Science.gov

Sample records for gas distribution mains

  1. Airflow Model Testing to Determine the Distribution of Hot Gas Flow and O/F Ratio Across the Space Shuttle Main Engine Main Injector Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahorter, L.; Chik, J.; McDaniels, D.; Dill, C.

    1990-01-01

    Engine 0209, the certification engine for the new Phase 2+ Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), showed severe deterioration of the Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) liner during hot fire tests. One theory on the cause of the damage held that uneven local distribution of the fuel rich hot gas flow through the main injector assembly was producing regions of high oxidizer/fuel (O/F) ratio near the wall of the MCC liner. Airflow testing was proposed to measure the local hot gas flow rates through individual injector elements. The airflow tests were conducted using full scale, geometrically correct models of both the current Phase 2 and the new Phase 2+ HGMs. Different main injector flow shield configurations were tested for each HGM to ascertain their effect on the pressure levels and distribution of hot gas flow. Instrumentation located on the primary faceplate of the main injector measured hot gas flow through selected injector elements. These data were combined with information from the current space shuttle main engine (SSME) power balances to produce maps of pressure, hot gas flow rate, and O/F ratio near the main injector primary plate. The O/F distributions were compared for the different injector and HGM configurations.

  2. Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Burkett; Hagen Schempf

    2006-01-31

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design of the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main NDE and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules and their arrangement, still allow the robot to configure itself to perform any-angle (up to 90 deg) turns in any orientation (incl. vertical), and enable the live launching and

  3. Explorer-II: Wireless Self-Powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains

    SciTech Connect

    Carnegie Mellon University

    2008-09-30

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design, field-trial and Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) sensor evaluation program for the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The resulting robot-train system with CAD renderings of the individual modules. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules

  4. GAS MAIN SENSOR AND COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen Schempf, Ph.D.

    2003-02-27

    Automatika, Inc. was contracted by the Department of Energy (DOE) and with co-funding from the New York Gas Group (NYGAS), to develop an in-pipe natural gas prototype measurement and wireless communications system for assessing and monitoring distribution networks. A prototype system was built for low-pressure cast-iron mains and tested in a spider- and serial-network configuration in a live network in Long Island with the support of Keyspan Energy, Inc. The prototype unit combined sensors capable of monitoring pressure, flow, humidity, temperature and vibration, which were sampled and combined in data-packages in an in-pipe master-slave architecture to collect data from a distributed spider-arrangement, and in a master-repeater-slave configuration in serial or ladder-network arrangements. It was found that the system was capable of performing all data-sampling and collection as expected, yielding interesting results as to flow-dynamics and vibration-detection. Wireless in-pipe communications were shown to be feasible and valuable data was collected in order to determine how to improve on range and data-quality in the future.

  5. Automated Gas Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Allen; Clark, Henry

    2012-10-01

    The cyclotron of Texas A&M University is one of the few and prized cyclotrons in the country. Behind the scenes of the cyclotron is a confusing, and dangerous setup of the ion sources that supplies the cyclotron with particles for acceleration. To use this machine there is a time consuming, and even wasteful step by step process of switching gases, purging, and other important features that must be done manually to keep the system functioning properly, while also trying to maintain the safety of the working environment. Developing a new gas distribution system to the ion source prevents many of the problems generated by the older manually setup process. This developed system can be controlled manually in an easier fashion than before, but like most of the technology and machines in the cyclotron now, is mainly operated based on software programming developed through graphical coding environment Labview. The automated gas distribution system provides multi-ports for a selection of different gases to decrease the amount of gas wasted through switching gases, and a port for the vacuum to decrease the amount of time spent purging the manifold. The Labview software makes the operation of the cyclotron and ion sources easier, and safer for anyone to use.

  6. Distributed PV Adoption in Maine Through 2021

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Pieter; Sigrin, Ben

    2015-11-06

    NREL has used its dSolar (distributed solar) model to generate low-medium-high estimates of distributed PV adoption in Maine through 2021. This presentation gives a high-level overview of the model and modeling results.

  7. Gas Main Sensor and Communications Network System

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen Schempf

    2006-05-31

    Automatika, Inc. was contracted by the Department of Energy (DOE) and with co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), to develop an in-pipe natural gas prototype measurement and wireless communications system for assessing and monitoring distribution networks. This projected was completed in April 2006, and culminated in the installation of more than 2 dozen GasNet nodes in both low- and high-pressure cast-iron and steel mains owned by multiple utilities in the northeastern US. Utilities are currently logging data (off-line) and monitoring data in real time from single and multiple networked sensors over cellular networks and collecting data using wireless bluetooth PDA systems. The system was designed to be modular, using in-pipe sensor-wands capable of measuring, flow, pressure, temperature, water-content and vibration. Internal antennae allowed for the use of the pipe-internals as a waveguide for setting up a sensor network to collect data from multiple nodes simultaneously. Sensor nodes were designed to be installed with low- and no-blow techniques and tools. Using a multi-drop bus technique with a custom protocol, all electronics were designed to be buriable and allow for on-board data-collection (SD-card), wireless relaying and cellular network forwarding. Installation options afforded by the design included direct-burial and external polemounted variants. Power was provided by one or more batteries, direct AC-power (Class I Div.2) and solar-array. The utilities are currently in a data-collection phase and intend to use the collected (and processed) data to make capital improvement decisions, compare it to Stoner model predictions and evaluate the use of such a system for future expansion, technology-improvement and commercialization starting later in 2006.

  8. GAS MAIN SENSOR AND COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen Schempf

    2004-09-30

    Automatika, Inc. was contracted by the Department of Energy (DOE) and with co-funding from the New York Gas Group (NYGAS), to develop an in-pipe natural gas prototype measurement and wireless communications system for assessing and monitoring distribution networks. In Phase II of this three-phase program, an improved prototype system was built for low-pressure cast-iron and high-pressure steel (including a no-blow installation system) mains and tested in a serial-network configuration in a live network in Long Island with the support of Keyspan Energy, Inc. The experiment was carried out in several open-hole excavations over a multi-day period. The prototype units (3 total) combined sensors capable of monitoring pressure, flow, humidity, temperature and vibration, which were sampled and combined in data-packages in an in-pipe master-repeater-slave configuration in serial or ladder-network arrangements. It was verified that the system was capable of performing all data-sampling, data-storage and collection as expected, yielding interesting results as to flow-dynamics and vibration-detection. Wireless in-pipe communications were shown to be feasible and the system was demonstrated to run off in-ground battery- and above-ground solar power. The remote datalogger access and storage-card features were demonstrated and used to log and post-process system data. Real-time data-display on an updated Phase-I GUI was used for in-field demonstration and troubleshooting.

  9. Distribution main rehabilitated with HDPE lining process

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, M. )

    1994-08-01

    Innovative use of a new HDPE lining technology recently saved Brooklyn Union Gas Co. 30% over conventional replacement costs. The company chose lining technology from United Pipeline Systems called Tite Liner to rehabilitate 2,500 ft of 20-in., 15 psig, bare steel main in Brooklyn's Bay Ridge section, an area spanning six city blocks and crossing three major avenues. The main is mechanically joined with no offsets or service connections. Due to surface and subsurface working space restrictions and the impact on costs, the company elected to employ the liner system in which a specially designed HDPE liner pipe is reduced to a smaller diameter through a rolldown box for insertion into a steel or cast iron main. A tight fit is attained as the liner is allowed to expand against the pipe wall after pull through.

  10. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  11. 34. ROUGH GAS MAIN RUNNING SOUTHEAST FROM THE BOP SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. ROUGH GAS MAIN RUNNING SOUTHEAST FROM THE BOP SHOP TO THE DUAL VENTURI GAS WASHERS. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  12. 14. DETAIL OF CLEAN GAS MAIN (UPPER PIPE) AND ROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF CLEAN GAS MAIN (UPPER PIPE) AND ROUGH GAS MAIN FOR BLAST FURNACE No. 2 AT THE BASE OF HOT BLAST STOVES LOOKING EAST. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Distributions of Quasar Hosts on the Galaxy Main Sequence Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-03-01

    The relation between star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, i.e., the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z ≤ 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the SFRs through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios, or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals, and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/mergers to ellipticals. However, combined with results at higher redshift, they suggest that quasars can be widely triggered in normal galaxies as long as they contain abundant gas and have ongoing star formation.

  14. MEASUREMENT OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM UNDERGROUND DISTRIBUTION MAINS AND SERVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of measurements of methane emissions from underground distribution mains and services. In the program, leakage from underground distribution systems is estimated by combining leak measurements with historical leak record data and the length of undergroun...

  15. 51. View looking west down ladle car rightofway; gas main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View looking west down ladle car right-of-way; gas main at right, Babcock & Wilcox boilers at left. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Air and gas pockets in sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F

    2005-01-01

    In The Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to large centralised WWTPs by means of an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the past decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. For that reason, in practice their state of functioning is often not known. Failure of operation is only noticed when the capacity of the system proves to be insufficient to fulfil the minimum design capacity demand. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. Many causes may account for the reduction of the system's nominal capacity like an increased wall roughness, scaling or occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. The occurrence of free gas may be caused by degassing of dissolved (bio) gas or by air entrained at the pumps' inlet or at air valves. A research study is started that will focus on three main issues: The description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation and dynamic hydraulic behaviour, A method to diagnose gas problems, and To overcome future problems by either applying remedial measures or improving the design of wastewater pressure systems. For this study, two experimental facilities are constructed, a small circuit for the study of multi-phase flow and a second, larger one for the research into diagnostic methods. This paper describes the preliminary results of the experiments in the multi-phase circuit.

