and across the entire tank surface. Two different sized commercial grade composite tanks were constructed with integral heat pipes and tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to examine the feasibility of using the storage tanks as system radiators. The storage radiators were subjected to different steady-state heat loads and varying heat load profiles. The surface emissivity and specific heat capacity of each tank were calculated. The results were incorporated into a model that simulates the performance of similar radiators using lightweight, space rated carbon composite tanks.

  7. High harmonic generation in a semi-infinite gas cell.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Julia; Christensen, E; Powers, N; Rhynard, S; Painter, J; Peatross, J

    2004-09-20

    Ten-millijoule 35-femtosecond laser pulses interact with a cell of helium or neon that extends from a focusing lens to an exit foil near the laser focus. High harmonic orders in the range of 50 to 100 are investigated as a function of focal position relative to the exit foil. An aperture placed in front of the focusing lens increases the brightness of observed harmonics by more than an order of magnitude. Counter-propagating light is used to directly probe where the high harmonics are generated within the laser focus. In neon, the harmonics are generated in the last few millimeters before the exit foil, limited by absorption. In helium, the harmonics are produced over a much longer distance. PMID:19483992

  8. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  9. Fabrication of glass gas cells for the HALOE and MAPS satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, E. M.; Walthall, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and the Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) experiment are satellite-borne experiments which measure trace constituents in the Earth's atmosphere. The instruments which obtain the data for these experiments are based on the gas filter correlation radiometer measurement technique. In this technique, small samples of the gases of interest are encapsulated in glass cylinders, called gas cells, which act as very selective optical filters. This report describes the techniques employed in the fabrication of the gas cells for the HALOE and MAPS instruments. Details of the method used to fuse the sapphire windows (required for IR transmission) to the glass cell bodies are presented along with detailed descriptions of the jigs and fixtures used during the assembly process. The techniques and equipment used for window inspection and for pairing the HALOE windows are discussed. Cell body materials and the steps involved in preparing the cell bodies for the glass-to-sapphire fusion process are given.

  10. Differentiations of 5-HT and GAS cells in the digestive canals of Rana chensinensis tadpoles

    PubMed Central

    LI, Xin-Yi; LI, Qian; ZHANG, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, 5-nydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gastrin (GAS) cells in the digestive canals of Rana chensinensis tadpoles at different developmental stages were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that the 5-HT cells were only detected in the duodenum before metamorphosis began, and were extensively distributed in the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and rectum thereafter, with the highest counts found in the duodenum and rectum when metamorphosis was completed. The GAS cells were only distributed in the stomach and duodenum, and only rarely detected in the duodenum before metamorphosis began, but increased in the stomach during metamorphosis and showed zonal distribution in the gastric mucosa when metamorphosis was completed. Metamorphosis is a critical period for amphibians, during which structural and functional physiological adaptations are required to transition from aquatic to terrestrial environments. During metamorphosis, the differentiations of 5-HT cells in the gastrointestinal canals of tadpoles could facilitate mucus secretion regulation, improve digestive canal lubrication, and help watershortage food digestion in terrestrial environments. Conversely, GAS cell differentiations during metamorphosis might contribute to the digestive and absorptive function transition from herbivore to omnivore. PMID:25017753

  11. Measuring Buffer-Gas Pressure in Sealed Glass Cells: An Assessment of the KSK Technique.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Travis; Huang, Michael; Camparo, James

    2016-07-01

    In alkali rf-discharge lamps used for optical pumping in atomic clocks and magnetometers, a buffer-gas (Kr or Xe) allows electrons to extract energy from an rf-field, and these energized electrons eventually produce alkali resonant light. Contrary to naïve intuition, rf-discharge lamps can lose their noble-gas buffer over time. Recently, we began a long-term experimental program to better understand the mechanism of noble-gas loss in rf-discharge lamps, and needed a nondestructive means of measuring buffer-gas pressure changes in sealed glass cells. For this purpose, we settled on the Kazantsev, Smirnova, and Khutorshchikov (KSK) technique, which is based on inferring buffer-gas pressure from the collision shift of an alkali ground-state hyperfine transition frequency νhfs. Here, we discuss the basic KSK technique and two modifications that we have implemented for its improvement: use of a diode laser for optical pumping, and extrapolation of νhfs to zero magnetic field. Testing our system's long-term performance with a very low pressure reference cell (i.e., 3.3 torr Xe), we find a reproducibility of 0.2% and an absolute accuracy of 5%. Further, our systematic drift is less than 1 mtorr/month. PMID:26529755

  12. Gas/liquid sensing via chemotaxis of Euglena cells confined in an isolated micro-aquarium.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Hara, Masahiko; Maeda, Mizuo

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate on-chip gas/liquid sensing by using the chemotaxis of live bacteria (Euglena gracilis) confined in an isolated micro-aquarium, and gas/liquid permeation through porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The sensing chip consisted of one closed micro-aquarium and two separated bypass microchannels along the perimeter of the micro-aquarium. Test gas/liquid and reference samples were introduced into the two individual microchannels separately, and the gas/liquid permeated through the PDMS walls and dissolved in the micro-aquarium water, resulting in a chemical concentration gradient in the micro-aquarium. By employing the closed micro-aquarium isolated from sample flows, we succeeded in measuring the chemotaxis of Euglena for a gas substance quantitatively, which cannot be achieved with the conventional flow-type or hydro-gel-type microfluidic devices. We found positive (negative) chemotaxis for CO2 concentrations below (above) 15%, with 64 ppm as the minimum concentration affecting the cells. We also observed chemotaxis for ethanol and H2O2. By supplying culture medium via the microchannels, the Euglena culture remained alive for more than 2 months. The sensing chip is thus useful for culturing cells and using them for environmental toxicity/nutrition studies by monitoring their motion.

  13. Measuring Buffer-Gas Pressure in Sealed Glass Cells: An Assessment of the KSK Technique.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Travis; Huang, Michael; Camparo, James

    2016-07-01

    In alkali rf-discharge lamps used for optical pumping in atomic clocks and magnetometers, a buffer-gas (Kr or Xe) allows electrons to extract energy from an rf-field, and these energized electrons eventually produce alkali resonant light. Contrary to naïve intuition, rf-discharge lamps can lose their noble-gas buffer over time. Recently, we began a long-term experimental program to better understand the mechanism of noble-gas loss in rf-discharge lamps, and needed a nondestructive means of measuring buffer-gas pressure changes in sealed glass cells. For this purpose, we settled on the Kazantsev, Smirnova, and Khutorshchikov (KSK) technique, which is based on inferring buffer-gas pressure from the collision shift of an alkali ground-state hyperfine transition frequency νhfs. Here, we discuss the basic KSK technique and two modifications that we have implemented for its improvement: use of a diode laser for optical pumping, and extrapolation of νhfs to zero magnetic field. Testing our system's long-term performance with a very low pressure reference cell (i.e., 3.3 torr Xe), we find a reproducibility of 0.2% and an absolute accuracy of 5%. Further, our systematic drift is less than 1 mtorr/month.

  14. Fuel cell operation on anaerobic digester gas: Conceptual design and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, R.J.; Thorneloe, S.A.; Trocciola, J.C.; Preston, J.L.

    1999-11-01

    The conceptual design of a fuel cell (FC) system for operation on anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is described and its economic and environmental feasibility is projected. ADG is produced at wastewater treatment plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids. The economic feasibility study shows the fuel cell is economical where plant electricity costs are 5 [cents]/kW h or higher, based on entry level fuel cell costs of $3,000/kW. FCs are one of the cleanest energy technologies available, and the widespread use of this concept should result in a significant reduction in global warming gas and acid rain air emissions. Additionally, technology evaluation focused on improving a commercial phosphoric acid FC power plant operation on ADG is described.

  15. Fuel cell operation on anaerobic digester gas: Conceptual design and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, R.J.; Thorneloe, S.A. . National Risk Management Research Lab.); Trocciola, J.C.; Preston, J.L. )

    1999-01-01

    The conceptual design of a fuel cell (FC) system for operation on anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is described and its economic and environmental feasibility is projected. ADG is produced at wastewater treatment plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids. The economic feasibility study shows the fuel cell is economical where plant electricity costs are 5 [cents]/kW h or higher, based on entry level fuel cell costs of $3,000/kW. FCs are one of the cleanest energy technologies available, and the widespread use of this concept should result in a significant reduction in global warming gas and acid rain air emissions. Additionally, technology evaluation focused on improving a commercial phosphoric acid FC power plant operation on ADG is described.

  16. Fabrication of gas impervious edge seal for a bipolar gas distribution assembly for use in a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Werth, John

    1986-01-01

    A bipolar gas reactant distribution assembly for use in a fuel cell is disclosed, the assembly having a solid edge seal to prevent leakage of gaseous reactants wherein a pair of porous plates are provided with peripheral slits generally parallel to, and spaced apart from two edges of the plate, the slit being filled with a solid, fusible, gas impervious edge sealing compound. The plates are assembled with opposite faces adjacent one another with a layer of a fusible sealant material therebetween the slits in the individual plates being approximately perpendicular to one another. The plates are bonded to each other by the simultaneous application of heat and pressure to cause a redistribution of the sealant into the pores of the adjacent plate surfaces and to cause the edge sealing compound to flow and impregnate the region of the plates adjacent the slits and comingle with the sealant layer material to form a continuous layer of sealant along the edges of the assembled plates.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  19. Environmental impacts of energy facilities: fuel cell technology compared with coal and conventional gas technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seip, Knut L.; Thorstensen, Bernt; Wang, Hagbarth

    We compare the environmental side effects of power plants based on fuel cell technology with the side effects of conventional electric power plants based on coal and natural gas. The environmental impact of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant is very much less than that of a coal-fired plant (a factor of {1}/{300} for air pollution and a factor of {1}/{5} for water pollution). Compared with a conventional gas plant, impact is reduced by between 50 and 98%. Damage to cultural monuments and buildings is negligible from a fuel cell plant. Socioeconomic negative impacts are reduced by about 30% relative to conventional gas plants (aesthetics and noise) whereas employment is unaltered. Impact on health and safety is greatly reduced compared with that from coal-fired plants and is about 70% of that from conventional gas plants. Preliminary results suggest that society's willingness to pay (WTP) for clean air, and thereby better health, matches the cost of installing emission-reducing equipment on conventional power plants. There is probably an additional WTP for other benefits (e.g., decreased risk of global warming). Thus, the utility of very small emissions, lower CO 2 discharges, and other benefits from SOFC generators may compensate for the increased cost incurred in producing electricity by SOFC generators.

  20. In-gas-cell laser ionization studies of plutonium isotopes at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjalainen, I.; Moore, I. D.; Kron, T.; Raeder, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Tomita, H.; Trautmann, N.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    In-gas-cell resonance laser ionization has been performed on long-lived isotopes of Pu at the IGISOL facility, Jyväskylä. This initiates a new programme of research towards high-resolution optical spectroscopy of heavy actinide elements which can be produced in sufficient quantities at research reactors and transported to facilities elsewhere. In this work a new gas cell has been constructed for fast extraction of laser-ionized elements. Samples of 238-240,242Pu and 244Pu have been evaporated from Ta filaments, laser ionized, mass separated and delivered to the collinear laser spectroscopy station. Here we report on the performance of the gas cell through studies of the mass spectra obtained in helium and argon, before and after the radiofrequency quadrupole cooler-buncher. This provides valuable insight into the gas phase chemistry exhibited by Pu, which has been additionally supported by measurements of ion time profiles. The resulting monoatomic yields are sufficient for collinear laser spectroscopy. A gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis of the Pu samples shows a good agreement with the assay provided by the Mainz Nuclear Chemistry department.

  1. Solar cells made by laser-induced diffusion directly from phosphine gas

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G.B.; Tarrant, D.; Pollock, G.; Pressley, R.; Press, R.

    1981-12-15

    A new method for making p-n junctions based on immersion in a transparent dopant gas followed by irradiation with a pulsed laser is presented. An alexandrite laser was used, operating at 0.73 ..mu..m where photolysis of the dopant gas PH/sub 3/ does not occur. Multiple pulses of 2.2--2.7 J/cm/sup 2/ were used to make Si solar cells with total area efficiencies up to 8.6% without benefit of antireflection coatings.

  2. Influence of electrolytes and membranes on cell operation for syn-gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

    2012-02-01

    The impact of membrane type and electrolyte composition for the electrochemical generation of synthesis gas (CO + H2) using a Ag gas diffusion electrode are presented. Changing from a cation exchange membrane to an anion exchange membrane (AEM) extended the cell operational time at low Ecell values (up to 4x) without impacting product composition. The use of KOH as the catholyte decreased the Ecell and resulted in a minimum electrolyte cost reduction of 39%. The prime factor in determining operational time at low Ecell values was the ability to maintain a sufficiently high anolyte pH.

  3. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  4. A miniaturized prototype of resonant banana-shaped photoacoustic cell for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulasevich, A. L.; Gorelik, A. V.; Kouzmouk, A. A.; Starovoitov, V. S.

    2013-09-01

    A resonant photoacoustic cell intended for laser-spectroscopy gas sensing is represented. This cell is a miniature imitation of a macro-scale banana-shaped cell developed previously. The parameters, which specify the cavity shape, are chosen so as not only to provide optimal cell operation at a selected acoustic resonance but also to reduce substantially the cell sizes. A miniaturized prototype cell (the volume of acoustic cavity of ∼5 mm3) adapted to the narrow diffraction-limited beam of near-infrared laser is produced and examined experimentally. The noise-associated measurement error and laser-initiated signals are studied as functions of modulation frequency. The background signal and the useful response to light absorption by the gas are analyzed in measurements of absorption for ammonia in nitrogen flow with the help of a pigtailed DFB laser diode oscillated near a wavelength of 1.53 μm. The performance of prototype operation at the second longitudinal acoustic resonance (the resonance frequency of ∼32.9 kHz, Q-factor of ∼16.3) is estimated. The noise-limited minimal detectable absorption normalized to laser-beam power and detection bandwidth is ∼8.07 × 10-8 cm-1 W Hz-1/2. The amplitude of the background signal is equivalent to an absorption coefficient of ∼2.51 × 10-5 cm-1. Advantages and drawbacks of the cell prototype are discussed. Despite low absorption-sensing performance, the produced miniaturized cell prototype shows a good capability of gas-leak detection.

  5. New stopping cell capabilities: RF carpet performance at high gas density and cryogenic operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, M.; Purushothaman, S.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Plass, W. R.; Schäfer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Van de Walle, J.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a stopping cell to be used at the FRS and Super-FRS (Super-conducting FRagment Separator) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy-Ion Research and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), both in Darmstadt, Germany. The cell has a stopping volume with a length of 1 m and a diameter of 25 cm. It is aimed at operation with high-density helium gas (up to 0.2 mg/cm3). Ours is the first realisation of a stopping cell in which the required purity of the helium stopping gas is ensured by operation at cryogenic temperatures. On the exit side, the ions are guided to the exit hole by an RF carpet with 4 electrodes per mm, operating at a frequency of 5.8 MHz. We present the first commissioning results of the cryogenic stopping cell. Using 219Rn ions emitted as alpha-decay recoils from a 223Ra source, a combined ion survival and extraction efficiency between 10 and 25% is measured for helium gas at a temperature of 85 K and with a density up to 0.07 mg/cm3 (equivalent to a pressure of 430 mbar at room temperature). This density is almost two times higher than demonstrated up to now for RF ion repelling structures in helium gas. Given the operational and design parameters of the system, it is projected that this technology is useful up to a helium gas density of at least 0.2 mg/cm3.

  6. Study of a distributed feedback diode laser based hygrometer combined Herriot-gas cell and waterless optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Chang, Jun; Lian, Jie; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A distributed feedback diode laser (DFB-DL) based hygrometer combined with a long-path-length Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components was proposed and investigated. The main function of this sensor was to simultaneously improve the measurement reliability and resolution. A comparison test between a 10-cm normal transmission-type gas cell and a 3-m Herriot gas cell was carried out to demonstrate the improvement. Reliability improvement was achieved by influence suppression of water vapor inside optical components (WVOC) through combined action of the Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components. The influence of WVOC was suppressed from 726 ppmv to 25 ppmv using the Herriot gas cell. Moreover, combined with waterless optical components, the influence of WVOC was further suppressed to no more than 4 ppmv. Resolution improvement from 11.7 ppmv to 0.32 ppmv was achieved mainly due to the application of the long-path-length Herriot gas cell. The results show that the proposed sensor has a good performance and considerable potential application in gas sensing, especially when probed gas possibly permeates into optical components.

  7. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  8. High pressure operation of tubular solid oxide fuel cells and their intergration with gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, C.; Wepfer, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fossil fuels continue to be used at a rate greater than that of their natural formation, and the current byproducts from their use are believed to have a detrimental effect on the environment (e.g. global warming). There is thus a significant impetus to have cleaner, more efficient fuel consumption alternatives. Recent progress has led to renewed vigor in the development of fuel cell technology, which has been shown to be capable of producing high efficiencies with relatively benign exhaust products. The tubular solid oxide fuel cell developed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation has shown significant promise. Modeling efforts have been and are underway to optimize and better understand this fuel cell technology. Thus far, the bulk of modeling efforts has been for operation at atmospheric pressure. There is now interest in developing high-efficiency integrated gas turbine/solid oxide fuel cell systems. Such operation of fuel cells would obviously occur at higher pressures. The fuel cells have been successfully modeled under high pressure operation and further investigated as integrated components of an open loop gas turbine cycle.

  9. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  10. Stable Laser-Driven Electron Beams from a Steady-State-Flow Gas Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, J.; Popp, A.; Karsch, S.; Major, Zs.; Marx, B.; Fuchs, M.; Hoerlein, R.; Gruener, F.; Habs, D.; Krausz, F.; Rowlands-Rees, T. P.; Hooker, S. M.

    2009-01-22

    Quasi-monoenergetic, laser-driven electron beams of up to {approx}200 MeV in energy have been generated from steady-state-flow gas cells [1]. These beams are emitted within a low-divergence cone of 2.1{+-}0.5 mrad FWHM and feature unparalleled shot-to-shot stability in energy (2.5% rms), pointing direction (1.4 mrad rms) and charge (16% rms) owing to a highly reproducible plasma-density profile within the laser-plasma-interaction volume. Laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in gas cells of this type constitutes a simple and reliable source of relativistic electrons with well defined properties, which should allow for applications such as the production of extreme-ultraviolet undulator radiation in the near future.

  11. A recoverable gas-cell diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Cassata, W. S.; Goldblum, B. L.; Siem, S.; Velsko, C. A.; Wiedeking, M.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The high-fluence neutron spectrum produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides an opportunity to measure the activation of materials by fast-spectrum neutrons. A new large-volume gas-cell diagnostic has been designed and qualified to measure the activation of gaseous substances at the NIF. This in-chamber diagnostic is recoverable, reusable and has been successfully fielded. Data from the qualification of the diagnostic have been used to benchmark an Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code simulation describing the downscattered neutron spectrum seen by the gas cell. We present early results from the use of this diagnostic to measure the activation of natXe and discuss future work to study the strength of interactions between plasma and nuclei.

  12. A planar anode-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell model with internal reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinda, P.; Chanchaona, S.; Brault, P.; Wechsatol, W.

    2011-05-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are of great interest due to their high energy efficiency, low emission level, and multiple fuel utilization. SOFC can operate with various kinds of fuels such as natural gas, carbon monoxide, methanol, ethanol, and hydrocarbon compounds, and they are becoming one of the main competitors among environmentally friendly energy sources for the future. In this study, a mathematical model of a co-flow planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with internal reforming of natural gas has been developed. The model simultaneously solves mass, energy transport equations, and chemical as well as electrochemical reactions. The model can effectively predict the compound species distributions as well as the cell performance under specific operating conditions. The main result is a rather small temperature gradient obtained at 800 °C with S/C = 1 in classical operating conditions. The cell performance is reported for several operating temperatures and pressures. The cell performance is specified in terms of cell voltage and power density at any specific current density. The influence of electrode microstructure on cell performance was investigated. The simulation results show that the steady state performance is almost insensitive to microstructure of cells such as porosity and tortuosity unlike the operating pressure and temperature. However, for SOFC power output enhancement, the power output could be maximized by adjusting the pore size to an optimal value, similarly to porosity and tortuosity. At standard operating pressure (1 atm) and 800 °C with 48% fuel utilization, when an output cell voltage was 0.73 V, a current density of 0.38 A cm-2 with a power density of 0.28 W cm-2 was predicted. The accuracy of the model was validated by comparing with existing experimental results from the available literature.

  13. A (S)TEM Gas Cell Holder with Localized Laser Heating for In Situ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mehraeen, Shareghe; McKeown, Joseph T.; Deshmukh, Pushkarraj V.; Evans, James E.; Abellan, Patricia; Xu, Pinghong; Reed, Bryan W.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Fischione, Paul E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-03-04

    We report that the advent of aberration correction for transmission electron microscopy has transformed atomic resolution imaging into a nearly routine technique for structural analysis. Now an emerging frontier in electron microscopy is the development of in situ capabilities to observe reactions at atomic resolution in real time and within realistic environments. Here we present a new in situ gas cell holder that is designed for compatibility with a wide variety of sample type (i.e., dimpled 3-mm discs, standard mesh grids, various types of focused ion beam lamellae attached to half grids). Its capabilities include localized heating and precise control of the gas pressure and composition while simultaneously allowing atomic resolution imaging at ambient pressure. The results show that 0.25-nm lattice fringes are directly visible for nanoparticles imaged at ambient pressure with gas path lengths up to 20 μm. Additionally, we quantitatively demonstrate that while the attainable contrast and resolution decrease with increasing pressure and gas path length, resolutions better than 0.2 nm should be accessible at ambient pressure with gas path lengths less than the 15 μm utilized for these experiments.

  14. Gasotransmitters are emerging as new guard cell signaling molecules and regulators of leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    Specialized guard cells modulate plant gas exchange through the regulation of stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is a direct function of the volume of the guard cells. The transport of solutes across channels in plasma membrane is a crucial process in the maintenance of guard cell water status. The fine tuned regulation of that transport requires an integrated convergence of multiple endogenous and exogenous signals perceived at both the cellular and the whole plant level. Gasotransmitters are novel signaling molecules with key functions in guard cell physiology. Three gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) are involved in guard cell regulatory processes. These molecules are endogenously produced by plant cells and are part of the guard cells responses to drought stress conditions through ABA-dependent pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gasotransmitters as versatile molecules interacting with different components of guard cell signaling network and propose them as players in new paradigms to study ABA-independent guard cell responses to water deficit.

  15. Gas1 Knockdown Increases the Neuroprotective Effect of Glial Cell-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Against Glutamate-Induced Cell Injury in Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Fanfan; Zhu, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Growth arrest-specific 1 (Gas1) protein acts as an inhibitor of cell growth and a mediator of cell death in nervous system during development and is also re-expressed in adult neurons during excitotoxic insult. Due to its structural similarity to the glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptors α (GFRα), Gas1 is likely to interfere with the neuroprotective effect of GDNF. In the present study, we investigated the expression profile of Gas1 during glutamate insults in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as well as the influence of Gas1 inhibition on the protective effect of GDNF against glutamate-induced cell injury. Our data showed that Gas1 expression was significantly increased with the treatment of glutamate in SH-SY5Y cells. The silencing of Gas1 by small interfering RNA promoted the protective effect of GDNF against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity as well as cell apoptosis, which effect was likely mediated through activating Akt/PI3 K-dependent cell survival signaling pathway and inhibiting mitochondrial-dependent cell apoptosis signaling pathway via Bad dephosphorylation blockade. In summary, this study showed the synergistic effect of Gas1 inhibition and GDNF against glutamate-induced cell injury in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which information might significantly contribute to better understanding the function of Gas1 in neuronal cells and form the basis of the therapeutic development of GDNF in treating human neurodegenerative diseases in the future.

  16. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  17. Hierarchy carbon paper for the gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chunyu; Wang, Baorong; Cheng, Xinqun

    This communication described the fabrication of a hierarchy carbon paper, and its application to the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The carbon paper was fabricated by growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers via covalently assembling metal nanocatalysts. Surface morphology observation revealed a highly uniform distribution of hydrophobic materials within the carbon paper. The contact angle to water of this carbon paper was not only very large but also particularly even. Polarization measurements verified that the hierarchy carbon paper facilitated the self-humidifying of PEM fuel cells, which could be mainly attributed to its higher hydrophobic property as diagnosed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  18. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-01

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O2 neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O2-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  19. Characterization techniques for gas diffusion layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvay, A.; Yli-Rantala, E.; Liu, C.-H.; Peng, X.-H.; Koski, P.; Cindrella, L.; Kauranen, P.; Wilde, P. M.; Kannan, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is one of the functional components that provide a support structure for gas and water transport. The GDL plays a crucial role when the oxidant is air, especially when the fuel cell operates in the higher current density region. There has been an exponential growth in research and development because the PEMFC has the potential to become the future energy source for automotive applications. In order to serve in this capacity, the GDL requires due innovative analysis and characterization toward performance and durability. It is possible to achieve the optimum fuel cell performance only by understanding the characteristics of GDLs such as structure, pore size, porosity, gas permeability, wettability, thermal and electrical conductivities, surface morphology and water management. This review attempts to bring together the characterization techniques for the essential properties of the GDLs as handy tools for R&D institutions. Topics are categorized based on the ex-situ and in-situ characterization techniques of GDLs along with related modeling and simulation. Recently reported techniques used for accelerated durability evaluation of the GDLs are also consolidated within the ex-situ and in-situ methods.

  20. Gas phase recovery of hydrogen sulfide contaminated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakati, Biraj Kumar; Kucernak, Anthony R. J.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the anode of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the gas phase recovery of the contaminated PEMFC using ozone (O3) were studied. Experiments were performed on fuel cell electrodes both in an aqueous electrolyte and within an operating fuel cell. The ex-situ analyses of a fresh electrode; a H2S contaminated electrode (23 μmolH2S cm-2); and the contaminated electrode cleaned with O3 shows that all sulfide can be removed within 900 s at room temperature. Online gas analysis of the recovery process confirms the recovery time required as around 720 s. Similarly, performance studies of an H2S contaminated PEMFC shows that complete rejuvenation occurs following 600-900 s O3 treatment at room temperature. The cleaning process involves both electrochemical oxidation (facilitated by the high equilibrium potential of the O3 reduction process) and direct chemical oxidation of the contaminant. The O3 cleaning process is more efficient than the external polarization of the single cell at 1.6 V. Application of O3 at room temperature limits the amount of carbon corrosion. Room temperature O3 treatment of poisoned fuel cell stacks may offer an efficient and quick remediation method to recover otherwise inoperable systems.

