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Sample records for gas chromatographic detection

  1. Detection system for a gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, John M.; Small, Gerald J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam.

  2. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of pans with luminol chemilumnescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.; Bornick, R.; Chen, Yu-Harn; Marley, N.

    1996-12-31

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) are important air pollutants in tropospheric chemistry. PANs are known to be potent phytotoxins at low ppb concentrations and are lachrymators. They can also transport the more reactive nitrogen dioxide long distances, because they are in equilibrium with that NO{sub x} species. Since PANs are trapped peroxyradicals, they are a direct measure of the peroxyradical levels and the of {open_quotes}photochemical age{close_quotes} of an air parcel. The PANs are typically measured in the atmosphere by using electron capture detection methods. These methods suffer from large background signals and detector responses to oxygen and water vapor. This paper describes the combination of a capillary gas chromatographic column with a modified luminol chemiluminescent nitrogen dioxide detector (Scintrex, Luminox) for rapid and sensitive detection of nitrogen dioxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate, peroxypropionyl nitrate, and peroxybutyryl nitrate. Detection limits for this approach in the low tens of parts per trillion have been observed with total analysis times of less than three minutes. We will discuss the potential application of this method to other compounds, particularly, organonitrates, in a pyrolysis system and/or with ozone addition to the sampling streams.

  3. Sensitive gas chromatographic detection of acetaldehyde and acetone using a reduction gas detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Dean; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a newly available mercuric oxide Reduction Gas Detector (RGD-2) to subpicomole and larger quantities of acetaldehyde and acetone is tested. The RGD-2 is found to be capable of subpicomole detection for these carbonyls and is more sensitive than an FID (Flame Ionization Detector) by an order of magnitude. Operating parameters can be further optimized to make the RGD-2 some 20-40 times more sensitive than an FID. The detector is linear over a wide range and is easily adapted to a conventional gas chromatograph (GC). Such a GC-RGD-2 system should be suitable for atmospheric carbonyl measurements in clean as well as polluted environments.

  4. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1985-01-01

    A chromatographic system that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a non-transparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extremely low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  5. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    A chromatographic system is described that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a nontransparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extreme low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  6. Detection of irradiated fruits by gas-chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    el-Dien, S; Farag, A

    1996-06-01

    To detect those fruits which have been subjected to low-dose irradiation (0.5-3 kGy), two methods of chromatography (GC-MS and LC-LC-GC-FID) were used to determine the radiolytic compounds of lipids formed after irradiation, such as alkanes and alkenes. Extraction of volatile hydrocarbon compounds from some parts of irradiated fruits, e.g. the flesh (avocado), seeds (papaya) and kernels (mango and apricot) was carried out. The analysis of hydrocarbons by GC-MS proved the suitability of using C17:1, C16:2, C15:0 and C14:1 as markers for avocados irradiated with a low dose (0.75 kGy). The same indicators appeared following the analysis of papayas and mangoes irradiated with 1.5, and 3.0 kGy. Also, C15:0, C14:1 and C16:3 can be used to identify apricots irradiated with a low dose (0.5 kGy). The detection of alkenes was only improved by a more selective isolation, e.g. of dienes or trienes by LC-LC-GC-FID. Within a few minutes, apricots and avocados irradiated at low doses (0.5 and 0.75 kGy) can be recognized by the indicators C16:2, C17:2 and C16:3, without interfering peaks. In all cases, C16:1, C16:2, C16:3 as well as significant amounts of C17:2 can be used as markers for fruit irradiation.

  7. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  8. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  9. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of nitrogen dioxide and pans with luminol chemiluminescent detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J. S.; Bornick, R. M.; Chen, Y.-H.; Marley, N. A.; Environmental Research

    1998-01-01

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) and nitrogen dioxide are important atmospheric air pollutants in the troposphere. These atmospheric nitrogen species are strongly coupled chemically by a clearly temperature-dependent equilibrium in the troposphere. A chemical method that can measure both nitrogen dioxide and PANs rapidly and with sub-part-per-billion detection is described that is based upon a modified luminol detection system coupled to a capillary gas chromatographic column by using helium as a carrier. The system can readily separate and detect nitrogen dioxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate, peroxyproprionyl nitrate, and peroxybutyrl nitrate with detection limits in the low tens of parts per trillion with total analysis time of less than 1 min. Calibration of PAN by thermal decomposition to nitrogen dioxide is demonstrated with PAN detection sensitivities approximately 75% of the sensitivities observed for NO2 luminol detection by using helium as a carrier gas. The advantages of this method for simultaneous measurement of nitrogen dioxide and PANs over ozone chemiluminescent detection and electron capture detection are discussed, as well as potential applications of this method for heterogeneous surface chemistry studies of PANs and nitrogen dioxide and for tropospheric measurements.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, EXPLOSIVES DETECTION TECHNOLOGY, SRI INSTRUMENTS, MODEL 8610C, GAS CHROMATOGRAPH/THERMIONIC IONIZATION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SRI Model 86 1 OC gas chromatograph (GC) is a transportable instrument that can provide on-site analysis of soils for explosives. Coupling this transportable gas chromatograph with a thermionic ionization detector (TID) allows for the determination of explosives in soil matri...

  11. Rapid detection of bacteria with miniaturized pyrolysis-gas chromatographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowry, Curtis; Morgan, Catherine H.; Baca, Quentin; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2002-02-01

    Rapid detection and identification of bacteria and other pathogens is important for many civilian and military applications. The profiles of biological markers such as fatty acids can be used to characterize biological samples or to distinguish bacteria at the gram-type, genera, and even species level. Common methods for whole cell bacterial analysis are neither portable nor rapid, requiring lengthy, labor intensive sample preparation and bench-scale instrumentation. These methods chemically derivatize fatty acids to produce more volatile fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) that can be separated and analyzed by a gas chromatograph (GC)/mass spectrometer. More recent publications demonstrate decreased sample preparation time with in situ derivatization of whole bacterial samples using pyrolysis/derivatization. Ongoing development of miniaturized pyrolysis/GC instrumentation by this department capitalizes on Sandia advances in the field of microfabricated chemical analysis systems ((mu) ChemLab). Microdevices include rapidly heated stages capable of pyrolysis or sample concentration, gas chromatography columns, and surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor arrays. We will present results demonstrating the capabilities of these devices toward fulfilling the goal of portable, rapid detection and early warning of the presence of pathogens in air or water.

  12. Headspace gas chromatographic determination of methylene chloride in decaffeinated tea and coffee, with electrolytic conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1984-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatographic procedure is described for the determination of methylene chloride (MC) in decaffeinated tea and coffee. The tea or coffee sample, with added methylene bromide (MB) internal standard, is equilibrated for 1.5 h at 100 degrees C in aqueous sodium sulfate before manual headspace sampling. MC and MB are separated on a Porasil A column at 160 degrees C and detected by using a Coulson electrolytic conductivity detector. For coffee and tea samples spiked at 1.3 ppm MC, as well as commercially decaffeinated teas and coffees containing up to 8 ppm MC, coefficients of variation were 10% or less. For decaffeinated teas, problems involving sample homogeneity and loss of MC before sealing the headspace vial had to be overcome. Similar problems with decaffeinated instant and ground coffees were minimal. The headspace procedure was superior to a previously reported distillation technique. MC was readily detected at 0.05 ppm. Fourteen decaffeinated teas and 15 decaffeinated coffees were analyzed; MC was detected at levels that ranged up to 15.9 and 4.0 ppm, respectively. PMID:6469909

  13. The gas-liquid chromatograph and the electron capture detection in equine drug testing.

    PubMed Central

    Blake, J. W.; Tobin, T.

    1976-01-01

    Three gas-liquid chromatographic (G.L.C.) procedures discussed have been designed around the four "esses" of detection tests--speed, sensitivity, simplicity, and specificity. These techniques are admirably applicable to the very low plasma drug levels encountered in blood testing under pre-race conditions. The methods are equally applicable to post-race testing procedures, where both blood and urine samples are tested. Drugs can only rarely be detected by the electron capture detector (E.C.D.) without a prior derivatization step, which conveys to the drug(s) high electron affinity. Because of broad applicability, two derivatizing agents, heptafluorobutyric (HFBA) and pentafluorpropionic (PFPA) anhydrides are employed. The three techniques, allowing broad coverage of various drug classes are: 1) direct derivatization of drugs to form strongly electron capturing amides and esters. 2) reductive fragmentation of drugs with lithium aluminum hydride to form alcohols, with conversion to ester derivatives. 3) oxidative fragmentation of drugs with potassium dichromate to form derivatizable groups, followed by direct derivatization. PMID:1000157

  14. Microminiature gas chromatographic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, R. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques commonly used for fabrication of integrated circuits are utilized to produce long capillary tubes for microminiature chromatographs. Method involves bonding of flat silicon plate to top of spirally grooved silicon chip to close groove and form capillary column.

  15. Influence of solvents and gas chromatographic injector conditions on the detectability of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, M; Lahrz, T; Spyra, W

    2001-05-18

    We investigated the influence of four common solvents and of several liner packings of a split/splitless injector on the gas chromatographic behavior of trinitrotoluenes and related nitroaromatic compounds. The highest peaks are observed using toluene in combination with an empty liner or with a prepacked CarboFrit liner. In particular, the peaks of trinitrotoluene isomers and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene significantly decreased or even totally disappeared when using quartz wool or glass wool, even when treated with dimethylchlorosilane. Similiar peak reductions are obtained with methanol or acetonitrile. Effects of decreasing peak are accompanied by the formation of two additional products when using methanol.

  16. Detection system for a gas chromatograph. [. cap alpha. -methylnaphthalene,. beta. -methylnapthalene

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, J.M.; Small, G.J.

    1982-04-26

    A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam. 3 figures, 2 tables.

  17. The Sample Analysis At Mars Gas Chromatograph (sam-gc) Ability To Detect Organic Molecules At The Mars Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Pascaline; Coll, P.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Sternberg, R.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P.

    2012-10-01

    The environmental conditions on Mars might have been favorable for the emergence of Life. The search for clues of a prebiotic chemistry or a biological activity represents one of the main objectives of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The Sample Analysis at Mars Gas Chromatograph (SAM-GC), aboard Curiosity rover, is dedicated to organic molecules research in atmospheric and solid samples. This instrument is constituted of six complementary chromatographic columns which have been selected to provide a broad range of separation and detection capability (volatile, refractory and chiral molecules). In order to treat and interpret the SAM-GC in situ results, it is necessary: (1) to determine the instrument ability to detect targets molecules under the instrument operating conditions and (2) to create a chromatographic and mass spectra data base to help their identification. With this aim we first selected molecules which might be analyzed with SAM-GC using the following criteria: (1) abundance at the Mars surface (2) astrobiological interest, (3) formation during the sample preparation. Then we characterized these target molecules on a laboratory gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC-MS) using a Chirasildex (30m x 0,25mm x 0,25µm) column dedicated to the enantiomeric separation and a CLP (30m x 0,25mm x 0,25µm) generalist columns which will be probably the first to be used on Mars. In a second step, we will use a SAM-GC mock-up to mimick the environmental conditions (pressure and temperature) inside Curiosity rover and study its variation impact on analyzes. Finally, we will present a study carried out on a Martian analogs, as Atacama samples.

  18. Comparison of extraction methods and detection systems in the gas chromatographic analysis of volatile carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Stashenko, E E; Ferreira, M C; Sequeda, L G; Martínez, J R; Wong, J W

    1997-08-29

    High-resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) with electron-capture detection (ECD), nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD), flame ionization detection (FID) or with mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring (MS-SIM) was used in the analysis of volatile carbonyl compounds. Eighteen carbonyl compounds that are typically produced during lipid peroxidation were derivatized quantitatively with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH) at room temperature, to afford their corresponding water-insoluble hydrazones. These derivatives were extracted into non-polar phases by means of either liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) (hexane) or solid-phase extraction (SPE) on 3 ml C18 octadecyl-bonded phase cartridges. Detection limits of 10(-14) and 10(-12) mol/ml per aldehyde were achieved with the ECD and MS-SIM systems, respectively. The effects of extraction conditions on sensitivity and recovery were determined by performing parallel HRGC-ECD and HRGC-MS-SIM analyses of pentafluorophenylhydrazones of the eighteen compounds under study. Recoveries of 51.4-78.9 +/- 1.2-4.5 and 80.9-98.3 +/- 1.0-3.5% were obtained with LLE and SPE, respectively. The method was applied to the analysis of the volatile carbonyl compounds in various heated vegetable oils (corn, palm or sunflower) and to the analysis of volatile aldehydes in human urine. PMID:9335127

  19. Atomic emission detection for gas chromatographic analysis of nitrogen-containing herbicides in water.

    PubMed

    Olson, N L; Carrell, R; Cummings, R; Rieck, R; Reimer, S

    1995-01-01

    A gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) system was used to analyze nitrogen-containing herbicides. Two methods of sample preparation were used to demonstrate the system's applicability. Method 1 was U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 507. Method 2 was a modification of EPA Method 507 using larger sample volumes and smaller extract volumes to yield compound detection levels 30 times lower than detection levels from method 1. Analysis of replicate reagent water spikes with method 1 gave analyte recoveries ranging from 82 to 107%, with standard deviations of recovery of not more than 6.7%. Method 2 gave recoveries ranging from 50 to 112%, with a standard deviation of recovery of not more than 33%. A loss in recovery and precision with method 2 compared with method 1 was attributed to loss of more volatile analytes during extract concentration. Selectivity was demonstrated with solvent spiked with fuel oil and atrazine. Response factors generated with the GC-AED system showed compound-independent elemental linearity for analytes. Relative standard deviations of not more than 5.34% were obtained for 3 elements tested: nitrogen, sulphur, and chlorine. An elemental calibration mixture was prepared to validate traditional methods of quantitation. Samples were analyzed for nitrogen-containing herbicides, which were quantitated with both an analyte calibration and an elemental calibration, and results were compared.

  20. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric detection of narcotine, papaverine, and thebaine in seeds of Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Paul, B D; Dreka, C; Knight, E S; Smith, M L

    1996-12-01

    In addition to codeine and morphine, three more compounds: narcotine (noscapine), papaverine, and thebaine were found in Indian and Netherlands poppy seeds (Papaver somniferum L). The compounds were detected by a GC/MS technique and the identities were confirmed by comparing retention times and ion ratios with the known references. The concentrations of codeine, morphine, thebaine, papaverine, and narcotine were 44, 167, 41, 67, and 230 micrograms/g in Indian poppy seeds, and were 1.8, 39, 1.0, 0.17, 0.84 micrograms/g in Netherlands poppy seeds, respectively. Because these compounds may be urinary products after poppy seed consumption, the lowest detectable concentrations of codeine, morphine, thebaine, papaverine, and narcotine in urine are of interest and were found to be 4, 4, 5, 0.4, and 4 ng/ml, respectively. The detection of urinary narcotine, papaverine, or thebaine may be utilized to differentiate poppy seed consumption from illicit codeine, morphine, or heroin use.

  1. Gas chromatographic quantification of fatty acid methyl esters: flame ionization detection vs. electron impact mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Eric D; McCoy, Mark R; Rea, Lorrie D; Kennish, John M

    2005-04-01

    The determination of FAME by GC is among the most commonplace analyses in lipid research. Quantification of FAME by GC with FID has been effectively performed for some time, whereas detection with MS has been used chiefly for qualitative analysis of FAME. Nonetheless, the sensitivity and selectivity of MS methods advocate a quantitative role for GC-MS in FAME analysis-an approach that would be particularly advantageous for FAME determination in complex biological samples, where spectrometric confirmation of analytes is advisable. To assess the utility of GC-MS methods for FAME quantification, a comparative study of GC-FID and GC-MS methods has been conducted. FAME in prepared solutions as well as a biological standard reference material were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS methods using both ion trap and quadrupole MS systems. Quantification by MS, based on total ion counts and processing of selected ions, was investigated for FAME ionized by electron impact. Instrument precision, detection limits, calibration behavior, and response factors were investigated for each approach, and quantitative results obtained by each technique were compared. Although there were a number of characteristic differences between the MS methods and FID with respect to FAME analysis, the quantitative performance of GC-MS compared satisfactorily with that of GC-FID. The capacity to combine spectrometric examination and quantitative determination advances GC-MS as a powerful alternative to GC-FID for FAME analysis. PMID:16028722

  2. Versatile gas/particle ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Ullah, S M Rahmat; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-02-01

    A new, compact gas/particle ion chromatograph has been developed for measuring ionic constituents in PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) and water-soluble ionogenic gases. The instrument has separate sampling channels for gases and particles. In one, a membrane denuder collects soluble gases for preconcentration and analysis. In the other, a cyclone removes larger particles, a membrane denuder removes soluble gases, and a continuously wetted hydrophilic filter collects particles. A single, multiport, syringe pump handles liquid transport, and one conductivity detector measures anions and ammonium for both channels. Electrodialytically generated gradient hydroxide eluent permits 20 min chromatographic runs. Gas/particle samples are each collected for 40 min, butthe sampling intervals are staggered by 20 min. Liquid samples from the gas denuder and particle collector are aspirated and preconcentrated on sequential cation and anion concentrators and transferred respectively to an ammonia transfer device and an anion separation column. The flow configuration results in an ammonium peak before anion peaks in the chromatogram. The system measures ammonia, organic acids (such as acetic, formic, and oxalic acids), HCl, HONO, SO2, HNO3, and the corresponding ions in the aerosol phase. Low ng/m3 to sub-ng/m3 limits of detection (LODs) are attained for most common gases and particulate constituents, the LODs for gaseous SO2 to NH3 range, for example, from sub parts per trillion by volume (sub-pptv) to approximately 5 pptv.

  3. Versatile gas/particle ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Ullah, S M Rahmat; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-02-01

    A new, compact gas/particle ion chromatograph has been developed for measuring ionic constituents in PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) and water-soluble ionogenic gases. The instrument has separate sampling channels for gases and particles. In one, a membrane denuder collects soluble gases for preconcentration and analysis. In the other, a cyclone removes larger particles, a membrane denuder removes soluble gases, and a continuously wetted hydrophilic filter collects particles. A single, multiport, syringe pump handles liquid transport, and one conductivity detector measures anions and ammonium for both channels. Electrodialytically generated gradient hydroxide eluent permits 20 min chromatographic runs. Gas/particle samples are each collected for 40 min, butthe sampling intervals are staggered by 20 min. Liquid samples from the gas denuder and particle collector are aspirated and preconcentrated on sequential cation and anion concentrators and transferred respectively to an ammonia transfer device and an anion separation column. The flow configuration results in an ammonium peak before anion peaks in the chromatogram. The system measures ammonia, organic acids (such as acetic, formic, and oxalic acids), HCl, HONO, SO2, HNO3, and the corresponding ions in the aerosol phase. Low ng/m3 to sub-ng/m3 limits of detection (LODs) are attained for most common gases and particulate constituents, the LODs for gaseous SO2 to NH3 range, for example, from sub parts per trillion by volume (sub-pptv) to approximately 5 pptv. PMID:16509343

  4. A Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Ethanol Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a gas chromatographic experiment for the quantitative determination of volume percent ethanol in water ethanol solutions. Background information, procedures, and typical results are included. Accuracy and precision of results are both on the order of two percent. (JN)

  5. Gas Chromatographic Detectors for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Humphry, Donald E.; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ chemical analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. Future missions to Mars', comets, or planetary moons such as Europa, will perform experiments with complex analyses. In addition, instrumentation for such missions must perform under severely restricted conditions with limited resources. To meet these analytical requirements, improved methods and highly sensitive yet smaller instruments must continually be developed with increasingly greater capabilities. We describe here efforts to achieve this objective, for past and future missions, through the development of new or the improvement of existing sensitive, miniaturized gas chromatographic detectors.

  6. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  8. FTIR gas chromatographic analysis of perfumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, H.; Stout, Phillip J.; Hill, Stephen L.; Krishnan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Perfumes, natural or synthetic, are complex mixtures consisting of numerous components. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques have been extensively utilized for the analysis of perfumes and essential oils. A limited number of perfume samples have also been analyzed by FT-IR gas chromatographic (GC-FTIR) techniques. Most of the latter studies have been performed using the conventional light pipe (LP) based GC-FTIR systems. In recent years, cold-trapping (in a matrix or neat) GC-FTIR systems have become available. The cold-trapping systems are capable of sub-nanogram sensitivities. In this paper, comparison data between the LP and the neat cold-trapping GC- FTIR systems is presented. The neat cold-trapping interface is known as Tracer. The results of GC-FTIR analysis of some commercial perfumes is also presented. For comparison of LP and Tracer GC-FTIR systems, a reference (synthetic) mixture containing 16 major and numerous minor constituents was used. The components of the mixture are the compounds commonly encountered in commercial perfumes. The GC-FTIR spectra of the reference mixture was obtained under identical chromatographic conditions from an LP and a Tracer system. A comparison of the two sets of data thus generated do indeed show the enhanced sensitivity level of the Tracer system. The comparison also shows that some of the major components detected by the Tracer system were absent from the LP data. Closer examination reveals that these compounds undergo thermal decomposition on contact with the hot gold surface that is part of the LP system. GC-FTIR data were obtained for three commercial perfume samples. The major components of these samples could easily be identified by spectra search against a digitized spectral library created using the Tracer data from the reference mixture.

  9. First-generation hybrid MEMS gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Jung; Steinecker, William H; Tian, Wei-Cheng; Oborny, Michael C; Nichols, Jamie M; Agah, Masoud; Potkay, Joseph A; Chan, Helena K L; Driscoll, Jeffrey; Sacks, Richard D; Wise, Kensall D; Pang, Stella W; Zellers, Edward T

    2005-10-01

    The fabrication, assembly, and initial testing of a hybrid microfabricated gas chromatograph (microGC) is described. The microGC incorporates capabilities for on-board calibration, sample preconcentration and focused thermal desorption, temperature-programmed separations, and "spectral" detection with an integrated array of microsensors, and is designed for rapid determinations of complex mixtures of environmental contaminants at trace concentrations. Ambient air is used as the carrier gas to avoid the need for on-board gas supplies. The microsystem is plumbed through an etched-Si/glass microfluidic interconnection substrate with fused silica capillaries and employs a miniature commercial pump and valve subsystem for directing sample flow. The latest performance data on each system component are presented followed by first analytical results from the working microsystem. Tradeoffs in system performance as a function of volumetric flow rate are explored. The determination of an 11-vapor mixture of typical indoor air contaminants in less than 90 s is demonstrated with projected detection limits in the low part-per-billion concentration range for a preconcentrated air-sample volume of 0.25 L.

  10. Gas-liquid chromatographic detection an determination of diacetyl tartaric acid ester of diglyceride in dairy and nondairy coffee cream powders.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Iwaida, M; Ito, Y; Tonogai, Y

    1981-03-01

    Diacetyl tartaric acid ester of diglyceride was directly extracted from dairy or nondairy coffee cream powder under acidic conditions with ethyl acetate; then the extract was saponified with methanolic potash. After acidification with HCl, free fatty acid was removed with ether and the reaction mixture was absorbed on an anion exchange column. Tartaric acid was eluted with 2N HCl-acetone (1+1). An aliquot of the trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative of the eluate was injected into a gas chromatograph with flame ionization detection, and a 1.5% SE-30 column. Recoveries of diacetyl tartaric acid ester of diglyceride at 50, 200, and 2000 ppm were 85.6-99.5%.

  11. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  12. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  13. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  14. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C M; Koo, J C

    2001-01-10

    Gas chromatography is a prominent technique for separating complex gases and then analyzing the relative quantities of the separate components. This analytical technique is popular with scientists in a wide range of applications, including environmental restoration for air and water pollution, and chemical and biological analysis. Today the analytical instrumentation community is to working towards moving the analysis away from the laboratory to the point of origin of the sample (''the field'') to achieve real-time data collection and lower analysis costs. The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has developed a hand-held, real-time detection gas chromatograph (GC) through Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this GC is approximately 8 pounds, and it measures 8 inches by 5 inches by 3 inches. It consumes approximately 12 watts of electrical power and has a response time on the order of 2 minutes. The current detector is a glow discharge detector with a sensitivity of parts per billion. The average retention time is about 30 to 45 seconds. Under optimum conditions, the calculated effective plate number is 40,000. The separation column in the portable GC is fabricated completely on silicon wafers. Silicon is a good thermal conductor and provides rapid heating and cooling of the column. The operational temperature can be as high as 350 degrees Celsius. The GC system is capable of rapid column temperature ramping and cooling operations. These are especially important for organic and biological analyses in the GC applications.

  15. Hand-held multiple system gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2001-01-01

    A multiple parallel hand-held gas chromatograph (GC) system which includes several independent GCs. Each independent GC has its own injector, separation column, detector and oven and the GCs are mounted in a light weight hand-held assembly. Each GC operates independently and simultaneously. Because of different coatings in different separation columns, different retention times for the same gas will be measured. Thus, for a GC system with multiple parallel GCs, the system can measure, in a short period, different retention times and provide a cross-reference in the determination of the measured gas and to become a two-dimensional system for direct field use.

  16. Derivatization procedure for gas chromatographic determination of hydroxylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Pesselman, R.L.; Foral, M.J.; Langer, S.H.

    1987-04-15

    Hydroxylamine has been of special interest recently because of the possibilities of manufacturing it by using electrochemical methods in which ammonia might also be formed. Its general chemistry and applications have been described elsewhere. Presently, there are two gas chromatographic methods reported for the determination of hydroxylamine in aqueous media. The first involves reacting the hydroxylamine to form acetone oxime and subsequently injecting the aqueous solution directly into a gas chromatograph equipped with nitrogen and flame ionization detectors. The second involves oxidizing hydroxylamine to nitrous oxide and trapping the gas for determination in an electron capture equipped gas chromatograph. Limits of detection are in the micromolar range for the former and the nanomolar range for the latter. Here, an alternate gas chromatographic procedure for determining hydroxylamine as the acetone oxime is described. Neither direct aqueous injection nor elaborate instrumentation is required. Extraction of the oxime into an ether phase allows for concentrating the analyte ad facilitates the use of an internal standard. The limitations and inconveniences of direct aqueous injection are avoided included column degradation and filament burnout in mass spectrometry detectors.

  17. Coupling of a gas chromatograph to a simultaneous-detection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrograph for speciation of organohalide and organometallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, James H.; Schilling, G; Sperline, Roger; Denton, M Bonner B.; Young, Erick T.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-06-01

    A gas chromatograph (GC) has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma Mattauch-Herzog geometry mass spectrograph (ICP-MHMS) equipped with a novel detector array. In its current state of development the detector array, termed the focal plan camera (FPC), permits the simultaneous monitoring of up to 15 m/z values. A heated line was used to transfer the capillary-column effluent from the GC to the ICP torch, though due to instrument operating conditions, the transfer line was terminated 50 mm ahead of the ICP torch. Minimal tailing was observed, with the most severe effect seen for high-boiling analytes. With the coupling, absolute limits of detection are in the tens to hundreds of femtogram regime for organometallic species and in the single pictogram regime for halogenated hydrocarbons.

  18. Determination of methyl mercury by aqueous phase Eehylation, followed by gas chromatographic separation with cold vapor atomic fluorescence detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Wild, John F.; Olsen, Mark L.; Olund, Shane D.

    2002-01-01

    A recent national sampling of streams in the United States revealed low methyl mercury concentrations in surface waters. The resulting median and mean concentrations, calculated from 104 samples, were 0.06 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and 0.15 ng/L, respectively. This level of methyl mercury in surface water in the United States has created a need for analytical techniques capable of detecting sub-nanogram per liter concentrations. In an attempt to create a U.S. Geological Survey approved method, the Wisconsin District Mercury Laboratory has adapted a distillation/ethylation/ gas-phase separation method with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy detection for the determination of methyl mercury in filtered and unfiltered waters. This method is described in this report. Based on multiple analyses of surface water and ground-water samples, a method detection limit of 0.04 ng/L was established. Precision and accuracy were evaluated for the method using both spiked and unspiked ground-water and surface-water samples. The percent relative standard deviations ranged from 10.2 to 15.6 for all analyses at all concentrations. Average recoveries obtained for the spiked matrices ranged from 88.8 to 117 percent. The precision and accuracy ranges are within the acceptable method-performance limits. Considering the demonstrated detection limit, precision, and accuracy, the method is an effective means to quantify methyl mercury in waters at or below environmentally relevant concentrations

  19. Target urinary analytes for the gas chromatographic- mass spectrometric detection of procyclidine and benzhexol in drug abuse cases.

    PubMed

    El-Haj, Babiker; Al-Amri, Abdulkader; Ali, Heyam Saad

    2011-03-01

    The two antiparkinsonian drugs procyclidine and benzhexol are presently finding considerable favor for their euphoric hallucinogenic effects among drug abusers in some countries. In anticipation of their possible scheduling in national drug laws, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for their detection in urine will be required. However, because of uncertainty of the metabolic fate of the two drugs in humans, the urinary target analytes for GC-MS detection were not well defined. The problem was addressed in the present study in which it was found that mono-hydroxy metabolites, where hydroxylation took place at the cyclohexane ring in both drugs, could be endorsed as the major target analytes. The metabolites could only be detected as the mono- and/or di-trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. The predominance of either derivative depended on the temperature and time of heating with the derivatizing reagent. Because of the basic properties of the hydroxy metabolites, analytic method optimization was needed for their detection in urine included extraction under basic pH conditions. Urine hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase did not have an effect on the recovery of the metabolites, but was usually performed in search for other drugs. Because of the relative abundance of ions, the electron impact mass spectra of the mono-TMS derivatives and the chemical ionization (CI) mass spectra of the mono- and di-TMS derivatives of the hydroxy metabolites of both drugs were found to be more structurally informative. The CI mass spectra of the di- TMS derivatives have the additive advantage of being potentially useful for quantitative analysis.

  20. Limits of detections for the determination of mono- and dicarboxylic acids using gas and liquid chromatographic methods coupled with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Št’ávová, Jana; Beránek, Josef; Nelson, Eric P.; Diep, Bonnie A.; Kubátová, Alena

    2011-01-01

    The chromatographic separation and instrumental limits of detection (LODs) were obtained for a broad range of C1-C18 monocarboxylic (MCAs) and C2-C14 dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) employing either chemical derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection (GC-MS/FID) or direct analysis with liquid chromatography high resolution MS and tandem MS (LC-MS). Suitability, efficiency and stability of reaction products for several derivatization agents used for esterification (BF3/butanol), and trimethysilylation, including trimethylsilyl-N-N-dimethylcarbamate (TMSDMC) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were evaluated. The lowest limits of detection for the majority of compounds below 10 pg (with the exception of acetic acid) were obtained for derivatization with BF3/butanol followed by GC-MS in the total ion current (TIC) mode. Further improvements were achieved when applying either selected ion monitoring (SIM), which decreased the LODs to 1–4 pg or a combination of SIM and TIC (SITI) (2–5 pg). GC-FID provided LODs comparable to those obtained by GC-MS TIC. Both trimethylsilylation (followed by GC-MS) and direct LC-MS/MS analysis yielded LODs of 5– 40 pg for most of the acids. For volatile acids the LODs were higher, e.g., 25 and 590 ng for TMSDMC and BSTFA derivatized formic acid, respectively whereas the LC-MS methods did not allow for the analysis of formic acid at all. PMID:21185238

  1. Features of a micro-gas chromatograph equipped with enrichment device and microchip plasma emission detection (muPED) for air monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tienpont, Bart; David, Frank; Witdouck, Wim; Vermeersch, Dries; Stoeri, Herbert; Sandra, Pat

    2008-11-01

    A field portable gas chromatograph (GC) was constructed allowing the enrichment of organic solutes from air samples on a miniaturized chemical trap and the subsequent gas chromatographic analysis on a resistively heated capillary column. The heart of the system is an integrated chip-based plasma emission detector (muPED). As a non-selective detector, the sensitivity is similar to that of a flame ionization detector (FID). The detector shows good selectivity for phosphorus, sulfur and chlorine-containing compounds with relative selectivities of ca. 5 x 10(5) gP gC(-1), 50 gS gC(-1) and 10(2) gCl gC(-1). The lifetime of the plasma chip under air monitoring conditions exceeded 3000 analyses. PMID:18941680

  2. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  3. Gas-Chromatographic Determination Of Water In Freon PCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic apparatus measures small concentrations of water in specimens of Freon PCA. Testing by use of apparatus faster and provides greater protection against accidental contamination of specimens by water in testing environment. Automated for unattended operation. Also used to measure water contents of materials, other than Freon PCA. Innovation extended to development of purgeable sampling accessory for gas chromatographs.

  4. Development of a Low Power Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer for In-Situ Detection of Organics in Martian Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinnick, Veronica; Buch, Arnaud; VanAmerom, Friso H. W.; Danell, Ryan M.; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Cotter, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is a joint venture by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop a sensitive, light-weight, low-power mass spectrometer for chemical analysis on Mars. MOMA is a key analytical instrument aboard the 2018 ExoMars rover mission seeking signs of past or present life. The current prototype was built to demonstrate operation of gas chromatography (OC) and laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry under martian ambient conditions (5-7 Torr of CO2-rich atmosphere). Recent reports have discussed the MO MA concept, design and performance. Here, we update the current prototype performance, focusing specifically on the GCMS mode.

  5. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne V.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  6. Emergency gas-chromatographic assay of phenobarbital and phenytoin and liquid-chromatographic assay of theophylline.

    PubMed

    Shihabi, Z K

    1978-09-01

    Phenobarbital and phenytoin are extracted and concentrated in a single step, without solvent evaporation, followed by on-column methylation and gas-chromatographic quanitation. A similar extraction step for the assay of theophylline by high-pressure liquid chromatography is described. The extraction step can be completed in less than 2 min, the chromatographic step in less than 8 min. This extraction method yields clean chromatograms, avoids evaporating health-hazardous solvents, and is applicable to other drugs.

  7. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Enrivonmentally Significant Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzinski, Walter E.; Beu, Steve

    1982-01-01

    A chromatographic procedure for analyzing organophosphorus pesticides (such as PCB's, nitrosamines, and phthalate esters) in orange juice is described, including a summary of the method, instrumentation, methodology, results/discussion, and calculations. (JN)

  8. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  9. The gas-chromatographic analysis system in the JET active gas handling plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lässer, R.; Grieveson, B.; Hemmerich, J. L.; Stagg, R.; Dowhyluk, T.; Torr, K.; Massey, R.; Chambers, P.

    1993-09-01

    A gas chromatographic system for the analysis of gas species to be collected from the JET torus and to be processed in the JET active gas handling plant during the active operation phase with deuterium and tritium plasmas was designed and built by CFFTP under contract with JET. The gas-chromatograph consists of a compression/injection stage and of two parallel, analytical stages, one for the detection of helium, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and the six hydrogen molecules by means of a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and one for the detection of carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide, and higher hydrocarbons by means of a flame ionization detector (FID). A flow proportional counting detector (FPCD) is placed in series to TCD and FID for the specific analysis of tritiated gas compounds. A detailed description of the system and of its performance will be given which was evaluated using several calibrated gas mixtures including test runs with tritiated species at JET. The gas species mentioned above can be detected in the concentration range from ppm levels to 100%. The estimated error is about 20% at very low concentrations and 1% at high concentrations. The required minimum detection limit for the TCD can be achieved by the injection of large samples and the use of large filament currents. In addition, neon or helium can be chosen as carrier gas. The use of Ne increases the sensitivity for hydrogen and allows the detection of He, whereas He carrier gas gives superior TCD results for all other gases. Due to the high sensitivity of the FPCDs ppb levels of tritiated gas species can be detected.

  10. Gas chromatographic determination of residual methylene chloride and trichloroethylene in decaffeinated instant and ground coffee with electrolytic conductivity and electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1977-05-01

    A method is described for the quantitative determination of residual methylene chloride (MC) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in decaffeinated instant and ground roasted coffees. The residual solvents were isolated by a closed system vacuum distillation technique with toluene as a carrier solvent, chromatographed on Chromosorb 102, detected by both electron capture and electrolytic conductivity detectors, and quantitated by comparison with an internal standard. Average recoveries of MC from instant and ground coffees spiked at 1, 10, and 25 ppm were 100.0 (88-113), 93.2 (92-95), and 97.7% (94-102%); and for TCE, 97.2 (92-101), 96.2 (95-99), and 96.5% (92-100%), respectively. The results from both detectors are compared. At lower attenuations, levels less than 1 ppm can be readily measured. The procedure developed was applied to domestic and imported coffee samples. PMID:858707

  11. An on-line calibration method for process gas chromatographs

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, M.; Wang, F.

    1995-05-01

    Gas chromatographs (GCs) used to measure gas concentrations in process streams usually need calibration for a wide range of concentrations. The gas chromatographs used in process applications are usually equipped with automatic samplers using sample loops. The sampling system can be modified to provide on-line calibration, by adding a vacuum system and a precision pressure gage. In this paper, the authors describe a method using pure gases for the calibration of automatic GCs by varying and measuring precisely the pressure of the sample loop, thus sending known quantities of gas into the column. The concentration of the gas is calculated using the ideal gas law, and they are able to calibrate GCs in a range from 1,000 ppm to 100 vol %.

  12. Determination of plant stanols and plant sterols in phytosterol enriched foods with a gas chromatographic-flame ionization detection method: NMKL collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Päivi H

    2014-01-01

    This collaborative study with nine participating laboratories was conducted to determine the total plant sterol and/or plant stanol contents in phytosterol fortified foods with a gas chromatographic method. Four practice and 12 test samples representing mainly commercially available foodstuffs were analyzed as known replicates. Twelve samples were enriched with phytosterols, whereas four samples contained only natural contents of phytosterols. The analytical procedure consisted of two alternative approaches: hot saponification method, and acid hydrolysis treatment prior to hot saponification. As a result, sterol/stanol compositions and contents in the samples were measured. The amounts of total plant sterols and total plant stanols varying from 0.005 to 8.04 g/100 g product were statistically evaluated after outliers were eliminated. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) varied from 1.34 to 17.13%. The reproducibility RSD (RSDR) ranged from 3.03 to 17.70%, with HorRat values ranging from 0.8 to 2.1. When only phytosterol enriched food test samples are considered, the RSDr ranged from 1.48 to 6.13%, the RSD, ranged from 3.03 to 7.74%, and HorRat values ranged from 0.8 to 2.1. Based on the results of this collaborative study, the study coordinator concludes the method is fit for its purpose.

  13. Gas chromatographic mass spectrometric detection of dihydroxy fatty acids preserved in the 'bound' phase of organic residues of archaeological pottery vessels.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Fabricio A; Bull, Ian D; Evershed, Richard P

    2011-07-15

    A methodology is presented for the determination of dihydroxy fatty acids preserved in the 'bound' phase of organic residues preserved in archaeological potsherds. The method comprises saponification, esterification, silica gel column chromatographic fractionation, and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The electron ionisation mass spectra of the trimethylsilyl ether methyl ester derivatives are characterised by fragment ions arising from cleavage of the bond between the two vicinal trimethylsiloxy groups. Other significant fragment ions are [M-15](+.), [M-31](+.), m/z 147 and ions characteristic of vicinal disubstituted (trimethylsiloxy) TMSO- groups (Δ(7,8), Δ(9,10), Δ(11,12) and Δ(13,14): m/z 304, 332, 360 and 388, respectively). The dihydroxy fatty acids identified in archaeological extracts exhibited carbon numbers ranging from C(16) to C(22) and concentrations varying from 0.05 to 14.05 µg g(-1) . The wide range of dihydroxy fatty acids observed indicates that this approach may be applied confidently in screening archaeological potsherds for the degradation products of monounsaturated fatty acids derived from commodities processed in archaeological pottery vessels.

  14. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions.

    PubMed

    Andrawes, F; Holzer, G; Roedder, E; Gibson, E K; Oro, J

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These conclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusion on a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crushing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the processes involved in the history of the samples analyzed. PMID:11541990

  15. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  16. Gas chromatographic method for measuring nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacetyl nitrate in air without compressed gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Maniga, N.I.; Stedman, D.H.; Paur, R.J.

    1988-04-15

    A gas chromatographic technique that measures atmospheric concentrations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO/sub 2/ has been developed that uses luminol-based chemiluminescence for detection. The carrier gas is air that has been scrubbed by passing it over FeSO/sub 4/, which eliminates the need for any compressed gas cylinders. A novel gas sampling system and time enable variable sample volumes of contaminated air to be injected. Ambient PAN and NO/sub 2/ measurements can be made every 40 s with detection limits of 0.12 ppb for PAN and 0.2 ppb for NO/sub 2/. Seven other atmospheric species, including ozone, gave no interference. Linear response was observed for NO/sub 2/ from 0.2 to 170 ppb and for PAN from 1 to 70 ppb.

  17. [Gas chromatographic analysis of benzodiazepines. 2. Diazepam and its metabolites].

    PubMed

    Heidbrink, V V; Mallach, H J; Moosmayer, A

    1975-04-01

    A gas-chromatographic method is reported which completely resolves diazepam and its major metabolites and thus enables the specific quantitation of these compounds after extraction from serum and urine. The sensitivity limits are about 3 ng/ml if 4 ml serum or urine are extracted.

  18. Dynamic technique for measuring adsorption in a gas chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deuel, C. L.; Hultgren, N. W.; Mobert, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic procedure, together with mathematical analysis of adsorption isotherm, allows relative surface areas and adsorptive powers for trace concentrations to be determined in a few minutes. Technique may be used to evaluate relative surface areas of different adsorbates, expressed as volume of adsorbent/gram of adsorbate, and to evaluate their relative adsorptive power.

  19. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of morphine, heroin, and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Prager, M J; Harrington, S M; Governo, T F

    1979-03-01

    Morphine, heroin, and cocaine are quantitatively determined with the same gas-liquid chromatographic system. The compounds are separated on a 6 ft X 2 mm id glass column packed with a 1:1 mixture of 5% SE-30 on 80--100 mesh Chromosorb W and 3% OV-17 on 80--100 mesh Varaport 30. The column is temperature-programmed. Flame ionization detector responses are measured with a computer-based data system. Heroin and cocaine are chromatographed directly; morphine is derivatized first. The procedure was evaluated with previously analyzed commercial and forensic samples. Accuracy and precision were 5 and 3%, respectively. PMID:447602

  20. New Method for Evaluating Irreversible Adsorption and Stationary Phase Bleed in Gas Chromatographic Capillary Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Bob W.; Wright, Cherylyn W.

    2012-10-26

    A novel method for the evaluation of gas chromatographic (GC) column inertness has been developed using a tandem GC approach. Typically column inertness is measured by analyte peak shape evaluation. In general, silica, glass, and metal surfaces are chemically reactive and can cause analyte adsorption, which typically is observed as chromatographic peak tailing. Adsorption processes produce broad, short chromatographic peaks that confound peak area determinations because a significant portion can reside in the noise. In addition, chromatographic surfaces and stationary phases can irreversibly adsorb certain analytes without obvious degradation of peak shape. The inertness measurements described in this work specifically determine the degree of irreversible adsorption behavior of specific target compounds at levels ranging from approximately 50 picograms to 1 nanogram on selected gas chromatographic columns. Chromatographic columns with 5% phenylmethylsiloxane, polyethylene glycol (wax), trifluoropropylsiloxane, and 78% cyanopropylsiloxane stationary phases were evaluated with a variety of phosphorus- and sulfur- containing compounds selected as test compounds due to their ease of adsorption and importance in trace analytical detection. In addition, the method was shown effective for characterizing column bleed.

  1. Derivatization in gas chromatographic determination of phenol and aniline traces in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzdev, I. V.; Zenkevich, I. G.; Kondratenok, B. M.

    2015-06-01

    Substituted anilines and phenols are the most common hydrophilic organic environmental toxicants. The principles of gas chromatographic determination of trace amounts of these compounds in aqueous media at concentrations <=0.1 μg litre-1 based on synthesis of their derivatives (derivatization) directly in the aqueous phase are considered. Conversion of relatively hydrophilic analytes into more hydrophobic derivatives makes it possible to achieve such low detection limits and optimize the protocols of extractive preconcentration and selective chromatographic detection. Among the known reactions, this condition is best met by electrophilic halogenation of compounds at the aromatic moiety. The bibliography includes 177 references.

  2. Fluoroalkyl chloroformates in treating amino acids for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Husek, Petr; Simek, Petr; Hartvich, Petr; Zahradnícková, Helena

    2008-04-01

    Novel fluoroalkyl chloroformates with three and four carbon atoms were investigated for the immediate conversion of amino acids into hydrophobic derivatives in water-containing media. Derivatization conditions were extensively studied and optimized sample preparation protocols elaborated. More than 30 amino acids were treated with the particular reagent in isooctane by simply vortexing the reactive organic phase with a slightly basified aqueous medium containing pyridine or 3-picoline as a catalyst. Outstanding separation of nearly all components on 5% phenylmethylsilicone phase in gas chromatographic (GC) analysis with mass spectrometric (MS) or flame ionization detection (FID) required <10 min. Quantitation characteristics involving linearity in the range of 0.1-100 nmol, regression coefficients of 0.999-0.953 (histidine), MS limit of detection (LOD) reaching 0.03 pmol at proline to nearly 20 pmol at glutamic acid, plus electron impact (EI) spectra and diagnostic SIM fragment ions of the derivatives are reported. The novel method is simple, robust and rapid, enabling to treat amino acids in aqueous environment and to analyze them in <15 min. PMID:18242622

  3. Analytical Method for the Detection of Ozone Depleting Chemicals (ODC) in Commercial Products Using a Gas Chromatograph with an Electron Capture Detector (GC-ECD)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Richard N.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Wright, Bob W.

    2008-08-01

    This document describes an analytical procedure that was developed for the trace level detection of residual ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) associated with the manufacture of selected commercial products. To ensure the United States meets it obligation under the Montreal Protocol, Congress enacted legislation in 1989 to impose an excise tax on electronic goods imported into the United States that were produced with banned chemicals. This procedure was developed to technically determine if residual ODC chemicals could be detected on electronic circuit boards. The analytical method utilizes a “purge and trap” technique followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection to capture and analyze the volatile chemicals associated with the matrix. The method describes the procedure, the hardware, operating conditions, calibration, and quality control measures in sufficient detail to allow the capability to be replicated. This document corresponds to internal Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) EFL-130A, Rev 4.

  4. Characterisation of wax works of art by gas chromatographic procedures.

    PubMed

    Regert, M; Langlois, J; Colinart, S

    2005-10-14

    To identify the various natural and synthetic substances used by sculptors at the end of the 19th century, several contemporary reference samples were investigated by high temperature gas chromatography (HT GC) and HT GC-MS. Using specific chromatographic conditions and minimising sample preparation, we could separate, detect and identify a wide range of biomolecular markers covering a great variety of molecular weights and volatilities, with a minimum amount of sample, in a single run. Beeswax, spermaceti, carnauba, candellila and Japan waxes as well as pine resin derivatives, animal fats, paraffin, ozokerite and stearin, used as additives in wax works of art, were chemically investigated. In the case of low volatile compounds, transbutylation was performed. The structure of long-chain esters of spermaceti was elucidated for the first time by HT GC-MS analysis. Such a method was then carried out on 10 samples collected on a statuette of Junon by Antoine-Louis Barye (Louvre Museum, Paris, France) and on a sculpture by Aimé-Jules Dalou (Musée de la Révolution Française, Vizille, France). The analytical results obtained provide new data on the complex recipes elaborated by sculptors at the end of the 19th century.

  5. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  6. Gas chromatographic method using electron-capture detection for the determination of musk xylene in human blood samples. Biological monitoring of the general population.

    PubMed

    Angerer, J; Käfferlein, H U

    1997-05-23

    Musk xylene (2,4,6-trinitro-1,3-dimethyl-5-tert.-butylbenzene, MX), a synthetic musk often used in different fragrances and soaps to substitute the natural musk, is a potential contaminant of humans. In this publication, a specific and sensitive detection method for the determination of musk xylene in human blood samples is described. The clean-up of the blood samples includes an extraction step followed by a solid-phase adsorption to separate MX from other plasma components. Separation and detection was carried out by capillary gas chromatography and an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). The results were verified using qualitative capillary gas chromatography and a mass selective detector with electron impact ionisation (GC-EI-MS). epsilon-Hexachlorocyclohexane (epsilon-HCH) is used as internal standard. The reliability of the GC-ECD method has been proved. The relative standard deviations of the within-series imprecision were 12.7% for samples with a concentration of 0.5 microg/l and 2.1% for samples with a concentration of 5.0 microg/l, whereas the relative standard deviations for the between-day imprecision were 14.9% (0.5 microg/l samples) and 3.4% (5.0 microg/l samples). The losses during sample treatment were between 10.1% and 17.8%. No interfering peaks were observed. The absolute detection limit was 0.1 microg/l plasma. A total of 72 human blood samples were analysed to determine the MX concentrations within the general population. In 66 of the 72 human blood samples, the MX concentrations ranged from 0.10 to 1.12 microg/l plasma for the described method. In six samples no MX was detected. The median concentration was 0.24+/-0.23 microg MX/l plasma. The 95 percentile was 0.79 microg/l. No correlation could be found between MX concentrations and smoking habit, broca index, age, sex as well as fish consumption habits. Nevertheless, the results demonstrate the exposure of the general population to MX.

  7. Determination of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine in human urine with gas chromatograph-flame thermionic detection coupling with direct immersed solid-phase micro-extraction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dong; Chen, Bo; Yao, Shouzhuo; Ying, Jianying

    2006-06-01

    An analytical method for determination of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (tetramine) in human urine by gas chromatography-flame thermionic detection (GC-FTD) coupling with a direct immersed solid-phase micro-extraction (DI-SPME) was developed. The enrichment effects of three fiber coatings of SPME for tetramine were compared. Results showed that the enrichment effect of polar 85 microm polyacrylate (PA) coating was better than that of apolar 100 and 7 microm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coatings. Other experimental parameters, such as ionic strength, volume, temperature of sample solution and time for extraction, time and temperature for desorption, were also optimized. The correlation coefficient of the calibration curve was 0.9998 in the range of 0.082-41.0 ng/mL for tetramine. The limit of quantitation of tetramine in urine was 0.082 ng/mL. In this method, the sample pretreatment is simple and convenient. As a monitoring means, it has been successfully applied to detection of tetramine toxicosis in criminal cases, as well as clinical therapy of poisoned sufferer.

  8. Gas chromatographic method using nitrogen-phosphorus detection for the measurement of tramadol and its O-desmethyl metabolite in plasma and brain tissue of mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Q; Stone, D J; Borenstein, M R; Jean-Bart, V; Codd, E E; Coogan, T P; Desai-Krieger, D; Liao, S; Raffa, R B

    2001-11-01

    A method that allows the measurement of plasma and brain levels of the centrally-acting analgesic tramadol and its major metabolite (O-desmethyl tramadol) in mice and rats was developed using gas chromatography equipped with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC-NPD). Plasma samples were extracted with methyl tert.-butyl ether (MTBE) and were injected directly into the GC system. Brain tissue homogenates were precipitated with methanol, the resulting supernatant was dried then acidified with hydrochloric acid. The aqueous solution was washed with MTBE twice, alkalinized, and extracted with MTBE. The MTBE layer was dried, reconstituted and injected into the GC system. The GC assay used a DB-1 capillary column with an oven temperature ramp (135 to 179 degrees C at 4 degrees C/min). Dextromethorphan was used as the internal standard. The calibration curves for tramadol and O-desmethyl tramadol in plasma and brain tissue were linear in the range of 10 to 10000 ng/ml (plasma) and ng/g (brain). Assay accuracy and precision of back calculated standards were within +/- 15%. PMID:11710575

  9. The application of atomic emission spectroscopy to chromatographic analyses for element-selective detection

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate the properties of existing atomic emission systems which are useful for element-selective detection of chromatographic effluent. A microwave induced plasma (MIP) system has been optimized for the selective detection of boron in the effluent of a gas chromatograph. A method was developed for the analysis of total boron present in several lubrication oil additives and in several formulated lubrication oils. Values obtained by this method compare favorably with those obtained by other atomic emission spectroscopic (AES) methods. A direct current plasma (DCP) system has been optimized for the selective detection of boron in flowing organic liquid streams. A method was developed for the analysis of total boron present in several lubrication oil additives by flow injection analysis (FIA). A method was also developed for the qualitative separation [open quotes]speciation[close quotes] of these additives by size exclusion chromatography-DCP. Values obtained through this method compare favorably with values obtained through other AES methods. The MIP system was optimized for the selective detection of titanium in the effluent of the gas chromatograph. This system was used to analyze a group of reaction mixtures containing novel titanium chelates and organo-metallic compounds, as well as several organo-titanium-boron compounds. The MIP system was optimized for the selective detection of several of the group VA and group VIA elements in the effluent of the gas chromatograph. This system was used to characterize a series of coal standards (the Argonne Premium Coal Standards) by pyrolysis-GC-AES. Volatile compounds containing nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur were detected. The Py-GC-AES method was used to characterize several other coal, sedimentary and kerogen samples. Volatile phosphorous, arsenic, and selenium compounds were detected, as were compounds of nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur.

  10. Liquid chromatographic determination of ethylenethiourea using pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Doerge, D R; Yee, A B

    1991-11-01

    A liquid chromatographic method was developed using pulsed amperometric detection at a gold working electrode to measure residue levels of ethylenethiourea (ETU) in crops and groundwater. Use of the sequential pulsing program eliminates electrode fouling while preserving the sensitive and selective detection of ETU. Minimum detection limits in crops were 5-10 ppb (1.25-2.5 ng on-column) and 5 ppb (0.5 ng) in groundwater. The commercial availability of the pulsed electrochemical detector and its gold working electrode that remains functional with a minimum of conditioning is an improvement in method simplicity.

  11. Gas chromatographic characterization of vegetable oil deodorization distillate.

    PubMed

    Verleyen, T; Verhe, R; Garcia, L; Dewettinck, K; Huyghebaert, A; De Greyt, W

    2001-07-01

    Because of its complex nature, the analysis of deodorizer distillate is a challenging problem. Deodorizer distillate obtained from the deodorization process of vegetable oils consists of many components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. A gas chromatographic method for the analysis of deodorizer distillate without saponification of the sample is described. After a concise sample preparation including derivatization and silylation, distillate samples were injected on column at 60 degrees C followed by a gradual increase of the oven temperature towards 340 degrees C. The temperature profile of the oven was optimized in order to obtain a baseline separation of the different distillate components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. Good recoveries for delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, stigmasterol and cholesteryl palmitate of 97, 94.4, 95.6 and 92%, respectively were obtained. Repeatability of the described gas chromatographic method was evaluated by analyzing five replicates of a soybean distillate. Tocopherols and sterols had low relative standard deviations ranging between 1.67 and 2.25%. Squalene, mono- and diacylglycerides had higher relative standard deviations ranging between 3.33 and 4.12%. Several industrial deodorizer distillates obtained from chemical and physical refining of corn, canola, sunflower and soybean have been analyzed for their composition.