  17. Catalogue of the main gas manifestation of Greece: Geochemical characterisation and preliminary gas hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Calabrese, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Like other geodynamically active areas, the Hellenic territory is also affected by a large number of geogenic gas manifestations. These occur either in form of point sources (fumaroles, mofettes, bubbling gases) or as diffuse soil gas emanations. The present work produced a first catalogue of the geogenic gas manifestations of the whole Hellenic territory also considering a few literature data. All collected samples were analysed for their chemical composition (He, Ne, Ar, O2, N2, H2, H2S, CO, CH4 and CO2) and isotopic composition (He, CO2-C, CH4-C, N2-N). Geogenic sources release huge amounts of gases, which, apart from having important influences on the global climate, could have strong impact on human health. Gases have both acute and chronic effects. Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulphide are the main gases responsible for acute mortality due to their asphyxiating and/or toxic properties. Methane instead represents a risk for its explosive properties. Gas hazard is often disregarded because in fatal episodes connected to geogenic gases the death cause is often not correctly attributed. Due to the fact that geodynamic active areas can release geogenic gases for million years over wide areas, it is important not to underestimate potential risks. A preliminary estimation of the gas hazard has been made for the time period of the last 20 years considering the whole population of Greece. In this period at least two fatal episodes with a total of three victims could be certainly attributed to geogenic gases (specifically CO2). This would give a risk of 1.3×10-8 fatality from geogenic gas manifestations per annum. Such value, although probably underestimated, is much lower than most other natural or anthropogenic risks. Nevertheless this risk, being unevenly distributed along the whole territory, should not be overlooked especially in areas with high density of gas manifestations and high soil gas fluxes.

  18. Site inspection of gas mains by helical tomography (sight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1995-05-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute (GRI), of Chicago, Illinois; INVOCON, Inc. (IVC) and Maurer Engineering, Inc. (MEI) are developing a unique, cost-efficient pipe inspection method employing ultrasonic technology. This article examines the gas industry's need for improved methods of inspection and the role that this new method can play in the satisfaction of that need. Subsequently, the article describes the system being developed. The narrative is supported by drawings of the engineering prototype. The system focuses on inspection of the three most common materials used in natural gas distribution systems: cast iron, steel, and plastic.

  19. Main line natural gas sales to industrial users, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, F.B.

    1981-12-01

    Main line natural gas sales (in million cubic feet) by interstate natural gas companies to industrial users and other public authorities are itemized for each year from 1976 through 1980. Information includes company name, customer name, customer's Standard Industrial Classification (SIC), the type of sale (where available and applicable), the delivery point, and the state involved in transactions. Tabulations summarize sales by SIC, by State and SIC, and by Natural Gas Companies and SIC. Also summarized in the tables and sales by State and type (offpeak interruptible, and not specified) for 1980 A brief narrative highlights recent trends and makes comparisons between the two most recent years. 5 tables.

  20. 46 CFR 169.678 - Main distribution panels and switchboards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Main distribution panels and switchboards. 169.678 Section 169.678 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations Operating at Potentials of 50 Volts Or More on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross...

  1. 46 CFR 169.678 - Main distribution panels and switchboards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Main distribution panels and switchboards. 169.678 Section 169.678 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations Operating at Potentials of 50 Volts Or More on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross...

  2. The Size Frequency Distribution of Small Main-Belt Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Brian J.; Trilling, David E.; Hines, Dean C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Hulsebus, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid size distribution informs us about the formation and composition of the Solar System. We build on our previous work in which we harvest serendipitously observed data of the Taurus region and measure the brightness and size distributions of Main-belt asteroids. This is accomplished with the highly sensitive MIPS 24 micron channel. We expect to catalog 104 asteroids, giving us a statistically significant data set. Results from this investigation will allow us to characterize the total population of small, Main-belt asteroids. Here we will present new results on the completeness of our study; on the presence of size distribution variations with inclination and radial distance in the belt; and early result on other archival fields.

  3. The Fossilized Size Distribution of the Main Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W. F.; Durda, D.; Nesvorny, D.; Jedicke, R.; Morbidelli, A.

    2004-05-01

    The main asteroid belt evolved into its current state via two processes: dynamical depletion and collisional evolution. During the planet formation epoch, the primordial main belt (PMB) contained several Earth masses of material, enough to allow the asteroids to accrete on relatively short timescales (e.g., Weidenschilling 1977). The present-day main belt, however, only contains 5e-4 Earth masses of material (Petit et al. 2002). To explain this mass loss, we suggest the PMB evolved in the following manner: Planetesimals and planetary embryos accreted (and differentiated) in the PMB during the first few Myr of the solar system. Gravitational perturbations from these embryos dynamically stirred the main belt, enough to initiate fragmentation. When Jupiter reached its full size, some 10 Myr after the solar system's birth, its perturbations, together with those of the embryos, dynamically depleted the main belt region of > 99% of its bodies. Much of this material was sent to high (e,i) orbits, where it continued to pummel the surviving main belt bodies at high impact velocities for more than 100 Myr. While some differentiated bodies in the PMB were disrupted, most were instead scattered; only small fragments from this population remain. This period of comminution and dynamical evolution in the PMB created, among other things, the main belt's wavy size-frequency distribution, such that it can be considered a "fossil" from this violent early epoch. From this time forward, however, relatively little collisional evolution has taken place in the main belt, consistent with the surprising paucity of prominent asteroid families. We will show that the constraints provided by asteroid families and the shape of the main belt size distribution are essential to obtaining a unique solution from our model's initial conditions. We also use our model results to solve for the asteroid disruption scaling law Q*D, a critical function needed in all planet formation codes that include

  4. The fossilized size distribution of the main asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William F.; Durda, Daniel D.; Nesvorný, David; Jedicke, Robert; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Vokrouhlický, David; Levison, Hal

    2005-05-01

    Planet formation models suggest the primordial main belt experienced a short but intense period of collisional evolution shortly after the formation of planetary embryos. This period is believed to have lasted until Jupiter reached its full size, when dynamical processes (e.g., sweeping resonances, excitation via planetary embryos) ejected most planetesimals from the main belt zone. The few planetesimals left behind continued to undergo comminution at a reduced rate until the present day. We investigated how this scenario affects the main belt size distribution over Solar System history using a collisional evolution model (CoEM) that accounts for these events. CoEM does not explicitly include results from dynamical models, but instead treats the unknown size of the primordial main belt and the nature/timing of its dynamical depletion using innovative but approximate methods. Model constraints were provided by the observed size frequency distribution of the asteroid belt, the observed population of asteroid families, the cratered surface of differentiated Asteroid (4) Vesta, and the relatively constant crater production rate of the Earth and Moon over the last 3 Gyr. Using CoEM, we solved for both the shape of the initial main belt size distribution after accretion and the asteroid disruption scaling law QD∗. In contrast to previous efforts, we find our derived QD∗ function is very similar to results produced by numerical hydrocode simulations of asteroid impacts. Our best fit results suggest the asteroid belt experienced as much comminution over its early history as it has since it reached its low-mass state approximately 3.9-4.5 Ga. These results suggest the main belt's wavy-shaped size-frequency distribution is a "fossil" from this violent early epoch. We find that most diameter D≳120 km asteroids are primordial, with their physical properties likely determined during the accretion epoch. Conversely, most smaller asteroids are byproducts of fragmentation

  5. The Fossilized Size Distribution of the Main Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W. F.; Durda, D.; Nesvorny, D.; Jedicke, R.; Morbidelli, A.

    2003-05-01

    At present, we do not understand how the main asteroid belt evolved into its current state. During the planet formation epoch, the primordial main belt (PMB) contained several Earth masses of material, enough to allow the asteroids to accrete on relatively short timescales (e.g., Weidenschilling 1977). The present-day main belt, however, only contains 5e-4 Earth masses of material (Petit et al. 2002). Constraints on this evolution come from (i) the observed fragments of differentiated asteroids, (ii) meteorites collected from numerous differentiated parent bodies, (iii) the presence of ˜ 10 prominent asteroid families, (iv) the "wavy" size-frequency distribution of the main belt, which has been shown to be a by-product of substantial collisional evolution (e.g., Durda et al. 1997), and (v) the still-intact crust of (4) Vesta. To explain the contradictions in the above constraints, we suggest the PMB evolved in this fashion: Planetesimals and planetary embryos accreted (and differentiated) in the PMB during the first few Myr of the solar system. Gravitational perturbations from these embryos dynamically stirred the main belt, enough to initiate fragmentation. When Jupiter reached its full size, some 10 Myr after the solar system's birth, its perturbations, together with those of the embryos, dynamically depleted the main belt region of ˜ 99% of its bodies. Much of this material was sent to high (e,i) orbits, where it continued to pummel the surviving main belt bodies at high impact velocities for more than 100 Myr. While some differentiated bodies in the PMB were disrupted, most were instead scattered; only small fragments from this population remain. This period of comminution and dynamical evolution in the PMB created, among other things, the main belt's wavy size distribution, such that it can be considered a "fossil" from this violent early epoch. From this time forward, however, relatively little collisional evolution has taken place in the main belt

  6. Main Ustilaginoidins and Their Distribution in Rice False Smut Balls

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jiajia; Sun, Weibo; Mao, Ziling; Xu, Dan; Wang, Xiaohan; Lu, Shiqiong; Lai, Daowan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Ligang; Zhang, Guozhen