  1. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part II: Dynamics and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems have achieved ultra-high efficiency and ultra-low emissions at small scales, but have yet to demonstrate effective dynamic responsiveness or base-load cost savings. Fuel cell systems and hybrid prototypes have not utilized controls to address thermal cycling during load following operation, and have thus been relegated to the less valuable base-load and peak shaving power market. Additionally, pressurized hybrid topping cycles have exhibited increased stall/surge characteristics particularly during off-design operation. This paper evaluates additional control actuators with simple control methods capable of mitigating spatial temperature variation and stall/surge risk during load following operation of hybrid fuel cell systems. The novel use of detailed, spatially resolved, physical fuel cell and turbine models in an integrated system simulation enables the development and evaluation of these additional control methods. It is shown that the hybrid system can achieve greater dynamic response over a larger operating envelope than either individual sub-system; the fuel cell or gas turbine. Results indicate that a combined feed-forward, P-I and cascade control strategy is capable of handling moderate perturbations and achieving a 2:1 (MCFC) or 4:1 (SOFC) turndown ratio while retaining >65% fuel-to-electricity efficiency, while maintaining an acceptable stack temperature profile and stall/surge margin.

  2. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Cycle Technology for Auxiliary Aerospace Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Freeh, Joshua E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.

    2005-01-01

    A notional 440 kW auxiliary power unit has been developed for 300 passenger commercial transport aircraft in 2015AD. A hybrid engine using solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and a gas turbine bottoming cycle has been considered. Steady-state performance analysis during cruise operation has been presented. Trades between performance efficiency and system mass were conducted with system specific energy as the discriminator. Fuel cell performance was examined with an area specific resistance. The ratio of fuel cell versus turbine power was explored through variable fuel utilization. Area specific resistance, fuel utilization, and mission length had interacting effects upon system specific energy. During cruise operation, the simple cycle fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid was not able to outperform current turbine-driven generators for system specific energy, despite a significant improvement in system efficiency. This was due in part to the increased mass of the hybrid engine, and the increased water flow required for on-board fuel reformation. Two planar, anode-supported cell design concepts were considered. Designs that seek to minimize the metallic interconnect layer mass were seen to have a large effect upon the system mass estimates.

  3. Tobacco smoke as inducer for gas phase-controlled transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Spielmann, Manuela; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Keller, Bettina; Aubel, Dominique; Fussenegger, Martin

    2005-06-30

    Capitalizing on components evolved to metabolize ethanol in Aspergillus nidulans, we previously designed the first molecular gas-gene expression interface using gaseous acetaldehyde as the major inducer. This fungus-derived acetaldehyde-inducible gene regulation (AIR) system operated perfectly and enabled precise and reversible transgene expression dosing in a variety of mammalian cells. We now validate the use of mainstream cigarette smoke typically containing acetaldehyde at regulation-effective nontoxic concentrations as a noninvasive modality to adjust transgene transcription in mammalian cells and mice. Indeed, tobacco smoke-induced expression fine-tuning of AIR-driven transgenes was successful in mammalian cells. Even mice implanted with cells transgenic for AIR-controlled SEAP (human secreted alkaline phosphatase) production showed serum SEAP levels correlating with inhaled tobacco smoke doses. Tobacco smoke-controlled gene expression may foster clinical opportunities as well as advances in understanding smoke-related pathologies.

  4. Performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte fuel cells by combining liquid removal mechanisms of a gas diffusion layer with wettability distribution and a gas channel with microgrooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utaka, Yoshio; Koresawa, Ryo

    2016-08-01

    Although polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are commercially available, there are still many problems that need to be addressed to improve their performance and increase their usage. At a high current density, generated water accumulates in the gas diffusion layer and in the gas channels of the cathode. This excess water obstructs oxygen transport, and as a result, cell performance is greatly reduced. To improve the cell performance, the effective removal of the generated water and the promotion of oxygen diffusion in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) are necessary. In this study, two functions proposed in previous reports were combined and applied to a PEFC: a hybrid GDL to form an oxygen diffusion path using a wettability distribution and a gas separator with microgrooves to enhance liquid removal. For a PEFC with a hybrid GDL and a gas separator with microgrooves, the concentration overvoltage of the PEFC was reduced, and the current density limit and maximum power density were increased compared with a conventional PEFC. Moreover, the stability of the cell voltage was markedly improved.

  5. The community seismic network and quake-catcher network: enabling structural health monitoring through instrumentation by community participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Monica D.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Cheng, Ming-Hei

    2013-04-01

    A new type of seismic network is in development that takes advantage of community volunteers to install low-cost accelerometers in houses and buildings. The Community Seismic Network and Quake-Catcher Network are examples of this, in which observational-based structural monitoring is carried out using records from one to tens of stations in a single building. We have deployed about one hundred accelerometers in a number of buildings ranging between five and 23 stories in the Los Angeles region. In addition to a USB-connected device which connects to the host's computer, we have developed a stand-alone sensor-plug-computer device that directly connects to the internet via Ethernet or wifi. In the case of the Community Seismic Network, the sensors report both continuous data and anomalies in local acceleration to a cloud computing service consisting of data centers geographically distributed across the continent. Visualization models of the instrumented buildings' dynamic linear response have been constructed using Google SketchUp and an associated plug-in to matlab with recorded shaking data. When data are available from only one to a very limited number of accelerometers in high rises, the buildings are represented as simple shear beam or prismatic Timoshenko beam models with soil-structure interaction. Small-magnitude earthquake records are used to identify the first set of horizontal vibrational frequencies. These frequencies are then used to compute the response on every floor of the building, constrained by the observed data. These tools are resulting in networking standards that will enable data sharing among entire communities, facility managers, and emergency response groups.

  6. Notch-1 promotes breast cancer cells proliferation by regulating LncRNA GAS5

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jing; Wang, Benzhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Notch signaling is indicated as novel therapeutic targets to prevent recurrence of breast cancer. LncRNAs were identified as downstream target of Notch pathway. However, the exact mechanisms involved in Notch signaling, lncRNAs and breast cancer remain to be explained. Objective: This original research aimed to determine the prognostic implications of Notch-1 for breast cancer, and explain mechanisms involved in regulation of lnRNA GAS5 by Notch-1, and identify the function of this mechanism on breast cancer. Method: Thirty breast cancer patients were included from The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University (China) since January 2006 in this study. The mRNA level by RT-PCR and protein level of Notch-1 by western blot in tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues were evaluated and 5-year survival analysis was applied to examine the significance of Notch-1. The levels of ten reported lncRNAs were determined by RT-PCR, and subsequently linear analysis was applied to analyze the relationship between these four unique lncRNAs and protein level of Notch-1, which identified the most relevant lncRNA GAS5 with Notch-1 in breast cancer. Subsequently, Notch1-siRNA was applied to influence the expression of Notch-1 in T47D, then the level of RSA5 was measured by RT-PCR, and CCK-8 assay was applied to measure the proliferation of T47D cells. Results: High level of Notch-1 provided a poor prognosis in breast cancer. Interference of Notch-1 significantly suppressed proliferation of T47D cell (P < 0.05), and significantly increased the level of GAS5. Conclusion: Notch-1 promotes breast cancer cells proliferation by regulating LncRNA GAS5. PMID:26550436

  7. Anode-pore tortuosity in solid oxide fuel cells found from gas and current flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V. Hugo; Tsai, Chih-Long

    The effect of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode thickness, porosity, pore size, and pore tortuosity on fuel and exhaust gas flow is calculated. Also determined is the concentration of these gases and of diluent gases as a function of position across the anode. The calculation is based on the dusty-gas model which includes a Knudsen (molecule-wall) collision term in the Stefan-Maxwell equation which is based on unlike-molecule collisions. Commonly made approximations are avoided in order to obtain more exact results. One such approximation is the assumption of uniform total gas pressure across the anode. Another such approximation is the assumption of zero fuel gas concentration at the anode-electrolyte interface under the anode saturation condition for which the SOFC output voltage goes to zero. Elimination of this approximation requires use of a model we developed (published elsewhere) for terminal voltage V as a function of electrolyte current density i. Key formulae from this model are presented. The formulae developed herein for gas flow and tortuosity are applied to the results of a series of careful experiments performed by another group, who used binary and ternary gas mixtures on the anode side of an SOFC. Our values for tortuosity are in a physically reasonable low range, from 1.7 to 3.3. They are in fair agreement with those obtained by the other group, once a difference in nomenclature is taken into account. This difference consists in their definition of tortuosity being what some call tortuosity factor, which is the square of what we and some others call tortuosity. The results emphasize the need for careful design of anode pore structures, especially in anode-supported SOFCs which require thicker anodes.

  8. ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING A PHOSPHORIC ACID FUEL CELL ON A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL GAS STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phorsphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Th...

  9. Superhydrophobic PAN nanofibers for gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Hwang, Gisuk; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered to be the promising alternatives of natural resources for generating electricity and power. An optimal water management in the gas diffusion layers (GDL) is critical to high fuel cell performance. Its basic functions include transportation of the reactant gas from flow channels to catalyst effectively, draining out the liquid water from catalyst layer to flow channels, and conducting electrons with low humidity. In this study, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in a solvent and electrospun at various conditions to produce PAN nanofibers prior to the stabilization at 280 °C for 1 hour in the atmospheric pressure and carbonization at 850 °C for 1 hour. The surface hydrophobicity values of the carbonized PAN nanofibers were adjusted using superhydrophobic and hydrophilic agents. The thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of the new GDLs depicted much better results compared to the conventionally used ones. The water condensation tests on the surfaces (superhydrophobic and hydrophilic) of the GDL showed a crucial step towards improved water managements in the fuel cell. This study may open up new possibilities for developing high- performing GDL materials for future PEM fuel cell applications.

  10. Microbial electrodialysis cell for simultaneous water desalination and hydrogen gas production.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D; Call, Douglas F; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m(3) H(2)/m(3) d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements.

  11. High reflected cubic cavity as long path absorption cell for infrared gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    One direct and efficient method to improve the sensitivity of infrared gas sensors is to increase the optical path length of gas cells according to Beer-Lambert Law. In this paper, cubic shaped cavities with high reflected inner coating as novel long path absorption cells for infrared gas sensing were developed. The effective optical path length (EOPL) for a single cubic cavity and tandem cubic cavities were investigated based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measuring oxygen P11 line at 763 nm. The law of EOPL of a diffuse cubic cavity in relation with the reflectivity of the coating, the port fraction and side length of the cavity was obtained. Experimental results manifested an increase of EOPL for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of port fraction of the connecting aperture f', and the EOPL equaled to the sum of that of two single cubic cavities at f'<0.01. The EOPL spectra at infrared wavelength range for different inner coatings including high diffuse coatings and high reflected metallic thin film coatings were deduced.

  12. Optical Pumping Spin Exchange 3He Gas Cells for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Jung, Y.; Woo, S.; Yurov, M.; Jang, J.

    2009-08-01

    We present a device for spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of polarized noble gases for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A method and design of apparatus for pumping the polarization of noble gases is described. The method and apparatus enable production, storage and usage of hyperpolarized noble gases for different purposes, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human and animal subjects. Magnetic imaging agents breathed into lungs can be observed by the radio waves of the MRI scanner and report back physical and functional information about lung's health and desease. The technique known as spin exchange optical pumping is used. Nuclear magnetic resonance is implemented to measure the polarization of hyperpolarized gas. The cells prepared and sealed under high vacuum after handling Alkali metals into the cell and filling with the 3He-N2 mixture. The cells could be refilled. The 3He reaches around 50% polarization in 5-15 hours.

  13. Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Migration by miR-203 via GAS41/miR-10b Axis in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dhananjaya; Mukhopadhyay, Debasmita; Ramaiah, M. Janaki; Sarma, Pranjal; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal

    2016-01-01

    Glioma amplified sequence 41(GAS41) is a potent transcription factor that play a crucial role in cell proliferation and survival. In glioblastoma, the expression of GAS41 at both transcriptional and post transcriptional level needs to be tightly maintained in response to cellular signals. Micro RNAs (miRNA) are small non coding RNA that act as important regulators for modulating the expression of various target genes. Studies have shown that several miRNAs play role in the post-transcriptional regulation of GAS41. Here we identified GAS41 as a novel target for endogenous miR-203 and demonstrate an inverse correlation of miR-203 expression with GAS41 in glioma cell lines (HNGC2 and U87). Over expression of miR-203 negatively regulates GAS41 expression in U87 and HNGC2 cell lines. Moreover, miR-203 restrained miR-10b action by suppressing GAS41. GAS41 is essential for repressing p53 in tumor suppressor pathway during cell proliferation. Enforced expression of GAS41 produced contradictory effect on miR-203 but was able to enhance p53 tumor suppressor pathway associated protein. It was also found that miR-203 maintains the stability of p53 as knock down of p53 expression using siRNA resulted in down regulation of pri-miR and mature miR-203 expression. Conversely reconstitution of miR-203 expression induced apoptosis and inhibited migratory property of glioma cells. Taken together, we show that miR-203 is a key negative regulator of GAS41 and acts as tumor suppressor microRNA in glioma. PMID:27467502

  14. Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Migration by miR-203 via GAS41/miR-10b Axis in Human Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dhananjaya; Mukhopadhyay, Debasmita; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Sarma, Pranjal; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal

    2016-01-01

    Glioma amplified sequence 41(GAS41) is a potent transcription factor that play a crucial role in cell proliferation and survival. In glioblastoma, the expression of GAS41 at both transcriptional and post transcriptional level needs to be tightly maintained in response to cellular signals. Micro RNAs (miRNA) are small non coding RNA that act as important regulators for modulating the expression of various target genes. Studies have shown that several miRNAs play role in the post-transcriptional regulation of GAS41. Here we identified GAS41 as a novel target for endogenous miR-203 and demonstrate an inverse correlation of miR-203 expression with GAS41 in glioma cell lines (HNGC2 and U87). Over expression of miR-203 negatively regulates GAS41 expression in U87 and HNGC2 cell lines. Moreover, miR-203 restrained miR-10b action by suppressing GAS41. GAS41 is essential for repressing p53 in tumor suppressor pathway during cell proliferation. Enforced expression of GAS41 produced contradictory effect on miR-203 but was able to enhance p53 tumor suppressor pathway associated protein. It was also found that miR-203 maintains the stability of p53 as knock down of p53 expression using siRNA resulted in down regulation of pri-miR and mature miR-203 expression. Conversely reconstitution of miR-203 expression induced apoptosis and inhibited migratory property of glioma cells. Taken together, we show that miR-203 is a key negative regulator of GAS41 and acts as tumor suppressor microRNA in glioma.

  15. A critical review of two-phase flow in gas flow channels of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ryan; Zhang, Lifeng; Ding, Yulong; Blanco, Mauricio; Bi, Xiaotao; Wilkinson, David P.

    Water management in PEM fuel cells has received extensive attention due to its key role in fuel cell performance. The unavoidable water, from humidified gas streams and electrochemical reaction, leads to gas-liquid two-phase flow in the flow channels of fuel cells. The presence of two-phase flow increases the complexity in water management in PEM fuel cells, which remains a challenging hurdle in the commercialization of this technology. Unique water emergence from the gas diffusion layer, which is different from conventional gas-liquid two-phase flow where water is introduced from the inlet together with the gas, leads to different gas-liquid flow behaviors, including pressure drop, flow pattern, and liquid holdup along flow field channels. These parameters are critical in flow field design and fuel cell operation and therefore two-phase flow has received increasing attention in recent years. This review emphasizes gas-liquid two-phase flow in minichannels or microchannels related to PEM fuel cell applications. In situ and ex situ experimental setups have been utilized to visualize and quantify two-phase flow phenomena in terms of flow regime maps, flow maldistribution, and pressure drop measurements. Work should continue to make the results more relevant for operating PEM fuel cells. Numerical simulations have progressed greatly, but conditions relevant to the length scales and time scales experienced by an operating fuel cell have not been realized. Several mitigation strategies exist to deal with two-phase flow, but often at the expense of overall cell performance due to parasitic power losses. Thus, experimentation and simulation must continue to progress in order to develop a full understanding of two-phase flow phenomena so that meaningful mitigation strategies can be implemented.

  16. Shale gas produced water treatment using innovative microbial capacitive desalination cell.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Zachary A; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Xu, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of unconventional oil and gas production has generated large amounts of wastewater for disposal, raising significant environmental and public health concerns. Treatment and beneficial use of produced water presents many challenges due to its high concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons and salinity. The objectives of this study were to investigate the feasibility of treating actual shale gas produced water using a bioelectrochemical system integrated with capacitive deionization-a microbial capacitive desalination cell (MCDC). Microbial degradation of organic compounds in the anode generated an electric potential that drove the desalination of produced water. Sorption and biodegradation resulted in a combined organic removal rate of 6.4 mg dissolved organic carbon per hour in the reactor, and the MCDC removed 36 mg salt per gram of carbon electrode per hour from produced water. This study is a proof-of-concept that the MCDC can be used to combine organic degradation with desalination of contaminated water without external energy input.

  17. Significance of Wheat Flour Dough Rheology to Gas Cell Structure Development in Bread and Other Baked Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engmann, Jan

    2008-07-01

    We discuss which rheological material functions of wheat flour dough are most relevant for structure development in baked products under common processing conditions. We consider the growth of gas cells during dough proofing (driven by yeast) and during baking, where the growth is driven by a combination of CO2 desorption, water and ethanol evaporation, and thermal expansion of gas. Attention is given to upper limits on biaxial extension rate and stress and the consequences for the required rheological material functions. The applicability of the "Considère criterion" to predict the probability of coalescence between gas cells and its effect on loaf aeration is briefly discussed.

  18. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA. PMID:27587174

  19. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA.

  20. The cytotoxic effect of volatile organic compounds of the gas phase of cigarette smoke on lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pouli, Aristea E; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitris G; Piperi, Christina; Stavridou, Anastasia; Psallidopoulos, Miltiades C; Stavrides, John C

    2003-02-01

    Health effects of cigarette smoke (CS) in humans are well known from both clinical and epidemiological studies. However, the mechanism behind CS toxicity and carcinogenicity remains mainly unknown. Recent studies have pointed to the major importance of the gas phase of CS in generating its cytotoxic effects. In the current study, an exposure system capable of introducing the gas phase of mainstream cigarette smoke deprived of its volatile organic constituents (VOCs) was used to study the role of the nonorganic components of the gas phase on the cytotoxicity of smoke to monolayer cultures of mouse lung epithelial cells. Cell viability was measured by Wst-1 and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. In cells treated with increasing doses of mainstream cigarette smoke gas phase (one to nine puffs), a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity was observed (one puff, 95% viability; nine puffs, 40% viability). Cell viability of cultures exposed to gas phase with only the nonorganic components was found to be equivalent to control, unexposed cultures, indicating that removal of VOCs resulted in almost eliminating the cytotoxic ability of the gas phase of CS. Furthermore, the removal of VOCs seems to reduce the effects of protein tyrosine nitration mediated through the gas phase constituents. The results obtained suggest the important and decisive role of VOCs in inducing cytotoxic effects.

  1. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Sylla, F.; Lambert, G.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 1019 cm-3 range well suited for LWFA.

  2. Numeric Design and Performance Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell -- Gas Turbine Hybrids on Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovakimyan, Gevorg

    The aircraft industry benefits greatly from small improvements in aircraft component design. One possible area of improvement is in the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Modern aircraft APUs are gas turbines located in the tail section of the aircraft that generate additional power when needed. Unfortunately the efficiency of modern aircraft APUs is low. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrids are one possible alternative for replacing modern gas turbine APUs. This thesis investigates the feasibility of replacing conventional gas turbine APUs with SOFC/GT APUs on aircraft. An SOFC/GT design algorithm was created in order to determine the specifications of an SOFC/GT APU. The design algorithm is comprised of several integrated modules which together model the characteristics of each component of the SOFC/GT system. Given certain overall inputs, through numerical analysis, the algorithm produces an SOFC/GT APU, optimized for specific power and efficiency, capable of performing to the required specifications. The SOFC/GT design is then input into a previously developed quasi-dynamic SOFC/GT model to determine its load following capabilities over an aircraft flight cycle. Finally an aircraft range study is conducted to determine the feasibility of the SOFC/GT APU as a replacement for the conventional gas turbine APU. The design results show that SOFC/GT APUs have lower specific power than GT systems, but have much higher efficiencies. Moreover, the dynamic simulation results show that SOFC/GT APUs are capable of following modern flight loads. Finally, the range study determined that SOFC/GT APUs are more attractive over conventional APUs for longer range aircraft.

  3. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part I: Steady state performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-07-01

    The hybridization of gas turbine technology with high temperature fuel cells represents an ultra-high efficiency, ultra-low emission, fuel flexible power generation platform. The performance of past prototypes has been limited by marginal compatibility of the two primary sub-systems. This paper addresses the challenge of selecting compatible hardware by presenting a simple and robust method for bespoke hybrid system design and off-the-shelf component integration. This is the first application of detailed, spatially resolved, physical models capable of resolving off-design performance to the integration analysis of FC-GT hybrids. Static maps are produced for both turbine and fuel cell sub-systems that readily evaluate the compatibility and hybrid performance. Molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells are considered for hybridization with recuperated micro-turbines and larger axial flow gas turbine systems. Current state-of-the-art molten carbonate technology is shown to pair well with present micro-turbine technology in an FC bottoming cycle design achieving 74.4% LHV efficiency. Solid oxide technology demonstrates remarkable potential for integration with larger scale axial turbo-machinery to achieve greater than 75% LHV efficiency. This performance map technique closely matches results from detailed integrated hybrid system analyses, and enables quick determination of performance requirements for balance of plant design and optimization.

  4. [Efficiency of oxidant gas generator cells powered by electric or solar energy].

    PubMed

    Brust Carmona, H; Benitez, A; Zarco, J; Sánchez, E; Mascher, I

    1998-02-01

    Diseases caused by microbial contaminants in drinking water continue to be a serious problem in countries like Mexico. Chlorination, using chlorine gas or chlorine compounds, is one of the best ways to treat drinking water. However, difficulties in handling chlorine gas and the inefficiency of hypochlorite solution dosing systems--due to sociopolitical, economic, and cultural factors--have reduced the utility of these chlorination procedures, especially in far-flung and inaccessible rural communities. These problems led to the development of appropriate technologies for the disinfection of water by means of the on-site generation of mixed oxidant gases (chlorine and ozone). This system, called MOGGOD, operates through the electrolysis of a common salt solution. Simulated system evaluation using a hydraulic model allowed partial and total costs to be calculated. When powered by electrical energy from the community power grid, the system had an efficiency of 90%, and in 10 hours it was able to generate enough gases to disinfect about 200 m3 of water at a cost of approximately N$8 (US $1.30). When the electrolytic cell was run on energy supplied through a photoelectric cell, the investment costs were higher. A system fed by photovoltaic cells could be justified in isolated communities that lack electricity but have a gravity-fed water distribution system.

  5. Model of a novel pressurized solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine hybrid engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbank, Winston; Witmer, Dennis, , Dr.; Holcomb, Frank

    Solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid systems for producing electricity have received much attention due to high-predicted efficiencies, low pollution and availability of natural gas. Due to the higher value of peak power, a system able to meet fluctuating power demands while retaining high efficiencies is strongly preferable to base load operation. SOFC systems and hybrid variants designed to date have had narrow operating ranges due largely to the necessity of heat management within the fuel cell. Such systems have a single degree of freedom controlled and limited by the fuel cell. This study will introduce a new SOFC-GT hybrid configuration designed to operate over a 5:1 turndown ratio, while maintaining the SOFC stack exit temperature at a constant 1000 °C. The proposed system introduces two new degrees of freedom through the use of a variable-geometry nozzle turbine to directly influence system airflow, and an auxiliary combustor to control the thermal and power needs of the turbomachinery.

  6. New alternative for electricity production. Part 3: Electricity production from biomass and natural gas by a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekinen, Tuula; Leppaelahti, Jukka; Kurkela, Esa; Solantausta, Yrjoe

    1992-09-01

    Solid oxide cells of different kinds are being tested primarily on a laboratory scale. A tube cell has already been tested and the experience obtained has been promising. The efficiency of the equipment used in the tests was 3 kW. The aim is to construct plants of 100 to 200 kW by the year 1996. These plants could be used as a basis for future power plant concepts. In planar cells and in a monolithic cell the losses can be significantly lower and the power density higher than in a tube cell construction. The efficiencies of these cells have so far been only 100 to 200 W in laboratory tests. The development of solid oxide cells to a power plant size class requires materials superior to the present cell materials and the development of the manufacturing technology of cell components. Efficiency assessments of three power plant processes based on the solid oxide fuel cell were carried out. Two of the processes are based on fluidized bed air gasification of wood and one on the use of natural gas. A combined cycle process based on pressurized fluidized bed air gasification of wood and a natural gas combined cycle process were used as references. The effect of two fuel cell parameters, the utilization ratio of fuel and the voltage of the cell, on the operation of the processes was studied. By connecting the fuel cell as a part to the combined cycle power plant process the electric efficiency and construction degree of the power plant processes was increased significantly. The efficiency of the fuel cell process based on pressurized gasification of wood was about 10 percentage units higher than that without the fuel cell. The improvement in the efficiency of the natural gas process was more than 20 percentage units. The electric efficiency of the natural gas process was about 70%.