  12. Gas chromatographic characterization of vegetable oil deodorization distillate.

    PubMed

    Verleyen, T; Verhe, R; Garcia, L; Dewettinck, K; Huyghebaert, A; De Greyt, W

    2001-07-01

    Because of its complex nature, the analysis of deodorizer distillate is a challenging problem. Deodorizer distillate obtained from the deodorization process of vegetable oils consists of many components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. A gas chromatographic method for the analysis of deodorizer distillate without saponification of the sample is described. After a concise sample preparation including derivatization and silylation, distillate samples were injected on column at 60 degrees C followed by a gradual increase of the oven temperature towards 340 degrees C. The temperature profile of the oven was optimized in order to obtain a baseline separation of the different distillate components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. Good recoveries for delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, stigmasterol and cholesteryl palmitate of 97, 94.4, 95.6 and 92%, respectively were obtained. Repeatability of the described gas chromatographic method was evaluated by analyzing five replicates of a soybean distillate. Tocopherols and sterols had low relative standard deviations ranging between 1.67 and 2.25%. Squalene, mono- and diacylglycerides had higher relative standard deviations ranging between 3.33 and 4.12%. Several industrial deodorizer distillates obtained from chemical and physical refining of corn, canola, sunflower and soybean have been analyzed for their composition. PMID:11471811

  13. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  14. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J R

    1989-03-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  15. Gas-chromatographic characterization of physicochemical properties of astatine compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.

    1995-07-01

    The organoastatine compounds obtained were identified by gas-liquid chromatography on a specially designed gas radiochromatograph with detection of eluted compounds both by their radioactivity and by thermal conductivity. Gas-liquid chromatography is the most efficient method for separation and identification of volatile organoastatine compounds.

  16. Improving the gas-chromatographic determination of the composition of the gas liberated from a battery

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, V.V.; Zubov, M.S.; Baulov, V.I.; Toguzov, B.M.

    1992-07-10

    Normally, gas chromatography is used for analyzing the gas composition that is liberated when batteries operate. Earlier work describes a gas-chromatographic technique for determining the composition of gas liberated from a battery. According to this reference, the gas is collected in an inverted burette over water. The gas is either sampled with a batching valve or with a medical syringe, which pierces the connecting vacuum hoses. The gas sample is injected into the chromatographic evaporator, and is separated on the chromatographic column into its individual components, each of which is analyzed on the detector. The method described was used to study gas liberation during the storage of charged nickel-zinc batteries. In the method described above, a high proportion of the gas specimen that accumulates and is collected in the measuring system occurs in the dead space volume. In this situation, it is very difficult to determine the liberated gas composition with a high degree of accuracy when the gas is liberated at low rates. Moreover, this method does not provide reliable system air tightness during long term operation of the batteries. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Gas chromatographic determination of cyclohexanone leached from hemodialysis tubing.

    PubMed

    Snell, R P

    1993-01-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic procedure is described for the determination of cyclohexanone leached from hemodialysis tubing by water. Recoveries were 100% at 2.0 mg/100 mL (20 ppm), 99.0% at 500 microg/100 mL (5 ppm), and 106% at 1.0 microg/100 mL (10 ppb). Reproducibility of the system was 0.152% for 3.0 microL injections of a solution containing cyclohexanone at 5.58 microg/mL. Correlation coefficients were 0.9983 for 0.3672-3.672 ng and 1.0000 for 3.672-367.2 ng. Twenty hemodialysis tubing sets from 4 manufacturers were examined. The leachable cyclohexanone ranged from 1.02 to 43.7 ppm per set. Rinsing the tubing with 1 L 0.9% sodium chloride solution did not remove significant amounts (P = 0.05) of leachable cyclohexanone.

  18. The gas chromatographic resolution of DL-isovaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Van Dort, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Isovaline is of cosmological interest because it is one of the 12 non-protein amino acids which have been isolated from the Murchison meteorite, and unlike the other chiral amino acids in this meteorite, it has no alpha-hydrogen at its asymmetric center and hence cannot racemize by the customary alpha-hydrogen-dependent mechanisms which engender racemization in ordinary amino acids. Experiments were conducted in which a .01 M solution of N-TFA-DL-isovalyl-L-leucine isopropyl ester in nitromethane was injected into the capillary column of a gas chromatograph coupled to a digital electronic integrator-recorder. Efflux times and integrated peak area percents are shown next to each diastereometer peak.

  19. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios.

  20. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios. PMID:27265004

  1. Gas chromatographic instrumentation for the analysis of aerosols and gases in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T. W.; Valentin, J. R.; Ohara, B. J.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Instrumentation presently being developed by NASA for the collection and analysis of organic gases and aerosols in Titan's atmosphere is described together with the results of the preliminary experiments. For the aerosols, stepwise pyrolysis was shown to be a suitable method for preparing complex organic material for gas chromatography (GC), and a pyrolysis-gas chromatograph was developed and successfully used to analyze a simulated Titan aerosol. Atmospheric gases will be collected by a low-pressure gas sampling system using large-volume sample loops and analyzed by GC. The results of preliminary studies using a 20 cu cm sampling system and a very sensitive metastable ionization detector showed that hydrocarbon components at the 10 ppb level can be detected. Studies are in progress on shortening the overall analysis time by improving the pyrolysis system, the gas sampling system, and the associated gas chromatograph. Further development of the gas sampling system is planned to ensure rapid collection of samples adequate for analysis by GC over the entire range of pressures to be encountered during the probe's descent.

  2. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  3. Interfacing a robotic station with a gas chromatograph for the full automation of the determination of organochlorine pesticides in vegetables

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, P.; Luque de Castro, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    A fully automated method for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in vegetables is proposed. The overall system acts as an {open_quotes}analytical black box{close_quotes} because a robotic station performs the prelimninary operations, from weighing to capping the leached analytes and location in an autosampler of an automated gas chromatograph with electron capture detection. The method has been applied to the determination of lindane, heptachlor, captan, chlordane and metoxcychlor in tea, marjoram, cinnamon, pennyroyal, and mint with good results in most cases. A gas chromatograph has been interfaced to a robotic station for the determination of pesticides in vegetables. 15 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Screening of ground water samples for volatile organic compounds using a portable gas chromatograph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    A portable gas chromatograph was used to screen 32 ground water samples for volatile organic compounds. Seven screened samples were positive; four of the seven samples had volatile organic substances identified by second-column confirmation. Four of the seven positive, screened samples also tested positive in laboratory analyses of duplicate samples. No volatile organic compounds were detected in laboratory analyses of samples that headspace screening indicated to be negative. Samples that contained volatile organic compounds, as identified by laboratory analysis, and that contained a volatile organic compound present in a standard of selected compounds were correctly identified by using the portable gas chromatography. Comparisons of screened-sample data with laboratory data indicate the ability to detect selected volatile organic compounds at concentrations of about 1 microgram per liter in the headspace of water samples by use of a portable gas chromatography. -Author

  5. Simple gas chromatographic system for analysis of microbial respiratory gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Dual column ambient temperature system, consisting of pair of capillary columns, microbead thermistor detector and micro gas-sampling valve, is used in remote life-detection equipment for space experiments. Performance outweighs advantage gained by utilizing single-column systems to reduce weight, conserve carrier gas and operate at lower power levels.

  6. First Results From the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.; Atreya, S.; Carignan, G.; Bauer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe of the Cassini Huygens Mission entered the atmosphere of the moon Titan on January 14,2005. The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and to support the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employed five electron impact ion sources with available electron energies of either 70 or 25 eV. Three ion sources served as detectors for the GC columns and two were dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling, respectively. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and served to evaporate surface constituents after impact.

  7. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-03-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers. PMID:24804069

  8. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Investigation Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Harpold, Dan; Owen, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    A decade ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission descended through the smog filled atmosphere of Titan and landed on the surface, revealing for the first time the extraordinary nature of Saturn's largest moon. One of the six payload instruments, the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), was crucial for measuring the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan [1,2]. Most of the GCMS findings were "firsts", including the first direct identification of molecular nitrogen as the bulk constituent of the atmosphere, first vertical profile of Titan's second most abundant volatile, methane, first determination of primordial and radiogenic argon, first quantification of a number of stable gas isotopes, and the first measurements of the make-up of Titan's surface. These data are key to understanding why Titan is so unique amongst planetary moons in possessing a massive atmosphere [3], how Titan maintains a cycle of methane complete with surface reservoirs, evaporation and condensation like the hydrological cycle on earth [3,4,5], and what is responsible for the photochemical smog on Titan that plays a central role in the very existence of an atmosphere on Titan [3]. This presentation will discuss the GCMS investigation and how it helped shape our current view of Titan. [website for downloading pdf's of relevant papers: www.umich.edu/~atreya] [1] Niemann, H. B. et al., The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe, Nature 438, 779-784, 2005. [2] Niemann, H. B. et al., The composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 115, 12006, 2010. [3] Atreya S. K., R. D. Lorenz and J. H. Waite, Volatile origin and cycles: Nitrogen and methane, in Titan from Cassini-Huygens, R. H. Brown, J. P. Lebreton and J. Waite, (eds.), Springer Dordrecht

  9. Capillary gas chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-cheng; Li, Qi-wan; Tang, Li-bin

    2007-01-01

    Simple procedures for extraction and chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco are described. The determination was carried out by capillary gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD) and confirmed by GC-MS. The mean recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 93.2%~112.9% and 3.5%~6.7%, respectively at levels ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg. The limit of determination was 0.001 mg/kg. Tobacco samples in routine check were successfully analyzed using the proposed method. PMID:17444603

  10. Application of gas chromatographic method in simultaneous measurements of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, J.; Bielewski, J.; Sliwka, I.

    2012-04-01

    Helium concentration in groundwater is a fine indicator in water dating in a range from a hundred to tens of thousands of years. Gas chromatography (GC) measurements of helium can be used as an alternative to mass spectrometry (MS) determinations of 4He for groundwater dating [1]. Argon and neon concentrations mainly serve for determining the temperature of recharge and the air excess which is needed to correct measured values of helium concentration [2] . A chromatographic measurement system of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwater is presented [3]. Water samples are taken from groundwater with a precise procedure without contamination with air in a special stainless steel vessels of volume equal to 2900 cm3. Helium is extracted from water samples using the head-space method. After enrichment by cryotrap method helium is analyzed in the gas chromatograph equipped with the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) with detection limit of about 2.8 ng He. The helium limit of detection of presented method is 1,2·10-8 cm3STP/gH2O [4]. We are currently working on adapting the method of cryogenic enrichment of helium concentration for simultaneous measurements of the concentration of helium, argon and neon using single sample of groundwater. Neon will be measured with the thermal conductivity detector and capillary column filled with molecular sieve 5A. Argon will be analyzed also with the thermal conductivity detector and packed column filled with molecular sieve 5A. This work was supported by grant No. N N525 3488 38 from the polish National Science Centre. [1] A. Zuber, W. Ciężkowski, K. Różański (red.), Tracer methods in hydrogeological studies - a methodological guide. Wroclaw University of Technology Publishing House, Wroclaw, 2007 (in polish). [2] P. Mochalski, Chromatographic method for the determination of Ar, Ne and N2 in water, Ph.D. thesis, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow, 2003 (in polish). [3] A. Żurek, P

  11. Mars Solar Balloon Landed Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Harpold, D.; Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Gorevan, S.; Israel, G.; Bertaux, J. L.; Jones, J.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.

    1999-01-01

    A Mars surface lander Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) is described to measure the chemical composition of abundant and trace volatile species and isotope ratios for noble gases and other elements. These measurements are relevant to the study of atmospheric evolution and past climatic conditions. A Micromission plan is under study where a surface package including a miniaturized GCMS would be delivered to the surface by a solar heated hot air balloon based system. The balloon system would be deployed about 8 km above the surface of Mars, wherein it would rapidly fill with Martian atmosphere and be heated quickly by the sun. The combined buoyancy and parachuting effects of the solar balloon result in a surface package impact of about 5 m/sec. After delivery of the package to the surface, the balloon would ascend to about 4 km altitude, with imaging and magnetometry data being taken for the remainder of the daylight hours as the balloon is blown with the Martian winds. Total atmospheric entry mass of this mission is estimated to be approximately 50 kg, and it can fit as an Ariane 5 piggyback payload. The GCMS would obtain samples directly from the atmosphere at the surface and also from gases evolved from solid phase material collected from well below the surface with a Sample Acquisition and Transport Mechanism (SATM). The experiment envisioned in the Mars Micromission described would obtain samples from a much greater depth of up to one meter below the surface, and would search for organic molecules trapped in ancient stratified layers well below the oxidized surface. Insitu instruments on upcoming NASA missions working in concert with remote sensing measurement techniques have the potential to provide a more detailed investigation of mineralogy and the extent of simple volatiles such as CO2 and H2O in surface and subsurface solid phase materials. Within the context of subsequent mission opportunities such as those provided by the Ariane 5 piggyback

  12. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  13. Chromatographic detection and analysis of traces of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickey, E. W.; Mullins, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Special analytical column having in series two separate absorption sections charged with beads of porous polymer and a sample of gas detects traces of hydrocarbons. New method requires only 15 minutes for execution.

  14. A Duffing oscillator algorithm to detect the weak chromatographic signal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2007-02-28

    Based on the Duffing equation, a Duffing oscillator algorithm (DOA) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was presented. By simulated and experimental data sets, it was proven that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the weak signal could be greatly enhanced by this method. Using signal enhancement by DOA, this method extends the SNR of low concentrations of methylbenzene from 2.662 to 29.90 and the method can be used for quantitative analysis of methylbenzene, which are lower than detection limit of an analytical system. The Duffing oscillator algorithm (DOA) might be a promising tool to extend instrumental linear range and to improve the accuracy of trace analysis. The research enlarged the application scope of Duffing equation to chromatographic signal processing.

  15. The use of silica nanoparticles for gas chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Na, Na; Cui, Xianglan; De Beer, Thomas; Liu, Tingting; Tang, Tingting; Sajid, Muhammad; Ouyang, Jin

    2011-07-15

    A new IL-dispersed silica nanoparticles (IL-SNs) capillary column, combining properties of silica nanoparticles and ionic liquid (IL), was used for gas chromatographic separation. By dispersing silica nanoparticles in a conventional IL of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BuMIm][BF6]), a layer of homogeneous interconnected particulate silica networks (thickness: 0.4-0.6 μm) was formed on the inner surface of a capillary column. This coating integrates advantages of silica nanoparticles (high surface area, high dispersed behaviour) and IL (extended liquid-state temperature range, chemical stability), hence increasing interactions between stationary phase and analytes. It was demonstrated that mixtures of a wide range of organic compounds including alcohols, esters, alkanes, aromatic compounds, as well as isomers and non-polar compounds can be well separated using an IL-SNs capillary column. Comparing to traditional support coated open tubular columns, the IL-SNs capillary column displays retention behaviors of separating both polar and non-polar compounds. The much thinner coating film of IL-SNs capillary column, compared to the coating film of SNs capillary column, decreases the resistance to mass transfer, resulting a good column efficiency of 3030 theoretical plates per meter for n-butanol (which is about 5 times higher than for the SNs capillary column). Furthermore, the IL-SNs capillary column decreases the IL retention selectivity dominated by IL structures, and has a higher coating value than neat IL stationary phase. Moreover, the preparation is simple as no modification of ILs or adoption of additional reagents is needed in pretreatments. This manuscript is the first report on the use of silica nanoparticles for gas chromatography, which would expand the applicability of silica nanoparticles in analytical chemistry.

  16. Toward a Micro Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, D. V.; Eyre, F. B.; Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Garkarian, V.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature mass filters (e.g., quadrupoles, ion traps) have been the subject of several miniaturization efforts. A project is currently in progress at JPL to develop a miniaturized Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) system, incorporating and/or developing miniature system components including turbomolecular pumps, scroll type roughing pump, quadrupole mass filter, gas chromatograph, precision power supply and other electronic components. The preponderance of the system elements will be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. The quadrupole mass filter will be fabricated using an X-ray lithography technique producing high precision, 5x5 arrays of quadrupoles with pole lengths of about 3 mm and a total volume of 27 cubic mm. The miniature scroll pump will also be fabricated using X-ray lithography producing arrays of scroll stages about 3 mm in diameter. The target detection range for the mass spectrometer is 1 to 300 atomic mass units (AMU) with are solution of 0.5 AMU. This resolution will allow isotopic characterization for geochronology, atmospheric studies and other science efforts dependant on the understanding of isotope ratios of chemical species. This paper will discuss the design approach, the current state-of-the art regarding the system components and the progress toward development of key elements. The full system is anticipated to be small enough in mass, volume and power consumption to allow in situ chemical analysis on highly miniaturized science craft for geochronology, atmospheric characterization and detection of life experiments applicable to outer planet roadmap missions.

  17. Combined liquid and gas chromatographic characterisation of polyglycerol fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    De Meulenaer, B; Van Royen, G; Vanhoutte, B; Huyghebaert, A

    2000-10-27

    In the present study a combined liquid and gas chromatographic technique is described for the analysis of polyglycerol fatty acid esters. Liquid chromatographic fractionation of samples resulted in pure standards of monoesters of di- and triglycerols and diesters of di- and triglycerols. Confirmation of their identity was achieved by LC-MS analysis. Moreover, a chromatographic identification of the mono- and diesters of cyclic diglycerol was proposed. From the isolation of pure esters and their gas chromatographic analysis, it was revealed that co-elution of several compounds occurred. Thus it was shown that prefractionation of the sample using a simplified liquid chromatographic separation, was necessary in order to characterise the esters correctly. In combination with some other chemical analyses, a complete profile of the chemical composition of polyglycerol fatty acid esters can be obtained.

  18. Miniaturized gas chromatograph-Paul ion trap system: applications to environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph (GC) and miniature Paul ion trap (PT) mass spectrometer system has been developed for identifying and quantifying chemical species present in closed environments having a complex mixture of gases.

  19. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  20. Gas chromatographic analysis of simmondsins and simmondsin ferulates in jojoba meal.

    PubMed

    Van Boven, M; Holser, R; Cokelaere, M; Flo, G; Decuypere, E

    2000-09-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of simmondsins and simmondsin ferulates in jojoba meal, in detoxified jojoba meal, in jojoba meal extracts, and in animal food mixtures.

  1. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Headspace gas chromatographic method for determination of methyl bromide in food ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, J.W.; Broge, J.M.; Schroeder, J.P.; Bowers, R.H.; Larson, P.A.; Burns, N.M.

    1985-11-01

    A headspace gas chromatographic (GC) method, which can be automated, has been developed for determination of methyl bromide. This method has been applied to wheat, flour, cocoa, and peanuts. Samples to be analyzed are placed in headspace sample vials, water is added, and the vials are sealed with Teflon-lined septa. After an appropriate equilibration time at 32 degrees C, the samples are analyzed within 10 h. A sample of the headspace is withdrawn and analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD). Methyl bromide levels were quantitated by comparison of peak area with a standard. The standard was generated by adding a known amount of methyl bromide to a portion of the matrix being analyzed and which was known to be methyl bromide free. The detection limit of the method was 0.4 ppb. The coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.5% for wheat, 8.3% for flour, 3.3% for cocoa, and 11.6% for peanuts.

  3. Rapid gas-chromatographic assay of bupivacaine in plasma.

    PubMed

    Le Normand, Y; Athouel, A; Blanloeil, Y; De Villepoix, C; Melchior, J C; Kergueris, M F; Bourin, M; Larousse, C

    1987-01-01

    A method for estimating bupivacaine concentration in human plasma by capillary gas-chromatography using solid injection and nitrogen-specific detection is described. Etidocaine, another anilidetype local anesthetic was used as internal standard and added to the sample before single-step extraction with diethylether. This method demonstrates high sensitivity (6 ng/ml plasma) and combines selectivity, rapidity, and simplicity. Results of this procedure correlate well with those obtained by an HPLC method.

  4. The Application of Chemical Derivatization in Forensic Drug Chemistry for Gas and High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Methods of Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, J M

    1990-12-01

    The analyses of solid-dosage forensic drug samples can be enhanced by chemical derivatization followed by gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. Using these techniques permits improved detection and chromatography of some illicit drugs and their manufacturing by-products. This review focuses on the use of chemical derivatization in conjunction with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection, gas chromatography-electron capture detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection and high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection in the analysis of illicit drug samples. These drugs include the amphetamines, barbiturates, cannabis, fentanyls, opium, and hallucinogens. Discussion on sensitivity enhancement and determination of enantiomeric composition using gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography is included. An entire section is devoted to the chemical derivatization and chromatographic analyses of manufacturing by-products found in illicit amphetamine and methamphetamine, heroin, and cocaine samples. This review also includes a section that describes practical elements and experimental design associated with chemical derivatization-chromatographic analyses..

  5. Design and Performance of a Gas Chromatograph for Automatic Monitoring of Pollutants in Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalobos, R.; Stevens, D.; LeBlanc, R.; Braun, L.

    1971-01-01

    In recent years, interest in air pollution constituents has focused on carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as prime components of polluted air. Instrumental methods have been developed, and commercial instruments for continuous monitoring of these components have been available for a number of years. For the measurement of carbon monoxide, non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy has been the accepted tool, in spite of its marginal sensitivity at low parts-per-million levels. For continuously monitoring total hydrocarbons, the hydrogen flame ionization analyzer has been widely accepted as the preferred method. The inadequacy of this latter method became evident when it was concluded that methane is non-reactive and cannot be considered a contaminant even though present at over 1 ppm in the earth's atmosphere. Hence, the need for measuring methane separately became apparent as a means of measuring the reactive and potentially harmful non-methane hydrocarbons fraction. A gas chromatographic method for the measurement of methane and total hydrocarbons which met these requirements has been developed. In this technique, methane was separated on conventional gas chromatographic columns and detected by a hydrogen flame ionization detector (FID) while the total hydrocarbons were obtained by introducing a second sample directly into the FID without separating the various components. The reactive, or non-methane hydrocarbons, were determined by difference. Carbon monoxide was also measured after converting to methane over a heated catalyst to render it detectable by the FID. The development of this method made it possible to perform these measurements with a sensitivity of as much as 1 ppm full scale and a minimum detectability of 20 ppb. Incorporating this technique, criteria were developed by APCO for a second generation continuous automatic instrument for atmospheric monitoring stations.

  6. Gas chromatograph monitors for VCM, automatically alerts emergency team

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C.; Ormond, D.L.

    1986-09-01

    Delaware City, located on the Delaware River with a metropolitan population of around 100,000, has played host to numerous companies in the CPI. The community has witnessed the expansion to a current level of eleven plants and a large oil refinery. Identified by the DNREC as possibly the most serious of recent problems was the potential for release of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) gas. VCM is a recognized carcinogen and is considered a hazardous waste and a priority pollutant by the EPA. A Citizens' Advisory Committee recommended that a permanent air monitor for detection of VCM be strategically located in Delaware City. It needed to be capable of detecting VCM at 50 ppb and utilize a suitable alarm procedure to alert the public. The committee also recommended the use of a mobile monitor equipped to track a VCM release which could by-pass the Delaware City monitor and threaten nearby residents during certain wind conditions. A gas chromatography with photoionization detector (PID) was selected based on the required specifications and on commercial availability. The Delaware City firehouse was selected as the most publicly acceptable location with sufficient security and unobstructed sampling at an adequate height. The air in Delaware City has been monitored continuously since December 9, 1985. As of April, 1986, the instrument has completed, 30,000 combined sample and calibration runs. No unusual problems have been encountered with maintenance or with anomalous data. It has required only routine service, surpassing the manufacturer's guarantees for parts and service.

  7. Gas chromatographic determination of volatile congeners in spirit drinks: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J; Chapman, S; Brereton, P; Bertrand, A; Guillou, C; Wittkowski, R

    1999-01-01

    An interlaboratory study of a gas chromatographic (GC) method for the determination of volatile congeners in spirit drinks was conducted; 31 laboratories from 8 countries took part in the study. The method uses GC with flame ionization detection and incorporates several quality control measures which permit the choice of chromatographic system and conditions to be selected by the user. Spirit drink samples were prepared and sent to participants as 10 blind duplicate or split-level test materials for the determination of 1,1-diethoxyethane (acetal), 2-methylbutan-1-ol (active amyl alcohol), 3-methylbutan-1-ol (isoamyl alcohol), methanol (methyl alcohol), ethyl ethanoate (ethyl acetate), butan-1-ol (n-butanol), butan-2-ol (sec-butanol), 2-methylpropan-1-ol (isobutyl alcohol), propan-1-ol (n-propanol), and ethanal (acetaldehyde). The precision of the method for 9 of the 10 analytes was well within the range predicted by the Horwitz equation. The precision of the most volatile analyte, ethanal, was just above statistically predicted levels. This method is recommended for official regulatory purposes. PMID:10589492

  8. Advances in Gas Chromatographic Methods for the Identification of Biomarkers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kouremenos, Konstantinos A.; Johansson, Mikael; Marriott, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Screening complex biological specimens such as exhaled air, tissue, blood and urine to identify biomarkers in different forms of cancer has become increasingly popular over the last decade, mainly due to new instruments and improved bioinformatics. However, despite some progress, the identification of biomarkers has shown to be a difficult task with few new biomarkers (excluding recent genetic markers) being considered for introduction to clinical analysis. This review describes recent advances in gas chromatographic methods for the identification of biomarkers in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. It presents a general overview of cancer metabolism, the current biomarkers used for cancer diagnosis and treatment, a background to metabolic changes in tumors, an overview of current GC methods, and collectively presents the scope and outlook of GC methods in oncology. PMID:23074381

  9. Convenient headspace gas chromatographic determination of azide in blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    Meatherall, Robert; Palatnick, Wes

    2009-10-01

    Azide in human blood and plasma samples was derivatized with propionic anhydride in a headspace vial without prior sample preparation. The reaction proceeds quickly at room temperature to form propionyl azide. A portion of the headspace was assayed by gas chromatography with a nitrogen-phosphorus detector. In the heated injector of the gas chromatograph, the propionyl azide undergoes thermal rearrangement, forming ethyl isocyanate, which is subsequently chromatographed and detected. Propionitrile was used as the internal standard. The method is linear to at least 20 microg/mL. Limit of quantitation was 0.04 microg/mL, and the within-run coefficient of variation was 5.6% at 1 microg/mL. There was no interference from cyanide. A fatality report in which blood and plasma azide concentrations from a 59-year-old man were monitored for 24 h following the ingestion of an unknown amount of sodium azide is presented. The patient became critically ill after his self-inflicted sodium azide ingestion. He was intubated and treated with vasopressors and aggressive supportive care, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy, in the intensive care facility but died from neurological brain damage secondary to anoxia. On admission, 1.4 h after ingestion, his azide level was 5.6 microg/mL (blood); shortly thereafter, it had risen to 13.7 microg/mL (plasma) and, subsequently, was projected to have been eliminated by 16.7 h. No azide was detected in the postmortem blood and vitreous humor.

  10. Evaluation of two commercial capillary columns for the enantioselective gas chromatographic separation of organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo-Used, Natalia; Blanco-González, Elisa; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2006-12-15

    The separation of the enantiomers of 13 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) has been investigated by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionisation detection (FID) using two different commercially available chiral columns, Chirasil-Val (l-valine-tert-butylamide) and CP-Chirasil-Dex CB (heptakis (2,3,6-tri-O-metil)-beta-cyclodextrin). Using the Chirasil-Val column no chiral resolution was obtained for the OPPs investigated under any tested experimental condition. The use of the CP-Chirasil-Dex CB stationary phase enabled good individual enantiomeric separation of two OPPs, ruelene and trichlorfon and partial separation of naled, chloretoxyphos, isophenphos and metamidophos. Also, the obtained chromatographic results showed that Chirasil-Dex could resolve enantiomers through the combination of different mechanism (e.g. formation of inclusion complexes and/or interactions outside the cyclodextrin cavity). Under optimised conditions, precision, linearity range and detection limits were evaluated for the enantiomers of ruelene and trichlorfon using CP-Chirasil-Dex CB column and electron capture detection (ECD). By using the GC-ECD method the enantiomers of these OPPs could be satisfactorily detected at very low concentration levels. The detection limits observed were 1.5ngmL(-1) and 11.5ngmL(-1) for the enantiomers of trichlorfon and ruelene, respectively. PMID:18970881

  11. Development and evaluation of a gas chromatographic method for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Brooks, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-residue method is described for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples. The technique uses solvent extraction followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection employing nitrogen-selective devices. Seven compounds can be determined simultaneously at a nominal detection limit of 0.1 ??g/L in a 1-litre sample. Three different natural water samples were used for error analysis via evaluation of recovery efficiencies and estimation of overall method precision. As an alternative to liquid-liquid partition (solvent extraction) for removal of compounds of interest from water, solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques employing chromatographic grade silicas with chemically modified surfaces have been examined. SPE is found to provide rapid and efficient concentration with quantitative recovery of some triazine herbicides from natural water samples. Concentration factors of 500 to 1000 times are obtained readily by the SPE technique.A multi-residue method is described for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples. The technique uses solvent extraction followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection employing nitrogen-selective devices. Seven compounds can be determined simultaneously at a nominal detection limit of 0. 1 mu g/L in a 1-litre sample. As an alternative to liquid-liquid partition (solvent extraction) for removal of compounds of interest from water, solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques employing chromatographic grade silicas with chemically modified surfaces have been examined. SPE is found to provide rapid and efficient concentration with quantitative recovery of some triazine herbicides from natural water samples. Concentration factors of 500 to 1000 times are obtained readily by the SPE technique.

  12. Cloud point extraction with surfactant derivatization as an enrichment step prior to gas chromatographic or gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Takagai, Yoshitaka; Hinze, Willie L

    2009-08-15

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) using Triton X-114 was successfully applied as an extractive preconcentration step prior to gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. No liquid chromatographic or back-extraction steps were required to remove the target analyte(s) from the surfactant-rich extractant phase. Instead a post-extraction derivatization step is employed in which the surfactant of the surfactant-rich phase is reacted with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) prior to injection into the gas chromatograph. Such derivatization of the Triton X-114 surfactant following CPE was found to provide improved chromatographic performance yielding a reasonable elution time window that is free of derivatized surfactant signals, reproducible analyte retention times, and quantitative results. Mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), herbicides, and profens were utilized to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this approach. The retention times of six PAHs (acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, anthracene, biphenyl, dibenzofuran, and fluorene) were found to be very reproducible with relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the range of 0.5-0.8%. Quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of a herbicide test mixture (composed of alachlor, atrazine, butachlor, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, metolachlor, and simazine) following their CPE from spiked water samples yielded detection limits in the range of 6.6-97 ng/L (except for that of hexachlorocyclopentadiene which was 482 ng/L). The enrichment factors achieved for these herbicides ranged from 17 to 33. The recovery of the herbicides from spiked water samples ranged from 90 to 100% except for simazine and atrazine which were 50% and 74%, respectively. The BSFTA derivatization step can serve not only to derivatize the surfactant but also appropriate nonvolatile (or less volatile) analytes. An ibuprofen and flurbiprofen test mix was utilized to demonstrate this feature. The

  13. Oral intake of a toluene-containing thinner. Effects and headspace gas chromatographic analytical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zahlsen, K; Rygnestad, T; Nilsen, O G

    1985-01-01

    After an accidental oral intake of a paint thinner, the constituents were identified in stomach content using headspace gas chromatography. The composition indicated ingestion of a commonly used thinner containing 60-70% toluene, 20-25% n-butylacetate and 10-15% of ethanol. A toluene concentration of 22.0 mg/kg was measured in serum in contrast to n-butylacetate which was not detected. Ethanol concentration was 1.85 g/kg, most of this was due to ethanol ingestion before the intake of thinner. The half life of toluene in serum was 8.5 h initially, which increased to 14 h after 19 h. An effect on liver function was demonstrated by increased activity of serum transaminases. Compared with the upper normal limits ASAT and ALAT were increased by 6 and 2.5 times, respectively. For both parameters the highest activity was seen 40 hours after admission and normal levels were achieved after 7 days. It is concluded that toluene is readily absorbed by ingestion of toluene-containing thinners, and that the function of the human liver is transiently affected. For screening purposes gas chromatography proved to be a useful method for the analytical diagnosis in cases of organic solvent intoxication. The use of the headspace technique further improved the speed of analysis and eliminated contamination of the gas chromatographic system. PMID:3868371

  14. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, S.; Demick-Monelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of mlz from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, ethane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  15. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Demick-Montelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of m/z from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  16. Residual solvent testing: a review of gas-chromatographic and alternative techniques.

    PubMed

    B'Hymer, Clayton

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to describe and discuss some of the current analytic procedures including gas-chromatographic and alternative techniques for residual solvent testing. Residual solvents, or organic volatile impurities, are a potential toxic risk for pharmaceutic products and have been a concern of manufacturers for many years. Residual solvents have had official limits in the United States as set in USP XXV and by the FDA in 1997 and have been monitored by most pharmaceutical manufacturers extensively for more than two decades in both bulk and finished products. The chief method of analysis for residual solvents is gas chromatography, which is generally considered the preferred methodology. Sample introduction techniques include both static and dynamic headspace analysis, solid-phase microextraction, and direct injection of solution containing bulk drug substance or drug product into the gas chromatograph. Also, some alternative methodologies for residual solvent testing are discussed in this review. In conclusion, gas chromatograph-based procedures will continue to dominate residual solvent testing because of its specificity for identification of the solvent, but the use of alternative sample introduction techniques into a gas chromatograph will continue to expand in the near future.

  17. Minimizing thermal degradation in gas chromatographic quantitation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Adam L; Field, Christopher R; Newsome, G Asher; Rogers, Duane A; Giordano, Braden C; Johnson, Kevin J

    2015-05-15

    An analytical method for establishing calibration curves for the quantitation of pentaerythriol tetranitrate (PETN) from sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (TDS-GC-ECD) was developed. As PETN has been demonstrated to thermally degrade under typical GC instrument conditions, peaks corresponding to both PETN degradants and molecular PETN are observed. The retention time corresponding to intact PETN was verified by high-resolution mass spectrometry with a flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source, which enabled soft ionization of intact PETN eluting the GC and subsequent accurate-mass identification. The GC separation parameters were transferred to a conventional GC-ECD instrument where analytical method-induced PETN degradation was further characterized and minimized. A method calibration curve was established by direct liquid deposition of PETN standard solutions onto the glass frit at the head of sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes. Two local, linear relationships between detector response and PETN concentration were observed, with a total dynamic range of 0.25-25ng. PMID:25841610

  18. Gas chromatographic column for the storage of sample profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimandja, J. M.; Valentin, J. R.; Phillips, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a sample retention column that preserves the true time profile of an analyte of interest is studied. This storage system allows for the detection to be done at convenient times, as opposed to the nearly continuous monitoring that is required by other systems to preserve a sample time profile. The sample storage column is essentially a gas chromatography column, although its use is not the separation of sample components. The functions of the storage column are the selective isolation of the component of interest from the rest of the components present in the sample and the storage of this component as a function of time. Using octane as a test substance, the sample storage system was optimized with respect to such parameters as storage and readout temperature, flow rate through the storage column, column efficiency and storage time. A 3-h sample profile was collected and stored at 30 degrees C for 20 h. The profile was then retrieved, essentially intact, in 5 min at 130 degrees C.

  19. Gas chromatographic determination of pesticide residues in white mustard.

    PubMed

    Słowik-Borowiec, Magdalena; Szpyrka, Ewa; Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2015-04-15

    A new analytical method employing gas chromatography coupled to electron capture and nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-ECD/NPD) has been developed and validated for the screening and quantification of 51 pesticides in a matrix of high chlorophyll content - white mustard (Sinapis alba L.). For preparation of the sample extract, the citrate buffered QuEChERS procedure was followed. However certain changes were made to adapt the method to our needs and available laboratory resources. The sample size was reduced to 5 g, 10 mL water was added and exchange of solvent before GC analysis was done. The samples spiked with the target pesticides at the concentration level 0.01 mg/kg and a higher level (depending on the compound) yielded average recoveries in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) 0-19% except for HCB, S-metolachlor and teflubenzuron, and displayed very good linearity (R(2)>0.99) for nearly all the analytes. Limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg for the majority of the analytes. The expanded measurement uncertainties were estimated employing a "top-down" empirical model as being between 6% and 32% and yielding an average value of 18% (coverage factor k=2, confidence level 95%). PMID:25466117

  20. Characterization of Gas Chromatographic Liquid Phases Using McReynolds Constants. An Experiment for Instrumental Analysis Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erskine, Steven R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment that is designed to aid in the understanding of the fundamental process involved in gas chromatographic separations. Introduces the Kovats retention index system for use by chemistry students to establish criteria for the optimal selection of gas chromatographic stationary phases. (TW)

  1. Acrylamide analysis in food by liquid chromatographic and gas chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Elbashir, Abdalla A; Omar, Mei M Ali; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Schmitz, Oliver J; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a compound classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. It was first discovered to be present in certain heated processed food by the Swedish National Food Administration (SNFA) and University of Stockholm in early 2002. The major pathway for AA formation in food is the Maillard reaction between reducing sugar and the amino acid asparagine at high temperature. Since the discovery of AA's presence in food, many analytical methods have been developed for determination of AA contents in different food matrices. Also, several studies have been conducted to develop extraction procedures for AA from difficult food matrices. AA is a small, highly polar molecule, which makes its extraction and analysis challenging. Many articles and reviews have been published dealing with AA in food. The aim of the review is to discuss AA formation in food, the factors affecting AA formation and removal, AA exposure assessment, AA extraction and cleanup from food samples, and analytical methods used in AA determination, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). Special attention is given to sample extraction and cleanup procedures and analytical techniques used for AA determination.

  2. Micro-scale extractive alkylation procedure for the gas-chromatographic measurement of theophylline in serum and saliva, with use of a nitrogen detector.

    PubMed

    Joern, W A

    1978-09-01

    In this 10-min gas-chromatographic assay for theophylline, a 25-microliter portion of serum or saliva sample, 100 microliter of extraction reagent, and 1.0 ml of solvent were mixed, the solvent separated and evaporated, and an aliquot of the reconstituted extract injected into the gas chromatograph. At a concentration of 11 mg/liter, within-run precision (CV) was 3.6% and run-to-run 2.9%. At 22 mg/liter, within-run precision was 2.8%. Concentration and instrument response are linearly related between 2 and 40 mg/liter. The limit of detection was 0.4 mg/liter. Results correlated well (r = 0.98) with those by another micro-scale gas-chromatographic procedure. Analytical recovery was estimated to exceed 90%, and no interferences from other xanthines or related drugs were observed.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  6. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  7. Sensitive gas chromatographic--mass spectrometric screening of acetylated benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Borrey, D; Meyer, E; Lambert, W; Van Calenbergh, S; Van Peteghem, C; De Leenheer, A P

    2001-02-23

    GC-MS screening conditions were developed for 15 low-dosed benzodiazepines, covering alprazolam, flunitrazepam, flurazepam, ketazolam, lorazepam and triazolam, and the corresponding metabolites alpha-hydroxyalprazolam, 4-hydroxyalprazolam; 7-aminoflunitrazepam, desmethylflunitrazepam, 7-aminodesmethylflunitrazepam; hydroxyethylflurazepam, N-desalkylflurazepam; oxazepam and alpha-hydroxytriazolam, respectively. Benzodiazepines are analyzed on a polydimethylsiloxane column in both the scan and the multiple ion monitoring modes using on-column injection to attain maximal sensitivity. The reactive compounds are acetylated with pyridine and acetic anhydride for 20 min. The derivatives are stable for at least 4 days. The relative standard deviation observed with standard compounds at the low nanogram-level ranged from 1.13 to 4.87% within-day and from 1.12 to 4.94% between-day. Unequivocal identification potential, high chromatographic resolution and sensitivity are combined with minimal thermal degradation. The presented screening conditions provide the basis for a unique routine screening method for low-dosed benzodiazepines with a broad polarity range.

  8. Gas chromatographic analysis of synthetic glycidol esters, mono-, di- and triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Engbersen, J A; van Stijn, F

    1976-03-01

    The gas chromatographic analysis of glycidol esters and mono-, di-,and triglycerides of palmitic-, stearic-, and oleic acid mixtures is described. The composition of the products was determined by gas chromatography on OV-17 after trimethylsilylation. Base-line separations between 1- and 2-monoglycerides and between 1,2- and 1,3-diglycerides were obtained. Isomerisation of the trimethylsilyl ethers of monoglycerides was not observed, contrary to published work.

  9. Development of and fabrication of high resolution gas chromatographic capillary columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1982-01-01

    Gas chromatographic columns which are used in the trace gas analyzer (TGA) for the space shuttle are coated with a polyoxyethylene lauryl ether. This stationary phase is of medium polarity and has a temperature limit of 160 C. A polymer for this application which has an improved thermal stability is investigated. The use of fused silica capillary columns with specially bonded phases as well as an introduction system (on column) was also studied.

  10. Rapid and sensitive gas-chromatographic determination of caffeine in blood plasma, saliva, and xanthine beverages.

    PubMed

    Teeuwen, H W; Elbers, E L; van Rossum, J M

    1991-02-01

    A gas chromatographic procedure is reported for the determination of caffeine in plasma, saliva, and xanthine beverages. Using a 75 cm column packed with OV-17, nitrogen-sensitive detection, and 1 ml samples, a suitable limit of analysis (coefficient of variation (CV) = 10.2%) of 50 ng/ml was obtained in plasma. Within-day CVs at caffeine concentrations of 0.1-0.5-2.0-7.5-15.0 micrograms/ml in plasma were 7.7-5.6-4.8-3.8-3.4%, respectively. The limit of detection, defined as the injected quantity of caffeine giving rise to a signal to noise ratio of 2, is 40 pg, corresponding to a plasma concentration of 1 ng/ml. The procedure involves addition of the internal standard 7-pentyl theophylline and alkaline extraction of the sample with dichloromethane. The method described rivals any gaschromatographic assay published so far in rapidness and accuracy. Plasma and saliva caffeine concentrations were determined in a healthy male volunteer after swallowing 400 ml of coffee. The calculated pharmacokinetic parameters, assuming complete absorption of caffeine from the G.I. tract, agree well with previously published values. PMID:1875916

  11. Development of gas chromatographic system for dissolved organic carbon analysis in seawater. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, T.

    1992-12-01

    During the first six months of this two-year grant, we have completed the construction of the analytical portion of a prototype gas chromatograph-based system for the analysis of dissolved organic carbon in seawater. We also have begun testing the procedures to be used to cryogenically concentrate and transfer carbon dioxide from the oxidizing atmosphere of the high-temperature furnace into the reducing hydrogen carrier gas of the gas chromatograph. During the second half of the first year, we will construct the high-temperature catalytic oxidation furnace and test the entire system on laboratory-prepared aqueous solutions of various organic compounds. Also during this period, we will take part in an initial scoping study within the Cape Hatteras field area on board the R/V Gyre. This study will involve both the collection of samples of seawater for organic and inorganic carbon analysis and the measurement of surface-water pCO{sub 2}.

  12. Development of gas chromatographic system for dissolved organic carbon analysis in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, T.

    1992-12-01

    During the first six months of this two-year grant, we have completed the construction of the analytical portion of a prototype gas chromatograph-based system for the analysis of dissolved organic carbon in seawater. We also have begun testing the procedures to be used to cryogenically concentrate and transfer carbon dioxide from the oxidizing atmosphere of the high-temperature furnace into the reducing hydrogen carrier gas of the gas chromatograph. During the second half of the first year, we will construct the high-temperature catalytic oxidation furnace and test the entire system on laboratory-prepared aqueous solutions of various organic compounds. Also during this period, we will take part in an initial scoping study within the Cape Hatteras field area on board the R/V Gyre. This study will involve both the collection of samples of seawater for organic and inorganic carbon analysis and the measurement of surface-water pCO[sub 2].

  13. The Construction of a Simple Pyrolysis Gas Chromatograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedrick, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive pyrolysis gas chromatography (PGC) system constructed from items available in undergraduate institutions. The system is limited, accepting only liquid samples and pyrolyzing "on the fly" rather than statically and not allowing for reductive pyrolysis. Applications, experiments, and typical results are included.…

  14. Performance of the MOMA Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer onboard the 2018 ExoMars Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Pinnick, Veronica; Szopa, Cyril; Grand, Noël; Freissinet, Caroline; Danell, Ryan; van Ameron, Friso; Arevalo, Ricardo; Brinckerhoff, William; Raulin, François; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is a dual ion source linear ion trap mass spectrometer that was designed for the 2018 joint ESA-Roscosmos mission to Mars. The main scientific aim of the mission is to search for signs of extant or extinct life in the near subsurface of Mars by acquir-ing samples from as deep as 2 m below the surface. MOMA will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular) information from the solid samples, with particular focus on the characterization of organic content. The MOMA instrument, itself, is a joint venture for NASA and ESA to develop a mass spectrometer capable of analyzing samples from pyrolysis gas chromatograph (GC) as well as ambient pressure laser desorption ionization (LDI). The combination of the two analytical techniques allows for the chemical characterization of a broad range of compounds, including volatile and non-volatile species. Generally, MOMA can provide in-formation on elemental and molecular makeup, po-larity, chirality and isotopic patterns of analyte spe-cies. Here we report on the current performance of the MOMA prototype instruments, specifically the demonstration of the gas chromatography-mass spec-trometry (GC-MS) mode of operation. Both instruments have been tested separately first and have been coupled in order to test the efficiency of the future MOMA GC-MS instrument. The main objective of the second step has been to test the quantitative response of both instruments while they are coupled and to characterize the combined instrument detection limit for several compounds. A final experiment has been done in order to test the feasibility of the separation and detection of a mixture contained in a soil sample introduced in the MOMA oven.

  15. Comparison of two gas-liquid chromatograph columns for the analysis of fatty acids in ruminant meat.

    PubMed

    Alves, Susana P; Bessa, Rui J B

    2009-06-26

    Two gas-liquid chromatograph capillary columns for the analysis of fatty acids (FA) in ruminant fat are compared. Those columns are the CP-Sil 88 of 100 m long with a highly polar stationary phase and the Omegawax 250 of 30 m long with a stationary phase of intermediate polarity. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) patterns of branched-chain, cis and trans octadecenoate isomers, as well as conjugated and non-conjugated 18:2 and 18:3 isomers are fairly different between columns, even though most of the FAME could be separated on either column. However, the CP-Sil 88 showed better resolution of 18:1 isomers than Omegawax 250. The analysis of 96 samples of ruminant meat fat in both chromatographic systems showed that averages obtained for total FA content and for most of the individual FA did not differ between columns. Moreover, regression analysis of Omegawax and CP-Sil 88 data is highly correlated. Quantitative differences between chromatographic systems were detected for samples containing more than 66 mg fatty acids per gram of muscle dry matter.

  16. A linear modulation-based stochastic resonance algorithm applied to the detection of weak chromatographic peaks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haishan; Xiang, Bingren; Liao, Xuewei; Xie, Shaofei

    2006-12-01

    A simple stochastic resonance algorithm based on linear modulation was developed to amplify and detect weak chromatographic peaks. The output chromatographic peak is often distorted when using the traditional stochastic resonance algorithm due to the presence of high levels of noise. In the new algorithm, a linear modulated double-well potential is introduced to correct for the distortion of the output peak. Method parameter selection is convenient and intuitive for linear modulation. In order to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio for the output signal, the performance of two-layer stochastic resonance was evaluated by comparing it with wavelet-based stochastic resonance. The proposed algorithm was applied to the quantitative analysis of dimethyl sulfide and the determination of chloramphenicol residues in milk, and the good linearity of the method demonstrated that it is an effective tool for detecting weak chromatographic peaks.

  17. Gas chromatographic method for the determination of hexaconazole residues in black tea*

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Chinnachamy; Sachin, Paul James

    2008-01-01

    A highly reliable, quantitative and sensitive analytical method for determining the residues of the fungicide, hexaconazole in black tea is described. The proposed method is based on liquid-liquid extraction followed by gas chromatographic determination, using nitrogen phosphorus detector (GC-NPD) for the identification and quantitation of hexaconazole. The most appropriate solvent mixture for extracting hexaconazole residues from black tea was n-hexane:acetone at 1:1 (v/v). The extract was cleaned up by adsorption column chromatography using activated florisil. Performance of the method was assessed by evaluating quality parameters such as recovery value, repeatability, reproducibility, linearity and limits of detection and quantitation. When the method was assessed for repeatability, the percentage of recovery ranged between 86% and 96% while the relative standard deviation was between 0.30% and 2.35%. In studies on reproducibility the recovery ranged from 81% to 85% and relative standard deviation from 1.68% to 5.13%, implying that the method was reliable. A field trial was conducted to verify the application of this method with real samples. Results prove that the validated method was suitable for extracting hexaconazole residues. PMID:18257139

  18. Micro-machined planar field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer as a gas chromatographic detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Nazarov, E. G.; Miller, R. A.; Krylov, E. V.; Zapata, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    A planar high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer (PFAIMS) with a micro-machined drift tube was characterized as a detector for capillary gas chromatography. The performance of the PFAIMS was compared directly to that of a flame ionization detector (FID) for the separation of a ketone mixture from butanone to decanone. Effluent from the column was continuously sampled by the detector and mobility scans could be obtained throughout the chromatographic analysis providing chemical inforrmation in mobility scans orthogonal to retention time. Limits of detection were approximately I ng for measurement of positive ions and were comparable or slightly better than those for the FID. Direct comparison of calibration curves for the FAIMS and the FID was possible over four orders of magnitude with a semi-log plot. The concentration dependence of the PFAIMS mobility scans showed the dependence between ion intensity and ion clustering, evident in other mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization technologies. Ions were identified using mass spectrometry as the protonated monomer and the proton bound dimer of the ketones. Residence time for column effluent in the PFAIMS was calculated as approximately 1 ms and a 36% increase in extra-column broadening versus the FID occurred with the PFAIMS.

  19. Gas-chromatographic retention indexes of organic sulfur (II) compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Garbuzov, V.G.; Aerov, A.F.; Golovnya, R.V.; Misharina, T.A.

    1985-10-01

    Despite the large number of papers on the gas chromatographyof sulfur-containing compounds, according to the authors no systematic study has been carried out of their behavior, showing the dependences of the sorptional characteristics on the structure of the molecule and on the polarity of the stationary phase. The present article systematizes the results of many years of work on the determination on four columns with different polarity of retention indexes of sulfurcontaining compounds: mercaptans, dimercaptans, di-n-alkyl sulfides, n-alkyl isoalkyl sulfides, diisoalkyl sulfides, unsaturated sulfides, di-n-alkyl disulfides, and many others, in all more than 400 compounds. The data obtained and the regularities in their change, depending on the structure and polarity of the stationary phases, were successfully used to identify sulfur-containing compounds in the study of the odor composition of salmon flesh, boiled beef, boiled-corned pork and an aromatizer with a meat aroma.

  20. Gas chromatographic quantitative analysis of methanol in wine: operative conditions, optimization and calibration model choice.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Rosario; Gambino, Grazia Laura; Scordino, Monica; Sabatino, Leonardo; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2011-12-01

    The influence of the wine distillation process on methanol content has been determined by quantitative analysis using gas chromatographic flame ionization (GC-FID) detection. A comparative study between direct injection of diluted wine and injection of distilled wine was performed. The distillation process does not affect methanol quantification in wines in proportions higher than 10%. While quantification performed on distilled samples gives more reliable results, a screening method for wine injection after a 1:5 water dilution could be employed. The proposed technique was found to be a compromise between the time consuming distillation process and direct wine injection. In the studied calibration range, the stability of the volatile compounds in the reference solution is concentration-dependent. The stability is higher in the less concentrated reference solution. To shorten the operation time, a stronger temperature ramp and carrier flow rate was employed. With these conditions, helium consumption and column thermal stress were increased. However, detection limits, calibration limits, and analytical method performances are not affected substantially by changing from normal to forced GC conditions. Statistical data evaluation were made using both ordinary (OLS) and bivariate least squares (BLS) calibration models. Further confirmation was obtained that limit of detection (LOD) values, calculated according to the 3sigma approach, are lower than the respective Hubaux-Vos (H-V) calculation method. H-V LOD depends upon background noise, calibration parameters and the number of reference standard solutions employed in producing the calibration curve. These remarks are confirmed by both calibration models used. PMID:22312744

  1. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques in the examination of engine oils.

    PubMed

    Fall, Jacek; Voelkel, Adam

    2002-09-01

    The emerging market of engine oils consists of a number of products from different viscosity and quality classes. Determination of the base oil used in manufacturing of the final product (engine oil) as well as estimation of mutual miscibility of oils and their solubility could be crucial problems. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques are presented as an interesting and fruitful extension of normalised standard analytical methods used in the oil industry. PMID:12385390

  2. Portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer for on-site chemical analyses

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Bushman, John F.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Eckels, Joel D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, lightweight (approximately 25 kg) gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, including the entire vacuum system, can perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of all sample types in the field. The GC/MS has a conveniently configured layout of components for ease of serviceability and maintenance. The GC/MS system can be transported under operating or near-operating conditions (i.e., under vacuum and at elevated temperature) to reduce the downtime before samples can be analyzed on-site.

  3. In situ derivatization and hollow fiber membrane microextraction for gas chromatographic determination of haloacetic acids in water.

    PubMed

    Varanusupakul, Pakorn; Vora-Adisak, Narongchai; Pulpoka, Bancha

    2007-08-13

    An alternative method for gas chromatographic determination of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in water using direct derivatization followed by hollow fiber membrane liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) has been developed. The method has improved the sample preparation step according to the conventional US EPA Method 552.2 by combining the derivatization and the extraction into one step prior to determination by gas chromatography electron captured detector (GC-ECD). The HAAs were derivatized with acidic methanol into their methyl esters and simultaneously extracted with supported liquid hollow fiber membrane in headspace mode. The derivatization was attempted directly in water sample without sample evaporation. The HF-LPME was performed using 1-octanol as the extracting solvent at 55 degrees C for 60 min with 20% Na2SO4. The linear calibration curves were observed for the concentrations ranging from 1 to 300 microg L(-1) with the correlation coefficients (R2) being greater than 0.99. The method detection limits of most analytes were below 1 microg L(-1) except DCAA and MCAA that were 2 and 18 microg L(-1), respectively. The recoveries from spiked concentration ranged from 97 to 109% with %R.S.D. less than 12%. The method was applied for determination of HAAs in drinking water and tap water samples. The method offers an easy one step high sample throughput sample preparation for gas chromatographic determination of haloacetic acids as well as other contaminants in water. PMID:17693310

  4. Gas chromatographic determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes using flame ionization detector in water samples with direct aqueous injection up to 250 microl.

    PubMed

    Kubinec, R; Adamuscin, J; Jurdáková, H; Foltin, M; Ostrovský, I; Kraus, A; Soják, L

    2005-08-19

    A simple method of solventless extraction of volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) from aqueous samples was developed. This method allows direct injection of large volume of water sample into a gas chromatograph using the sorption capacity of the sorbent Chromosorb P NAW applied directly in the injection port of gas chromatograph. The system prevent water penetration into a column, keep it adsorbed on its surface until the analytes are stripped into a column, and the residual water is purging using split flow. The limit of detection ranging from 0.6 for benzene to 1.1 microg l(-1) for o-xylene and limit of quantification ranging 2.0-3.6 microg l(-1) are lower that those reached by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and direct aqueous injection before.