    2015-01-01

    Rice false smut has become an increasingly serious fungal disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. Ustilaginoidins are bis-naphtho-γ-pyrone mycotoxins previously isolated from the rice false smut balls (FSBs) infected by the pathogen Villosiclava virens in rice spikelets on panicles. To investigate the main ustilaginoidins and their distribution in rice FSBs, five main bis-naphtho-γ-pyrones, namely ustilaginoidins A (1), G (2), B (3), I (4) and C (5), were isolated and identified by NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry as well as by comparison with the data in the literature. The rice FSBs at early, middle and late maturity stages were divided into their different parts and the contents of five main ustilaginoidins for each part were determined by HPLC analysis. The results revealed that the highest levels of ustilaginoidins were in late stage rice FSBs, followed by those at middle stage. Most ustilaginoidins, 96.4% of the total quantity, were distributed in the middle layer at early stage. However, ustilaginoidins were mainly distributed in the outer and middle layers at middle and late stages. Small amounts of ustilaginoidins A (1) and G (2) were found in the inner part of rice FSBs at each maturity stage. The contents of ustilaginoidins A (1) and G (2) without hydroxymethyl groups at C-2 and C-2’ of the γ-pyrone rings in rice FSBs were relatively high at early stage, while the contents of ustilaginoidins B (3), I (4), and C (5) with hydroxymethyl groups at C-2 or C-2’ were relatively high at late stage. PMID:26473920

  7. Sampling and quantifying invertebrates from drinking water distribution mains.

    PubMed

    van Lieverloo, J Hein M; Bosboom, Dick W; Bakker, Geo L; Brouwer, Anke J; Voogt, Remko; De Roos, Josje E M

    2004-03-01

    Water utilities in the Netherlands aim at controlling the multiplication of (micro-) organisms by distributing biologically stable water through biologically stable materials. Disinfectant residuals are absent or very low. To be able to assess invertebrate abundance, methods for sampling and quantifying these animals from distribution mains were optimised and evaluated. The presented method for collecting invertebrates consists of unidirectionally flushing a mains section with a flow rate of 1 ms(-1) and filtering the flushed water in two separate flows with 500 microm and 100 microm mesh plankton gauze filters. Removal efficiency from mains was evaluated in nine experiments by collecting the invertebrates removed from the mains section by intensive cleaning immediately subsequent to sampling. Of 12 taxa distinguished, all except case-building Chironomidae larvae (2%) and Oligochaeta (30%) were removed well (51-75%). Retention of invertebrates in 100 microm filters was evaluated by filtering 39 filtrates using 30 microm filters. Except for flexible and small invertebrates such as Turbellaria (13%), Nematoda (11%) and Copepoda larvae (24%), most taxa were well retained in the 100 microm filters (53-100%). During sample processing, the method for taking sub-samples with a 10 ml pipette from the suspension of samples with high sediment concentrations was found to perform well in 75% of the samples. During a 2-year national survey in the Netherlands and consecutive investigations, the method appeared to be very suitable to assess the abundance of most invertebrate taxa in drinking water distribution systems and to be practicable for relatively inexperienced sampling and lab technicians. Although the numbers of small, less abundant or sessile taxa were not accurately assessed using the method, these taxa probably should not be the primary focus of monitoring by water utilities, as consumer complaints are not likely to be caused by these invertebrates. The accuracy of

  8. The distribution of mantle material among main-belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, Francesca E.; Carry, Benoit; Binzel, Richard P.; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Polishook, David; Burt, Brian J.

    2014-06-01

    We expect there to have been many bodies in the Main Asteroid Belt (MB) sufficiently heated at the time of solar system formation to allow their interiors to differentiate into an iron core and silicate-rich crust and mantle. Evidence for early solar system differentiation includes the diversity of iron meteorites that imply the existence of over 60 distinct parent bodies (Mittlefehldt et al. 2006). Searches have been performed to identify silicate-rich basaltic crust material (spectral V-type asteroids) in the outer MB have been successful (e.g., Roig et al. 2006, Masi et al. 2008, Moskovitz et al. 2008, Solontoi et al. 2012). The olivine-rich mantles of differentiated asteroids should have produced substantially greater volumes (and therefore substantially greater numbers) of remnant asteroids compared with basaltic and iron samples. Yet olivine-rich asteroids (A-types) are one of the rarest asteroid types (Bus & Binzel 2002, DeMeo et al. 2009). An alternative way to search for differentiated bodies that have been heavily or completely disrupted is to identify these spectral A-type asteroids, characterized by a very wide and deep 1 micron absorption indicative of large amounts (> 80%) of olivine. Burbine et al. (1996) proposed that these asteroids are only found among the largest because most were “battered to bits” due to collisions, so smaller A-types were below our detection limit. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Moving Object Catalog to select A-type asteroid candidates, we have conducted a near-infrared spectral survey of asteroids over 12 nights in the near-infrared in an effort to determine the distribution and abundance of crustal and mantle material across the Main Asteroid Belt (MB). From three decades of asteroid spectral observations only ~10 A-type asteroids have been discovered. In our survey we have detected >20 A-type asteroids thus far throughout the belt, tripling the number of known A-types. We present these spectra and their

  9. Size Distribution of Main-Belt Asteroids with High Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Yoichi

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the size distribution of high-inclination main-belt asteroids (MBAs) so as to explore asteroid collisional evolution under hypervelocity collisions of around 10 km s-1. We performed a wide-field survey for high-inclination sub-km MBAs using the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope with the Subaru Prime Focus Camera (Suprime-Cam). Suprime-Cam archival data were also used. A total of 616 MBA candidates were detected in an area of 9.0 deg² with a limiting magnitude of 24.0 mag in the SDSS r filter. Most of the candidate diameters were estimated to be smaller than 1 km. We found a scarcity of sub-km MBAs with high inclination. Cumulative size distributions (CSDs) were constructed using Subaru data and published asteroid catalogs. The power-law indexes of the CSDs were 2.17±0.02 for low-inclination (<15°) MBAs and 2.02±0.03 for high-inclination (>15°) MBAs in the 0.7-50 km diameter range. The high-inclination MBAs had a shallower CSD. We also found that the CSD of S-like MBAs had a small slope with high inclination, whereas the slope did not vary with the inclination in the C-like group. The most probable cause of the shallow CSD of the high-inclination S-like MBAs is the large power-law index in the diameter-impact strength curve in hypervelocity collisions. The collisional evolution of MBAs may have advanced with oligopolistic survival during the dynamical excitation phase in the final stage of planet formation.

  10. Limits on the number distribution of Main Belt Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnett, S.; Kleyna, J.; Jedicke, R.; Masiero, J.

    2011-10-01

    We searched the Thousand Asteroid Light Curve Survey (TALCS, [1]) data for new Main Belt Comet (MBC) candidates in the most sensitive MBC survey effort to date, extending the search to objects as small as absolute magnitude H ∼ 21 (corresponding to diameters of about 150 m). We identified zero MBC candidates but found evidence that about 5% of all asteroids show low level activity in the form of a directionalized excess flux in the point spread function (PSF). To measure the fractional contribution of the coma to the total surface brightness we fit each of the 924 TALCS objects to a PSF model that incorporated both coma and nuclear components. We determined the significance of the coma detection using the same algorithm on a sample of null detections of comparable magnitude and rate of motion. We did not identify any MBC candidates with this technique to a sensitivity limit on the order of typical cometary mass loss rates of about 0.1 kg/s. Our tail detection algorithm relied on identifying statistically significant flux in a segmented annulus around the candidate object (see Figure 1). We show that the technique can detect tail activity throughout the asteroid belt to the level of the currently known MBCs. Although we did not identify any MBC candidates with this technique we found a statistically significant detection of faint activity in the entire ensemble of TALCS asteroids. This suggests that about 5% of main belt asteroids are active at very low levels. Our null detection of MBCs allows us to set 90% upper confidence limits on the number distribution of MBCs as a function of absolute magnitude, semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination. There are <400,000 MBCs in the main belt brighter than HV = 21 (∼ 150 m in diameter) and the MBC:MBA ratio is <1:400. We further comment on the ability of observations to meaningfully constrain the snow line's location. Under some reasonable and simple assumptions we claim 85% confidence that the contemporary snow

  11. Condition Assessment for Drinking Water Transmission and Distribution Mains

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project seeks to improve the capability to characterize the condition of water infrastructure. The integrity of buried drinking water mains is critical, as it influences water quality, losses, pressure and cost. This research complements the U.S. Environmental Protection A...