  7. Multivariable Robust Control of a Simulated Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Alex; Banta, Larry; Tucker, David; Gemmen, Randall

    2010-08-01

    This work presents a systematic approach to the multivariable robust control of a hybrid fuel cell gas turbine plant. The hybrid configuration under investigation built by the National Energy Technology Laboratory comprises a physical simulation of a 300kW fuel cell coupled to a 120kW auxiliary power unit single spool gas turbine. The public facility provides for the testing and simulation of different fuel cell models that in turn help identify the key difficulties encountered in the transient operation of such systems. An empirical model of the built facility comprising a simulated fuel cell cathode volume and balance of plant components is derived via frequency response data. Through the modulation of various airflow bypass valves within the hybrid configuration, Bode plots are used to derive key input/output interactions in transfer function format. A multivariate system is then built from individual transfer functions, creating a matrix that serves as the nominal plant in an H{sub {infinity}} robust control algorithm. The controller’s main objective is to track and maintain hybrid operational constraints in the fuel cell’s cathode airflow, and the turbo machinery states of temperature and speed, under transient disturbances. This algorithm is then tested on a Simulink/MatLab platform for various perturbations of load and fuel cell heat effluence. As a complementary tool to the aforementioned empirical plant, a nonlinear analytical model faithful to the existing process and instrumentation arrangement is evaluated and designed in the Simulink environment. This parallel task intends to serve as a building block to scalable hybrid configurations that might require a more detailed nonlinear representation for a wide variety of controller schemes and hardware implementations.

  8. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    SciTech Connect

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-22

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  9. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  10. Kinect Technology Game Play to Mimic Quake Catcher Network (QCN) Sensor Deployment During a Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D. L.; Yang, A.; Rohrlick, D.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J.; Chung, A. I.; Neighbors, C.; Choo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Kinect technology allows for hands-free game play, greatly increasing the accessibility of gaming for those uncomfortable using controllers. How it works is the Kinect camera transmits invisible near-infrared light and measures its "time of flight" to reflect off an object, allowing it to distinguish objects within 1 centimeter in depth and 3 mm in height and width. The middleware can also respond to body gestures and voice commands. Here, we use the Kinect Windows SDK software to create a game that mimics how scientists deploy seismic instruments following a large earthquake. The educational goal of the game is to allow the players to explore 3D space as they learn about the Quake Catcher Network's (QCN) Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP). Many of the scenarios within the game are taken from factual RAMP experiences. To date, only the PC platform (or a Mac running PC emulator software) is available for use, but we hope to move to other platforms (e.g., Xbox 360, iPad, iPhone) as they become available. The game is written in programming language C# using Microsoft XNA and Visual Studio 2010, graphic shading is added using High Level Shader Language (HLSL), and rendering is produced using XNA's graphics libraries. Key elements of the game include selecting sensor locations, adequately installing the sensor, and monitoring the incoming data. During game play aftershocks can occur unexpectedly, as can other problems that require attention (e.g., power outages, equipment failure, and theft). The player accrues points for quickly deploying the first sensor (recording as many initial aftershocks as possible), correctly installing the sensors (orientation with respect to north, properly securing, and testing), distributing the sensors adequately in the region, and troubleshooting problems. One can also net points for efficient use of game play time. Setting up for game play in your local environment requires: (1) the Kinect hardware ( $145); (2) a computer

  11. Proposal and examination of method of water removal from gas diffusion layer by applying slanted microgrooves inside gas channel in separator to improve polymer electrolyte fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utaka, Yoshio; Okabe, Akira; Omori, Yasuyuki

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the management of moisture from the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in the gas channel of a separator for PEFC. At the cathode-side, oxygen is transported as reactant gas from gas channel through GDL. When large quantity of moisture is generated during high power generation, moisture blocks transport of oxygen, and the cell voltage drops drastically. Narrow microgrooves with axes at tilt angle to the air flow were arranged inside channel walls. The water from GDL was discharged along microgrooves to facing top of GDL by forces of capillary and air flow shearing. Laser induced fluorescence method was used to measure water velocity in microgrooves. The effect of air velocity in the gas channel on water velocity in microgrooves was investigated. It was shown microgrooves manufactured inside gas channel worked properly. Water velocity in microgrooves increased with increasing air velocity, and moisture could be discharged from GDL by applying microgrooves. Furthermore, effective length of the microgrooves needed to remove water from the GDL surface increased with decreasing inclination angle of microgrooves in the range of 20°-45°. An effective length of approximately 200 mm was attained, which was overall length of experimental apparatus.

  12. Proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells on 3D porous silicon gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouassi, S.; Gautier, G.; Thery, J.; Desplobain, S.; Borella, M.; Ventura, L.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Since the 90's, porous silicon has been studied and implemented in many devices, especially in MEMS technology. In this article, we present a new approach to build miniaturized proton exchange membrane micro-fuel cells using porous silicon as a hydrogen diffusion layer. In particular, we propose an innovative process to build micro fuel cells from a “corrugated iron like” 3D structured porous silicon substrates. This structure is able to increase up to 40% the cell area keeping a constant footprint on the silicon wafer. We propose here a process route to perform electrochemically 3D porous gas diffusion layers and to deposit fuel cell active layers on such substrates. The prototype peak power performance was measured to be 90 mW cm-2 in a “breathing configuration” at room temperature. These performances are less than expected if we compare with a reference 2D micro fuel cell. Actually, the active layer deposition processes are not fully optimized but this prototype demonstrates the feasibility of these 3D devices.

  13. Low-volume, fast response-time hollow silica waveguide gas cells for mid-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Francis, Daniel; Hodgkinson, Jane; Livingstone, Beth; Black, Paul; Tatam, Ralph P

    2016-09-01

    Hollow silica waveguides (HSWs) are used to produce long path length, low-volume gas cells, and are demonstrated with quantum cascade laser spectroscopy. Absorption measurements are made using the intrapulse technique, which allows measurements to be made across a single laser pulse. Simultaneous laser light and gas coupling is achieved through the modification of commercially available gas fittings with low dead volume. Three HSW gas cell configurations with different path lengths and internal diameters are analyzed and compared with a 30 m path length astigmatic Herriott cell. Limit of detection measurements are made for the gas cells using methane at a wavelength 7.82 μm. The lowest limit of detection was provided by HSW with a bore diameter of 1000 μm and a path length of 5 m and was measured to be 0.26 ppm, with a noise equivalent absorbance of 4.1×10-4. The long-term stability of the HSW and Herriott cells is compared through analysis of the Allan-Werle variance of data collected over a 24 h period. The response times of the HSW and Herriott cells are measured to be 0.8 s and 36 s, respectively. PMID:27607251

  14. Relaxation rates of low-field gas-phase ^129Xe storage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limes, Mark; Saam, Brian

    2010-10-01

    A study of longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates T1 of ^129Xe and Xe-N2 mixtures in a magnetic field of 3.8 mT is presented. In this regime, intrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the intramolecular spin-rotation interaction due to persistent xenon dimers, a mechanism that can be quelled by introducing large amounts of N2 into the storage cell. Extrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the wall-relaxation rate, which is the primary quantity of interest for the various low-field storage cells and coatings that we have tested. Previous group work has shown that extremely long gas-phase relaxation times T1 can be obtained, but only at large magnetic fields and low xenon densities. The current work is motivated by the practical benefits of retaining hyperpolarized ^129Xe for extended periods of time in a small magnetic field.

  15. Electrochemical study of natural gas fueled electrodes for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. Jafar; Raza, Rizwan; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Ali, Akbar; Ahmad, Imran; Syed, Waqar A. A.; Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Anis-Ur-Rehman, M.; Khan, M. Ajmal; Shahid, Shaukat A.; Abbas, Ghazanfar

    2016-07-01

    Fuel cell is undoubtedly widespread energy conversion technology, which can convert fuel (biogas) energy into electricity. Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is one of the best choices among the fuel cell’s family due to high efficiency and fuel flexibility. In this study, zinc-based nanostructured Mn0.20FexZn0.80-xOδ electrode materials were successfully developed by solid state reaction. The proposed materials have been characterized by XRD and SEM. The electrical conductivities have been examined by four-probe DC method in the temperature range of 300-600∘C, the maximum values were recorded and found to be 12.019 and 5.106 S/cm at natural gas and air atmosphere, respectively. The electrochemical performance has been measured employing NK-SDC electrolyte material and their current density versus voltage and current density versus power density (I-V and I-P characteristics) have been drawn. The maximum power density was found to be 170 mW/cm2 using natural gas as a bio-fuel over a temperature of 600∘C.

  16. Intermediate-sized natural gas fueled carbonate fuel cell power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhoff, Frederick A.; Fleming, Donald K.

    1994-04-01

    This executive summary of the report describes the accomplishments of the joint US Department of Energy's (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) and M-C POWER Corporation's Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) No. 93-013. This study addresses the intermediate power plant size between 2 megawatt (MW) and 200 MW. A 25 MW natural-gas, fueled-carbonate fuel cell power plant was chosen for this purpose. In keeping with recent designs, the fuel cell will operate under approximately three atmospheres of pressure. An expander/alternator is utilized to expand exhaust gas to atmospheric conditions and generate additional power. A steam-bottoming cycle is not included in this study because it is not believed to be cost effective for this system size. This study also addresses the simplicity and accuracy of a spreadsheet-based simulation with that of a full Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) simulation. The personal computer can fully utilize the simple spreadsheet model simulation. This model can be made available to all users and is particularly advantageous to the small business user.

  17. Interactions between liquid-water and gas-diffusion layers in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Prodip K.; Santamaria, Anthony D.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2015-06-11

    Over the past few decades, a significant amount of research on polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) has been conducted to improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of fuel cell systems. However, the cost associated with the platinum (Pt) catalyst remains a barrier to their commercialization and PEFC durability standards have yet to be established. An effective path toward reducing PEFC cost is making the catalyst layers (CLs) thinner thus reducing expensive Pt content. The limit of thin CLs is high gas-transport resistance and the performance of these CLs is sensitive to the operating temperature due to their inherent lowmore » water uptake capacity, which results in higher sensitivity to liquid-water flooding and reduced durability. Therefore, reducing PEFC's cost by decreasing Pt content and improving PEFC's performance and durability by managing liquid-water are still challenging and open topics of research. An overlooked aspect nowadays of PEFC water management is the gas-diffusion layer (GDL). While it is known that GDL's properties can impact performance, typically it is not seen as a critical component. In this work, we present data showing the importance of GDLs in terms of water removal and management while also exploring the interactions between liquid-water and GDL surfaces. The critical interface of GDL and gas-flow-channel in the presence of liquid-water was examined through systematic studies of adhesion forces as a function of water-injection rate for various GDLs of varying thickness. GDL properties (breakthrough pressure and adhesion force) were measured experimentally under a host of test conditions. Specifically, the effects of GDL hydrophobic (PTFE) content, thickness, and water-injection rate were examined to identify trends that may be beneficial to the design of liquid-water management strategies and next-generation GDL materials for PEFCs.« less

  18. Interactions between liquid-water and gas-diffusion layers in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Santamaria, Anthony D.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2015-06-11

    Over the past few decades, a significant amount of research on polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) has been conducted to improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of fuel cell systems. However, the cost associated with the platinum (Pt) catalyst remains a barrier to their commercialization and PEFC durability standards have yet to be established. An effective path toward reducing PEFC cost is making the catalyst layers (CLs) thinner thus reducing expensive Pt content. The limit of thin CLs is high gas-transport resistance and the performance of these CLs is sensitive to the operating temperature due to their inherent low water uptake capacity, which results in higher sensitivity to liquid-water flooding and reduced durability. Therefore, reducing PEFC's cost by decreasing Pt content and improving PEFC's performance and durability by managing liquid-water are still challenging and open topics of research. An overlooked aspect nowadays of PEFC water management is the gas-diffusion layer (GDL). While it is known that GDL's properties can impact performance, typically it is not seen as a critical component. In this work, we present data showing the importance of GDLs in terms of water removal and management while also exploring the interactions between liquid-water and GDL surfaces. The critical interface of GDL and gas-flow-channel in the presence of liquid-water was examined through systematic studies of adhesion forces as a function of water-injection rate for various GDLs of varying thickness. GDL properties (breakthrough pressure and adhesion force) were measured experimentally under a host of test conditions. Specifically, the effects of GDL hydrophobic (PTFE) content, thickness, and water-injection rate were examined to identify trends that may be beneficial to the design of liquid-water management strategies and next-generation GDL materials for PEFCs.

  19. LncRNA GAS5 is a critical regulator of metastasis phenotype of melanoma cells and inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Yang, Huixin; Xiao, Yanbin; Tang, Xiaoxia; Li, Yuqian; Han, Qiaoqiao; Fu, Junping; Yang, Yuye; Zhu, Yuechun

    2016-01-01

    The present study intended to demonstrate the effects of long noncoding RNA growth arrest-specific transcript 5 (GAS5) on the migration and invasion of melanoma cells. We first detected the expression of GAS5 among four kinds of melanoma cell lines, followed by constructing GAS5-knocked down and overexpressed stable cells. Next, we evaluated the effects of GAS5 on cell migration and invasion using wound healing and gelatin zymography assays. Finally, melanoma cells with different GAS5 expression were injected into nude mice, and the tumor volumes were recorded and tumor tissues were analyzed after sacrificing the mice. This study systematically examined the function of GAS5 in mediating melanoma metastasis and revealed that GAS5 plays an anticancer role in melanoma via regulating gelatinase A and B, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27445498

  20. A 3D GCL compatible cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving gas dynamics equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, Gabriel; Breil, Jérôme; Maire, Pierre-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Solving the gas dynamics equations under the Lagrangian formalism enables to simulate complex flows with strong shock waves. This formulation is well suited to the simulation of multi-material compressible fluid flows such as those encountered in the domain of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These types of flows are characterized by complex 3D structures such as hydrodynamic instabilities (Richtmyer-Meshkov, Rayleigh-Taylor, etc.). Recently, the 3D extension of different Lagrangian schemes has been proposed and appears to be challenging. More precisely, the definition of the cell geometry in the 3D space through the treatment of its non-planar faces and the limiting of a reconstructed field in 3D in the case of a second-order extension are of great interest. This paper proposes two new methods to solve these problems. A systematic and symmetric geometrical decomposition of polyhedral cells is presented. This method enables to define a discrete divergence operator leading to the respect of the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL). Moreover, a multi-dimensional minmod limiter is proposed. This new limiter constructs, from nodal gradients, a cell gradient which enables to ensure the monotonicity of the numerical solution even in presence of strong discontinuity. These new ingredients are employed into a cell-centered Lagrangian scheme. Robustness and accuracy are assessed against various representative test cases.

  1. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  2. Real-time calibration of laser absorption spectrometer using spectral correlation performed with an in-line gas cell.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clinton J; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard

    2013-09-23

    A real-time drift correction and calibration method using spectral correlation based on a revolving in-line gas cell for laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas measurements has been developed and evaluated experimentally. This technique is relatively simple to implement in laser spectroscopy systems and assures long-term stability of trace-gas measurements by minimizing the effects of external sources of drift in real-time. Spectroscopic sensitivity sufficient for environmental monitoring and effective drift suppression has been achieved for long-term measurements of CO₂ with a quantum cascade laser based spectrometer.

  3. Investigation of water droplet dynamics in PEM fuel cell gas channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Preethi

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) has remained one of the most important issues that need to be addressed before its commercialization in automotive applications. Accumulation of water on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface in a PEMFC introduces a barrier for transport of reactant gases through the GDL to the catalyst layer. Despite the fact that the channel geometry is one of the key design parameters of a fluidic system, very limited research is available to study the effect of microchannel geometry on the two-phase flow structure. In this study, the droplet-wall dynamics and two-phase pressure drop across the water droplet present in a typical PEMFC channel, were examined in auto-competitive gas channel designs (0.4 x 0.7 mm channel cross section). The liquid water flow pattern inside the gas channel was analyzed for different air velocities. Experimental data was analyzed using the Concus-Finn condition to determine the wettability characteristics in the corner region. It was confirmed that the channel angle along with the air velocity and the channel material influences the water distribution and holdup within the channel. Dynamic contact angle emerged as an important parameter in controlling the droplet-wall interaction. Experiments were also performed to understand how the inlet location of the liquid droplet on the GDL surface affects the droplet dynamic behavior in the system. It was found that droplets emerging near the channel wall or under the land lead to corner filling of the channel. Improvements in the channel design has been proposed based on the artificial channel roughness created to act as capillary grooves to transport the liquid water away from the land area. For droplets emerging near the center of the channel, beside the filling and no-filling behavior reported in the literature, a new droplet jumping behavior was observed. As droplets grew and touched the sidewalls, they jumped off to the sidewall leaving the

  4. Interaction of coal-derived synthesis gas impurities with solid oxide fuel cell metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Cramer, Carolyn N.

    Oxidation-resistant alloys find use as interconnect materials, heat exchangers, and gas supply tubing in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, especially when operated at temperatures below ∼800 °C. If fueled with synthesis gas derived from coal or biomass, such metallic components could be exposed to impurities contained in those fuel sources. In this study, coupons of ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and SS 441, austenitic nickel-chromium superalloy Inconel 600, and an alumina-forming high nickel alloy alumel were exposed to synthesis gas containing ≤2 ppm phosphorus, arsenic and antimony, and reaction products were tested. Crofer 22 APU coupons coated with a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protective layer were also evaluated. Phosphorus was found to be the most reactive. On Crofer 22 APU, the (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 passivation layer reacted to form an Mn-P-O product, predicted to be manganese phosphate from thermochemical calculations, and Cr 2O 3. On SS 441, reaction of phosphorus with (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 led to the formation of manganese phosphate as well as an Fe-P product, predicted from thermochemical calculations to be Fe 3P. Minimal interactions with antimony or arsenic in synthesis gas were limited to Fe-Sb and Fe-As solid solution formation. Though not intended for use on the anode side, a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 spinel coating on Crofer 22 APU reacted with phosphorus in synthesis gas to produce products consistent with Mn 3(PO 4) 2 and Co 2P. A thin Cr 2O 3 passivation layer on Inconel 600 did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides and arsenides and of iron phosphides and arsenides, though no reaction with Cr 2O 3 was apparent. On alumel, an Al 2O 3 passivation layer rich in Ni did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides, arsenides, and antimonides, though no reaction with Al 2O 3 occurred. This work shows that unprotected metallic components of an SOFC stack and system can provide a sink for P, As and Sb impurities that may be present in fuel gases, and thus complicate

  5. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  6. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  7. Growth Arrest Specific 2 (GAS2) is a Critical Mediator of Germ Cell Cyst Breakdown and Folliculogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    York, J. Philippe; Ren, Yi Athena; Zeng, Jie; Bin Zhang; Wang, Fang; Chen, Rui; Liu, Jianqiao; Xia, Xuefeng; Zhang, Pumin

    2016-01-01

    In the mouse ovary, the primordial follicle pool is established through a diverse array of signaling pathways and tissue remodeling events. Growth arrest specific gene two (GAS2) is a highly conserved cytoskeleton-associated protein whose in vivo function remains unclear. In Drosophila, loss of the GAS2 homolog, Pigs, results in infertility. We demonstrate herein that, in the mouse ovary, GAS2 is expressed in the stromal cells surrounding the oocyte cysts on 16.5 dpc, and in stromal cells surrounding growing follicles during juvenile and adult life. We have generated genetically engineered mice with inactivated Gas2. Gas2 homozygous mutant mice are viable but have severely impaired fertility in females, in which oocyte cyst breakdown is disrupted and follicle growth is impaired, with significantly reduced numbers of large antral follicles and corpora lutea. In these mutant mice, the organization of the basal lamina surrounding developing follicles is severely defective at multiple stages of folliculogenesis. We also found that Notch signaling activity was altered in ovaries from Gas2 null mice around the time of birth and during follicular development later in life. These results indicate that GAS2 is a critical and novel regulator of tissue remodeling in the ovary during oocyte cyst breakdown and folliculogenesis. PMID:27734842

  8. In search of nuclear fusion in electrolytic cells and in metal/gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, D. R.; Paquette, J.; Boniface, H. A.; Graham, W. R. C.; Johnson, R. E.; Briden, N. A.; Cross, W. G.; Arneja, A.; Tennant, D. C.; Lone, M. A.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Chambers, K. W.; McIlwain, A. K.; Attas, E. M.; Dutton, R.

    1990-06-01

    It has been reported recently in the literature that unexpected thermal and nuclear effects (production of excess heat, neutrons, γ-rays, and tritium) can occur during the electrolysis of heavy water at palladium or titanium electrodes, or during temperature and pressure cycling of the titanium/deuterium gas system. We have attempted to reproduce some of these experiments. A variety of electrochemical cells having palladium cathodes in the form of wires, tubes, sheets, and rods have been used to electrolyze heavy water containing 0.1 mol.dm-3 LiOH, 0.1 mol.dn-3 LiOD or 0.5 mol.dm-3 D3PO4. Current densities of up to 200 mA.cm-2 were applied. The mass of the palladium cathodes covered the range from 1-40 grams and the surface area varied from 8-140 cm2. Neutron detection systems with low constant backgrounds were used to search for neutron emission during electrolysis. These included3He- and10BF3-based detectors. After running some of the cells for more than 30 days, no neutron emission above background could be detected. This puts upper limits of 0.5 s-1 and 2×10-23 fus. D-D.s-1 on the neutron emission and the fusion rate, respectively. A sensitive and accurate heat-flow calorimeter was built and used to monitor the energy balance of some of the cells during electrolysis. No unexpected heat effects were observed. This puts an upper limit of 0.13 W.cm-3 on the specific excess power. No enrichment of the electrolyte in tritium was evident after electrolysis. Experiments were also performed with the titanium/ deuterium gas system. These consisted of exposing titanium metal to a deuterium gas pressure of 40 atmospheres, lowering the temperature to -196°C, releasing the pressure and gradually warming the titanium to room temperature. No neutron emission above background was observed during these experiments, which puts upper limits of 0.5 s-1 and 4×10-25 fus.D-D.s-1 on the neutron emission and fusion rate, respectively.

  9. Exposure at the cell surface is required for gas3/PMP22 To regulate both cell death and cell spreading: implication for the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and Dejerine-Sottas diseases.

    PubMed

    Brancolini, C; Edomi, P; Marzinotto, S; Schneider, C

    2000-09-01

    Gas3/PMP22 is a tetraspan membrane protein highly expressed in myelinating Schwann cells. Point mutations in the gas3/PMP22 gene account for the dominant inherited peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A) and Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS). Gas3/PMP22 can regulate apoptosis and cell spreading in cultured cells. Gas3/PMP22 point mutations, which are responsible for these diseases, are defective in this respect. In this report, we demonstrate that Gas3/PMP22-WT is exposed at the cell surface, while its point-mutated derivatives are intracellularly retained, colocalizing mainly with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The putative retrieval motif present in the carboxyl terminus of Gas3/PMP22 is not sufficient for the intracellular sequestration of its point-mutated forms. On the contrary, the introduction of a retrieval signal at the carboxyl terminus of Gas3/PMP22-WT leads to its intracellular accumulation, which is accompanied by a failure to trigger cell death as well as by changes in cell spreading. In addition, by substituting the Asn at position 41 required for N-glycosylation, we provide evidence that N-glycosylation is required for the full effect on cell spreading, but it is not necessary for triggering cell death. In conclusion, we suggest that the DSS and the CMT1A neuropathies derived from point mutations of Gas3/PMP22 might arise, at the molecular level, from a reduced exposure of Gas3/PMP22 at the cell surface, which is required to exert its biological functions. PMID:10982389

  10. The Community Seismic Network and Quake-Catcher Network: Monitoring building response to earthquakes through community instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Kohler, M. D.; Heaton, T. H.; Clayton, R. W.; Chandy, M.; Cochran, E.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Community Seismic Network (CSN) and Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) are dense networks of low-cost ($50) accelerometers that are deployed by community volunteers in their homes in California. In addition, many accelerometers are installed in public spaces associated with civic services, publicly-operated utilities, university campuses, and high-rise buildings. Both CSN and QCN consist of observation-based structural monitoring which is carried out using records from one to tens of stations in a single building. We have deployed about 150 accelerometers in a number of buildings ranging between five and 23 stories in the Los Angeles region. In addition to a USB-connected device which connects to the host's computer, we have developed a stand-alone sensor-plug-computer device that directly connects to the internet via Ethernet or WiFi. In the case of CSN, the sensors report data to the Google App Engine cloud computing service consisting of data centers geographically distributed across the continent. This robust infrastructure provides parallelism and redundancy during times of disaster that could affect hardware. The QCN sensors, however, are connected to netbooks with continuous data streaming in real-time via the distributed computing Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing software program to a server at Stanford University. In both networks, continuous and triggered data streams use a STA/LTA scheme to determine the occurrence of significant ground accelerations. Waveform data, as well as derived parameters such as peak ground acceleration, are then sent to the associated archives. Visualization models of the instrumented buildings' dynamic linear response have been constructed using Google SketchUp and MATLAB. When data are available from a limited number of accelerometers installed in high rises, the buildings are represented as simple shear beam or prismatic Timoshenko beam models with soil-structure interaction. Small-magnitude earthquake records

  11. Circulating long noncoding RNA GAS5 is a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenjun; Lv, Tangfeng; Shi, Xuefei; Liu, Hongbing; Zhu, Qingqing; Zeng, Junli; Yang, Wen; Yin, Jie; Song, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The recently discovered long noncoding RNAs have the potential to regulate many biological processes, which are aberrantly expressed in many tumor types. Our previous study showed that the long noncoding RNA-growth arrest-specific transcript 5 (GAS5) was decreased in lung cancer tissue, which contributed to the proliferation and apoptosis of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). GAS5 was also associated with the prognosis of lung cancer patients. These results suggest that GAS5 may represent a novel prognostic indicator and a target for gene therapy in NSCLC. However, the expression and diagnosis significance of GAS5 in the plasma of NSCLC patients was unknown. The plasma samples were more readily available than the tissue samples in clinical, so we designed the study to investigate the diagnosis value of GAS5 in blood samples. In our study, 90 patients with NSCLC and 33 healthy controls were included. Blood samples were collected before surgery and therapy. We extracted the free RNA in the plasma and analyzed the expression of GAS5 with quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Suitable statistics methods were used to compare the plasma GAS5 levels of preoperative and postoperative plasma samples between the NSCLC patients and healthy controls. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of plasma GAS5 in NSCLC. The results showed that GAS5 was detectable and stable in the plasma of NSCLC patients. Furthermore, the plasma levels of GAS5 were significantly down-regulated in NSCLC patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0.000). Moreover, GAS5 levels increased markedly on the seventh day after surgery compared with preoperative GAS5 levels in NSCLC patients (P = 0.003). GAS5 expression levels could be used to distinguish NSCLC patients from control patients with an area under the curve of 0.832 (P < 0.0001; sensitivity, 82.2%; specificity, 72.7%). The combination of the GAS5 and

  12. Persistent Effectivity of Gas Plasma-Treated, Long Time-Stored Liquid on Epithelial Cell Adhesion Capacity and Membrane Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Hoentsch, Maxi; Bussiahn, René; Rebl, Henrike; Bergemann, Claudia; Eggert, Martin; Frank, Marcus; von Woedtke, Thomas; Nebe, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Research in plasma medicine includes a major interest in understanding gas plasma-cell interactions. The immediate application of gas plasma in vitro inhibits cell attachment, vitality and cell-cell contacts via the liquid. Interestingly, in our novel experiments described here we found that the liquid-mediated plasma effect is long-lasting after storage up to seven days; i. e. the liquid preserves the characteristics once induced by the argon plasma. Therefore, the complete Dulbecco's Modified Eagle cell culture medium was argon plasma-treated (atmospheric pressure, kINPen09) for 60 s, stored for several days (1, 4 and 7 d) at 37°C and added to a confluent mouse hepatocyte epithelial cell (mHepR1) monolayer. Impaired tight junction architecture as well as shortened microvilli on the cell membrane could be observed, which was accompanied by the loss of cell adhesion capacity. Online-monitoring of vital cells revealed a reduced cell respiration. Our first time-dependent analysis of plasma-treated medium revealed that temperature, hydrogen peroxide production, pH and oxygen content can be excluded as initiators of cell physiological and morphological changes. The here observed persisting biological effects in plasma-treated liquids could open new medical applications in dentistry and orthopaedics. PMID:25170906

  13. Measurement of effective gas diffusion coefficients of catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells with a Loschmidt diffusion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Navessin, Titichai; Liu, Zhong-Sheng (Simon); Lei, Chao; Rohling, Jurandir H.; Bessarabov, Dmitri; Knights, Shanna; Ye, Siyu

    In this work, using an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell, we measure the effective coefficient of dry gas (O 2-N 2) diffusion in cathode catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells at 25 °C and 1 atmosphere. The thicknesses of the catalyst layers under investigation are from 6 to 29 μm. Each catalyst layer is deposited on an Al 2O 3 membrane substrate by an automated spray coater. Diffusion signal processing procedure is developed to deduce the effective diffusion coefficient, which is found to be (1.47 ± 0.05) × 10 -7 m 2 s -1 for the catalyst layers. Porosity and pore size distribution of the catalyst layers are also measured using Hg porosimetry. The diffusion resistance of the interface between the catalyst layer and the substrate is found to be negligible. The experimental results show that the O 2-N 2 diffusion in the catalyst layers is dominated by the Knudsen effect.