  5. Construction of a cryogen-free thermal desorption gas chromatographic system with off-the-shelf components for monitoring ambient volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Liao, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Pei-Chieh; Fan, Gang-Jei; Hsiao, Chien-Cheng; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Chang, Chih-Chung; Lin, Neng-Huei; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-04-01

    An automated gas chromatographic system aimed at performing unattended measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds was configured and tested. By exploiting various off-the-shelf components, the thermal desorption unit was easily assembled and can be connected with any existing commercial gas chromatograph in the laboratory to minimize cost. The performance of the complete thermal desorption gas chromatographic system was assessed by analyzing a standard mixture containing 56 target nonmethane hydrocarbons from C2 -C12 at sub-ppb levels. Particular attention was given to the enrichment efficiency of the C2 compounds, such as ethane (b.p. = -88.6°C) and ethylene (b.p. = -104.2°C), due to their extremely high volatilities. Quality assurance was performed in terms of the linearity, precision and limits of detection of the target compounds. To further validate the system, field measurements of target compounds in ambient air were compared with those of a commercial total hydrocarbon analyzer and a carbon monoxide analyzer. Highly coherent results from the three instruments were observed during a two-month period of synchronized measurements. Moreover, the phenomenon of opposite diurnal variations between the biogenic isoprene and anthropogenic species was exploited to help support the field applicability of the thermal desorption gas chromatographic method. PMID:26924196

  6. Capillary gas-chromatographic determination of spermidine in hair lotion.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Veniero; Casagni, Eleonora; Dell'Acqua, Lucia; Valenti, Mauro; Visconti, Giacomo L

    2006-06-01

    Biogenic polyamines, such as spermidine (SPD, NH2-(CH2)4-NH-(CH2)3-NH2), are ubiquitous polycationic molecules which play a definitive role in many biological processes such as nucleic acid metabolism, protein synthesis, and cell growth. SPD is commonly used as an ingredient in hair lotions, because it seems to promote hair growth. This work describes a capillary GC method for quantitative determination of SPD in hair lotions using 1,6-diaminohexane as internal standard, a methyl silicone capillary column, and a flame ionisation detector. Aliquots of hair lotion were treated with an alkaline aqueous solution and internal standard was added. The emulsion was extracted with diethyl ether containing ethyl chloroformate. Ether extracts, evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in ethyl acetate, were analysed by capillary GC with flame ionisation detection. Validation took into account the specificity, linearity, precision, and accuracy of the analytical method: these parameters were valid for the quantitative determination of SPD in hair lotion.

  7. A Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer System for UltraLow-Emission Combustor Exhaust Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Wey, Chowen Chou

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph (GC)/mass spectrometer (MS) system that allows the speciation of unburnt hydrocarbons in the combustor exhaust has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Combustion gas samples are withdrawn through a water-cooled sampling probe which, when not in use, is protected from contamination by a high-pressure nitrogen purge. The sample line and its connecting lines, filters, and valves are all ultraclean and are heated to avoid condensation. The system has resolution to the parts-per-billion (ppb) level.

  8. Optimizing mass spectrometric detection for ion chromatographic analysis. I. Common anions and selected organic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyuan; Schnute, William C

    2009-11-01

    We describe a systematic method of optimizing mass spectrometric (MS) detection for ion chromatographic (IC) analysis of common anions and three selected organic acids using response surface methodology (RSM). RSM was utilized in this study because it minimized the number of experiments required to achieve the optimum MS response and included the interactions between individual parameters for multivariable optimization. Five MS parameters, including probe temperature, nebulizer gas, assistant makeup flow, needle voltage and cone voltage, were screened and systematically optimized by two steps. Central composite design (CCD) was used to design the experiment points and a quadratic model was applied to fit the experimental data. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to evaluate the validity of the statistical model and to determine the most significant parameters for MS response. The optimum MS conditions for each analyte were summarized and the method optimum condition was achieved by applying desirability function. Our observation showed good agreements between statistically predicted optimum response and the responses collected at the predicted optimum condition. Operable range of each parameter (with normalized MS response greater than 0.8 for each analyte) was provided for general anionic IC/MS applications.

  9. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.

    2006-01-01

    The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Cassini-Huygens Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and coupled with the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the surface after impact. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of m/z from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be NP and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3 x 10(exp-5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8 x 10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3 x l0(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, ethane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane.

  10. Gas-chromatographic micro-scale procedure for theophylline, with use of a nitrogen-sensitive detector.

    PubMed

    Least, C J; Johnson, G F; Solomon, H M

    1976-06-01

    We report a micro-scale procedure for determination of theophylline by use of gas chromatography with nitrogen-sensitive detection. The procedure requires only 10 mul of serum, plasma, or saliva. This sample size makes the determination especially appropriate for monitoring in a pediatric population. With the sample volume used, background interference is equivalent to about 0.1 mg/liter and 0.5 mg of theophylline per liter can easily be measured. The new method correlates well with our earlier flame ionization gas-chromatographic procedure that required 1 ml of sample [Clin. Chem. 21, 1038 (1975)]. The selectiviey of the nitrogen detector allows a simplified extraction procedure. Between-run precision (CV) is 2.8% at a theophylline concentration of 14.8 mg/liter.

  11. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  12. [Chromatographic determination of bile acids in biological fluids with sensitive and selective detection].

    PubMed

    Goto, J

    1990-11-01

    Separation and determination of bile acids in biological fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography are reviewed. The capacity ratios of bile acids on an ODS column were affected by the number, position and configuration of the hydroxyl group on the steroid nucleus, and the chromatographic behavior was markedly influenced by the pH of a mobile phase according to the conjugated form at C-24. A new pre-column derivatization reagent, 1-anthroyl nitrile, was developed and applied to the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids. Bile acids were derivatized through the 3 alpha-hydroxyl group into the corresponding esters, separated on an ODS column, and monitored by a fluorescence detector with detection limit of 20 fmol. The sensitive method for the determination of bile acids in biological materials by gas chromatography (GC) in combination with negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) mass spectrometry is also described. Of various derivatives for the carboxyl group, the pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) ester provided the highest value of the ratio of the negative to positive ion current. A characteristic carboxylate anion [M-181]- was produced as the most abundant ion by the loss of the PFB group in NICI. PFB esters of bile acids were further derivatized into the dimethylethylsilyl ethers and then separated by GC. The detection limit was 2 fg when the characteristic anion was monitored in the NICI mode. The preparation of 18O-labelled bile acids, as the internal standard for the trace analysis or the tracer for the metabolic study, was developed. Finally, the clean-up procedure for bile acids in biological fluids was investigated. The combined use of solid-phase extraction with a Sep-pak C18 or Bond Elut cartridge and group separation on a lipophilic ion-exchange gel, piperidinohydroxypropyl Sephadex LH-20, was found most effective for this purpose. PMID:2082011

  13. Determinations of gas-liquid partition coefficients using capillary chromatographic columns. Alkanols in squalane.

    PubMed

    Tascon, Marcos; Romero, Lílian M; Acquaviva, Agustín; Keunchkarian, Sonia; Castells, Cecilia

    2013-06-14

    This study focused on an investigation into the experimental quantities inherent in the determination of partition coefficients from gas-liquid chromatographic measurements through the use of capillary columns. We prepared several squalane - (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) - containing columns with very precisely known phase ratios and determined solute retention and hold-up times at 30, 40, 50 and 60°C. We calculated infinite dilution partition coefficients from the slopes of the linear regression of retention factors as a function of the reciprocal of the phase ratio by means of fundamental chromatographic equations. In order to minimize gas-solid and liquid-solid interface contributions to retention, the surface of the capillary inner wall was pretreated to guarantee a uniform coat of stationary phase. The validity of the proposed approach was first tested by estimating the partition coefficients of n-alkanes between n-pentane and n-nonane, for which compounds data from the literature were available. Then partition coefficients of sixteen aliphatic alcohols in squalane were determined at those four temperatures. We deliberately chose these highly challenging systems: alcohols in the reference paraffinic stationary phase. These solutes exhibited adsorption in the gas-liquid interface that contributed to retention. The corresponding adsorption constant values were estimated. We fully discuss here the uncertainties associated with each experimental measurement and how these fundamental determinations can be performed precisely by circumventing the main drawbacks. The proposed strategy is reliable and much simpler than the classical chromatographic method employing packed columns.

  14. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better

  15. Gas chromatographic analysis of organic marker compounds in fine particulate matter using solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Lee, Milton L; Eatough, Delbert J

    2007-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method that uses solid-phase microextraction for analysis of organic marker compounds in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is reported. The target marker compounds were selected for specificity toward emission from wood smoke, diesel or gasoline combustion, or meat cooking. Temperature-programmed volatilization analysis was used to characterize the thermal stabilities and volatile properties of the compounds of interest. The compounds were thermally evaporated from a quartz filter, sorbed to a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber, and thermally desorbed at 280 degrees C in a gas chromatograph injection port connected via a DB 1701 capillary separating column. Various experimental parameters (fiber type, time, and temperature of sorption) were optimized. It was found that high extraction yield could be achieved using a polyacrylate fiber for polar substances, such as levoglucosan, and a 7-microm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated fiber for nonpolar compounds, such as hopanes and polyaromatic hydrocarbon. A compromise was made by selecting a carboxen/PDMS fiber, which can simultaneously extract all of the analytes of interest with moderate-to-high efficiency at 180 degrees C within a 30-min accumulation period. The optimized method was applied to the determination of levoglucosan in pine wood combustion emissions. The simplicity, rapidity, and selectivity of sample collection with a polymer-coated SPME coupled to capillary gas chromatography (GC) made this method potentially useful for atmospheric chemistry studies.

  16. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey.

  17. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey. PMID:10794629

  18. Capillary gas chromatographic assay of camphor and m-cresol in dermatological creams.

    PubMed

    Mirza, T; Tan, H S

    1998-09-01

    Camphor and m-cresol mixtures are used in antiseptic and anti-itching creams. No compendial method exists for these preparations. This paper reports a capillary gas chromatographic method using FID detection with 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol as internal standard on a 30 m x 0.32 mm Supelcowax -10 column (0.25 micron film) with helium as carrier gas. Ramped temperature programming was applied. The method allows simultaneous quantitation of camphor and m-cresol in the presence of o- and p-cresols, calamine and zinc oxide. Overall percent recoveries (+/- SD, n = 9) of camphor, o-, p- and m-cresol from spiked placebo creams, at a labeled amount of 10 (w/w)% were 96.9 +/- 0.6, 98.2 +/- 0.6, 99.2 +/- 0.5 and 101.0 +/- 0.9%, respectively, and at a labeled amount of 1% were 96.7 +/- 0.6, 97.8 +/- 0.9, 97.8 +/- 0.6, and 100.3 +/- 1.0%, respectively. The recovery studies were carried out at +/- 30% of the labeled amounts. Linear peak area or height ratios were obtained (r > 0.999) for camphor, o-, p- and m-cresol covering a concentration range of 10-200% of the labeled amount. Linearity (r > 0.999) was also obtained for m-cresol when the relative concentration of o- and p-cresol was varied from 5 to 100% of the m-cresol concentration. The resolution between the 'critical pair' of p- and m-cresol was > or = 1.1. The limit of quantitation was 23 pg for m-cresol and 9.3 pg for camphor using an injection split of 1:50. The repeatability (%RSD) for all compounds were < 2% for peak area and < 1.4% for peak height ratios. System suitability and robustness of the method were established. The method was successively applied to the assay of available commercial products and allows assay of camphor and the three cresol isomers. PMID:9800662

  19. Application of Gas Chromatographic analysis to RPC detectors in the ATLAS experiment at CERN-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asmundis, R.

    2007-06-01

    Starting from 2007 a large number (1200) Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors will be used as muon trigger detectors in the ATLAS Experiment at CERN-LHC accelerator. RPC are gaseous detector in which the quality and the stability of the gas mixture as well as the design of the gas supplying system, play a fundamental role in their functioning. RPC are foreseen to work more than ten years in the high radiation environment of ATLAS and the gas mixture acts really as a "lifeguard" for the detectors. For this reason a great attention has been devoted to the gas studies in order to optimize RPC performance, robustness and reliability in a high radiation environment. In this paper we describe the work done to decide how to supply and control in an optimal way the gas to the detectors, in order to ensure their best performance for a long time. The activity, based on Gas Chromatographic (GC) analysis, has been carried on a sample of final RPC working in radiation conditions much more intense than those foreseen for the ATLAS experiment. This has been possible using a high Gamma ray radiation facility available at CERN (GIF). The gas has been supplied using a system similar but at a reduced scale with respect to the final one and including: a recirculation circuit, a humidification module and a three stages purification subsystem.

  20. Fast low-pressure microwave assisted extraction and gas chromatographic determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, M C; Maina, R; Tumiatti, V; Sarzanini, C; Rivoira, L; De Carlo, R M

    2012-11-23

    A new technology equipment for low-pressure microwave assisted extraction (usually employed for organic chemistry reactions), recently launched in the market, is used for the first time in environmental analysis for the extraction of commercial technical Aroclor mixtures from soil. Certified reference materials of Aroclor 1260, Aroclor 1254 and Aroclor 1242 in transformer oils were used to contaminate the soil samples and to optimize the extraction method as well as the subsequent gas chromatographic electron capture detection (GC-ECD) analytical method. The study was performed optimizing the extraction, the purification and the gas chromatographic separation conditions to enhance the resolution of difficult pairs of congeners (C28/31 and C141/179). After optimization, the recovery yields were included within the range 79-84%. The detection limits, evaluated for two different commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures (Aroclor 1260 and Aroclor 1242) were 0.056 ± 0.001 mg/kg and 0.290 ± 0.006 mg/kg, respectively. The method, validated with certified soil samples, was used to analyze a soil sample after an event of failure of a pole-mounted transformer which caused the dumping of PCB contaminated oil in soil. Moreover, the method provides simple sample handling, fast extraction with reduced amount of sample and solvents than usually required, and simple purification step involving the use of solvent (cyclohexane) volumes as low as 5 mL. Reliability and reproducibility of extraction conditions are ensured by direct and continuous monitoring of temperature and pressure conditions. PMID:23084486

  1. Fast low-pressure microwave assisted extraction and gas chromatographic determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, M C; Maina, R; Tumiatti, V; Sarzanini, C; Rivoira, L; De Carlo, R M

    2012-11-23

    A new technology equipment for low-pressure microwave assisted extraction (usually employed for organic chemistry reactions), recently launched in the market, is used for the first time in environmental analysis for the extraction of commercial technical Aroclor mixtures from soil. Certified reference materials of Aroclor 1260, Aroclor 1254 and Aroclor 1242 in transformer oils were used to contaminate the soil samples and to optimize the extraction method as well as the subsequent gas chromatographic electron capture detection (GC-ECD) analytical method. The study was performed optimizing the extraction, the purification and the gas chromatographic separation conditions to enhance the resolution of difficult pairs of congeners (C28/31 and C141/179). After optimization, the recovery yields were included within the range 79-84%. The detection limits, evaluated for two different commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures (Aroclor 1260 and Aroclor 1242) were 0.056 ± 0.001 mg/kg and 0.290 ± 0.006 mg/kg, respectively. The method, validated with certified soil samples, was used to analyze a soil sample after an event of failure of a pole-mounted transformer which caused the dumping of PCB contaminated oil in soil. Moreover, the method provides simple sample handling, fast extraction with reduced amount of sample and solvents than usually required, and simple purification step involving the use of solvent (cyclohexane) volumes as low as 5 mL. Reliability and reproducibility of extraction conditions are ensured by direct and continuous monitoring of temperature and pressure conditions.

  2. Gas chromatographic determination of sulfuric acid and application to urinary sulfate.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, N; Ubuka, T; Kinuta, M; Yoshida, S; Taguchi, T

    1988-10-01

    A new gas chromatographic method for the determination of sulfate was developed. In this method, sulfate was quantitatively converted to a volatile derivative, dimethyl sulfate, by a two-step procedure. First, sulfate was converted to silver sulfate by reaction with silver oxide, and then to dimethyl sulfate by reaction with methyl iodide. The derivative was analyzed by gas chromatography. Methyl methanesulfonate was used as an internal standard. The method was applied to the determination of total urinary sulfate. Phosphate and chloride ions, which interfered with the present method, were eliminated with the use of basic magnesium carbonate and an excess of silver oxide, respectively. Recovery was over 96% when 5 to 40 mumol/ml of sulfate was added to human urine samples. PMID:3223336

  3. Gas-Chromatographic analysis of Mars soil samples with the SAM instrument onboard Curiosity - the 359 first sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Cyril; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Mahaffy, Paul; Buch, Arnaud; Goutail, Jean Pierre; Cabane, Michel; Glavin, Daniel; Correia, Jean-Jacques; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; Meftah, Mustapha; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Brunner, Anna; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Millan, Maeva; Pascalin

    Amongst the SAM suite of instruments, SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal/chemical treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. The first soil samples analyzed with SAM were composed of windblown dust and sand collected at the Rocknest site, while the second site analyzed was a basin called “Yellowknife Bay” where two holes were drilled (John Klein & Cumberland) and analysis showed these sites to be a fluvio-lacustrine sediment.. For their analysis, these samples were subjected to a pyrolysis at temperatures reaching about 850°C. For SAM-GC and GCMS analyses, different fractions of pyrolysates were collected at different temperature in the ambient-900°C range in order to discriminate potential different volatile fractions present in the solid sample. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of a thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was used as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. This channel is also equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) capable to detect the most abundant species (with abundances down to approximately 10-10mol). His channel is thus complementary to the mass spectrometer detection for quantification of such species, as this last instrument does not have linear response in this domain of high abundance, whereas it is significantly more sensitive than the TCD. The results obtained with this instrument first show that the performances of SAM-GC is representative of those obtained during calibrations of the instrument in laboratory, and also that results are repeatable. Hence, the instrument performs nominally, making it the first GCMS running successfully on Mars since the Viking missions (middle of the 70’s). Moreover, the complementarity of GC towards MS is also shown, both by allowing the

  4. Simulation of elution profiles for two-dimensional dynamic gas chromatographic experiments.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Oliver; Shellie, Robert; Marriott, Philip; Schurig, Volker

    2003-09-01

    The interconversion of E and Z isomers of acetaldoxime 1 and butyraldoxime 2 have been investigated by comprehensive two-dimensional dynamic gas chromatography (DGCxDGC) and computer simulation. Time-resolved cryogenic modulation is capable of revealing the precise isomeric ratio as a fine structure under the dynamic elution profile, which is characterized in one-dimensional experiments by a plateau formation or peak coalescence caused by interconversion of the isomers during the separation process. The chromatographic theoretical plate model has been extended for the computer simulation of comprehensive two-dimensional dynamic chromatographic experiments. A novel program, ChromWin 2D, based on the new algorithm has been developed for computer simulation to evaluate and predict the elution profiles of DGCxDGC experiments. ChromWin 2D allows the determination of rate constants and barriers of isomerization, epimerization, and enantiomerization processes occurring during chromatographic separations. The Eyring activation parameters of the E/Z and Z/E isomerization barriers in the presence of the stationary phase BP21 (poly(ethylene glycol) terephthalate terminated) were determined by temperature-dependent experiments between 80 and 90 degrees C for 1 and 70 and 130 degrees C for 2. The thermodynamic Gibbs free energy of the E/Z equilibrium of the isomers has been determined from the time-resolved chromatograms by cryogenic modulation. The method described here constitutes a new and important tool for the determination of isomerization barriers, which are of great interest, for example, for the quantitative determination of derivatized aldehydes, such as dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives, in trace analysis.

  5. Gas-liquid chromatographic headspace technique for determination of vinyl chloride in corn oil and three food-simulating solvents.

    PubMed

    Diachenko, G W; Breder, C V; Brown, M E; Dennison, J L

    1977-05-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic headspace technique for the determination of vinyl chloride (VC) in corn oil, 50% ethanol, 3% acetic acid, and n-heptane is described. These food-simulating solvents and the corn oil are placed in septum-sealed bottles and heated to 90 degrees C, and aliquots of headspace vapor are injected into a gas-liquid chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. VC may be quantitated at concentrations of 1 ppb or less. This technique was used to measure the migration of VC into corn oil and 50% ethanol from 2 unplasticized polyvinyl chloride sheets containing 0.28 and 0.44 ppm residual monomer.

  6. A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry method for determining isotopic distributions in organic compounds used in the chemical approach to stable isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.M.; Spall, W.D.; Smith, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods have been developed to resolve benzene, benzophenone, anthracene, fluorenone, and their respective stable isotope analogs from other components by gas chromatography. The ratio of stable isotope-labeled material to natural isotopic abundance compounds is determined from the mass spectra averaged across the chromatographic peak. Both total ion and selective ion chromatographic approaches were used for relative data and comparison. 9 refs., 11 tabs.

  7. Capillary gas chromatographic determination of putrescine and cadaverine in serum of cancer patients using trifluoroacetylacetone as derivatizing reagent.

    PubMed

    Khuhawar, M Y; Memon, A A; Jaipal, P D; Bhanger, M I

    1999-02-19

    Trifluoroacetylacetone (FAA) derivatives of 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) (Pu) and 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) (CA) were prepared and characterized by elemental microanalysis, IR, and mass spectrometry. Diamine derivatives were eluted from capillary gas chromatographic (CGC) column BP1 (12 m x 0.22 mm I.D.) or BP5 (50 m x 0.22 mm) with layer thickness 0.25 microm, using nitrogen as a carrier gas and flame ionization detection (FID). A solvent extraction procedure was developed for the extraction of Pu and CA from aqueous solution with a linear calibration range 0-20 microg/0.2 ml of extract with a detection limit of 0.5-0.6 ng/injection. The method was applied for the determination of Pu and CA in the serum of five cancer patients before and after radiotherapy. The serum of two healthy persons was also analyzed for Pu and CA contents. Pu and CA concentrations were found within the range 1.16-3.96 microg/ml and 0.88-1.46 microg/ml in cancer patients as compared to 0.11-0.16 microg/ml and 0.06-0.075 microg/ml respectively in healthy persons with a coefficient of variation (CV) within 0.62-5.47%. Pu and CA concentrations decreased on radiotherapy in cancer patients, but were much higher than in healthy persons. PMID:10080628

  8. Capillary gas chromatographic determination of cyclohexanone and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol leached from solution administration sets.

    PubMed

    Danielson, J W

    1991-01-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic method is described for the determination of cyclohexanone and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol leached from solution administration sets. A preliminary study was made of compounds leached from solution administration sets by 5% sodium bicarbonate solution (pH 8.1), 0.9% sodium chloride solution (pH 6.8), and water. Water was selected as the leaching solvent because similar quantities of the compounds were leached into water and into both types of parenteral solutions. The correlation coefficients were 0.99977 for cyclohexanone and 0.99974 for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, and recoveries were good (93-94%). Five administration sets from each of 2 manufacturers were analyzed by this method. The amounts of cyclohexanone that were leached from the individual sets varied considerably; however, similar quantities were leached from sets of both manufacturers. 2-Ethyl-1-hexanol was also found in extracts from each of the sets analyzed.

  9. Gas-liquid chromatographic properties of positional isomers of methyl thia, selena, and tellura laurate analogs.

    PubMed

    Jie, M S; Bakare, O; Cheung, Y K; Chau, S H

    1997-06-01

    Gas-liquid chromatographic analyses of three complete series of synthetic positional isomers of methyl thia, selena, and tellura laurate analogs were carried on a nonpolar (SE-30) and a polar (SP-2330) stationary phase. The average ECL (equivalent chain length) values of the thia, selena, and tellura laurate on SE-30 stationary phase were 13.8, 14.8, and 15.7, respectively, while on SP-2330 the average values for the same series were 17.1, 19.0, and 19.1, respectively. Positional isomers with the heteroatom at the 2-position exhibited the lowest ECL values, while those with the heteroatom at the omega-1 position gave the highest ECL values and were readily separated from the other positional isomers of the same series of analogs by this technique.

  10. The current practice in the application of chemometrics for correlation of sensory and gas chromatographic data.

    PubMed

    Seisonen, Sirli; Vene, Kristel; Koppel, Kadri

    2016-11-01

    A lot of research has been conducted in correlating the sensory properties of food with different analytical measurements in recent years. Various statistical methods have been used in order to get the most reliable results and to create prediction models with high statistical performance. The current review summarises the latest practices in the field of correlating attributes from sensory analysis with volatile data obtained by gas chromatographic analysis. The review includes the origin of the data, different pre-processing and variable selection methods and finally statistical methods of analysis and validation. Partial least squares regression analysis appears as the most commonly used statistical method in the area. The main shortcomings were identified in the steps of pre-processing, variable selection and also validation of models that have not gained enough attention. As the association between volatiles and sensory perception is often nonlinear, future studies should test the application of different nonlinear techniques. PMID:27211679

  11. Determination and discrimination of biodiesel fuels by gas chromatographic and chemometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milina, R.; Mustafa, Z.; Bojilov, D.; Dagnon, S.; Moskovkina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition method (PRM) was applied to gas chromatographic (GC) data for a fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) composition of commercial and laboratory synthesized biodiesel fuels from vegetable oils including sunflower, rapeseed, corn and palm oils. Two GC quantitative methods to calculate individual fames were compared: Area % and internal standard. The both methods were applied for analysis of two certified reference materials. The statistical processing of the obtained results demonstrates the accuracy and precision of the two methods and allows them to be compared. For further chemometric investigations of biodiesel fuels by their FAME-profiles any of those methods can be used. PRM results of FAME profiles of samples from different vegetable oils show a successful recognition of biodiesels according to the feedstock. The information obtained can be used for selection of feedstock to produce biodiesels with certain properties, for assessing their interchangeability, for fuel spillage and remedial actions in the environment.

  12. Validation study of gas chromatographic determination of pentachlorophenol in animal liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gillard, D.; Epstein, R.L.; Ashworth, R.B.; Curry, K.; Nathan, Q.

    1988-01-01

    A validation study was conducted of a gas chromatographic procedure for the determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in chicken, pork, and beef liver. Five analysts representing 5 laboratories analyzed randomly numbered blind duplicates at 3 fortified tissue concentrations and one incurred tissue on 2 consecutive days. The PCP concentrations ranged from approximately 40 to 400 parts per billion (ppb). All data were reported to 3 significant figures in ppb. The coefficients of variation for repeatability were between 2.8 and 8.5%, except for the beef liver, at a mean value of 80 ppb PCP, where the CV was 11.3%. The CVs for reproducibility were in the range of 9.7 - 16.5% with little significant difference by species. The CV asymptotically approached 10% as the PCP level increased.

  13. Linear solvation energy relationships as classifiers in non-target analysis - a gas chromatographic approach.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Nadin; Mühlenberg, Jana; Retzbach, Heiko; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Brack, Werner

    2012-11-16

    Linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) are applied as classifiers to predict the logarithmic retention factors logk from the structures of candidate compounds in non-target analysis. By comparison of the predicted value with the experimentally determined logk, progressive exclusion of candidates is done. The approach is based on the determination of stationary phase parameters to describe ten different gas chromatographic columns under four isothermal conditions. To demonstrate retention prediction and the application of the classifier model, twelve compounds with the molecular formula C(12)H(10)O(2) were selected, while experimental logk values were compared to the predicted values and exclusion of potential candidate compounds was performed. The analytical power of the approach was demonstrated on the basis of experimentally determined compound descriptors achieved from gas chromatographic measurements. The prediction got less accurate when calculated compound descriptors were employed. For the time being insufficient precision in estimating the descriptors limits the possibility to exclude candidate compounds in non-target analysis. It is expected that new approaches to estimate compound descriptors, will improve this situation. At present, the insufficient accuracy of descriptor estimates can be dealt with larger prognosis intervals. Furthermore, the combination of two stationary phases with corresponding retention prediction further advanced the exclusion of potential candidates. The most appropriate pair of stationary phases was selected by the application of four different orthogonal strategies. In addition, the classifier was applied for a validation set with different molecular composition, where column selection was considered on the basis of the differences in the compound descriptors of the corresponding candidate compounds.

  14. A purge-and-trap capillary column gas chromatographic method for the measurement of halocarbons in water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Happell, J.D.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wills, K.D.; Wilke, R.J.; Neill, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes an automated, accurate, precise and sensitive capillary column purge- and -trap method capable of quantifying CFC-12, CFC-11, CFC-113, CH{sub 3}CCL{sub 3}, and CCL{sub 4} during a single chromatographic analysis in either water or gas phase samples.

  15. Selectivity and sensitivity of some thin-layer chromatographic detection systems.

    PubMed

    Fodor-Csorba, K; Dutka, F

    1986-09-19

    The selectivity and sensitivity of some thin-layer chromatographic detection systems widely used internationally and developed in our laboratory were studied. Halogenated organophosphorus pesticides were found to interfere with the detection of organochlorine pesticides when using silver nitrate-2-phenoxyethanol. The stability of colours formed by the 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)pyridine-tetraethylenepentamine system was enhanced by spraying with acetic acid and allowed densitometric evaluation. The most sensitive detection method for thiocarbamates is the reaction with 2,6-dichlorobenzoquinone-N-chloroimine or its dibromo analogue (50 ng). Application of this method for sulphur-containing organophosphorus insecticides results in the same or better sensitivity. Quantitation of these compounds was carried out by densitometry.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase in gas chromatographic separation and determination of argon, carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norooz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi

    2010-08-24

    A chromatographic technique is introduced based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as stationary phase for separation of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) at parts per million (ppm) levels. The efficiency of SWCNTs was compared with solid materials such as molecular sieve, charcoal, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. The morphology of SWCNTs was optimized for maximum adsorption of H(2), CO(2) and Ar and minimum adsorption of gases such as N(2), O(2), CO and H(2)O vapour. To control temperature of the gas chromatography column, peltier cooler was used. Mixtures of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) were separated according to column temperature program. Relative standard deviation for nine replicate analyses of 0.2 mL H(2) containing 10 microL of each Ar or CO(2) was 2.5% for Ar, 2.8% for CO(2) and 3.6% for H(2). The interfering effects of CO, and O(2) were investigated. Working ranges were evaluated as 40-600 ppm for Ar, 30-850 ppm for CO(2) and 10-1200 ppm for H(2). Significant sensitivity, small relative standard deviation (RSD) and acceptable limit of detection (LOD) were obtained for each analyte, showing capability of SWCNTs for gas separation and determination processes. Finally, the method was used to evaluate the contents of CO(2) in air sample.

  17. A gas chromatographic method for the indirect determination of hydroxylamine in pharmaceutical preparations: conversion into nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Guzowski, J P; Golanoski, C; Montgomery, E R

    2003-12-01

    A simple, sensitive, and selective headspace gas-chromatographic method has been developed for measuring hydroxylamine (HA) in a variety of sample matrices including pharmaceutical formulations. This procedure relies on converting HA into nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a single-step reaction that is carried out directly in a heated headspace vial. The gaseous products are then analyzed by headspace capillary gas chromatography. Several detection strategies were evaluated and electron capture provided the best sensitivity (4 parts-per-billion (ppb)) while the mass selective and thermal conductivity values were higher (14 ppb and 1.4 parts-per-million (ppm), respectively). The method's linear dynamic range spans two to four decades with a run-to-run precision that was better than 5% R.S.D. (n=7). The reagent concentrations (oxidant, buffer) strongly impact the N2O signal and the greatest response was obtained for solutions that contained equimolar amounts of reactants. HA was efficiently (98%) recovered from a sample matrix that contained only the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) but the recovery was lower (83%) when excipients were present.

  18. Development of High Precision Metal Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems Column for Portable Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaya, Takamitsu; Akao, Shingo; Sakamoto, Toshihiro; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Nakaso, Noritaka; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2012-07-01

    In the field of environmental measurement and security, a portable gas chromatograph (GC) is required for the on-site analysis of multiple hazardous gases. Although the gas separation column has been downsized using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology, an MEMS column made of silicon and glass still does not have sufficient robustness and a sufficiently low fabrication cost for a portable GC. In this study, we fabricated a robust and inexpensive high-precision metal MEMS column by combining diffusion-bonded etched stainless-steel plates with alignment evaluation using acoustic microscopy. The separation performance was evaluated using a desktop GC with a flame ionization detector and we achieved the high separation performance comparable to the best silicon MEMS column fabricated using a dynamic coating method. As an application, we fabricated a palm-size surface acoustic wave (SAW) GC combining this column with a ball SAW sensor and succeeded in separating and detecting a mixture of volatile organic compounds.

  19. Detection of gas leakage

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven; Brown, Jason

    2012-06-19

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  20. Detection of gas leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven M; Brown, Jason

    2015-02-17

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as a device, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), provides a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement. The PPM is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr) using a venturi pump, perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  1. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of higher alcohol synthesis products from syngas.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robert; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven

    2012-07-20

    An on-line gas chromatographic (GC) system has been developed for rapid and accurate product analysis in catalytic conversion of syngas (a mixture of H₂ and CO) to alcohols, so called "higher alcohol synthesis (HAS)". Conversion of syngas to higher alcohols is an interesting second step in the route of converting coal, natural gas and possibly biomass to liquid alcohol fuel and chemicals. The presented GC system and method are developed for analysis of the products formed from syngas using alkali promoted MoS₂ catalysts, however it is not limited to these types of catalysts. During higher alcohol synthesis not only the wanted short alcohols (∼C₂-C₅) are produced, but also a great number of other products in smaller or greater amounts, they are mainly short hydrocarbons (olefins, paraffins, branched, non-branched), aldehydes, esters and ketones as well as CO₂, H₂O. Trace amounts of sulfur-containing compounds can also be found in the product effluent when sulfur-containing catalysts are used and/or sulfur-containing syngas is feed. In the presented GC system, most of them can be separated and analyzed within 60 min without the use of cryogenic cooling. Previously, product analysis in "higher alcohol synthesis" has in most cases been carried out partly on-line and partly off-line, where the light gases (gases at room temp) are analyzed on-line and liquid products (liquid at room temp) are collected in a trap for later analysis off-line. This method suffers from many drawbacks compared to a complete on-line GC system. In this paper an on-line system using an Agilent 7890 gas chromatograph equipped with two flame ionization detectors (FID) and a thermal conductivity detector (TCD), together with an Agilent 6890 with sulfur chemiluminescence dual plasma detector (SCD) is presented. A two-dimensional GC system with Deans switch (heart-cut) and two capillary columns (HP-FFAP and HP-Al₂O₃) was used for analysis of the organic products on the FIDs. Light

  2. Use of an acoustic wave device to detect target analytes during chromatographic separations

    SciTech Connect

    Tom-Moy, M.; Doherty, T.P.; Baer, R.L.

    1995-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories has developed a proprietary acoustic wave device which permits the detection of specific analyte in a flowing system. By coupling specific chemistry to the surface of the device, the mass loading of the target analyte is detected as a shift in phase is measured in real time. In process monitoring, the analyte of interest is isolated by passing the sample through a series of chromatographic columns. Conventional HPLC systems monitor the protein peaks using UV-VIS. The peaks are collected and biochemical assays are performed to determine the specific peak of interest. We have configured our acoustic sensors to make specific chemical measurements without the use of labeled reagents or enzymes to generate a real time signal of specific analyte as it elutes from the column. The output signal can be integrated over time to yield a concentration. Such a detector has the potential to increase productivity in process chromatography in biopharmaceutical applications.

  3. Gas-chromatographic analysis of Mars soil samples at Rocknest site with the SAM instrument onboard Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Coscia, David; Buch, Aranaud; Teinturier, Samuel; Navarro-gonzalez, Rafael; Gaboriaud, Alain; Mahaffy, Paul; MSL science Team

    2013-04-01

    Amongst the SAM suite of instruments [1], SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal/chemical treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. The first soil samples analyzed with SAM were composed of sand collected at the Rocknest site. For their analysis, these samples were submitted to a pyrolysis at temperatures reaching about 900°C. For SAM-GC and GCMS analyses, different fractions of pyrolysates were collected at different temperature in the ambient-900°C range in order to discriminate potential different volatile fractions present in the solid sample. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was used as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. This channel is also equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) capable to detect the most abundant species (with abundances down to approximately 10-10 mol). It is thus complementary to the mass spectrometer detection for quantification of such species as this last instrument has not a linear response in this domain of high abundance, whereas it is significantly more sensitive than the TCD. The results obtained with this instrument for the analysis of Rocknest soil first show that the performances of SAM-GC are representative of those obtained during calibrations of the instrument in laboratory, as well as they are repeatable. Hence, the instrument performs nominally, making it the first GCMS running successfully on Mars since the Viking missions. Moreover, the complementarity of GC towards MS is also shown, either by allowing the quantification of the major species detected (as water), or by providing a chromatographic signal well resolved temporally which can be used to improve the QMS signal treatment. In the frame of research of organics, the SAM

  4. Autonomous gas chromatograph system for Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES) proof of concept demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, F.J.; Laguna, G.R.

    1996-09-01

    An autonomous gas chromatograph system was designed and built to support the Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES) demonstration. TEVES is a remediation demonstration that seeks to enhance an existing technology (vacuum extraction) by adding a new technology (soil heating). A pilot scale unit was set up at one of the organic waste disposal pits at the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) in Tech Area 3. The responsibility for engineering a major part of the process instrumentation for TEVES belonged to the Manufacturing Control Subsystems Department. The primary mission of the one-of-a-kind hardware/software system is to perform on-site gas sampling and analysis to quantify a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various sources during TEVES operations. The secondary mission is to monitor a variety of TEVES process physical parameters such as extraction manifold temperature, pressure, humidity, and flow rate, and various subsurface pressures. The system began operation in September 1994 and was still in use on follow-on projects when this report was published.

  5. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in human placenta and cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.; Saito, H.; Wakisaka, I.

    1986-10-01

    Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in placenta, maternal blood, cord blood, and milk were carried out. Trichlorobiphenyl, tetrachlorobiphenyl, pentachlorobiphenyls, and hexachlorobiphenyls were identified by the mass chromatogram and the mass spectra. Some minor peaks of PCBs were identified by gas chromatography. The relationship between the PCB concentration in placenta and that in milk is different in each PCB congener. The higher the chlorine content of the PCB congener, the more significant the correlation. No significant but a low negative correlation exists between the concentration of some PCB congeners in the placenta and that in cord blood. On the other hand, a significant linear correlation exists between the concentration of hexachlorobenzene in the placenta and that in cord blood. The transplacental transport of each PCB congener varied depending upon its chemical nature. Trichlorobiphenyl and tetrachlorobiphenyl were more transferable than hexachlorobiphenyls. The results show that the placenta and cord blood are useful human samples to analyze the body burden of environmental pollutants and to estimate their transfer from mother to fetus.

  6. Determination of thymol in human plasma by automated headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kohlert, Claudia; Abel, Gudrun; Schmid, Eleonora; Veit, Markus

    2002-02-01

    A reliable and sensitive method was developed for determination of thymol in human plasma by automated headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME). After enzymatic cleavage of thymol sulfate thymol was extracted by a 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene crimped fiber (Supelco) after addition of sodium chloride and phosphoric acid (85%). Desorption of the fiber was performed in the injection port of a gas chromatograph at 220 degrees C (HP 5890; 50 m x 0.2 mm I.D., 0.2 microm HP Innowax capillary column; flame ionization detection). Fibers were used repeatedly up to 40 analysis. The recovery was 5% after 35 min of extraction. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 8.1-203.5 ng ml(-1) with a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 8.1 ng ml(-1). The within-day and between-day precision and accuracy were < or = 20% at the LOQ and <15% at higher concentrations according to international guidelines for validation of bioanalytical methods. After administration of a thymol-containing herbal extract only thymol sulfate, no free thymol, could be detected in human plasma, thus analysis of thymol was after enzymatic cleavage of thymol sulfate. It is concluded that the newly developed automated method can be used in clinical trials on bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of thymol-containing herbal medicinal products. PMID:11863281

  7. Fuzzy C-means clustering for chromatographic fingerprints analysis: A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry case study.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Bazrafshan, Alisina

    2016-03-18

    Fuzzy C-means clustering (FCM) is proposed as a promising method for the clustering of chromatographic fingerprints of complex samples, such as essential oils. As an example, secondary metabolites of 14 citrus leaves samples are extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The obtained chromatographic fingerprints are divided to desired number of chromatographic regions. Owing to the fact that chromatographic problems, such as elution time shift and peak overlap can significantly affect the clustering results, therefore, each chromatographic region is analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to address these problems. Then, the resolved elution profiles are used to make a new data matrix based on peak areas of pure components to cluster by FCM. The FCM clustering parameters (i.e., fuzziness coefficient and number of cluster) are optimized by two different methods of partial least squares (PLS) as a conventional method and minimization of FCM objective function as our new idea. The results showed that minimization of FCM objective function is an easier and better way to optimize FCM clustering parameters. Then, the optimized FCM clustering algorithm is used to cluster samples and variables to figure out the similarities and dissimilarities among samples and to find discriminant secondary metabolites in each cluster (chemotype). Finally, the FCM clustering results are compared with those of principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Kohonon maps. The results confirmed the outperformance of FCM over the frequently used clustering algorithms.

  8. Leveraging probabilistic peak detection to estimate baseline drift in complex chromatographic samples.

    PubMed

    Lopatka, Martin; Barcaru, Andrei; Sjerps, Marjan J; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel

    2016-01-29

    Accurate analysis of chromatographic data often requires the removal of baseline drift. A frequently employed strategy strives to determine asymmetric weights in order to fit a baseline model by regression. Unfortunately, chromatograms characterized by a very high peak saturation pose a significant challenge to such algorithms. In addition, a low signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. s/n<40) also adversely affects accurate baseline correction by asymmetrically weighted regression. We present a baseline estimation method that leverages a probabilistic peak detection algorithm. A posterior probability of being affected by a peak is computed for each point in the chromatogram, leading to a set of weights that allow non-iterative calculation of a baseline estimate. For extremely saturated chromatograms, the peak weighted (PW) method demonstrates notable improvement compared to the other methods examined. However, in chromatograms characterized by low-noise and well-resolved peaks, the asymmetric least squares (ALS) and the more sophisticated Mixture Model (MM) approaches achieve superior results in significantly less time. We evaluate the performance of these three baseline correction methods over a range of chromatographic conditions to demonstrate the cases in which each method is most appropriate. PMID:26774434

  9. Gas-Chromatographic analysis of Mars soil samples with the SAM instrument onboard Curiosity - the 180 first sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Coscia, D.; Buch, A.; Teinturier, S.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Goutail, J.-P.; Montaron, C.; Rigal, J.-B.; Poinsignon, P.; Guerrini, V.; Clerc, M.-S.; Meftah, M.; Soldani, L.; Mettetal, F.; Jerôme, M.; Philippon, C.; Galic, A.; Sablairolles, J.; Triqueneaux, S.; Chazot, D.; Toffolo, B.; Rakoto, F. Y.; Gaboriaud, A.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-09-01

    Amongst the SAM suite of instruments [1], SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal/chemical treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. The first soil samples analyzed with SAM were composed of sand collected at the Rocknest site, when the second site analyzed was a basin called "Yellowkive Bay". For their analysis, these samples were submitted to a pyrolysis at temperatures reaching about 900°C. For SAM-GC and GCMS analyses, different fractions of pyrolysates were collected at different temperature in the ambient-900°C range in order to discriminate potential different volatile fractions present in the solid sample. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was used as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. This channel is also equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) capable to detect the most abundant species (with abundances down to approximately 10-10 mol). It is thus complementary to the mass spectrometer detection for quantification of such species as this last instrument has not a linear response in this domain of high abundance, whereas it is significantly more sensitive than the TCD. The results obtained with this instrument first show that the performances of SAM-GC are representative of those obtained during calibrations of the instrument in laboratory, as well as they are repeatable. Hence, the instrument performs nominally, making it the first GCMS running successfully on Mars since the Viking missions. Moreover, the complementarity of GC towards MS is also shown, either by allowing the quantification ofthe major species detected (as water), or by providing a chromatographic signal well resolved temporally which can be used to improve the QMS signal treatment. In the frame of

  10. Potential for Measurement of Trace Volatile Organic Compounds in Closed Environments Using Gas Chromatograph/Differential Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Cheng, Patti

    2007-01-01

    For nearly 3.5 years, the Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) has routinely analyzed the International Space Station (ISS) atmosphere for a target list of approximately 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Additionally, an early prototype of the VOA collected data aboard submarines in two separate trials. Comparison of the data collected on ISS and submarines showed a surprising similarity in the atmospheres of the two environments. Furthermore, in both cases it was demonstrated that the VOA data can detect hardware issues unrelated to crew health. Finally, it was also clear in both operations that the VOA s size and resource consumption were major disadvantages that would restrict its use in the future. The VOA showed the value of measuring VOCs in closed environments, but it had to be shrunk if it was to be considered for future operations in these environments that are characterized by cramped spaces and limited resources. The Sionex Microanalyzer is a fraction of the VOA s size and this instrument seems capable of maintaining or improving upon the analytical performance of the VOA. The two design improvements that led to a smaller, less complex instrument are the Microanalyzer s use of recirculated air as the gas chromatograph s carrier gas and a micromachined detector. Although the VOA s ion mobility spectrometer and the Microanalyzer s differential mobility spectrometer (DMS) are related detector technologies, the DMS was more amenable to micromachining. This paper will present data from the initial assessment of the Microanalyzer. The instrument was challenged with mixtures that simulated the VOCs typically detected in closed-environment atmospheres.

  11. Validation of a QuEChERS-based gas chromatographic method for analysis of pesticide residues in Cassia angustifolia (senna).

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Vandana; Saha, Ajoy; Patel, Dilipkumar J; Basak, B B; Shah, Paresh G; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-08-01

    A simple multi-residue method based on modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach was established for the determination of 17 organochlorine (OC), 15 organophosphorous (OP) and 7 synthetic pyrethroid (SP) pesticides in an economically important medicinal plant of India, Senna (Cassia angustifolia), by gas chromatography coupled to electron capture and flame thermionic detectors (GC/ECD/FTD) and confirmation of residues was done on gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The developed method was validated by testing the following parameters: linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), matrix effect, accuracy-precision and measurement uncertainty; the validation study clearly demonstrated the suitability of the method for its intended application. All pesticides showed good linearity in the range 0.01-1.0 μg mL(-1) for OCs and OPs and 0.05-2.5 μg mL(-1) for SPs with correlation coefficients higher than 0.98. The method gave good recoveries for most of the pesticides (70-120%) with intra-day and inter-day precision < 20% in most of the cases. The limits of detection varied from 0.003 to 0.03 mg kg(-1), and the LOQs were determined as 0.01-0.049 mg kg(-1). The expanded uncertainties were <30%, which was distinctively less than a maximum default value of ±50%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine pesticide residues in 12 commercial market samples obtained from different locations in India. PMID:27153296

  12. Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: III. Development of the gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Kjell; Jalava, Kaisa; Lock, Eric; Finnon, Yvonne; Huizer, Henk; Kaa, Elisabet; Lopes, Alvaro; Poortman-van der Meer, Anneke; Cole, Michael D; Dahlén, Johan; Sippola, Erkki

    2007-06-14

    This study focused on gas chromatographic analysis of target compounds found in illicit amphetamine synthesised by the Leuckart reaction, reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone, and the nitrostyrene route. The analytical method was investigated and optimised with respect to introduction of amphetamine samples into the gas chromatograph and separation and detection of the target substances. Sample introduction using split and splitless injection was tested at different injector temperatures, and their ability to transfer the target compounds to the GC column was evaluated using cold on column injection as a reference. Taking the results from both techniques into consideration a temperature of 250 degrees C was considered to be the best compromise. The most efficient separation was achieved with a DB-35MS capillary column (35% diphenyl 65% dimethyl silicone; 30 m x 0.25 mm, d(f) 0.25 microm) and an oven temperature program that started at 90 degrees C (1 min) and was increased by 8 degrees C/min to 300 degrees C (10 min). Reproducibility, repeatability, linearity, and limits of determination for the flame ionisation detector (FID), nitrogen phosphorous detector (NPD), and mass spectrometry (MS) in scan mode and selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode were evaluated. In addition, selectivity was studied applying FID and MS in both scan and SIM mode. It was found that reproducibility, repeatability, and limits of determination were similar for FID, NPD, and MS in scan mode. Moreover, the linearity was better when applying FID or NPD whereas the selectivity was better when utilising the MS. Finally, the introduction of target compounds to the GC column when applying injection volumes of 0.2 microl, 1 microl, 2 microl, and 4 microl with splitless injection respectively 1 microl with split injection (split ratio, 1:40) were compared. It was demonstrated that splitless injections of 1 microl, 2 microl, and 4 microl could be employed in the developed method, while split

  13. Rayleigh light scattering detection of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists coupled with high performance liquid chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Huanjun; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, Ming Qiong; Zhang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Herein, a Rayleigh light-scattering (RLS) detection method combined with high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) without any post-column probe was developed for the separation and determination of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists. The quantitative analysis is benefiting from RLS signal enhancement upon addition of methanol which induced molecular aggregation to form an hydrophobic interface between aggregates and water that produce a sort of superficial enhanced scattering effect. A good chromatographic separation among the compounds was achieved using a Gemini 5u C18 reversed phase column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 4 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol and ammonium acetate-formic acid buffer solution (25 mM; pH = 3.0) at the flow rate of 0.7 mL min-1. The RLS signal was monitored at λex = λem = 354 nm. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.065-0.70 μg L-1 was reached and a linear range was found between peak height and concentration in the range of 0.75-15 μg L-1 for doxazosin mesylate (DOX), 0.075-3.0 μg L-1 for prazosin hydrochloride (PRH), and 0.25-5 μg L-1 for terazosin hydrochloride (TEH), with linear regression coefficients all above 0.999. Recoveries from spiked urine samples were 88.4-99.0% which is within acceptable limits. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive which has been used successfully in human urine samples.

  14. Application of a Modified Gas Chromatograph to Analyze Space Experiment Combustion Gases on Space Shuttle Mission STS-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coho, William K.; Weiland, Karen J.; VanZandt, David M.

    1998-01-01

    A space experiment designed to study the behavior of combustion without the gravitational effects of buoyancy was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on July 1, 1997. The space experiment, designated as Combustion Module-1 (CM-1), was one of several manifested on the Microgravity Sciences Laboratory - 1 (MSL-1) mission. The launch, designated STS-94, had the Spacelab Module as the payload, in which the MSL-1 experiments were conducted by the Shuttle crewmembers. CM-1 was designed to accommodate two different combustion experiments during MSL-1. One experiment, the Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number experiment (SOFBALL), required gas chromatography analysis to verify the composition of the known, premixed gases prior to combustion, and to determine the remaining reactant and the products resulting from the combustion process in microgravity. A commercial, off-the-shelf, dual-channel micro gas chromatograph was procured and modified to interface with the CM-1 Fluids Supply Package and the CM-1 Combustion Chamber, to accommodate two different carrier gases, each flowing through its own independent column module, to withstand the launch environment of the Space Shuttle, to accept Spacelab electrical power, and to meet the Spacelab flight requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) and offgassing. The GC data was down linked to the Marshall Space Flight Center for near-real time analysis, and stored on-orbit for post-flight analysis. The gas chromatograph operated successfully during the entire SOFBALL experiment and collected 309 runs. Because of the constraints imposed upon the gas chromatograph by the CM-1 hardware, system and operations, it was unable to measure the gases to the required accuracy. Future improvements to the system for a re-flight of the SOFBALL experiment are expected to enable the gas chromatograph to meet all the requirements.

  15. Cross-column prediction of gas-chromatographic retention indices of saturated esters.

    PubMed

    D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Ruggieri, Fabrizio

    2014-08-15

    We combine computational molecular descriptors and variables related with the gas-chromatographic stationary phase into a comprehensive model able to predict the retention of solutes in external columns. To explore the quality of various approaches based on alternative column descriptors, we analyse the Kováts retention indices (RIs) of 90 saturated esters collected with seven columns of different polarity (SE-30, OV-7, DC-710, OV-25, XE-60, OV-225 and Silar-5CP). Cross-column retention prediction is evaluated on an internal validation set consisting of data of 40 selected esters collected with each of the seven columns, sequentially excluded from calibration. The molecular descriptors are identified by a genetic algorithm variable selection method applied to a large set of non-empirical structural quantities aimed at finding the best multi-linear quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) for the column OV-25 having intermediate polarity. To describe the columns, we consider the sum of the first five McReynolds phase constants and, alternatively, the coefficients of the corresponding QSRRs. Moreover, the mean RI value for the subset of esters used in QSRR calibration or RIs of a few selected compounds are used as column descriptors. For each combination of solute and column descriptors, the retention model is generated both by multi-linear regression and artificial neural network regression.

  16. Computer monitoring, capture and analysis of gas/liquid chromatograph traces.

    PubMed

    Bulleid, N; Schofield, J

    1986-12-01

    The work described here is effectively the computerization of a gas/liquid chromatograph of the pen recorder type using a BBC microcomputer. The output from the g.l.c. can be captured by the computer in accordance with a series of parameters. The sampling rate can be altered, as can an averaging facility to reduce noise, and a threshold level to eliminate the storage of irrelevant and space-consuming data. The unprocessed readings are initially stored on the computer's floppy disk, then later retrieved and cut into smaller sections to allow maximum resolution for on-screen analysis. In the main analysis stage of the system all processing is shown graphically on the computer monitor at all stages. The principal steps in analysis involve the mathematical modelling and elimination of the solvent peak, the fixing of the retention time for each subsequent peak and its disentangling from any following peaks, and finally the calculation of the area under each individual peak. Several alternative methods are made available for disentangling peaks, which can be tried successively on a single peak then each printed out with comments for comparison later. All readings and results in table form and screen dumps of all trace images are available via a dot matrix printer.

  17. Determination of vapor pressures for nonpolar and semipolar organic compounds from gas chromatographic retention data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Foreman, W.T.; Tuschall, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Vapor pressures for nonpolar and moderately polar organochlorine, pyrethroid, and organophosphate insecticides, phthalate esters, and organophosphate flame retardants were determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC). Organochlorines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with known liquid-phase vapor pressures (P??L) (standard compounds) were chromatographed along with two reference compounds n-C20 (elcosane) and p,p???-DDT on a 1.0-m-long poly(dimethylsiloxane) bonded-phase (BP-1) column to determine their vapor pressures by GC (P??GC). A plot of log P??L vs log P??GC for standard compounds was made to establish a correlation between measured and literature values, and this correlation was then used to compute P??L of test compounds from their measured P??GC. P??L of seven major components of technical chlordane, endosulfan and its metabolites, ??-hexachlorocyclohexane, mirex, and two components of technical toxaphene were determined by GC. This method provides vapor pressures within a factor of 2 of average literature values for nonpolar compounds, similar to reported interlaboratory precisions of vapor pressure determinations. GC tends to overestimate vapor pressures of moderately polar compounds. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  18. Gas-chromatographic determination of 1,3-butadiene trimers in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drugov, Yu.S.; Murav`eva, G.V.; Shlyakhov, A.F.

    1992-02-10

    In the catalytic polymerization of 1,3-butadiene during the manufacture of SKD-1 rubber (with titanium and aluminum compounds as catalysts) the toxic oligomers (1,3-butadiene trimers) t,t,t-1, 5,9-cyclododecatriene (I), t,t,c-1, 5,9-cyclododecatriene (II), n-2,4,6,10-dodecatetraene (III), n-1,3,6,10-dodecatertraine (IV), and others end up in the atmosphere and the manufacture of cyclododecane. In the content of the oligomers in the air used for drying the rubber was determined by passing it through active carbon and desorbing the trapped substances with water vapor. However, aspects of the concentration of the microimpurities during their determination in the atmosphere were not considered. The aim of the present work was to develop a gas-chromatographic procedure for the determination of small amounts of compounds in the atmosphere. The tentative safe level amounts to 0.008 mg/m{sup 3} for (I) and 0.01 mg/m{sup 3} for (II, III). In air these oligomers are present in the form of vapor and aerosols. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Gas chromatographic mass analysis and further pharmacological actions of Cymbopogon proximus essential oil.