  12. Reconstructing the spin distributions of main-belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holsapple, K.

    2014-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: We now have spin data for almost six thousand asteroids, each value being a result of that asteroid's history. Some features of that distribution are now evident. The gravity spin limit at the period of about 2.3 h for asteroids with a diameter greater than a few kilometers is well established (Harris 1996, Pravec and Harris 2000, Holsapple 2001, and others). The strength of smaller asteroids as inferred from the ''fast spinners'' has been presented by Holsapple (2007), Sanchez and Scheeres (2014), and others. Several statistical analyses of the database have been presented (e.g., Pravec and Harris 2002). Here that database is used as a means of investigating the prior history of the asteroid belt. THEORETICAL APPROACHES: A way to understand the data is to attempt to reproduce it using theoretical models and numerical simulations of the physics of the processes that created it. Such studies have evolved since McAdoo and Burns (1973) first suggested collisions as a source of the spins; they include Davis et al. (1979), Dobrovolskis and Burns (1984), Harris (1979), Davis et al. (1989), Farinella et al. (1992), Henych and Pravec (2013), and others. These analyses are based upon averaging the effects of a number of individual impacts into a given target asteroid. I retrace the path and analyses of those authors in this work, but make important modifications and updates. The primary elements introduced in those prior studies include: 1) a population of asteroids in a given space; 2) a distribution of impact velocities and angles; 3) the efficiency of angular-momentum transfer in an impact; 4) the loss or gain of mass and angular inertia; 5) the amount, direction, and speed of the cratering ejecta. The characteristics of the ejecta are especially important: they determine the ''angular-momentum drain'' first identified by Dobrovolskis and Burns (1984). It is caused by the preferential escape of ejecta in the downrange spin direction. Here I revisit, update

  13. Reconstructing the spin distributions of main-belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holsapple, K.

    2014-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: We now have spin data for almost six thousand asteroids, each value being a result of that asteroid's history. Some features of that distribution are now evident. The gravity spin limit at the period of about 2.3 h for asteroids with a diameter greater than a few kilometers is well established (Harris 1996, Pravec and Harris 2000, Holsapple 2001, and others). The strength of smaller asteroids as inferred from the ''fast spinners'' has been presented by Holsapple (2007), Sanchez and Scheeres (2014), and others. Several statistical analyses of the database have been presented (e.g., Pravec and Harris 2002). Here that database is used as a means of investigating the prior history of the asteroid belt. THEORETICAL APPROACHES: A way to understand the data is to attempt to reproduce it using theoretical models and numerical simulations of the physics of the processes that created it. Such studies have evolved since McAdoo and Burns (1973) first suggested collisions as a source of the spins; they include Davis et al. (1979), Dobrovolskis and Burns (1984), Harris (1979), Davis et al. (1989), Farinella et al. (1992), Henych and Pravec (2013), and others. These analyses are based upon averaging the effects of a number of individual impacts into a given target asteroid. I retrace the path and analyses of those authors in this work, but make important modifications and updates. The primary elements introduced in those prior studies include: 1) a population of asteroids in a given space; 2) a distribution of impact velocities and angles; 3) the efficiency of angular-momentum transfer in an impact; 4) the loss or gain of mass and angular inertia; 5) the amount, direction, and speed of the cratering ejecta. The characteristics of the ejecta are especially important: they determine the ''angular-momentum drain'' first identified by Dobrovolskis and Burns (1984). It is caused by the preferential escape of ejecta in the downrange spin direction. Here I revisit, update

  14. Radon gas distribution in natural gas processing facilities and workplace air environment.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Shwiekani, R

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation was made of the distribution of radon gas and radiation exposure rates in the four main natural gas treatment facilities in Syria. The results showed that radiation exposure rates at contact of all equipment were within the natural levels (0.09-0.1 microSvh(-1)) except for the reflex pumps where a dose rate value of 3 microSvh(-1) was recorded. Radon concentrations in Syrian natural gas varied between 15.4 Bq m(-3) and 1141 Bq m(-3); natural gas associated with oil production was found to contain higher concentrations than the non-associated natural gas. In addition, radon concentrations were higher in the central processing facilities than the wellheads; these high levels are due to pressurizing and concentrating processes that enhance radon gas and its decay products. Moreover, the lowest 222Rn concentration was in the natural gas fraction used for producing sulfur; a value of 80 Bq m(-3) was observed. On the other hand, maximum radon gas and its decay product concentrations in workplace air environments were found to be relatively high in the gas analysis laboratories; a value of 458 Bq m(-3) was observed. However, all reported levels in the workplaces in the four main stations were below the action level set by IAEA for chronic exposure situations involving radon, which is 1000 Bq m(-3). PMID:17905489

  15. Radon gas distribution in natural gas processing facilities and workplace air environment.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Shwiekani, R

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation was made of the distribution of radon gas and radiation exposure rates in the four main natural gas treatment facilities in Syria. The results showed that radiation exposure rates at contact of all equipment were within the natural levels (0.09-0.1 microSvh(-1)) except for the reflex pumps where a dose rate value of 3 microSvh(-1) was recorded. Radon concentrations in Syrian natural gas varied between 15.4 Bq m(-3) and 1141 Bq m(-3); natural gas associated with oil production was found to contain higher concentrations than the non-associated natural gas. In addition, radon concentrations were higher in the central processing facilities than the wellheads; these high levels are due to pressurizing and concentrating processes that enhance radon gas and its decay products. Moreover, the lowest 222Rn concentration was in the natural gas fraction used for producing sulfur; a value of 80 Bq m(-3) was observed. On the other hand, maximum radon gas and its decay product concentrations in workplace air environments were found to be relatively high in the gas analysis laboratories; a value of 458 Bq m(-3) was observed. However, all reported levels in the workplaces in the four main stations were below the action level set by IAEA for chronic exposure situations involving radon, which is 1000 Bq m(-3).

  16. Sour gas distribution in the Amudaria Basin, Central Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, D.; Ivlev, A.; Shkutnik, E.

    1995-08-01

    The Amudaria Basin is the main sour-gas bearing region in Central Asia. In this region, sour gases occur in Upper Jurassic carbonate-reservoir rocks as well as in terrigenous rocks of Cretareous age, but the Upper Jurassic sulfate-carbonate complex is the main sour-gas bearing and producing complex. The chemical and isotopic composition of fluids in Upper Jurassic rocks show that sulfate reduction is the main process responsible for sour gas formation in the central part of the basin, where Kimmeridgian-Tithonian evaporites occur. The H{sub 2}S content of gases varies widely (0 to 10 percent by volume), even within similar carbonate traps located close to one another in the same temperature zone. Analyses of sour-gas distribution and composition in fluids in these areas indicate the main factors which control the variation of H{sub 2}S content in Upper Jurassic hydrocarbon pools in the same temperature zones. These factors include (1) the carbonate sediment facies type (shelf, barrier reef, deep water facies), and (2) within the same facies, the characteristics of traps and pools (tight, gentle, structural, phase-type, etc). The most favorable conditions for H{sub 2}S accumulation occur in hydrocarbon pools confined to the barrier reef flat and the parts of the shelf closest to it. The least favorable conditions are in pools confined to local reefs or carbonate build-ups located within the deep-water facies zone. These results are important for the prediction of H{sub 2}S in hydrocarbon pools. In most cases, H{sub 2}S in the Cretaceous complex is epigenetic. With the exception of Central Karakum zone H{sub 2}S distribution in this complex depends on the distribution and composition of Upper Jurassic evaporites.

  17. Gas distribution and starbursts in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Detailed maps of most elliptical galaxies reveal that, whereas the greatest part of their luminous mass originates from a smooth distribution with a surface brightness approximated by a de Vaucouleurs law, a small percentage of their light is contributed by low surface brightness distortions termed 'fine structures'. The sharp-edged features called 'shells' are successfully reproduced by merger and infall models involving accretion from less massive companions. In this context, dwarf spheroidal and compact disk galaxies are likely progenitors of these stellar phenomena. However, it is probable that the sources of shell-forming material also contain significant amounts of gas. This component may play an important role in constraining the formation and evolution of shell galaxies. To investigate the effects of the gaseous component, numerical simulations were performed to study the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars by more massive primaries, and the evolution of the ensuing debris. The calculations were performed with a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code. Collisionless matter is evolved using a conventional N-body technique and gas is treated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in which self-gravitating fluid elements are represented as particles evolving according to Lagrangian hydrodynamic equations. An isothermal equation of state is employed so the gas remains at a temperature 104 K. Owing to the large mass ratio between the primary and companion, the primary is modeled as a rigid potential and the self-gravity of both galaxies is neglected.

  18. Preliminary analysis of selected gas dynamic problems. [space shuttle main engine main combustion transients and IUS nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.; Farmer, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The VAST computer code was used to analyze SSME main combustion chamber start-up transients and the IUS flow field for a damaged nozzle was investigated to better understand the gas dynamic considerations involved in vehicle problems, the effect of start transients on the nozzle flow field for the SSME, and the possibility that a damaged nozzle could account for the acceleration anomaly noted on IUS burn. The results obtained were compared with a method of characteristics prediction. Pressure solutions from both codes were in very good agreement and the Mach number solution on the nozzle centerline deviates substantially for the high expansions for the SSME. Since this deviation was unexpected, the phenomenon is being further examined.

  19. Inspiratory flow and intrapulmonary gas distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rehder, K.; Knopp, T.J.; Brusasco, V.; Didier, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of flow of inspired gas on intrapulmonary gas distribution was examined by analysis of regional pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances and of total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearance measured at the mouth after equilibration of the lungs with /sup 133/Xe. Five awake healthy volunteers (24 to 40 yr of age) and another 5 healthy, anesthetized-paralyzed volunteers (26 to 28 yr of age) were studied while they were in the right lateral decubitus position. The awake subjects were studied at 3 inspiratory flows (0.4, 0.7, and 1.0 L/s) and the anesthetized-paralyzed subjects at 4 inspiratory flows (0.2, 0.5, 1.1, and 1.6 L/s). Interregional differences in /sup 133/Xe clearances along the vertical axis were significantly less during anesthesia-paralysis and mechanical ventilation than during spontaneous breathing in the awake state. No differences in the regional or total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances were detected at these different flows in either of the two states, i.e., the difference between the awake and anesthetized-paralyzed states persisted.

  20. Subaru Main Belt Asteroid Survey (SMBAS)—Size and color distributions of small main-belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, F.; Nakamura, T.