  14. A Monte Carlo Analysis of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Process Load Cell Data

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, James R; Whitaker, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    As uranium enrichment plants increase in number, capacity, and types of separative technology deployed (e.g., gas centrifuge, laser, etc.), more automated safeguards measures are needed to enable the IAEA to maintain safeguards effectiveness in a fiscally constrained environment. Monitoring load cell data can significantly increase the IAEA s ability to efficiently achieve the fundamental safeguards objective of confirming operations as declared (i.e., no undeclared activities), but care must be taken to fully protect the operator s proprietary and classified information related to operations. Staff at ORNL, LANL, JRC/ISPRA, and University of Glasgow are investigating monitoring the process load cells at feed and withdrawal (F/W) stations to improve international safeguards at enrichment plants. A key question that must be resolved is what is the necessary frequency of recording data from the process F/W stations? Several studies have analyzed data collected at a fixed frequency. This paper contributes to load cell process monitoring research by presenting an analysis of Monte Carlo simulations to determine the expected errors caused by low frequency sampling and its impact on material balance calculations.

  15. Cycle Analysis of Micro Gas Turbine-Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Hybrid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimijima, Shinji; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    A hybrid system based on a micro gas turbine (µGT) and a high-temperature fuel cell, i.e., molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) or solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), is expected to achieve a much higher efficiency than conventional distributed power generation systems. In this study, a cycle analysis method and the performance evaluation of a µGT-MCFC hybrid system, of which the power output is 30kW, are investigated to clarify its feasibility. We developed a general design strategy in which a low fuel input to a combustor and higher MCFC operating temperature result in a high power generation efficiency. A high recuperator temperature effectiveness and a moderate steam-carbon ratio are the requirements for obtaining a high material strength in a turbine. In addition, by employing a combustor for complete oxidation of MCFC effluents without additional fuel input, i.e., a catalytic combustor, the power generation efficiency of a µGT-MCFC is achieved at over 60%(LHV).

  16. Induction of benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells by manufactured gas residues

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, R.; Levine, G.; Leadon, S.A.; Chaloupka, K.; Safe, S.

    1994-12-31

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the non-genotoxic effects of manufactured gas plant residues which present complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The effect of these residues on benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells was studied. Cells were preincubated with hexane-extractable coal tar material for 16 hr, then incubated with {sup 3}H-BaP for 2 hr and the amount of BaP metabolites in cell extracts was determined by HPLC. An up to 5-fold increase over control in BaP metabolites was seen after preincubation with 0.2 {mu}g/ml coal tar material (a oncytotoxic dose). Coal tar extracts were equally effective as pure BaP in inducing BaP metabolism. As BaP constitutes less than 1% of the coal tar, other components in the coal tar mixtures appear to be even more potent than BaP in inducing the enzyme system responsible for BaP metabolism. The increase in BaP metabolites was accompanied by a proportional increase in P4501A1 mRNA as measured by Northern blotting, and resulted in an increase of BaP adducts to DNA. These results show that coal tars and other P450-inducting compounds can act as cocarcinogens by enhancing the genotoxic effects of compounds metabolized by the P4501A1 enzyme.

  17. Dual quantum cascade laser trace gas instrument with astigmatic Herriott cell at high pass number.

    PubMed

    McManus, J Barry; Zahniser, Mark S; Nelson, David D

    2011-02-01

    We have developed and demonstrated a high-sensitivity trace gas instrument employing two mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and an astigmatic Herriott sample cell with up to a 240 m path length. Several aspects of astigmatic Herriott cell optics have been addressed to enable operation at a high pass number (up to 554), including aberrations and pattern selection to minimize interference fringes. The new instrument design, based on the 200 m cell, can measure various atmospheric trace gases, depending on the installed lasers, with multiple trace gases measured simultaneously. Demonstrated concentration noise levels (1 s average) are 40 parts per trillion [(ppt) 10(-12)] for formaldehyde, 10 ppt for carbonyl sulfide, 110 ppt for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 180 ppt for nitrous acid (HONO). High-precision measurements of nitrous oxide and methane have been recorded at the same time as high-sensitivity measurements of HONO and H2O2.

  18. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  19. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.'' This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft[sup 2] cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  20. Deformation of PEM fuel cell gas diffusion layers under compressive loading: An analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzifard, Vahid; Bahrami, Majid

    2014-10-01

    In the PEM fuel cell stack, the fibrous porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) provides mechanical support for the membrane assembly against the compressive loads imposed by bipolar plates. In this study, a new mechanistic model is developed using fundamental beam theory that can accurately predict the mechanical deflection of GDL under compressive loads. The present analytical model is built on a unit cell approach, which assumes a simplified geometry for the complex and random GDL microstructure. The model includes salient microstructural parameters and properties of the fibrous porous medium including: carbon fiber diameter, fiber elastic modulus, pore size distribution, and porosity. Carbon fiber bending is proved to be the main deformation mechanism at the unit cell level. A comprehensive optical measurement study with statistical analysis is performed to determine the geometrical parameters of the model for a number of commercially available GDL samples. A comparison between the present model and our experimental stress-strain data shows a good agreement for the linear deformation region, where the compressive pressure is higher than 1 MPa.

  1. Development of Electrolysis System Powered by Solar-Cell Array to Supply Hydrogen Gas for Fuel-Cell Energy Resource Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priambodo, Purnomo Sidi; Yusivar, Feri; Subiantoro, Aries; Gunawan, Ridwan

    2009-09-01

    The huge demand of energy worldwide and the depletion of fossil based energy, is a strong reason to rapidly develop any kind of renewable energy resources, which has economical advantages and zero pollution effect. One of the renewable energy technologies aimed in this paper is the generation of electric-energy based on fuel-cell technology, where the input hydrogen (H2) gas is supplied by electrolysis system powered by renewable energy system based on solar cell. In this paper, the authors explain the development of electrolysis system which is powered by solar cell array to supply hydrogen for fuel-cell system. The authors explain in detail how to design an efficient electrolysis system to obtain high ratio conversion of electric energy to hydrogen gas volume. It includes the explanation of the usage of multiple anodes with a single cathode for many solar cell inputs in a single electrolysis system. Hereinafter this is referred as multiple anode electrolysis system. This multiple anode electrolysis system makes the management of hydrogen gas becomes more efficient and effective by using only a single hydrogen gas storage system. This paper also explain the careful design of the resistance value of the electrolysis system to protect or avoid the solar cell panel to deliver excessive current to the electrolysis system which can cause damage on the solar cell panel. Moreover, the electrolyte volume detector is applied on the system as a tool to measure the electrolyte concentration to assure the system resistance is still in the allowed range. Further, the hydrogen gas produced by electrolysis system is stored into the gas storage which consists of silica-gel purifier, first stage low pressure gas bottle, vacuum pump, and second stage high pressure gas bottle. In the first step, the pump will vacuum the first bottle. The first bottle will collect the hydrogen from the electrolysis system through the silica gel to get rid of water vapor. When the first bottle

  2. A system using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacities in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1976-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 kN/sq m (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench, gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples. The system also contains the high input impedance electronics necessary for measurements, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change relative to temperature and redox state. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  3. JSC systems using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacites in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1981-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 KN/sq meter (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change of temperature. A thermogravimetric analysis system employing these techniques of redox control and measurement is also described. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  4. Inventing the Wave Catchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Arthur

    1983-01-01

    Physicists and engineers advance the state of several arts in the design of gravitational-wave detection equipment. Provides background information and discusses the equipment (including laser interferometer), its use, and results of several experimental studies. (JN)

  5. Cytotoxicity of NO2 gas to cultured human and murine cells in an inverted monolayer exposure system.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Wallin, A; Moldéus, P; Cotgreave, I A

    1995-01-19

    We report the development of an optimised exposure system for the exposure of inverted cell cultures to NO2, which presents several advantages over conventional, right-side-up exposure systems. Firstly, the cells may be directly exposed to NO2 in the gas phase for up to 1 h, without the interposition of an aqueous layer. Secondly, the chamber system allows simple and precise control of the gas concentration during the exposure. Finally, the system allows the simultaneous exposure of large numbers of cells under sterile conditions, facilitating further culture of the cells after the exposure period. We report the application of this system to a comparative study of the toxicity of NO2 in three different cell types involved in the circuit of the inflammatory response, the IC-21 murine macrophage line, the A-549 human pulmonary type II-like epithelial cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. As little as 2 ppm NO2 for 20 min reduced colony-forming efficiency of HUVE cells and A-549 cells and A-549 cells to 35% and 78% of their air controls, respectively. Exposure to 5 ppm NO2 for 1 h increased lactate dehydrogenase release of HUVE cells, IC-21 macrophages and A-549 cells from 7.9% to 21.6%, 5.7% to 10.9% and 2.0% to 3.4%, respectively, whilst 10 ppm NO2 for 1 h lowered cellular glutathione in HUVE cells, IC-21 cells and A-549 cells from 35.2 nmol/mg to 23.3 nmol/mg, from 45.0 nmol/mg to 31.0 nmol/mg and from 86.4 nmol/mg to 69.2 nmol/mg, respectively. Of the cell types tested it was shown that HUVE cells and IC-21 cells were equally sensitive to the toxicity of NO2, whilst A-549 cells displayed considerable resistance, perhaps due to the considerably higher levels of glutathione in this cell line. Further, a comparison of the sensitivity of HUVE cells to NO2, using several modes of exposure (inverted and right-side-up (either rocked or static)) and the assay of lactate dehydrogenase and [3H]deoxyglucose release, revealed that the present inverted exposure

  6. Design, construction and cooling system performance of a prototype cryogenic stopping cell for the Super-FRS at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Dickel, T.; Reiter, M. P.; Ayet, S.; Haettner, E.; Moore, I. D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Geissel, H.; Plaß, W. R.; Schäfer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schreuder, F.; Timersma, H.; Van de Walle, J.; Weick, H.

    2015-01-01

    A cryogenic stopping cell for stopping energetic radioactive ions and extracting them as a low energy beam was developed. This first ever cryogenically operated stopping cell serves as prototype device for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS at FAIR. The cell has a stopping volume that is 1 m long and 25 cm in diameter. Ions are guided by a DC field along the length of the stopping cell and by a combined RF and DC fields provided by an RF carpet at the exit-hole side. The ultra-high purity of the stopping gas required for optimum ion survival is reached by cryogenic operation. The design considerations and construction of the cryogenic stopping cell, as well as some performance characteristics, are described in detail. Special attention is given to the cryogenic aspects in the design and construction of the stopping cell and the cryocooler-based cooling system. The cooling system allows the operation of the stopping cell at any desired temperature between about 70 K and room temperature. The cooling system performance in realistic on-line conditions at the FRS Ion Catcher Facility at GSI is discussed. A temperature of 110 K at which efficient ion survival was observed is obtained after 10 h of cooling. A minimum temperature of the stopping gas of 72 K was reached. The expertise gained from the design, construction and performance of the prototype cryogenic stopping cell has allowed the development of a final version for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS to proceed.

  7. The Case for Natural Gas Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Weimar, Mark R.; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Natural-gas-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (NGSOFC) power systems yield electrical conversion efficiencies exceeding 60% and may become a viable alternative for distributed generation (DG) if stack life and manufacturing economies of scale can be realized. Currently, stacks last approximately 2 years and few systems are produced each year because of the relatively high cost of electricity from the systems. If mass manufacturing (10,000 units per year) and a stack life of 15 years can be reached, the cost of electricity from an NGSOFC system is estimated to be about 7.7 ¢/kWh, well within the price of commercial and residential retail prices at the national level (9.9-10¢/kWh and 11-12 ¢/kWh, respectively). With an additional 5 ¢/kWh in estimated additional benefits from DG, NGSOFC could be well positioned to replace the forecasted 59-77 gigawatts of capacity loss resulting from coal plant closures due to stricter emissions regulations and low natural gas prices.

  8. Pyrolytic Methylation-Gas Chromatography of Whole Bacterial Cells for Rapid Profiling of Cellular Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dworzanski, Jacek P.; Berwald, Luc; Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.

    1990-01-01

    A novel, on-line derivatization technique has been developed which enables generation of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles from microorganisms by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry without the need for laborious and time-consuming sample preparation. Microgram amounts of bacterial cells are directly applied to a thin ferromagnetic filament and covered with a single drop of methanolic solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide. After air drying, the filament is inserted into a special gas chromatograph inlet equipped with a high-frequency coil, thus enabling rapid inductive heating of the ferromagnetic filament. This so-called Curie-point heating technique is shown to produce patterns of bacterial FAMEs which are qualitatively and quantitatively nearly identical to those obtained from extracts of methylated lipids prepared by conventional sample pretreatment methods. Relatively minor differences involve the loss of hydroxy-substituted fatty acids by the pyrolytic approach as well as strongly enhanced signals of FAMEs derived from mycolic acids. This type of pyrolysis enables on-line derivatization and thermal extraction of volatile derivatives for analysis, whereas the residual components remain on a disposable probe (ferromagnetic wire) of a pyrolytic device. The reduced sample size (micrograms instead of milligrams) and the lack of sample preparation requirements open up the possibility of rapid microbiological identification of single colonies (thus overcoming the need for time-consuming subculturing) as well as analysis of FAME profiles directly from complex environmental samples. PMID:16348214

  9. Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Benjamin P.; Lavery, Nicholas P.; Jarvis, David J.; Anttila, Tomi; Rantanen, Jyri; Brown, Stephen G. R.; Adkins, Nicholas J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a cradle-to-grave comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of new gas atomised (GA) sponge nickel catalysts and evaluates their performance against the both cast and crush (CC) sponge nickel and platinum standards currently used in commercial alkaline fuel cells (AFC). The LCA takes into account the energy used and emissions throughout the entire life cycle of sponge nickel catalysts - ranging from the upstream production of materials (mainly aluminium and nickel), to the manufacturing, to the operation and finally to the recycling and disposal. Through this assessment it was found that the energy and emissions during the operational phase associated with a given catalyst considerably outweigh the primary production, manufacturing and recycling. Primary production of the nickel (and to a lesser extent dopant materials) also has a significant environmental impact but this is offset by operational energy savings over the electrode's estimated lifetime and end of life recyclability. From the results it can be concluded that higher activity spongy nickel catalysts produced by gas atomisation could have a significantly lower environmental impact than either CC nickel or platinum. Doped GA sponge nickel in particular showed comparable performance to that of the standard platinum electrode used in AFCs.

  10. Hot-gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells-dechlorination and soot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D.; Gelb, A.; Lord, G.; Simons, G.

    1984-01-01

    Two separate aspects of hot-gas conditioning for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) were investigated: potential high temperature chloride sorbent materials were screened and tested and carbon deposition on MCFC components was studied experimentally to determine guidelines for maximizing MCFC efficiency while avoiding carbon fouling. Natural minerals containing sodium carbonate were identified as the most promising candidates for economical removal of chlorides from coal gasifier effluents at temperatures of about 800 K (980 F). The mineral Shortite was tested in a fixed bed and found to perform remarkably well with no calcination. Measurements showed that carbon deposition can occur in the equilibrium carbon free region because of the relative rates of the relevant reactions. On all surfaces tested, the Boudouard carbon formation reaction is much faster than the water-gas shift reaction which is much faster than the methanation reaction. This means that the normal practice of adding steam to prevent carbon formation will only succeed if flows are slow enough for the water shift reaction to go substantially to completion. More direct suppression of carbon formation can be achieved by CO2 addition through anode recycle to force the Boudouard reaction backward.

  11. Platform for a hydrocarbon exhaust gas sensor utilizing a pumping cell and a conductometric sensor.

    PubMed

    Biskupski, Diana; Geupel, Andrea; Wiesner, Kerstin; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich) atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga(2)O(3) or doped SrTiO(3) are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electrochemical pumping cell made of YSZ to establish a constant oxygen concentration in the ambient of the conductometric sensor film. In this paper, the platform is introduced, the two-sensor-setup is integrated into this new design, and sensing performance is characterized. Such a platform can be used for other sensor principles as well. PMID:22423212

  12. Usage of biomass gas for fuel cells by the SIR process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Viktor; Faleschini, Gottfried; Fuchs, Heidrun; Fankhauser, Robert; Simader, Günter; Ghaemi, Mehdi; Spreitz, Birgit; Friedrich, Kurt

    The application of fuel cells in our future energy system depends on a cost-efficient production and supply of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO). The process cycle iron oxide/iron/hydrogen offers a simple possibility to store the energy of synthesis gases in the form of sponge iron and at the same time to reform and condition these synthesis gases. As `product' of this energy storage system one receives pure hydrogen. The `Sponge Iron Reaction' (SIR) process offers some advantages against conventional gas cleaning and conversion processes: (i) low-cost hydrogen by using cheap sponge iron materials; (ii) high-quality hydrogen from low-BTU gases by a two-step operation; (iii) high efficiency compared with competitive technologies and (iv) system versatility and ease of siting. Commercially available iron ore pellets (hematite Fe2O3) and self-produced pellets are used as contact mass.

  13. Preparation and operation of gas diffusion electrodes for high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chao; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf; He, Ronghuan; Cleemann, Lars N.; Nilsson, Morten S.; Bjerrum, Niels J.; Zeng, Qingxue

    Gas diffusion electrodes for high-temperature PEMFC based on acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes were prepared by a tape-casting method. The overall porosity of the electrodes was tailored in a range from 38% to 59% by introducing porogens into the supporting and/or catalyst layers. The investigated porogens include volatile ammonium oxalate, carbonate and acetate and acid-soluble zinc oxide, among which are ammonium oxalate and ZnO more effective in improving the overall electrode porosity. Effects of the electrode porosity on the fuel cell performance were investigated in terms of the cathodic limiting current density and minimum air stoichiometry, anodic limiting current and hydrogen utilization, as well as operations under different pressures and temperatures.

  14. The extraction of 229Th3+ from a buffer-gas stopping cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wense, L. v. d.; Seiferle, B.; Laatiaoui, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2016-06-01

    In the whole landscape of atomic nuclei, 229Th is currently the only known nucleus which could allow for the development of a nuclear-based frequency standard, as it possesses an isomeric state of just 7.6 eV energy above the ground state. The 3+ charge state is of special importance in this context, as Th3+ allows for a simple laser-cooling scheme. Here we emphasize the direct extraction of triply-charged 229Th from a buffer-gas stopping cell. This finding will not only simplify any future approach of 229Th ion cooling, but is also used for thorium-beam purification and in this way provides a powerful tool for the direct identification of the 229Th isomer to ground state nuclear transition.

  15. Energy recuperation in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine (GT) combined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchonthara, Prapan; Bhattacharya, Sankar; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    A combined power generation system consisting of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine (GT) with steam and heat recuperation (HR) was evaluated using a commercial process simulation tool, ASPEN Plus. The effect of steam recuperation (SR) on the overall efficiency of the combined system was investigated by comparing the SOFC-GT during heat and steam recuperation (HSR) against the system during only heat recuperation. At low turbine inlet temperatures (TITs), the overall efficiency of the SOFC-GT combined system with heat and steam recuperation improved by showing an increase in TIT and a reduction in pressure ratio (PR). On the other hand, at high TITs, the opposite trend was observed. The integration of steam recuperation was found to improve the overall efficiency and specific power of SOFC-GT combined systems with a relatively compact SOFC component.

  16. The performance of a thermophilic microbial fuel cell fed with synthesis gas.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A; Mehta, P; Raghavan, V; Wang, H; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2012-08-10

    This study demonstrated electricity generation in a thermophilic microbial fuel cell (MFC) operated on synthesis gas (syngas) as the sole electron donor. At 50°C, a volumetric power output of 30-35 mWL(R)(-1) and a syngas conversion efficiency of 87-98% was achieved. The observed pathway of syngas conversion to electricity primarily consisted of a two-step process, where the carbon monoxide and hydrogen were first converted to acetate, which was then consumed by the anodophilic bacteria to produce electricity. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rDNA revealed the presence of Geobacter species, Acetobacter, methanogens and several uncultured bacteria and archaea in the anodic chamber. PMID:22759536

  17. Elimination of the light shift in rubidium gas cell frequency standards using pulsed optical pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, T. C.; Jechart, E.; Kwon, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the intensity of the light source in an optically pumped, rubidium, gas cell frequency standard can produce corresponding frequency shifts, with possible adverse effects on the long-term frequency stability. A pulsed optical pumping apparatus was constructed with the intent of investigating the frequency stability in the absence of light shifts. Contrary to original expectations, a small residual frequency shift due to changes in light intensity was experimentally observed. Evidence is given which indicates that this is not a true light-shift effect. Preliminary measurements of the frequency stability of this apparatus, with this small residual pseudo light shift present, are presented. It is shown that this pseudo light shift can be eliminated by using a more homogeneous C-field. This is consistent with the idea that the pseudo light shift is due to inhomogeneity in the physics package (position-shift effect).

  18. Comparing neural networks: a benchmark on growing neural gas, growing cell structures, and fuzzy ARTMAP.

    PubMed

    Heinke, D; Hamker, F H

    1998-01-01

    This article compares the performance of some recently developed incremental neural networks with the wellknown multilayer perceptron (MLP) on real-world data. The incremental networks are fuzzy ARTMAP (FAM), growing neural gas (GNG) and growing cell structures (GCS). The real-world datasets consist of four different datasets posing different challenges to the networks in terms of complexity of decision boundaries, overlapping between classes, and size of the datasets. The performance of the networks on the datasets is reported with respect to measure classification error, number of training epochs, and sensitivity toward variation of parameters. Statistical evaluations are applied to examine the significance of the results. The overall performance ranks in the following descending order: GNG, GCS, MLP, FAM. PMID:18255809

  19. Parabolic cell for low-background Raman analysis of gas samples.

    PubMed

    Yu, Anlan; Zuo, Duluo; Li, Bin; Gao, Jun; Wang, Xinbing

    2016-05-01

    A compact Raman system constructed by a parabolic sample cell and an imaging spectrograph, which has good capability for enhancing a Raman signal and compressing a continuous background, has been put forward. In the Raman spectra of ambient air acquired by this system, the signal level of N2 was enhanced up to 14 times compared with free space, and the related signal to background ratio was increased nearly to 96. With an integration time of 10 s, the rotational fine structure of O2 and N2 were clearly recognized. Besides, a standard analytic gas mixture consisting of H2, CO2, and CO was also tested, and the 3σ LODs of 68 ppm for H2, 54 ppm for CO2 and 116 ppm for CO were obtained.