    PubMed

    Al-Taweel, A M; Fawzy, G A; Perveen, S; El Tahir, K E H

    2013-09-01

    The present study reports Gas chromatographic mass analysis (GC-MS) as well as important biological activities of Cymbopogon proximus essential oil. The chemical composition of the essential oil of Cymbopogon proximus was investigated by GC-MS. Furthermore, the effects of Cymbopogon proximus essential oil on the cardiac parasympathetic ganglia in rats, the intra-tracheal pressure in guinea-pigs and on carrageenan-induced inflammation in the rats paw, were studied. The GC-MS study led to the identification of 22 components with Piperitone representing (73.81%), Elemol (9.32%), alpha-Eudesmol (5.21%) and alpha-Terpineol (3.01%) of the oils composition. The percentage protective effect of the oil on the vagus-induced bradycardia in rats was 90.1±3.1%, which represents a significant protection. As for the effect of Cymbopogon oil on bronchoconstrictors-induced increase in intra-tracheal pressure in guinea-pigs, the oil antagonized the actions of 5-HT and histamine by 80±3.7 and 93±8.3%, respectively. Pharmacological investigations using Cymbopogon oil revealed its inherent ability to possess a bronchodilator activity mediated via blockade of both histamine and serotonin receptors. It possessed a significant ganglionic blocking action and a limited anti-inflammatory activity that seemed to involve blockade of histamine and serotonin receptors in the rats' paws.

  20. Graphitic carbon nitride as high-resolution stationary phase for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunzhong; Qi, Meiling; Fu, Ruonong

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the first example of utilization of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as stationary phase for capillary gas chromatographic (GC) separations. The statically coated g-C3N4 column showed the column efficiencies of 3760 plates/m and weak polarity. Its resolving capability and retention behaviours were investigated by using the Grob test mixture, and mixtures of diverse types of analytes, and structural and positional isomers. The results showed superior separation performance of the g-C3N4 stationary phase for some critical analytes and preferential retention for aromatic analytes. Specifically, it exhibited high-resolution capability for aromatic and aliphatic isomers such as methylnaphthalenes and dimethylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene and anthracene and alkane isomers. In addition, g-C3N4 column showed excellent thermal stability up to 280°C and good repeatability with relative standard deviation (RSD) values less than 0.09% for intra-day, below 0.23% for inter-day and in the range of 1.9-8.4% for between-column, respectively. The advantageous separation performance shows the potential of g-C3N4 and related materials as stationary phase in GC and other separation technologies.

  1. Gas chromatographic simulated distillation-mass spectrometry for the determination of the boiling point distributions of crude oils

    PubMed

    Roussis; Fitzgerald

    2000-04-01

    The coupling of gas chromatographic simulated distillation with mass spectrometry for the determination of the distillation profiles of crude oils is reported. The method provides the boiling point distributions of both weight and volume percent amounts. The weight percent distribution is obtained from the measured total ion current signal. The total ion current signal is converted to weight percent amount by calibration with a reference crude oil of a known distillation profile. Knowledge of the chemical composition of the crude oil across the boiling range permits the determination of the volume percent distribution. The long-term repeatability is equivalent to or better than the short-term repeatability of the currently available American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) gas chromatographic method for simulated distillation. Results obtained by the mass spectrometric method are in very good agreement with results obtained by conventional methods of physical distillation. The compositional information supplied by the method can be used to extensively characterize crude oils.

  2. Fission gas detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  3. [High performance liquid chromatographic determination of reducing sugars in fruit juices with laser resonance Raman detection].

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Koizumi, H; Suzuki, Y

    1997-07-01

    A liquid chromatographic method using semi-microcolumn separation combined with laser resonance Raman detection was developed for the determination of monosaccharides in fruit juices. Reducing sugars (galactose, glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose and ribose) were derivatized with 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene-4'-sulfonyl (DABSYL) hydrazine. The derivatives of the monosaccharides exhibited strong resonance Raman scattering at 1136 cm(-1) when Ar+ laser emission line 488.0 nm was used. A semi-microcolumn Inertsil ODS-2 (250 mm x 1.5 mm i.d.) was used to the separation of the monosaccharide derivatives. The saccharides eluted within 25 min. However the excess DABSYL hydrazine was retained strongly with a retention time of about 60 min. In order to reduce the longer analysis time, the excess DABSYL hydrazine was removed by adding glyoxylic acid and then Na2CO3 aqueous solution when the derivation reaction was finished. As a result, the analysis time was reduced to about a half of its initial run time. The sensitivity of resonance Raman detection greater two orders of magnitude than refractive index (RI) detection. The detection limit of glucose is 10 ng (5.5 pmol). The high selectivity of Raman detection came from the facts that only the interested compounds in a given sample was derived with the Raman labeling reagent and that only the characteristic Raman bands of the derivatives were selectively detected. In this work, in spite of the coexisting large quantities of organic acids in fruit juice, the determined values of glucose agreed well with those obtained by RI detection without any derivatization procedure.

  4. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, F; Daldrup, T

    1997-08-01

    A sensitive method for the detection and quantification of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in serum samples is described. After liquid-liquid extraction the trimethylsilyl derivative of LSD is detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Experiments with spiked samples resulted in a recovery of 76%, the coefficient of variation was 9.3%. Excellent linearity was obtained over the range 0.1-10 ng ml-1. Additionally experiments demonstrating the light sensitivity of LSD are presented together with casuistics.

  5. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  6. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  7. Development of gas chromatographic methods for the analyses of organic carbonate-based electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terborg, Lydia; Weber, Sascha; Passerini, Stefano; Winter, Martin; Karst, Uwe; Nowak, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In this work, novel methods based on gas chromatography (GC) for the investigation of common organic carbonate-based electrolyte systems are presented, which are used in lithium ion batteries. The methods were developed for flame ionization detection (FID), mass spectrometric detection (MS). Further, headspace (HS) sampling for the investigation of solid samples like electrodes is reported. Limits of detection are reported for FID. Finally, the developed methods were applied to the electrolyte system of commercially available lithium ion batteries as well as on in-house assembled cells.

  8. Paper-based chromatographic chemiluminescence chip for the detection of dichlorvos in vegetables.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kou, Juan; Xing, Huizhong; Li, Baoxin

    2014-02-15

    Paper chromatography was a big breakthrough in the early of 20th century but it is rarely used due to the long separation time and the diffusion on the sample spots. In this work, for the first time, a paper-based chemiluminescence (CL) analytical device combined with paper chromatography was developed for the determination of dichlorvos (DDV) in vegetables without complicated sample pretreatment. The paper chromatography separation procedure can be accomplished in 12 min on a paper support (0.8 × 7.0 cm(2)) by using 5 µL sample spotted on it. After sample developing, the detection area (0.8 × 1.0 cm(2)) was cut and inserted between two layers of water-impermeable single-sided adhesive tapes. The paper-based chip was made by attaching the middle layer of paper onto the bottom layer. Then it was covered by another tape layer, which was patterned by the cutting method to form a square hole (0.8 × 1.0 cm(2)) in it. 10 μL mixed solution of luminol and H2O2 was dropped on the detection area to produce CL. A linear relationship was obtained between the CL intensity and the concentrations of DDV in the range between 10.0 ng mL(-1) and 1.0 μg mL(-1)and the detection limit was 3.6 ng mL(-1). Water-soluble metal ions and vitamins can be developed at different spatial locations relative to DDV, eliminating interference with DDV during detection. The paper-based chromatographic chip can be successfully used for the determination of DDV without complicated sample preparation in vegetables. This study should, therefore, be suitable for rapid and sensitive detection of trace levels of organophosphate pesticides in environmental and food samples.

  9. [Gas chromatographic determination of the solubility coefficient for volatile anaesthetics (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lauven, P M; Hack, G; Stoeckel, H

    1979-03-01

    For the determination of the solubility coefficient of volatile anaesthetics in Schindler's liquid culture, modified by Karzel, a gas-chromatographic analysis with direct-injection-method was used. A well defined volume with a known concentration of the anaesthetic was added to a vessel with known volume. After equilibration the concentration of the inhalational anaesthetics was determined in the liquid at various temperatures. The solubility coefficient and the temperature coefficient were then calculated from these data. We obtained the following solubility coefficients at -4 degrees C (37 degrees): for halothane 1,07 (0,77), for enflurane 1,14 (0,70), for methoxyflurane 4,92 (3,23) and for isoflurane 1,13 (0,82). In Schindler's liquid culture modified by Karzel the values at 24 degrees (37 degrees) were: for halothane 1,33 (0,92), for enflurane 1,32 (0,87), for methoxyflurane 6,61 (4,48) and for isoflurane 1,19 (0,98). The temperature coefficient for this temperature range were in water (in Schindler's liquid culture) for halothane: -2,31 . 10(-2) K(-1) (-3,15 . 10(-2) K(-1)), for methoxyflurane: -13,0 . 10(-2) K(-1) (-16,48 . 10(-2) K(-1)), for enflurane: -3,38 . 10(-2) K(-1) (-3,46 . 10(-2) K(-1)) and for isoflurane: -2,38 . 10(-2) K(-1) (-1,62 . 10(-2) K(-1)).

  10. Gas chromatographic isolation of individual compounds from complex matrices for radiocarbon dating.

    PubMed

    Eglinton, T I; Aluwihare, L I; Bauer, J E; Druffel, E R; McNichol, A P

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel, practical approach for isolation of individual compounds from complex organic matrices for natural abundance radiocarbon measurement. This is achieved through the use of automated preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) to separate and recover sufficient quantities of individual target compounds for (14)C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We developed and tested this approach using a suite of samples (plant lipids, petroleums) whose ages spanned the (14)C time scale and which contained a variety of compound types (fatty acids, sterols, hydrocarbons). Comparison of individual compound and bulk radiocarbon signatures for the isotopically homogeneous samples studied revealed that Δ(14)C values generally agreed well (±10%). Background contamination was assessed at each stage of the isolation procedure, and incomplete solvent removal prior to combustion was the only significant source of additional carbon. Isotope fractionation was addressed through compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analyses. Fractionation of isotopes during isolation of individual compounds was minimal (<5‰ for δ(13)C), provided the entire peak was collected during PCGC. Trapping of partially coeluting peaks did cause errors, and these results highlight the importance of conducting stable carbon isotopic measurements of each trapped compound in concert with AMS for reliable radiocarbon measurements. The addition of carbon accompanying derivatization of functionalized compounds (e.g., fatty acids and sterols) prior to chromatographic separation represents a further source of potential error. This contribution can be removed using a simple isotopic mass balance approach. Based on these preliminary results, the PCGC-based approach holds promise for accurately determining (14)C ages on compounds specific to a given source within complex, heterogeneous samples.

  11. Measurement of Ethanol in Gaseous Breath Using a Miniature Gas Chromatograph

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Timothy E.; Booth, Matthew M.; Prather, Robert A.; Nixon, Sara J.; Boissoneault, Jeff; Melker, Richard J.; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Wohltjen, Hank; Dennis, Donn M.

    2011-01-01

    We designed and built a novel, miniature gas chromatograph (mGC) to use exhaled breath to estimate blood ethanol concentrations that may offer GC quality sensitivity and specificity, but with portability, reduced size, and decreased cost. We hypothesized that the mGC would accurately estimate the serum ethanol concentration using exhaled breath. Human subjects (n = 8) were dosed with ethanol employing the Widmark criteria, targeting a blood concentration of 0.08 g/dL. Serum and breath samples were collected concurrently over an hour. Ethanol concentrations in serum were measured using a CLIA-approved laboratory. Ethanol concentrations in conventional breath were assayed using a calibrated mGC or Intoxilyzer 400PA. Data were analyzed using Bland-Altman analysis using serum concentrations as a “gold standard”. For the mGC, the regression line (correlation coefficient), bias, and 95% limits of agreement were y = 1.013x − 0.009 (r = 0.91), −0.008 g/dL, and −0.031 to 0.016 g/dL, respectively, for 30 specimens. For the Intoxilyzer 400PA, the regression line (correlation coefficient), bias, and 95% limits of agreement were y = 0.599x + 0.008 (r = 0.86), −0.024 g/dL, and −0.049 to 0.002 g/dL, respectively, for 71 specimens with a large magnitude effect. We concluded that the mGC, using exhaled breath, performed well to estimate the serum ethanol concentrations. PMID:21439148

  12. Ammonia Analysis by Gas Chromatograph/Infrared Detector (GC/IRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Joseph P.; Whitfield, Steve W.

    2003-01-01

    Methods are being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center's Toxicity Lab on a CG/IRD System that will be used to detect ammonia in low part per million (ppm) levels. These methods will allow analysis of gas samples by syringe injections. The GC is equipped with a unique cryogenic-cooled inlet system that will enable our lab to make large injections of a gas sample. Although the initial focus of the work will be analysis of ammonia, this instrument could identify other compounds on a molecular level. If proper methods can be developed, the IRD could work as a powerful addition to our offgassing capabilities.

  13. Prototype of the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer to investigate volatile species in the lunar soil for the Luna-Glob and Luna-Resurs missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, L.; Lasi, D.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.; Cabane, M.; Cosica, D.; Gerasimov, M.; Rodinov, D.

    2013-09-01

    In preparation for the Russian Luna-Glob and Luna-Resurs missions we combined our compact time-offlight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) with a chemical pre-separation of the species by gas chromatography (GC). Combined measurements with both instruments were successfully performed with the laboratory prototype of the mass spectrometer and a flight-like gas chromatograph. Due to its capability to record mass spectra over the full mass range at once with high sensitivity and a dynamic range of up to 106 within 1s, the TOF-MS system is a valuable extension of the GC analysis. The combined GC-MS complex is able to detect concentrations of volatile species in the sample of about 2·10^-9 by mass.

  14. Simultaneous derivatisation and preconcentration of parabens in food and other matrices by isobutyl chloroformate and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajeev; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Chauhan, Abhishek; Ch, Ratnasekhar; Murthy, R C; Khan, Haider A

    2013-11-01

    A simple, rapid and economical method has been proposed for the quantitative determination of parabens (methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl paraben) in different samples (food, cosmetics and water) based on isobutyl chloroformate (IBCF) derivatisation and preconcentration using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in single step. Under optimum conditions, solid samples were extracted with ethanol (disperser solvent) and 200 μL of this extract along with 50 μL of chloroform (extraction solvent) and 10 μL of IBCF was rapidly injected into 2 mL of ultra-pure water containing 150 μL of pyridine to induce formation of a cloudy state. After centrifugation, 1 μL of the sedimented phase was analysed using gas chromatograph-flame ionisation detector (GC-FID) and the peaks were confirmed using gas chromatograph-positive chemical ionisation-mass spectrometer (GC-PCI-MS). Method was found to be linear over the range of 0.1-10 μg mL(-1) with square of correlation coefficient (R(2)) in the range of 0.9913-0.9992. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were found to be 0.029-0.102 μg mL(-1) and 0.095-0.336 μg mL(-1) with a signal to noise ratio of 3:1 and 10:1, respectively.

  15. Simultaneous derivatisation and preconcentration of parabens in food and other matrices by isobutyl chloroformate and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajeev; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Chauhan, Abhishek; Ch, Ratnasekhar; Murthy, R C; Khan, Haider A

    2013-11-01

    A simple, rapid and economical method has been proposed for the quantitative determination of parabens (methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl paraben) in different samples (food, cosmetics and water) based on isobutyl chloroformate (IBCF) derivatisation and preconcentration using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in single step. Under optimum conditions, solid samples were extracted with ethanol (disperser solvent) and 200 μL of this extract along with 50 μL of chloroform (extraction solvent) and 10 μL of IBCF was rapidly injected into 2 mL of ultra-pure water containing 150 μL of pyridine to induce formation of a cloudy state. After centrifugation, 1 μL of the sedimented phase was analysed using gas chromatograph-flame ionisation detector (GC-FID) and the peaks were confirmed using gas chromatograph-positive chemical ionisation-mass spectrometer (GC-PCI-MS). Method was found to be linear over the range of 0.1-10 μg mL(-1) with square of correlation coefficient (R(2)) in the range of 0.9913-0.9992. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were found to be 0.029-0.102 μg mL(-1) and 0.095-0.336 μg mL(-1) with a signal to noise ratio of 3:1 and 10:1, respectively. PMID:23768377

  16. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, R. H.; Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen.

  17. Evaluation of a Gas Chromatograph-Differential Mobility Spectrometer for Potential Water Monitoring on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental monitoring for manned spaceflight has long depended on archival sampling, which was sufficient for short missions. However, the longer mission durations aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have shown that enhanced, real-time monitoring capabilities are necessary in order to protect both the crewmembers and the spacecraft systems. Over the past several years, a number of real-time environmental monitors have been deployed on the ISS. Currently, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the station air are monitored by the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), a small, lightweight gas chromatograph-differential mobility spectrometer. For water monitoring, real-time monitors are used for total organic carbon (TOC) and biocide analysis. No information on the actual makeup of the TOC is provided presently, however. An improvement to the current state of environmental monitoring could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for VOCs in air samples, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. The major hurdle for this effort lies in the liberation of the target analytes from the water matrix. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target VOCs at the concentrations at which they are routinely detected in archival water samples from the ISS. We will compare the results of these studies with those obtained from the instrumentation routinely used to analyze archival water samples.

  18. Capillary column gas chromatographic determination of dicamba in water, including mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, N C; Atallah, Y H; Bade, T R

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive method is described for determining dicamba at low micrograms/L levels in ground waters by capillary column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-EC); compound identity is confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring. Dicamba residue is hydrolyzed in KOH to form the potassium salt. The sample is then extracted with ethyl ether which is discarded. The aqueous phase is acidified to pH less than 1 and extracted twice with ethyl ether. The combined ethyl ether extracts are concentrated, and the residue is methylated using diazomethane to form the corresponding dicamba ester. The derivatized sample is cleaned up on a deactivated silica gel column. The methylated dicamba is separated on an SE-30 capillary column and quantitated by electron-capture or mass spectrometric detection. Average recoveries (X +/- SD) for ground water samples fortified with 0.40 microgram/L of dicamba are 86 +/- 5% by GC-EC and 97 +/- 7% by GC-MS detections. The EDL (estimated detection limit) for this method is 0.1 microgram dicamba/L water (ppb). PMID:2808247

  19. Peak tailoring concept in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic pollutants in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chieh-Heng; Chang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2005-09-16

    An automated gas chromatographic system aiming at performing unattended analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed in laboratory. To encompass VOCs of a wide range of volatility, two different designs of enrichment and separation methods were adopted and compared with performance in analyzing ozone precursors of C3-C12. In the dual-trap dual-column design, lower boiling species (C3-C6) are enriched and separated by one set of trap and column (porous layer open tubular (PLOT)), whereas the enrichment and separation for the higher boiling species (C6-C12) are performed by the other set (wall-coated open tubular (WCOT)). Undesired peaks also inevitably appear on both chromatograms often causing annoyances. To reduce complexity of both the apparatus and the resulting chromatograms, the heart-cut technique was adopted as a base for developing a system, which only uses one trap and one flame ionization detector for constructing two-dimensional GC with PLOT and DB-1. Methods were developed to allow the auxiliary flow pressure in the heart-cut device to be programmed to create dual effects, which not only can perform regular heart-cut actions but can also temporally hold up species in the precolumn for prescribed time intervals. Because it is characteristic for PLOT chromatograms to have reproducible blank retention time windows, segments of a DB-1 trace are produced by the auxiliary flow program aligning perfectly in time with the gaps of the PLOT trace. Subsequently, the two column flows are merged and channeled into single flame ionization detector to produce a very condensed "tailored" chromatogram which is equivalent to overlaying a PLOT and a DB-1 chromatogram on top of each other, except that no peaks are overlapped. This innovative "peak tailoring" concept based on the heart-cut technique is simple in design, easy to build, and extremely rugged for long-term continuous operation as fewer moving parts are involved, which is beneficial for deploying

  20. Flow system for optical activity detection of vegetable extracts employing molecular exclusion continuous chromatographic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajer, V.; Rodríguez, C.; Naranjo, S.; Mesa, G.; Mora, W.; Arista, E.; Cepero, T.; Fernández, H.

    2006-02-01

    The combination of molecular exclusion chromatography and laser polarimetric detection has turned into a carbohydrate separation and quantification system for plant fluids of industrial value, making it possible the evaluation of the quality of sugarcane juices, agave juices and many other plant extracts. Some previous papers described a system where liquid chromatography separation and polarimetric detection using a LASERPOL 101M polarimeter with He-Ne light source allowed the collection and quantification of discrete samples for analytical purposes. In this paper, the authors are introducing a new improved system which accomplishes polarimetric measurements in a continuous flux. Chromatograms of several carbohydrates standard solutions were obtained as useful references to study juice quality of several sugarcane varieties under different physiological conditions. Results by either discrete or continuous flux systems were compared in order to test the validation of the new system. An application of the system to the diagnostics of scalded foliar is described. A computer program allowing the output of the chromatograms to a display on line and the possibility of digital storing, maxima detections, zone integration, and some other possibilities make this system very competitive and self-convincing.

  1. Versatile and fast gas chromatographic determination of frequently used brominated flame retardants in styrenic polymers.

    PubMed

    Pöhlein, Manfred; Bertran, Raquel Urpi; Wolf, Marion; van Eldik, Rudi

    2008-09-01

    Two versatile and fast methods to identify and quantify brominated flame retardants (BrFRs) in styrenic polymers were developed. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) as well as gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC/ECD), both following ultrasonic-supported dissolution and precipitation (USDP), were applied. The substance range includes poly-brominated biphenyls (PBBs) and diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), as well as other commonly used flame retardants (FRs), including two phosphate-based flame retardants. The methods were verified using congener standards and flame-retardant polymer samples. Good recoveries were found. Overall run time for the analysis, including sample preparation, is less than 60 min. PMID:18687441

  2. Gas chromatographic determination of N-nitrosamines in beverages following automatic solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sánchez, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Evaristo; Gallego, Mercedes

    2007-11-28

    A semiautomatic method for the determination of seven N-nitrosamines in beverages by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection is proposed. Beverage samples are aspirated into a solid-phase extraction module for preconcentration and cleanup. The influence of the experimental conditions was examined by using various sorbents among which LiChrolut EN was found to provide quantitative elution and the highest preconcentration factors of all. The proposed method is sensitive, with limits of detection between 7 and 33 ng/kg, and precise, with relative standard deviations from 4.3% to 6.0%. The recoveries of N-nitrosamines from beverage samples spiked with 0.5 or 1 microg/kg concentrations of these compounds ranged from 95% to 102%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of residues of the studied N-nitrosamines in beverages including beer, wine, liquor, whisky, cognac, rum, vodka, grape juice, cider, tonic water, and soft drinks. The analytes were only detected in beer samples, positives being confirmed by gas chromatography coupled with impact ionization mass spectrometry.

  3. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analyses of unknown analytical response in imported Fava beans: 4-chloro-6-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Petzinger, G; Barry, T L; Roach, J A; Musser, S M; Sphon, J

    1995-01-01

    A halogenated unidentified analytical response (UAR) was encountered in a number of imported Fava bean samples during the Food and Drug Administration's routine pesticide-monitoring program. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analyses identified the halogenated component as 4-chloro-6-methoxyindole, a naturally occurring promutagen in Fava beans that has been linked to incidents of gastric cancer. Data from electron impact, positive and negative chemical ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and deuteration studies of this compound are presented, along with GC retention time data.

  4. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analyses of unknown analytical response in imported Fava beans: 4-chloro-6-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Petzinger, G; Barry, T L; Roach, J A; Musser, S M; Sphon, J

    1995-01-01

    A halogenated unidentified analytical response (UAR) was encountered in a number of imported Fava bean samples during the Food and Drug Administration's routine pesticide-monitoring program. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analyses identified the halogenated component as 4-chloro-6-methoxyindole, a naturally occurring promutagen in Fava beans that has been linked to incidents of gastric cancer. Data from electron impact, positive and negative chemical ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and deuteration studies of this compound are presented, along with GC retention time data. PMID:7756907

  5. Preliminary results of investigations into the use of artificial neural networks for discriminating gas chromatograph mass spectra of remote samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Harold A.; Norris, Eugene; Warnock, Archibald, III

    1991-01-01

    Neural networks trained using mass spectra data from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are studied. The investigations also included sample data from the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument aboard the Viking Lander, obtained from the National Space Science Data Center. The work performed to data and the preliminary results from the training and testing of neural networks are described. These preliminary results are presented for the purpose of determining the viability of applying artificial neural networks in discriminating mass spectra samples from remote instrumentation such as the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission and the Cassini Probe.

  6. The Composition of Titan's Lower Atmosphere and Simple Surface Volatiles as Measured by the Cassini-Huygens Probe Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Demick, J. E.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Lunine, J. I.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Probe Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) determined the composition of the Titan atmosphere from 140km altitude to the surface. After landing, it returned composition data of gases evaporated from the surface. Height profiles of molecular nitrogen (N2), methane (CH4) and molecular hydrogen (H2) were determined. Traces were detected on the surface of evaporating methane, ethane (C2H6), acetylene (C2H2), cyanogen (C2N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The methane data showed evidence that methane precipitation occurred recently. The methane mole fraction was (1.48+/-0.09) x 10(exp -2) in the lower stratosphere (139.8 km to 75.5 km) and (5.65+/-0.18) x 10(exp -2) near the surface (6.7 km to the surface). The molecular hydrogen mole fraction was (1.01+/-0.16) x 10(exp -3) in the atmosphere and (9.90+/-0.17) x 10(exp -4) on the surface. Isotope ratios were 167.7+/-0.6 for N-14/N-15 in molecular nitrogen, 91.1+/-1.4 for C-12/C-13 in methane and (1.35+/-0.30) x 10(exp -4) for D/H in molecular hydrogen. The mole fractions of Ar-36 and radiogenic Ar-40 are (2.1+/-0.8) x 10(exp -7) and (3.39 +/-0.12) x 10(exp -5) respectively. Ne-22 has been tentatively identified at a mole fraction of (2.8+/-2.1) x 10(exp -7) Krypton and xenon were below the detection threshold of 1 x 10(exp -8) mole fraction. Science data were not retrieved from the gas chromatograph subsystem as the abundance of the organic trace gases in the atmosphere and on the ground did not reach the detection threshold. Results previously published from the GCMS experiment are superseded by this publication.

  7. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  8. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol residues in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Sills, J.B.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of 3-mftuormethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in fish tissues is described. Homogenized tissues are extracted with hexane-ethyl ether; the extract is cleaned up by partitioning the TFM from the extracting solvent into O.IN NaOB, acidifying the aqueous solution, and partitioning again with hexaneethyl ether. The TFM is methylated with diazomethane and analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, using electron capture detection. Recoveries ranged from 75 to 1000/., from fish muscles that were spiked with 0.01-2.00 JA#g TFM/g.

  9. A low thermal mass fast gas chromatograph and its implementation in fast gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Moragn, Mati; Amirav, Aviv

    2011-12-30

    A new type of low thermal mass (LTM) fast gas chromatograph (GC) was designed and operated in combination with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), including GC-MS-MS with SMB, thereby providing a novel combination with unique capabilities. The LTM fast GC is based on a short capillary column inserted inside a stainless steel tube that is resistively heated. It is located and mounted outside the standard GC oven on its available top detector port, while the capillary column is connected as usual to the standard GC injector and supersonic molecular beam interface transfer line. This new type of fast GC-MS with SMB enables less than 1 min full range temperature programming and cooling down analysis cycle time. The operation of the fast GC-MS with SMB was explored and 1 min full analysis cycle time of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons in the C(10)H(22) up to C(44)H(90) range was achieved. The use of 35 mL/min high column flow rate enabled the elution of C(44)H(90) in less than 45 s while the SMB interface enabled splitless acceptance of this high flow rate and the provision of dominant molecular ions. A novel compound 9-benzylazidanthracene was analyzed for its purity and a synthetic chemistry process was monitored for the optimization of the chemical reaction yield. Biodiesel was analyzed in jet fuel (by both GC-MS and GC-MS-MS) in under 1 min as 5 ppm fatty acid methyl esters. Authentic iprodion and cypermethrin pesticides were analyzed in grapes extract in both full scan mode and fast GC-MS-MS mode in under 1 min cycle time and explosive mixture including TATP, TNT and RDX was analyzed in under 1 min combined with exhibiting dominant molecular ion for TATP. Fast GC-MS with SMB is based on trading GC separation for speed of analysis while enhancing the separation power of the MS via the enhancement of the molecular ion in the electron ionization of cold molecules in the SMB. This paper further discusses several features of

  10. Structure elucidation and chromatographic identification of anthraquinone components of cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) detected in historical objects.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Valianou, Lemonia; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2013-12-01

    Cochineal is one of the most well known organic red dyes. Dactylopius coccus Costa (Dactylopiidae) is a scale insect that is used as the source of the dye known as Mexican cochineal. Although cochineal is today a natural food colorant (E120) and although it has been used in art objects (textiles and paintings) for centuries, its exact chemical consistency is not well clarified except for carminic acid which is the major component and kermesic and flavokermesic acids. Several minor components (typically less than 5% of the colouring material) remained unknown or partially studied, although their presence has been reported in numerous analytical works related to art objects. Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the dried insects, after subsequent HPLC chromatographic separations, led to the isolation and structure elucidation of six new anthraquinones, along with the known compounds carminic acid, kermesic acid and flavokermesic acid. The new compounds formerly described as DCII and DCIII, were found to be the 2-C-glucoside of flavokermesic acid and 4-aminocarminic acid, respectively, while DCIV and DCVII were found to be the α/β C-glucofuranosides of kermesic acid, and were studied as a mixture due to equilibrium. In addition, 3-O-glucoside of flavokermesic acid (DCOFK), and 3,4-dideoxycarminic acid (DDCA) were identified. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of their NMR and MS data. Finally, the new compounds were detected in silk dyed with cochineal, lake pigment and, furthermore, in historical objects of the cultural heritage (icon and textile) using LC-DAD and LC-MS. PMID:24267092

  11. Hybrid preconcentrator/focuser module for determinations of explosive marker compounds with a micro-scale gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Gustavo; Sukaew, Thitiporn; Zellers, Edward T

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the development and characterization of a partially selective preconcentrator/focuser (PCF) module for a field-portable micro-scale gas chromatograph (μGC) designed to rapidly determine trace levels of two vapor-phase markers of the explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT): 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT). The PCF module has three primary components. The first is a high-volume sampler, comprising a resistively-heated 6-cm long stainless steel tube packed with tandem beds of the graphitized carbons Carbopack B (C-B, 30 mg) and Carbopack Y (C-Y, 15 mg), which traps the markers but permits more volatile interferences to pass through largely unretained. The second component is a microfocuser (μF), comprising a 4.2×9.8 mm Si chip containing a deep-reactive-ion-etched (DRIE) cavity packed with 2mg of C-B, a Pyrex cap, integrated heaters, and etched fluidic channels. The third component is a commercial polymer-membrane filter used as a pre-trap to remove particles and adsorbed low volatility interferences. Markers captured in the sampler are thermally desorbed and transferred to the μF, and then thermally desorbed/injected from the μF into a downstream separation (micro)column and detected. Scrubbed ambient air is used as carrier gas. The adsorbent capacities, baseline temperatures, sampling and desorption flow rates, and heating profiles were optimized for each PCF module component while minimizing the analysis time. An overall transfer efficiency of 86% was achieved at marker concentrations of ~0.2-2.6 ppb. In the final configuration the PCF module requires just 60s to collect a 1-L sample (3 L/min), focus (40 mL/min), and inject the markers (3 mL/min), producing half-maximum injection peak widths of ~2 and 5 s, and preconcentration factors of 4500 and 1800, for DMNB and 2,4-DNT, respectively. PMID:23357747

  12. Determination of Milk Fat Adulteration with Vegetable Oils and Animal Fats by Gas Chromatographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Ha-Jung; Park, Jung-Min

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed the potential application of gas chromatography (GC) in detecting milk fat (MF) adulteration with vegetable oils and animal fats and of characterizing samples by fat source. One hundred percent pure MF was adulterated with different vegetable oils and animal fats at various concentrations (0%, 10%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90%). GC was used to obtain the fatty acid (FA) profiles, triacylglycerol (TG) contents, and cholesterol contents. The pure MF and the adulterated MF samples were discriminated based on the total concentrations of saturated FAs and on the 2 major FAs (oleic acid [C18:1n9c] and linoleic acid [C18:2n6c], TGs [C52 and C54], and cholesterol contents using statistical analysis to compared difference. These bio-markers enabled the detection of as low as 10% adulteration of non-MF into 100% pure MF. The study demonstrated the high potential of GC to rapidly detect MF adulteration with vegetable and animal fats, and discriminate among commercial butter and milk products according to the fat source. These data can be potentially useful in detecting foreign fats in these butter products. Furthermore, it is important to consider that several individual samples should be analyzed before coming to a conclusion about MF authenticity.

  13. Determination of Milk Fat Adulteration with Vegetable Oils and Animal Fats by Gas Chromatographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Ha-Jung; Park, Jung-Min

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed the potential application of gas chromatography (GC) in detecting milk fat (MF) adulteration with vegetable oils and animal fats and of characterizing samples by fat source. One hundred percent pure MF was adulterated with different vegetable oils and animal fats at various concentrations (0%, 10%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90%). GC was used to obtain the fatty acid (FA) profiles, triacylglycerol (TG) contents, and cholesterol contents. The pure MF and the adulterated MF samples were discriminated based on the total concentrations of saturated FAs and on the 2 major FAs (oleic acid [C18:1n9c] and linoleic acid [C18:2n6c], TGs [C52 and C54], and cholesterol contents using statistical analysis to compared difference. These bio-markers enabled the detection of as low as 10% adulteration of non-MF into 100% pure MF. The study demonstrated the high potential of GC to rapidly detect MF adulteration with vegetable and animal fats, and discriminate among commercial butter and milk products according to the fat source. These data can be potentially useful in detecting foreign fats in these butter products. Furthermore, it is important to consider that several individual samples should be analyzed before coming to a conclusion about MF authenticity. PMID:26265530

  14. Gas chromatographic determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and smoked rice samples after solid-phase microextraction using multiwalled carbon nanotube loaded hollow fiber.

    PubMed

    Matin, Amir Abbas; Biparva, Pourya; Gheshlaghi, Mohammad

    2014-12-29

    A novel solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded on hollow fiber membrane pores. Stainless steel wire was used as unbreakable support. The major advantages of the proposed fiber are its (a) high reproducibility due to the uniform structure of the hollow fiber membranes, (b) high extraction capacity related to the porous structure of the hollow fiber and outstanding adsorptive characteristics of MWCNTs. The proposed fiber was applied for the microextraction of five representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous media (river and hubble-bubble water) and smoked rice samples followed by gas chromatographic determination. Analytical merits of the method, including high correlation coefficients [(0.9963-0.9992) and (0.9982-0.9999)] and low detection limits [(9.0-13.0ngL(-1)) and (40.0-150.0ngkg(-1))] for water and rice samples, respectively, made the proposed method suitable for the ultra-trace determination of PAHs.

  15. Advances in the gas chromatographic determination of persistent organic pollutants in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, S P J; de Boer, J

    2008-04-01

    Environmental chemists have been challenged for over 30 years to analyse complex mixtures of halogenated organic pollutants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated alkanes (PCAs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated furans (PCDD/Fs). Gas chromatography (GC) often proved to be the method of choice because of its high resolution. The recent developments in the field of comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GCxGC) show that this technique can provide much more information than conventional (single-column) GC. Large volume injection (e.g. by programmed temperature vaporiser, or on-column injection) can be employed for the injection of tens of microliters of sample extract, in that way substantially improving the detection limits. Electron-capture detection (ECD) is a sensitive detection method but unambiguous identification is not possible and misidentification easily occurs. Mass spectrometric (MS) detection substantially improves the identification and the better the resolution (as with MS/MS, time-of-flight (TOF) MS and high-resolution (HR)MS), the lower the chances of misidentification are. Unfortunately, this comes only with substantially higher investments and maintenance costs. Co-extracted lipids, sulphur and other interferences can disturb the GC separation and detection leading to unreliable results. Extraction, and more so, sample clean-up and fractionation, are crucial steps prior to the GC analysis of these pollutants. Recent developments in sample extraction and clean-up show that selective pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) is an effective and efficient extraction and clean-up technique that enables processing of multiple samples in less than 1h. Quality assurance tools such as interlaboratory studies and reference materials are very well established for PCDD/Fs and PCBs but the improvement of that infrastructure is needed for brominated flame retardants, PCAs and toxaphene. PMID

  16. Characterization of Atypical Off-Flavor Compounds in Natural Cork Stoppers by Multidimensional Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Slabizki, Petra; Fischer, Claus; Legrum, Charlotte; Schmarr, Hans-Georg

    2015-09-01

    Natural cork stoppers with sensory deviations other than the typical cork taint were subgrouped according to their sensory descriptions and compared with unaffected control cork stoppers. The assessment of purge and trap extracts obtained from corresponding cork soaks was performed by heart-cut multidimensional gas chromatography-olfactometry (MDGC-O). The identification of compounds responsible for atypical cork taint detected in MDGC-O was further supported with additional multidimensional GC analysis in combination with mass spectrometric detection. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol were mainly found in cork stoppers described as moldy and cellarlike; 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine were found in cork stoppers described with green attributes. Across all cork subgroups, the impact compound for typical cork taint, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), was present and is therefore a good marker for cork taint in general. Another potent aroma compound, 3,5-dimethyl-2-methoxypyrazine (MDMP), was also detected in each subgroup, obviously playing an important role with regard to the atypical cork taint. Sensory deviations possibly affecting the wine could be generated by MDMP and its presence should thus be monitored in routine quality control.

  17. Measurement of dissolved H2, O2, and CO2 in groundwater using passive samplers for gas chromatographic analyses.

    PubMed

    Spalding, B P; Watson, D B

    2006-12-15

    A simple in-situ passive dissolved gas groundwater sampler, comprised of a short length of silicone tubing attached to a gastight or other syringe, was adapted and tested for in-situ collection of equilibrium gas samples. Sampler retrieval after several days of immersion in groundwater allowed the direct injection of the sample onto a gas chromatograph (GC), simplifying field collection and sample handling over the commonly used "bubble stripping" method for H2 analyses. A GC was modified by sequencing a thermal conductivity (TC) detector followed by a reductive gas (RG) detector so that linear calibration of H2 over the range 0.2-200,000 ppmv was attained using a 0.5-mL gas sample; inclusion of the TC detector allowed the simultaneous quantification of other fixed gases (O2, CO2, He, and Ne) to which the RG detector was not responsive. Uptake kinetics for H2 and He indicated that the passive sampler reached equilibrium within 12 h of immersion in water. Field testing of these passive samplers revealed unusually large equilibrium gas-phase H2 concentrations in groundwater, ranging from 0.1 to 13.9%, by volume, in 11 monitoring wells surrounding four former radiological wastewater disposal ponds at the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  18. Solid phase micro extraction - A new technique coupled with gas chromatograph for chloroethene analysis from aqueous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.; Sewell, G.W.

    1996-10-01

    Once the chloroethenes (tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene) contamination occurs in the subsurface environment, they tend to retain and form a Pollution plum in the aquifer because of their recalcitrance to aerobic oxidation. Currently, the most promising bioremediation method for chlorinated compounds is through anaerobic reductive biotransformation, in which each chlorine is replaced by a hydrogen. To study the biodegradation process, it is essential to monitor tetrachloroethene and its degradation daughter products frequently. An analytical method has been modified for chloroethene analysis by gas chromatography. Solid Phase Micro Extraction technique has been used to extract aqueous sample onto a fiber and then to desorb the sample directly into a gas chromatograph injection port. The total run time is less than 17 minutes.

  19. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination with photodiode array detection of ellagic acid in fresh and processed fruits.

    PubMed

    Amakura, Y; Okada, M; Tsuji, S; Tonogai, Y

    2000-10-27

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure based on an isocratic elution with photodiode array detection has been developed for a simple and rapid determination of ellagic acid (EA) in fresh and processed fruits. The homogenized sample was refluxed with methanol and then the extract was refined using a solid-phase cartridge before HPLC. We analyzed EA in 40 kinds of fresh fruits and 11 kinds of processed fruits by the developed method. EA was found in several berries, fueijoa, pineapple and pomegranate. This is the first occurrence of the detection of EA in bayberry, fueijoa and pineapple.

  20. Miniaturized system of a gas chromatograph coupled with a Paul ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Miniature gas chromatography (GC) and miniature mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation has been developed to identify and quantify the chemical compounds present in complex mixtures of gases. The design approach utilizes micro-GC components coupled with a Paul quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Inherent to the system are high sensitivity, good dynamic range, good QIT resolution, low GC flow-rates to minimize vacuum requirements and the need for consumables; and the use of a modular approach to adapt to volatile organic compounds dissolved in water or present in sediment. Measurements are reported on system response to gaseous species at concentrations varying over four orders of magnitude. The ability of the system to deal with complicated mixtures is demonstrated, and future improvements are discussed. The GC/QIT system described herein has a mass, volume and power that are, conservatively, one-twentieth of those of commercial off-the-shelf systems. Potential applications are to spacecraft cabin-air monitoring, robotic planetary exploration and trace-species detection for residual gas analysis and environmental monitoring.

  1. Classification of gasoline by octane number and light gas condensate fractions by origin with using dielectric or gas-chromatographic data and chemometrics tools.

    PubMed

    Rudnev, Vasiliy A; Boichenko, Alexander P; Karnozhytskiy, Pavel V

    2011-05-15

    The approach for classification of gasoline by octane number and light gas condensate fractions by origin with using dielectric permeability data has been proposed and compared with classification of same samples on the basis of gas-chromatographic data. The precision of dielectric permeability measurements was investigated by using ANOVA. The relative standard deviation of dielectric permeability was in the range from 0.3 to 0.5% for the range of dielectric permeability from 1.8 to 4.4. The application of exploratory chemometrics tools (cluster analysis and principal component analysis) allow to explicitly differentiate the gasoline and light gas condensate fractions into groups of samples related to specific octane number or origin. The neural networks allow to perfectly classifying the gasoline and light gas condensate fractions. PMID:21482310

  2. Classification of gasoline by octane number and light gas condensate fractions by origin with using dielectric or gas-chromatographic data and chemometrics tools.

    PubMed

    Rudnev, Vasiliy A; Boichenko, Alexander P; Karnozhytskiy, Pavel V

    2011-05-15

    The approach for classification of gasoline by octane number and light gas condensate fractions by origin with using dielectric permeability data has been proposed and compared with classification of same samples on the basis of gas-chromatographic data. The precision of dielectric permeability measurements was investigated by using ANOVA. The relative standard deviation of dielectric permeability was in the range from 0.3 to 0.5% for the range of dielectric permeability from 1.8 to 4.4. The application of exploratory chemometrics tools (cluster analysis and principal component analysis) allow to explicitly differentiate the gasoline and light gas condensate fractions into groups of samples related to specific octane number or origin. The neural networks allow to perfectly classifying the gasoline and light gas condensate fractions.

  3. Evaluation of poly(90% biscyanopropyl/10% cyanopropylphenyl siloxane) capillary columns for the gas chromatographic quantification of trans fatty acids in non-hydrogenated vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Delmonte, Pierluigi

    2016-08-19

    Current gas chromatographic (GC) methods for the analysis of fatty acids (FA) were optimized primarily for the quantification of the trans 18:1 FAs (18:1 tFAs) produced during the partial hydrogenation of fats and oils. Recent regulatory action regarding the application of partial hydrogenation in the processing of edible fats and oils may reshape the FA composition of these products. The higher content in 18:3 tFAs compared to 18:1 tFAs of most refined non-hydrogenated vegetable oils (RNHVO), and the challenge in their quantification applying current methods, suggest the need for new methodologies. This manuscript describes a simple GC method for the analysis of FAs in RNHVOs utilizing a 100m (0.25mm I.D.) capillary column coated with poly(90% biscyanopropyl/10% cyanopropylphenyl siloxane) (90% BCS). The optimization of the chromatographic conditions and the detection of co-eluting compounds were carried out by applying comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with online reduction (GC-OR×GC). Results showed that 90% BCS capillary columns operated at the elution temperature of 162°C provide the separation of the 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 tFAs, contained in RNHVOs, from other components. A minor constituent of Canola oil, 16:3n-3, partially co-eluted with trans-18:1 FAMEs. This simple GC method showed the ability to measure trans-fat in RNHVOs at the level of 0.5g/100g, providing comparable quantitative results to the more complex GC×GC methodology.

  4. Evaluation of poly(90% biscyanopropyl/10% cyanopropylphenyl siloxane) capillary columns for the gas chromatographic quantification of trans fatty acids in non-hydrogenated vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Delmonte, Pierluigi

    2016-08-19

    Current gas chromatographic (GC) methods for the analysis of fatty acids (FA) were optimized primarily for the quantification of the trans 18:1 FAs (18:1 tFAs) produced during the partial hydrogenation of fats and oils. Recent regulatory action regarding the application of partial hydrogenation in the processing of edible fats and oils may reshape the FA composition of these products. The higher content in 18:3 tFAs compared to 18:1 tFAs of most refined non-hydrogenated vegetable oils (RNHVO), and the challenge in their quantification applying current methods, suggest the need for new methodologies. This manuscript describes a simple GC method for the analysis of FAs in RNHVOs utilizing a 100m (0.25mm I.D.) capillary column coated with poly(90% biscyanopropyl/10% cyanopropylphenyl siloxane) (90% BCS). The optimization of the chromatographic conditions and the detection of co-eluting compounds were carried out by applying comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with online reduction (GC-OR×GC). Results showed that 90% BCS capillary columns operated at the elution temperature of 162°C provide the separation of the 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 tFAs, contained in RNHVOs, from other components. A minor constituent of Canola oil, 16:3n-3, partially co-eluted with trans-18:1 FAMEs. This simple GC method showed the ability to measure trans-fat in RNHVOs at the level of 0.5g/100g, providing comparable quantitative results to the more complex GC×GC methodology. PMID:27470095

  5. Evaluation of the retention pattern on ionic liquid columns for gas chromatographic analyses of fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Chen; Wasta, Ziar; Mjøs, Svein A

    2014-07-11

    Fatty acid methyl esters from marine sources were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry on three ionic liquid columns, SLB-IL61, SLB-IL82 and SLB-IL100 (Supelco). Retention indices (equivalent chain lengths) are reported for more than 100 compounds and the overlap patterns are evaluated from these data. The influence of chromatographic conditions on the retention indices of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters is also evaluated. Compared to typical alternative phases the retention patterns on all three columns are highly dependent on the conditions. The SLB-IL61 phase had overlaps between nutritionally important fatty acids that could not be resolved by changing the chromatographic conditions. This column is therefore regarded as unsuitable for clinical and nutritional studies of the fatty acid composition, but similar overlaps may be avoided on IL82 and IL100. On all three columns double bonds close to the carboxyl group in the analytes contribute with limited retention, which makes it challenging to predict the retention of polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters. PMID:24873965

  6. Modified ion source triple quadrupole mass spectrometer gas chromatograph for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analyses.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kim A; Szelewski, Michael J; Wilson, Glenn; Quimby, Bruce D; Hoffman, Peter D

    2015-11-01

    We describe modified gas chromatography electron-impact/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-EI/MS/MS) utilizing a newly developed hydrogen-injected self-cleaning ion source and modified 9mm extractor lens. This instrument, with optimized parameters, achieves quantitative separation of 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Existing methods historically limited rigorous identification and quantification to a small subset, such as the 16 PAHs the US EPA has defined as priority pollutants. Without the critical source and extractor lens modifications, the off-the-shelf GC-EI/MS/MS system was unsuitable for complex PAH analysis. Separations were enhanced by increased gas flow, a complex GC temperature profile incorporating multiple isothermal periods, specific ramp rates, and a PAH-optimized column. Typical determinations with our refined GC-EI/MS/MS have a large linear range of 1-10,000pgμl(-1) and detection limits of <2pgμl(-1). Included in the 62 PAHs, multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) mode enabled GC-EI/MS/MS identification and quantitation of several constituents of the MW 302 PAH isomers. Using calibration standards, values determined were within 5% of true values over many months. Standard curve r(2) values were typically >0.998, exceptional for compounds which are archetypally difficult. With this method benzo[a]fluorene, benzo[b]fluorene, benzo[c]fluorene were fully separated as was benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, and benzo[j]fluoranthene. Chrysene and triphenylene, were sufficiently separated to allow accurate quantitation. Mean limits of detection (LODs) across all PAHs were 1.02±0.84pgμl(-1) with indeno[1,2,3-c,d] pyrene having the lowest LOD at 0.26pgμl(-1) and only two analytes above 2.0pgμl(-1); acenaphthalene (2.33pgμl(-1)) and dibenzo[a,e]pyrene (6.44pgμl(-1)).

  7. Modified ion source triple quadrupole mass spectrometer gas chromatograph for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analyses

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kim A.; Szelewski, Michael J.; Wilson, Glenn; Quimby, Bruce D.; Hoffman, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe modified gas chromatography electron-impact/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC–EI/MS/MS) utilizing a newly developed hydrogen-injected self-cleaning ion source and modified 9 mm extractor lens. This instrument, with optimized parameters, achieves quantitative separation of 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Existing methods historically limited rigorous identification and quantification to a small subset, such as the 16 PAHs the US EPA has defined as priority pollutants. Without the critical source and extractor lens modifications, the off-the-shelf GC–EI/MS/MS system was unsuitable for complex PAH analysis. Separations were enhanced by increased gas flow, a complex GC temperature profile incorporating multiple isothermal periods, specific ramp rates, and a PAH-optimized column. Typical determinations with our refined GC–EI/MS/MS have a large linear range of 1–10,000 pg μl−1 and detection limits of <2 pg μl−1. Included in the 62 PAHs, multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) mode enabled GC-EI/MS/MS identification and quantitation of several constituents of the MW 302 PAHs isomers. Using calibration standards, values determined were within 5% of true values over many months. Standard curve r2 values were typically >0.998, exceptional for compounds which are archetypally difficult. With this method benzo[a]fluorene, benzo[b]fluorene, benzo[c]fluorene were fully separated as was benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, and benzo[j]fluoranthene. Chrysene and triphenylene, were sufficiently separated to allow accurate quantitation. Mean limits of detection (LODs) across all PAHs were 1.02 ± 0.84 pg μl−1 with indeno[1,2,3-c,d] pyrene having the lowest LOD at 0.26 pg μl−1 and only two analytes above 2.0 pg μl−1; acenaphthalene (2.33 pg μl−1) and dibenzo[a,e]pyrene (6.44 pg μl−1). PMID:26454790

  8. Modified ion source triple quadrupole mass spectrometer gas chromatograph for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analyses.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kim A; Szelewski, Michael J; Wilson, Glenn; Quimby, Bruce D; Hoffman, Peter D

    2015-11-01

    We describe modified gas chromatography electron-impact/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-EI/MS/MS) utilizing a newly developed hydrogen-injected self-cleaning ion source and modified 9mm extractor lens. This instrument, with optimized parameters, achieves quantitative separation of 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Existing methods historically limited rigorous identification and quantification to a small subset, such as the 16 PAHs the US EPA has defined as priority pollutants. Without the critical source and extractor lens modifications, the off-the-shelf GC-EI/MS/MS system was unsuitable for complex PAH analysis. Separations were enhanced by increased gas flow, a complex GC temperature profile incorporating multiple isothermal periods, specific ramp rates, and a PAH-optimized column. Typical determinations with our refined GC-EI/MS/MS have a large linear range of 1-10,000pgμl(-1) and detection limits of <2pgμl(-1). Included in the 62 PAHs, multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) mode enabled GC-EI/MS/MS identification and quantitation of several constituents of the MW 302 PAH isomers. Using calibration standards, values determined were within 5% of true values over many months. Standard curve r(2) values were typically >0.998, exceptional for compounds which are archetypally difficult. With this method benzo[a]fluorene, benzo[b]fluorene, benzo[c]fluorene were fully separated as was benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, and benzo[j]fluoranthene. Chrysene and triphenylene, were sufficiently separated to allow accurate quantitation. Mean limits of detection (LODs) across all PAHs were 1.02±0.84pgμl(-1) with indeno[1,2,3-c,d] pyrene having the lowest LOD at 0.26pgμl(-1) and only two analytes above 2.0pgμl(-1); acenaphthalene (2.33pgμl(-1)) and dibenzo[a,e]pyrene (6.44pgμl(-1)). PMID:26454790

  9. Simultaneous gas-chromatographic analysis for diazepam and its major metabolite, desmethyldiazepam, with use of double internal standardization.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, D J

    1978-10-01

    Electron-capture gas-liquid chromatography was used for simultaneous quantitation of plasma diazepam (I) and its major metabolite, desmethyldiazepam(II). Because concentrations of I can greatly exceed those of II after single doses of I, two benzodiazepine-analog internal standards were added to all samples, thereby allowing reliable quantitation of high concentrations of I and low concentrations of II. After extraction at neutral pH with benzene (containing isoamyl alcohol), the organic extract is evaporated and the residue is reconstituted in a small volume of solvent and chromatographed on a 3% OV-17 column. The sensitivity limits are 2 to 3 ng of I or II per milliliter of original sample, with a CV for identical samples of less than 5%. The applicability of the method to single-dose pharmacokinetic studies of I in humans is illustrated.

  10. The use of canisters/GC-MS and a portable gas chromatograph to characterize emissions from an air stripper

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C.M.; Bennett, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Demonstrating and maintaining removal efficiencies for various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air stripper/carbon adsorption system would ideally be done through continuous real-time monitoring. However, especially for state funded cleanup operations, cost considerations and timeliness of decisions become the overriding factors. Method TO-14, consisting of whole air samples obtained in stainless steel canisters shipped for GC-MS analysis, is the conventional method to speciate and quantitate VOCs at the sub-parts per billion levels found in the carbon adsorption system outlet. Unfortunately, method TO-14 does not provide real time information, and can be expensive. This paper summarizes the results obtained from using both method TO-14 and a portable gas chromatograph with a photoionization detector to characterize emissions from an air-stripper/carbon adsorption system. Field experience indicates that a combination of both methods can achieved the desired results at a reasonable cost.

  11. [The preparation procedure of tests for the gas chromatographic determination of fat acids without preliminary extraction of lipids].

    PubMed

    Aripovskiĭ, A V; Kolesnik, P O; Vezhdel, M I; Titov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The enhancement of the procedure of quantitative gas chromatographic determination of fit acids in biologic liquids samples is proposed. Instead of the conventional Folch procedure of extraction of lipids with subsequent ablution, concentration and methylation of extracts the direct saponification and methylation of vacuum dried liquid samples (50-200 mkl) can be applied. To compare the effectiveness of the proposed and conventional procedures both of them had been applied to evaluate how converge the results of determination of composition of fat acids in whole blood, blood plasma, packed red blood cells, homogenates of hepatic and muscular tissues. The proposed procedure is applied to determine the characteristics of fat acids composition inpatients with ischemic heart disease.