    2007-06-01

    Since February, 2001, we have been conducting a series of survey observations to investigate the physical property of very small Main Belt Asteroids (sub-km MBAs) using the Subaru prime-focus camera (Suprime-Cam) attached to the 8.2 m Subaru telescope. We call our surveys "SMBAS: Subaru Main-Belt Asteroids Survey". This paper presents the results of the second SMBAS (SMBAS-II) which was performed in October 2001. In SMBAS-II, a˜4.0deg2 sky area near the opposition and near the ecliptic was surveyed with the R- and B-bands. We detected 1838 moving objects up to R˜25mag. In SMBAS-II, we could not determine the exact orbits of the objects, because of the short observational arc of only ˜40min. Instead, we statistically estimated the semi-major axis ( a) of each moving object from its apparent sky-motion vector assuming its circular orbit and then, we used the a's to select MBAs and to estimate their absolute magnitudes ( H). The limiting magnitude of SMBAS-II for MBAs was R˜24.2 mag. It corresponds to H˜20 mag at the outer edge of main belt. Thus, assuming their mean albedos, down to D˜0.3 km of S-type asteroids and 0.6 km of C-type asteroids were detected in SMBAS-II. We found that the slopes ( b) of the cumulative size distribution (CSD) (i.e. N(>D)∝D, D: diameter) for sub-km MBAs ranging from 0.6 to 1 km in diameter is 1.29±0.02. Our b value (1.29) is much shallower than those ( ˜ 1.8) of the Palomer Leiden Survey (PLS) [van Houten, C.J., van Houten, G.I., Herget, P., Gehrels, T., 1970. The Palomar-Leiden survey of faint minor planets. Astr. Astrophys. Suppl. 2, 339-448] and Spacewatch surveys [Jedicke, R., Metcalfe, T.S., 1998. The orbital and absolute magnitude distributions of main belt asteroids. Icarus 131, 245-260.] for larger asteroids ( D>5 km) and almost consistent with that (1.3) of SDSS [Ivezić, Ž., Tabachnik, S., Rafikov, R., Lupton, R.H., Quinn, T., Hammergren, M., Eyer, L., Chu, J., Armstrong, J.C., Fan, X., Finlator, K., Geballe, T

  1. Karst hazard assessment in the design of the main gas pipeline (South Yakutia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strokova, L. A.; Dutova, E. M.; Ermolaeva, A. V.; Alimova, I. N.; Strelnikova, A. B.

    2015-11-01

    The paper represents the description of the zonal and regional geological factors of geoengineering conditions which characterize the territory in South Yakutia crossed by the designed main gas pipeline. Cryogenic processes and karst are considered to be the most dangerous hazards for gas pipeline maintenance. Karst hazard assessment of the gas pipeline section made in the course of the research has involved a complex of geological methods: geoengineering, geophysical, hydrogeological, and mapping. Sections prone to karst development have been identified. The authors have suggested the measures to protect potentially hazardous sections and to ensure timely informing on sinkhole collapses.

  2. Recent and historical distributions of Canada lynx in Maine and the Northeast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoving, C.L.; Joseph, R.A.; Krohn, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    The contiguous United States population of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis Kerr) is listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. However, the historic distribution of lynx in the Northeast is poorly understood. We used museum records, bibliographic records, and interviews to reconstruct the past distribution of lynx in Maine, which is at the current southern limit of the species' distribution in the eastern United States. We found a total of 118 records, representing at least 509 lynx in Maine. Lynx were observed throughout Maine, 1833-1912, with the exception of coastal areas. After 1913, lynx were most common in the forests of western and northern Maine, and absent to rare along the coast, but had not returned to southern Maine by 1999. Thirty-nine kittens representing at least 21 litters were distributed throughout northern and western Maine, 1864-1999. Populations apparently fluctuated, and in some years 200-300 lynx were harvested in Maine. Prior to the 1900s, lynx were much more widely distributed in the Northeast, ranging from Pennsylvania north into Quebec. Because Canada lynx have had a long presence in northern New England, and at times were relatively common, this species merits serious consideration in conservation planning in this region.

  3. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-05-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software.

  4. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software.

  5. 157. ARAIII Reactor building (ARA608) Main gas loop mechanical flow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    157. ARA-III Reactor building (ARA-608) Main gas loop mechanical flow sheet. This drawing was selected as a typical example of mechanical arrangements within reactor building. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-0608-50-013-102634. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Clouds and trace gas distributions during TRACE-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J.; Olson, J.; Davis, D.; Chen, G.; Barrick, J.; Shetter, R.; Lefer, B.; Jordan, C.; Anderson, B.; Clarke, A.; Sachse, G.; Blake, D.; Singh, H.; Sandolm, S.; Tan, D.; Kondo, Y.; Avery, M.; Flocke, F.; Eisele, F.; Mauldin, L.; Zondlo, M.; Brune, W.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Talbot, R.; Bandy, A.; Thornton, D.

    2003-11-01

    This paper addresses the question: To what extent do trace gas distributions correspond to cloudiness? Observations taken during NASA's TRACE-P experiment indicate that there can be statistically significant differences in trace gas concentrations between clear-sky and cloudy areas. During the TRACE-P mission, frontal outflow of Asian emissions from the Pacific Rim to the western, North Pacific was sampled by NASA's DC-8 and P-3B aircraft. On several occasions, enhanced CO mixing ratios were observed in and around frontal clouds. A more detailed analysis of trace gas distributions revealed CO enhancements of 30% in the lower free troposphere (1-5 km) for cloudy regions as compared to clear areas. These enhancements exist within clouds as well as above and below clouds. In the upper free troposphere (5-11 km), overall enhancement in CO of 15% was observed although enhancements are mainly restricted to observations within clouds. These in-cloud observations were enhanced by factors of 1.5 to 2 over clear air data. Similar enhancements were seen for many other anthropogenic tracers. By contrast, distributions for O3 revealed no clear differences between cloudy and clear regions suggesting that other influences (e.g., stratosphere-troposphere exchange) might complicate any correspondence with local cloudiness. Expected cloud influences on oxidation chemistry were evident in enhanced OH concentrations above clouds and depressed OH below clouds. These findings are particularly relevant to current and future satellite investigations of the troposphere. Understanding the potential biases created by the inability to probe cloudy regions will improve the interpretation of regional and globally averaged satellite observations.

  7. Molecular and atomic gas along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintonge, Amelie; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Genzel, Reinhard; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Kramer, Carsten; Lutz, Katharina A.; Schiminovich, David; Tacconi, Linda J.; Wuyts, Stijn; Accurso, Gioacchino

    2016-10-01

    We use spectra from the ALFALFA, GASS and COLD GASS surveys to quantify variations in the mean atomic and molecular gas mass fractions throughout the SFR-M* plane and along the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies. Although galaxies well below the MS tend to be undetected in the Arecibo and IRAM observations, reliable mean atomic and molecular gas fractions can be obtained through a spectral stacking technique. We find that the position of galaxies in the SFR-M* plane can be explained mostly by their global cold gas reservoirs as observed in the H I line, with in addition systematic variations in the molecular-to-atomic ratio and star formation efficiency. When looking at galaxies within ±0.4 dex of the MS, we find that as stellar mass increases, both atomic and molecular gas mass fractions decrease, stellar bulges become more prominent, and the mean stellar ages increase. Both star formation efficiency and molecular-to-atomic ratios vary little for massive MS galaxies, indicating that the flattening of the MS is due to the global decrease of the cold gas reservoirs of galaxies rather than to bottlenecks in the process of converting cold atomic gas to stars.

  8. Improved Main Shaft Seal Life in Gas Turbines Using Laser Surface Texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNickle, Alan D.; Etsion, Izhak

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents a general overview of the improved main shaft seal life in gas turbines using laser surface texturing (LST). The contents include: 1) Laser Surface Texturing System; 2) Seal Schematic with LST applied; 3) Dynamic Rig Tests; 4) Surface Finish Definitions; 5) Wear Test Rig; 6) Dynamic Test Rig; 7) Seal Cross Section-Rig Test; and 8) Typical Test Results. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  9. Is the Grand Tack model compatible with the orbital distribution of main belt asteroids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Gomes, Rodney S.; Walsh, Kevin J.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Nesvorný, David

    2016-07-01

    The Asteroid Belt is characterized by the radial mixing of bodies with different physical properties, a very low mass compared to Minimum Mass Solar Nebula expectations and has an excited orbital distribution, with eccentricities and inclinations covering the entire range of values allowed by the constraints of dynamical stability. Models of the evolution of the Asteroid Belt show that the origin of its structure is strongly linked to the process of terrestrial planet formation. The Grand Tack model presents a possible solution to the conundrum of reconciling the small mass of Mars with the properties of the Asteroid Belt, including the mass depletion, radial mixing and orbital excitation. However, while the inclination distribution produced in the Grand Tack model is in good agreement with the one observed, the eccentricity distribution is skewed towards values larger than those found today. Here, we evaluate the evolution of the orbital properties of the Asteroid Belt from the end of the Grand Tack model (at the end of the gas nebula phase when planets emerge from the dispersing gas disk), throughout the subsequent evolution of the Solar System including an instability of the Giant Planets approximately 400 Myr later. Before the instability, the terrestrial planets were modeled on dynamically cold orbits with Jupiter and Saturn locked in a 3:2 mean motion resonance. The model continues for an additional 4.1 Gyr after the giant planet instability. Our results show that the eccentricity distribution obtained in the Grand Tack model evolves towards one very similar to that currently observed, and the semimajor axis distribution does the same. The inclination distribution remains nearly unchanged with a slight preference for depletion at low inclination; this leads to the conclusion that the inclination distribution at the end of the Grand Tack is a bit over-excited. Also, we constrain the primordial eccentricities of Jupiter and Saturn, which have a major influence

  10. Neotectonics, sea level change, and Quaternary natural gas occurrence in coastal Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.; Shipp, C.R.