  20. Platform for a Hydrocarbon Exhaust Gas Sensor Utilizing a Pumping Cell and a Conductometric Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Biskupski, Diana; Geupel, Andrea; Wiesner, Kerstin; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich) atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga2O3 or doped SrTiO3 are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electrochemical pumping cell made of YSZ to establish a constant oxygen concentration in the ambient of the conductometric sensor film. In this paper, the platform is introduced, the two-sensor-setup is integrated into this new design, and sensing performance is characterized. Such a platform can be used for other sensor principles as well. PMID:22423212

  1. Optical-cell evidence for superheated ice under gas-hydrate-forming conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Hogenboom, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported indirect but compelling evidence that fine-grained H2O ice under elevated CH4 gas pressure can persist to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while slowly reacting to form methane clathrate hydrate. This phenomenon has now been visually verified by duplicating these experiments in an optical cell while observing the very slow hydrate-forming process as the reactants were warmed from 250 to 290 K at methane pressures of 23 to 30 MPa. Limited hydrate growth occurred rapidly after initial exposure of the methane gas to the ice grains at temperatures well within the ice subsolidus region. No evidence for continued growth of the hydrate phase was observed until samples were warmed above the equilibrium H2O melting curve. With continued heating, no bulk melting of the ice grains or free liquid water was detected anywhere within the optical cell until hydrate dissociation conditions were reached (292 K at 30 MPa), even though full conversion of the ice grains to hydrate requires 6-8 h at temperatures approaching 290 K. In a separate experimental sequence, unreacted portions of H2O ice grains that had persisted to temperatures above their ordinary melting point were successfully induced to melt, without dissociating the coexisting hydrate in the sample tube, by reducing the pressure overstep of the equilibrium phase boundary and thereby reducing the rate of hydrate growth at the ice-hydrate interface. Results from similar tests using CO2 as the hydrate-forming species demonstrated that this superheating effect is not unique to the CH4-H2O system.

  2. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-01-01

    Method using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen therefrom at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate.

  3. Experimental and theoretical study of a dual-layer gas diffusion layer in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sehkyu

    2008-07-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) functions as a diffuser and a current collector. The GDL typically consists of the microporous layer (MPL) and the macroporous substrate (MPS). The MPL reduces the ohmic losses and facilitates water removal in the MEA. In this study, a novel method was developed to prepare a dual-layer GDL that enhances the catalyst utilization and the overall fuel cell performance. Several characterization techniques, including mercury porosimetry, water permeation measurement, electrochemical polarization and ac impedance spectroscopy were performed to investigate how carbon loading (or MPL thickness) and PTFE content in the MPL and in the MPS control the water management in PEM fuel cells. An experimental study on carbon loading in the MPL showed that a relatively low carbon loading (0.5 mg cm-2 in this study) results in a balancing of water saturations in the catalyst layer and the GDL, thus improving the oxygen diffusion kinetics. Experimental studies on PTFE content in the MPL and in the MPS indicated that effective water management is attributed to the trade-off between the pore volume and the hydrophobic property of each diffusion layer. A theoretical study of a dual-layer GDL in PEM fuel cells demonstrated that saturation in the MPS is intimately coupled with both the fraction of hydrophilic surface and the average pore diameter. A thin and more hydrophobic MPL altered the pore geometry and the hydrophobic property of a MPS, resulting in better mass transport of reactants and products in the MEA.

  4. Investigations of Biofilm-Forming Bacterial Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy Prior to and Following Treatment from Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervoort, K. G.; Joaquin, J. C.; Kwan, C.; Bray, J. D.; Torrico, R.; Abramzon, N.; Brelles-Marino, G.

    2007-03-01

    We present investigations of biofilm-forming bacteria before and after treatment from gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve bacteria in biofilm communities, where cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard killing methods. Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In addition, cell wall elasticity was studied by measuring force distance curves as the AFM tip was pressed into the cell surface. Results for cell surface morphology and micromechanical properties for plasma treatments lasting from 5 to 60 minutes were obtained and will be presented.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: UTC FUEL CELLS' PC25C POWER PLANT - GAS PROCESSING UNIT PERFORMANCE FOR ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program, which provides objective and scientific third party analysis of new technology that can benefit the environment, a combined heat and power system based on the UTC Fuel Cell's PC25C Fuel Cell Power Plant was evaluated. The...

  6. Reversible Poisoning of the Nickel/Zirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes by Hydrogen Chloride in Coal Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Yoon, Kyung J.

    2010-10-15

    The performance of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was evaluated in synthetic coal gas containing HCl in the temperature range 650 to 850oC. Exposure to up to 800 ppm HCl resulted in reversible poisoning of the Ni/zirconia anode by chlorine species adsorption, the magnitude of which decreased with increased temperature. Performance losses increased with the concentration of HCl to ~100 ppm, above which losses were insensitive to HCl concentration. Cell voltage had no effect on poisoning. No evidence was found for long-term degradation that can be attributed to HCl exposure. Similarly, no evidence of microstructural changes or formation of new solid phases as a result of HCl exposure was found. From thermodynamic calculations, solid nickel chloride phase formation was shown to be highly unlikely in coal gas. Further, the presence of HCl at even the highest anticipated concentrations in coal gas would minimally increase the volatility of nickel.

  7. Proteomic investigation of natural killer cell microsomes using gas-phase fractionation by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Josip; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria Cecilia; Lucas, David A; Young, Howard A; Issaq, Haleem J; Veenstra, Timothy D; Conrads, Thomas P

    2004-04-01

    We have explored the utility of gas-phase fractionation by mass spectrometry (MS) in the mass-to-charge (m/z) dimension (GPF(m/z)) for increasing the effective number of protein identifications in cases where sample quantity limits the use of multi-dimensional chromatographic fractionation. A peptide digestate from proteins isolated from the membrane fraction of natural killer (NK) cells was analyzed by microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled online to an ion-trap (IT) mass spectrometer. Performing GPF(m/z) using eight narrow precursor ion scan m/z ranges enabled the identification of 340 NK cell proteins from 12 microg of digestate, representing more than a fivefold increase in the number of proteins identified as compared to the same experiment employing a standard precursor ion survey scan m/z range (i.e., m/z 400-2000). The results show that GPF(m/z) represents an effective technique for increasing protein identifications in global proteomic investigations especially when sample quantity is limited.

  8. Fabrication of stainless steel mesh gas diffusion electrode for power generation in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    You, Shi-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Heng; Zhang, Jin-Na; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Ren, Nan-Qi; Gong, Xiao-Bo

    2011-01-15

    This study reports the fabrication of a new membrane electrode assembly by using stainless steel mesh (SSM) as raw material and its effectiveness as gas diffusion electrode (GDE) for electrochemical oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC). Based on feeding glucose (0.5 g L(-1)) substrate to a single-chambered MFC, power generation using SSM-based GDE was increased with the decrease of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) content applied during fabrication, reaching the optimum power density of 951.6 mW m(-2) at 20% PTFE. Repeatable cell voltage of 0.51 V (external resistance of 400 Ω) and maximum power density of 951.6 mW m(-2) produced for the MFC with SSM-based GDE are comparable to that of 0.52 V and 972.6 mW m(-2), respectively obtained for the MFC containing typical carbon cloth (CC)-made GDE. Besides, Coulombic efficiency (CE) is found higher for GDE (SSM or CC) with membrane assembly than without, which results preliminarily from the mitigation of Coulombic loss being associated with oxygen diffusion and substrate crossover. This study demonstrates that with its good electrical conductivity and much lower cost, the SSM-made GDE suggests a promising alternative as efficient and more economically viable material to conventional typical carbon for power production from biomass in MFC.

  9. Cycle analysis of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell and recuperative gas turbine with an air reheating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiongwen; Li, Jun; Li, Guojun; Feng, Zhenping

    Cycle simulation and analysis for two kinds of SOFC/GT hybrid systems were conducted with the help of the simulation tool: Aspen Custom Modeler. Two cycle schemes of recuperative heat exchanger (RHE) and exhaust gas recirculated (EGR) were described according to the air reheating method. The system performance with operating pressure, turbine inlet temperature and fuel cell load were studied based on the simulation results. Then the effects of oxygen utilization, fuel utilization, operating temperature and efficiencies of the gas turbine components on the system performance of the RHE cycle and the EGR cycle were discussed in detail. Simulation results indicated that the system optimum efficiency for the EGR air reheating cycle scheme was higher than that of the RHE cycle system. A higher pressure ratio would be available for the EGR cycle system in comparison with the RHE cycle. It was found that increasing fuel utilization or oxygen utilization would decrease fuel cell efficiency but improve the system efficiency for both of the RHE and EGR cycles. The efficiency of the RHE cycle hybrid system decreased as the fuel cell air inlet temperature increased. However, the system efficiency of EGR cycle increased with fuel cell air inlet temperature. The effect of turbine efficiency on the system efficiency was more obvious than the effect of the compressor and recuperator efficiencies among the gas turbine components. It was also indicated that improving the gas turbine component efficiencies for the RHE cycle increased system efficiency higher than that for the EGR cycle.

  10. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS AT THE YONKERS, NY, WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the results of a 2-year field test to assess the performance of a specially modified commercial phosphoric acid 200 kW fuel cell power plant to recover energy from anaerobic digester gas (ADG) which has been cleansed of contaminants (sulfur and halide compoun...

  11. BIOMASS AND NATURAL GAS AS CO-FEEDSTOCKS FOR PRODUCTION OF FUEL FOR FUEL-CELL VEHICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an examination of prospects for utilizing renewable energy crops as a source of liquid fuel to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from mobile sources and reduce dependence on imported petroleum. Fuel cells would provide an optimum vehicle technology fo...

  12. On-line experimental results of an argon gas cell-based laser ion source (KEK Isotope Separation System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Jung, H. S.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.

    2016-06-01

    KEK Isotope Separation System (KISS) has been developed at RIKEN to produce neutron rich isotopes with N = 126 to study the β -decay properties for application to astrophysics. The KISS is an element-selective mass-separation system which consists of an argon gas cell-based on laser ion source for atomic number selection and an ISOL mass-separation system. The argon gas cell of KISS is a key component to stop and collect the unstable nuclei produced in a multi-nucleon transfer reaction, where the isotopes of interest will be selectively ionized using laser resonance ionization. We have performed off- and on-line experiments to study the basic properties of the gas cell as well as of the KISS. We successfully extracted the laser-ionized stable 56Fe (direct implantation of a 56Fe beam into the gas cell) atoms and 198Pt (emitted from the 198Pt target by elastic scattering with a 136Xe beam) atoms from the KISS during the commissioning on-line experiments. We furthermore extracted laser-ionized unstable 199Pt atoms and confirmed that the measured half-life was in good agreement with the reported value.

  13. Carbon Nanotube-Silicon Nanowire Heterojunction Solar Cells with Gas-Dependent Photovoltaic Performances and Their Application in Self-Powered NO2 Detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yi; Zhang, Zexia; Xiao, Lin; Lv, Ruitao

    2016-06-01

    A multifunctional device combining photovoltaic conversion and toxic gas sensitivity is reported. In this device, carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes are used to cover onto silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form heterojunction. The porous structure and large specific surface area in the heterojunction structure are both benefits for gas adsorption. In virtue of these merits, gas doping is a feasible method to improve cell's performance and the device can also work as a self-powered gas sensor beyond a solar cell. It shows a significant improvement in cell efficiency (more than 200 times) after NO2 molecules doping (device working as a solar cell) and a fast, reversible response property for NO2 detection (device working as a gas sensor). Such multifunctional CNT-SiNW structure can be expected to open a new avenue for developing self-powered, efficient toxic gas-sensing devices in the future.

  14. Carbon Nanotube-Silicon Nanowire Heterojunction Solar Cells with Gas-Dependent Photovoltaic Performances and Their Application in Self-Powered NO2 Detecting.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Zhang, Zexia; Xiao, Lin; Lv, Ruitao

    2016-12-01

    A multifunctional device combining photovoltaic conversion and toxic gas sensitivity is reported. In this device, carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes are used to cover onto silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form heterojunction. The porous structure and large specific surface area in the heterojunction structure are both benefits for gas adsorption. In virtue of these merits, gas doping is a feasible method to improve cell's performance and the device can also work as a self-powered gas sensor beyond a solar cell. It shows a significant improvement in cell efficiency (more than 200 times) after NO2 molecules doping (device working as a solar cell) and a fast, reversible response property for NO2 detection (device working as a gas sensor). Such multifunctional CNT-SiNW structure can be expected to open a new avenue for developing self-powered, efficient toxic gas-sensing devices in the future.

  15. Decreased expression of long non-coding RNA GAS5 indicates a poor prognosis and promotes cell proliferation and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma by regulating vimentin

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, LEI; LI, CUICUI; LAN, TIAN; WU, LONG; YUAN, YUFENG; LIU, QUANYAN; LIU, ZHISU

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Recent studies have demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key in carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of lncRNA GAS5 in HCC tissues and to define the role of growth arrest-specific 5 (GAS5) in the regulation of hepatoma cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization were performed to investigate the expression of GAS5 in tumor tissues and corresponding adjacent tissues from 50 patients with HCC. Low expression of GAS5 was significantly correlated with differentiation (P<0.010) and portal vein tumor thrombosis (P=0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that GAS5 expression was an independent predictor for overall survival (P=0.017). Further experiments demonstrated that overexpression of GAS5 significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion of hepatoma cells in vitro. Overexpression of GAS5 significantly promoted the apoptosis of hepatoma cells. In addition, it was demonstrated that GAS5 negatively regulates vimentin expression in vitro and in vivo. Notably, vimentin knockdown promoted GAS5-pcDNA3.1-inhibition of hepatoma cell proliferation. In conclusion, the present study suggests an important role of GAS5 in the molecular etiology of HCC and suggests the potential application of GAS5 in HCC therapy. PMID:26707238

  16. Compressed gas manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  17. Hydrogen gas treatment prolongs replicative lifespan of bone marrow multipotential stromal cells in vitro while preserving differentiation and paracrine potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Guan, Jianjun; Tamama, Kenichi

    2010-07-02

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. Low frequency of MSCs in adult bone marrow necessitates ex vivo expansion of MSCs after harvest; however, such a manipulation causes cellular senescence with loss of differentiation, proliferative, and therapeutic potentials of MSCs. Hydrogen molecules have been shown to exert organ protective effects through selective reduction of hydroxyl radicals. As oxidative stress is one of the key insults promoting cell senescence in vivo as well as in vitro, we hypothesized that hydrogen molecules prevent senescent process during MSC expansion. Addition of 3% hydrogen gas enhanced preservation of colony forming early progenitor cells within MSC preparation and prolonged the in vitro replicative lifespan of MSCs without losing differentiation potentials and paracrine capabilities. Interestingly, 3% hydrogen gas treatment did not decrease hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting that scavenging hydroxyl radical might not be responsible for these effects of hydrogen gas in this study.

  18. The Effects of Gas Humidification with High-Flow Nasal Cannula on Cultured Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chidekel, Aaron; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jordan; Mosko, John J.; Rodriguez, Elena; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Humidification of inspired gas is important for patients receiving respiratory support. High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) effectively provides temperature and humidity-controlled gas to the airway. We hypothesized that various levels of gas humidification would have differential effects on airway epithelial monolayers. Calu-3 monolayers were placed in environmental chambers at 37°C with relative humidity (RH) < 20% (dry), 69% (noninterventional comparator), and >90% (HFNC) for 4 and 8 hours with 10 L/min of room air. At 4 and 8 hours, cell viability and transepithelial resistance measurements were performed, apical surface fluid was collected and assayed for indices of cell inflammation and function, and cells were harvested for histology (n = 6/condition). Transepithelial resistance and cell viability decreased over time (P < 0.001) between HFNC and dry groups (P < 0.001). Total protein secretion increased at 8 hours in the dry group (P < 0.001). Secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in the dry group was greater than the other groups at 8 hours (P < 0.001). Histological analysis showed increasing injury over time for the dry group. These data demonstrate that exposure to low humidity results in reduced epithelial cell function and increased inflammation. PMID:22988501

  19. Gas-to-liquids synthetic fuels for use in fuel cells : reformability, energy density, and infrastructure compatibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.; Kopasz, J. P.; Russell, B. J.; Tomlinson, H. L.

    1999-09-08

    The fuel cell has many potential applications, from power sources for electric hybrid vehicles to small power plants for commercial buildings. The choice of fuel will be critical to the pace of its commercialization. This paper reviews the various liquid fuels being considered as an alternative to direct hydrogen gas for the fuel cell application, presents calculations of the hydrogen and carbon dioxide yields from autothermal reforming of candidate liquid fuels, and reports the product gas composition measured from the autothermal reforming of a synthetic fuel in a micro-reactor. The hydrogen yield for a synthetic paraffin fuel produced by a cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch process was found to be similar to that of retail gasoline. The advantages of the synthetic fuel are that it contains no contaminants that would poison the fuel cell catalyst, is relatively benign to the environment, and could be transported in the existing fuel distribution system.

  20. Development of a Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid System Model for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeh, Joshua E.; Pratt, Joseph W.; Brouwer, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Recent interest in fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid applications for the aerospace industry has led to the need for accurate computer simulation models to aid in system design and performance evaluation. To meet this requirement, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and fuel processor models have been developed and incorporated into the Numerical Propulsion Systems Simulation (NPSS) software package. The SOFC and reformer models solve systems of equations governing steady-state performance using common theoretical and semi-empirical terms. An example hybrid configuration is presented that demonstrates the new capability as well as the interaction with pre-existing gas turbine and heat exchanger models. Finally, a comparison of calculated SOFC performance with experimental data is presented to demonstrate model validity. Keywords: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, Reformer, System Model, Aerospace, Hybrid System, NPSS

  1. Modeling of gas turbine - solid oxide fuel cell systems for combined propulsion and power on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Daniel Francis

    This dissertation investigates the use of gas turbine (GT) engine integrated solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce fuel burn in aircraft with large electrical loads like sensor-laden unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The concept offers a number of advantages: the GT absorbs many SOFC balance of plant functions (supplying fuel, air, and heat to the fuel cell) thereby reducing the number of components in the system; the GT supplies fuel and pressurized air that significantly increases SOFC performance; heat and unreacted fuel from the SOFC are recaptured by the GT cycle offsetting system-level losses; good transient response of the GT cycle compensates for poor transient response of the SOFC. The net result is a system that can supply more electrical power more efficiently than comparable engine-generator systems with only modest (<10%) decrease in power density. Thermodynamic models of SOFCs, catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) reactors, and three GT engine types (turbojet, combined exhaust turbofan, separate exhaust turbofan) are developed that account for equilibrium gas phase and electrochemical reaction, pressure losses, and heat losses in ways that capture `down-the-channel' effects (a level of fidelity necessary for making meaningful performance, mass, and volume estimates). Models are created in a NASA-developed environment called Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). A sensitivity analysis identifies important design parameters and translates uncertainties in model parameters into uncertainties in overall performance. GT-SOFC integrations reduce fuel burn 3-4% in 50 kW systems on 35 kN rated engines (all types) with overall uncertainty <1%. Reductions of 15-20% are possible at the 200 kW power level. GT-SOFCs are also able to provide more electric power (factors >3 in some cases) than generator-based systems before encountering turbine inlet temperature limits. Aerodynamic drag effects of engine-airframe integration are by far the most important

  2. Simulated coal-gas fueled carbonate fuel cell power plant system verification. Final report, September 1990--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed under U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) Contract DE-AC-90MC27168 for September 1990 through March 1995. Energy Research Corporation (ERC), with support from DOE, EPRI, and utilities, has been developing a carbonate fuel cell technology. ERC`s design is a unique direct fuel cell (DFC) which does not need an external fuel reformer. An alliance was formed with a representative group of utilities and, with their input, a commercial entry product was chosen. The first 2 MW demonstration unit was planned and construction begun at Santa Clara, CA. A conceptual design of a 10OMW-Class dual fuel power plant was developed; economics of natural gas versus coal gas use were analyzed. A facility was set up to manufacture 2 MW/yr of carbonate fuel cell stacks. A 100kW-Class subscale power plant was built and several stacks were tested. This power plant has achieved an efficiency of {approximately}50% (LHV) from pipeline natural gas to direct current electricity conversion. Over 6,000 hours of operation including 5,000 cumulative hours of stack operation were demonstrated. One stack was operated on natural gas at 130 kW, which is the highest carbonate fuel cell power produced to date, at 74% fuel utilization, with excellent performance distribution across the stack. In parallel, carbonate fuel cell performance has been improved, component materials have been proven stable with lifetimes projected to 40,000 hours. Matrix strength, electrolyte distribution, and cell decay rate have been improved. Major progress has been achieved in lowering stack cost.

  3. Comparison between pressurized design and ambient pressure design of hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. K.; Kim, T. S.

    Design performances of the hybrid solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)-gas turbine (GT) system have been investigated. A pressurized system and an indirectly heated ambient pressure system were analyzed and their performances were compared. In the baseline layout, the basic performance characteristics of the two system configurations were analyzed, with the cell operation temperature and the pressure ratio as the main design parameters. The pressurized system exhibits a better efficiency owing to not only the higher cell voltage but also more effective utilization of gas turbine, i.e., a larger GT power contribution due to a higher turbine inlet temperature. Independent setting of the turbine inlet temperature was simulated by using the additional fuel supply as well as the air bypass. Increasing the pressure ratio of the gas turbine hardly improves the system efficiency, but the efficiency becomes less sensitive to the turbine inlet temperature. In the ambient pressure system, the available design parameter range is much reduced due to the limit on the recuperator temperature. In particular, design of the ambient pressure hybrid system with a gas turbine of a high pressure ratio does not seem quite feasible because the system efficiency that can be achieved at the possible design conditions is even lower than the efficiency of the SOFC only system.

  4. The design of stationary and mobile solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Wolfgang; Lorenz, Hagen

    A general thermodynamic model has shown that combined fuel cell cycles may reach an electric-efficiency of more than 80%. This value is one of the targets of the Department of Energy (DOE) solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) program. The combination of a SOFC and GT connects the air flow of the heat engine and the cell cooling. The principle strategy in order to reach high electrical-efficiencies is to avoid a high excess air for the cell cooling and heat losses. Simple combined SOFC-GT cycles show an efficiency between 60 and 72%. The combination of the SOFC and the GT can be done by using an external cooling or by dividing the stack into multiple sub-stacks with a GT behind each sub-stack as the necessary heat sink. The heat exchangers (HEXs) of a system with an external cooling have the benefit of a pressurization on both sides and therefore, have a high heat exchange coefficient. The pressurization on both sides delivers a low stress to the HEX material. The combination of both principles leads to a reheat (RH)-SOFC-GT cycle that can be improved by a steam turbine (ST) cycle. The first results of a study of such a RH-SOFC-GT-ST cycle indicate that a cycle design with an efficiency of more than 80% is possible and confirm the predictions by the theoretical thermodynamic model mentioned above. The extremely short heat-up time of a thin tubular SOFC and the market entrance of the micro-turbines give the option of using these SOFC-GT designs for mobile applications. The possible use of hydrocarbons such as diesel oil is an important benefit of the SOFC. The micro-turbine and the SOFC stack will be matched depending on the start-up requirements of the mobile system. The minimization of the volume needed is a key issue. The efficiency of small GTs is lower than the efficiency of large GTs due to the influence of the leakage within the stages of GTs increasing with a decreasing size of the GT. Thus, the SOFC module pressure must be lower than in larger

  5. Ultra Efficient CHHP Using a High Temperature Fuel Cell to Provide On-Site Process Reducing Gas, Clean Power, and Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, Fred C.

    2015-06-30

    FuelCell Energy and ACuPowder investigated and demonstrated the use of waste anode exhaust gas from a high temperature fuel cell for replacing the reducing gas in a metal processing furnace. Currently companies purchase high pressure or liquefied gases for the reducing gas which requires substantial energy in production, compression/liquefaction, and transportation, all of which is eliminated by on-site use of anode exhaust gas as reducing gas. We performed research on the impact of the gas composition on product quality and then demonstrated at FuelCell Energy’s manufacturing facility in Torrington, Connecticut. This demonstration project continues to operate even though the research program is completed as it provides substantial benefits to the manufacturing facility by supplying power, heat, and hydrogen.

  6. Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W. J. ,

    2003-01-01

    In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

  7. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Michael; Li, Xiu-Fen; Yates, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance. PMID:25642216

  8. Water gas shift reaction kinetics and reactor modeling for fuel cell grade hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    The kinetics of the water gas shift reaction was studied to evaluate existing reaction mechanisms, test various rate expressions and simulate the performance in a methanol fuel processor for fuel cell applications. The reaction was carried out in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Sud-Chemie Cu/ZnO/Al 2O 3 catalyst between 120 and 250 °C with a range of feed rates and compositions. Using non-linear least squares optimization, the parameters in five rate expressions were fit to the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. Numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model was used for this parameter fitting. An empirical rate expression, rCO= kPCOPH 2O (1- β) with activation energy of 47.4 kJ/mol was also obtained from the experimental data. Reactor performance was simulated to determine catalyst loadings required to achieve specific CO conversions as a function of temperature and water feed rate. These results are useful in studying the design trade offs available to reformer systems.

  9. A new model for thermal contact resistance between fuel cell gas diffusion layers and bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2014-11-01

    A new analytical model is developed to predict the thermal contact resistance (TCR) between fibrous porous media such as gas diffusion layers (GDLs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and flat surfaces (bipolar plates). This robust model accounts for the salient geometrical parameters of GDLs, mechanical deformation, and thermophysical properties of the contacting bodies. The model is successfully validated against experimental data, and is used to perform in a comprehensive parametric study to investigate the effects of fiber parameters such as waviness and GDL properties on the TCR. Fiber waviness, diameter and surface curvature, as well as GDL porosity, are found to have a strong influence on TCR whereas fiber length does not affect the TCR when the porosity is kept constant. Such findings provide useful guidance for design and manufacturing of more effective GDLs for PEMFC heat management. The analytic model can be readily implemented in simulation and modeling of PEMFCs, and can be extended with minor modifications to other fibrous porous media such as fibrous catalysts, insulating media and sintered metals.

  10. Downregulation of the long noncoding RNA GAS5-AS1 contributes to tumor metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Lyu, Hui; Liu, Hongbing; Shi, Xuefei; Song, Yong; Liu, Bolin

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) plays pivotal roles in cancer development. To date, only a small number of lncRNAs have been characterized at functional level. Here, we discovered a novel lncRNA termed GAS5-AS1 as a tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The expression of GAS5-AS1 in NSCLC tumors was much lower than that in the adjacent normal lung tissues. The reduced GAS5-AS1 was significantly correlated with larger tumors, higher TNM stages, and lymph node metastasis in NSCLC patients. While ectopic expression or specific knockdown of GAS5-AS1 had no effect on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis, it dramatically decreased or increased, respectively, NSCLC cell migration and invasion. Overexpression of GAS5-AS1 in NSCLC cells reduced a cohort of molecules (ZEB1, N-cadherin, Vimentin, and/or Snail1) critical for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine failed to upregulate GAS5-AS1 in NSCLC cells, whereas the pan-HDAC inhibitors panobinostat and SAHA significantly induced GAS5-AS1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GAS5-AS1 can be upregulated by specific knockdown of HDAC1 or HDAC3. Collectively, our data suggest that histone modifications play a major role leading to epigenetic silencing of GAS5-AS1 in NSCLC and subsequently promote tumor metastasis via upregulation of several key EMT markers. PMID:27489122

  11. Use of high-temperature gas-tight electrochemical cells to measure electronic transport and thermodynamics in metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Ma, B.; Park, E.T.