  12. Cyclotriveratrylene as a new-type stationary phase for gas chromatographic separations of halogenated compounds and isomers.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Qi, Meiling; Bai, Hua; Ma, Qiang; Meng, Xianshuang; Fu, Ruonong

    2015-07-24

    Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) is reported here for the first time as stationary phase for capillary gas chromatographic (GC) separations. CTV stationary phase showed weak polarity comparable to the conventional 5% phenyl polysiloxane stationary phase but exhibited different retention behaviours and higher resolution for some of the indicated analytes. Most importantly, CTV stationary phase exhibited preferential selectivity for halogenated compounds, positional and geometrical isomers. Effect of column temperature on retention and thermal stability of CTV column were also investigated. Moreover, CTV capillary column showed good repeatability in terms of run-to-run, day-to-day and column-to-column. The unique physicochemical features and efficient separation ability for analytes of close properties show the potential of CTV as a new-type stationary phase in GC as well as separation science.

  13. Demonstration/field study of new designs of automated gas chromatographs in Connecticut and other locations, 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Holdren, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Pollack, A.J.; Pate, A.D.

    1993-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to install, test and demonstrate two automated gas chromatographic (GC) systems to state and regional EPA groups. The Dynatherm/Hewlett Packard GC system was designed for the measurement of the 41 toxic compounds listed in EPA's Compendium of Methods for Method TO-14. The second system was a Perkin Elmer GC configured for the analysis of the 55 ozone precursor compounds identified in the EPA Technical Assistance Document No. EPA/600-8-91/215. Both GC systems performed well during the field evaluations with data capture of 98 percent. A method quantitation limit (MQL) of 0.5 ppbv was obtained for most of the target compounds. In examining daily control check runs, the variation of corrected GC retention times for each instrument and detector ranged from 0.023 to 0.044 minutes.

  14. Ambient Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Content as Determined by Gas Chromatographic Techniques from Rural Tidewater Virginia in Late Spring 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, G. E.; Davis, R.; Maroulis, P.; Bandy, A. R.; Denyszyn, R.; Kindle, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to ascertain the naturally generated hydrocarbon contribution to the air quality of the Hampton Roads region of Tidewater Virginia, a series of 27 air samples was obtained in two rural locations during late spring of 1974. These samples were analyzed for their hydrocarbon content (carbon number range C5 to C10) using gas chromatographic techniques. The thirty different hydrocarbon species were identified and monitored in the experiment. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates an average concentration of 397 parts per billion by weight (carbon) for the total non-methane hydrocarbon loading for C5 to C10 during the experiment. This value exceeds the National Primary Air Quality Standards as set by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. Cyclotriveratrylene as a new-type stationary phase for gas chromatographic separations of halogenated compounds and isomers.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Qi, Meiling; Bai, Hua; Ma, Qiang; Meng, Xianshuang; Fu, Ruonong

    2015-07-24

    Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) is reported here for the first time as stationary phase for capillary gas chromatographic (GC) separations. CTV stationary phase showed weak polarity comparable to the conventional 5% phenyl polysiloxane stationary phase but exhibited different retention behaviours and higher resolution for some of the indicated analytes. Most importantly, CTV stationary phase exhibited preferential selectivity for halogenated compounds, positional and geometrical isomers. Effect of column temperature on retention and thermal stability of CTV column were also investigated. Moreover, CTV capillary column showed good repeatability in terms of run-to-run, day-to-day and column-to-column. The unique physicochemical features and efficient separation ability for analytes of close properties show the potential of CTV as a new-type stationary phase in GC as well as separation science. PMID:26051084

  16. Gas chromatographic determination of cholesterol and tocopherols in edible oils and fats with automatic removal of interfering triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, E; Gallego, M; Valcárcel, M

    1996-01-01

    An automated gas chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of cholesterol, alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl acetate in edible oils and fats without derivatization is reported. Interferences from lipid material are avoided by using a continuous system to transesterify triglycerides with potassium methylate in methanol. The precision of the method is 1.9, 2.2 and 3.1% for cholesterol, alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl acetate, respectively. The proposed methods was validated by analysing a standard reference material of coconut oil (SRM 1563-2) with good results. The method features a high throughput, minimal sample handling and analyte specificity (lipid material does not interfere). PMID:8589831

  17. A bond graph model for the sample extraction/injection system of a microsized gas chromatographic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Wang, Wanjun; Murphy, Michael C.; Overton, Edward

    1996-09-01

    A bond graph model of the sample extraction/injection system of a prototype portable gas chromatographic instrument has been developed. In addition to performing the same functions as current portable gas chromatographs (GCs), the new generation of GC instruments is designed to perform extraction of analytes from liquid and solid samples. The prototype instrument achieves these improvements by taking of advantage of microfabrication technologies and microprocessor control in the design. A novel sample extraction/injection module is essential to the improved performance of the portable instrument, which will include microfabricated components such as inlets, interface chips, fluid channels, control valves, optimal heater/sensor combinations, and multiport connectors. In order to achieve the desired analytical performance, all of the major components are heated to 250 °C during different stages of a sample analysis. Predicting the performance of the system in this operating regime requires the modeling and analysis of system behavior in two interacting energy domains, fluid and thermal. This article represents the first effort to understand the dynamic behavior of the thermofluid aspect of micro-GC instruments and one of the first attempts to apply the widely-used bond graph technique to modeling and analysis of microsized thermofluid systems. Simulation results using the bond graph model closely match available experimental data, with differences typically less than 10%. This demonstrates that fluid dynamic theory for macroscale systems, and the bond graph method based on it, can be readily applied to microscale systems with these dimensions. The bond graph method can be a useful computer-aided design tool for the development of a new generation of truly integrated micro-GC instruments and sensors fabricated with micromachining technology.

  18. Gas chromatographic analysis of guanidino compounds in sera and urine of uremic patients using glyoxal and ethyl chloroformate as derivatizing reagents.

    PubMed

    Majidano, Subhan Ali; Khuhawar, Muhammad Yar

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatographic (GC) method has been developed for the determination of the guanidino compounds: guanidine (G), methylguanidine (MG), guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), guanidinobutyric acid (GBA) and guanidinosuccinic acid (GSA) was carried out after precolumn derivatization with glyoxal and ethyl chloroformate from the column HP-5 (30 m × 0.32 mm i.d.) at 90°C for 3 min, followed by a heating rate 25°C/min up to 260°C with a nitrogen flow rate of 2 ml/min. Detection was by FID. The linear calibrations were obtained within 0.1-20.0 μmol/L, with limits of detection (LODs) within 0.014-0.024 μmol/L. The separation and derivatization was repeatable (n = 6) with relative standard deviations (RSD) within 0.8-1.9% in retention time and 0.5-1.8% in peak height/peak area. A number of additives and amino acids did not affect the determination. The method was applied for the determination of guanidino compounds from the serum and urine of 9 healthy volunteers and 8 uremic patients and the amounts found were in the range 0.08-0.48 and below the limit of detection (LOD) - 345 μmol/L and 1.82 - 13.88 and 0.77 - 432.0 μmol/L with RSDs within 4.2%, respectively. PMID:23400288

  19. Integration of gas chromatographs into the Federal Highway Administration/Environmental Protection Agency near road MSAT study in Las Vegas, NV

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper documents the technical evaluation of a semi-continuous gas chromatograph (GC) for the measurement of benzene and 1,33butadiene in the near road environment. This paper will also consider the some of the non-technical implications associated with the operation of a GC ...

  20. Evaluation of a gas chromatograph with a novel surface acoustic wave detector (SAW GC) for screening of volatile organic compounds in Hanford waste tank samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1998-01-12

    A novel instrument, a gas chromatograph with a Surface Acoustic Wave Detector (SAW GC), was evaluated for the screening of organic compounds in Hanford tank headspace vapors. Calibration data were developed for the most common organic compounds, and the accuracy and precision were measured with a certified standard. The instrument was tested with headspace samples collected from seven Hanford waste tanks.

  1. Evaluation of the application of some gas chromatographic methods for the determination of properties of synthetic fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the applicability, to some synthetic fuels, of some gas chromatographic methods now under development for use with petroleum based fuels. Thirty-two jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes were examined. The boiling range distribution of each was determined by gas chromatography, and from that data distillation properties were calculated. The calculated results gave sufficient agreement with the measured values that the equations could be useable in their present form. Bulk fuel properties were calculated for the sixteen JP-5 and Diesel No. 2 type fuels. The results show that the equations would not give useable results. Capillary column gas chromatography was used to determine the n-alkane content of the eight JP-5 type samples and the results related to the observed freezing points. The results show that the concentrations of the long straight chain molecules in the fuels exert influence on the freezing point but are not the complete controlling factor.

  2. A water extraction, static headspace sampling, gas chromatographic method to determine MTBE in heating oil and diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Cummins, T M; Robbins, G A; Henebry, B J; Goad, C R; Gilbert, E J; Miller, M E; Stuart, J D

    2001-03-15

    A method was developed to determine the fuel/water partition coefficient (KMTBE) of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and then used to determine low parts per million concentrations of MTBE in samples of heating oil and diesel fuel. A special capillary column designed for the separation of MTBE and to prevent coelution and a gas chromatograph equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) were used. MTBE was partitioned from fuel samples into water during an equilibration step. The water samples were then analyzed for MTBE using static headspace sampling followed by GC/PID. A mathematical relationship was derived that allowed a KMTBE value to be calculated by utilizing the fuel/water volume ratios and the corresponding PID signal. KMTBE values were found to range linearly from 3.8 to 10.9 over a temperature range of 5-40 degrees C. This analysis method gave a MDL of 0.7 ppm MTBE in the fuel and a relative average accuracy of +/-15% by comparison with an independent laboratory using purge and trap GC/ MS analysis. MTBE was found in home heating oil in residential tanks and in diesel fuel at service stations throughout the state of Connecticut. The levels of MTBE were found to vary significantly with time. Heating oil and diesel fuel from terminals were also found to contain MTBE. This research suggests thatthe reported widespread contamination of groundwater with MTBE may also be due to heating oil and diesel fuel releases to the environment. used extensively for the past 20 years as a gasoline additive (up to 15 wt %) to reduce automobile carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions. The fact that MTBE is highly soluble in water (approximately 5 wt %) (3) and chemically inert when compared to other fuel constituents causes it to be often detected at high concentrations in groundwater in the vicinity of gasoline spills. The EPA has reported that low levels of MTBE in drinking water (above 40 microg/L) may cause unpleasant taste and odors and has designated MTBE as a

  3. Composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Demick, J. E.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Lunine, J. I.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) determined the composition of the Titan atmosphere from ˜140 km altitude to the surface. After landing, it returned composition data of gases evaporated from the surface. Height profiles of molecular nitrogen (N2), methane (CH4), and molecular hydrogen (H2) were determined. Traces were detected on the surface of evaporating methane, ethane (C2H6), acetylene (C2H2), cyanogen (C2N2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). The methane data showed evidence that methane precipitation occurred recently. The methane mole fraction was (1.48 ± 0.09) × 10-2 in the lower stratosphere (139.8-75.5 km) and (5.65 ± 0.18) × 10-2 near the surface (6.7 km to the surface). The molecular hydrogen mole fraction was (1.01 ± 0.16) × 10-3 in the atmosphere and (9.90 ± 0.17) × 10-4 on the surface. Isotope ratios were 167.7 ± 0.6 for 14N/15N in molecular nitrogen, 91.1 ± 1.4 for 12C/13C in methane, and (1.35 ± 0.30) × 10-4 for D/H in molecular hydrogen. The mole fractions of 36Ar and radiogenic 40Ar are (2.1 ± 0.8) × 10-7 and (3.39 ± 0.12) × 10-5, respectively. 22Ne has been tentatively identified at a mole fraction of (2.8 ± 2.1) × 10-7. Krypton and xenon were below the detection threshold of 1 × 10-8 mole fraction. Science data were not retrieved from the gas chromatograph subsystem as the abundance of the organic trace gases in the atmosphere and on the ground did not reach the detection threshold. Results previously published from the GCMS experiment are superseded by this publication.

  4. Quantification of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Hydrocarbons using a Commercial Gas Chromatograph - Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer at a Ground Site near Fort McKay, AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarek, T. W.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    The extraction of fossil fuels from the Alberta oil sands has been the focus of considerable attention due to its association with sizeable emissions of a variety of atmospheric pollutants, the magnitude and impacts of which are currently poorly constrained by observations. In order to more reliably estimate the magnitude and impact of these emissions, an intensive air quality measurement campaign, called "Fort McMurray Oil Sands Strategic Investigation of Local Sources" (FOSSILS), was conducted in the summer of 2013 as part of the Alberta-Canada joint oil sands monitoring program (JOSM) to identify and quantify emissions and their transformations from the Alberta oil sands. The challenge is that the region is surrounded by boreal forest, which provides a substantial background of biogenic hydrocarbons during summer. In this presentation, measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the AMS13 ground site near Fort McKay, Alberta, from Aug 17 to Sept 6, 2013 using a commercial Griffin 450 gas chromatograph equipped with ion trap mass spectrometric detection and Tenax preconcentration are described. The combination of retention information and electron impact mass spectral data allowed unambiguous identification and quantification of the major biogenic monoterpenes, e.g., α and β-pinene, limonene, camphene, and 3Δ-carene, and of many anthropogenically derived hydrocarbons. Mixing ratios of biogenic hydrocarbons varied with time of day, temperature, and solar radiation, with maxima typically occurring at night, rationalized by nocturnal mixing heights and low mixing ratios of the nocturnal oxidants ozone (O3) and the nitrate radical (NO3). In contrast, mixing ratios of anthropogenic VOCs, e.g., benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and o-, p-, and m-xylene (BTEX), strongly depended on meteorological conditions, i.e., local wind direction. During episodes with high BTEX abundance, many additional high molecular weight hydrocarbons were observed which were not

  5. Simple and rapid method for simultaneous gas chromatographic determination of bitertanol, metalaxyl, oxadixyl, propiconazole, and triadimefon residues in cucumbers.

    PubMed

    Lee, W O; Wong, S K

    1995-10-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of bitertanol, metalaxyl, oxadixyl, propiconazole and triadimefon residues in cucumbers has been developed. The fungicide residues were extracted from the sample with ethyl acetate and determined, after an automated gel permeation chromatographic clean-up, by GC with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. Cucumbers fortified with fungicides in the laboratory were analysed using the proposed method and that of Luke, Frooberg, Masumoto and Doose (J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem., 1981, 64, 1187). For the proposed method, mean recoveries ranged from 87.9% for bitertanol to 96.5% for oxadixyl. For the method of Luke et al. mean recoveries ranged from 79.8% for triadimefon to 97.8% for bitertanol. Cucumbers treated with the fungicides in the field were also analysed by these two methods. For the determination of all these five fungicides, no difference was observed at the 5% significance level.

  6. Element-selective trace detection of toxic species in environmental samples using chromatographic techniques and derivative diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Zybin, A.; Niemax, K.

    1998-10-01

    Very sensitive laser absorption techniques based on a double-beam scheme with logarithmic processing of the detector signals and wavelength modulation of laser diodes are presented. Detection limits equivalent to 10-7 absorption per square root of detection bandwidth are obtained if sufficient laser power is available and if the absorption is also subject to additional modulation. The analytical versatility of these techniques is demonstrated by quantitative analysis of very low concentrations of (i) Cr(VI) species in tap water and (ii) chlorinated poly-aromatics (chlorophenols) in plant extracts, both after chromatographic separation. The atomic absorption measurements were performed in an air-acetylene flame (Cr) and in a low-pressure microwave-induced plasma (chlorophenols).

  7. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Methyl Salicylate in Rubbing Alcohol: An Experiment Employing Standard Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Atta, Robert E.; Van Atta, R. Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Provides a gas chromatography experiment that exercises the quantitative technique of standard addition to the analysis for a minor component, methyl salicylate, in a commercial product, "wintergreen rubbing alcohol." (CS)

  8. Detection and Identification of Bacteria by Gas Chromatography1

    PubMed Central

    Henis, Y.; Gould, J. R.; Alexander, M.

    1966-01-01

    Ether extracts of cultures of 29 strains representing 6 species of Bacillus, and of individual strains of Escherichia coli, Aerobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were examined in a gas chromatograph by use of flame ionization and electron capture detectors. Among the products detected were compounds with the chromatographic characteristics of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, ethyl alcohol, diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. The differences in peak areas of the various products formed by the bacteria were determined statistically for the chromatograms obtained with the two detectors, and the peaks were arranged in order of decreasing areas to yield a signature for each bacterial strain. Different signatures were obtained for the various genera and species and for strains of the same species. B. licheniformis, B. subtilis, and A. aerogenes formed significant quantities of a number of volatile compounds, and qualitative and quantitative differences between strains were noted. The electron capture detector was particularly sensitive to diacetyl and acetoin as well as to unknown compounds. By use of this detector, the presence of 5 pg of diacetyl and 20 pg of acetoin could be demonstrated. The quantity of acetoin detected in B. subtilis and B. licheniformis cultures was present in as little as 6.3 × 10-3 μliters of medium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:4959077

  9. Detection and identification of bacteria by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Henis, Y; Gould, J R; Alexander, M

    1966-07-01

    Ether extracts of cultures of 29 strains representing 6 species of Bacillus, and of individual strains of Escherichia coli, Aerobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were examined in a gas chromatograph by use of flame ionization and electron capture detectors. Among the products detected were compounds with the chromatographic characteristics of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, ethyl alcohol, diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. The differences in peak areas of the various products formed by the bacteria were determined statistically for the chromatograms obtained with the two detectors, and the peaks were arranged in order of decreasing areas to yield a signature for each bacterial strain. Different signatures were obtained for the various genera and species and for strains of the same species. B. licheniformis, B. subtilis, and A. aerogenes formed significant quantities of a number of volatile compounds, and qualitative and quantitative differences between strains were noted. The electron capture detector was particularly sensitive to diacetyl and acetoin as well as to unknown compounds. By use of this detector, the presence of 5 pg of diacetyl and 20 pg of acetoin could be demonstrated. The quantity of acetoin detected in B. subtilis and B. licheniformis cultures was present in as little as 6.3 x 10(-3) muliters of medium.

  10. Gas Chromatographic Verification of a Mathematical Model: Product Distribution Following Methanolysis Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, R. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated application of binomial statistics to equilibrium distribution of ester systems by employing gas chromatography to verify the mathematical model used. Discusses model development and experimental techniques, indicating the model enables a straightforward extension to symmetrical polyfunctional esters and presents a mathematical basis…

  11. Detection of Gas Slugs in Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature sensing system detects presence of gas slugs in heat pipes. System designed for operation between zero and 70 degrees C and detects noncondensable pockets of gas that result from decomposition of ammonia cooling fluid. Slugs 1 in. (25mm) in length detected.

  12. Determination of partition coefficients of refrigerants by gas liquid chromatographic headspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H; Gil-Lostes, Javier; Corr, Stuart; Acree, William E

    2012-11-23

    Gas-water partition coefficients, K(w), and gas-solvent partition coefficients, K(s), have been determined for chlorodifluoromethane and for 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane by headspace analysis, using a very simple experimental procedure. These partition coefficients then yield water-solvent partition coefficients, P(s). Where comparisons can be made there is excellent agreement with literature values for K(w) and P(s). The obtained values of K(s) and P(s) can be used to obtain physicochemical properties, or descriptors, for the refrigerants. Combination of these descriptors with previous equations we have developed enables partition coefficients to be obtained for a host of systems.

  13. Flat plate film cooling measurement using PSP and gas chromatograph techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.J.; Fox, M.

    1999-07-01

    The use of pressure sensitive paint (PSP) to measure film cooling effectiveness is demonstrated in a high speed wind tunnel using a flat plate. To validate this technology, gas chromatography was used to measure film cooling effectiveness from the same plate. Four (4) blowing ratios 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 were tested using the two methods. The flow stream turbulence effect was not studied and the free stream turbulence intensity was fixed at 4.0%. The PSP was calibrated at various temperatures as well as at various pressures before testing. The test results on the flat plate indicate that the PSP method of measuring film cooling effectiveness is far superior than the traditional gas chromatography method. The better spatial resolution and two dimensionality of the pressure sensitive paint method offers a great potential for its application in film cooling measurements.

  14. Determination of partition coefficients of refrigerants by gas liquid chromatographic headspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H; Gil-Lostes, Javier; Corr, Stuart; Acree, William E

    2012-11-23

    Gas-water partition coefficients, K(w), and gas-solvent partition coefficients, K(s), have been determined for chlorodifluoromethane and for 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane by headspace analysis, using a very simple experimental procedure. These partition coefficients then yield water-solvent partition coefficients, P(s). Where comparisons can be made there is excellent agreement with literature values for K(w) and P(s). The obtained values of K(s) and P(s) can be used to obtain physicochemical properties, or descriptors, for the refrigerants. Combination of these descriptors with previous equations we have developed enables partition coefficients to be obtained for a host of systems. PMID:23089519

  15. On-line gas chromatographic studies of rutherfordium (Element 104), hahnium (Element 105), and homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Kadkhodayan, B.

    1993-05-01

    Gas-phase isothermal chromatogaphy is a method by which volatile compounds of different chemical elements can be separated according to their volatilities. The technique, coupled with theoretical modeling of the processes occurring in the chromatogaphy column, provides accurate determination of thermodynamic properties (e.g., adsorption enthalpies) for compounds of elements, such as the transactinides, which can only be produced on an atom-at-a-time basis. In addition, the chemical selectivity of the isothermal chromatogaphy technique provides the decontamination from interfering activities necessary for the determination of the nuclear decay properties of isotopes of the transactinide elements. Volatility measurements were performed on chloride species of Rf and its group 4 homologs, Zr and Hf, as well as Ha and its group 5 homologs, Nb and Ta. Adsorption enthalpies were calculated for all species using a Monte Carlo code simulation based on a microscopic model for gas thermochromatography in open columns with laminar flow of the carrier gas. Preliminary results are presented for Zr- and Nb-bromides.

  16. Simultaneous determination of CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 in seawater samples using a purge and trap gas-chromatographic system.

    PubMed

    Massolo, Serena; Rivaro, Paola; Frache, Roberto

    2009-12-15

    We have optimized the analytical parameters of a homemade instrument for the simultaneous measurement of the chlorofluorocarbons CCl(2)F(2) (CFC-12), CCl(3)F (CFC-11) and C(2)Cl(3)F(3) (CFC-113) in seawater. Seawater samples are flame sealed into 60 ml glass ampoules avoiding any contact with the atmosphere and stored in cold, dark condition until analysis. In the laboratory, after cracking the ampoule in an enclosed chamber filled with ultra-pure nitrogen, the seawater sample is transferred to a stripping chamber, where ultra-pure nitrogen is used to purge the dissolved CFCs from the seawater. The extracted gases are then cryogenically trapped, subsequently the trap is isolated and heated and the CFCs are transferred by a carrier gas stream into a precolumn and then are separated on a gaschromatographic packed column. To separate adequately CFC-12 from N(2)O, during the early part of the chromatographic run, the gas stream passes through a molecular sieve, which is then isolated and backflushed. The CFCs are detected on an electron capture detector ((63)Ni ECD). After a careful choice of the experimental conditions, the performances of the system were evaluated. The detection limits for seawater samples are: 0.0081 pmol kg(-1) for CFC-12, 0.0073 pmol kg(-1) for CFC-11 and 0.0043 pmol kg(-1) for CFC-113. The reproducibility of replicate samples lies within 5% for the three CFCs. The system has been successfully employed for CFC measurements in seawater samples collected in the Ross Sea (Antarctica) in the framework of the Italian Antarctic research project. PMID:19836579

  17. Integration and Ruggedization of a Commercially Available Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) for the Resource Prospector Mission (RPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Kathleen; Griffin, Timothy; Captain, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The Resource Prospector is a mission to prospect for lunar volatiles (primarily water) at one of the two lunar poles, as well as demonstrate In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon. The Resource Prospector consists of a lander, a rover, and a rover-borne scientific payload. The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload, will be able to (1) locate near subsurface volatiles, (2) excavate and analyze samples of the volatile-bearing regolith, and (3) demonstrate the form, extractability and usefulness of the materials. The gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) is the primary instrument in the RESOLVE instrumentation suite responsible for identification and quantification of the volatiles evolved from the lunar regolith. Specifically, this instrument must have: a low mass, a low power consumption, be able to perform fast analyses of samples ranging from less than one to greater than ninety nine percent water by mass, be autonomously controlled by the payload's software and avionics platform, and be able to operate in the harsh lunar environment. The RPM's short mission duration is the primary driver of the requirement for a very fast analysis time currently base lined at less than 2 minutes per sample. This presentation will discuss the requirements levied upon the GCMS design, lessons learned from a preliminary field demonstration deployment, the current design, and the path forward.

  18. Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tienstra, M; Portolés, T; Hernández, F; Mol, J G J

    2015-11-27

    Significant speed improvement for instrumental runtime would make GC–MS much more attractive for determination of pesticides and contaminants and as complementary technique to LC–MS. This was the trigger to develop a fast method (time between injections less than 10 min) for the determination of pesticides and PCBs that are not (or less) amenable to LC–MS. A key factor in achieving shorter analysis time was the use of split injection (1:10) which allowed the use of a much higher initial GC oven temperature. A shorter column (15 m), higher temperature ramp, and higher carrier gas flow rate (6 mL/min) further contributed to analysis-time reduction. Chromatographic resolution was slightly compromised but still well fit-for-purpose. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique used (GC–APCI-triple quadrupole MS/MS), quantification and identification were still possible down to the 10 μg/kg level, which was demonstrated by successful validation of the method for complex feed matrices according to EU guidelines. Other advantages of the method included a better compatibility of acetonitrile extracts (e.g. QuEChERS) with GC, and a reduced transfer of co-extractants into the GC column and mass spectrometer. PMID:26601712

  19. Gas-chromatographic measurements of atmospheric CF2Cl2, CFCl3 and N2O in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, H.; Makino, Y.; Chubachi, S.; Muramatsu, H.; Shiobara, M.

    1985-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone is produced photochemically and destroyed by reactions with such minor constituents as O, NOx, HOx, and ClOx. Chlorofluoromethanes (CF2Cl2 and CFCl3) and dinitrogen oxide (NwO) are considered as major sources of the stratospheric ClOx and NOx, respectively. It is well known that CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 are released only by man's activities, and are being accumulated in the troposphere. In order to assess the influence of these compounds on the natural ozone balance these gases have been measured over Japan since 1978. Measurements of Antarctic air samples are also indispensable to understanding the global distributions of these gases, because most CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 have been released in the Northern Hemisphere. Antarctic air samples were obtained by the 23rd, 24th and 25th Japanese Antarctic Research Expeditions, and analyzed by a gas-chromatographic method using an electron capture detector. Three experimental results were obtained: (1) latitudinal distribution of these gases from Tokyo to Syowa Station (69.0 deg S, 39.6 deg E), (2) time trends at Syowa Station, and (3) vertical distributions over Syowa Station. Results are reported.

  20. New high-performance cryofocalizer injector for in-tube solid-phase microextraction and headspace capillary gas chromatographic applications.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Luigi

    2003-01-24

    The construction of a high-efficiency but cheap injector for volatile and very volatile compounds is shown. The device focuses the compounds in a fused-silica (FS) transfer capillary with the aid of liquid nitrogen. A 6.2 mm O.D. glass tube liner (ca. 25 cm x 1.5 mm I.D.) is inserted in the heated (-200 degrees C) injector of the gas chromatograph in place of the standard glass liner, and extends further externally through a liquid nitrogen container made with styrofoam-like material. Inside this glass tube, the FS transfer line passing through the oven door is connected like a pre-column to the analytical high-resolution GC column. It can move fast between the heated and the cooled zone (<-->, deltaL = 13 cm), and when this movement starts, crvofocused analytes are injected "at once" resulting in symmetrical and sharp injection bands with "zero" carryover. The performance of this device is demonstrated by its application to in-tube solid-phase microextraction and to spice volatiles analysis.

  1. Gas chromatographic separation of stereoisomers of non-protein amino acids on modified γ-cyclodextrin stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stefan; Strasdeit, Henry; Haasmann, Stephan; Brückner, Hans

    2015-09-11

    Stereoisomers (enantiomers and diastereoisomers) of synthetic, non-protein amino acids comprising α-, β-, and γ-amino acids, including α,α-dialkyl amino acids, were converted into the respective N-trifluoroacetyl-O-methyl esters and analyzed and resolved by gas chromatography (GC) on a commercial fused silica capillary column coated with the chiral stationary phase octakis(3-O-butyryl-2,6-di-O-pentyl)-γ-cyclodextrin. This column is marketed under the trade name Lipodex(®) E. Chromatograms, retention times, and a chart displaying the retention times of approximately 40 stereoisomers of amino acids are presented. With few exceptions, baseline or almost baseline resolution was achieved for enantiomers and diastereoisomers. The chromatographic method presented is considered to be highly suitable for the elucidation of the stereochemistry of non-protein amino acids, for example in natural products, and for evaluating the enantiopurity of genetically non-coded amino acids used for the synthesis and design of conformationally tailored peptides. The method is applicable to extraterrestrial materials or can be used in experimental work related to abiotic syntheses or enantioselective destruction and amplification of amino acids. PMID:26278360

  2. Development of automated online gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatograph mass spectrometry for measuring multiresidual pesticides in agricultural products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Bin; Hashi, Yuki; Qin, Ya-Ping; Zhou, Hai-Xia; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2007-01-01

    An automated online gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GPC-GC/MS) was developed for the rapid determination of residual pesticides in agricultural products. Pesticides were extracted from homogenized food samples with acetonitrile and decontaminated via the matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) technique, using a primary secondary amine as sorbent prior to GPC-GC/MS analysis. A slightly modified preparation method and automated GPC step proved useful in minimizing matrix interference. To evaluate the performance of the system, 97 target pesticides were spiked at a concentration of 0.1mg/kg into a range of food types, including potato, cabbage, carrot, apple, orange, cucumber, and rice. A low flow rate of 0.1 mL/min in GPC resulted in a 40-fold reduction in solvent consumption compared with conventional GPC column applications. The combination of MSPD technique and GPC-GC/MS for the analysis of the 97 pesticides can be accomplished within 90 min. Most pesticides were recovered in the range of 70-120%, with relative standard deviation generally less than 10%. The results demonstrate that the method can be successfully applied with acceptable recoveries to a broad range of target pesticides within a diverse range of food types.

  3. A low-power pressure-and temperature-programmed separation system for a micro gas chromatograph.

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, Richard D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Advanced Sensor Technologies, Albuquerque, NM); Lambertus, Gordon R. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Potkay, Joseph A. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

    2006-10-01

    This thesis presents the theory, design, fabrication and testing of the microvalves and columns necessary in a pressure- and temperature-programmed micro gas chromatograph ({micro}GC). Two microcolumn designs are investigated: a bonded Si-glass column having a rectangular cross section and a vapor-deposited silicon oxynitride (Sion) column having a roughly circular cross section. Both microcolumns contain integrated heaters and sensors for rapid, controlled heating. The 3.2 cm x 3.2 cm, 3 m-long silicon-glass column, coated with a non-polar polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stationary phase, separates 30 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in less than 6 min. This is the most efficient micromachined column reported to date, producing greater than 4000 plates/m. The 2.7 mm x 1.4 mm Sion column eliminates the glass sealing plate and silicon substrate using deposited dielectrics and is the lowest power and fastest GC column reported to date; it requires only 11 mW to raise the column temperature by 100 C and has a response time of 11s and natural temperature ramp rate of 580 C/min. A 1 m-long PDMS-coated Sion microcolumn separates 10 VOCs in 52s. A system-based design approach was used for both columns.

  4. Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tienstra, M; Portolés, T; Hernández, F; Mol, J G J

    2015-11-27

    Significant speed improvement for instrumental runtime would make GC–MS much more attractive for determination of pesticides and contaminants and as complementary technique to LC–MS. This was the trigger to develop a fast method (time between injections less than 10 min) for the determination of pesticides and PCBs that are not (or less) amenable to LC–MS. A key factor in achieving shorter analysis time was the use of split injection (1:10) which allowed the use of a much higher initial GC oven temperature. A shorter column (15 m), higher temperature ramp, and higher carrier gas flow rate (6 mL/min) further contributed to analysis-time reduction. Chromatographic resolution was slightly compromised but still well fit-for-purpose. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique used (GC–APCI-triple quadrupole MS/MS), quantification and identification were still possible down to the 10 μg/kg level, which was demonstrated by successful validation of the method for complex feed matrices according to EU guidelines. Other advantages of the method included a better compatibility of acetonitrile extracts (e.g. QuEChERS) with GC, and a reduced transfer of co-extractants into the GC column and mass spectrometer.

  5. Gas chromatographic separation of stereoisomers of non-protein amino acids on modified γ-cyclodextrin stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stefan; Strasdeit, Henry; Haasmann, Stephan; Brückner, Hans

    2015-09-11

    Stereoisomers (enantiomers and diastereoisomers) of synthetic, non-protein amino acids comprising α-, β-, and γ-amino acids, including α,α-dialkyl amino acids, were converted into the respective N-trifluoroacetyl-O-methyl esters and analyzed and resolved by gas chromatography (GC) on a commercial fused silica capillary column coated with the chiral stationary phase octakis(3-O-butyryl-2,6-di-O-pentyl)-γ-cyclodextrin. This column is marketed under the trade name Lipodex(®) E. Chromatograms, retention times, and a chart displaying the retention times of approximately 40 stereoisomers of amino acids are presented. With few exceptions, baseline or almost baseline resolution was achieved for enantiomers and diastereoisomers. The chromatographic method presented is considered to be highly suitable for the elucidation of the stereochemistry of non-protein amino acids, for example in natural products, and for evaluating the enantiopurity of genetically non-coded amino acids used for the synthesis and design of conformationally tailored peptides. The method is applicable to extraterrestrial materials or can be used in experimental work related to abiotic syntheses or enantioselective destruction and amplification of amino acids.

  6. Gas chromatographic determination of sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol in chewing gum and sorbitol in mints.

    PubMed

    Daniels, D H; Warner, C R; Fazio, T

    1982-05-01

    A method has been developed for determination of sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol in chewing gum and sorbitol in mints. Chewing gum is partitioned between methylene chloride and water; the mint is simply dissolved in water. The aqueous extract is dried and the residue is derivatized with pyridine-acetic anhydride to form the corresponding peracetates. The derivatives are quantitated by gas chromatography using a 9 ft x 2 mm column packed with 10% Silar 10C on Chromosorb W/AW. Average recoveries of these sugar alcohols ranged from 96 to 102%. PMID:6807952

  7. A charcoal sampling method and a gas chromatographic analytical procedure for carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    McCammon, C S; Quinn, P M; Kupel, R E

    1975-08-01

    Research is reported concerning an acceptable method for sampling and analyzing samples for carbon disulfide. Test atmospheres of carbon disulfide were generated dynamically using the syringe injection method, ant the theoretical concetnration verified by a liquid absorbent, colorimetric method. The CS2 was adsorbed on charcoal tubes, eluted with benzene, and quantitated with a gas chromatography equipped with a sulfer flame photometric detector. The results compared with the colorimetris analysis. The sensitivity of this method is 1 mug on a charcoal tube. The charcoal tubes were also tested for breakthrough volumes, holding power vs time, and the effect of air transport and temperature cycles.

  8. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay for 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate and 6-hydroxymelatonin glucuronide in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, P.L.; Leone, A.M.; Young, I.M.; Stovell, P.; Silman, R.E.

    1987-04-01

    Circulating melatonin is hydroxylated to 6-hydroxymelatonin and excreted in urine as the sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. We extracted these two compounds from urine by using octadecylsilane-bonded silica cartridges to eliminate most of the urea and electrolytes, and silica cartridges to separate the sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. After hydrolyzing the separated conjugates enzymically, we determined the free hydroxymelatonin by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Though recoveries were low and variable, we were able to quantify the analyte in the original sample by adding deuterated sulfate and glucuronide conjugates to the urines before extraction.

  9. Gas chromatographic determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and smoked rice samples after solid-phase microextraction using multiwalled carbon nanotube loaded hollow fiber.

    PubMed

    Matin, Amir Abbas; Biparva, Pourya; Gheshlaghi, Mohammad

    2014-12-29

    A novel solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded on hollow fiber membrane pores. Stainless steel wire was used as unbreakable support. The major advantages of the proposed fiber are its (a) high reproducibility due to the uniform structure of the hollow fiber membranes, (b) high extraction capacity related to the porous structure of the hollow fiber and outstanding adsorptive characteristics of MWCNTs. The proposed fiber was applied for the microextraction of five representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous media (river and hubble-bubble water) and smoked rice samples followed by gas chromatographic determination. Analytical merits of the method, including high correlation coefficients [(0.9963-0.9992) and (0.9982-0.9999)] and low detection limits [(9.0-13.0ngL(-1)) and (40.0-150.0ngkg(-1))] for water and rice samples, respectively, made the proposed method suitable for the ultra-trace determination of PAHs. PMID:25476686

  10. Determination of diethylhexyladipate and acetyltributylcitrate in aqueous extracts after cloud point extraction coupled with microwave assisted back extraction and gas chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Zygoura, Panagiota D; Paleologos, Evangelos K; Riganakos, Kyriakos A; Kontominas, Michael G

    2005-11-01

    The determination of commercial plasticizers (di-(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (DEHA) and acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC)) in aqueous solutions is described. The newly proposed technique of applying microwaves to cloud point extracts in order to enable combination with gas chromatographic analysis has been used for this purpose. Both plasticizers were entrapped in the micelles of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 and removed from the bulk phase by centrifugation. Micellization was enhanced by increasing the ionic strength of the solution with concentrated NaCl. Extraction recoveries of the proposed method were over 95% for water and 3% (w/v) aqueous acetic acid and over 85% for 10% (v/v) aqueous ethanol, respectively. The calibration curves obtained, following the proposed methodology have a linear range between 50 and 2000 microg/L for each analyte while the detection limits were as low as 15 and 19 microg/L for DEHA and ATBC, respectively, with an RSD below 5% even for low concentrations. As an analytical demonstration the proposed methodology was applied for the determination of the migration levels of the selected plasticizers from a PVC food packaging film into aqueous simulants.

  11. Gas chromatographic analysis of reactive carbonyl compounds formed from lipids upon UV-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, K.J.; Shibamoto, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Peroxidation of lipids produces carbonyl compounds; some of these, e.g., malonaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, are genotoxic because of their reactivity with biological nucleophiles. Analysis of the reactive carbonyl compounds is often difficult. The methylhydrazine method developed for malonaldehyde analysis was applied to simultaneously measure the products formed from linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and squalene upon ultraviolet-irradiation (UV-irradiation). The photoreaction products, saturated monocarbonyl, alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls, and beta-dicarbonyls, were derivatized with methylhydrazine to give hydrazones, pyrazolines, and pyrazoles, respectively. The derivatives were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Lipid peroxidation products identified included formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, malonaldehyde, n-hexanal, and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. Malonaldehyde levels formed upon 4 hr of irradiation were 0.06 micrograms/mg from squalene, 2.4 micrograms/mg from linolenic acid, and 5.7 micrograms/mg from arachidonic acid. Significant levels of acrolein (2.5 micrograms/mg) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (0.17 micrograms/mg) were also produced from arachidonic acid upon 4 hr irradiation.

  12. MOMA Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer onboard the 2018 ExoMars Mission: results and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Pinnick, V. T.; Szopa, C.; Grand, N.; Humeau, O.; van Amerom, F. H.; Danell, R.; Freissinet, C.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Gonnsen, Z.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Coll, P.; Raulin, F.; Goesmann, F.

    2015-10-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is a dual ion source linear ion trap mass spectrometer that was designed for the 2018 joint ESA-Roscosmos mission to Mars. The main scientific aim of the mission is to search for signs of extant or extinct life in the near subsurface of Mars by acquiring samples from as deep as 2 m below the surface. MOMA will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular and chiral) information from the solid samples, with particular focus on the characterization of organic content. The MOMA instrument, itself, is a joint venture for NASA and ESA to develop a mass spectrometer capable of analyzing samples from pyrolysis/chemical derivatization gas chromatography (GC) as well as ambient pressure laser desorption ionization (LDI). The combination of the two analytical techniques allows for the chemical characterization of a broad range of compounds, including volatile and non-volatile species. Generally, MOMA can provide information on elemental and molecular makeup, polarity, chirality and isotopic patterns of analyte species. Here we report on the current performance of the MOMA prototype instruments, specifically the demonstration of the gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS) mode of operation.

  13. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided. PMID:27492597

  14. Gas chromatographic separation of fatty acid esters of cholesterol and phytosterols on an ionic liquid capillary column.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2015-12-15

    Steryl esters are high molecular weight compounds (600-700g/mol) regularly present as a minor lipid class in animal and plant lipids. Different sterol backbones (e.g., cholesterol, β-sitosterol and brassicasterol) which can be esterified with various fatty acids can result in highly complex steryl ester patterns in food samples. The gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of intact steryl esters is challenging, since high elution temperatures are required for their elution. On nonpolar GC phases, steryl esters with fatty acids with differing degree of unsaturation (e.g., oleate and linoleate) cannot be separated and there are only few polar columns available with sufficient temperature stability. In this study, we used gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and analyzed intact steryl esters on a commercial room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) column which was shortened to a length of 12m. The column separated the steryl esters both by total carbon number and by degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. For instance, cholesteryl esters with stearic acid (18:0), oleic acid (18:1n-9), linoleic acid (18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) could be resolved (R≥1.3) from each other. By analysis of synthesized standard substances, the elution orders for different steryl backbones and different fatty acids on a given sterol backbone could be determined. Analysis of spreads and plant oils allowed to determine retention times for 37 steryl esters, although a few co-elutions were observed. The ionic liquid column proved to be well-suited for the analysis of intact steryl esters.

  15. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided.

  16. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of kepone in field-collected avian tissues and eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, C.J.; Reichel, W.L.; Swineford, D.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure is described for determining Kepone (decachlorooctahydro-1,3,4-metheno-2H-cyclobuta [cd] pentalene-2-one) residues in avian egg, liver, and tissue. Samples were extracted with benzene-isopropanol, and the extract was cleaned up with fuming H2SO4-concentrated H2SO4. Kepone was separated from organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls on a Florisil column and analyzed by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The average recovery from spiked tissues was 86%. The analyses performed on 14 bald eagle carcasses and livers, 3 bald eagle eggs, and 14 osprey eggs show measurable levels which indicate that Kepone accumulates in the tissues of fish-eating birds. Residues were confirmed by GLC-mass spectrometry.

  17. Liquid chromatographic analysis of a formulated ester from a gas-turbine engine test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Morales, W.

    1983-01-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) utilizing mu-Bondagel and mu-Styragel columns with a tetrahydrofuran mobile phase was used to determine the chemical degradation of lubricant samples from a gas-turbine engine test. A MIL-L-27502 candidate, ester-based lubricant was run in a J57-29 engine at a bulk oil temperature of 216 C. In general, the analyses indicated a progressive loss of primary ester, additive depletion, and formation of higher molecular weight material. An oil sample taken at the conclusion of the test showed a reversal of this trend because of large additions of new oil. The high-molecular-weight product from the degraded ester absorbed strongly in the ultraviolet region at 254 nanometers. This would indicate the presence of chromophoric groups. An analysis of a similar ester lubricant from a separate high-temperature bearing test yielded qualitatively similar results.

  18. Development and evaluation of gas and liquid chromatographic methods for the analysis of fatty amines.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Zachary S; Weatherly, Choyce A; Woods, Ross M; Xu, Chengdong; Vale, Glenda; Berthod, Alain; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2014-03-01

    In contrast to the plethora of publications on the separation of fatty acids, analogous studies involving fatty amines are scarce. A recently introduced ionic-liquid-based capillary column for GC was used to separate trifluoroacetylated fatty amines focusing on the analysis of a commercial sample. Using the ionic liquid column (isothermal mode at 200 °C) it was possible to separate linear primary fatty amines from C12 to C22 chain length in less 25 min with MS identification. The log of the amine retention factors are linearly related to the alkyl chain length with a methylene selectivity of 0.117 kcal/mol for the saturated amines and 0.128 kcal/mol for the mono-unsaturated amines. The sp2 selectivity for unsaturated fatty amines also could be calculated as 0.107 kcal/mol for the ionic liquid column. The commercial sample was quantified by GC with flame ionization detection (FID). An LC method also was developed with a reversed phase gradient separation using acetonitrile/formate buffer mobile phases and ESI-MS detection. Native amines could be detected and identified by their single ion monitoring chromatograms even when partial coelution was observed. The analysis of the commercial sample returned results coherent with those obtained by GC-FID and with the manufacturer's data. PMID:24415651

  19. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  20. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  1. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  2. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  3. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  4. Effect of cation-exchange pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts on the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilylation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Tsunoda, N; Ohta, H; Tsuge, K; Takesako, H; Seto, Y

    1998-10-23

    The efficiency of pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts using a cation-exchange resin has been investigated by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatization. An aqueous solution containing methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and its monoalkyl esters, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid, was dried, and these phosphonic acids were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoro-acetamide and analyzed by GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives were significantly decreased by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions to an aqueous solution (approximately 0.5 mM) before derivatization. The extent of lowered yields was related to the hydrophilicity of phosphonic acids. MPA and its monoalkyl esters were spiked into soil samples (sand, alluvial soil and volcanic ash soil), extracted with distilled water, dried, silylated and applied to GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters from soil samples were low (3-42%) and MPA derivative was scarcely detected (yield: < 0.7%). By desalting the aqueous soil extract by passage through a strong cation-exchange resin, the yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters were significantly improved (12-69%) and MPA derivative was detected (yield: 2-36%). The extent of improved yields was related to the concentrations of divalent metal cations in aqueous soil extracts. In combination with desalting by the cation-exchange resin, GC-MS after TBDMS derivatization enables detection of nerve agent hydrolysis products in soils at sub-ppm (0.2 microgram/g) concentrations. PMID:9818434

  5. Parabens determination in cosmetic and personal care products exploiting a multi-syringe chromatographic (MSC) system and chemiluminescent detection.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Melisa; Portugal, Lindomar A; Avivar, Jessica; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2015-10-01

    Parabens are widely used in dairy products, such as in cosmetics and personal care products. Thus, in this work a multi-syringe chromatographic (MSC) system is proposed for the first time for the determination of four parabens: methylparaben (MP), ethylparaben (EP), propylparaben (PP) and butylparaben (BP) in cosmetics and personal care products, as a simpler, practical, and low cost alternative to HPLC methods. Separation was achieved using a 5mm-long precolumn of reversed phase C18 and multi-isocratic separation, i.e. using two consecutive mobile phases, 12:88 acetonitrile:water and 28:72 acetonitrile:water. The use of a multi-syringe buret allowed the easy implementation of chemiluminescent (CL) detection after separation. The chemiluminescent detection is based on the reduction of Ce(IV) by p-hydroxybenzoic acid, product of the acid hydrolysis of parabens, to excite rhodamine 6G (Rho 6G) and measure the resulting light emission. Multivariate designs combined with the concepts of multiple response treatments and desirability functions have been employed to simultaneously optimize and evaluate the responses. The optimized method has proved to be sensitive and precise, obtaining limits of detection between 20 and 40 µg L(-1) and RSD <4.9% in all cases. The method was satisfactorily applied to cosmetics and personal care products, obtaining no significant differences at a confidence level of 95% comparing with the HPLC reference method.

  6. Enhancement of fluorescence detection in chromatographic methods by computer analysis of second order data. Progress report, August 1, 1990--October 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rutan, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    Two types of experiments were studied during the course of this project. The first was liquid chromatographic separation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) followed by detection with full-spectrum fluorescence spectroscopy using anintensified diode array detector. Methods such as generalized rank annihilation and adaptive Kalman filtering were developed and evaluated. The second was the use of a thin-layer chromatographic or planar electrophoretic separation of analytes (amino acids or enzymes). The analytes are then reacted with a reagent or enzyme substrate; the reaction is followed by fluorescence intensity vs time and migration distance, and kinetic analysis is used to quantify the component species.

  7. Validation of a gas chromatographic method to quantify sesquiterpenes in copaiba oils.

    PubMed

    Sousa, João Paulo B; Brancalion, Ana P S; Souza, Ariana B; Turatti, Izabel C C; Ambrósio, Sérgio R; Furtado, Niege A J C; Lopes, Norberto P; Bastos, Jairo K

    2011-03-25

    Copaifera species (Leguminoseae) are popularly known as "copaiba" or "copaíva". The oleoresins obtained from the trunk of these species have been extensively used in folk medicine and are commercialized in Brazil as crude oil and in several pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. This work reports a complete validated method for the quantification of β-caryophyllene, α-copaene, and α-humulene in distinct copaiba oleoresins available commercially. Thus, essential oil samples (100μL) were dissolved in 20mL of hexanes containing internal standard (1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene, 3.0mM) in a 25mL glass flask. A 1μL aliquot was injected into the GC-FID system. A fused-silica capillary column HP-5, coated with 5% phenyl-methylsiloxane was used for this study. The developed method gave a good detection response with linearity in the range of 0.10-18.74mM. Limits of detection and quantitation variety ranged between 0.003 and 0.091mM. β-Caryophyllene, α-copaene, and α-humulene were recovered in a range from 74.71% to 88.31%, displaying RSD lower than 10% and relative errors between -11.69% and -25.30%. Therefore, this method could be considered as an analytical tool for the quality control of different Copaifera oil samples and its products in both cosmetic and pharmaceutical companies.

  8. Gas chromatographic isolation of individual compounds from complex matrices for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Eglinton, T.I.; Aluwihare, L.I.; McNichol, A.P.; Bauer, J.E.; Druffel, E.R.M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel, practical approach for isolation of individual compounds from complex organic matrices for natural abundance radiocarbon measurement. This is achieved through the use of automated pereparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) to separate and recover sufficient quantities of individual target compounds for {sup 14}C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We developed and tested this approach using a suite of samples (plant lipids, petroleums) whose ages spanned the {sup 14}C time scale and which contained a variety of compound types (fatty acids, sterols, hydrocarbons). Comparison of individual compound and bulk radiocarbon signatures for the isotopically homogeneous samples studied revealed that {Delta}{sup 14}C values generally agreed well ({+-}10%). Background contamination was assessed at each stage of the isolation procedure, and incomplete solvent removal prior to combustion was the only significant source of additional carbon. Isotope fractionation was addressed through compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analyses. Fractionation of isotopes during isolation of individual compounds was minimal (<5% for {delta}{sup 13}C), provided the entire peak was collected during PCGC. Trapping of partially coeluting peaks did cause errors, and these results highlight the importance of conducting stable carbon isotopic measurements of each trapped compound in concert with AMS for reliable radiocarbon measurements. 29 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Gas chromatographic analysis of histamine in mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus).

    PubMed

    Antoine, Francis R; Wei, Cheng-I; Otwell, W Steve; Sims, Charlie A; Littell, Ramon C; Hogle, Amanda D; Marshall, Maurice R

    2002-08-14

    Several authors have studied histamine using gas chromatography (GC) as a tool for quantitation, but the methods used were not always suitable depending on the kind of food. Problems frequently cited include incomplete histamine elution from the columns and peak tailing. Histamine is of interest because it is the factor common to all cases of scombroid poisoning, it has physiological and biological activity, and it is a chemical indicator of fish quality. In this study a modified GC method was used to quantify histamine in mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). Mean recovery was 67% for the GC method, compared with 90% for the AOAC fluorometric method. There was a 0.96 correlation of the GC histamine values with those of the AOAC fluorometric method. A temperature program, splitless/split injection, and analyte cleanup were essential for GC properties. Histamine retention time was 8.2 min. The method allowed peak height to be used for quantitation and simultaneous analysis of cadaverine and putrescine. PMID:12166956

  10. A practical methodology to measure unbiased gas chromatographic retention factor vs. temperature relationships.

    PubMed

    Peng, Baijie; Kuo, Mei-Yi; Yang, Panhia; Hewitt, Joshua T; Boswell, Paul G

    2014-12-29

    Compound identification continues to be a major challenge. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a primary tool used for this purpose, but the GC retention information it provides is underutilized because existing retention databases are experimentally restrictive and unreliable. A methodology called "retention projection" has the potential to overcome these limitations, but it requires the retention factor (k) vs. T relationship of a compound to calculate its retention time. Direct methods of measuring k vs. T relationships from a series of isothermal runs are tedious and time-consuming. Instead, a series of temperature programs can be used to quickly measure the k vs. T relationships, but they are generally not as accurate when measured this way because they are strongly biased by non-ideal behavior of the GC system in each of the runs. In this work, we overcome that problem by using the retention times of 25 n-alkanes to back-calculate the effective temperature profile and hold-up time vs. T profiles produced in each of the six temperature programs. When the profiles were measured this way and taken into account, the k vs. T relationships measured from each of two different GC-MS instruments were nearly as accurate as the ones measured isothermally, showing less than two-fold more error. Furthermore, temperature-programmed retention times calculated in five other laboratories from the new k vs. T relationships had the same distribution of error as when they were calculated from k vs. T relationships measured isothermally. Free software was developed to make the methodology easy to use. The new methodology potentially provides a relatively fast and easy way to measure unbiased k vs. T relationships.

  11. Characterization of low-temperature cofired ceramic tiles as platforms for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Darko, Ernest; Thurbide, Kevin B; Gerhardt, Geoff C; Michienzi, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    A gas chromatography (GC) column is fabricated within a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) tile, and its analytical properties are characterized. By using a dual-spiral design, a 100 μm wide square channel up to 15 m in length is produced within an 11 cm × 5.5 cm LTCC tile. The channel is dynamically coated with an OV-101 stationary phase that is cross-linked with dicumyl peroxide. While the uncoated LTCC tiles were able to separate a mixture of n-alkanes, the peak shapes were broad (base width of ~2 min) and tailing. In contrast to this, the coated LTCC tiles produced sharp (base width of ~8-10 s), symmetrical, well-resolved peaks for the same analytes. By using a 7.5 m long channel, about 15,000 plates were obtained for a dodecane test analyte. Further, the coated LTCC tiles were found to produce plate heights that were about 3-fold smaller than those obtained from a conventional capillary GC column of similar length, dimension, and coating operated under the same conditions. As a result, test analyte separations were slightly improved in the LTCC tiles, and their overall performance fared well. In terms of temperature programming, it was found that a series of n-alkanes separated on the LTCC tile provided a cumulative peak capacity of around 54 peaks when using C₈ to C₁₃ as analyte markers. Results indicate that LTCC tiles provide a viable and useful alternative platform for performing good quality GC separations.

  12. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of linoleic acid peroxide-derived radicals using electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, H

    2000-12-29

    High-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED) was applied to detect 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE)-derived radicals such as the pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical. The 13-HPODE-derived radicals were successfully detected using HPLC-ED by the combined use of the spin-trapping technique with alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN). The 4-POBN-pentyl radical adduct was detected at the retention time of 18.2 +/- 0.3 min on the elution profile of HPLC-ED with an ODS column (15 cm x 4.6 mm I.D.) using a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min with 50 mM ammonium acetate in 29% (v/v) aqueous acetonitrile. The 4-POBN-octanoic acid radical adduct was also detected at the retention time of 13.7 +/- 0.7 min using a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min with 50 mM ammonium acetate in 14% (v/v) aqueous acetonitrile. The concentrations of the 4-POBN radical adducts were determined using HPLC-ED without an internal standard. HPLC-ED is 100 times as sensitive as HPLC-electron spin resonance (ESR) under the ESR and ED conditions employed here. Even 1.8 pmol of the 4-POBN-pentyl (or octanoic acid) radical adduct was detectable using PMID:11204234

  13. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations with a temperature programmed microfabricated thermal modulator.