    1985-02-01

    The glaciated, passive continental margin of northern New England is not a likely location for either tectonic activity or hydrocarbon accumulation, but neotectonic action has played a role in creating favorable stratigraphic traps for natural gas in the Quaternary inner-shelf and estuarine deposits of Maine. During late glacial time (13,000 year B.P.), a marine inundation accompanied ice retreat across the isostatically depressed lowlands of coastal Maine and blanketed the area with marine sediment (Presumpscot Formation) up to 50 m thick. Unloading of the ice led to rapid coastal rebound within a few thousand years, and the former sea floor became emergent to present depths of -65 m. A gullied and weathered lag surface on the muddy Presumpscot Formation marks the regression that followed deposition. Since about 8000 years B.P., sea level has risen in Maine, and within historic times it has been accompanied by seismicity and subsidence rates up to 9 mm/yr. Examinations of over 1500 km of seismic reflection profiles and limited coring reveal the presence of abundant natural gas in Holocene sediments filling ravines cut into the Presumpscot Formation during emergence. It appears that the gas is derived from and trapped by mud deposited in estuarine depocenters that migrated landward during the Holocene transgression.

  11. On the current distribution of main belt objects: Constraints for evolutionary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michtchenko, T. A.; Lazzaro, D.; Carvano, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    Context. It is widely accepted that the current distribution of material in the main asteroidal belt (MB) is a product of the evolutionary history of the solar system during its whole lifetime of ~4.5 billions of years and is, consequently, a major witness of the diverse stages of this evolution. Aims: The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, we study the principal aspects of the distribution of the asteroids in proper element space, mass, and, physical composition for a complete picture of the current MB. Second, we analyze if and how these current distributions can be explained by the long-lasting dynamical effects of the planets on this region of the solar system. Methods: We studied the distribution in the proper element space for the sample that consists of about 350 000 objects whose proper orbital elements are available from the database AstDyS. We studied the distribution in size and physical composition using the most recent and large available datasets. We constructed the dynamical portrait of the MB in form of the dynamical and averaged maps via the spectral analysis method. Results: The main properties of the current distributions of MB objects are identified. A comparison of the distributions of real objects with dynamical maps allows us to detect principal mechanisms of the diffusive transportation of the objects. These mechanisms are related to mean-motion resonances (MMRs) and secular resonances (SRs), overlaying with the slow dissipative Yarkovsky/Yorp drift. Conclusions: We identify the most relevant distributions of the material in the MB and show that many of the current features of the MB can be explained by the interplay of diverse dynamical mechanisms due to the planetary perturbations over 4 Gyr with nongravitational effects, without the need of 'catastrophic' events or 'ad hoc' migration mechanisms during the early stages of the solar system. In this sense, the obtained distributions can provide relevant constraints for modeling the

  12. The relations between natural gas hydrate distribution and structure on Muli basin Qinghai province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Li, Y.; Lu, Z.; Luo, S.; Qu, C.; Tan, S.; Zhang, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Muli area is located in a depression area which between middle Qilian and south Qilian tectonic elements. The natural gas hydrate stratum belongs the Jurassic series coal formation stratum, the main lithological character clamps the purple mudstone, the siltstone, the fine grain sandstone and the black charcoal mudstone for the green gray. The plutonic metamorphism is primarily deterioration function of the Muli area coal, is advantageous in forming the coal-bed gas. Cretaceous system, the Paleogene System and Neogene System mainly include the fine grain red clastic rock and clay stone. The distribution of Quaternary is widespread. The ice water - proluvial and glacier deposit are primarily depositional mode. The Qilian Montanan Muli permafrost area has the good gas source condition (Youhai Zhu 2006) and rich water resources. It is advantage to forming the natural gas hydrate. The natural gas hydrate is one kind of new latent energy, widely distributes in the mainland marginal sea bottom settlings and land permanent tundra. Through researching the area the structure ,the deposition carries on the analysis and responds the characteristic analysis simulation in the rock physics analysis and the seismic in the foundation, and then the reflected seismic data carried by tectonic analysis processing and the AVO characteristic analysis processing reveal that the research area existence natural gas hydrate (already by drilling confirmation) and the natural gas hydrate distribution and the structure relations is extremely close. In the structure development area, the fault and the crevasse crack growing, the natural gas hydrate distribution characteristic is obvious (this is also confirmed the storing space of natural gas hydrate in this area is mainly crevasse crack). This conclusion also agree with the actual drilling result. The research prove that the distribution of natural gas hydrate in this area is mainly controlled by structure control. The possibility of fault

  13. Spatial concentration distribution model for short-range continuous gas leakage of small amount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meirong; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Long, Yunting; Gao, Yue

    2012-06-01

    Passive infrared gas imaging systems have been utilized in the equipment leak detection and repair in chemical manufacturers and petroleum refineries. The detection performance mainly relates to the sensitivity of infrared detector, optical depth of gas, atmospheric transmission, wind speed, and so on. Based on our knowledge, the spatial concentration distribution of continuously leaking gas plays an important part in leak detection. Several computational model of gas diffusion were proposed by researchers, such as Gaussian model, BM model, Sutton model and FEM3 model. But these models focus on calculating a large scale gas concentration distribution for a great amount of gas leaks above over 100- meter height, and not applicable to assess detection limit of a gas imaging system in short range. In this paper, a wind tunnel experiment is designed. Under different leaking rate and wind speed, concentration in different spatial positions is measured by portable gas detectors. Through analyzing the experimental data, the two parameters σy(x) and σz (x) that determine the plume dispersion in Gaussian model are adjusted to produce the best curve fit to the gas concentration data. Then a concentration distribution model for small mount gas leakage in short range is established. Various gases, ethylene and methane are used to testify this model.

  14. Particle size distribution of main-channel-bed sediments along the upper Mississippi River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, Jonathan W. F.; Heine, Reuben A.; Ickes, Brian S.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we compared pre-lock-and-dam (ca. 1925) with a modern longitudinal survey of main-channel-bed sediments along a 740-km segment of the upper Mississippi River (UMR) between Davenport, IA, and Cairo, IL. This comparison was undertaken to gain a better understanding of how bed sediments are distributed longitudinally and to assess change since the completion of the UMR lock and dam navigation system and Missouri River dams (i.e., mid-twentieth century). The comparison of the historic and modern longitudinal bed sediment surveys showed similar bed sediment sizes and distributions along the study segment with the majority (> 90%) of bed sediment samples having a median diameter (D50) of fine to coarse sand. The fine tail (≤ D10) of the sediment size distributions was very fine to medium sand, and the coarse tail (≥ D90) of sediment-size distribution was coarse sand to gravel. Coarsest sediments in both surveys were found within or immediately downstream of bedrock-floored reaches. Statistical analysis revealed that the particle-size distributions between the survey samples were statistically identical, suggesting no overall difference in main-channel-bed sediment-size distribution between 1925 and present. This was a surprising result given the magnitude of river engineering undertaken along the study segment over the past ~ 90 years. The absence of substantial differences in main-channel-bed-sediment size suggests that flow competencies within the highly engineered navigation channel today are similar to conditions within the less-engineered historic channel.

  15. Particle size distribution of main-channel-bed sediments along the upper Mississippi River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Remo, Jonathan; Heine, Ruben A.; Ickes, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared pre-lock-and-dam (ca. 1925) with a modern longitudinal survey of main-channel-bed sediments along a 740-km segment of the upper Mississippi River (UMR) between Davenport, IA, and Cairo, IL. This comparison was undertaken to gain a better understanding of how bed sediments are distributed longitudinally and to assess change since the completion of the UMR lock and dam navigation system and Missouri River dams (i.e., mid-twentieth century). The comparison of the historic and modern longitudinal bed sediment surveys showed similar bed sediment sizes and distributions along the study segment with the majority (> 90%) of bed sediment samples having a median diameter (D50) of fine to coarse sand. The fine tail (≤ D10) of the sediment size distributions was very fine to medium sand, and the coarse tail (≥ D90) of sediment-size distribution was coarse sand to gravel. Coarsest sediments in both surveys were found within or immediately downstream of bedrock-floored reaches. Statistical analysis revealed that the particle-size distributions between the survey samples were statistically identical, suggesting no overall difference in main-channel-bed sediment-size distribution between 1925 and present. This was a surprising result given the magnitude of river engineering undertaken along the study segment over the past ~ 90 years. The absence of substantial differences in main-channel-bed-sediment size suggests that flow competencies within the highly engineered navigation channel today are similar to conditions within the less-engineered historic channel.