    1997-10-01

    By using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors can perform high-temperature coulometric titration and measure electronic transport properties to determine the electronic defect structure of metal oxides. This technique reduces the time and expense required for conventional thermogravimetric measurements. The components of the gas-tight coulometric titration cell are an oxygen sensor, Pt/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Pt, and an encapsulated metal oxide sample. Based on cell design, both transport and thermodynamic measurements can be performed over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures (pO{sub 2} = 10{sup {minus}35} to 1 atm). This paper describes the high-temperature gas-tight electrochemical cells used to determine electronic defect structures and transport properties for pure and doped-oxide systems, such as YSZ, doped and pure ceria (Ca-CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}), copper oxides, and copper-oxide-based ceramic superconductors, transition metal oxides, SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x}, and BaTiO{sub 3}.

  12. Electrochemical, structural and surface characterization of nickel/zirconia solid oxide fuel cell anodes in coal gas containing antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Edwards, Danny J.

    The interactions of antimony with the nickel-zirconia anode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been investigated. Tests with both anode-supported and electrolyte-supported button cells were performed at 700 and 800 °C in synthetic coal gas containing 100 ppb to 9 ppm antimony. Minor performance loss was observed immediately after Sb introduction to coal gas resulting in ca. 5% power output drop. While no further degradation was observed during the following several hundred hours of testing, cells abruptly and irreversibly failed after 800-1600 h depending on Sb concentration and test temperature. Antimony was found to interact strongly with nickel resulting in extensive alteration phase formation, consistent with expectations based on thermodynamic properties. Nickel antimonide phases, NiSb and Ni 5Sb 2, were partially coalesced into large grains and eventually affected electronic percolation through the anode support. Initial degradation was attributed to diffusion of antimony to the active anode/electrolyte interface to form an adsorption layer, while the late stage degradation was due the Ni-Sb phase formation. Assuming an average Sb concentration in coal gas of 0.07 ppmv, a 500 μm thick Ni/zirconia anode-supported cell is not expected to fail within 7 years when operated at a power output of 0.5 W cm -2 and fuel utilization above 50%.

  13. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completelymore » transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to upgrade bio-oils to stable hydrocarbon fuels.« less

  14. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completely transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to

  15. Laser Frequency Stabilization for Coherent Lidar Applications using Novel All-Fiber Gas Reference Cell Fabrication Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meras, Patrick, Jr.; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Levin, Jason; Spiers, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Compact hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF)gas frequency reference cell was constructed using a novel packaging technique that relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers. The use of this gas cell for laser frequency stabilization was demonstrated by locking a tunable diode laser to the center of the P9 line from the (nu)1+(nu)3 band of acetylene with RMS frequency error of 2.06 MHz over 2 hours. This effort was performed in support of a task to miniaturize the laser frequency stabilization subsystem of JPL/LMCT Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) instrument.

  16. Effect of through-plane polytetrafluoroethylene distribution in gas diffusion layers on performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Iwamura, Takuya; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo; Nakano, Akihiro; Heo, Yun; Ishida, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Hironori; Kitahara, Tatsumi

    2016-02-01

    This experimental study identifies the effect of through-plane polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) distribution in gas diffusion backing (GDB) on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). PTFE-drying under vacuum pressure created a relatively uniform PTFE distribution in GDB compared to drying under atmospheric pressure. Carbon paper samples with different PTFE distributions due to the difference in drying conditions were prepared and used for the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) of PEMFCs. Also investigated is the effect of MPL application on the performance for those samples. The current density (i) - voltage (V) characteristics of these PEMFCs measured under high relative humidity conditions clearly showed that, with or without MPL, the cell using the GDL with PTFE dried under vacuum condition showed better performance than that dried under atmospheric condition. It is suggested that this improved performance is caused by the efficient transport of liquid water through the GDB due to the uniform distribution of PTFE.

  17. Durability Prediction of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Material under Thermo-Mechanical and Fuel Gas Contaminants Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Gulfam; Guo, Hua; Kang , Bruce S.; Marina, Olga A.

    2011-01-10

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) operate under harsh environments, which cause deterioration of anode material properties and service life. In addition to electrochemical performance, structural integrity of the SOFC anode is essential for successful long-term operation. The SOFC anode is subjected to stresses at high temperature, thermal/redox cycles, and fuel gas contaminants effects during long-term operation. These mechanisms can alter the anode microstructure and affect its electrochemical and structural properties. In this research, anode material degradation mechanisms are briefly reviewed and an anode material durability model is developed and implemented in finite element analysis. The model takes into account thermo-mechanical and fuel gas contaminants degradation mechanisms for prediction of long-term structural integrity of the SOFC anode. The proposed model is validated experimentally using a NexTech ProbostatTM SOFC button cell test apparatus integrated with a Sagnac optical setup for simultaneously measuring electrochemical performance and in-situ anode surface deformation.

  18. Efficiency analysis of a hydrogen-fueled solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Roland; Deja, Robert; Engelbracht, Maximilian; Frank, Matthias; Nguyen, Van Nhu; Blum, Ludger; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes different hydrogen-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system layouts. It begins with a simple system layout without any anode off-gas recirculation, continues with a configuration equipped with off-gas recirculation, including steam condensation and then considers a layout with a dead-end anode off-gas loop. Operational parameters such as stack fuel utilization, as well as the recirculation rate, are modified, with the aim of achieving the highest efficiency values. Drawing on experiments and the accumulated experience of the SOFC group at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, a set of operational parameters were defined and applied to the simulations. It was found that anode off-gas recirculation, including steam condensation, improves electrical efficiency by up to 11.9 percentage-points compared to a layout without recirculation of the same stack fuel utilization. A system layout with a dead-end anode off-gas loop was also found to be capable of reaching electrical efficiencies of more than 61%.

  19. Commercially Available Gas-Permeable Cell Culture Bags May Not Prevent Anoxia in Cultured or Shipped Islets

    PubMed Central

    Avgoustiniatos, E.S.; Hering, B.J.; Rozak, P.R.; Wilson, J.R.; Tempelman, L.A.; Balamurugan, A.N.; Welch, D.P.; Weegman, B.P.; Suszynski, T.M.; Papas, K.K.

    2009-01-01

    Prolonged anoxia has deleterious effects on islets. Gas-permeable cell culture devices can be used to minimize anoxia during islet culture and especially during shipment when elimination of gas-liquid interfaces is required to prevent the formation of damaging gas bubbles. Gas-permeable bags may have several drawbacks, such as propensity for puncture and contamination, difficult islet retrieval, and significantly lower oxygen permeability than silicone rubber membranes (SRM). We hypothesized that oxygen permeability of bags may be insufficient for islet oxygenation. We measured oxygen transmission rates through the membrane walls of three different types of commercially available bags and through SRM currently used for islet shipment. We found that the bag membranes have oxygen transmission rates per unit area about 100-fold lower than SRM. We solved the oxygen diffusion-reaction equation for 150-μm diameter islets seeded at 3000 islet equivalents per cm2, a density adequate to culture and ship an entire human or porcine islet preparation in a single gas-permeable device, predicting that about 40% of the islet volume would be anoxic at 22°C and about 70% would be anoxic at 37°C. Islets of larger size or islets accumulated during shipment would be even more anoxic. The model predicted no anoxia in islets similarly seeded in devices with SRM bottoms. We concluded that commercially available bags may not prevent anoxia during islet culture or shipment; devices with SRM bottoms are more suitable alternatives. PMID:18374080

  20. A compact and highly efficient natural gas fuel processor for 1-kW residential polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Doohwan; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Soonho

    A compact and highly efficient natural gas fuel processor for 1-kW residential polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) has been developed at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT). The fuel processor, referred to as SFP-2, consists of a natural gas reformer, a water-gas shift reactor, a heat-exchanger and a burner, in which the overall integrated volume including insulation is exceptionally small, namely, about 14 l. The SFP-2 produces hydrogen at 1000 l h -1 (STP) at full load with the carbon monoxide concentration in the process gas below 7000 ppmv (dry gas base). The maximum thermal efficiency is ∼78% (lower heating value) at full load and even ∼72% at 25% partial load. This fuel processor of small size with high thermal efficiency is one of the best such technologies for the above given H 2 throughputs. The time required for starting up the SFP-2 is within 20 min with the addition of external heating for the shift reactor. No additional medium, such as nitrogen, is required either for start-up or for shut down of the SFP-2, which is an advantage for application in residential PEMFC co-generations systems.

  1. Laser induced asymmetry and inhomogeneous broadening of the microwave lineshape of a gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camparo, J. C.; Freuholz, R. P.; Volk, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of replacing the RF discharge lamp in a rubidium gas cell clock with a single mode laser diode is addressed. Since the short term stability of the rubidium frequency standard is limited by the shot noise of the photodetector, an increased signal-to-noise ratio due to more efficient laser diode optical pumping might improve the short term performance. Because the emission wavelength of the laser diode can be tuned, improved long term performance could be gained through the control of the light shift effect. However, due to the nature of the gas cell frequency standard, various physical phenomena are strongly coupled in their effect on the frequency output, and thus careful consideration must be given to any change in one parameter because of its interrelation with other parameters. Some investigations concerning the coupled effect of the optical and microwave fields in the rubidium atomic clock are reported. It is shown that this type of coupling is an important consideration for any attempt to incorporate a laser diode into a gas cell clock.

  2. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario

  3. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario).

  4. Investigation of gas diffusion layer compression by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on running polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotelli, Giovanni; Omati, Luca; Gallo Stampino, Paola; Grassini, Paolo; Brivio, Davide

    Two gas diffusion layers based on the same carbon cloth substrate, produced by an Italian Company (SAATI), and coated with microporous layers of different hydrophobicities, were assembled in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell and its performances assessed. For comparison the cell mounting the carbon cloth without microporous layer was also tested. The membrane electrode assembly was made of Nafion ® 212 with Pt load 0.3/0.6 mg cm -2 (anode/cathode). The cell testing was run at 60 °C and 80 °C with fully humidified air (100%RH) and 80%RH hydrogen feedings. The assembly of gas diffusion layers and membrane with electrodes was compressed to 30% and 50% of its initial thickness. For each configuration polarization and power curves were recorded; in order to evaluate the role of different GDLs, AC impedance spectroscopy of the running cell was also performed. The higher compression ratio caused the worsening of cell performances, partially mitigated when the operating temperature was raised to 80 °C. The presence of the microporous layer onto the carbon cloth resulted extremely beneficial for the operations especially at high current density; moreover, it sensibly reduces the high frequency resistance of the overall assembly.

  5. CAD/CAM-designed 3D-printed electroanalytical cell for the evaluation of nanostructured gas-diffusion electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chervin, Christopher N; Parker, Joseph F; Nelson, Eric S; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2016-04-29

    The ability to effectively screen and validate gas-diffusion electrodes is critical to the development of next-generation metal-air batteries and regenerative fuel cells. The limiting electrode in a classic two-terminal device such as a battery or fuel cell is difficult to discern without an internal reference electrode, but the flooded electrolyte characteristic of three-electrode electroanalytical cells negates the prime function of an air electrode-a void volume freely accessible to gases. The nanostructured catalysts that drive the energy-conversion reactions (e.g., oxygen reduction and evolution in the air electrode of metal-air batteries) are best evaluated in the electrode structure as-used in the practical device. We have designed, 3D-printed, and characterized an air-breathing, thermodynamically referenced electroanalytical cell that allows us to mimic the Janus arrangement of the gas-diffusion electrode in a metal-air cell: one face freely exposed to gases, the other wetted by electrolyte.

  6. CAD/CAM-designed 3D-printed electroanalytical cell for the evaluation of nanostructured gas-diffusion electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervin, Christopher N.; Parker, Joseph F.; Nelson, Eric S.; Rolison, Debra R.; Long, Jeffrey W.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to effectively screen and validate gas-diffusion electrodes is critical to the development of next-generation metal-air batteries and regenerative fuel cells. The limiting electrode in a classic two-terminal device such as a battery or fuel cell is difficult to discern without an internal reference electrode, but the flooded electrolyte characteristic of three-electrode electroanalytical cells negates the prime function of an air electrode—a void volume freely accessible to gases. The nanostructured catalysts that drive the energy-conversion reactions (e.g., oxygen reduction and evolution in the air electrode of metal-air batteries) are best evaluated in the electrode structure as-used in the practical device. We have designed, 3D-printed, and characterized an air-breathing, thermodynamically referenced electroanalytical cell that allows us to mimic the Janus arrangement of the gas-diffusion electrode in a metal-air cell: one face freely exposed to gases, the other wetted by electrolyte.

  7. Human hepatoma cell lines on gas foaming templated alginate scaffolds for in vitro drug-drug interaction and metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Stampella, A; Rizzitelli, G; Donati, F; Mazzarino, M; de la Torre, X; Botrè, F; Giardi, M F; Dentini, M; Barbetta, A; Massimi, M

    2015-12-25

    Liver in vitro systems that allow reliable prediction of major human in vivo metabolic pathways have a significant impact in drug screening and drug metabolism research. In the present study, a novel porous scaffold composed of alginate was prepared by employing a gas-in-liquid foaming approach. Galactose residues were introduced on scaffold surfaces to promote cell adhesion and to enhance liver specific functions of the entrapped HepG2/C3A cells. Hepatoma cells in the gal-alginate scaffold showed higher levels of liver specific products (albumin and urea) and were more responsive to specific inducers (e.g. dexamethasone) and inhibitors (e.g. ketoconazole) of the CYP3A4 system than in conventional monolayer culture. HepG2/C3A cells were also more efficient in terms of rapid elimination of testosterone, used as a model substance, at rates comparable to those of in vivo excretion. In addition, an improvement in metabolism of testosterone, in terms of phase II metabolite formation, was also observed when the more differentiated HepaRG cells were used. Together the data suggest that hepatocyte/gas templated alginate-systems provide an innovative high throughput platform for in vitro drug metabolism and drug-drug interaction studies, with broad fields of application, and might provide a valid tool for minimizing animal use in preclinical testing of human relevance.

  8. Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-11

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected

  9. The origin of the selectivity and activity of ruthenium-cluster catalysts for fuel-cell feed-gas purification: a gas-phase approach.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M; Krstić, Marjan; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2014-05-19

    Gas-phase ruthenium clusters Ru(n)(+) (n=2-6) are employed as model systems to discover the origin of the outstanding performance of supported sub-nanometer ruthenium particles in the catalytic CO methanation reaction with relevance to the hydrogen feed-gas purification for advanced fuel-cell applications. Using ion-trap mass spectrometry in conjunction with first-principles density functional theory calculations three fundamental properties of these clusters are identified which determine the selectivity and catalytic activity: high reactivity toward CO in contrast to inertness in the reaction with CO2; promotion of cooperatively enhanced H2 coadsorption and dissociation on pre-formed ruthenium carbonyl clusters, that is, no CO poisoning occurs; and the presence of Ru-atom sites with a low number of metal-metal bonds, which are particularly active for H2 coadsorption and activation. Furthermore, comprehensive theoretical investigations provide mechanistic insight into the CO methanation reaction and discover a reaction route involving the formation of a formyl-type intermediate. PMID:24803209

  10. CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection of ethane using a novel compact multipass gas absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzempek, Karol; Jahjah, Mohammad; Lewicki, Rafał; Stefański, Przemysław; So, Stephen; Thomazy, David; Tittel, Frank K.

    2013-09-01

    The development of a continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra-sensitive and selective ethane (C2H6) concentration measurements is reported. The sensor platform used tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy as the detection technique. TDLAS was performed using an ultra-compact 57.6 m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass cell capable of 459 passes between two mirrors separated by 12.5 cm and optimized for the 2.5-4 μm range TEC mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. For an interference-free C2H6 absorption line located at 2,976.8 cm-1, a 1 σ minimum detection limit of 740 pptv with a 1 s lock-in amplifier time constant was achieved.

  11. Histological demonstration of glucose transporters, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and glycogen in gas gland cells of the swimbladder: is a metabolic futile cycle operating?

    PubMed

    Munakata, Keijiro; Ookata, Kayoko; Doi, Hiroyuki; Baba, Otto; Terashima, Tatsuo; Hirose, Shigehisa; Kato, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Luminal surface of the swimbladder is covered by gas gland epithelial cells and is responsible for inflating the swimbladder by generating O(2) from Root-effect hemoglobin that releases O(2) under acidic conditions. Acidification of blood is achieved by lactic acid secreted from gas gland cells, which are poor in mitochondria but rich in the glycolytic activity. The acidic conditions are locally maintained by a countercurrent capillary system called rete mirabile. To understand the regulation of anaerobic metabolism of glucose in the gas gland cells, we analyzed the glucose transporter expressed there and the fate of ATP generated by glycolysis. The latter is important because the ATP should be immediately consumed otherwise it strongly inhibits the glycolysis rendering the cells unable to produce lactic acid anymore. Expression analyses of glucose transporter (glut) genes in the swimbladder of fugu (Takifugu rubripes) by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization demonstrated that glut1a and glut6 are expressed in gas gland cells. Immunohistochemical analyses of metabolic enzymes demonstrated that a gluconeogenesis enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (Fbp1) and a glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh) are highly expressed in gas gland cells. The simultaneous catalyses of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis reactions suggest the presence of a futile cycle in gas gland cells to maintain the levels of ATP low and to generate heat that helps reduce the solubility of O(2).

  12. Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

    2012-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

  13. Hot gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells. A zinc oxide reactor model, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1980-09-16

    Utilization of coal gasifiers to power MCFC requires a cleanup system to remove sulfur and particulates. Of the two near term options available for desulfurization of gasifier effluent, namely low temperature cleanup utilizing absorber/stripper technology, and hot gas cleanup utilizing metal oxides, there is a clear advantage to using hot gas cleanup. Since the MCFC will operate at 1200/sup 0/F, and the gasifier effluent could be between 1200 to 1900/sup 0/F, a hot gas cleanup system will require little or no change in process gas temperature, thereby contributing to a high overall system efficiency. A hot gas cleanup system will consist of FeO for bulk H/sub 2/S removal and ZnO for reduction of H/sub 2/S to sub ppM levels. Hot gas cleanup systems at present are not available commercially, and therefore it is the objective of this project to model the components of the system in order to help bring this technology closer to commercialization, by providing simulated operating characteristics to aid in system design, and system simulations of gasifier/MCFC systems. The modeling of the ZnO reactor is presented.

  14. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  15. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization.

  16. Anode gas recirculation for improving the performance and cost of a 5-kW solid oxide fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Ryohei; Tachikawa, Yuya; Sasaki, Kazunari; Ito, Kohei

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have the potential to efficiently convert chemical energy into electricity and heat and are expected to be implemented in stationary combined heat and power (CHP) systems. This paper presents the heat balance analysis for a 5-kW medium-sized integrated SOFC system and the evaluation of the effect of anode gas recirculation on the system performance. The risk of carbon deposition on an SOFC anode due to anode gas recirculation is also assessed using the C-H-O diagram obtained from thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. These results suggest that a higher recirculation ratio increases net fuel utilization and improves the electrical efficiency of the SOFC system. Furthermore, cost simulation of the SOFC system and comparison with the cost of electricity supply by a power grid indicates that the capital cost is sufficiently low to popularize the SOFC system in terms of the total cost over one decade.

  17. A study on the effect of various design parameters on the natural circulation flow rate of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a study on the effect of various design parameters such as the channel gap width, heat flux distribution, down-comer pipe size and two-phase flow slip ratio on the natural circulation flow rate is performed based on a physical model for a natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of an EU-APR1400, and these effects on the natural circulation flow rate are analyzed and compared with the minimum flow rate required for the safe operation of the system. (authors)

  18. Loss of Basal Cells Precedes Bronchiolitis Obliterans–Like Pathological Changes in a Murine Model of Chlorine Gas Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    O’Koren, Emily G.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a major cause of chronic airway dysfunction after toxic chemical inhalation. The pathophysiology of BO is not well understood, but epithelial cell injury has been closely associated with the development of fibrotic lesions in human studies and in animal models of both toxin-induced and transplant-induced BO. However, whereas almost all cases and models of BO include epithelial injury, not all instances of epithelial injury result in BO, suggesting that epithelial damage per se is not the critical event leading to the development of BO. Here, we describe a model of chlorine-induced BO in which mice develop tracheal and large airway obliterative lesions within 10 days of exposure to high (350 parts per million [ppm]), but not low (200 ppm), concentrations of chlorine gas. Importantly, these lesions arise only under conditions and in areas in which basal cells, the resident progenitor cells for large airway epithelium, are eliminated by chlorine exposure. In areas of basal cell loss, epithelial regeneration does not occur, resulting in persistent regions of epithelial denudation. Obliterative airway lesions arise specifically from regions of epithelial denudation in a process that includes inflammatory cell infiltration by Day 2 after exposure, fibroblast infiltration and collagen deposition by Day 5, and the ingrowth of blood vessels by Day 7, ultimately leading to lethal airway obstruction by Days 9–12. We conclude that the loss of epithelial progenitor cells constitutes a critical factor leading to the development of obliterative airway lesions after chemical inhalation. PMID:23742075

  19. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and genotype distribution determined by the cyclic-catcher melting temperature analysis in Korean medical checkup population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Jee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Woo, Hee-Yeon; Paik, Soon-Young

    2013-10-01

    Although cytology screening has reduced the incidence and mortality rate of cervical cancer significantly, its usefulness is limited to samples from the site of the lesion, resulting in its low sensitivity and unsuitability for use in medical checkups. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection using genotype distribution and to analyze the correlation of the HPV DNA test results with cytological results. We also evaluated the benefits of quantitative information obtained from cyclic-catcher melting temperature analysis (CMTA) in screening for cervical cancer. We performed cyclic-CMTA using Anyplex™ II HPV28 Detection in combination with cervical cytology for 2,181 subjects. The following HPV positivity types were detected using cyclic-CMTA and HPV positivity was found to increase together with the severity of the cytology results: (1) For 419 HPV positive specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 18.1% of normal specimens, 78.3% of ASCUS, and all of LSIL and HSIL; (2) high-risk HPV DNAs were detected in 63.3% of normal (N=547), 65.9% of ASCUS (N=41), 76.9% of LSIL (N=13), and 88.9% of HSIL (N=9) among total detected HPV DNA regardless multiple detection; (3) multiple HPV genotypes were detected in 4.8% of normal specimens (N=2,146), 52.2% of ASCUS (N=23), 57.1% of LSIL (N=7), and 40.0% of HSIL (N=5). In addition, a high level of viral DNA was observed using cyclic-CMTA in all specimens beyond the LSIL stage according to cytology, while only 6% of specimens with normal cytology showed a correlation with viral quantitation by cyclic-CMTA. The combination of HPV genotyping with a quantitative assay and cytology will allow for a more accurate diagnosis of cervical cancer.

  20. Electrochemical, Structural and Surface Characterization of Nickel/Zirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes in Coal Gas Containing Antimony

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Edwards, Danny J.

    2011-02-27

    The interaction of antimony with the nickel-zirconia solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode has been investigated. Tests with both anode-supported and electrolyte-supported button cells were performed at 700 and 800oC in synthetic coal gas containing 10 ppb to 9 ppm antimony. Minor performance loss was observed immediately after Sb introduction to coal gas resulting in ca. 5 % power output drop. While no further degradation was observed during the following several hundred hours of testing, cells abruptly and irreversibly failed after 800-1500 hours depending on Sb concentration and test temperature. Antimony was found to interact strongly with nickel and result in extensive alteration phase formation, consistent with expectations based on thermodynamic properties. Nickel antimonide phases, NiSb and Ni5Sb2, were partially coalesced into large grains and eventually affected electronic percolation through the anode support. Initial degradation was attributed to diffusion of antimony to the active anode/electrolyte interface to form an adsorption layer.

  1. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2015-02-02

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation.

  2. DNA transfer and cell killing in epidermoid cells by diagnostic ultrasound activation of contrast agent gas bodies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Song, Jianming

    2003-04-01

    DNA transfer by sonoporation and cell killing in monolayer cells were examined by contrast-aided low-power diagnostic ultrasound (US). Culture chambers with epidermoid cell monolayers were scanned at about 1 mm/s with a 1.5-MHz scan head aimed upward at the chamber in a 37 degrees C water bath. For DNA transfer tests, plasmids coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP) were added to the medium, and GFP expression was assessed by flow cytometry after 2 days. In separate tests, cell killing was determined immediately after treatment. GFP-positive cell counts were 0.4% (0.7% SD) for shams and 3.7% (1.2% SD) of cells for exposure at 2.3 MPa with 2% Optison contrast agent. The fraction of dead cells was 3.4% (1.7% SD) in shams and 28.6% (6.3% SD) in exposed chambers. Both effects increased for increasing Optison concentration and increasing peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. Contrast-aided diagnostic US has a potential therapeutic application for gene transfer, but a trade-off appears to exist with cell killing.

  3. USING LANDFILL GAS IN FUEL CELLS - A STEP CLOSER TO COMMERICAL REALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses Phase II and Phase III results of a U.S. EPA program underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation. The program involves controlling methane emissions from landfills using a fuel cell. The fuel cell would reduce air emissions affecting global warming, aci...

  4. Nonlinear empirical model of gas humidity-related voltage dynamics of a polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, M.; Andre, D.; Schmid, O.; Hofer, E. P.

    suitable experimental setup to apply fast variations of gas humidity is introduced and is used to investigate a 10 cell PEMFC stack under various operation conditions. Using methods like stepwise multiple-regression a good mathematical description with reduced free parameters is achieved.