    PubMed

    Collin, William R; Nuñovero, Nicolas; Paul, Dibyadeep; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2016-04-29

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) with a temperature-programmed microfabricated thermal modulator (μTM) is demonstrated. The 0.78 cm(2), 2-stage μTM chip with integrated heaters and a PDMS coated microchannel was placed in thermal contact with a solid-state thermoelectric cooler and mounted on top of a bench scale GC. It was fluidically coupled through heated interconnects to an upstream first-dimension ((1)D) PDMS-coated capillary column and a downstream uncoated capillary or second-dimension ((2)D) PEG-coated capillary. A mixture of n-alkanes C6-C10 was separated isothermally and the full-width-at-half-maximum (fwhm) values of the modulated peaks were assessed as a function of the computer-controlled minimum and maximum stage temperatures of μTM, Tmin and Tmax, respectively. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at -25 and 100°C, respectively, modulated peaks of C6 and C7 had fwhm values<53 ms while the modulated peaks of C10 had a fwhm value of 1.3s, due to inefficient re-mobilization. With Tmin and Tmax fixed at 0 and 210°C, respectively, the fwhm value for the modulated C10 peaks decreased to 67 ms, but C6 and C7 exhibited massive breakthrough. By programming Tmin from -25 to 0°C and Tmax from 100 to 220°C, the C6 and C7 peaks had fwhm values≤50 ms, and the fwhm for C10 peaks remained<95 ms. Using the latter conditions for the GC×GC separation of a sample of unleaded gasoline yielded resolution similar to that reported with a commercial thermal modulator. Replacing the PDMS phase in the μTM with a trigonal-tricationic room temperature ionic liquid eliminated the bleed observed with the PDMS, but also reduced the capacity for several test compounds. Regardless, the demonstrated capability to independently temperature program this low resource μTM enhances its versatility and its promise for use in bench-scale GC×GC systems.

  14. Quantitative gas chromatographic mass spectrometric determination of pinaverium-bromide in human serum.

    PubMed

    de Weerdt, G A; Beke, R P; Verdievel, H G; Barbier, F; Jonckheere, J A; de Leenheer, A P

    1983-03-01

    A method has been developed for quantitative determination of pinaverium-bromide, a quaternary ammonium derivative with papaverine-like activity, in human serum. The method involves a chloroform extraction of serum spiked with N-(6,6-dimethyl bicyclo[3.1.1]2-heptenyl-ethoxyethyl) perhydro-1,4-oxazine as internal standard. After evaporation of the solvent, and reduction of the residue with Raney-Nickel, the internal standard and the reduced pinaverium-bromide are re-extracted from the reaction mixture with toluene and analysed isothermally on a fused silica column coated with OV-101. Although chemical ionization with methane revealed intense protonated molecular ions for both pinaverium-bromide and the internal standard, selectivity and sensitivity were significantly lower in comparison with electron impact ionization at 70 e V. Therefore, quantification was performed in the electron impact mode by single ion monitoring of the common fragment ion at m/z 100.2. A linear detector response was observed up to 160 ng ml-1. A within-run assay precision better than 2% CV (n = 5) was found, and a detection limit of 1 ng pinaverium-bromide ml-1 of serum was attained. PMID:6850068

  15. Development of a gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method for determination of phthalates in oily foods.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Anna

    2010-01-01

    A GC/MS method was developed for simultaneous determination of 12 phthalates and four other plasticizers--acetyl tributyl citrate, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, dibutyl sebacate, di-isononyl cyclohexane 1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH)--in vegetable oil, pesto, and tomato sauce. Samples were extracted with acetonitrile and cleaned on a Florisil column. The final extract was analyzed by GC in combination with ion trap MS. The phthalates and di-isononyl cyclohexane 1,2-dicarboxylate were detected by MS/MS, while the other three plasticizers were monitored in the same GC run using full scan mode. The analytical process was validated in each matrix by the analysis of blank samples. Performance characteristics, such as linearity, LOQ, precision, and recoveries were studied. Studies at fortification levels of 0.25-200 mg/kg gave mean recoveries ranging from 71 to 106% and RSD values between 7 and 12% for all compounds. LOQs were 0.050-0.10 mg/kg for all the target compounds except di-isononyl phthalate, di-isodecyl phthalate, and DINCH (2.0 mg/kg).

  16. Detection of arecoline by simple high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method in Indian nontobacco pan masala.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Anjan; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Sur, Tapas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chewing the habit of blended pan masala containing areca nut with or without tobacco is a common practice in the Indian subcontinent. Arecoline, a pyridine alkaloid presence in areca nut alarmed for oral carcinogenesis and strictly prohibited in the western world. However, in India using blended pan masala is very popular among young and old individuals. In this context, we aimed to detect arecoline in Indian blended nontobacco pan masala sold in Kolkata using a simple densitometric high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method and for alarming their use in common people. Eleven popularly Indian blended nontobacco pan masala were collected from the territory of Kolkata and isolated arecoline, following solvent extraction method derived for pyridine alkaloid. The quantitative analysis of arecoline was measured using automated software-based HPTLC instruments and validated the method according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. Arecoline was detected in all 11 blended nontobacco pan masala samples in a range of minimum 130 to maximum 415 μg/g dry samples. Arecoline is hazardous carcinogenic compound, so the use of Indian blended nontobacco pan masala should be restricted. Further, the method was found suitable for routine quantitative analysis of arecoline in areca nut containing substances.

  17. Immuno-Chromatographic Wicking Assay for the Rapid Detection of Chikungunya Viral Antigens in Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Hinson, Juanita M; Davé, Sonia; McMenamy, Scott S; Davé, Kirti; Turell, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    The outbreak of disease caused by chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in 2006 and the recent spread of this virus to the Americas in 2013 indicate the potential for this virus to spread and cause significant disease. However, there are currently no accurate and reliable field-usable, diagnostic methods to provide critical, real-time information for early detection of CHIKV within the vector populations in order to implement appropriate vector control and personal protective measures. In this article, we report the ability of an immuno-chromatographic assay developed by VecTOR Test Systems Inc. to detect CHIKV in a pool of female Aedes mosquitoes containing a single CHIKV-infected mosquito. The CHIKV dipstick assay was simple to use, did not require a cold chain, and provided clear results within 1 h. It was highly specific and did not cross-react with samples spiked with a variety of other alpha, bunya, and flaviviruses. The CHIKV assay can provide real-time critical information on the presence of CHIKV in mosquitoes to public health personnel. Results from this assay will allow a rapid threat assessment and the focusing of vector control measures in high-risk areas.

  18. Immuno-chromatographic wicking assay for the rapid detection of dengue viral antigens in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Wanja, Elizabeth; Parker, Zahra F; Odusami, Oluwakemi; Rowland, Tobin; Davé, Kirti; Davé, Sonia; Turell, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    There is a threat for dengue virus (DENV) reemergence in many regions of the world, particularly in areas where the DENV vectors, Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse), are readily available. However, there are currently no accurate and reliable diagnostic methods to provide critical, real-time information for early detection of DENV within the vector populations to implement appropriate vector control and personal protective measures. In this article, we report the ability of an immuno-chromatographic assay developed by VecTOR Test Systems Inc. to detect DENV in a pool of female Aedes mosquitoes infected with any of the four viral serotypes. The DENV dipstick assay was simple to use, did not require a cold chain, and provided clear results within 30 min. It was highly specific and did not cross-react with samples spiked with West Nile, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Rift Valley fever, chikungunya, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, Ross River, LaCrosse, or Caraparu viruses. The DENV assay can provide real-time critical information on the presence of DENV in mosquitoes to public health personnel. Results from this assay will allow a rapid threat assessment and the focusing of vector control measures in high-risk areas. PMID:24605472

  19. Evaluation of two adsorbents for diffusive sampling and thermal desorption-gas chromatographic analysis of monoterpenes in air.

    PubMed

    Sunesson, A L; Sundgren, M; Levin, J O; Eriksson, K; Carlson, R

    1999-02-01

    Tube type samplers with two different adsorbents, Chromosorb 106 and Tenax TA, were evaluated by laboratory experiments and field tests for simultaneous diffusive sampling of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and delta 3-carene and subsequent thermal desorption-gas chromatographic analysis. No statistically significant effects of exposure time, concentrations of monoterpenes or relative humidity were found for samplers with Chromosorb 106 when running a factorial design, with the exception of the adsorption of delta 3-carene, for which some weak effects were noted. Samplers with Tenax TA were affected by the sampling time as well as the concentration for all terpenes, with a strong interaction effect between these two factors. The terpenes showed good storage stability on both adsorbents. No effect of back-diffusion was noted when using Chromosorb 106, while Tenax TA showed some back-diffusion effects. The uptake rates, in ml min-1, for the terpenes on Chromosorb 106 were 0.36 for alpha-pinene, 0.36 for beta-pinene and 0.40 for delta 3-carene. The corresponding average values on Tenax TA were 0.30 for alpha-pinene, 0.32 for beta-pinene and 0.38 for delta 3-carene. The field validation proved that diffusive sampling on Chromosorb 106 agreed well with pumped sampling on charcoal for stationary samples, while the personal samples indicated a discrepancy of 25% between Chromosorb 106 and charcoal samples. Tenax TA generally gave lower results than Chromosorb 106 in all field samples. Samplers packed with Chromosorb 106 could be used to monitor terpene levels in workplaces such as sawmills. The major advantages with this method are the sampling procedure, which is simple to perform compared to other techniques, the easily automated analysis procedure and the possibility to reuse the samplers.

  20. Comparing different gas chromatographic methods for the quantification of bisphenol A (BPA) trace levels in paper and cardboard products from the market.

    PubMed

    Jurek, A; Leitner, E

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA; 4,4'-(propane-2,2-diyl)diphenol), a suspected endocrine disruptor with weak estrogenic activity, is used in a variety of consumer products, including paper and cardboard products used as food contact materials. The present study compared four different gas chromatographic methods for the analysis of BPA in paper and cardboard food packages. Eighteen different food packages were extracted and BPA was determined using two different derivatisation reactions--trimethylsilylation with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and halide alkylation with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBOCl)--and four different separation and detection techniques. The BSTFA derivatives were quantified with (1) GC-MS in single-ion monitoring (SIM) mode with electron ionisation (EI-GC-MS) and (2) GC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using electron ionisation (EI-GC-MS/MS); while the PFBOCl derivatives were quantified with (3) GC-MS using electron ionisation (EI-GC-MS) as well as (4) GC-MS with negative chemical ionisation (NCI-GC-MS). All developed methods showed good linearity (R(2) > 0.9938), precision (CV < 4.5% for reproducibility; CV < 2.2% for repeatability) and sensitivity, with limits of detection (LODs) between 0.02 µg kg(-1) for the pentafluorobenzoyl derivatives measured with the NCI-GC-MS method and 6 µg kg(-1) for the pentafluorobenzoyl derivatives determined with EI-GC-MS. Levels of BPA in the samples were in agreement for all methods, ranging from values below the limit of quantitation (LOQ) to 11.9 mg kg(-1) paper. In a last step, the maximum potential migration into food products was calculated for all tested paper and cardboard samples, assuming a 'worst case' scenario of 100% migration.

  1. [THE DEVELOPMENT OF IMMUNE ENZYME AND IMMUNE CHROMATOGRAPHIC MONOCLONAL TEST-SYSTEM FOR DETECTING TULAREMIA AGENT].

    PubMed

    Eremkin, A V; Elagin, G D; Petchenkin, D V; Fomenkov, O O; Bogatcheva, N V; Kitmanov, A A; Kuklina, G V; Tikhvinskaya, O V

    2016-03-01

    The immune enzyme and immunochromatographic test-systems for detecting tularemia agent were developed on the basis of selected set of monoclonal antibodies having immunochemical activity to antigens Francisella tularensis. The evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of developed test-systems demonstrated that samples provided detection of strains of F. tularensis in concentration from 5.0 x 105 mkxcm-3 to 1.0 x 106 mkxcm-3 and gave no false positive results in analysis of heterologous microorganisms in concentration of 1.0 x 108 mkxcm-3. PMID:27506111

  2. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation and indirect fluorescence detection of thiols.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Sarah; Lucy, Charles A

    2002-10-01

    A fluorescent post-column reaction detection scheme has been devised for selective determination of thiols. The post-column reagent is 40 microM Cd2+ and 100 microM 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQS) in non-complexing buffer at pH 10. HQS complexes Cd2+ to form a fluorescent product. Thiols in the HPLC effluent compete for complexation of the Cd2+, resulting in a decrease in the fluorescence response. Detection limits of 0.2 microM (0.04 ppm) are achieved for cysteine, homocysteine and glutathione in a 5 min separation. Recoveries from spiked synthetic urine samples are 87-120%.

  3. [THE DEVELOPMENT OF IMMUNE ENZYME AND IMMUNE CHROMATOGRAPHIC MONOCLONAL TEST-SYSTEM FOR DETECTING TULAREMIA AGENT].

    PubMed

    Eremkin, A V; Elagin, G D; Petchenkin, D V; Fomenkov, O O; Bogatcheva, N V; Kitmanov, A A; Kuklina, G V; Tikhvinskaya, O V

    2016-03-01

    The immune enzyme and immunochromatographic test-systems for detecting tularemia agent were developed on the basis of selected set of monoclonal antibodies having immunochemical activity to antigens Francisella tularensis. The evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of developed test-systems demonstrated that samples provided detection of strains of F. tularensis in concentration from 5.0 x 105 mkxcm-3 to 1.0 x 106 mkxcm-3 and gave no false positive results in analysis of heterologous microorganisms in concentration of 1.0 x 108 mkxcm-3.

  4. Plasma emission spectral detection for pyrolysis-gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riska, Gregory D.; Estes, Scott A.; Beyer, John O.; Uden, Peter C.

    Specific element gas chromatographic detection by plasma emission spectroscopy has been evaluated for the characterization of volatile pyrolyzates from a number of polymers containing hetero-atoms. Directly interfaced rapid-temperature rise time pyrolysis with high resolution open tubular column gas chromatography was employed. The atmospheric pressure microwave induced and sustained plasma utilizing a "Beenakker" type TM 010 cavity was applied for specific detection of phosphorus and carbon in polyphosphazene pyrolysis and for boron in carborane-silicone pyrolysis. An interfaced d.c. argon atmospheric pressure plasma was found more advantageous for the specific determination of silicon in the pyrolysis products of novel linear silarylene-siloxanes. In phosphazene pyrolysis notable differences were seen in the phosphorus content of volatiles formed on pyrolysis between polymers fluoroalkoxy and chlorophenoxy substituents. For carborane-silicones sequential volatilization followed by pyrolysis allowed the identification of residual boron containing monomers as well as pyrolyzates. Pyrolysis of the silarylene-siloxanes showed markedly differing levels of silicon content in polymers with differing aromatic backbones and different levels of vinyl substitution.

  5. Thin-layer chromatographic detection and identification of methaqualone metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, H K; Cella, J A; Harvey, J L; Beach, D J

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for detecting methaqualone and identifying methaqualone metabolites in urine by thin-layer chromatography is described and evaluated. Urine is hydrolyzed with HCl or NaIO4, adjusted to pH 9.5, and extracted with chloroform. The chloroform extract is evaporated, reconstituted in methanol, applied to fluorescent silica-gel plates, and developed with ethyl acetate:methanol:ammonium hydroxide (28%) (85:10:5 by vol). Methaqualone use is detected by a pattern of four metabolites, which can be seen under ultraviolet light or are made visible by acidified iodoplatinate reagent. Synthetic methaqualone metabolites are used for identification and to compensate for procedural variables. More than 250 positive urine specimens were correctly identified by this method. Hydrolyzed natural and synthetic metabolites were identical by several criteria.

  6. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  7. Development of a robust chromatographic method for the detection of chlorophenols in cork oak forest soils.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Iain; Hursthouse, Andrew; Morrison, Calum; Varela, Adélia; Pereira, Cristina Silva

    2014-02-01

    A major concern for the cork and wine industry is 'cork taint' which is associated with chloroanisoles, the microbial degradation metabolites of chlorophenols. The use of chlorophenolic compounds as pesticides within cork forests was prohibited in 1993 in the European Union (EU) following the introduction of industry guidance. However, cork produced outside the EU is still thought to be affected and simple, robust methods for chlorophenol analysis are required for wider environmental assessment by industry and local environmental regulators. Soil samples were collected from three common-use forests in Tunisia and from one privately owned forest in Sardinia, providing examples of varied management practice and degree of human intervention. These provided challenge samples for the optimisation of a HPLC-UV detection method. It produced recoveries consistently >75% against a soil CRM (ERM-CC008) for pentachlorophenol. The optimised method, with ultraviolet (diode array) detection is able to separate and quantify 16 different chlorophenols at field concentrations greater than the limits of detection ranging from 6.5 to 191.3 μg/kg (dry weight). Application to a range of field samples demonstrated the absence of widespread contamination in forest soils at sites sampled in Sardinia and Tunisia.

  8. Direct gas chromatographic determination of the two isomeric insecticides, aldicarb and butocarboxime and their toxic metabolites: application to residue analysis in crops and leaves.

    PubMed

    Aharonson, N; Muszkat, L

    1985-02-01

    A gas-chromatographic method is described for determination of residues of butocarboxime (Drawin), its structural isomer aldicarb (Temik), and their toxic sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites. These compounds were determined intact, by gas chromatography employing a thermionic specific detector (TSD). Breakdown of these relatively thermally unstable compounds was avoided by lowering the inlet temperature to 150 degrees C, by keeping column temperature as low as possible, and by using a low-load liquid phase (2% of OV-17 on Gas-Chrom Q). These compounds were determined in enriched extracts of samples of tomatoes and apples and also in the leaves of citrus and cotton. The method is suitable for the separation, differentiation and determination of the two isomers and their metabolites at an enrichment level of 0.1 micrograms/g of fresh weight. The results were confirmed by gas chromatography--chemical-ionization mass-spectrometry. PMID:3984517

  9. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... must be set at or below the threshold limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for the cargo carried. ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas detection. 154.1345 Section 154.1345 Shipping...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... must be set at or below the threshold limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for the cargo carried. ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas detection. 154.1345 Section 154.1345 Shipping...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... must be set at or below the threshold limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for the cargo carried. ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas detection. 154.1345 Section 154.1345 Shipping...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... must be set at or below the threshold limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for the cargo carried. ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas detection. 154.1345 Section 154.1345 Shipping...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... must be set at or below the threshold limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for the cargo carried. ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas detection. 154.1345 Section 154.1345 Shipping...

  14. Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-09-04

    A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

  15. Gas-influx detection with MWD technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, T.M.; Grosso, D.S.; Wallace, S.N. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes a new gas-influx detection technique that monitors the acoustic responses of annular measurement-while-drilling (MWD) pulses to provide a rapid, early warning of the development of potential gas-kick situations. The technique has been evaluated in both water- and oil-based muds during about 40 gas-kick simulations at two full-scale testing facilities. Free gas is identified by amplitude attenuation and phase delay of MWD fundamentals and their harmonic frequencies. Detection is independent of influx location because the entire length of the annulus between the bit nozzles and a surface-pressure transducer is sampled. Detection of potential gas-kick situations generally occurred within minutes of influx initiation, before any significant gas expansion. Some tests also evaluated a downhole MWD mud-resistivity sensor. Results indicated that both these techniques, and particularly the pulse acoustics, can provide unequivocal confirmation of gas and an earlier warning of gas-kick situations than conventional kick- detection techniques.

  16. Polymer-coated micro-optofluidic ring resonator detector for a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic microsystem: μGC ×μGC-μOFRR.

    PubMed

    Collin, William R; Scholten, Kee W; Fan, Xudong; Paul, Dibyadeep; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    We describe first results from a micro-analytical subsystem that integrates a detector comprising a polymer-coated micro-optofluidic ring resonator (μOFRR) chip with a microfabricated separation module capable of performing thermally modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations (μGC ×μGC) of volatile organic compound (VOC) mixtures. The 2 × 2 cm μOFRR chip consists of a hollow, contoured SiO(x) cylinder (250 μm i.d.; 1.2 μm wall thickness) grown from a Si substrate, and integrated optical and fluidic interconnection features. By coupling to a 1550 nm tunable laser and photodetector via an optical fiber taper, whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances were generated within the μOFRR wall, and shifts in the WGM wavelength caused by transient sorption of eluting vapors into the PDMS film lining the μOFRR cylinder were monitored. Isothermal separations of a simple alkane mixture using a PDMS coated 1st-dimension ((1)D) μcolumn and an OV-215-coated 2nd-dimension ((2)D) μcolumn confirmed that efficient μGC ×μGC-μOFRR analyses could be performed and that responses were dominated by film-swelling. Subsequent tests with more diverse VOC mixtures demonstrated that the modulated peak width and the VOC sensitivity were inversely proportional to the vapor pressure of the analyte. Modulated peaks as narrow as 120 ms and limits of detection in the low-ng range were achieved. Structured contour plots generated with the μOFRR and a reference FID were comparable. PMID:26588451

  17. Polymer-coated micro-optofluidic ring resonator detector for a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic microsystem: μGC ×μGC-μOFRR.

    PubMed

    Collin, William R; Scholten, Kee W; Fan, Xudong; Paul, Dibyadeep; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Zellers, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    We describe first results from a micro-analytical subsystem that integrates a detector comprising a polymer-coated micro-optofluidic ring resonator (μOFRR) chip with a microfabricated separation module capable of performing thermally modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic separations (μGC ×μGC) of volatile organic compound (VOC) mixtures. The 2 × 2 cm μOFRR chip consists of a hollow, contoured SiO(x) cylinder (250 μm i.d.; 1.2 μm wall thickness) grown from a Si substrate, and integrated optical and fluidic interconnection features. By coupling to a 1550 nm tunable laser and photodetector via an optical fiber taper, whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances were generated within the μOFRR wall, and shifts in the WGM wavelength caused by transient sorption of eluting vapors into the PDMS film lining the μOFRR cylinder were monitored. Isothermal separations of a simple alkane mixture using a PDMS coated 1st-dimension ((1)D) μcolumn and an OV-215-coated 2nd-dimension ((2)D) μcolumn confirmed that efficient μGC ×μGC-μOFRR analyses could be performed and that responses were dominated by film-swelling. Subsequent tests with more diverse VOC mixtures demonstrated that the modulated peak width and the VOC sensitivity were inversely proportional to the vapor pressure of the analyte. Modulated peaks as narrow as 120 ms and limits of detection in the low-ng range were achieved. Structured contour plots generated with the μOFRR and a reference FID were comparable.

  18. Gas-liquid chromatographic and gas-liquid-mass spectometric determination of fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissue samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Kolbe, E.J.; Stafford, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for determining fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissues. Samples are Soxhlet-extracted with hexane and cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography with an in-line alumina column. Samples are analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography with electron capture detection, and confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The average recovery from fortified tissues was 97%.

  19. Method for measuring changes in the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio by a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohjima, Yasunori

    2000-06-01

    We present a method for measuring changes in the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio based on data from a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). In this method, O2 and N2 in an air sample are separated on a column filled with molecular sieve 5A with H2 carrier gas. Since the separated O2 includes Ar, which has a retention time similar to that of O2, the (O2+Ar)/N2 ratio is actually measured. The change in the measured (O2+Ar)/N2 ratio can be easily converted to that in the O2/N2 ratio with a very small error based on the fact that the atmospheric Ar/N2 ratio is almost constant. The improvements to achieve the high-precision measurement include stabilization of the pressure at the GC column head and at the outlets of the TCD and the sample loop. Additionally, the precision is improved statistically by repeating alternate analyses of sample and a reference gas. The standard deviation of the replicate cycles of reference and sample analyses is about 18 per meg (corresponding to 3.8 parts per million (ppm) O2 in air). This means that the standard error is about 7 per meg (1.5 ppm O2 in air) for seven cycles of alternate analyses, which takes about 70 min. The response of this method is likely to have a 2% nonlinearity. Ambient air samples are collected under pressure in glass flasks equipped with two stopcocks sealed by Viton O-rings at both ends. Pressure depletion in the flask during the O2/N2 measurement does not cause any detectable change in the O2/N2 ratio, but the O2/N2 ratio in the flask was found to gradually decrease during the storage period. We also present preliminary results from air samples collected at Hateruma Island (latitude 24°03'N, longitude 123°49') from July 1997 through March 1999. The observed O2/N2 ratios clearly show a seasonal variation, increasing in spring and summer and decreasing in autumn and winter.

  20. Chromatographic immunoassays for Helicobacter pylori detection – are they reliable in Mali, West Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Austarheim, Ingvild; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Paulsen, Berit Smestad; Togola, Adiaratou; Diakité, Chiaka; Diallo, Drissa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal diseases are major reasons for morbidity in Mali. As Helicobacter pylori is known to play a major role in gastritis and gastric ulcer we wanted to find a simple method for detection. Methods Twenty-nine volunteers with confirmed gastric ulcer by gastroscopy and 59 randomly selected volunteers were diagnosed by using the rapid serological test Clearview® H. Pylori. The ImmunoCard STAT!® HpSA®test was applied on stool from 65 volunteers seeking help for gastrointestinal related ailments. Results A Helicobacter pylori prevalence of 21% was found among the individuals with confirmed gastric ulcer, 44% among the randomly selected volunteers and 14% in individuals with gastrointestinal related ailments. Conclusion According to what is already known about the aetiology of gastric ailments and the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in neighboring countries, the infection rates in our study appear strikingly low. This might indicate that Clearview® H. Pylori and ImmunoCard STAT!® HpSA® have low sensitivities in the populations studied. Strain variability of H. Pylori may be an explanation. The tests need to be properly evaluated in Mali before they can be relied upon as diagnostic tools. PMID:23646208

  1. Quantification of five plasticizers used in PVC tubing through high performance liquid chromatographic-UV detection.

    PubMed

    Radaniel, Tsanta; Genay, Stéphanie; Simon, Nicolas; Feutry, Frédéric; Quagliozzi, Francesca; Barthélémy, Christine; Lecoeur, Marie; Sautou, Valérie; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-08-15

    Searching for alternatives to di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate, a plasticizer that has been widely used in the manufacturing of PVC medical devices, has become a major challenge since a European regulation underlined some clinical risks. The aim of this study is to develop an HPLC-UV method to quantify the currently used alternative plasticizers to DEHP. Five plasticizers, acetyl tributyl citrate, di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate, di-(ethylhexyl)-terephthalate, di-isononyl-1,2-cyclohexane-dicarboxylate, and trioctyl trimellitate, were separated on a C8 stationary phase (2.6 μm, 100 mm × 4.6mm) under gradient elution in 13 min. They were detected at 221 nm leading to a quantification threshold from 0.3 to 750 μg/mL as a function of the plasticizer. Within-day and between-day precisions were inferior to 0.9% and 18%, respectively. The assays were validated according to the accuracy profile method. Plasticizers were extracted from PVC-tubing by dissolving PVC in THF then precipitating it in methanol with a yield of over 90% for each plasticizer. This assay could feasibly be used to quantify plasticizers in PVC medical devices.

  2. Liquid-chromatographic separation and on-line bioluminescence detection of creatine kinase isoenzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    Isoenzymes of creatine kinase were separated by anion-exchange chromatography, with use of an elution gradient containing lithium acetate (0.1 to 0.6 mol/L). A stream splitter was used to divert a 5% side stream of column effluent, which was subsequently mixed with the reagents necessary for bioluminescence assay of the separated isoenzymes. The use of the stream splitter greatly decreased the rate of consumption of reagent and, when combined with a peristaltic pumping system, permitted independent control of the side-stream flow rate. Thus both the residence interval in a delay coil in which the ATP reaction product is formed and the bioluminescence emission was monitored in a flow-through fluorometer without use of an external light source or filters. Separation and detection of the isoenzymes of creatine kinase were rapid, sensitive, and highly selective. The incremental decrease of bioluminescence response owing to inhibition by the ions in the eluent was less than 31% across the entire gradient.

  3. Liquid chromatographic determination of total homocysteine in blood plasma with photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhloba, Alexander A; Blashko, Eduard L

    2004-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for quantification of homocysteine total forms and glutathione levels in blood plasma via HPLC was developed. Dithiotreitol as a water soluble agent has been used as a reductant for both protein and nonprotein disulphides. Dithiotreitol reacts with the mixed disulphides under 60 degrees C treatment within 10 min. Reduced aminothiols and homocystein were easily derivated with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and the resultant ultraviolet absorbance within 330 nm was detected by the HPLC method. The concentration of total plasma homocysteine was significantly higher in groups of patients: with the end stage of renal disease: 45.5+/-40.9 micromol/l (n=79), with cerebral vascular disorders 12.3+/-7.0 micromol/l (n=65), and with coronary atherosclerosis 15.4+/-10.9 micromol/l (n=15) than that in healthy subjects (6.2+/-1.74 micromol/l, n=20). Some major advantages of the method include: simultaneous measurement of both total homocysteine and total glutathione, no loss of oxidized form during processing of blood plasma for aminothiols measurement, use of protein-bound aminothiols solution as a calibrator.

  4. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric determination of chlorophenoxy acids and related herbicides as their (cyanoethyl)dimethylsilyl derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, M.J.; Ahmed, A.W.; Sarrasin, B.; Mallet, V.N.

    1987-05-01

    A method for using (2-cyanoethyl)dimethyl(diethylamino)silane to form derivatives with phenoxy acid herbicides and related compounds is presented. Results obtained with 18 compounds demonstrate that the reaction is quantitative and complete within minutes at room temperature. The derivatives formed can readily be analyzed by gas chromatography using a selective nitrogen-phosphorus detector which eliminates the need for rigorous cleanup of the sample required for detection by electron capture. Response-concentration plots show that detection is linear over several decades with limits of detection being in the low picogram range for all compounds studied. Mass spectral analysis of the derivatives of the 18 compounds studied indicates that the spectra are highly specific showing characteristic ions at (M-54), (M-82), and or (M-98) which are useful for structure confirmation or analysis at low levels by using selected ion monitoring. The analytical advantages of the approach for the analysis of acid herbicides are discussed.

  5. Microwave radar detection of gas pipeline leaks.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Kanareykin, D. B.; Asanov, V. D; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A. C.

    2002-10-02

    We are developing a microwave radar sensing and imaging system to detect and locate gas leaks in natural gas pipelines. The underlying detection principle is radar backscattering from the index-of-refraction inhomogeneities introduced by the dispersion of methane in air. An essential first step in the development effort is modeling to estimate the radar cross section. This paper describes the modeling results and the experimental efforts underway to validate the model. For the case of leaks from small holes in a pressurized gas pipeline, we modeled the gas dynamics of the leak jet to determine the plume geometry and the variation of methane concentration in air as a function of distance from the leak source. From the static and dynamic changes in the index of refraction in the turbulent plume, the radar backscatter cross sections were calculated. The results show that the radar cross sections of the leak plumes should be detectable by special-purpose radars.

  6. Detection of hydrogen chloride gas in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Launch vehicle effluent (LVE) monitoring is part of NASA's overall tropospheric and stratospheric environmental program. Following nine techniques are evaluated and developed in report: bubbler method, pH measurements, indicator tubes, microcoulometers, modified condensation nuclei counter, dual-isotope absorption, gas-filter correlation, chemiluminescent nitric oxide detection, chemiluminescent luminol-oxidation detection.

  7. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  8. Gas chromatographic vapor pressure determination of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene and α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartonen, Kari; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Vilja, Vesa-Pekka; Tiala, Heidi; Knuuti, Sinivuokko; Lai, Ching Kwan; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2013-12-01

    Vapor pressures (subcooled liquid, pliquid) of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene (β-caryophyllene aldehyde 0.18 ± 0.03 Pa and β-nocaryophyllene aldehyde 0.17 ± 0.03 Pa), and α-pinene (pinonaldehyde 16.8 ± 0.20 Pa, cis-pinic acid 0.12 ± 0.06 Pa, and cis-pinonic acid 0.99 ± 0.19 Pa) at 298 K were obtained by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The effects of stationary phase polarity and column film thickness on the vapor pressure values were investigated. Increase in stationary phase polarity provided smaller values, while increase in film thickness gave slightly higher values. Values for vapor pressure were at least two orders of magnitude lower when obtained by a method utilizing vaporization enthalpy (determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) than by retention index method. Finally, the results were compared with values calculated by group contribution theory. For the β-caryophyllene oxidation products, the values measured by gas chromatography were slightly lower than those obtained by theoretical calculations. The opposite trend was observed for the α-pinene oxidation products. The methods based on gas chromatography are concluded to be highly useful for the determination of vapor pressures of semi-volatile compounds. Except for the most polar pinic and pinonic acids, differences between vapor pressure values obtained by GC-FID and GC-MS were small. Since GC-MS provides structural information simultaneously, the use of GC-MS is recommended.

  9. Chemometric processing of second-order liquid chromatographic data with UV-vis and fluorescence detection. A comparison of multivariate curve resolution and parallel factor analysis 2.

    PubMed

    Bortolato, Santiago A; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2014-09-01

    Second-order liquid chromatographic data with multivariate spectral (UV-vis or fluorescence) detection usually show changes in elution time profiles from sample to sample, causing a loss of trilinearity in the data. In order to analyze them with an appropriate model, the latter should permit a given component to have different time profiles in different samples. Two popular models in this regard are multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) and parallel factor analysis 2 (PARAFAC2). The conditions to be fulfilled for successful application of the latter model are discussed on the basis of simple chromatographic concepts. An exhaustive analysis of the multivariate calibration models is carried out, employing both simulated and experimental chromatographic data sets. The latter involve the quantitation of benzimidazolic and carbamate pesticides in fruit and juice samples using liquid chromatography with diode array detection, and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples, in both cases in the presence of potential interferents using liquid chromatography with fluorescence spectral detection, thereby achieving the second-order advantage. The overall results seem to favor MCR-ALS over PARAFAC2, especially in the presence of potential interferents.

  10. Gas chromatographic determination of some phenolic compounds in fuels and engine oil after simultaneous derivatization and microextraction.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Yadeghari, Adeleh; Khoshmaram, Leila; Ghorbanpour, Houshang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a simultaneous derivatization/air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction method has been developed for sample preparation of some phenolic compounds in fuels and engine oil. Analytes are transferred by back liquid-liquid extraction into NaOH solution and then are derivatized with butyl chloroformate and extracted simultaneously into carbon tetrachloride. The extracted derivatized analytes are analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The effect of extracting solvent type, derivatization agent and extraction solvent volumes, ionic strength of the aqueous solution, number of extraction cycles, etc., on the extraction efficiency is investigated. The calibration graphs are linear in the range of 3-10,000 μg/L. Enhancement factors, enrichment factors, and extraction recoveries are in the ranges of 497 to 1471, 571 to 991, and 60 to 109%, respectively. Detection limits are obtained in the range of 0.8 to 2.0 μg/L. Relative standard deviations for the extraction of each selected phenols are in the ranges of 2-4% for intraday (n = 6) and 3-6% (n = 5) for interday precisions for 200 μg/L. This technique is successfully applied for the extraction, preconcentration, and determination of the selected phenols in gasoline, kerosene, gas oil, and engine oil. PMID:25082460

  11. Gas chromatographic determination of some phenolic compounds in fuels and engine oil after simultaneous derivatization and microextraction.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Yadeghari, Adeleh; Khoshmaram, Leila; Ghorbanpour, Houshang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a simultaneous derivatization/air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction method has been developed for sample preparation of some phenolic compounds in fuels and engine oil. Analytes are transferred by back liquid-liquid extraction into NaOH solution and then are derivatized with butyl chloroformate and extracted simultaneously into carbon tetrachloride. The extracted derivatized analytes are analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The effect of extracting solvent type, derivatization agent and extraction solvent volumes, ionic strength of the aqueous solution, number of extraction cycles, etc., on the extraction efficiency is investigated. The calibration graphs are linear in the range of 3-10,000 μg/L. Enhancement factors, enrichment factors, and extraction recoveries are in the ranges of 497 to 1471, 571 to 991, and 60 to 109%, respectively. Detection limits are obtained in the range of 0.8 to 2.0 μg/L. Relative standard deviations for the extraction of each selected phenols are in the ranges of 2-4% for intraday (n = 6) and 3-6% (n = 5) for interday precisions for 200 μg/L. This technique is successfully applied for the extraction, preconcentration, and determination of the selected phenols in gasoline, kerosene, gas oil, and engine oil.

  12. Semiconducting polymers for gas detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, N. R.; Sheratte, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    Conjugated polyenes, and polyesters containing phthalocyanine in their backbone, were synthesized. These polymers were characterized by chemical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, spectral analysis, and X-ray diffraction studies for crystallinity, as well as for their film-forming capability and gas/polymer interactions. Most of the polymers were relatively insensitive to water vapor up to 50 percent relative humidity, but the polyester/phthalocyanine (iron) polymer was relatively insensitive up to 100 percent RH. On the other hand, poly(p-dimethylaminophenylacetylene) was too conductive at 100 percent RH. Of the gases tested, the only ones that gave any evidence of interacting with the polymers were SO2, NOx, HCN and NH3. Poly(imidazole)/thiophene responded to each of these gases at all relative humidities, while the other polymers gave varying response, depending upon the RH. Thus, since most of these gases were electron-accepting, the electron-donating character of poly(imidazole)/thiophene substantiates the concept of electronegativity being the operating principle for interaction effects. Of the six polymers prepared, poly(imidazole)/thiophene first showed a very good response to smoldering cotton, but it later became nonresponsive; presumably due to oxidation effects.

  13. Good odorant practices ensure safer operations. [Natural gas odorant detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Oudman, P. )

    1993-12-01

    Regulations in Canada and the US require that combustible gas used as a fuel be odorized at such a level that a concentration in air of one-fifth the lower explosive limit the gas can be readily detected and recognized by a person with a normal sense of smell. These regulations do not specify how the odorant level should be determined. However, since the requirement is related to smell, the level should be determined by an olfactory method. There are two odorant monitoring methods commonly used by gas companies, the olfactory (odorometer) and the instrumentation (gas chromatograph) methods. The instrument method provides only quantitative results, which somehow must be related to an olfactory response. This paper discusses these methods.

  14. Detecting PCBs using soil gas pathfinders

    SciTech Connect

    Viellenave, J.H.; Harrington, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    Thousands of contaminated sites have experienced enhanced characterization by using soil gas geochemical methods to focus invasive investigations and to identify a myriad of organic chemical constituents. The application of soil gas technologies has largely been restricted to detecting volatiles, although operators of passive methods have reported detection of semivolatiles (1). Accumulations of such non-volatile species as poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, metals, etc. have largely gone undetected by soil gas methods except by fortuitous circumstances. However, an investigator with a sophisticated and intensive understanding of the chemistry of a mixture or of a process will discover associations of chemical species that allow the use of one species, the {open_quotes}Pathfinder,{close_quotes} to predict the behavior and distribution of another, otherwise undetectable species. A case study is presented concerning the use of trichlorobenzene as a pathfinder towards the detection of a PCB contaminated area at an asphalt blending plant.

  15. Search for organic molecules on Mars with the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer of the Sample Analysis at Mars experiment onboard the MSL 2011 Curiosity rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Francois, P.; Coll, P. J.; Cabane, M.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Stalport, F.; Buch, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    In past times, life might have emerged under Martian conditions milder than the present ones, and left some remnants at the surface. Even if this did not happen, prebiotic molecules may have been preserved in the soil, and they might be similar to those that prevailed on the Earth surface some 3.5 to 4 billion years ago. NASA's MSL2011 rover Curiosity will explore the surface and subsurface of Mars, seeking traces of prebiotic or biological activity. Organic signatures are among the main signatures of interest in this frame, and they will be among the main targets of the Gas Chromatograph Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (GC-QMS) which constitutes the core of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical laboratory, developed by the NASA/GSFC in collaboration with the University of Paris (Fr) and the JPL. The main goal of this instrumentation is indeed to determine molecular abundances and isotopic ratios of organic molecules present in the collected samples, by analyzing gases either sampled from the atmosphere, or obtained from soil processing, either by physical heating or chemical reactions. In order to prepare for the interpretation of the data obtained in situ with the GCQMS of SAM, and due to the complexity of this instrumentation, a number of calibrations are required to determine the exact behaviour of each part of this instrumentation, that is required to correctly treat the signal and obtain a correct interpretation of it. In order to prepare the SAM-GC in situ results treatment and interpretation, it is necessary: (1) to determine the instrument ability to detect targets molecules under the instrument operating conditions and (2) to create data bases to help for the identification and quantification of the molecules that could be detected with SAM. With this aim we first selected molecules which might be analyzed with SAM-GC using the following criteria: (1) abundance at the Mars surface (2) astrobiological interest, (3) formation during the sample

  16. Permanent gas analysis using gas chromatography with vacuum ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Fan, Hui; Hildenbrand, Zacariah; Wong, Derek; Wetz, David; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of complex mixtures of permanent gases consisting of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, inert gases, and toxic species plays an increasingly important role in today's economy. A new gas chromatography detector based on vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopy (GC-VUV), which simultaneously collects full scan (115-240 nm) VUV and UV absorption of eluting analytes, was applied to analyze mixtures of permanent gases. Sample mixtures ranged from off-gassing of decomposing Li-ion and Li-metal batteries to natural gas samples and water samples taken from private wells in close proximity to unconventional natural gas extraction. Gas chromatography separations were performed with a porous layer open tubular column. Components such as C1-C5 linear and branched hydrocarbons, water, oxygen, and nitrogen were separated and detected in natural gas and the headspace of natural gas-contaminated water samples. Of interest for the transport of lithium batteries were the detection of flammable and toxic gases, such as methane, ethylene, chloromethane, dimethyl ether, 1,3-butadiene, CS2, and methylproprionate, among others. Featured is the capability for deconvolution of co-eluting signals from different analytes.

  17. Determination of hexanal as an oxidative marker in vegetable oils using an automated dynamic headspace sampler coupled to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jaeho; Seo, Dong-Won; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Jin-Bong; Shim, You-Shin

    2011-01-01

    An automated dynamic headspace sampler coupled to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer was evaluated as an oxidative marker to determine hexanal content in vegetable oils. For the effective analysis, a cooled injection system (CIS) was used to focus and to introduce the hexanal desorbed from the Tenax TA. The temperature of the CIS was maintained at -60 °C for 12 min before desorbing the hexanal. Hexanal was separated on a capillary column (DB-5, 0.25 mm × 60 m, 0.25 µm in film thickness) from 50 to 230 °C, followed by mass spectrometer-selected ion monitoring analysis at m/z 56. The instrumental response to hexanal was highly linear from 10 ng mL(-1) to 1 µg mL(-1) (r(2) = 0.9999). The relative standard deviation (RSD) of intra- and inter-day repeatability was acceptable, with values of less than 3.88 and 4.25%, respectively. The LOD and LOQ of hexanal were determined by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer-selected ion monitoring to be 3.3 and 9.8 ng mL(-1), respectively. The acid value, peroxide value and fatty acid composition revealed a good correlation with the hexanal concentration.

  18. Air Monitoring for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Adams, Frederick W.; Naylor, Guy; Haskell, William; Floyd, David; Curley, Charles; Follistein, Duke W.

    2004-01-01

    The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and quantify various hazardous gases. Traditionally these systems are designed for leak detection of the cryogenic gases used for the propulsion of the Shuttle and other vehicles. Mass spectrometers are the basis of these systems, which provide excellent quantitation, sensitivity, selectivity, response times and detection limits. A Table lists common gases monitored for aerospace applications. The first five gases, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are historically the focus of the HGDL.

  19. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2012-12-25

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO2 nanocrystals doped with In2O3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  20. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2014-07-15

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals doped with In.sub.2O.sub.3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  1. [Application of Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction and Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer to the Phthalic Acid Esters Analysis in Seawater].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen-chen; Li, Feng-min; Lu, Lun; Sun, Yue

    2015-10-01

    For the determination of trace amounts of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in complex seawater matrix, a stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SBSE-GC-MS) method was established. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) were selected as study objects. The effects of extraction time, amount of methanol, amount of sodium chloride, desorption time and desorption solvent were optimized. The method of SBSE-GC-MS was validated through recoveries and relative standard deviation. The optimal extraction time was 2 h. The optimal methanol content was 10%. The optimal sodium chloride content was 5% . The optimal desorption time was 50 min. The optimal desorption solvent was the mixture of methanol to acetonitrile (4:1, volume: volume). The linear relationship between the peak area and the concentration of PAEs was relevant. The correlation coefficients were greater than 0.997. The detection limits were between 0.25 and 174.42 ng x L(-1). The recoveries of different concentrations were between 56.97% and 124.22% . The relative standard deviations were between 0.41% and 14.39%. On the basis of the method, several estuaries water sample of Jiaozhou Bay were detected. DEP was detected in all samples, and the concentration of BBP, DEHP and DOP were much higher than the rest. PMID:26841630

  2. Infrared hyperspectral imaging sensor for gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2000-11-01

    A small light weight man portable imaging spectrometer has many applications; gas leak detection, flare analysis, threat warning, chemical agent detection, just to name a few. With support from the US Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a small man portable hyperspectral imaging sensor with an embedded DSP processor for real time processing that is capable of remotely imaging various targets such as gas plums, flames and camouflaged targets. Based upon their spectral signature the species and concentration of gases can be determined. This system has been field tested at numerous places including White Mountain, CA, Edwards AFB, and Vandenberg AFB. Recently evaluation of the system for gas detection has been performed. This paper presents these results. The system uses a conventional infrared camera fitted with a diffractive optic that images as well as disperses the incident radiation to form spectral images that are collected in band sequential mode. Because the diffractive optic performs both imaging and spectral filtering, the lens system consists of only a single element that is small, light weight and robust, thus allowing man portability. The number of spectral bands are programmable such that only those bands of interest need to be collected. The system is entirely passive, therefore, easily used in a covert operation. Currently Pacific Advanced Technology is working on the next generation of this camera system that will have both an embedded processor as well as an embedded digital signal processor in a small hand held camera configuration. This will allow the implementation of signal and image processing algorithms for gas detection and identification in real time. This paper presents field test data on gas detection and identification as well as discuss the signal and image processing used to enhance the gas visibility. Flow rates as low as 0.01 cubic feet per minute have been imaged with this system.

  3. Determination of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in plasma by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, J.F.; Bopp, R.J.; Carmichael, R.H.; Farid, K.Z.; Lemberger, L.

    1982-10-01

    This gas-chromatographic method for assay of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in human plasma involves extraction of the drugs and use of a /sup 63/Ni electron-capture detector. The linear range of detection is 25 to 800 micrograms/L for each drug. Overall precision (CV) in the concentration range of 10 to 100 micrograms/L for both drugs was approximately 10%. Accuracy (relative error) in the same concentration range was approximately +10%. None of the commonly prescribed antidepressants or tranquilizers that we tested interfere with the assay.

  4. Determination of n-butylated trialkyllead compounds by gas chromatography with microwave plasma emission detection

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, S.A.; Uden, P.C.; Barnes, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    An analytical gas chromatographic procedure is described for the determination of trialkyllead compounds in aqueous media. The analyte compounds are extracted into benzene from an aqueous solution saturated with sodium chloride. They are then quantitatively converted into n-butyltrialkyllead derivatives by reaction with an n-butyl Grignard reagent. Precolumn Tenax trap enrichment of the derived trialkylbutylleads enables determination to low parts per billion levels to be carried out. Also investigated are extraction efficiencies and injection split ratios onto a fused silica capillary column. Lead specific detection is by atmospheric pressure microwave induced plasma spectrometric emission. Data are presented for a wastewater effluent sample. 3 figures.

  5. Acidic methanolysis v. alkaline saponification in gas chromatographic characterization of mycobacteria: differentiation between Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare and Mycobacterium gastri.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L

    1983-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare and M.gastri were analyzed with capillary gas chromatography after each strain had been subjected to acidic methanolysis or to alkaline saponification followed by methylation. Prominent peaks of myristic, palmitoleic, palmitic, oleic, stearic and tuberculostearic acids were found in the chromatograms of both species, whereas 2-octadecanol and 2-eicosanol were detected only in M. avium-intracellulare. In initial runs, both of the derivatization principles yielded virtually identical chromatograms for a given strain. After repeated injections of extracts from alkaline saponification, however, the alcohol peaks showed pronounced tailing and finally almost disappeared from the chromatograms. This disadvantage, which was not observed when only acid methanolysis was used, could be overcome with trifluoroacetylation. Restored peak shape of the underivatized alcohols could be achieved by washing the cross-linked stationary phase in the capillary tubing with organic solvents. The study demonstrated the importance of conditions which enable separation of 2-octadecanol and 2-eicosanol when gas chromatography is used for species identification of mycobacteria.

  6. Determination of volatile organic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil with efficient gas-chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijing; Geppert, Helmut; Fischer, Thomas; Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Möller, Detlev

    2015-01-01

    Determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in crude oil, such as super volatile organic compounds (super VOCs) and simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is vital for targeting crude oil spill spots. In this study, a static headspace gas chromatography flame ionization detection method was established for determination of super VOCs in crude oil with both external and internal standard determination, which can be used in the field when using portable gas chromatography. Identification was done by comparing the retention time with the corresponding standards and quantitation was done with a new one-drop method. Another simplified and efficient method was performed to analyze volatile PAHs in crude oil, which can also be used in field analysis. Toluene was used as the extraction solvent for PAHs in crude oil. Method validation for both analyses was satisfactory. The result showed that n-butane and n-pentane were maximum super VOCs and naphthalene, phenanthrene and fluorene were the main PAHs in the crude oil studied. The super VOCs quantity ranged from 3 to 6% and the main PAHs consisted of 0.02-0.06% of studied crude oil. PMID:25225200

  7. Radioimmunoassay of methaqualone in human urine compared with chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Mulé, S J; Kogan, M; Jukofsky, D

    1978-09-01

    The 125I-radioimmunoassay for methaqualone in human urine was evaluated by a comparison with newly modified gas-liquid chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic methods. The statistically significant sensitivity value for the radioimmunoassay was at 2 microgram of methaqualone per liter of urine. The coefficient of variation was 2.88 +/- 0.39% interassay and 2.71 +/- 0.16% intraassay. There was cross-reactivity only with metabolites of methaqualone, 4'-hydroxymethaqualone being twice as sensitively measured as methaqualone. There was complete agreement between results by radioimmunoassay and by gas-liquid chromatography in 96.7% of the samples analyzed. Only 1.2% of the radioimmunoassay values were false positives, and 2.1% false negatives (phi = 0.8917, P less than 0.001). Comparisons between the thin-layer chromatographic data and the gas-liquid chromatographic or radioimmunoassay data showed less agreement because of the 50- to 200-fold higher sensitivity of the latter two techniques. Gas-liquid chromatography therefore appears to represent the best reference method for the evaluation of the radioimmunoassay, which appears to be a very sensitive and reliable technique for detecting methaqualone and its metabolites in human urine.

  8. Chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection strategy to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for beverage analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Wu, Hai-Long; Gu, Hui-Wen; Hu, Yong; Wang, Li; Xia, Hui; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-02-26

    This work reports a chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) strategy to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for the rapid simultaneous determination of six synthetic colorants in five kinds of beverages with little sample pretreatment. The investigation was performed using two types of LC columns under the same elution conditions. Although analytes using different columns have different co-elution patterns that appear more seriously in complex backgrounds, all colorants were properly resolved by alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) method and accurate chromatographic elution profiles, spectral profiles as well as relative concentrations were obtained. The results were confirmed by those obtained from traditional HPLC-UV method at a particular wavelength and the results of both methods were consistent with each other. All results demonstrated that the proposed chemometrics-assisted HPLC-DAD method is accurate, economical and universal, and can be promisingly applied to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for the analysis of complex food samples.

  9. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  10. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  11. Study of the Behaviors of Gunshot Residues from Spent Cartridges by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2015-07-01

    Gunshot residues, produced after shooting activity, have acquired their importance in analysis due to the notoriety of firearms-related crimes. In this study, solid-phase microextraction was performed to extract the headspace composition of spent cartridges using 85-μm polyacrylate fiber at 66°C for 21 min. Organic compounds, that is, naphthalene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, and dibutyl phthalate were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. Evaluation of chromatograms for diphenylamine, dibutyl phthalate, and naphthalene indicates the period after a gunshot was discharged, whether it was 1 days, 2-4 days, <5 days, 10 days, 20 days, or more than 30 days ago. This study revealed the potential effects of environmental factors such as occasional wind blow and direct sunlight on the estimation of time after spent cartridges were discharged. In conclusion, we proposed reliable alternative in analyzing the headspace composition of spent cartridges in a simulated crime scene. PMID:25771708

  12. Does further clean-up reduce the matrix enhancement effect in gas chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues in food?

    PubMed

    Schenck, F J; Lehotay, S J

    2000-01-28

    Sample extracts of apples, peas, green beans, oranges, raspberries, clementines, carrots, and wheat obtained using the Food and Drug Administration (acetone extraction) and Canadian Pest Management Regulatory Agency (acetonitrile extraction) multiresidue methods for pesticides were subjected to clean-up using different solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges in an attempt to reduce or eliminate the matrix enhancement effect. The matrix enhancement effect is related to the blocking of active sites on the injector liner by matrix components, thereby increasing signal in the presence of matrix versus standards in solvent in which the pesticides themselves interact with the active sites. Graphitized carbon black (GCB) was often used in combination with various anion-exchange SPE cartridges. The extracts were then spiked with organophosphorus insecticides. These process standards were then compared to standards in acetone of the same concentration using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection or ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Sample matrix enhancement varied from little to no effect for some pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos, malathion) to >200% in the case of certain susceptible pesticides. The GCB removed color components but showed little effect in reducing matrix enhancement by itself. The anion-exchange cartridges in combination with GCB or not, substantially reduced the matrix enhancement effect but did not eliminate it. PMID:10677079

  13. On greenhouse gas signal detection strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesinger, M.E.; Barnett, T.P.