  16. Leaf gas films, underwater photosynthesis and plant species distributions in a flood gradient.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Anders; Visser, Eric J W; Colmer, Timothy D; Brodersen, Klaus P; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Pedersen, Ole

    2016-07-01

    Traits for survival during flooding of terrestrial plants include stimulation or inhibition of shoot elongation, aerenchyma formation and efficient gas exchange. Leaf gas films form on superhydrophobic cuticles during submergence and enhance underwater gas exchange. The main hypothesis tested was that the presence of leaf gas films influences the distribution of plant species along a natural flood gradient. We conducted laboratory experiments and field observations on species distributed along a natural flood gradient. We measured presence or absence of leaf gas films and specific leaf area of 95 species. We also measured, gas film retention time during submergence and underwater net photosynthesis and dark respiration of 25 target species. The presence of a leaf gas film was inversely correlated to flood frequency and duration and reached a maximum value of 80% of the species in the rarely flooded locations. This relationship was primarily driven by grasses that all, independently of their field location along the flood gradient, possess gas films when submerged. Although the present study and earlier experiments have shown that leaf gas films enhance gas exchange of submerged plants, the ability of species to form leaf gas films did not show the hypothesized relationship with species composition along the flood gradient.

  17. Leaf gas films, underwater photosynthesis and plant species distributions in a flood gradient.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Anders; Visser, Eric J W; Colmer, Timothy D; Brodersen, Klaus P; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Pedersen, Ole

    2016-07-01

    Traits for survival during flooding of terrestrial plants include stimulation or inhibition of shoot elongation, aerenchyma formation and efficient gas exchange. Leaf gas films form on superhydrophobic cuticles during submergence and enhance underwater gas exchange. The main hypothesis tested was that the presence of leaf gas films influences the distribution of plant species along a natural flood gradient. We conducted laboratory experiments and field observations on species distributed along a natural flood gradient. We measured presence or absence of leaf gas films and specific leaf area of 95 species. We also measured, gas film retention time during submergence and underwater net photosynthesis and dark respiration of 25 target species. The presence of a leaf gas film was inversely correlated to flood frequency and duration and reached a maximum value of 80% of the species in the rarely flooded locations. This relationship was primarily driven by grasses that all, independently of their field location along the flood gradient, possess gas films when submerged. Although the present study and earlier experiments have shown that leaf gas films enhance gas exchange of submerged plants, the ability of species to form leaf gas films did not show the hypothesized relationship with species composition along the flood gradient. PMID:26846194

  18. Using hydrologic measurements to investigate free-phase gas ebullition in a Maine peatland, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, C. E.; Reeve, A. S.; Slater, L.; Comas, X.

    2014-03-01

    Northern peatlands cover more than 350 million ha and are an important source of methane (CH4) and other biogenic gases contributing to climate change. Free-phase gas (FPG) accumulation and episodic release has recently been recognized as an important mechanism for biogenic gas flux from peatlands. It is likely that gas production and groundwater flow are interconnected in peatlands: groundwater flow influences gas production by regulating geochemical conditions and nutrient supply available for methanogenesis, while FPG influences groundwater flow through a reduction in peat permeability and by creating excess pore water pressures. Water samples collected from three well sites at Caribou Bog, Maine, show substantial dissolved CH4 (5-16 mg L-1) in peat waters below 2 m depth and an increase in concentrations with depth. This suggests production and storage of CH4 in deep peat that may be episodically released as FPG. Two min increment pressure transducer data reveal approximately 5 cm fluctuations in hydraulic head from both deep and shallow peat that are believed to be indicative of FPG release. FPG release persists up to 24 h during decreasing atmospheric pressure and a rising water table. Preferential flow is seen towards an area of relatively lower hydraulic head associated with the esker and pool system. Increased CH4 concentrations are also found at the depth of the esker crest, suggesting that the high permeability esker is acting as a conduit for groundwater flow, driving a downward transport of labile carbon, resulting in higher rates of CH4 production.

  19. Using hydrologic measurements to investigate free phase gas ebullition in a Maine Peatland, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, C. E.; Reeve, A. S.; Slater, L.; Comas, X.

    2013-07-01

    Northern Peatlands cover more than 350 million ha and are an important source of methane (CH4) and other biogenic gases contributing to climate change. Free phase gas (FPG) accumulation and episodic release has recently been recognized as an important mechanism for biogenic gas flux from peatlands. It is likely that gas production and groundwater flow are interconnected in peatlands: groundwater flow influences gas production by regulating geochemical conditions and nutrient supply available for methanogenesis while FPG influences groundwater flow through a reduction in peat permeability and by creating excess pore water pressures. Water samples collected from three well sites at Caribou Bog, Maine, show substantial dissolved CH4 (5-16 mg L-1) in peat waters below 2 m depth and an increase in concentrations with depth. This suggests substantial production and storage of CH4 in deep peat that may be episodically released as FPG. Two minute increment pressure transducer data reveal approximately 5 cm fluctuations in hydraulic head from both deep and shallow peat that are believed to be indicative of FPG release. FPG release persists up to 24 h during decreasing atmospheric pressure and a rising water table. Preferential flow is seen towards an area of relatively lower hydraulic head associated with the esker and pool system. Increased CH4 concentrations are also found at the depth of the esker crest suggesting that the high permeability esker is acting as a conduit for groundwater flow, driving a downward transport of labile carbon, resulting in higher rates of CH4 production.

  20. Experimental evaluation of an advanced Space Shuttle main engine hot-gas manifold design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, D. G.; Lepore, F. F.; Oconnor, G. M.; Rao, G. V. R.; Ratekin, G. H.; Vogt, S. T.

    1985-01-01

    This study, using an extensively modified, full-scale space shuttle main engine (SSME) hot-gas manifold (HGM), established a detailed aerodynamic data base to support development of an advanced, three-dimensional, fluid-dynamic analysis computer model. In addition, the advanced SSME hot-gas manifold design used in this study demonstrated improved flow environment (uniformity) in the fuel side turbine exit and transfer duct exit regions. Major modifications were incorporated in the full-scale HGM flow test article model using two large transfer ducts on the fuel turbine side of the HGM in place of the three small transfer ducts in the present design. Other model features included an increases in the flow areas downstream of the 180-degree turn and in the fishbowl regions.

  1. Fugitive methane emissions from leak-prone natural gas distribution infrastructure in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Margaret F; Ackley, Robert; Sanaie-Movahed, Bahare; Tang, Xiaojing; Phillips, Nathan G

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive emissions from natural gas systems are the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. and contribute to the risk of explosions in urban environments. Here, we report on a survey of CH4 emissions from 100 natural gas leaks in cast iron distribution mains in Metro Boston, MA. Direct measures of CH4 flux from individual leaks ranged from 4.0 - 2.3 × 10(4) g CH4•day(-1). The distribution of leak size is positively skewed, with 7% of leaks contributing 50% of total CH4 emissions measured. We identify parallels in the skewed distribution of leak size found in downstream systems with midstream and upstream stages of the gas process chain. Fixing 'superemitter' leaks will disproportionately stem greenhouse gas emissions. Fifteen percent of leaks surveyed qualified as potentially explosive (Grade 1), and we found no difference in CH4 flux between Grade 1 leaks and all remaining leaks surveyed (p = 0.24). All leaks must be addressed, as even small leaks cannot be disregarded as 'safely leaking.' Key methodological impediments to quantifying and addressing the impacts of leaking natural gas distribution infrastructure involve inconsistencies in the manner in which gas leaks are defined, detected, and classified. To address this need, we propose a two-part leak classification system that reflects both the safety and climatic impacts of natural gas leaks.

  2. Fugitive methane emissions from leak-prone natural gas distribution infrastructure in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Margaret F; Ackley, Robert; Sanaie-Movahed, Bahare; Tang, Xiaojing; Phillips, Nathan G

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive emissions from natural gas systems are the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. and contribute to the risk of explosions in urban environments. Here, we report on a survey of CH4 emissions from 100 natural gas leaks in cast iron distribution mains in Metro Boston, MA. Direct measures of CH4 flux from individual leaks ranged from 4.0 - 2.3 × 10(4) g CH4•day(-1). The distribution of leak size is positively skewed, with 7% of leaks contributing 50% of total CH4 emissions measured. We identify parallels in the skewed distribution of leak size found in downstream systems with midstream and upstream stages of the gas process chain. Fixing 'superemitter' leaks will disproportionately stem greenhouse gas emissions. Fifteen percent of leaks surveyed qualified as potentially explosive (Grade 1), and we found no difference in CH4 flux between Grade 1 leaks and all remaining leaks surveyed (p = 0.24). All leaks must be addressed, as even small leaks cannot be disregarded as 'safely leaking.' Key methodological impediments to quantifying and addressing the impacts of leaking natural gas distribution infrastructure involve inconsistencies in the manner in which gas leaks are defined, detected, and classified. To address this need, we propose a two-part leak classification system that reflects both the safety and climatic impacts of natural gas leaks. PMID:27023280

  3. Distribution of heavy metals from flue gas in algal bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napan, Katerine

    Flue gas from coal-fired power plants is a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Microalgae can use this enriched form of CO2 as carbon source and in turn the biomass can be used to produce food, feed, fertilizer and biofuels. However, along with CO2, coal-based flue gas will inevitably introduce heavy metals, which have a high affinity to bind algal cells, could be toxic to the organisms and if transferred to the products could limit their uses. This study seeks to address the distribution and impact of heavy metals present in flue gas on microalgae production systems. To comprehend its effects, algae Scenedesmus obliquus was grown in batch reactors in a multimetal system. Ten heavy metals (Cu, Co, Zn, Pb, As, Se, Cr, Hg, Ni and Cd) were selected and were evaluated at four concentrations (1X, 2X, 5X and 10X). Results show that most heavy metals accumulated mainly in biomass and were found in very low concentrations in media. Hg was shown to be lost from the culture, with low amounts present in the biomass. An upper limit for As uptake was observed, suggesting its likelihood to build-up in the system during medium recycle. The As limited bioaccumulation was overcome by addition of sulfur to the algal medium. Heavy metal at 2X, 5X and 10X inhibited both growth and lipid production, while at the reference concentration both biomass and lipids yields were increased. Heavy metal concentrations in the medium and biomass were time dependent, and at the end of the cultivation most heavy metals in the supernatant solution complied with the recommendations for irrigation water, while biomass was below limits for cattle and poultry feed, fertilizer, plastic and paper. This research shows that bioremediation of CO2 and heavy metals in combination with energy production can be integrated, which is an environmentally friendly form of biotechnology.