  5. TESTING OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: GROTON LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of follow-on tests following a four-phase EPA program. The environmental impact of widespread use of this concept would be a significant reduction of global warming gas emissions (methane and carbon dioxide). The follow-on testing, conducted by N...

  6. In Situ Measurement of Epidermal Cell Turgor, Leaf Water Potential, and Gas Exchange in Tradescantia virginiana L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Shackel, Kenneth A.; Brinckmann, Enno

    1985-01-01

    A combined system has been developed in which epidermal cell turgor, leaf water potential, and gas exchange were determined for transpiring leaves of Tradescantia virginiana L. Uniform and stable values of turgor were observed in epidermal cells (stomatal complex cells were not studied) under stable environmental conditions for both upper and lower epidermises. The changes in epidermal cell turgor that were associated with changes in leaf transpiration were larger than the changes in leaf water potential, indicating the presence of transpirationally induced within-leaf water potential gradients. Estimates of 3 to 5 millimoles per square meter per second per megapascal were obtained for the value of within-leaf hydraulic conductivity. Step changes in atmospheric humidity caused rapid changes in epidermal cell turgor with little or no initial change in stomatal conductance, indicating little direct relation between stomatal humidity response and epidermal water status. The significance of within-leaf water potential gradients to measurements of plant water potential and to current hypotheses regarding stomatal response to humidity is discussed. PMID:16664210

  7. Observations of interstellar helium with a gas absorption cell - Implications for the structure of the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J.; Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

    1980-01-01

    A photometer sensitive at the 584 A line of He 1, incorporating a helium gas resonance absorption cell, was flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975. The instrument observed much of the night-time sky, and returned 42 min of usable data. The data were analyzed by fitting to a model of resonant scattering of solar 584 A flux from nearby interstellar helium. Good model fits were obtained for an interstellar gas bulk velocity vector pointing toward alpha = 72 deg, delta = +15 deg, with speed 20 km/s, with interstellar medium temperatures from 5000 to 20,000 K and with neutral interstellar helium density (8.9 plus or minus 10 to the -3rd/cu cm). In the context of theoretical studies of the interstellar medium by McKee and Ostriker (1977), the results may indicate that the sun lies in the warm, partially ionized periphery of a cold interstellar cloud, surrounded by a high-temperature gas heated by old supernova remnants.

  8. A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Greg, G.

    2007-03-31

    A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

  9. Thermodynamic Modeling of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell to Couple with an Existing Gas Turbine Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Thomas E.; Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center are interested in combining a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to operate in conjunction with a gas turbine engine. A detailed engine model currently exists in the Matlab/Simulink environment. The idea is to incorporate a SOFC model within the turbine engine simulation and observe the hybrid system's performance. The fuel cell will be heated to its appropriate operating condition by the engine s combustor. Once the fuel cell is operating at its steady-state temperature, the gas burner will back down slowly until the engine is fully operating on the hot gases exhausted from the SOFC. The SOFC code is based on a steady-state model developed by The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In its current form, the DOE SOFC model exists in Microsoft Excel and uses Visual Basics to create an I-V (current-voltage) profile. For the project's application, the main issue with this model is that the gas path flow and fuel flow temperatures are used as input parameters instead of outputs. The objective is to create a SOFC model based on the DOE model that inputs the fuel cells flow rates and outputs temperature of the flow streams; therefore, creating a temperature profile as a function of fuel flow rate. This will be done by applying the First Law of Thermodynamics for a flow system to the fuel cell. Validation of this model will be done in two procedures. First, for a given flow rate the exit stream temperature will be calculated and compared to DOE SOFC temperature as a point comparison. Next, an I-V curve and temperature curve will be generated where the I-V curve will be compared with the DOE SOFC I-V curve. Matching I-V curves will suggest validation of the temperature curve because voltage is a function of temperature. Once the temperature profile is created and validated, the model will then be placed into the turbine engine simulation for system analysis.

  10. Minimizing Residual Pressure within a Windowless Gas Target System - JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Orlando; Browne, Justin; Kontos, Antonios; Montes, Fernando; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear reactions between light gases and radioactive isotope beams are essential to address open questions in nuclear structure and astrophysics. Pure light gas targets are critical for the measurements of proton- and alpha-induced reactions. J _ et E _ xperiments in N _ uclear S _ tructure and A _ strophysics (JENSA) is the world's most dense (~ 1019 atoms/cm2) windowless gas target system. Most of the gas flow is localized; however, escaping gas creates a pressure gradient which degrades experimental measurements and contaminates the beam line. JENSA contains a differential pumping system to maintain a vacuum. The previous design configuration was not optimized for experiments (pressure measurements 70 cm downstream from the jet were ~ 10-3 torr; optimal is less than 10-4 torr). We have altered the current differential pumping system to minimize the residual pressure profile. Several configurations of two gas-receiving catchers were tested, and the most efficient ones identified using Enhanced Pirani and Cold Cathode gauges. We have determined the 30 mm outer and 20 mm inner gas-receiving cones minimize JENSA central chamber pressure to 200 millitorr at 16,000 torr of discharge pressure. Altering the tubing configuration has additionally lowered the pressure 70 cm downstream to 10-5 torr. The new residual pressure allows operation of JENSA with planned expansion of a recoil mass separator SECAR.

  11. Guard cell biochemistry: response to environmental stimuli causing changes in gas exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Our understanding of how the light reactions of photosynthesis influence carbon metabolism in guard cells is rudimentary. This state of affairs is understandable; reliable reports of PS II in guard cells were published only two years ago. At this point, I wish to warn against complacency in drawing strict analogies between guard cell chloroplast function and that in other cells. In general, guard cell chloroplasts and their mesophyll counterparts differ in morphology, for example, the guard cell organelles are smaller, less abundant, and paler, have fewer thylakoids/granna, have areas of peripheral reticulum, and contain relatively more starch. One biochemical difference underlying these morphological ones has already been identified (fluorescence kinetics). 107 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A high order cell-centered semi-Lagrangian scheme for multi-dimensional kinetic simulations of neutral gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güçlü, Y.; Hitchon, W. N. G.

    2012-04-01

    The term 'Convected Scheme' (CS) refers to a family of algorithms, most usually applied to the solution of Boltzmann's equation, which uses a method of characteristics in an integral form to project an initial cell forward to a group of final cells. As such the CS is a 'forward-trajectory' semi-Lagrangian scheme. For multi-dimensional simulations of neutral gas flows, the cell-centered version of this semi-Lagrangian (CCSL) scheme has advantages over other options due to its implementation simplicity, low memory requirements, and easier treatment of boundary conditions. The main drawback of the CCSL-CS to date has been its high numerical diffusion in physical space, because of the 2nd order remapping that takes place at the end of each time step. By means of a modified equation analysis, it is shown that a high order estimate of the remapping error can be obtained a priori, and a small correction to the final position of the cells can be applied upon remapping, in order to achieve full compensation of this error. The resulting scheme is 4th order accurate in space while retaining the desirable properties of the CS: it is conservative and positivity-preserving, and the overall algorithm complexity is not appreciably increased. Two monotone (i.e. non-oscillating) versions of the fourth order CCSL-CS are also presented: one uses a common flux-limiter approach; the other uses a non-polynomial reconstruction to evaluate the derivatives of the density function. The method is illustrated in simple one- and two-dimensional examples, and a fully 3D solution of the Boltzmann equation describing expansion of a gas into vacuum through a cylindrical tube.

  13. Inverted Fuel Cell: Room-Temperature Hydrogen Separation from an Exhaust Gas by Using a Commercial Short-Circuited PEM Fuel Cell without Applying any Electrical Voltage.

    PubMed

    Friebe, Sebastian; Geppert, Benjamin; Caro, Jürgen

    2015-06-26

    A short-circuited PEM fuel cell with a Nafion membrane has been evaluated in the room-temperature separation of hydrogen from exhaust gas streams. The separated hydrogen can be recovered or consumed in an in situ olefin hydrogenation when the fuel cell is operated as catalytic membrane reactor. Without applying an outer electrical voltage, there is a continuous hydrogen flux from the higher to the lower hydrogen partial pressure side through the Nafion membrane. On the feed side of the Nafion membrane, hydrogen is catalytically split into protons and electrons by the Pt/C electrocatalyst. The protons diffuse through the Nafion membrane, the electrons follow the short-circuit between the two brass current collectors. On the cathode side, protons and electrons recombine, and hydrogen is released.

  14. Fuel cell system modeling for solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid power plants, Part I: Modeling and simulation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leucht, Florian; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Kallo, Josef; Friedrich, K. Andreas; Müller-Steinhagen, H.

    A sustainable future power supply requires high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies even in small-scale power plants. A promising technology to reach this goal is a hybrid power plant in which a gas turbine (GT) is coupled with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This paper presents a dynamic model of a pressurized SOFC system consisting of the fuel cell stack with combustion zone and balance-of-plant components such as desulphurization, humidification, reformer, ejector and heat exchangers. The model includes thermal coupling between the different components. A number of control loops for fuel and air flows as well as power management are integrated in order to keep the system within the desired operation window. Models and controls are implemented in a MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. Different hybrid cycles proposed earlier are discussed and a preferred cycle is developed. Simulation results show the prospects of the developed modeling and control system.

  15. Technology Status and Expected Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Battery, Plug-In Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipman, Timothy E.

    2011-11-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) of various types are experiencing a commercial renaissance but of uncertain ultimate success. Many new electric-drive models are being introduced by different automakers with significant technical improvements from earlier models, particularly with regard to further refinement of drivetrain systems and important improvements in battery and fuel cell systems. The various types of hybrid and all-electric vehicles can offer significant greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions when compared to conventional vehicles on a full fuel-cycle basis. In fact, most EVs used under most condition are expected to significantly reduce lifecycle GHG emissions. This paper reviews the current technology status of EVs and compares various estimates of their potential to reduce GHGs on a fuel cycle basis. In general, various studies show that battery powered EVs reduce GHGs by a widely disparate amount depending on the type of powerplant used and the particular region involved, among other factors. Reductions typical of the United States would be on the order of 20-50%, depending on the relative level of coal versus natural gas and renewables in the powerplant feedstock mix. However, much deeper reductions of over 90% are possible for battery EVs running on renewable or nuclear power sources. Plug-in hybrid vehicles running on gasoline can reduce emissions by 20-60%, and fuel cell EV reduce GHGs by 30-50% when running on natural gas-derived hydrogen and up to 95% or more when the hydrogen is made (and potentially compressed) using renewable feedstocks. These are all in comparison to what is usually assumed to be a more advanced gasoline vehicle "baseline" of comparison, with some incremental improvements by 2020 or 2030. Thus, the emissions from all of these EV types are highly variable depending on the details of how the electric fuel or hydrogen is produced.

  16. Hydrogen Fueled Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) System for Long-Haul Rail Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Justin Jeff

    Freight movement of goods is the artery for America's economic health. Long-haul rail is the premier mode of transport on a ton-mile basis. Concerns regarding greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions, however, have motivated the creation of annually increasing locomotive emissions standards. Health issues from diesel particulate matter, especially near rail yards, have also been on the rise. These factors and the potential to raise conventional diesel-electric locomotive performance warrants the investigation of using future fuels in a more efficient system for locomotive application. This research evaluates the dynamic performance of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) Hybrid system operating on hydrogen fuel to power a locomotive over a rail path starting from the Port of Los Angeles and ending in the City of Barstow. Physical constraints, representative locomotive operation logic, and basic design are used from a previous feasibility study and simulations are performed in the MATLAB Simulink environment. In-house controls are adapted to and expanded upon. Results indicate high fuel-to-electricity efficiencies of at least 54% compared to a conventional diesel-electric locomotive efficiency of 35%. Incorporation of properly calibrated feedback and feed-forward controls enables substantial load following of difficult transients that result from train kinematics while maintaining turbomachinery operating requirements and suppressing thermal stresses in the fuel cell stack. The power split between the SOFC and gas turbine is deduced to be a deterministic factor in the balance between capital and operational costs. Using hydrogen results in no emissions if renewable and offers a potential of 24.2% fuel energy savings for the rail industry.

  17. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  18. Demonstration of neutron detection utilizing open cell foam and noble gas scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, C. M. Miller, E. C.; Coplan, M.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Yue, A. T.; Kowler, A. L.; Koeth, T.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Clark, Charles W.

    2015-03-02

    We present results demonstrating neutron detection via a closely spaced converter structure coupled to low pressure noble gas scintillation instrumented by a single photo-multiplier tube (PMT). The converter is dispersed throughout the gas volume using a reticulated vitreous carbon foam coated with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C). A calibrated cold neutron beam is used to measure the neutron detection properties, using a thin film of enriched {sup 10}B as a reference standard. Monte Carlo computations of the ion energy deposition are discussed, including treatment of the foam random network. Results from this study indicate that the foam shadows a significant portion of the scintillation light from the PMT. The high scintillation yield of Xe appears to overcome the light loss, facilitating neutron detection and presenting interesting opportunities for neutron detector design.

  19. Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Design for High Altitude Long Endurance Aerospace Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himansu, Ananda; Freeh, Joshua E.; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Wang, Xiao-Yen J.

    2006-01-01

    A system level analysis, inclusive of mass, is carried out for a cryogenic hydrogen fueled hybrid solid oxide fuel cell and bottoming gas turbine (SOFC/GT) power system. The system is designed to provide primary or secondary electrical power for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over a high altitude, long endurance mission. The net power level and altitude are parametrically varied to examine their effect on total system mass. Some of the more important technology parameters, including turbomachinery efficiencies and the SOFC area specific resistance, are also studied for their effect on total system mass. Finally, two different solid oxide cell designs are compared to show the importance of the individual solid oxide cell design on the overall system. We show that for long mission durations of 10 days or more, the fuel mass savings resulting from the high efficiency of a SOFC/GT system more than offset the larger powerplant mass resulting from the low specific power of the SOFC/GT system. These missions therefore favor high efficiency, low power density systems, characteristics typical of fuel cell systems in general.

  20. Non-thermal gas plasma-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ruwan Kumara, Madduma Hewage Susara; Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Park, Jeong Eon; Shilnikova, Kristina; Jo, Jin Oh; Mok, Young Sun; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seong Bong; Yoo, Suk Jae; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common type of tumor among both men and women worldwide. Conventional remedies such as chemotherapies pose the risk of side‑effects, and in many cases cancer cells develop chemoresistance to these treatments. Non‑thermal gas plasma (NTGP) was recently identified as a potential tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated the potential use of NTGP to control SNUC5 human colon carcinoma cells. We hypothesized that NTGP would generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells, resulting in induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ROS generation, expression of ER stress‑related proteins and mitochondrial calcium levels were analyzed. Our results confirmed that plasma‑generated ROS induce apoptosis in SNUC5 cells. Furthermore, we found that plasma exposure resulted in mitochondrial calcium accumulation and expression of unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins such as glucose‑related protein 78 (GRP78), protein kinase R (PKR)‑like ER kinase (PERK), and inositol‑requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1). Elevated expression of spliced X‑box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and CCAAT/enhancer‑binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) further confirmed that ROS generated by NTGP induces apoptosis through the ER stress signaling pathway. PMID:27573888

  1. Diffusion, thermalization, and optical pumping of YbF molecules in a cold buffer-gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoff, S. M.; Hendricks, R. J.; Sinclair, C. D. J.; Hudson, J. J.; Segal, D. M.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2011-02-01

    We produce YbF molecules with a density of 1018 m-3 using laser ablation inside a cryogenically cooled cell filled with a helium buffer gas. Using absorption imaging and absorption spectroscopy we study the formation, diffusion, thermalization, and optical pumping of the molecules. The absorption images show an initial rapid expansion of molecules away from the ablation target followed by a much slower diffusion to the cell walls. We study how the time constant for diffusion depends on the helium density and temperature and obtain values for the YbF-He diffusion cross section at two different temperatures. We measure the translational and rotational temperatures of the molecules as a function of time since formation, obtain the characteristic time constant for the molecules to thermalize with the cell walls, and elucidate the process responsible for limiting this thermalization rate. Finally, we make a detailed study of how the absorption of the probe laser saturates as its intensity increases, showing that the saturation intensity is proportional to the helium density. We use this to estimate collision rates and the density of molecules in the cell.

  2. Non-thermal gas plasma-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ruwan Kumara, Madduma Hewage Susara; Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Park, Jeong Eon; Shilnikova, Kristina; Jo, Jin Oh; Mok, Young Sun; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seong Bong; Yoo, Suk Jae; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common type of tumor among both men and women worldwide. Conventional remedies such as chemotherapies pose the risk of side‑effects, and in many cases cancer cells develop chemoresistance to these treatments. Non‑thermal gas plasma (NTGP) was recently identified as a potential tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated the potential use of NTGP to control SNUC5 human colon carcinoma cells. We hypothesized that NTGP would generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells, resulting in induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ROS generation, expression of ER stress‑related proteins and mitochondrial calcium levels were analyzed. Our results confirmed that plasma‑generated ROS induce apoptosis in SNUC5 cells. Furthermore, we found that plasma exposure resulted in mitochondrial calcium accumulation and expression of unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins such as glucose‑related protein 78 (GRP78), protein kinase R (PKR)‑like ER kinase (PERK), and inositol‑requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1). Elevated expression of spliced X‑box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and CCAAT/enhancer‑binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) further confirmed that ROS generated by NTGP induces apoptosis through the ER stress signaling pathway.

  3. Mitigation of Memory Effects in Beta Scintillation Cells for Radioactive Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E; McIntyre, Justin I; Antolick, Kathryn C; Carman, April J; Cooper, Matthew W; Hayes, James C; Heimbigner, Tom R; Hubbard, C W; Litke, Kevin E; Ripplinger, Mike D; Suarez, Reynold

    2005-08-31

    The Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) developed at PNNL measures the relative concentrations of xenon isotopes using a coincidence system. Previous tests of the ARSA system have shown that latent radioactivity remains in the plastic cells after evacuation of the gases, leading to a “memory effect” in which the background count rate is dependent on the sample history. The increased background results in lower detection sensitivity. Two possible solutions to the memory effect are explored in this work: depositing a thin layer of metal on the plastic cell (“metallization”), and using an inorganic scintillating cell composed of yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP). In both cases, the presence of inorganic material at the surface is intended to inhibit the diffusion of gases into the cell walls.

  4. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  5. MiR-34a targets GAS1 to promote cell proliferation and inhibit apoptosis in papillary thyroid carcinoma via PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yanfei; Qin, Huadong; Cui, Yunfu

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •MiR-34a is up- and GAS1 is down-regulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma. •GAS1 is a direct target for miR-34a. •MiR-34a promotes PTC cells proliferation and inhibits apoptosis through PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are fundamental regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and are implicated in tumorigenesis of many cancers. MiR-34a is best known as a tumor suppressor through repression of growth factors and oncogenes. Growth arrest specific1 (GAS1) protein is a tumor suppressor that inhibits cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through inhibition of RET receptor tyrosine kinase. Both miR-34a and GAS1 are frequently down-regulated in various tumors. However, it has been reported that while GAS1 is down-regulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), miR-34a is up-regulated in this specific type of cancer, although their potential roles in PTC tumorigenesis have not been examined to date. A computational search revealed that miR-34a putatively binds to the 3′-UTR of GAS1 gene. In the present study, we confirmed previous findings that miR-34a is up-regulated and GAS1 down-regulated in PTC tissues. Further studies indicated that GAS1 is directly targeted by miR-34a. Overexpression of miR-34a promoted PTC cell proliferation and colony formation and inhibited apoptosis, whereas knockdown of miR-34a showed the opposite effects. Silencing of GAS1 had similar growth-promoting effects as overexpression of miR-34a. Furthermore, miR-34a overexpression led to activation of PI3K/Akt/Bad signaling pathway in PTC cells, and depletion of Akt reversed the pro-growth, anti-apoptotic effects of miR-34a. Taken together, our results demonstrate that miR-34a regulates GAS1 expression to promote proliferation and suppress apoptosis in PTC cells via PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. MiR-34a functions as an oncogene in PTC.

  6. Performance assessment of natural gas and biogas fueled molten carbonate fuel cells in carbon capture configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barelli, Linda; Bidini, Gianni; Campanari, Stefano; Discepoli, Gabriele; Spinelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The ability of MCFCs as carbon dioxide concentrator is an alternative solution among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to reduce the CO2 emission of an existing plant, providing energy instead of implying penalties. Moreover, the fuel flexibility exhibited by MCFCs increases the interest on such a solution. This paper provides the performance characterization of MCFCs operated in CCS configuration and fed with either natural gas or biogas. Experimental results are referred to a base CCS unit constituted by a MCFC stack fed from a reformer and integrated with an oxycombustor. A comparative analysis is carried out to evaluate the effect of fuel composition on energy efficiency and CO2 capture performance. A higher CO2 removal ability is revealed for the natural feeding case, bringing to a significant reduction in MCFC total area (-11.5%) and to an increase in produced net power (+13%). Moreover, the separated CO2 results in 89% (natural gas) and 86.5% (biogas) of the CO2 globally delivered by the CCS base unit. Further investigation will be carried out to provide a comprehensive assessment of the different solutions eco-efficiency considering also the biogas source and availability.

  7. Method using gas chromatography to determine the molar flow balance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells exposed to impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, G.; Angelo, M.; Bethune, K.; Dorn, S.; Thampan, T.; Rocheleau, R.

    An understanding of the potentially serious performance degradation effects that trace level contaminants can cause in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is crucial for the successful deployment of PEMFC for commercial applications. An experimental and analytic methodology is described that employs gas chromatography (GC) to accurately determine the concentration of impurity species in the fuel and oxidant streams of a PEMFC. In this paper we further show that the accurate determination of the contaminant concentrations at the anode and cathode inlets and outlets provides a means to quantify reactions of contaminants within the cell and to identify diffusive mass transport across the membrane. High data accuracy down to sub-ppm contaminant levels is required and was achieved by addressing several challenges pertaining to experimental setup and data analysis which are both discussed in detail. The application of the methodology is demonstrated using carbon monoxide and toluene which were injected into the cell at concentrations between 1 and 10 ppm and 20 and 60 ppm, respectively. Both impurities were observed to react in the fuel cell: carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, and toluene to methylcyclohexane. For both contaminants closure of the molar flow balances to within 3% was achieved even at the low contaminant concentrations. This allowed the extent of both reactions at the applied operating conditions to be quantified. The presented methodology is shown to be a valuable tool for investigating the effects and reactions of trace contaminants in fuel cells and for providing critical insights into the mechanisms responsible for the associated performance degradation.

  8. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  9. Nonlinear predictive control for the concentrations profile regulation under unknown reaction disturbances in a fuel cell anode gas channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Julio; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Serra, Maria

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) strategy is proposed to regulate the concentrations of the different gas species inside a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) anode gas channel. The purpose of the regulation relies on the rejection of the unmeasurable perturbations that affect the system: the hydrogen reaction and water transport terms. The model of the anode channel is derived from the discretisation of the partial differential equations that define the nonlinear dynamics of the system, taking into account spatial variations along the channel. Forward and backward discretisations of the distributed model are employed to take advantage of the boundary conditions of the problem. A linear observer is designed and implemented to perform output-feedback control of the plant. This information is fed to the controller to regulate the states towards their desired values. Simulation results are presented to show the performance of the proposed control method over a given case study. Different cost functions are compared and the one with minimum state-regulation error is identified. Suitable dynamic responses are obtained facing the different considered disturbances.

  10. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  11. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-10-01

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions in a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.

  12. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  13. Microstructural analysis of mass transport phenomena in gas diffusion media for high current density operation in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-04-01

    Cost reduction is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). High current density operation is a solution pathway. In order to realize high current density operation, it is necessary to reduce mass transport resistance in the gas diffusion media commonly consisted of gas diffusion layer (GDL) and micro porous layer (MPL). However, fundamental understanding of the underlying mass transport phenomena in the porous components is not only critical but also not fully understood yet due to the inherent microstructural complexity. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of electron and oxygen transport in the GDL and MPL is conducted experimentally and numerically with three-dimensional (3D) microstructural data to reveal the structure-transport relationship. The results reveal that the mass transport in the GDL is strongly dependent on the local microstructural variations, such as local pore/solid volume fractions and connectivity. However, especially in the case of the electrical conductivity of MPL, the contact resistance between carbon particles is the dominant factor. This suggests that reducing the contact resistance between carbon particles and/or the number of contact points along the transport pathway can improve the electrical conductivity of MPL.

  14. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-08-15

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions inmore » a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Lastly, simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.« less

  15. Long non-coding RNA-GAS5 acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder transitional cell carcinoma via regulation of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    CAO, QIFENG; WANG, NING; QI, JUAN; GU, ZHENGQIN; SHEN, HAIBO

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in diverse biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell growth and tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether lncRNA-growth arrest-specific (GAS)5 regulated bladder cancer progression via regulation of chemokine (C-C) ligand (CCL)1 expression. The viability of BLX bladder cancer cells was detected using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining. The expression levels of specific genes and proteins were analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. In addition, cells were transfected with small interfering (si)RNAs or recombinant GAS5 in order to silence or overexpress GAS5, respectively. The results of the present study demonstrated that knockdown of GAS5 expression promoted bladder cancer cell proliferation, whereas overexpression of GAS5 suppressed cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 resulted in an increased percentage of cells in S and G2 phase, and a decreased percentage of cells in G1 phase. In addition, the present study performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs in bladder cancer cells and detected that CCL1 overexpression resulted in an upregulation of GAS5, which may improve the ability of cells to regulate a stress response in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 expression increased the mRNA and protein expression of CCL1 in bladder cancer cells. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that GAS5 was able to inhibit bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study demonstrated that GAS5 was able to suppress bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least partially, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study may provide a basis for developing novel effective treatment

  16. Characterization of Clostridia by Gas Chromatography: Differentiation of Species by Trimethylsilyl Derivatives of Whole-Cell Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Farshy, David C.; Moss, C. Wayne

    1970-01-01

    Trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives prepared from whole-cell hydrolysates of 36 strains, representing 10 species of Clostridium were examined by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The TMS profile of each species contained a group of peaks which characterized the species. Variation among strains within a species was much lower than variation between species. Some of the closely related clostridia could be differentiated by comparing their TMS profiles. Strains of Clostridium botulinum were distinguished from C. sporogenes on the basis of the ratio of two GLC peaks which corresponded to arabinose and glucose. A peak with a retention time identical to that of mannose was present in all C. bifermentans strains but was absent in those of C. sordellii. PMID:4318575

  17. Numerical study of droplet dynamics in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell gas channel using an embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarauta, Alex; Ryzhakov, Pavel; Secanell, Marc; Waghmare, Prashant R.; Pons-Prats, Jordi

    2016-08-01

    An embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for the simulation of droplet dynamics within a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) channel is presented. Air is modeled using an Eulerian formulation, whereas water is described with a Lagrangian framework. Using this framework, the gas-liquid interface can be accurately identified. The surface tension force is computed using the curvature defined by the boundary of the Lagrangian mesh. The method naturally accounts for material property changes across the interface and accurately represents the pressure discontinuity. A sessile drop in a horizontal surface, a sessile drop in an inclined plane and droplets in a PEFC channel are solved for as numerical examples and compared to experimental data. Numerical results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Numerical results are also compared to results obtained with the semi-analytical model previously developed by the authors in order to discuss the limitations of the semi-analytical approach.