    1989-02-24

    The indisputable detection of a greenhouse gas signal in the global climate system will be a true decision point for mankind. Yet, at this stage of knowledge, the details of an appropriate detection strategy are only beginning to be developed. Two key elements in the eventual strategy are the subject of this report: (1) what variables should be monitored in a detection program, and (2) the comparison of the equilibrium versus transient climate system response. Subsequent sections consider these items in turn while a final section summarizes the main conclusion of the study. 10 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Simultaneous liquid chromatographic determination of metals and organic compounds in pharmaceutical and food-supplement formulations using evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Spacil, Zdenek; Folbrova, Jana; Megoulas, Nikolaos; Solich, Petr; Koupparis, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A novel method for the non-derivatization liquid chromatographic determination of metals (potassium, aluminium, calcium and magnesium) and organic compounds (ascorbate and aspartate) was developed and validated based on evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD). Separation of calcium, magnesium and aluminium was achieved by the cation exchange column Dionex CS-14 and an aqueous TFA mobile phase according to the following time program: 0-6 min TFA 0.96 mL L(-1), 6-7 min linear gradient from TFA 0.96-6.4 mL L(-1). Separation of potassium, magnesium and aspartate was achieved by the lipophilic C18 Waters Spherisorb column and isocratic aqueous 0.2 mL L(-1) TFA mobile phase. Separation of sodium, magnesium, ascorbate and citrate was also achieved by the C18 analytical column, according to the following elution program: 0-2.5 min aqueous nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) 0.5 mL L(-1); 2.5-3.5 min linear gradient from 0.5 mL L(-1) NFPA to 1.0 mL L(-1) TFA. In all cases, evaporation temperature was 70 degrees C, pressure of the nebulizing gas (nitrogen) 3.5 bar, gain 11 and the flow rate 1.0 mL min(-1). Resolution among calcium and magnesium was 1.8, while for all other separations was > or = 3.2. Double logarithmic calibration curves were obtained within various ranges from 3-24 to 34-132 microg mL(-1), and with good correlation (r>0.996). Asymmetry factor ranged from 0.9 to 1.9 and limit of detection from 1.3 (magnesium) to 17 microg mL(-1) (ascorbate). The developed method was applied for the assay of potassium, magnesium, calcium, aluminium, aspartate and ascorbate in pharmaceuticals and food-supplements. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using spiked samples (%recovery 95-105%, %R.S.D. < 2) and the absence of constant or proportional errors was confirmed by dilution experiments.

  15. Simultaneous liquid chromatographic determination of metals and organic compounds in pharmaceutical and food-supplement formulations using evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Spacil, Zdenek; Folbrova, Jana; Megoulas, Nikolaos; Solich, Petr; Koupparis, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A novel method for the non-derivatization liquid chromatographic determination of metals (potassium, aluminium, calcium and magnesium) and organic compounds (ascorbate and aspartate) was developed and validated based on evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD). Separation of calcium, magnesium and aluminium was achieved by the cation exchange column Dionex CS-14 and an aqueous TFA mobile phase according to the following time program: 0-6 min TFA 0.96 mL L(-1), 6-7 min linear gradient from TFA 0.96-6.4 mL L(-1). Separation of potassium, magnesium and aspartate was achieved by the lipophilic C18 Waters Spherisorb column and isocratic aqueous 0.2 mL L(-1) TFA mobile phase. Separation of sodium, magnesium, ascorbate and citrate was also achieved by the C18 analytical column, according to the following elution program: 0-2.5 min aqueous nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) 0.5 mL L(-1); 2.5-3.5 min linear gradient from 0.5 mL L(-1) NFPA to 1.0 mL L(-1) TFA. In all cases, evaporation temperature was 70 degrees C, pressure of the nebulizing gas (nitrogen) 3.5 bar, gain 11 and the flow rate 1.0 mL min(-1). Resolution among calcium and magnesium was 1.8, while for all other separations was > or = 3.2. Double logarithmic calibration curves were obtained within various ranges from 3-24 to 34-132 microg mL(-1), and with good correlation (r>0.996). Asymmetry factor ranged from 0.9 to 1.9 and limit of detection from 1.3 (magnesium) to 17 microg mL(-1) (ascorbate). The developed method was applied for the assay of potassium, magnesium, calcium, aluminium, aspartate and ascorbate in pharmaceuticals and food-supplements. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using spiked samples (%recovery 95-105%, %R.S.D. < 2) and the absence of constant or proportional errors was confirmed by dilution experiments. PMID:17386552

  16. A rapid gas chromatographic injection-port derivatization method for the tandem mass spectrometric determination of patulin and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Marsol-Vall, Alexis; Balcells, Mercè; Eras, Jordi; Canela-Garayoa, Ramon

    2016-07-01

    A novel method consisting of injection-port derivatization coupled to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is described. The method allows the rapid assessment of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and patulin content in apple and pear derivatives. The chromatographic separation of the compounds was achieved in a short chromatographic run (12.2min) suitable for routine controls of these compounds in the fruit juice industry. The optimal conditions for the injection-port derivatization were at 270°C, 0.5min purge-off, and a 1:2 sample:derivatization reagent ratio (v/v). These conditions represent an important saving in terms of derivatization reagent consumption and sample preparation time. Quality parameters were assessed for the target compounds, giving LOD of 0.7 and 1.6μg/kg and LOQ of 2 and 5μg/kg for patulin and HMF, respectively. These values are below the maximum patulin concentration in food products intended for infants and young children. Repeatability (%RSD n=5) was below 12% for both compounds. In addition, the method linearity ranged between 25 and 1000μg/kg and between 5 and 192μg/kg for HMF and patulin, respectively. Finally, the method was applied to study HMF and patulin content in various fruit juice samples. PMID:27240947

  17. Gas chromatographic methods for determination of gamma-BHC in technical emulsifiable concentrates and water-dispersible powder formulations and in lindane shampoo and lotion: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Miles, J W; Mount, D L; Beckmann, T J; Carrigan, S K; Galoux, I M; Hitos, P; Hodge, M C; Kissler, K; Martijn, A; Sanchez-Rasero, F

    1984-01-01

    Although the gas chromatographic separation of the isomers of BHC was demonstrated two decades ago, the present AOAC method of analysis of BHC for gamma-isomer (lindane) content is based on a separation carried out on a liquid chromatographic partition column. A method of analysis has been developed that uses an OV-210 column for separation of the gamma-isomer from the other isomers and impurities in technical BHC. Di-n-propyl phthalate was chosen as an internal standard. The same system allows quantitation of lindane in lotion and shampoo after these products are extracted with ethyl acetate-isooctane (1 + 4). The analytical methods were subjected to a collaborative trial with 10 laboratories. The coefficient of variation for technical BHC was 2.83%. For the water-dispersible powder and emulsifiable concentrate, the coefficients of variation were 2.89% and 4.62%, respectively. Coefficients of variation for 1% lindane lotion and shampoo were 4.36% and 11.92%, respectively. The method has been adopted official first action.

  18. New gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the determination of urinary pyrethroid metabolites in environmental medicine.

    PubMed

    Schettgen, T; Koch, H M; Drexler, H; Angerer, J

    2002-10-01

    We have developed and validated a new, reliable and very sensitive method for the determination of the urinary metabolites of the most common pyrethroids in one analytical run. After acidic hydrolysis for the cleavage of conjugates, the analytes cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (cis-Cl(2)CA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (trans-Cl(2)CA), cis-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (Br(2)CA), 4-fluoro-3-phenoxybenzoic acid (F-PBA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) were extracted from the matrix with a liquid-liquid extraction procedure using n-hexane under acidic conditions. For further clean-up, NaOH was added to the organic phase and the carboxylic acids were re-extracted into the aqueous phase. After acidification and extraction into n-hexane again, the metabolites were then derivatised to volatile esters using N-tert.-butyldimethylsilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamid (MTBSTFA). Separation and detection were carried out using capillary gas chromatography with mass-selective detection (GC-MS). 2-Phenoxybenzoic acid (2-PBA) served as internal standard for the quantification of the pyrethroid metabolites. The limit of detection for all analytes was 0.05 microg/l urine. The RSD of the within-series imprecision was between 2.0 and 5.4% at a spiked concentration of 0.4 microg/l and the relative recovery was between 79.3 and 93.4%, depending on the analyte. This method was used for the analysis of urine samples of 46 persons from the general population without known exposure to pyrethroids. The metabolites cis-Cl(2)CA, trans-Cl(2)CA and 3-PBA could be found in 52, 72 and 70% of all samples with median values of 0.06, 0.11 and 0.16 microg/l, respectively. Br(2)CA and F-PBA could also be detected in 13 and 4% of the urine samples. PMID:12376120

  19. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA. PMID:21619278

  20. Gas Chromatographic/Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatile Metabolites in Bovine Vaginal Fluid and Assessment of Their Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, R.; Archunan, G.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical profiles of vaginal fluid collected from cows in oestrus and nonoestrus were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to establish any qualitative differences that might have potential value in bovine biocommunication. Eight different organic compounds were detected using the two chromatograms. The chemical profiles of oestrus vaginal fluid were distinguished significantly by the presence of three specific substances, namely, trimethylamine, acetic acid, and propionic acid that were not present in nonoestrus phase. The oestrus specific synthetic compounds were rubbed onto the genital region of nonoestrus animals (dummy cows), and the bulls were allowed to sniff the genital region and observed sexual behaviours. The statistical significance was higher (P < 0.001) in bulls exhibiting repeated flehmen and mounting behaviours towards the mixture of acetic acid, propionic acid, and trimethylamine as compared to test these compounds separately. It was concluded that the volatile substances present in the bovine vaginal fluid during oestrus may act as chemical communicators. PMID:22114602

  1. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric fragmentation study of phytoestrogens as their trimethylsilyl derivatives: Identification in soy milk and wastewater samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Barber, L.B.; Thurman, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    An analytical method for the identification of eight plant phytoestrogens (biochanin A, coumestrol, daidzein, equol, formononetin, glycitein, genistein and prunetin) in soy products and wastewater samples was developed using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS). The phytoestrogens were derivatized as their trimethylsilyl ethers with trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). The phytoestrogens were isolated from all samples with liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. Daidzein-d4 and genistein-d4 labeled standards were used as internal standards before extraction and derivatization. The fragmentation patterns of the phytoestrogens were investigated by isolating and fragmenting the precursor ions in the ion-trap and a typical fragmentation involved the loss of a methyl and a carbonyl group. Two characteristic fragment ions for each analyte were chosen for identification and confirmation. The developed methodology was applied to the identification and confirmation of phytoestrogens in soy milk, in wastewater effluent from a soy-milk processing plant, and in wastewater (influent and effluent) from a treatment plant. Detected concentrations of genistein ranged from 50,000 ??g/L and 2000 ??g/L in soy milk and in wastewater from a soy-plant, respectively, to 20 ??g/L and <1 ??g/L for influent and effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, respectively. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in fruits and vegetables using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Lal, Asha; Tan, Guanhuat; Chai, Meekin

    2008-02-01

    A new extraction and cleanup procedure with gas chromatography was developed for the sensitive determination of acephate, dimethoate, malathion, diazinon, quinalphos, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, chlorothalonil and carbaryl using 1-chloro-4-fluorobenzene as an internal standard in fruits and vegetables. Several extracting and eluting solvents for solid-phase extraction were investigated. The overall extracting solvent with a mixture of acetone:ethyl acetate:hexane (10:80:10, v/v/v) and a eluting solvent of 5% acetone in hexane used with the RPC18 cartridge gave the best recovery for all of the investigated pesticides, and minimized the interference from co-extractants. Under the optimal extraction and clean-up conditions, recoveries of 85 - 99% with RSD < 5.0% (n = 3) for most of the pesticides at the 0.02 - 0.5 mg/kg level were obtained. The limit of detection was between 0.005 - 0.01 mg/kg and the limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg. This analytical procedure was characterized with high accuracy and acceptable sensitivity to meet requirements for monitoring pesticides in crops. PMID:18270414

  3. Multi-channel open tubular traps for headspace sampling, gas chromatographic fraction collection and olfactory assessment of milk volatiles.

    PubMed

    Naudé, Yvette; van Aardt, Marleen; Rohwer, Egmont Richard

    2009-04-01

    A headspace sampling method is described for concentrating milk volatiles onto a multi-channel open tubular silicone rubber trap (MCT) for thermal desorption into a GC-FID. Sections of the chromatographic profile, single peaks or combinations of compounds are recaptured with secondary MCTs during a subsequent run. The recaptured aroma is released in a controlled manner by heating the MCT in a portable heating device. An aroma release window of several minutes allows up to six people the opportunity to sniff each aroma fraction more than once. Olfactory results suggest that a synergistic combination of 2-heptanone and 2-nonanone could be responsible for a pungent cheese, sour milk-like aroma. MCTs containing single components or fractions can be desorbed into a GC-MS for compound identification.

  4. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric characterization of all acyclic C5-C7 alkenes from fluid catalytic cracked gasoline using polydimethylsiloxane and squalane stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Soják, Ladislav; Addová, Gabriela; Kubinec, Róbert; Kraus, Angelika; Hu, Gengyuan

    2002-02-15

    Published retention indices of acyclic alkenes C5-C7 on squalane and polydimethylsiloxane as stationary phases were investigated, and reliable retention indices of alkenes from various sources were converted to separation systems used in a laboratory. Retention indices measured on available authentic commercial alkenes and on alkenic fraction of gasoline, published retention indices as well as means of GC-MS were used for verification of calculated retention indices. Retention of some gas chromatographic unseparated isomer pairs was obtained by mass spectrometric deconvolution using a specific single-ion monitoring. On the basis of these retention data, C5-C7 alkenes were identified and analyzed in the gasoline from fluid catalytic cracking. In the gasoline all 59 acyclic C5-C7 isomeric alkenes were determined at significantly different concentration levels.

  5. Stereometabolism of ethylbenzene in man: gas chromatographic determination of urinary excreted mandelic acid enantiomers and phenylglyoxylic acid and their relation to the height of occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Korn, M; Gfrörer, W; Herz, R; Wodarz, I; Wodarz, R

    1992-01-01

    Ethylbenzene is an important industrial solvent and a key substance in styrene production. Ethylbenzene metabolism leads to the formation of mandelic acid, which occurs in two enantiomeric forms, and phenylglyoxylic acid. To decide which enantiomer is preferably formed, 70 urine samples of exposed workers were taken at the end of shifts and--after 3-pentyl ester derivatisation--gas chromatographically analysed. The R/S ratio of mandelic acid enantiomers in urine amounts to 19:1, which means that R-mandelic acid is a major metabolite and S-mandelic acid is one of the minor urinary metabolites of ethylbenzene in man. The R/S ratio is independent of ambient air concentration of ethylbenzene within the investigated range. Compared to an ethylbenzene monoexposure the height of total mandelic acid excretion is decreased in the case of coexposure to other aromatic solvents.

  6. Screening for volatile organic compounds in soil and groundwater by use of a portable gas chromatograph during field investigations at an Air Force installation in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parnell, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of the portable gas chromatograph for screening of soil and water samples in the field was part of the drilling program for the installation of monitoring wells for a basewide ground-water monitoring program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Selected soil and ground-water samples were screened in the field for volatile organic compounds to determine if contamination was present, to define the vertical and lateral extent of contamination, and to aid in the placement of the well screens for optimal interception of contaminants. This report describes the screening methods, sample-collection, quality-assurance/quality-control methods, and data-interpretation procedures necessary for screening of soil and ground-water samples in the field during the water resources investigations.

  7. Characteristic chromatographic fingerprint study of short-chain fatty acids in human milk, infant formula, pure milk and fermented milk by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenzuo; Liu, Yanan; Zhu, Yan; Yang, Jing; Sun, Lili; Chai, Xin; Wang, Yuefei

    2016-09-01

    Human milk, infant formula, pure milk and fermented milk as food products or dietary supplements provide a range of nutrients required to both infants and adults. Recently, a growing body of evidence has revealed the beneficial roles of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), a subset of fatty acids produced from the fermentation of dietary fibers by gut microbiota. The objective of this study was to establish a chromatographic fingerprint technique to investigate SCFAs in human milk and dairy products by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The multivariate method for principal component analysis assessed differences between milk types. Human milk, infant formula, pure milk and fermented milk were grouped independently, mainly because of differences in formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid and hexanoic acid levels. This method will be important for the assessment of SCFAs in human milk and various dairy products.

  8. Comparison of nutshell granular activated carbons to commercial adsorbents for the purge-and-trap gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wartelle, L H; Marshall, W E; Toles, C A; Johns, M M

    2000-05-26

    Granular activated carbons (GACs) made from agricultural by-products were investigated as adsorbents for short path thermal desorption gas chromatographic analysis of selected polar and nonpolar organic compounds. GACs made from macadamia nut, black walnut and hazelnut shells were compared to four commercially available adsorbents, namely, Tenax TA, Carboxen 569, Carbosieve SIII and coconut charcoal for their properties in purge-and-trap analysis. Adsorption values and breakthrough volumes were calculated for compounds from C3 and C6-C10. GACs derived from macadamia nut shells were found to adsorb and desorb between 80% (benzene) and 277% (ethylbenzene) more acetone (C3), benzene (C6), toluene (C7), ethyl- (C8), n-propyl- (C9), or sec.-butylbenzenes (C10) purged from water at the 100 ppb level than the commercial adsorbents tested. PMID:10893033

  9. A multidimensional micro gas chromatograph employing a parallel separation multi-column chip and stop-flow μGC × μGCs configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Xun; Hung, Te-Yu; Jian, Rih-Sheng; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2013-04-01

    A dual-chip, multidimensional micro gas chromatographic module was designed, built and evaluated. Column chips were fabricated on a silicon wafer with an etched rectangular channel 100 μm (width) × 250 μm (depth) using a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. The column chip for the first GC dimension was 3 m long and was coated with polydimethylsiloxane (DB-1) as the stationary phase. The columns on the second dimensional chip were etched with the same width and depth as the first chip, but the flow channel was split into three parallel columns, 1 m long, on the same sized silicon chip (i.e., 3 cm × 3 cm). These three parallel columns on the second chip were coated with polyethylene oxide (DB-Wax), trifluoropropylpolymethylsilicone (OV-210) and cyanopropylmethylphenylmethylpolysilicone (OV-225), accordingly, in order to provide diversified chromatographic retention. These two chips were connected via a stop-flow configuration to simultaneously generate multiple two-dimensional gas chromatograms for every analysis. This stop-flow μGC × μGCs design allowed the first column to function as a pre-separator and as a sequencing injector for the second parallel-separation chip. Fifteen volatile organic compounds with boiling points that ranged from 80-131 °C with various functional groups were tested using this μGC × μGCs module. Three discrete 2-D chromatograms were generated simultaneously, which demonstrated the advantages of simultaneously combining GC × GC with parallel separation GCs in microchip chromatography. The total traveling length in the column was only 4 m for each eluted peak and fully resolved separation was achieved through the cross reference among triplet 2-D chromatograms. PMID:23381092

  10. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  11. Heterodyne method for high specificity gas detection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Donaldson, R. W.; Gunter, W. D., Jr.; Jaynes, D. N.; Margozzi, A. P.; Deboo, G. J.; Mcclatchie, E. A.; Williams, K. G.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique for measuring trace quantities of gases. The technique involves the use of a reference cell (containing a known amount of the gas being sought) and a sample cell (containing an unknown amount of the same gas) wherein the gas densities are modulated. Light passing through the two cells in sequence is modulated in intensity at the vibrational-rotational lines characteristic of the absorption spectrum for the gas of interest. Since the absorption process is nonlinear, modulating the two absorption cells at two different frequencies gives rise to a heterodyning effect, which in turn introduces sum and difference frequencies in the detected signal. Measuring the ratio of the difference frequency signal for example, to the signal introduced by the reference cell provides a normalized measure of the amount of the gas in the sample cell. The readings produced are thereby independent of source intensity, window transparency, and detector sensitivity. Experimental evaluation of the technique suggests that it should be applicable to a wide range of gases, that it should be able to reject spurious signals due to unwanted gases, and that it should be sensitive to concentrations of the order of 10 to the minus 8th power when used with a sample cell of only 20 cm length.

  12. A very simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method with fluorescence detection for the determination of gemifloxacin in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Sagirli, Olcay; Demirci, Seda; Önal, Armağan

    2015-12-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method with fluorescence detection was developed and validated for the determination of gemifloxacin in human breast milk. The proposed method allows the determination of gemifloxacin in breast milk samples without complex sample preparation. The samples were mixed with a mobile phase and filtered with a 0.45 µm polytetrafluoroethylene filter before analysis. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm I.D.) using methanol:50 mM ortho-phosphoric acid solution (40:60) as the mobile phase with a 1.0 mL/min flow rate. Quantitation was performed using fluorescence detection with an excitation wavelength at 272 nm and an emission wavelength at 395 nm. The linear range was found to be 0.1-2.5 µg/mL. The method was applied successfully for the determination of gemifloxacin in breast milk obtained from a breastfeeding mother after oral administration of a single tablet that included 320 mg gemifloxacin per gemifloxacin tablet.

  13. Gas chromatographic determination of ethyl glucuronide in hair: comparison between tandem mass spectrometry and single quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cappelle, Delphine; Neels, Hugo; Yegles, Michel; Paulus, Jeff; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Covaci, Adrian; Crunelle, Cleo L

    2015-04-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG), a minor metabolite of ethanol, accumulates in hair and is currently used as a long-term marker for the detection of chronic and excessive alcohol consumption. Sensitive methods are required to differentiate teetotalers from moderate drinkers according to the established cut-off (i.e., 7 pg/mg hair). The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive method using gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) operated in the negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) mode. The validated method was applied to hair samples from teetotalers, moderate and excessive alcohol consumers, and results were compared to a previously validated GC-NICI-MS method. The developed GC-NICI-MS/MS method showed linearity over a range from 2 to 400 pg/mg hair, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.05 pg/mg hair and a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.2 pg/mg hair, compared to an LOD of 0.5 pg/mg hair and LLOQ of 1.5 pg/mg hair obtained with GC-NICI-MS. Furthermore, lower background noise was observed using GC-NICI-MS/MS. Comparison of results of hair samples (n=58) obtained by GC-NICI-MS and GC-NICI-MS/MS showed no significant difference between both methods (paired-sample t-test, p>0.05; mean CV=1.0%). The differences between both methods were larger for EtG concentrations<30 mg/pg hair (mean CV=1.7%) than for EtG concentrations>30 mg/pg hair (mean CV=0.7%). This suggests a higher selectivity of GC-NICI-MS/MS at lower concentrations. In conclusion, by using GC-NICI-MS/MS, a higher analytical selectivity and an improved signal to noise ratio, can be achieved. Although GC-NICI-MS would not change the interpretation of the EtG concentrations, the present GC-NICI-MS/MS method should preferentially be used for the determination of EtG in hair, especially when differentiating between teetotalers and moderate drinkers according to the current cut-off (i.e., 7 pg/mg hair). PMID:25562794

  14. Limit of detection of 15{sub N} by gas-chromatography atomic emission detection: Optimization using an experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Deruaz, D.; Bannier, A.; Pionchon, C.

    1995-08-01

    This paper deals with the optimal conditions for the detection of {sup 15}N determined using a four-factor experimental design from [2{sup 13}C,-1,3 {sup 15}N] caffeine measured with an atomic emission detector (AED) coupled to gas chromatography (GC). Owing to the capability of a photodiodes array, AED can simultaneously detect several elements using their specific emission lines within a wavelength range of 50 nm. So, the emissions of {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N are simultaneously detected at 420.17 nm and 421.46 nm respectively. Four independent experimental factors were tested (1) helium flow rate (plasma gas); (2) methane pressure (reactant gas); (3) oxygen pressure; (4) hydrogen pressure. It has been shown that these four gases had a significant influence on the analytical response of {sup 15}N. The linearity of the detection was determined using {sup 15}N amounts ranging from 1.52 pg to 19 ng under the optimal conditions obtained from the experimental design. The limit of detection was studied using different methods. The limits of detection of {sup 15}N was 1.9 pg/s according to the IUPAC method (International-Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry). The method proposed by Quimby and Sullivan gave a value of 2.3 pg/s and that of Oppenheimer gave a limit of 29 pg/s. For each determination, and internal standard: 1-isobutyl-3.7 dimethylxanthine was used. The results clearly demonstrate that GC AED is sensitive and selective enough to detect and measure {sup 15}N-labelled molecules after gas chromatographic separation.

  15. Air Monitoring for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Naylor, Guy; Haskell, William; Floyd, David; Curley, Charles; Griffin, Timothy P.; Adams, Frederick; Follistein, Duke

    2003-01-01

    The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and quantify various hazardous gases. Traditionally these systems are designed for leak detection of the cryogenic gases used for the propulsion of the Shuttle and other vehicles. Mass spectrometers are the basis of these systems, which provide excellent quantitation, sensitivity, selectivity, response and limits of detection. Unfortunately, these systems are large, heavy and expensive. This feature limits the ability to perform gas analysis in certain applications. Smaller and lighter mass spectrometer systems could be used in many more applications primarily due to the portability of the system. Such applications would include air analysis in confined spaces, in-situ environmental analysis and emergency response. In general, system cost is lowered as size is reduced. With a low cost air analysis system, several systems could be utilized for monitoring large areas. These networked systems could be deployed at job-sites for worker safety, throughout a community for pollution warnings, or dispersed in a battlefield for early warning of chemical or biological threats. Presented will be information on the first prototype of this type of system. Included will be field trial data, with this prototype performing air analysis autonomously from an aircraft.

  16. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in a compressor station must have a fixed gas detection and alarm system, unless the building is— (1)...

  17. A rapid reversed-phase thin layer chromatographic protocol for detection of adulteration in ghee (clarified milk fat) with vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anupama; Sharma, Vivek; Arora, Sumit; Lal, Darshan; Kumar, Anil

    2015-04-01

    Detection of milk fat adulteration with foreign fats/oils continues to be a challenge for the dairy industry as well as food testing laboratories, especially in the present scenario of rampant adulteration using the scientific knowledge by unscrupulous persons involved in the trade. In the present investigation a rapid reversed-phase thin layer chromatographic (RP-TLC) protocol was standardized to ascertain the purity of milk fat. RP-TLC protocol did not show any false positive results in the genuine ghee (clarified butter fat) samples of known origin. Adulteration of ghee with coconut oil up to 7. 5 %, soybean oil, sunflower oil and groundnut oil up to 1 %, while, designer oil up to 2 % level could be detected using the standardized RP-TLC protocol. The protocol standardized is rapid and convenient to use. PMID:25825547

  18. Sensor array for toxic gas detection

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Zaromb, Solomon; Penrose, William R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting and identifying a hazardous component in air or other gas including an array of small sensors which upon exposure to the gas from a pattern of electrical responses, a source of standard response patterns characteristic of various components, and microprocessor means for comparing the sensor-formed response pattern with one or more standard patterns to thereby identify the component on a display. The number of responses may be increased beyond the number of sensors by changing the operating voltage, temperature or other condition associated with one or more sensors to provide a plurality of responses from each of one or more of the sensors. In one embodiment, the instrument is capable of identifying anyone of over 50-100 hazardous components.

  19. A photoacoustic spectrometer for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, E. M.; Bezerra, E.; Scalabrin, A.

    2005-06-01

    A high-resolution external laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been developed for trace gas detection with absorption transitions in coincidence with CO2 laser emission lines (9,2-10,9 μm: 920-1086 cm-1). The CO2 laser operates in 90 CW lines with power of up to 15 W. A PC-controlled step motor can tune the laser lines. The resonance frequency of first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell is at 1600 Hz. The cell Q-factor and cell constant are measured close to 50 and 28 mVcmW-1, respectively. The spectrometer has been tested in preliminary studies to analyze the absorption transitions of ozone (O_3). The ethylene (C_2H_4) from papaya fruit is also investigated using N2 as carrier gas at a constant flow rate.

  20. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  1. Gas Chromatography Analysis with Olfactometric Detection (GC-O) as a Useful Methodology for Chemical Characterization of Odorous Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Brattoli, Magda; Cisternino, Ezia; Dambruoso, Paolo Rosario; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Giungato, Pasquale; Mazzone, Antonio; Palmisani, Jolanda; Tutino, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) technique couples traditional gas chromatographic analysis with sensory detection in order to study complex mixtures of odorous substances and to identify odor active compounds. The GC-O technique is already widely used for the evaluation of food aromas and its application in environmental fields is increasing, thus moving the odor emission assessment from the solely olfactometric evaluations to the characterization of the volatile components responsible for odor nuisance. The aim of this paper is to describe the state of the art of gas chromatography-olfactometry methodology, considering the different approaches regarding the operational conditions and the different methods for evaluating the olfactometric detection of odor compounds. The potentials of GC-O are described highlighting the improvements in this methodology relative to other conventional approaches used for odor detection, such as sensoristic, sensorial and the traditional gas chromatographic methods. The paper also provides an examination of the different fields of application of the GC-O, principally related to fragrances and food aromas, odor nuisance produced by anthropic activities and odorous compounds emitted by materials and medical applications. PMID:24316571

  2. High performance liquid chromatographic separations of gas oil samples and their hydrotreated products using commercial normal phases.

    PubMed

    Oro, Nicole E; Lucy, Charles A

    2011-10-28

    Three commercially available high performance liquid chromatography columns are used in normal phase or quasi-normal phase mode for the separation of gas oil samples. The columns are tested with 20 analytical standards to determine their suitability for separations of petroleum samples and their ability to separate the nitrogen group-types (pyrrole and pyridine) found in petroleum. The columns studied are polymeric hypercrosslinked polystyrene (HGN), a biphenyl phase, and a Chromegabond "DNAP" column from ES Industries. The HGN column separates gas oils based on both ring structure and heteroatom, while the biphenyl phase has low retention of most compounds studied in quasi-normal phase mode. The "DNAP" column is selective for nitrogen-containing compounds, separating them from PAHs as well as oxygen and sulphur compounds. Retention data of standards on all three columns is shown, along with chromatograms of gas oil samples on the HGN and "DNAP" columns.

  3. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness.

  4. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness. PMID:24005155

  5. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  6. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  7. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  8. Evaluation of Comprehensive 2-D Gas Chromatography-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for 209 Chlorinated Biphenyl Congeners in Two Chromatographic Runs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research evaluates a recently developed comprehensive 2-D GC coupled with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer for the potential separation of 209 PCB congeners, using a sequence of 1-D and 2-D chromatographic modes. In two consecutive chromatographic runs, using a 40 m,...

  9. Comparison of three chromatographic techniques for the detection of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Carrell, Emily J; Ali, Zulfiqar; Avula, Bharathi; Avonto, Cristina; Parcher, Jon F; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-06-01

    Leaves of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa are used to suppress pain and mitigate opioid withdrawal syndromes. The potential threat of abuse and ready availability of this uncontrolled psychoactive plant have led to the need for improved analytical techniques for the detection of the major active components, mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Three independent chromatographic methods coupled to two detection systems, GC with MS, supercritical fluid chromatography with diode array detection, and HPLC with MS and diode array detection, were compared for the analysis of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in M. speciosa plants. The indole alkaloids included two sets of diastereoisomers: (i) paynantheine and 3-isopaynantheine and (ii) mitragynine, speciogynine, and speciociliatine. Two oxindole alkaloid diastereoisomers, corynoxine and corynoxine B, were also studied. The HPLC and supercritical fluid chromatography methods successfully resolved the major components with slightly different elution orders. The GC method was less satisfactory because it was unable to resolve mitragynine and speciociliatine. This separation was difficult by GC with a liquid stationary phase because these diastereoisomers differ only in the orientation of an interior hydrogen atom. The observed lack of resolution of the indole alkaloid diastereoisomers coupled with the likeness of the mass and tandem mass spectra, calls into question proposed GC methods for the analysis of mitragynine based on solely GC with MS separation and identification. PMID:24659356

  10. Comparison of three chromatographic techniques for the detection of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Carrell, Emily J; Ali, Zulfiqar; Avula, Bharathi; Avonto, Cristina; Parcher, Jon F; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-06-01

    Leaves of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa are used to suppress pain and mitigate opioid withdrawal syndromes. The potential threat of abuse and ready availability of this uncontrolled psychoactive plant have led to the need for improved analytical techniques for the detection of the major active components, mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Three independent chromatographic methods coupled to two detection systems, GC with MS, supercritical fluid chromatography with diode array detection, and HPLC with MS and diode array detection, were compared for the analysis of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in M. speciosa plants. The indole alkaloids included two sets of diastereoisomers: (i) paynantheine and 3-isopaynantheine and (ii) mitragynine, speciogynine, and speciociliatine. Two oxindole alkaloid diastereoisomers, corynoxine and corynoxine B, were also studied. The HPLC and supercritical fluid chromatography methods successfully resolved the major components with slightly different elution orders. The GC method was less satisfactory because it was unable to resolve mitragynine and speciociliatine. This separation was difficult by GC with a liquid stationary phase because these diastereoisomers differ only in the orientation of an interior hydrogen atom. The observed lack of resolution of the indole alkaloid diastereoisomers coupled with the likeness of the mass and tandem mass spectra, calls into question proposed GC methods for the analysis of mitragynine based on solely GC with MS separation and identification.

  11. Gas correlation lidar for methane detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galletti, E.; Zanzottera, E.; Draghi, S.; Garbi, M.; Petroni, R.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of DIAL system for the detection of methane in the atmosphere is being developed. The main feature of this lidar is the use of a gas correlation technique to obtain the reference signal by means of a single laser pulse, instead of two shots at different wavelengths. This fact is useful to make measurements on fast moving platforms. To meet the infrared absorption band of methane an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was used with a LiNbO3 crystal as active element, and a tuning range between 1.5 divided by 4 microns. As known, the major problem to overcome in parametric oscillators are the pump beam quality and the difficulty in reducing the linewidth. The first requirement is met by using, as a pump, a Nd-YAG laser based on a new type of resonator cavity, named SFUR (Self Filtering Unstable Resonator). The laser emits, with high efficiency, near diffraction limited pulsed beams of about 250 mJ of energy, 20 ns of duration at 10 pps of frequency repetition rate. On the other hand, the gas correlation technique allows the operation with a bandwidth as large as 1/cm, which is obtainable using only a diffraction grating as a dispersive element in the OPO cavity.

  12. Examination of the kinetic isotopic effect to the acetylation derivatization for the gas chromatographic-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometric doping control analysis of endogenous steroids.

    PubMed

    Angelis, Yiannis S; Kioussi, Maroula K; Kiousi, Polyxeni; Brenna, J Thomas; Georgakopoulos, Costas G

    2012-12-01

    In gas chromatographic-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) doping control analysis, endogenous androgenic anabolic steroids and their metabolites are commonly acetylated using acetic anhydride reagent, thus incorporating exogenous carbon that contributes to the measured isotope ratio. Comparison of the endogenous δ(13)C of free, mono-, and di-acetylated steroids requires application of corrections, typically through straightforward use of the mass balance equation. Variability in kinetic isotope effects (KIE) due to steroid structures could cause fractionation of endogenous steroid carbon, resulting in inaccurate results. To test for possible KIE influence on δ(13)C, acetic anhydride of graded isotope ratio within the natural abundance range was used under normal derivatization conditions to test for linearity. In all cases, plots of measured steroid acetate δ(13)C versus acetic anhydride δ(13)C were linear and slopes were not significantly different. Regression analysis of the Δδ(13)C of enriched acetic anhydrides versus Δδ(13)C of derivatized steroids shows that KIE are similar in all cases. We conclude that δ(13)C calculated from the mass balance equation is independent of the δ(13)C of the acetic anhydride reagent, and that net KIE under normal derivatization conditions do not bias the final reported steroid δ(13)C.

  13. Gas chromatographic method for the determination of residual monomers, 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate, as curing agents in an ultraviolet curable adhesive.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung-Hyoun; Kim, Nosun; Moon, Dong Cheul

    2014-02-01

    A gas chromatographic method is described for the determination of residual 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (AOI) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (MOI) as curing agents in an ultraviolet curable adhesive. Pre-column derivatization was employed in the determination of AOI and MOI as a means of enhancing the response of the flame ionization detector. Urethane derivatives of AOI and MOI were derived using methanol for 30 min at room temperature. The accuracies (n = 5, three concentration levels) were in the range of 113.4 to 126.7%, and precisions (n = 5, three concentration levels) were in the range of 0.8 to 4.3% for AOI-OMe. Furthermore, the accuracies were in the range of 79.5 to 108.6% and the precisions were in the range of 1.0 to 2.4% for MOI-OMe. The correlation coefficients of six calibration standards were all greater than 0.9999 for AOI-OMe and greater than 0.9998 for MOI-OMe over the range from 10 to 100 µg/mL.

  14. Selective Retention of Explosives and Related Compounds on Gas-Chromatographic Capillary Columns Coated with Lanthanide(III) ß-diketonate Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2009-09-04

    The purpose of this research was to investigate coating capillary columns with lanthanide(III) beta-diketonate polymers to provide gas-chromatographic columns with selectivity toward explosives and related compounds. Capillary columns were statically coated with a combination of a lanthanide(III) beta-diketonate polymer, which utilized p-di(4,4,5,5,6,6,6-heptafluoro-1,3-hexanedionyl)benzene (dihed) as a ligand, and SE-30. A novel coating technique was developed that used a methanol-containing azeotrope to provide solubility for both polymers while maintaining a low boiling point compatible with static coating. As based on temperature-programmed retention indices, the custom experimental columns displayed selective retention of nitroaromatic, nitroalkane, and nitrate ester test probes relative to an appropriate SE-30 control column. Selective retention was more pronounced for strong Lewis base analytes (i.e., cyclohexanone). Relative analyte retention on the La(dihed), Tb(dihed) and Eu(dihed) columns are discussed relative to Lewis acidity and solubility of the polymer in the azeotrope coating solution.

  15. 2,3-di-O-methoxymethyl-6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-beta-cyclodextrin, a useful stationary phase for gas chromatographic separation of enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Takahisa, Eisuke; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2005-05-27

    Heptakis(2,3-di-O-methoxymethyl-6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (2,3-MOM-6-TBDMS-beta-CD), synthesized by using methoxymethylchloride (MOM-Cl) as derivatization reagent, was used for capillary gas chromatographic separation of enantiomers. The new chiral stationary phase proved to be suitable for the enantiodifferentiation of volatiles from various chemical classes. Compared to the corresponding gamma-CD derivative (2,3-MOM-6-TBDMS-gamma-CD), the spectrum of compounds for which enantiomers could be separated was more limited and the enantioseparation achieved was generally less pronounced. Unusually high separation factors were observed for 2-alkyl esters of short chain acids (C2-C6). Phenomena underlying the enantioseparation of 2-pentyl acetate (alpha: 4.31; 35 degrees C) were investigated by determining thermodynamic parameters. Data show that only one enantiomer is retained significantly on the chiral stationary phase whereas the other one behaves like the hydrocarbons used as references. PMID:15974081

  16. Comparison of multiple linear regression, partial least squares and artificial neural networks for prediction of gas chromatographic relative retention times of trimethylsilylated anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Farmaki, E; Thomaidis, N; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Georgakopoulos, C

    2012-09-21

    The comparison among different modelling techniques, such as multiple linear regression, partial least squares and artificial neural networks, has been performed in order to construct and evaluate models for prediction of gas chromatographic relative retention times of trimethylsilylated anabolic androgenic steroids. The performance of the quantitative structure-retention relationship study, using the multiple linear regression and partial least squares techniques, has been previously conducted. In the present study, artificial neural networks models were constructed and used for the prediction of relative retention times of anabolic androgenic steroids, while their efficiency is compared with that of the models derived from the multiple linear regression and partial least squares techniques. For overall ranking of the models, a novel procedure [Trends Anal. Chem. 29 (2010) 101-109] based on sum of ranking differences was applied, which permits the best model to be selected. The suggested models are considered useful for the estimation of relative retention times of designer steroids for which no analytical data are available.

  17. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis of metabolites in natural and artificial agarwood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoxia; Xie, Mingrong; Liu, Shaofeng; Guo, Xiaoling; Chen, Xiaoying; Zhong, Zhaojian; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin

    2014-09-15

    Agarwood is a resinous material formed in wounded Aquilaria sinensis in China, which is widely used as an effective traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This study is aimed to use gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric methods to create reliable criteria for accurate identification of natural agarwood and artificial agarwood, as well as for quality evaluation of artificial agarwood. Natural agarwood and artificial agarwood (stimulated by formic acid or formic acid plus fungal inoculation) were used as standards and controls for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. The identification criteria developed were applied to commercial agarwood. A reliable criteria including correlation coefficient of GC-MS fingerprint of natural agarwood and 22 markers of metabolism in natural and artificial agarwood was constructed. Compared with chemically stimulated agarwood (formic acid) and in terms of the 22 markers, artificial agarwood obtained by formic acid stimulation and fungal inoculation were much closer to natural agarwood. The study demonstrates that the chemical components of artificial agarwood obtained by comprehensive stimulated method (formic acid plus fungal inoculation) are much closer to the natural agarwood than those obtained by chemically stimulated method (formic acid), as times goes by. A reliable criteria containing correlation coefficient of GC-MS fingerprint of natural agarwood and 22 metabolism markers can be used to evaluate the quality of the agarwood. As an application case, three samples were identified as natural agarwood from the 25 commercial agarwood by using the evaluation method.

  18. Fast chromatographic method for the determination of dyes in beverages by using high performance liquid chromatography--diode array detection data and second order algorithms.

    PubMed

    Culzoni, María J; Schenone, Agustina V; Llamas, Natalia E; Garrido, Mariano; Di Nezio, Maria S; Band, Beatriz S Fernández; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2009-10-16

    A fast chromatographic methodology is presented for the analysis of three synthetic dyes in non-alcoholic beverages: amaranth (E123), sunset yellow FCF (E110) and tartrazine (E102). Seven soft drinks (purchased from a local supermarket) were homogenized, filtered and injected into the chromatographic system. Second order data were obtained by a rapid LC separation and DAD detection. A comparative study of the performance of two second order algorithms (MCR-ALS and U-PLS/RBL) applied to model the data, is presented. Interestingly, the data present time shift between different chromatograms and cannot be conveniently corrected to determine the above-mentioned dyes in beverage samples. This fact originates the lack of trilinearity that cannot be conveniently pre-processed and can hardly be modelled by using U-PLS/RBL algorithm. On the contrary, MCR-ALS has shown to be an excellent tool for modelling this kind of data allowing to reach acceptable figures of merit. Recovery values ranged between 97% and 105% when analyzing artificial and real samples were indicative of the good performance of the method. In contrast with the complete separation, which consumes 10 mL of methanol and 3 mL of 0.08 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate, the proposed fast chromatography method requires only 0.46 mL of methanol and 1.54 mL of 0.08 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate. Consequently, analysis time could be reduced up to 14.2% of the necessary time to perform the complete separation allowing saving both solvents and time, which are related to a reduction of both the costs per analysis and environmental impact.

  19. Fast chromatographic method for the determination of dyes in beverages by using high performance liquid chromatography--diode array detection data and second order algorithms.

    PubMed

    Culzoni, María J; Schenone, Agustina V; Llamas, Natalia E; Garrido, Mariano; Di Nezio, Maria S; Band, Beatriz S Fernández; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2009-10-16

    A fast chromatographic methodology is presented for the analysis of three synthetic dyes in non-alcoholic beverages: amaranth (E123), sunset yellow FCF (E110) and tartrazine (E102). Seven soft drinks (purchased from a local supermarket) were homogenized, filtered and injected into the chromatographic system. Second order data were obtained by a rapid LC separation and DAD detection. A comparative study of the performance of two second order algorithms (MCR-ALS and U-PLS/RBL) applied to model the data, is presented. Interestingly, the data present time shift between different chromatograms and cannot be conveniently corrected to determine the above-mentioned dyes in beverage samples. This fact originates the lack of trilinearity that cannot be conveniently pre-processed and can hardly be modelled by using U-PLS/RBL algorithm. On the contrary, MCR-ALS has shown to be an excellent tool for modelling this kind of data allowing to reach acceptable figures of merit. Recovery values ranged between 97% and 105% when analyzing artificial and real samples were indicative of the good performance of the method. In contrast with the complete separation, which consumes 10 mL of methanol and 3 mL of 0.08 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate, the proposed fast chromatography method requires only 0.46 mL of methanol and 1.54 mL of 0.08 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate. Consequently, analysis time could be reduced up to 14.2% of the necessary time to perform the complete separation allowing saving both solvents and time, which are related to a reduction of both the costs per analysis and environmental impact. PMID:19748097

  20. Derivative Quotient Spectrophotometry and an Eco-Friendly Micellar Chromatographic Approach with Time-Programmed UV-Detection for the Separation of Two Fluoroquinolones and Phenazopyridine.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Manar M; Salim, Mohamed M

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two analytical approaches were exploited for the resolution of binary mixtures of ciprofloxacin HCl (CIP) or norfloxacin (NOR) and phenazopyridine HCl (PHZ). In the first approach, the amplitudes of the first derivative of the ratio spectra were measured at 267 or 287 nm for CIP and at 268 or 291 nm for NOR. PHZ could be directly determined in the presence of CIP or NOR at 405 nm. The calibration graphs were rectilinear over the ranges of 1.0-16.0 µg/mL for CIP or NOR and 1.0-10.0 µg/mL for PHZ. In the second approach, an accurate, reliable and environmentally nontoxic micellar liquid chromatographic (MLC) method was developed. A good chromatographic separation was achieved using a 150 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm particle size Spherisorb ODS-2 column. Eco-friendly mobile phase containing 0.12 M sodium dodecyl sulphate, 0.3% triethylamine and 6%n-butanol in 0.02 M orthophosphoric acid of pH 3.0 was pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. Time programmed UV-detection was applied to allow sensitive determination of the studied drugs. The analytes were eluted without interferences in <10 min. Methocarbamol was used as an internal standard. The MLC method was found to be rectilinear over the concentration range of 0.5-20.0 μg/mL for CIP, NOR or PHZ. These optimized and validated methods were successfully applied for the simultaneous analysis of the studied drugs in their synthetic mixtures and co-formulated tablets. Moreover, the second method was further extended to the determination of these drugs in human urine with direct injection and without any pretreatment.

  1. Comparison of gravimetric and gas chromatographic methods for assessing performance of textile materials against liquid pesticide penetration.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Anugrah; Abbi, Ruchika

    2004-01-01

    Penetration of liquid pesticides through textile materials is a criterion for determining the performance of protective clothing used by pesticide handlers. The pipette method is frequently used to apply liquid pesticides onto textile materials to measure penetration. Typically, analytical techniques such as Gas Chromatography (GC) are used to measure percentage penetration. These techniques are labor intensive and costly. A simpler gravimetric method was developed, and tests were conducted to compare the gravimetric and GC methods of analysis. Three types of pesticide formulations and 4 fabrics were used for the study. Diluted pesticide formulations were pipetted onto the test specimens and percentage penetration was measured using the 2 methods. For homogeneous formulation, the results of the two methods were fairly comparable. However, due to the filtering action of the textile materials, there were differences in the percentage penetration between the 2 methods for formulations that were not homogeneous.

  2. Fabrication of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8-methacrylate monolith composite capillary columns for fast gas chromatographic separation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Kareem; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed Yacine; Aqel, Ahmad; ALOthman, Zeid Abdullah

    2015-08-01

    A composite zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) with a butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate (BuMA-co-EDMA) monolithic capillary column (33.5cm long×250μm i.d.) was fabricated to enhance the separation efficiency of methacrylate monoliths toward small molecules using conventional low-pressure gas chromatography in comparison with a neat butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate (BuMA-co-EDMA) monolithic capillary column (33.5cm long×250μm i.d.). The addition of 10mgmL(-1) ZIF-8 micro-particles increased the BET surface area of BuMA-co-EDMA by 3.4-fold. A fast separation of five linear alkanes in 36s with high resolution (Rs≥1.3) was performed using temperature program. Isothermal separation of the same sample also showed a high efficiency (3315platesm(-1) for octane) at 0.89min. Moreover, the column was able to separate skeletal isomers, such as iso-octane/octane and 2-methyl octane/nonane. In addition, an iso-butane/iso-butylene gas mixture was separated at ambient temperature. Comparison with an open tubular TR-5MS column (30m long×250μm i.d.) revealed the superiority of the composite column in separating the five-membered linear alkane mixture with 4-5 times increase in efficiency and a total separation time of 0.89min instead of 4.67min. A paint thinner sample was fully separated using the composite column in 2.43min with a good resolution (Rs≥0.89). The perfect combination between the polymeric monolith, with its high permeability, and ZIF-8, with its high surface area and flexible 0.34nm pore openings, led to the fast separation of small molecules with high efficiency and opened a new horizon in GC applications.

  3. Fabrication of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8-methacrylate monolith composite capillary columns for fast gas chromatographic separation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Kareem; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed Yacine; Aqel, Ahmad; ALOthman, Zeid Abdullah

    2015-08-01

    A composite zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) with a butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate (BuMA-co-EDMA) monolithic capillary column (33.5cm long×250μm i.d.) was fabricated to enhance the separation efficiency of methacrylate monoliths toward small molecules using conventional low-pressure gas chromatography in comparison with a neat butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate (BuMA-co-EDMA) monolithic capillary column (33.5cm long×250μm i.d.). The addition of 10mgmL(-1) ZIF-8 micro-particles increased the BET surface area of BuMA-co-EDMA by 3.4-fold. A fast separation of five linear alkanes in 36s with high resolution (Rs≥1.3) was performed using temperature program. Isothermal separation of the same sample also showed a high efficiency (3315platesm(-1) for octane) at 0.89min. Moreover, the column was able to separate skeletal isomers, such as iso-octane/octane and 2-methyl octane/nonane. In addition, an iso-butane/iso-butylene gas mixture was separated at ambient temperature. Comparison with an open tubular TR-5MS column (30m long×250μm i.d.) revealed the superiority of the composite column in separating the five-membered linear alkane mixture with 4-5 times increase in efficiency and a total separation time of 0.89min instead of 4.67min. A paint thinner sample was fully separated using the composite column in 2.43min with a good resolution (Rs≥0.89). The perfect combination between the polymeric monolith, with its high permeability, and ZIF-8, with its high surface area and flexible 0.34nm pore openings, led to the fast separation of small molecules with high efficiency and opened a new horizon in GC applications. PMID:26141277

  4. Comparison of a jet separator and an open splitter as an interface between a multi-capillary gas chromatographic column and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    PubMed

    Pongpun; Mlynski; Crisp; Guilhaus

    2000-09-01

    A gas chromatographic/time-of-flight mass spectrometric (GC/TOFMS) interface is being developed for fast on-line analysis utilizing multi-capillary column technology. A variable gap-distance jet separator has been constructed and its performance compared with that of a commercially supplied post-column open splitter recommended for use between the multi-capillary column and a mass spectrometer. Both interfaces were found to be compatible with the GC/TOFMS system at high carrier gas flow-rates, facilitating high-speed and high-resolution separations. The systems were investigated and tested with a mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with molecular masses from 85 to 166: dichloromethane, toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene and tetrachloroethylene. The optimum tip-to-tip gap distance corresponding to the highest efficiency of the jet separator was found to be 0.030 mm for each compound at carrier gas flow-rates of 20, 40 and 60 ml min(-1) giving, in the ion source housing, ion gauge pressure readings of 1.6 x 10(-6), 5.0 x 10(-6) and 5.8 x 10(-6) mbar, respectively. The efficiency of the jet separator (10-30% yields) was significantly higher than that of the open splitter (6-9% yields). The observation that the open splitter did not provide a constant flow-rate to the ion source was not in agreement with the manufacturer's specifications. A method for measuring the gas flow-rates in all parts of the equipment is described. The correlation between yield in the jet separator and molecular mass for the heterogeneous set of compounds studied was found to be less linear than usually reported for homologous series of compounds in jet separator studies. The result suggests that the pressure conditions in the jet may be sufficient for the separation process to be partly controlled by diffusion rather than predominately by effusion. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Nanoparticle-coated micro-optofluidic ring resonator as a detector for microscale gas chromatographic vapor analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholten, K; Collin, W R; Fan, X; Zellers, E T

    2015-05-28

    A vapor sensor comprising a nanoparticle-coated microfabricated optofluidic ring resonator (μOFRR) is introduced. A multilayer film of polyether functionalized, thiolate-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (MPN) was solvent cast on the inner wall of the hollow cylindrical SiOxμOFRR resonator structure, and whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances were generated with a 1550 nm tunable laser via an optical fiber taper. Reversible shifts in the WGM resonant wavelength upon vapor exposure were detected with a photodetector. The μOFRR chip was connected to a pair of upstream etched-Si chips containing PDMS-coated separation μcolumns and calibration curves were generated from the peak-area responses to five volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Calibration curves were linear, and the sensitivities reflected the influence of analyte volatility and analyte-MPN functional group affinity. Sorption-induced changes in film thickness apparently dominate over changes in the refractive index of the film as the determinant of responses for all VOCs. Peaks from the MPN-coated μOFRR were just 20-50% wider than those from a flame ionization detector for similar μcolumn separation conditions, reflecting the rapid response of the sensor for VOCs. The five VOCs were baseline separated in <1.67 min, with detection limits as low as 38 ng. PMID:25939851

  6. Nanoparticle-coated micro-optofluidic ring resonator as a detector for microscale gas chromatographic vapor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, K.; Collin, W. R.; Fan, X.; Zellers, E. T.

    2015-05-01

    A vapor sensor comprising a nanoparticle-coated microfabricated optofluidic ring resonator (μOFRR) is introduced. A multilayer film of polyether functionalized, thiolate-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (MPN) was solvent cast on the inner wall of the hollow cylindrical SiOx μOFRR resonator structure, and whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances were generated with a 1550 nm tunable laser via an optical fiber taper. Reversible shifts in the WGM resonant wavelength upon vapor exposure were detected with a photodetector. The μOFRR chip was connected to a pair of upstream etched-Si chips containing PDMS-coated separation μcolumns and calibration curves were generated from the peak-area responses to five volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Calibration curves were linear, and the sensitivities reflected the influence of analyte volatility and analyte-MPN functional group affinity. Sorption-induced changes in film thickness apparently dominate over changes in the refractive index of the film as the determinant of responses for all VOCs. Peaks from the MPN-coated μOFRR were just 20-50% wider than those from a flame ionization detector for similar μcolumn separation conditions, reflecting the rapid response of the sensor for VOCs. The five VOCs were baseline separated in <1.67 min, with detection limits as low as 38 ng.

  7. Metabolism of anabolic steroids by recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rendic, S; Nolteernsting, E; Schänzer, W

    1999-11-26

    Metabolism of steroid hormones with anabolic properties was studied in vitro using human recombinant CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and 2B6 enzymes. The enzyme formats used for CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 were insect cell microsomes expressing human CYP enzymes and purified recombinant human CYP enzymes in a reconstituted system. CYP3A4 enzyme formats incubated with anabolic steroids, testosterone, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, metandienone, boldenone and 4-chloro-1,2-dehydro-17alpha-methyltestosterone, produced 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites identified as trimethylsilyl (TMS)-ethers by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. When the same formats of CYP2C9 were incubated with the anabolic steroids, no 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites were formed. Human lymphoblast cell microsomes expressing human CYP2B6 incubated with the steroids investigated produced traces of 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites with testosterone and 17alpha-methyltestosterone only. We suggest that the electronic effects of the 3-keto-4-ene structural moiety contribute to the selectivity within the active site of CYP3A4 enzyme resulting in selective 6beta-hydroxylation. PMID:10630892

  8. Capillary gas chromatographic separation of organic bases using a pH-adjusted basic water stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Darko, Ernest; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2016-09-23

    The use of a pH-adjusted water stationary phase for analyzing organic bases in capillary gas chromatography (GC) is demonstrated. Through modifying the phase to typical values near pH 11.5, it is found that various organic bases are readily eluted and separated. Conversely, at the normal pH 7 operating level, they are not. Sodium hydroxide is found to be a much more stable base than ammonium hydroxide for altering the pH due to the higher volatility and evaporation of the latter. In the basic condition, such analytes are not ionized and are observed to produce good peak shapes even for injected masses down to about 20ng. By comparison, analyses on a conventional non-polar capillary GC column yield more peak tailing and only analyte masses of 1μg or higher are normally observed. Through carefully altering the pH, it is also found that the selectivity between analytes can be potentially further enhanced if their respective pKa values differ sufficiently. The analysis of different pharmaceutical and petroleum samples containing organic bases is demonstrated. Results indicate that this approach can potentially offer unique and beneficial selectivity in such analyses.

  9. Capillary gas chromatographic separation of organic bases using a pH-adjusted basic water stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Darko, Ernest; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2016-09-23

    The use of a pH-adjusted water stationary phase for analyzing organic bases in capillary gas chromatography (GC) is demonstrated. Through modifying the phase to typical values near pH 11.5, it is found that various organic bases are readily eluted and separated. Conversely, at the normal pH 7 operating level, they are not. Sodium hydroxide is found to be a much more stable base than ammonium hydroxide for altering the pH due to the higher volatility and evaporation of the latter. In the basic condition, such analytes are not ionized and are observed to produce good peak shapes even for injected masses down to about 20ng. By comparison, analyses on a conventional non-polar capillary GC column yield more peak tailing and only analyte masses of 1μg or higher are normally observed. Through carefully altering the pH, it is also found that the selectivity between analytes can be potentially further enhanced if their respective pKa values differ sufficiently. The analysis of different pharmaceutical and petroleum samples containing organic bases is demonstrated. Results indicate that this approach can potentially offer unique and beneficial selectivity in such analyses. PMID:27578412

  10. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis of 36 lignin-related methoxyphenols from uncontrolled combustion of wood.

    PubMed

    Kjällstrand, J; Ramnäs, O; Petersson, G

    1998-10-23

    Eighteen 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl (guaiacyl) compounds in wood smoke from spruce, and 18 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl (syringyl) analogues in birchwood smoke were analysed. Smoke samples were taken by a gas syringe from wood burning under varying but more or less choked conditions in laboratory pot experiments. Retention index data for a methylsilicone column and basic mass spectral data are given for all compounds. Retention index in combination with molecular mass and structure-specific fragment ions greatly facilitates qualitative analysis. The syringyl and guaiacyl analogues differ by 240 units in retention index and the matching structure-specific ions in their mass spectra by 30 mass units. The identified methoxyphenols differ in the structure of the sidechain, which may be lacking, an alkyl group, an alkenyl group, a carbonyl-containing group or an alcoholic moiety. The proportions between these groups of compounds varied strongly with combustion conditions whereas the proportions of phenols within them were quite specific for each group. The phenols with reactive olefinic linkages in the sidechain were present in larger proportions than reported in other studies of methoxyphenols. PMID:9818433

  11. Characterisation of minor components in vegetable oil by comprehensive gas chromatography with dual detection.

    PubMed

    Purcaro, Giorgia; Barp, Laura; Beccaria, Marco; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2016-12-01

    The profile of minor compounds, such as alcohols, sterols, free and alkyl fatty acids, waxes, etc., was investigated in different vegetable oils by a comprehensive gas chromatographic system, coupled with a simultaneous dual detection (flame ionisation detector and mass spectrometer) for quantitative and qualitative purposes. Such a system generated a unique two-dimensional chromatogram to be used as a chemical fingerprint. Multi-level information, due not only to a more "comprehensive" preparation technique, but also thanks to the exploitation of a more powerful and sensitive analytical determination allowed the extrapolation of diagnostic information from the minor components profile of different vegetable oils, along with their characteristic profile. Furthermore, an admixture of an extra virgin olive oil with a low amount of sunflower and palm oils was evaluated, attesting to the powerful diagnostic information provided by the proposed approach. PMID:27374590

  12. Characterisation of minor components in vegetable oil by comprehensive gas chromatography with dual detection.

    PubMed

    Purcaro, Giorgia; Barp, Laura; Beccaria, Marco; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2016-12-01

    The profile of minor compounds, such as alcohols, sterols, free and alkyl fatty acids, waxes, etc., was investigated in different vegetable oils by a comprehensive gas chromatographic system, coupled with a simultaneous dual detection (flame ionisation detector and mass spectrometer) for quantitative and qualitative purposes. Such a system generated a unique two-dimensional chromatogram to be used as a chemical fingerprint. Multi-level information, due not only to a more "comprehensive" preparation technique, but also thanks to the exploitation of a more powerful and sensitive analytical determination allowed the extrapolation of diagnostic information from the minor components profile of different vegetable oils, along with their characteristic profile. Furthermore, an admixture of an extra virgin olive oil with a low amount of sunflower and palm oils was evaluated, attesting to the powerful diagnostic information provided by the proposed approach.

  13. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  15. Detection of endogenous ethanol and other compounds in the breath by gas chromatography with on-column concentration of sample.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M; Greenberg, J

    1987-05-15

    A new method is described for collecting and concentrating volatile compounds in the breath, in order to facilitate their assay by gas chromatography. Breath was collected into sealed Mylar bags containing an internal standard (isopropyl alcohol). The sample was pumped through a cooled gas chromatograph column, where the volatile compounds were concentrated by adsorption onto the resin packing (Porapak Q) at 35 degrees C. The column was then heated, and the volatilized sample was separated for assay by flame ionization detection. The assay was highly sensitive for ethanol (detecting at least 4.0 nmol) and linear up to 20 nmol (r2 = 0.98). Accuracy and precision were determined by assaying nine replicates of a sample containing 12.0 nmol ethanol; a mean value of 12.18 nmol ethanol was obtained with a coefficient of variation of 10.26%. In a group of normal volunteers, endogenous breath ethanol concentrations ranged from 2.23 to 6.51 nmol/liter. This assay provided a number of advantages over previously described methods: The use of breath collection bags enabled the collection of samples outside the laboratory. The use of an internal standard in the collection bag reduced errors that might have resulted from leakage of the specimen. An on-column concentration of the sample in the gas chromatograph eliminated the need for an additional preconcentration device, such as a cryogenic or adsorptive trapping apparatus.

  16. Towards aerial natural gas leak detection system based on TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuyang; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    Pipeline leakage is a complex scenario for sensing system due to the traditional high cost, low efficient and labor intensive detection scheme. TDLAS has been widely accepted as industrial trace gas detection method and, thanks to its high accuracy and reasonable size, it has the potential to meet pipeline gas leakage detection requirements if it combines with the aerial platform. Based on literature study, this paper discussed the possibility of applying aerial TDLAS principle in pipeline gas leak detection and the key technical foundation of implementing it. Such system is able to result in a high efficiency and accuracy measurement which will provide sufficient data in time for the pipeline leakage detection.

  17. A simple thin-layer chromatographic method for the detection of ergovaline in leaf sheaths of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) infected with Neotyphodium coenophialum.

    PubMed

    Salvat, A E; Godoy, H M

    2001-09-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) method is described for the detection and semiquantitative measurement of ergovaline in leaf sheaths of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Samples were finely ground and extracted with methanol. The extracts were filtered and the methanol was evaporated. The aqueous residue was extracted with hexane, followed by chloroform at pH 9. The chloroform extract was concentrated and further purified on a preparative silica gel TLC plate, developed with toluene/ethyl acetate/acetonitrile (50:10:40). The ergovaline band was scraped and eluted with methanol. The eluant was concentrated and an aliquot was applied to a silica gel TLC plate. The plate was developed successively with chloroform/acetone/acetic acid (90:10:5) and chloroform/ethanol (9:1). Ergovaline was visualized with p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde and sulfuric acid. Semiquantitation of ergovaline was achieved by comparison with a known standard of ergotamine, which was shown to have the same Rf as ergovaline in this system. Spike recovery of ergotamine averaged 60%, with a limit of detection of 200 microg/kg of dry tall fescue leaf sheaths. The method was applied to 15 tall fescue samples with varying degrees of fungal infection, and ergovaline was identified in all contaminated samples with endophyte infection above 15%. Thin-layer chromatography may be also applicable for tall fescue seed, where the ergovaline content is usually higher and the amount of interfering pigments is much lower.

  18. Rapid, low cost thin-layer chromatographic screening method for the detection of ochratoxin A in green coffee at a control level of 10 microg/kg.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Alain; Royer, Delphine

    2002-01-16

    A thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) screening method was developed for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in green coffee at a control level of 10 microg/kg. The method is based on extraction of OTA with a mixture of phosphoric acid and dichloromethane, purification by liquid-liquid partition into sodium hydrogen carbonate, separation by normal-phase TLC, and detection by visual estimation of fluorescence intensity under a UV lamp at 366 nm. The method was validated by performing replicate analyses of uncontaminated green coffee material spiked at 3 different levels of OTA (5, 10, and 20 microg/kg), and also by comparing results obtained on a series of test trial green coffees naturally contaminated with OTA (range 0.2 to 136.7 microg/kg) with those measured by a quantitative immunoaffinity/HPLC method. The agreement between the two methods was excellent, and neither false positive nor false negative results were recorded. This screening method is rapid, simple, robust, and very cheap, which makes it particularly well adapted for implementation in coffee-producing countries. PMID:11782189

  19. Authenticity control of essential oils containing citronellal and citral by chiral and stable-isotope gas-chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nhu-Trang, Tran-Thi; Casabianca, Hervé; Grenier-Loustalot, Marie-Florence

    2006-12-01

    Enantioselective capillary GC on a Supelco beta-DEX 225 column (heptakis(2,3-di-O-acetyl-6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-cyclodextrin SPB 20poly--20% diphenyl, 80% dimethylsiloxane) and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, coupled online with capillary GC on an HP5 column have been used for origin-specific analysis and authenticity control of essential oils, for example lemon (Citrus limon), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon flexuosus), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus L.--Ceylon type and Cymbopogon winterianus--Java type), Litsea cubeba, Lippia citriodora, lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora), lemon gum (Eucalyptus citriodora), and, especially, precious lemon balm oil (Melissa officinalis L.). Isotope data (delta13C(PDB) and delta2H(V-SMOW)) for citral (neral + geranial) and citronellal from on-line GC-C/Py-IRMS and chiral data for citronellal in these essential oils are reported. The possibility of using these data to determine the origin of these essential oils and to detect adulteration is discussed. Principal-components analysis (PCA) of specific compounds in two essential oils of lemongrass and Litsea cubeba was performed as a practical statistical method for distinguishing between these two types of oil.

  20. The gas chromatographic analysis of the reaction products of the partial isobutane oxidation as a two phase process.

    PubMed

    Willms, Thomas; Kryk, Holger; Hampel, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The partial oxidation of isobutane to t-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) has been studied analytically for the first time as a two-phase process in a capillary micro reactor. In order to obtain detailed information on products, yields, selectivities and reaction pathways, the products have been investigated by GC/MS. An Rxi-5ms column and a PTV-injector have been used to analyze the liquid products. TBHP, di-t-butyl peroxide (DTBP), t-butanol (TBA), and propanone as main products as well as further by-products e.g. methanal, isopropanol, isobutanol and isobutanal in minor quantities have been identified by MS. The liquid products have been obtained by quenching the reaction and vaporizing the isobutane afterwards by pressure reduction using a mass flow controller allowing a constant mass flow. For all liquid reaction products calibrations, a validation of the method including limits of quantification and detection as well as calculation of uncertainties has been performed. The results have been applied successfully for the investigation of the selectivities of the main products (TBHP, DTBP, TBA, propanone) of the isobutane oxidation. In the frame of the analytical investigation of this reaction a correlation coefficient of r(2)>0.999 for TBHP and DTBP, which is necessary to perform a validation, has been obtained for the first time. The gaseous phase has been analyzed using a GASPRO column, a DEANS switch, a mole sieve column and a TCD detector. Apart from the gaseous reactants, isobutene has been found. PMID:27378248

  1. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... gas-safe; (5) Each hold space, interbarrier space, and other enclosed spaces, except fuel oil or ballast tanks, in the cargo area, unless the vessel has independent tanks type C; and (6) Each space... detection system must not pass through any gas-safe space, except the gas-safe space in which the...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gas-safe; (5) Each hold space, interbarrier space, and other enclosed spaces, except fuel oil or.... (l) Each flammable gas detection system must have a filter that removes particulate matter in each gas sampling line. (m) Each filter under paragraph (l) of this section must be located where it can...

  3. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  4. Determination of odor release in hydrocolloid model systems containing original or carboxylated cellulose at different pH values using static headspace gas chromatographic (SHS-GC) analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Mi; Shin, Gil-Ok; Park, Kyung Min; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Kim, Young-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Static headspace gas chromatographic (SHS-GC) analysis was performed to determine the release of 13 odorants in hydrocolloid model systems containing original or regio-selectively carboxylated cellulose at different pH values. The release of most odor compounds was decreased in the hydrocolloid solutions compared to control, with the amounts of 2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2,3-butanedione released into the headspace being less than those of any other odor compound in the hydrocolloid model systems. However, there was no considerable difference between original cellulose-containing and carboxylated-cellulose containing systems in the release of most compounds, except for relatively long-chain esters such as ethyl caprylate and ethyl nonanoate. The release from the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions controlled to pH 10 was significantly higher than that from solutions adjusted to pH 4 and 7 in the case of some esters (ethyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethyl propionate, ethyl butyrate, butyl propionate, ethyl caproate) and alcohols (2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol), in particular, ethyl butyrate and 3-methyl-1-butanol. In contrast, the release of 2,3-butanedione from both the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions was increased at pH 4 and 7 compared to that at pH 10 by about 70% and 130%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the release of some odorants could be changed significantly by addition of both original and carboxylated cellulose in hydrocolloid model systems, but only minor effect was observed in pH of the solution. PMID:23447013

  5. Determination of Odor Release in Hydrocolloid Model Systems Containing Original or Carboxylated Cellulose at Different pH Values Using Static Headspace Gas Chromatographic (SHS-GC) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Mi; Shin, Gil-Ok; Park, Kyung Min; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Kim, Young-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Static headspace gas chromatographic (SHS-GC) analysis was performed to determine the release of 13 odorants in hydrocolloid model systems containing original or regio-selectively carboxylated cellulose at different pH values. The release of most odor compounds was decreased in the hydrocolloid solutions compared to control, with the amounts of 2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2,3-butanedione released into the headspace being less than those of any other odor compound in the hydrocolloid model systems. However, there was no considerable difference between original cellulose-containing and carboxylated-cellulose containing systems in the release of most compounds, except for relatively long-chain esters such as ethyl caprylate and ethyl nonanoate. The release from the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions controlled to pH 10 was significantly higher than that from solutions adjusted to pH 4 and 7 in the case of some esters (ethyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethyl propionate, ethyl butyrate, butyl propionate, ethyl caproate) and alcohols (2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol), in particular, ethyl butyrate and 3-methyl-1-butanol. In contrast, the release of 2,3-butanedione from both the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions was increased at pH 4 and 7 compared to that at pH 10 by about 70% and 130%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the release of some odorants could be changed significantly by addition of both original and carboxylated cellulose in hydrocolloid model systems, but only minor effect was observed in pH of the solution. PMID:23447013

  6. Preparation and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymer for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate: application to sample clean-up prior to gas chromatographic determination.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Huma; Memon, Najma; Khan, Hamayun; Bhanger, M I; Nizamani, S M

    2012-07-20

    The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) selective for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) an environmental endocrine disruptor was prepared by suspension polymerization using methacrylamide as functional monomer and N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide as cross-linker. The imprinted polymer was employed for solid-phase extraction of DEHP from water samples of environmental importance and characterized by FT-IR and SEM. The adsorption properties of the imprinted polymer were demonstrated by equilibrium rebinding experiments, Pseudo-second-order kinetic model, Sips isotherm and Scatchard analysis. The reusability of MIP was checked for at least six repeated batch adsorption cycles and the results showed almost no deterioration in the adsorption capacity. The competitive recognition studies were performed with DEHP and structurally similar compounds; dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP). The imprinting factor (IF) of DEHP was found to be 12.86 which was much higher than the imprinting factors (IF) of other phthalates. A method constituted by molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) with GC-FID was developed for DEHP analysis in water samples under very simple conditions. Sample loading and desorption conditions were also optimized. The MISPE method's linearity ranged from 0.035 to 3.0 μg ml⁻¹ with r² = 0.9998. Intra-assay, interassay precision and accuracy ranged from 0.0168% to 1.017%, 1.130% to 4.799% and 94.98% to 99.35%, respectively. The LOD and LOQ were found to be 0.011 and 0.035 μg ml⁻¹, respectively. Synthesized MIP was employed in MISPE for cleaning up the spiked river water samples prior to gas chromatographic analysis. The river samples were found to contain DEHP in the range of 1.4 × 10⁻³ to 0.349 μg ml⁻¹. PMID:22673816

  7. Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-11

    The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the

  8. New approach for sensitive photothermal detection of C60 and C70 fullerenes on micro-thin-layer chromatographic plates.

    PubMed

    Suszyński, Zbigniew; Zarzycki, Paweł K

    2015-03-10

    In this paper the pulse thermovision (photothermal) detection and quantification methods of C60 and C70 fullerenes are presented. Quantification results are compared with optical and fluorescence measurements. Target components were separated under isothermal conditions (30 °C) on micro-TLC plates (RP18WF254S) using n-hexane as the mobile phase. The principle of described analytical protocol is based on sensitive measurement of the temperature contrast generated within TLC stationary phase and fullerenes spots after white light pulse excitation. It has been demonstrated that observed temperature contrast is mainly driven by the optical properties of fullerenes (UV-vis absorption spectra). Contrary to the commonly applied optical reflection or transmission techniques the proposed thermovision method involves dissipated light. The results of presented experimental work have revealed that both types of quantitative measurements provide similar outcome despite the key differences in the signal origin. However, it has been found that thermovision method was characterized by smaller value of LOD, particularly for C60 molecule. We demonstrated that application of correlation technique to post-acquisition analysis of the sequence of temperature contrast images significantly increase detection limits of fullerenes, even in comparison to fluorescence quenching detection mode. Moreover, the thermal contrast images and particularly, computed correlation image, allow detection of stationary phase layer nonuniformities, including changes in the adsorbent thickness and thermal conductivity. Therefore, invented pulsed thermovision methodology can be additionally used for fast quality screening of home made and commercially available TLC plates.

  9. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  12. Development of a chromatographic low pressure flow injection system using amperometric detection: Application to the analysis of niacin in coffee.

    PubMed

    Santos, João Rodrigo; Rangel, António O S S

    2015-11-15

    In this work, an analytical flow system able to perform low pressure chromatography with amperometric detection is presented. As case study, the determination of niacin (vitamin B3) in coffee brewed samples was selected. The manifold comprised a 1.0 cm length monolithic column coated with didecyldimethylammonium bromide, a laboratory-made boron doped diamond electrode, and featured in-line ionic strength adjustment of the mobile phase. The figures of merit concerning the selected case study namely, detection limit, 7.90 × 10(-7) M, determination rate, ca. 10 samplesh(-1), mobile phase and ISA solution consumption, ca. 2.6 mL per analysis, and CV, below 5% for retention time and peak height, showed the competitiveness of this analytical strategy comparing to the described HPLC methods for niacin determination. The strategy displays a simple configuration, low cost, fast and easy assembling, foreseeing its use to general purpose applications.

  13. Determining orthogonal and similar chromatographic systems from the injection of mixtures in liquid chromatography-diode array detection and the interpretation of correlation coefficients color maps.

    PubMed

    Van Gyseghem, E; Crosiers, I; Gourvénec, S; Massart, D L; Vander Heyden, Y

    2004-02-13

    Generic orthogonal chromatographic systems might be helpful tools as potential starting points in the development of methods to separate impurities and the active substance in drugs with unknown impurity profiles. The orthogonality of 38 chromatographic systems was evaluated from weighted-average-linkage dendrograms and color maps, both based on the correlation coefficients between the retention factors on the different systems. On each chromatographic system, 68 drug substances were injected as mixtures of three or four components to increase the throughput. The (overlapping) peaks were identified and resolved with a peak purity algorithm, orthogonal projection approach (OPA). The visualization techniques applied allowed a simple evaluation of orthogonal and (groups of) similar systems.

  14. Detecting Changes of a Distant Gas Source with an Array of MOX Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pashami, Sepideh; Lilienthal, Achim J.; Trincavelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of detecting changes in the activity of a distant gas source from the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system. The main challenge is the turbulent nature of gas dispersion and the response dynamics of the sensors. We propose a change point detection approach and evaluate it on individual gas sensors in an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, or mixture ratio. We also introduce an efficient sensor selection algorithm and evaluate the change point detection approach with the selected sensor array subsets. PMID:23443385

  15. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction and liquid chromatographic separation with electrochemical detection of methylmercury from biological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Using the coupled methods presented in this paper, methylmercury can be accurately and rapidly extracted from biological samples by modified supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and quantitated using liquid chromatography with reductive electrochemical detection. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide modified with methanol effectively extracts underivatized methylmercury from certified reference materials Dorm-1 (dogfish muscle) and Dolt-2 (dogfish liver). Calcium chloride and water, with a ratio of 5:2 (by weight), provide the acid environment required for extracting methylmercury from sample matrices. Methylmercury chloride is separated from other organomercury chloride compounds using HPLC. The acidic eluent, containing 0.06 mol L-1 NaCl, insures the presence of methylmercury chloride and facilitates the reduction of mercury on a glassy carbon electrode. If dual glassy carbon electrodes are used, a positive peak is observed at -0.65 to -0.70 V and a negative peak is observed at -0.90V with the organomercury compounds that were tested. The practical detection limit for methylmercury is 5 X 10-8 mol L-1 (1 X 10-12 tool injected) when a 20 ??L injection loop is used.

  16. Electropolymerized fluorinated aniline-based fiber for headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatographic determination of benzaldehyde in injectable pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Ali; Mohammadi, Somayeh; Bayandori Moghaddam, Abdolmajid; Masoumi, Vahideh; Walker, Roderick B

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a simple method was developed and validated to detect trace levels of benzaldehyde in injectable pharmaceutical formulations by solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Polyaniline was electrodeposited on a platinum wire in trifluoroacetic acid solvent by cyclic voltammetry technique. This fiber shows high thermal and mechanical stability and high performance in extraction of benzaldehyde. Extraction and desorption time and temperature, salt effect and gas chromatography parameters were optimized as key parameters. At the optimum conditions, the fiber shows good linearity between peak area ratio of benzaldehyde/3-chlorobenzaldehyde and benzaldehyde concentration in the range of 50-800 ng/mL with percent relative standard deviation values ranging from 0.75 to 8.64% (n = 3). The limits of quantitation and detection were 50 and 16 ng/mL, respectively. The method has the requisite selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision to assay benzaldehyde in injectable pharmaceutical dosage forms. PMID:24125736

  17. Electropolymerized fluorinated aniline-based fiber for headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatographic determination of benzaldehyde in injectable pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Ali; Mohammadi, Somayeh; Bayandori Moghaddam, Abdolmajid; Masoumi, Vahideh; Walker, Roderick B

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a simple method was developed and validated to detect trace levels of benzaldehyde in injectable pharmaceutical formulations by solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Polyaniline was electrodeposited on a platinum wire in trifluoroacetic acid solvent by cyclic voltammetry technique. This fiber shows high thermal and mechanical stability and high performance in extraction of benzaldehyde. Extraction and desorption time and temperature, salt effect and gas chromatography parameters were optimized as key parameters. At the optimum conditions, the fiber shows good linearity between peak area ratio of benzaldehyde/3-chlorobenzaldehyde and benzaldehyde concentration in the range of 50-800 ng/mL with percent relative standard deviation values ranging from 0.75 to 8.64% (n = 3). The limits of quantitation and detection were 50 and 16 ng/mL, respectively. The method has the requisite selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision to assay benzaldehyde in injectable pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  18. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Blair, Dianna S.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  19. Isolation and recovery of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers from human serum and sheep serum: coupling reversed-phase solid-phase disk extraction and liquid-liquid extraction techniques with a capillary gas chromatographic electron capture negative ion mass spectrometric determinative technique.

    PubMed

    Loconto, Paul R; Isenga, David; O'Keefe, Michael; Knottnerus, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are isolated and recovered with acceptable percent recoveries from human serum via liquid-liquid extraction and column chromatographic cleanup and fractionation with quantitation using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron capture negative ion and selected ion monitoring. PBDEs are found in unspiked serum. An alternative sample preparation approach is developed using sheep serum that utilizes a formic acid pre-treatment followed by reversed-phase solid-phase disk extraction and normal-phase solid-phase cleanup using acidified silica gel that yields>50% recoveries. When these percent recoveries are combined with a minimized phase ratio for human serum and very low instrument detection limits, method detection limits below 500 parts-per-trillion are realized.

  20. Determination of pterins in urine by HPLC with UV and fluorescent detection using different types of chromatographic stationary phases (HILIC, RP C8, RP C18).

    PubMed

    Kośliński, Piotr; Jarzemski, Piotr; Markuszewski, Michał J; Kaliszan, Roman

    2014-03-01

    Pterins are a class of potential cancer biomarkers. New methods involving hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and reversed phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography have been developed for analysis of eight pterin compounds: 6,7-dimethylpterin, pterin, 6-OH-methylpterin, biopterin, isoxanthopterin, neopterin, xanthopterin, and pterin-6-carboxylic acid. The effect of mobile phase composition, buffer type, pH and concentration on retention using HILIC, C8 and C18 RP stationary phases were examined. Separation of pterins on RP and HILIC stationary phase was performed and optimized. Eight pterins were successfully separated on HILIC Luna diol-bonded phases, Aquasil C18 RP column and LiChrospher C8 RP column. Determination and separation of the pterins from urine samples were performed on HILIC Luna and LiChrospher C8 RP columns which were chosen as the most appropriate ones. Finally, LiChrospher C8 RP column with fluorescence detection was selected for further validation of the method. The optimum chromatographic condition was mobile phase methanol (A)/phosphoric buffer pH 7, 10mM (B), isocratic elution 0-15min 5% A flow=0.5ml/min 15-17min. 5% A, flow=0.5-1ml/min the linearity (R(2)>0.997) and retention time repeatability (RSD%<1) were at satisfactory level. The precision of peak areas expressed as RSD in % was between 0.55 and 14. Pterins detection limits varied from 0.041ng/ml to 2.9ng/ml. Finally, HPLC method was used for the analysis of pterins in urine samples with two different oxidation procedures. Concentration levels of pterin compounds in bladder cancer patients and healthy subjects were compared.

  1. A multiresidue liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric method for the detection and quantitation of 15 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in bovine meat and milk.

    PubMed

    van Pamel, Els; Daeseleire, Els

    2015-06-01

    This study concerns a validated liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) multiresidue method for the simultaneous detection, identification, and quantitation of 15 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in bovine meat and milk. The NSAIDs considered are carprofen, diclofenac, flufenamic acid, flunixin (5-hydroxyflunixin as marker metabolite in milk), ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, meloxicam, 4-methylaminoantipyrine (marker metabolite of metamizole in meat and milk), naproxen, niflumic acid, phenylbutazone (and metabolite oxyphenbutazone), ramifenazone, salicylic acid, and tolfenamic acid. These compounds were chosen as representatives of different chemical subclasses of NSAIDs. Flunixin-d3, diclofenac-d4, 4-aminoantipyrine-d3, and phenylbutazone-d10 were used as internal standards. Performance characteristics were validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC (Off J Eur Communities, L221: 8-36). Recovery percentages varied between 81 and 114% for bovine meat and between 79 and 118% for milk. Repeatability percentages were within the range of 1-12% for meat and between 1 and 17% for milk, whereas the intralaboratory reproducibility varied between 3 and 19% for meat and between 3 and 23% for milk. The decision limit and the detection capability for bovine meat were within the range of 0.5-579 μg kg(-1)and 0.6-642 μg kg(-1), respectively. Those for milk were within the range of 0.12-55 μg kg(-1) and 0.14-61 μg kg(-1), respectively. The methods developed were successfully applied for proficiency test samples and routine samples analyzed in the laboratory. The methodology concerns fast, user-friendly, and sensitive methods, which can be easily extended for other compounds and matrices. In general, such multiresidue methods contribute to the reduction of human exposure to these veterinary drug residues by consumption of contaminated bovine-derived products such as meat and milk.

  2. Detection and quantification of gas-phase oxidized mercury compounds by GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Colleen P.; Lyman, Seth N.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Allen, Tanner; O'Neil, Trevor L.

    2016-05-01

    Most mercury pollution is emitted to the atmosphere, and the location and bioavailability of deposited mercury largely depends on poorly understood atmospheric chemical reactions that convert elemental mercury into oxidized mercury compounds. Current measurement methods do not speciate oxidized mercury, leading to uncertainty about which mercury compounds exist in the atmosphere and how oxidized mercury is formed. We have developed a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based system for identification and quantification of atmospheric oxidized mercury compounds. The system consists of an ambient air collection device, a thermal desorption module, a cryofocusing system, a gas chromatograph, and an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometer. It was able to separate and identify mercury halides with detection limits low enough for ambient air collection (90 pg), but an improved ambient air collection device is needed. The GC/MS system was unable to quantify HgO or Hg(NO3)2, and data collected cast doubt upon the existence of HgO in the gas phase.

  3. Brief: Acoustic gas-kick detection with wellhead sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, J.; Mjaaland, S.; Hendriks, P.; Jensen, L.K.

    1995-02-01

    The capability to detect gas kicks (gas influxes into a borehole) quickly as the borehole is being drilled is of the utmost importance for drilling safety and efficiency. In this paper a novel kick-detection system based on an acoustic pulse-echo technique is described. Computer simulations and full-scale experimental results show that this system can detect small gas influxes (typically < 1 bbl) at depths as great as 16,400 ft. The system, which has surface-based equipment, functions irrespective of mud circulation.

  4. Gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiochon, Georges; Guillemin, Claude L.

    1990-11-01

    Gas chromatography is a powerful separation technique for gas and vapor mixtures. Combining separation and on-line detection permits accurate quantitative analysis of complex mixtures, including traces of compounds down to parts per trillions in some particular cases. The importance of gas chromatography in quality control and process control in the chemical and drug industry, in environmental pollution investigations and in clinical analysis is critical. The principles of the technique are discussed, the main components of a gas chromatograph are described and some idea of the importance of the applications is given.

  5. A compact gas chromatograph and pre-column concentration system for enhanced in-field separation of levoglucosan and other polar organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cropper, Paul M; Goates, Steven R; Hansen, Jaron C

    2015-10-23

    Portable and compact instruments for separating and detecting organic compounds are needed in the field for environmental studies. This is especially the case for pollution studies as in-field detection of organic compounds helps identify sources of pollution. Here we describe the development of a compact GC and simple pre-concentrator coupled to a MS detector. This simple system can easily be incorporated into portable instrumentation. Combining the pre-concentrator and compact column has the advantage of decoupling separation from manual injection and enhances separation of environmentally relevant polar organic compounds, such as levoglucosan. A detection limit of 2.2 ng was obtained for levoglucosan. This simple design has the potential to expand the use of gas chromatography as a routine in-field separation technique. PMID:26410183

  6. A compact gas chromatograph and pre-column concentration system for enhanced in-field separation of levoglucosan and other polar organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cropper, Paul M; Goates, Steven R; Hansen, Jaron C

    2015-10-23

    Portable and compact instruments for separating and detecting organic compounds are needed in the field for environmental studies. This is especially the case for pollution studies as in-field detection of organic compounds helps identify sources of pollution. Here we describe the development of a compact GC and simple pre-concentrator coupled to a MS detector. This simple system can easily be incorporated into portable instrumentation. Combining the pre-concentrator and compact column has the advantage of decoupling separation from manual injection and enhances separation of environmentally relevant polar organic compounds, such as levoglucosan. A detection limit of 2.2 ng was obtained for levoglucosan. This simple design has the potential to expand the use of gas chromatography as a routine in-field separation technique.

  7. Acquisition of a Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer System for Laboratory Study of Prebiotic Organic Geochemical Processes on the Early Earth, Mars, and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollom, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This was a major equipment grant that provided funds ($72K) for purchase of a benchtop gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use in experimental studies of prebiotic organic compounds. An Agilent model 689015973 GC-MS was purchased and installed in the PI's lab in August of 2003. The instrument is now being used for a variety of research projects. The primary use of the instrument is to analyze and quantify organic products of laboratory experiments conducted by the PI. One example is shown, which shows organic products (predominantly n-alkanes) formed during Fischer-Tropsch-type abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions. The analytical capabilities of the GC- MS allowed identification of the numerous organic products of this as well as other laboratory experiments. A key use of the instrument in this research is that the mass spectrometer capabilities allow use of isotopically labeled reactants to trace the progress of reactions and evaluate background contaminants. collaborative projects with other scientists involved in exobiology & astrobiology research (e.g., Mitch Schulte, NASA Ames; Katrina Edwards, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution). For instance, an analysis of membrane lipids of an lithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria being grown on basalt as a source of metabolic energy, a project where the instrument is being used to evaluate possible biomarker compounds from these organisms is shown. These iron oxidizers are thought to be similar to those living within the ocean crust, and are being investigated as possible analog organisms to those on the early Earth or crust of Mars. The instrument has also been used by an outside investigator (graduate student Brandon Canfeld, Arizona State University) for identification and isotopic characterization of experimental products of abiotic organic synthesis experiments he is conducting with Dr. John Holloway. analysis of quality control samples for other NASA-funded projects. For instance, an

  8. Improvements in NDIR gas detection within the same optical chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Silva-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) is a well known technique for gas concentration monitoring. Lead salt photoconductors and thermopile detectors are typically used. Together with gas filter correlation (GFC) they are the basis for a reference standard in environmental gas monitoring like carbon monoxide determination and other gas species. To increase gas sensitivity, a multi-pass optical cavity is often used. In this contribution we propose a new optical design that allows for auto-reference multiple gas detection. It basically consists of an array of White's cell multi-pass camera that allows multiple channels with independent lengths inside the same volume. We explore its performance for carbon monoxide detection and based on recent commercial developments in infrared detector and emitter technologies.

  9. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  10. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

  11. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  12. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  13. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  14. Ultrasonic gas accumulation detection and evaluation in nuclear cooling pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Lin, Bin; Shin, Yong-June; Wang, Jingjiang; Tian, Zhenhua

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a novel ultrasonic guided wave based inspection methodology for detecting and evaluating gas accumulation in nuclear cooling pipe system. The sensing is in-situ by means of low-profile permanently installed piezoelectric wafer sensors to excite interrogating guided waves and to receive the propagating waves in the pipe structure. Detection and evaluation is established through advanced cross time-frequency analysis to extract the phase change in the sensed signal when the gas is accumulating. A correlation between the phase change and the gas amount has been established to provide regulatory prediction capability based on measured sensory data.

  15. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

  16. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.

    1995-05-01

    Exploration strategies are needed to identify subtle basement features critical to locating fractured regions in advance of drilling in tight gas reservoirs. The Piceance Basin served as a demonstration site for an analysis utilizing aeromagnetic surveys, remote sensing, Landsat Thematic Mapper, and Side Looking Airborne Radar imagery for the basin and surrounding areas. Spatially detailed aeromagnetic maps were used to to interpret zones of basement structure.

  17. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  18. Determination of volatile organic compounds in different microenvironments by multibed adsorption and short-path thermal desorption followed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuntasal, Oznur Oğuz; Karman, Deniz; Wang, Daniel; Tuncel, Semra G; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2005-12-16

    A multiphase assurance approach was developed for the accurate and precise determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in different microenvironments. This approach includes (i) development of a method including adsorption of VOCs onto a multisorbent media followed by short-path thermal desorption (SPTD) pre-concentration and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to a mass spectrometry (MS) quantification, (ii) validation of the sampling and analytical method and (iii) validation of the data using a multidimensional procedure. Tenax TA and Carbopack B sorbent combinations were used to collect 102 individual VOCs ranging from C5 to C12. Method parameters including thermal desorption temperature, desorption time and cryofocusing temperature were optimized. The average recoveries and method detection limits (MDL) for the target analytes were in the range 80-100% and 0.01-0.14 ppbv, respectively. The method also showed good linearity (R2 > 0.99) and precision (<8%) values. Validation of the method was performed under real environmental conditions at a gas station, in an office and a residential household to examine the influence of variation in meteorological conditions such as temperature and relative humidity and a wide range of VOC concentrations. The sampling and analytical method resulted in successful determination of VOC in different microenvironments. Finally, validation of the data was performed by assessing fingerprint and time series plots and correlation matrices together with meteorological parameters such as mixing height, wind speed and temperature. The data validation procedure provided detection of both faulty data and air pollution episodes.

  19. Determination of levamisole in plasma and animal tissues by gas chromatography with thermionic specific detection.

    PubMed

    Woestenborghs, R; Michielsen, L; Heykants, J

    1981-06-12

    A rapid and sensitive method has been developed for the determination of the anthelmintic levamisole in plasma and tissues from man and animals. The procedure involves the extraction of the drug and its internal standard from the biological material at alkaline pH, back-extraction into sulphuric acid and re-extraction into the organic phase (heptane-isoamyl alcohol). Several extraction steps can be omitted, however, whenever the gas chromatographic background permits and some operations can be simplified using Clin ElutTM extraction tubes. The analyses were carried out by gas chromatography using a nitrogen-selective thermionic specific detector. The detection limit was 5 ng, contained in 1 ml of plasma or in 1 g of the various tissues, and recoveries were sufficiently high (79-86%). The method was applied to human plasma samples in a comprehensive bioavailability study of levamisole in healthy volunteers, and to plasma and tissues in a residue trial in cattle. The effect of the blood collection technique on the plasma levels was also studied and pointed to decreased plasma concentrations when Vacutainer tubes were used.

  20. Early detection of combustible gas leaks using open path infrared (IR) gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Edward; Baliga, Shankar

    2012-06-01

    Open path IR gas detectors are a mainstay in the oil and gas industry. They are used in a variety of instances to identify gas accumulations or monitor gas cloud migrations. In offshore installations, open path optical gas detectors are used to monitor drilling and production operations, crude oil separation, compression, and exhaust and ventilation systems. Because they can monitor a perimeter or fence line, they are ideally suited for detecting gas in open facilities, where point gas detectors would be difficult or expensive to deploy. Despite their widespread use, open path optical gas detectors are rarely employed to detect low level concentrations of combustible gases. Standard models are typically set to alarm at 50% LEL-m (50% LEL extended over one meter), providing sufficiently early warning when gas accumulations occur. Nevertheless, in cases in which a combustible gas is diluted quickly, such as ventilation exhaust ducting, it may be necessary to set the detector to alarm at the lowest predictable level. Further, interest in low level infrared gas detection has been growing as gases such as CH4 and CO2 are greenhouse gases. The present paper describes a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) open path system designed to detect combustible and carbon dioxide gas leaks in the parts-per-million-meter (ppm-m or mg/cm2). The detector has been installed in offshore platforms and large onshore facilities to detect a variety of flammable gases and vapors. Advantages and limitations of the system are presented. False alarm immunity and resilience to atmospheric interferences are also discussed.

  1. Polypyrrole based gas sensor for ammonia detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunst, K. J.; Cysewska, K.; Kalinowski, P.; Jasiński, P.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of polypyrrole response to toxic gases does not allow using the sensor in a conventional way. The main aim of this study is to acquire the information about the concentration using different approaches: a linear approximation, a non-linear approximation and a tangent method. In this paper a two-steps procedure for sensor response measurements has been utilized. Polypyrrole films were electrochemically synthesized on the interdigitated electrodes. Gas sensing measurements of polypyrrole based sensor were carried out at room temperature. The influence of the flow rate on the sensing performance to NH3 were investigated. The preliminary studies of aging of the sensor were also explored.

  2. Characterization of the volatile fraction emitted by Pinus spp. by one- and two-dimensional chromatographic techniques with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Mateus, E; Barata, R C; Zrostlíková, Jitka; Gomes da Silva, M D R; Paiva, M R

    2010-03-12

    The chemical composition of the needles of P. pinea, P. pinaster, P. halepensis, P. nigra, P. brutia, P. patula, P. radiata, P. taeda, P. elliotti, P. kesiya, P. sylvestris and P. eldarica was investigated. Headspace solid-phase microextraction and steam distillation extraction were used to collect the volatile fractions. Samples were analyzed using one-dimensional gas chromatography (1D-GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) associated with a quadrupole and a time-of-flight mass detectors. Results showed that the analytical capabilities of 1D-GC are partially limited by the separation power of the columns. The higher sensibility and the absence of peak skewing of the time-of-flight mass analyzer, with the use of automated peak finding and deconvolution algorithms, allowed for the detection of trace components with qualitative full spectra and the extraction of true mass spectra from coeluting compounds, promoting their reliable identification and thus significantly improving results obtained by 1D-GC/MS, when using a quadrupole mass analyzer. The use of GC x GC resulted in enhanced separation efficiency and increased signal to noise ratio (sensitivity) of the analytes, maximizing mass spectra quality and improving compound detection and identification. This work shows the use of 1D-GC/ToFMS for the analysis of pine needles volatiles, achieving the detection of 177 compounds, that is more than twice the number previously identified by standard 1D-GC/MS. The analysis by GC x GC for the same sample allowed the detection of 212 compounds. The enantioselective GC x GC analysis performed for all the Pinus spp. under study achieved the detection of 422 different compounds. Cross-over phenomena according to operational conditions are highlighted and discussed.

  3. Chromatographic determination of amino acids in foods.

    PubMed

    Peace, Robert W; Gilani, G Sarwar

    2005-01-01

    Amino acids in foods exist in a free form or bound in peptides, proteins, or nonpeptide bonded polymers. Naturally occurring L-amino acids are required for protein synthesis and are precursors for essential molecules, such as co-enzymes and nucleic acids. Nonprotein amino acids may also occur in animal tissues as metabolic intermediates or have other important functions. The development of bacterially derived food proteins, genetically modified foods, and new methods of food processing; the production of amino acids for food fortification; and the introduction of new plant food sources have meant that protein amino acids and amino acid enantiomers in foods can have both nutritional and safety implications for humans. There is, therefore, a need for the rapid and accurate determination of amino acids in foods. Determination of the total amino acid content of foods requires protein hydrolysis by various means that must take into account variations in stability of individual amino acids and resistance of different peptide bonds to the hydrolysis procedures. Modern methods for separation and quantitation of free amino acids either before or after protein hydrolysis include ion exchange chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. Chemical derivatization of amino acids may be required to change them into forms amenable to separation by the various chromatographic methods or to create derivatives with properties, such as fluorescence, that improve their detection. Official methods for hydrolysis and analysis of amino acids in foods for nutritional purposes have been established. LC is currently the most widely used analytical technique, although there is a need for collaborative testing of methods available. Newer developments in chromatographic methodology and detector technology have reduced sample and reagent requirements and improved identification, resolution, and sensitivity of amino acid analyses

  4. Ion chromatographic determination of trace iodate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, bromate and nitrite in drinking water using suppressed conductivity detection and visible detection.

    PubMed

    Binghui, Zhu; Zhixiong, Zhong; Jing, Yao

    2006-06-16

    An ion chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of trace iodate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, bromate and nitrite in drinking water has been developed using an anion-exchange column and the suppressed conductivity detector, followed by post-column addition of reagent to enhance visible absorbance detection of ions. A high capacity anion exchange Ion Pac9-HC column (250 mm x 4 mm I.D.) was used. Eight millimole per liter sodium carbonate was used as eluent, an auto-suppression external water mode was selected, 0.5 g/l o-dianisidine.2HCl (ODA)+4.5 g/l KBr+25% methanel+5.6% nitric acid was used as post-column reagent. The post-column reaction (PCR) temperature was at 60 degrees C, and the visible absorbance detected wavelength at 450 nm. The sample's pH and coexist anions had no influence on determination. The method enjoyed a wide linear range and a good linear correlation coefficient (r>0.999). The method detection limits were between 0.023 and 2.0 microg/l. The average recoveries ranged from 87.5 to 110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSD) were in the range of 1.1-4.6%. The analytical results by the method of post-column addition of reagent to enhance visible absorbance detection of anions was compared with that of the suppressed conductivity detection, and the former was proved to be better in sensitivity and selectivity. The results showed that this method was accurate, sensitive and might be good for application and suitable for trace analysis at the level of mug/l.

  5. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and

  6. Fingerprinting of vegetable oil minor components by multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatography with dual detection.

    PubMed

    Purcaro, Giorgia; Barp, Laura; Beccaria, Marco; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2015-01-01

    The potentiality of a multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatographic (GC × GC) method, employing a simultaneous dual detection (FID and mass spectrometer), to generate peculiar two-dimensional chromatograms to be used as a chemical fingerprint, was investigated to characterize minor compounds in edible oil, particularly olive oil. The best column combination for this application was investigated comparing two column sets (orthogonal or reverse-type), equivalent in terms of theoretical plate number, but differing in stationary phase combination. The apolar × mid-polar set gave a superior separation power, thus was used for further characterization. Different levels of information were extrapolated from the two-dimensional chromatogram. Using the FID, reliable quantification of the alkyl esters fatty acids and waxes was obtained, comparable to the results obtained using the official method, as required by the European legislation. However, thanks to a slight modification of the sample preparation method, the increased separation power obtained using the GC × GC method, and the support of the mass spectrometer detector, further diagnostic information was extrapolated considering the free sterol and tocopherol fractions. In particular, the profiles of extra virgin olive oil samples were compared with a hazelnut oil sample, highlighting that the latter was characterized by a larger number of compounds, completely absent in the extra virgin olive oil samples, which can be used to detect illegal admixtures.

  7. Ethanol analysis by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame-ionization and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin

    2011-09-01

    Ethanol is the most frequently identified compound in forensic toxicology. Although confirmation involving mass spectrometry is desirable, relatively few methods have been published to date. A novel technique utilizing a Dean's Switch to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame-ionization (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation is presented. Using 100 μL of sample, the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.005 and 0.010 g/dL, respectively. The zero-order linear range (r(2) > 0.990) was determined to span the concentrations of 0.010 to 1.000 g/dL. The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 3.1%. Quantitative accuracy was within ±8%, ±6%, ±3%, and ±1.5% at concentrations of 0.010, 0.025, 0.080, and 0.300 g/dL, respectively. In addition, 1,1-difluoroethane was validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validated FID-MS method provides a procedure for the quantitation of ethyl alcohol in blood by FID with simultaneous confirmation by MS and can also be utilized as an identification method for inhalants such as 1,1-difluoroethane. PMID:21871160

  8. Bernoulli excitation and detection of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Telling, R H; Walton, A J

    2001-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for detecting and sizing bubbles in pipeline fluid flow. This is based on changing the pressure of the fluid, which in turn excites volume oscillations in the bubble. If the change in pressure is of sufficient brevity and magnitude, the transient distortion results in excitation of the bubble into radiative oscillation at its natural frequency. In a moving fluid, the Bernoulli equation predicts that such a pressure change can be achieved through a suitable gradient in the flow velocity. In the experiments described here, this is achieved by altering the cross-sectional area of the pipe in which the fluid is flowing. We demonstrate the efficacy of this excitation method and, by detecting the radiated sound using a nearby hydrophone, determine the size of individual bubbles from their characteristic oscillation frequency.

  9. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  10. Gas chromatographic determination of N-nitrosamines, aromatic amines, and melamine in milk and dairy products using an automatic solid-phase extraction system.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sanchez, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Evaristo; Gallego, Mercedes

    2011-07-13

    A reliable analytical method was presented for the simultaneous determination of six N-nitrosamines, nine aromatic amines, and melamine in milk and dairy products using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The sample treatment includes the precipitation of proteins with acetonitrile, centrifugation, solvent changeover by evaporation, and continuous solid-phase extraction for cleanup and preconcentration purposes. Samples (5 g) containing 0.15-500 ng of each amine were analyzed, and low detection limits (15-130 ng/kg) were achieved. Recoveries for milk and dairy products samples spiked with 1, 10, and 50 μg/kg ranged from 92% to 101%, with intraday and interday relative standard deviation values below 7.5%. The method was successfully applied to determine amine residues in several milk types (human breast, cow, and goat) and dairy products.

  11. Development and validation of a gas chromatographic method by solid-phase microextraction for the determination of surface flavouring content in encapsulated flavouring.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-García, Yineth; Valcarcel-Mauri, Yelinet; Pino, Jorge A

    2015-06-15

    A solid-phase microextraction procedure followed by analysis by gas chromatography is proposed to determine surface flavouring content in encapsulated flavouring. The method showed a good selectivity, as well as good intraday and interday precision, CVs<4% in both cases. The calibration curves were linear at the tested ranges (R=0.998). The limits of detection and quantification were 0.52 g kg(-1) and 1.57 g kg(-1), respectively. Good recoveries were obtained (90.8-104.5%). In the ruggedness test, sample amount, pre-extraction time, desorption time and desorption temperature were the factors that stood out as the causing of the greater effects on the analytical results. These results present a SPME methodology, which may be applied as a quality control tool for industrial laboratories. PMID:25660868

  12. Evaluation and confirmation of an alkylation-gas-liquid chromatographic method for the determination of carbamate and urea herbicides in foods.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J F

    1976-09-01

    An alkylation technique using methyl iodide and sodium hydride in dimethyl sulfoxide has been evaluated for 3 carbamate and 7 urea herbicides in 9 foods. Recoveries ranged from 56 to 113%, depending on herbicide, concentration, and food type. Reproducibility was about +/-6% at 0.1 and 1.0 ppm. Identities of the herbicides were confirmed at these and lower levels by cleaving the aniline moiety from the alkylated herbicides with sodium methoxide in methanol, followed by gas-liquid chromatography on the same column as the parent compound. An electrolytic conductivity detector in the nitrogen mode was used for all analyses. Minimum detectable levels were in the range of 0.005-0.01 ppm in the foods studied.

  13. Wide-band gas leak imaging detection system using UFPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei-qi; Li, Jia-kun; Dun, Xiong; Jin, Minglei; Wang, Xia

    2014-11-01

    The leakage of toxic or hazardous gases not only pollutes the environment, but also threatens people's lives and property safety. Many countries attach great importance to the rapid and effective gas leak detection technology and instrument development. However, the gas leak imaging detection systems currently existing are generally limited to a narrow-band in Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) or Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) cooled focal plane imaging, which is difficult to detect the common kinds of the leaking gases. Besides the costly cooled focal plane array is utilized, the application promotion is severely limited. To address this issue, a wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) detector is proposed, which is composed of wide-band IR optical lens, sub-band filters and switching device, wide-band UFPA detector, video processing and system control circuit. A wide-band (3µm~12µm) UFPA detector is obtained by replacing the protection window and optimizing the structural parameters of the detector. A large relative aperture (F#=0.75) wide-band (3μm~12μm) multispectral IR lens is developed by using the focus compensation method, which combining the thickness of the narrow-band filters. The gas leak IR image quality and the detection sensitivity are improved by using the IR image Non-Uniformity Correction (NUC) technology and Digital Detail Enhancement (DDE) technology. The wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using UFPA detector takes full advantage of the wide-band (MWIR&LWIR) response characteristic of the UFPA detector and the digital image processing technology to provide the resulting gas leak video easy to be observed for the human eyes. Many kinds of gases, which are not visible to the naked eyes, can be sensitively detected and visualized. The designed system has many commendable advantages, such as scanning a wide range simultaneously, locating the leaking source quickly, visualizing the gas

  14. Imaging spectrometer for fugitive gas leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-12-01

    Under contract to the U.S. Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive infrared imaging spectrometer that can perform remote imaging and spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of smoke stack emissions and fugitive leaks. To date remote continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems have not been approved by the EPA, however, they are under consideration. If the remote sensing technology is available with the sensitivity to monitor emission at the required levels and man portable it can reduce the cost and improve the reliability of performing such measurements. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) believes that it currently has this technology available to industry. This paper will present results from a field test where gas vapors during a refueling process were imaged and identified. In addition images of propane from a leaking stove will be presented. We at PAT have developed a real time image processing board that enhances the signal to noise ratio of low contrast gases and makes them easily viewable using the Image Multispectral Sensing (IMSS) imaging spectrometer. The IMSS imaging spectrometer is the size of a camcorder. Currently the data is stored in a Notebook computer thus allowing the system to be easily carried into power plants to look for fugitive leaks. In the future the IMSS will have an embedded processor and DSP and will be able to transfer data over an Ethernet link.

  15. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  16. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  17. Methods for gas detection using stationary hyperspectral imaging sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Conger, James L.; Henderson, John R.

    2012-04-24

    According to one embodiment, a method comprises producing a first hyperspectral imaging (HSI) data cube of a location at a first time using data from a HSI sensor; producing a second HSI data cube of the same location at a second time using data from the HSI sensor; subtracting on a pixel-by-pixel basis the second HSI data cube from the first HSI data cube to produce a raw difference cube; calibrating the raw difference cube to produce a calibrated raw difference cube; selecting at least one desired spectral band based on a gas of interest; producing a detection image based on the at least one selected spectral band and the calibrated raw difference cube; examining the detection image to determine presence of the gas of interest; and outputting a result of the examination. Other methods, systems, and computer program products for detecting the presence of a gas are also described.

  18. Detection of gaseous compounds by needle trap sampling and direct thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry: concept and demonstrative application to breath gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Kleeblatt, Juliane; Schubert, Jochen K; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    A fast detection method to analyze gaseous organic compounds in complex gas mixtures was developed, using a needle trap device (NTD) in conjunction with thermal-desorption photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-PI-TOFMS). The mass spectrometer was coupled via a deactivated fused silica capillary to an injector of a gas chromatograph. In the hot injector, the analytes collected on the NTD were thermally desorbed and directly transferred to the PI-TOFMS ion source. The molecules are softly ionized either by single photon ionization (SPI, 118 nm) or by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI, 266 nm), and the molecular ion signals are detected in the TOF mass analyzer. Analyte desorption and the subsequent PI-TOFMS detection step only lasts ten seconds. The specific selectivity of REMPI (i.e., aromatic compounds) and universal ionization characteristics render PI-MS as a promising detection system. As a first demonstrative application, the alveolar phase breath gas of healthy, nonsmoking subjects was sampled on NTDs. While smaller organic compounds such as acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene, or cysteamine can be detected in the breath gas with SPI, REMPI depicts the aromatic substances phenol and indole at 266 nm. In the breath gas of a healthy, smoking male subject, several xenobiotic substances such as benzene, toluene, styrene, and ethylbenzene can be found as well. Furthermore, the NTD-REMPI-TOFMS setup was tested for breath gas taken from a mechanically ventilated pig under continuous intravenous propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol, narcotic drug) infusion.

  19. Toxics and combustibles: Designing gas-detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, L.P.

    1998-07-01

    When a plant decides to install a gas-detection system, several questions come to mind: How many detectors are needed and where should they go? Simple questions--but unfortunately ones without a simple answer. However, there are some general considerations that plant personnel can use to rough out a gas-monitoring installation. Any evaluation process should include the following five steps. Each is discussed: (1) Understand the application; (2) Identify potential danger points; (3) Establish design goals; (4) Determine gas characteristics; and (5) Profile the plant and potential release scenarios.

  20. Surface Ionization Gas Detection at SnO2 Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkow, A.; Oberhüttinger, C.; Habauzit, A.; Kessler, M.; Göbel, J.; Müller, G.

    2009-05-01

    In surface ionization (SI) gas detection adsorbed analyte molecules are converted into ionic species at a heated solid surface and extracted into free space by an oppositely biased counter electrode. In the present work we consider the formation of positive and negative analyte gas ions at SnO2 surfaces. We find that SI leads to positive ion formation only, with the SI efficiency scaling with the ionization energy of the analyte gas molecules. Aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with amine functional groups exhibit particularly high SI efficiencies.