  18. Redesigned Gas Mass Flow Sensors for Space Shuttle Pressure Control System and Fuel Cell System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine if a state of the art micro-machined silicon solid state flow sensor could be used to replace the existing space shuttle orbiter flow sensors. The rather aggressive goal was to obtain a new sensor which would also be a multi-gas sensor and operate over a much wider flow range and with a higher degree of accuracy than the existing sensors. Two types of sensors were tested. The first type was a venturi throat design and the second was a bypass design. The accuracy of venturi design was found to be marginally acceptable. The bypass sensor was much better although it still did not fully reach the accuracy goal. Two main problems were identified which would require further work.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine power plant cycles and performance estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    SOFC pressurization enhances SOFC efficiency and power performance. It enables the direct integration of the SOFC and gas turbine technologies which can form the basis for very efficient combined- cycle power plants. PSOFC/GT cogeneration systems, producing steam and/or hot water in addition to electric power, can be designed to achieve high fuel effectiveness values. A wide range of steam pressures and temperatures are possible owing to system component arrangement flexibility. It is anticipated that Westinghouse will offer small PSOFC/GT power plants for sale early in the next decade. These plants will have capacities less than 10 MW net ac, and they will operate with efficiencies in the 60-65% (net ac/LHV) range.

  20. Assessing accuracy of gas-driven permeability measurements: a comparative study of diverse Hassler-cell and probe permeameter devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filomena, C. M.; Hornung, J.; Stollhofen, H.

    2013-08-01

    Permeability is one of the most important petrophysical parameters to describe the reservoir potential of sedimentary rocks, contributing to problems in hydrology, geothermics, or hydrocarbon reservoir analysis. Outcrop analog studies, well core measurements, or individual sample analysis take advantage of a variety of commercially available devices for permeability measurements. Very often, permeability data derived from different devices need to be merged within one study, e.g. outcrop mini-permeametry and lab-based core plug measurements. To enhance accuracy of different gas-driven permeability measurements, device-specific aberrations need to be taken into account. The application of simple one-to-one correlations may draw a wrong picture of permeability trends. For this purpose, transform equations need to be established. This study presents a detailed comparison of permeability data derived from a selection of commonly used Hassler cells and probe permeameters. As a result of individual cross-plots, typical aberrations and transform equations are elaborated which enable corrections for the specific permeameters. Permeability measurements of the commercially available ErgoTech Gas Permeameter and the TinyPerm II probe-permeameter are well-comparable over the entire range of permeability, with R2 = 0.967. Major aberrations are identified among the TinyPerm II and the mini-permeameter/Hassler-cell combination at Darmstadt University, which need to be corrected and standardized within one study. However, transforms are critical to their use, as aberrations are frequently limited to certain permeability intervals. In the presented examples, deviations typically tend to occur in the lower permeability range < 10 mD. Applying standardizations which consider these aberration intervals strongly improve the comparability of permeability datasets and facilitate the combination of measurement principles. Therefore, the utilization of such correlation tests is highly

  1. Assessing accuracy of gas-driven permeability measurements: a comparative study of diverse Hassler-cell and probe permeameter devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filomena, C. M.; Hornung, J.; Stollhofen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Permeability is one of the most important petrophysical parameters to describe the reservoir properties of sedimentary rocks, pertaining to problems in hydrology, geothermics, and hydrocarbon reservoir analysis. Outcrop analogue studies, well core measurements, and individual sample analysis take advantage of a variety of commercially available devices for permeability measurements. Very often, permeability data derived from different devices need to be merged within one study (e.g. outcrop minipermeametry and lab-based core plug measurements). To enhance accuracy of different gas-driven permeability measurements, device-specific aberrations need to be taken into account. The application of simple one-to-one correlations may draw the wrong picture of permeability trends. For this purpose, transform equations need to be established. This study presents a detailed comparison of permeability data derived from a selection of commonly used Hassler cells and probe permeameters. As a result of individual cross-plots, typical aberrations and transform equations are elaborated, which enable corrections for the specific permeameters. Permeability measurements of the commercially available ErgoTech gas permeameter and the TinyPerm II probe permeameter are well-comparable over the entire range of permeability, with R2 = 0.955. Aberrations are mostly identified in the permeability range < 10 mD, regarding the TinyPerm II and the minipermeameter/Hassler-cell combination at Darmstadt University, which need to be corrected and standardized. Applying standardizations which consider these aberration intervals strongly improves the comparability of permeability data sets and facilitates the combination of measurement principles. Therefore, the utilization of such correlation tests is highly recommended for all kinds of reservoir studies using integrated permeability databases.

  2. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for evacuating, refilling and connectorizing hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for use asgas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to amechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  3. Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program. Topical report: Cathode compatibility tests

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

  4. Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

  5. An alternative gas-phase in vitro exposure system for toxicity testing: the interaction between nitrous oxide and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Stellavato, Antonietta; Cammarota, Marcella; Miraglia, Nadia; Simonelli, Angela; Giuliano, Mariateresa

    2011-10-01

    An original in vitro approach was adopted to expose cells to volatile agents. The anaesthetic nitrous oxide (N(2)O) was chosen as the model agent, and type II pneumocyte-like cells (A549 cells) were used as the target to represent the lungs. A time-lapse microscopy station was equipped with a manual gas mixer that allowed the generation of a mixture of N(2)O/air/CO(2) in the gas phase, to provide a uniform distribution of the volatile agent. The dissolution of N(2)O in the culture medium was monitored by gas chromatography-electron capture detection. Biochemical alterations, in terms of homocysteine accumulation, demonstrated that intracellular methionine synthase had been inactivated by N(2)O absorbed by the cells, a process that also occurs in vivo. Toll-like receptors, which are key molecules in inflammatory lung diseases, were also investigated at the molecular level. Our experiments indicated that biochemical and molecular alterations occurred in the cells, even under conditions where neither morphologic changes nor consistent alterations in cell proliferation were evident. This in vitro exposure system can be efficiently adopted for looking at the repeat-dose effects of volatile agents on respiratory tissues. Moreover, it could be of further benefit for identifying the wide range of specific cell targets, and for monitoring relevant endpoints in the cellular and molecular processes that occur during exposure to volatile compounds.

  6. Lattice-Boltzmann Simulations of Multiphase Flows in Gas-Diffusion-Layer (GDL) of a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjeea, Shiladitya; Cole, J Vernon; Jainb, Kunal; Gidwania, Ashok

    2008-11-01

    Improved power density and freeze-thaw durability in automotive applications of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) requires effective water management at the membrane. This is controlled by a porous hydrophobic gas-diffusion-layer (GDL) inserted between the membrane catalyst layer and the gas reactant channels. The GDL distributes the incoming gaseous reactants on the catalyst surface and removes excess water by capillary action. There is, however, limited understanding of the multiphase, multi-component transport of liquid water, vapor and gaseous reactants within these porous materials. This is due primarily to the challenges of in-situ diagnostics for such thin (200 -“ 300 {microns}), optically opaque (graphite) materials. Transport is typically analyzed by fitting Darcy's Law type expressions for permeability, in conjunction with capillary pressure relations based on formulations derived for media such as soils. Therefore, there is significant interest in developing predictive models for transport in GDLs and related porous media. Such models could be applied to analyze and optimize systems based on the interactions between cell design, materials, and operating conditions, and could also be applied to evaluating material design concepts. Recently, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has emerged as an effective tool in modeling multiphase flows in general, and flows through porous media in particular. This method is based on the solution of a discrete form of the well-known Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for molecular distribution, tailored to recover the continuum Navier-Stokes flow. The kinetic theory basis of the method allows simple implementation of molecular forces responsible for liquid-gas phase separation and capillary effects. The solution advances by a streaming and collision type algorithm that makes it suitable to implement for domains with complex boundaries. We have developed both single and multiphase LB models and applied them to

  7. Investigations of gas/electrode interactions in solid oxide fuel cells using vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, Harry Wilson, III

    The goal of current solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) research is to design electrode materials and other system components that permit the fuel cell to be operated in the 400-700°C range. Cell performance in this lower temperature range is limited by the oxygen reduction process at the SOFC cathode and by multiple contamination processes. The work presented demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy, a form of vibrational spectroscopy, can provide structural and compositional information complementary to that from traditional characterization methods. Initial experiments into the oxygen reduction mechanism on SOFC cathodes were unable to detect surface oxygen species on selected perovksite-based SOFC cathode materials. However, the Raman signal from the cathode surface was able to be enhanced by depositing silver or gold nanoparticles on the cathode, creating the so-called surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. The Raman sample chamber was also used to study two possible electrode contamination processes. First, the deposition of carbon on nickel and copper anodes was observed when exposed to different hydrocarbon fuel gases. Second, the poisoning of an SOFC cathode by chromium-containing vapor (usually generated by stainless steel SOFC system components) was monitored. Overall, Raman spectroscopy was shown to be useful in many areas crucial to the development of practical, cost-effective SOFCs. The techniques developed here could also be applied to other high temperature electrochemical and catalytic systems.

  8. Bulk and contact resistances of gas diffusion layers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Donghao; Gauthier, Eric; Benziger, Jay B.; Pan, Mu

    2014-06-01

    A multi-electrode probe is employed to distinguish the bulk and contact resistances of the catalyst layer (CL) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) with the bipolar plate (BPP). Resistances are compared for Vulcan carbon catalyst layers (CL), carbon paper and carbon cloth GDL materials, and GDLs with microporous layers (MPL). The Vulcan carbon catalyst layer bulk resistance is 100 times greater than the bulk resistance of carbon paper GDL (Toray TG-H-120). Carbon cloth (CCWP) has bulk and contact resistances twice those of carbon paper. Compression of the GDL decreases the GDL contact resistance, but has little effect on the bulk resistance. Treatment of the GDL with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) increases the contact resistance, but has little effect on the bulk resistance. A microporous layer (MPL) added to the GDL decreases the contact resistance, but has little effect on the bulk resistance. An equivalent circuit model shows that for channels less than 1 mm wide the contact resistance is the major source of electronic resistance and is about 10% of the total ohmic resistance associated with the membrane electrode assembly.

  9. RGA Analysis of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Hybrid Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Alex; Banta, Larry; Tucker, D.A.; Gemmen, R.S.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a Relative Gain Array (RGA) analysis of a simulated SOFC/Gas Turbine plant based on a multivariate empirical formulation of a 300kW hybrid system. The HyPer test facility at the National Energy Technology Laboratory, served as the test bed for deriving frequency response data and subsequent multivariable model of a direct fired, recuperated hybrid cycle plant. Through the modulation of various airflow bypass-valves, magnitude and phase data is used to formulate Transfer Function {TF} equations that describe input/output system interaction. A frequency dependent RGA calculation of the empirical Transfer Function matrix provides a means of quantifying the degree of coupling between system inputs and outputs for the configuration studied. Various input/output interaction time scales are obtained to identify frequencies where fully developed system coupling occur. Analysis of the RGA matrix leads to a better understanding of the inherent properties the hybrid configuration, and can serve as a validating tool to existing analytical RGA calculations of similar types of hybrids.

  10. Effects of Glucose Feeding on Respiration and Photosynthesis in Photoautotrophic Dianthus caryophyllus Cells: Mass Spectrometric Determination of Gas Exchange.

    PubMed

    Avelange, M H; Sarrey, F; Rébillé, F

    1990-11-01

    When glucose (20 millimolar) was added to photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures of Dianthus caryophyllus, there was during the first 10 hours an accumulation of carbohydrates and phosphorylated compounds. These biochemical changes were accompanied by a progressive decrease of net photosynthesis and a twofold increase of the dark respiratory rate. The rise of respiration was associated with a rise of fumarase and cytochrome c oxidase activities, two mitochondrial markers. Gas exchange of illuminated cells were performed with a mass spectrometry technique and clearly established that during the first hours of glucose feeding, the decrease of net photosynthesis was essentially due to an increase of respiration in light, whereas the photosynthetic processes (gross O(2) evolution and gross CO(2) fixation) were almost not affected. However, after 24 hours of experiment, O(2) evolution and CO(2) fixation started to decline in turn. While ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity was little affected during the first 48 hours of the experiment, the maximal light-induced phosphoribulokinase activity dramatically decreased with time and represented after 48 hours only 30% of its initial activity. It is postulated that the decrease in phosphoribulokinase activity was at least partially responsible for the decrease of CO(2) fixation and the metabolic events involved in this regulation are discussed.

  11. Temperature and density relaxation close to the liquid-gas critical point: an analytical solution for cylindrical cells.

    PubMed

    Carlès, Pierre; Zhong, Fang; Weilert, Mark; Barmatz, M

    2005-04-01

    We present a study of the temperature and density equilibration near the liquid-gas critical point of a composite system consisting of a thin circular disk of near-critical fluid surrounded by a copper wall. This system is a simplified model for a proposed space experiment cell that would have 60 thin fluid layers separated by perforated copper plates to aid in equilibration. Upper and lower relaxation time limits that are based on radial and transverse diffusion through the fluid thickness are shown to be too significantly different for a reasonable estimate of the time required for the space experiment. We therefore have developed the first rigorous analytical solution of the piston effect in two dimensions for a cylindrically symmetric three-dimensional cell, including the finite conductivity of the copper wall. This solution covers the entire time evolution of the system after a boundary temperature step, from the early piston effect through the final diffusive equilibration. The calculation uses a quasistatic approximation for the copper and a Laplace-transform solution to the piston effect equation in the fluid. Laplace inversion is performed numerically. The results not only show that the equilibration is divided into three temporal regimes but also give an estimate of the amplitudes of the remaining temperature and density inhomogeneity in each regime. These results yield characteristic length scales for each of the regimes that are used to estimate the expected relaxation times in the one- and two-phase regions near the critical point.

  12. PdPt catalyst synthesized using a gas aggregation source and magnetron sputtering for fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillard, A.; Cuynet, S.; Lecas, T.; Andreazza, P.; Mikikian, M.; Thomann, A.-L.; Brault, P.

    2015-12-01

    PdPt catalysts with different morphologies and atomic ratios have been synthesized on native SiO2/Si and on proton exchange membranes. The combination of the gas aggregation source and magnetron sputtering techniques allows the formation of quasi core-shell Pd0.97Pt0.03@Pt nanoclusters. Transmission electron microscopy and grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering measurements of the Pd-rich core reveal a mean diameter of 4 nm and a face-centered cubic structure. The Pt shell around half of the Pd-rich core is formed by magnetron sputtering, and increases the nanocluster diameter (up to 10 nm) and the overall Pt content (up to 85%). Membranes coated by the PdPt core catalyst and PdPt@Pt catalyst (resulting in the formation of catalyst-coated membranes) are incorporated into fuel cells and their electrical characteristics are measured. The association of the two deposition techniques results in the formation of quasi core-shell PdPt@Pt nanoclusters, improving the start-up step of the fuel cell.

  13. Improvement of oxygen diffusion characteristic in gas diffusion layer with planar-distributed wettability for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koresawa, Ryo; Utaka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Mass transfer characteristics of gas diffusion layer (GDL) are closely related to performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics of water distribution relating to the microscopic conformation and oxygen diffusivity of GDL. A hybrid type carbon paper GDL with planar-distributed wettability is investigated for control of liquid water movement and distribution due to hydrophobic to hydrophilic areas that provide wettability differences in GDL and to achieve enhancement of both oxygen diffusion and moisture retention. Hybrid GDLs with different PTFE content were fabricated in an attempt to improve the oxygen diffusion characteristics. The effects of different PTFE contents on the oxygen diffusivity and water distribution were simultaneously measured and observed using galvanic cell oxygen absorber and X-ray radiography. The PTFE distribution was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The formation of oxygen diffusion paths was confirmed by X-ray radiography, where voids in the hybrid GDL were first formed in the hydrophobic regions and then spread to the untreated wetting region. Thus, the formation of oxygen diffusion paths enhanced the oxygen diffusion. In addition, the effects of local PTFE content in the hydrophobic region and the optimal amount of PTFE for hybrid GDL were elucidated.

  14. WT1 is involved in the Akt-JNK pathway dependent autophagy through directly regulating Gas1 expression in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, Hao; He, Juliang; Yuan, Zhenchao; Mo, Ligen; Wu, Zhenjie; Lin, Xiang; Liu, Bin; Guan, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Macroautophagy (herein termed autophagy) works as a protective mechanism in tumorigenesis and development under metabolic stress condition. Multitudes of genes have been found involved in this process during past decades. In the present study, we report that Wilm's tumor suppressor1 (WT1) is involved in autophagy in osteosarcoma (OS) cells. WT1, a transcription factor with multitude of target genes, expresses in a majority of cancer types. Though wide-ranging effect of WT1 is now well documented, the function of WT1 in tumors remains poorly defined. In this chapter, it is found that high expression of WT1 positively correlates with active autophagy in human osteosarcoma cells. And further study on cell signaling pathway illustrates that Akt/JNK pathway acts as a positive regulator of autophagy induced by WT1. Here, we present evidence that WT1 modulates Akt/JNK signaling pathway mediated autophagy by controlling the expression of growth arrest-specific 1 (Gas1). We show that WT1 is required for Gas1 transcription in osteosarcoma cells. And Gas1 is upregulated followed WT1 overexpression in a time-dependent manner. Loss of Gas1 results in a reduction of WT1-induced autophagy. PMID:27453337

  15. ZTEK`s ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine system for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, M.; Nathanson, D.; Bradshaw, D.T.

    1996-12-31

    Ztek`s Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system has exceptional potential for utility electric power generation because of: simplicity of components construction, capability for low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of very high quality by-product heat (up to 1000{degrees}C), and system integration simplicity. Utility applications of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell are varied and include distributed generation units (sub-MW to 30MW capacity), repowering existing power plants (i.e. 30MW to 100MW), and multi-megawatt central power plants. A TVA/EPRI collaboration program involved functional testing of the advanced solid oxide fuel cell stacks and design scale-up for distributed power generation applications. The emphasis is on the engineering design of the utility modules which will be the building blocks for up to megawatt scale power plants. The program has two distinctive subprograms: Verification test on a 1 kW stack and 25kW module for utility demonstration. A 1 kW Planar SOFC stack was successfully operated for 15,000 hours as of December, 1995. Ztek began work on a 25kW SOFC Power System for TVA, which plans to install the 25kW SOFC at a host site for demonstration in 1997. The 25kW module is Ztek`s intended building block for the commercial use of the Planar SOFC. Systems of up to megawatt capacity can be obtained by packaging the modules in 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional arrays.

  16. Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

    1982-01-01

    This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

  17. Cerium oxide nanoparticle uptake kinetics from the gas-phase into lung cells in vitro is transport limited.

    PubMed

    Raemy, David O; Limbach, Ludwig K; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Grass, Robert N; Gehr, Peter; Birbaum, Karin; Brandenberger, Christina; Günther, Detlef; Stark, Wendelin J

    2011-04-01

    Nowadays, aerosol processes are widely used for the manufacture of nanoparticles (NPs), creating an increased occupational exposure risk of workers, laboratory personnel and scientists to airborne particles. There is evidence that possible adverse effects are linked with the accumulation of NPs in target cells, pointing out the importance of understanding the kinetics of particle internalization. In this context, the uptake kinetics of representative airborne NPs over 30 min and their internalization after 24 h post-exposure were investigated by the use of a recently established exposure system. This system combines the production of aerosolized cerium oxide (CeO(2)) NPs by flame spray synthesis with its simultaneous particle deposition from the gas-phase onto A549 lung cells, cultivated at the air-liquid interface. Particle uptake was quantified by mass spectrometry after several exposure times (0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 min). Over 35% of the deposited mass was found internalized after 10 min exposure, a value that increased to 60% after 30 min exposure. Following an additional 24 h post-incubation, a time span, after which adverse biological effects were observed in previous experiments, over 80% of total CeO(2) could be detected intracellularly. On the ultrastructural level, focal cerium aggregates were present on the apical surface of A549 cells and could also be localized intracellularly in vesicular structures. The uptake behaviour of aerosolized CeO(2) is in line with observations on cerium suspensions, where particle mass transport was identified as the rate-limiting factor for NP internalization. PMID:21118721

  18. Preliminary analysis of compound systems based on high temperature fuel cell, gas turbine and Organic Rankine Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, D.; Muñoz de Escalona, J. M.; Monje, B.; Chacartegui, R.; Sánchez, T.

    This article presents a novel proposal for complex hybrid systems comprising high temperature fuel cells and thermal engines. In this case, the system is composed by a molten carbonate fuel cell with cascaded hot air turbine and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), a layout that is based on subsequent waste heat recovery for additional power production. The work will credit that it is possible to achieve 60% efficiency even if the fuel cell operates at atmospheric pressure. The first part of the analysis focuses on selecting the working fluid of the Organic Rankine Cycle. After a thermodynamic optimisation, toluene turns out to be the most efficient fluid in terms of cycle performance. However, it is also detected that the performance of the heat recovery vapour generator is equally important, what makes R245fa be the most interesting fluid due to its balanced thermal and HRVG efficiencies that yield the highest global bottoming cycle efficiency. When this fluid is employed in the compound system, conservative operating conditions permit achieving 60% global system efficiency, therefore accomplishing the initial objective set up in the work. A simultaneous optimisation of gas turbine (pressure ratio) and ORC (live vapour pressure) is then presented, to check if the previous results are improved or if the fluid of choice must be replaced. Eventually, even if system performance improves for some fluids, it is concluded that (i) R245fa is the most efficient fluid and (ii) the operating conditions considered in the previous analysis are still valid. The work concludes with an assessment about safety-related aspects of using hydrocarbons in the system. Flammability is studied, showing that R245fa is the most interesting fluid also in this regard due to its inert behaviour, as opposed to the other fluids under consideration all of which are highly flammable.

  19. The noble gas argon modifies extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling in neurons and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, Astrid V; Rossaint, Rolf; Haase, Hajo; Al Kassam, Hussam; Ryang, Yu-Mi; Beyer, Cordian; Coburn, Mark

    2012-01-15

    Recently, the noble gas argon has been identified as a potent neuroprotective agent, but little is known about its cellular effects. In this in vitro study, we investigated argon's influence on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, a ubiquitous enzyme with numerous functions in cell proliferation and survival. Primary neuronal and astroglial cell cultures and the microglial cell line BV-2 were exposed to 50 vol.% argon. Further possible effects were studied following stimulation of microglia with 50 ng/ml LPS. ERK 1/2 activation was assessed by phosphorylation state-specific western blotting, cytokine levels by real-time PCR and western blotting. Total phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity was examined with p-nitrophenylphosphate. After 30 min exposure, argon significantly activated ERK 1/2 signaling in microglia. Enhanced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 was also found in astrocytes and neurons following argon exposure, but it lacked statistical significance. In microglia, argon did not substantially interfere with LPS-induced ERK1/2 activation and inflammatory cytokine induction. Addition of the MEK-Inhibitor U0126 abolished the induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Cellular phosphatase activity and the inactivation of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 were not altered by argon. In conclusion, argon enhanced ERK 1/2 activity in microglia via the upstream kinase MEK, probably through a direct mode of activation. ERK 1/2 signaling in astrocytes and neurons in vitro was also influenced, although not with statistical significance. Whether ERK 1/2 activation by argon affects cellular functions like differentiation and survival in the brain in vivo will have to be determined in future experiments.

  20. System Design of a Natural Gas PEM Fuel Cell Power Plant for Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Ferrall, Tim Rehg, Vesna Stanic

    2000-09-30

    The following conclusions are made based on this analysis effort: (1) High-temperature PEM data are not available; (2) Stack development effort for Phase II is required; (3) System results are by definition preliminary, mostly due to the immaturity of the high-temperature stack; other components of the system are relatively well defined; (4) The Grotthuss conduction mechanism yields the preferred system characteristics; the Grotthuss conduction mechanism is also much less technically mature than the vehicle mechanism; (5) Fuel processor technology is available today and can be procured for Phase II (steam or ATR); (6) The immaturity of high-temperature membrane technology requires that a robust system design be developed in Phase II that is capable of operating over a wide temperature and pressure range - (a) Unpressurized or Pressurized PEM (Grotthuss mechanism) at 140 C, Highest temperature most favorable, Lowest water requirement most favorable, Pressurized recommended for base loaded operation, Unpressurized may be preferred for load following; (b) Pressurized PEM (vehicle mechanism) at about 100 C, Pressure required for saturation, Fuel cell technology currently available, stack development required. The system analysis and screening evaluation resulted in the identification of the following components for the most promising system: (1) Steam reforming fuel processor; (2) Grotthuss mechanism fuel cell stack operating at 140 C; (3) Means to deliver system waste heat to a cogeneration unit; (4) Pressurized system utilizing a turbocompressor for a base-load power application. If duty cycling is anticipated, the benefits of compression may be offset due to complexity of control. In this case (and even in the base loaded case), the turbocompressor can be replaced with a blower for low-pressure operation.