  4. Relationships between sinkholes areal distribution and main tectonic alignments in Abruzzo (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, G.; Moretti, A.; De Rose, C.; Stagnini, E.,; Serafini, M.

    2012-04-01

    present there is no evidence of hydrothermal activity or gas diffusion, morphological and geostructural analogy with the hydrothermal field of San Vittorino (Rieti) suggest dissolution processes related to the rising of underground mineralized fluids (piping) and a subsequent collapse phase, in a classic sink-hole evolutionary model. To note the areal distribution of these elements developed in a narrow band , WNW-ESE oriented, running for about 40 km parallel back to the tectonic front of the Gran Sasso and coinciding, with good approximation, to the seismogenic source of the earthquake of April 6th 2009 and of the major historical earthquakes which hit the region. Geophysical survey carried out after the last strong seismic event pointed out the presence of large hidden cavities developed in the Neogene sedimentary filling of the L'Aquila basin confirming that the phenomenon cannot be considered exhausted; then a geochemical mapping of the all area is started to identify suitable sites for monitoring fluid in relation to seismic activity and to evaluate the risk of potential, sudden phenomena of gravitational collapse.

  5. Dust reentrainment, gas distribution and electrostatic precipitator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, A.G.

    1989-05-01

    Field observations indicating that uniform gas flow at the precipiator outlet may not result in best performance led to a study of how reentrainment and changes in gas distributions within a precipitator affect performance. A computer model developed in the study predicts that an improvement over uniform flow performance is possible by using controlled non-uniform gas distributions at both the inlet and the outlet faces of the precipitator. The model was used to study how changes in precipitator side view geometry affect performance and offers explanations for the reduction in precipitation constants experienced with larger installations.

  6. Impact of radial migration on stellar and gas radial metallicity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Kawata, Daisuke; Cropper, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Radial migration is defined as the change in guiding centre radius of stars and gas caused by gains or losses of angular momentum that result from gravitational interaction with non-axisymmetric structure. This has been shown to have significant impact on the metallicity distribution in galactic discs, and therefore affects the interpretation of Galactic archaeology. We use a simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy to examine the effect of radial migration on the star and gas radial metallicity distribution. We find that both the star and gas component show significant radial migration. The stellar radial metallicity gradient remains almost unchanged but the radial metallicity distribution of the stars is broadened to produce a greater dispersion at all radii. However, the metallicity dispersion of the gas remains narrow. We find that the main drivers of the gas metallicity distribution evolution are metal enrichment and mixing: more efficient metal enrichment in the inner region maintains a negative slope in the radial metallicity distribution, and the metal mixing ensures the tight relationship of the gas metallicity with the radius. The metallicity distribution function reproduces the trend in the age-metallicity relation found from observations for stars younger than 1.0 Gyr in the Milky Way.

  7. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  8. Distribution and abundance of tidal marshes along the coast of maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, H.A.; Jacobson, G.L.; Kelley, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Planimetry studies of coastal geology maps prepared by the Maine Geological Survey show that there is more than an order of magnitude more tidal marsh area in the state of Maine than documented in previously published estimates. The highly convoluted coast of Maine, which is approximately 5,970 km long, contains almost 79 km2 of salt marsh, far more than any other New England state, New York, or the Bay of Fundy region. Reasonable estimates for the per-unit primary productivity of salt marshes lead to projections of total marsh productivity on the order of 1010 g dry weight yr-1 for the Maine coast and 1011 g dry weight yr-1 for the Gulf of Maine as a whole. Distribution of tidal marsh area is strongly controlled by coastal geomorphology, which varies considerably along the coast of Maine. The salt marsh area is concentrated in the southwestern coastal region of arcuate bays, where marshes have developed behind sandy beaches. A series of long islands and bedrock peninsulas in the south-central portion of the coast also provides sheltered areas where large marshes occur. Northeast of Penobscot Bay salt marshes become more numerous and smaller in average areal extent. A lack of protection from waves, along with limited sources of glacio-fluvial and glacio-marine sediments, restricts the occurrence of salt marshes in that region to the frignes of coves and tidal rivers. ?? 1987 Estuarine Research Federation.

  9. Effect of rotational disruption on the size-frequency distribution of the Main Belt asteroid population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Marzari, Francesco; Rossi, Alessandro; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Davis, Donald R.

    2014-03-01

    The size distribution of small asteroids in the Main Belt is assumed to be determined by an equilibrium between the creation of new bodies out of the impact debris of larger asteroids and the destruction of small asteroids by collisions with smaller projectiles. However, for a diameter less than 6 km, we find that YORP-induced rotational disruption significantly contributes to the erosion even exceeding the effects of collisional fragmentation. Including this additional grinding mechanism in a collision evolution model for the asteroid belt, we generate size-frequency distributions from either an accretional or an `Asteroids were born big' initial size-frequency distribution that are consistent with observations reported in Gladman et al. Rotational disruption is a new mechanism that must be included in all future collisional evolution models of asteroids.

  10. COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2013-06-15

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  11. Modeling Gas Distribution in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Martin; Lewis, Josiah; Brittain, Sean

    2010-07-01

    Protoplanetary accretion disks are disks of dust and gas which surround and feed material onto a forming star in the earliest stages of its evolution. One of the most useful methods for studying these disks is near infrared spectroscopy of rovibrational CO emission. This paper presents the methods in which synthetically generated spectra are modeled and fit to spectral data gathered from protoplanetary disks. This paper also discussed the methods in which this code can be improved by modifying the code to run a Monte Carlo analysis of best fit across the CONDOR cluster at Clemson University, thereby allowing for the creation of a catalog of protoplanetary disks with detailed information about them as gathered from the model.

  12. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DENSE GAS IN SERPENS MAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Katherine I.; Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Kwon, Woojin; Kauffmann, Jens; Tobin, John J.; Volgenau, N. H.; Tassis, Konstantinos; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), HCO{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), and HCN (J = 1 → 0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 arcmin{sup 2} of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of ∼7''. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of ∼0.2 pc and widths of ∼0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.

  13. Long-Range Untethered Real-Time Live Gas Main Robotic Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen Schempf; Daphne D'Zurko

    2004-10-31

    Under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) developed an untethered, wireless remote controlled inspection robot dubbed Explorer. The project entailed the design and prototyping of a wireless self-powered video-inspection robot capable of accessing live 6- and 8-inch diameter cast-iron and steel mains, while traversing turns and Ts and elbows under real-time control with live video feedback to an operator. The design is that of a segmented actively articulated and wheel-leg powered robot design, with fisheye imaging capability and self-powered battery storage and wireless real-time communication link. The prototype was functionally tested in an above ground pipe-network, in order to debug all mechanical, electrical and software subsystems, and develop the necessary deployment and retrieval, as well as obstacle-handling scripts. A pressurized natural gas test-section was used to certify it for operation in natural gas at up to 60 psig. Two subsequent live-main field-trials in both cast-iron and steel pipe, demonstrated its ability to be safely launched, operated and retrieved under real-world conditions. The system's ability to safely and repeatably exidrecover from angled and vertical launchers, traverse multi-thousand foot long pipe-sections, make T and varied-angle elbow-turns while wirelessly sending live video and handling command and control messages, was clearly demonstrated. Video-inspection was clearly shown to be a viable tool to understand the state of this critical buried infrastructure, irrespective of low- (cast-iron) or high-pressure (steel) conditions. This report covers the different aspects of specifications, requirements, design, prototyping, integration and testing and field-trialing of the Explorer platform.

  14. Distribution of the background gas in the MITICA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Dal Bello, S.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2013-02-01

    MITICA is the ITER neutral beam test facility to be built in Padova for the generation of a 40A D- ion beam with a 16×5×16 array of 1280 beamlets accelerated to 1MV. The background gas pressure distribution and the particle flows inside MITICA accelerator are critical aspects for stripping losses, generation of secondary particles and beam non-uniformities. To keep the stripping losses in the extraction and acceleration stages reasonably low, the source pressure should be 0.3 Pa or less. The gas flow in MITICA accelerator is being studied using a 3D Finite Element code, named Avocado. The gas-wall interaction model is based on the cosine law, and the whole vacuum system geometry is represented by a view factor matrix based on surface discretization and gas property definitions. Pressure distribution and mutual fluxes are then solved linearly. In this paper the result of a numerical simulation is presented, showing the steady-state pressure distribution inside the accelerator when gas enters the system at room temperature. The accelerator model is limited to a horizontal slice 400 mm high (1/4 of the accelerator height). The pressure profile at solid walls and through the beamlet axis is obtained, allowing the evaluation and the discussion of the background gas distribution and nonuniformity. The particle flux at the inlet and outlet boundaries (namely the grounded grid apertures and the lateral conductances respectively) will be discussed.

  15. Real-Time Fluid and Gas Monitoring During Drilling of the SAFOD Main Hole in Parkfield, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Erzinger, J.

    2005-12-01

    Little is known about the role and origin of fluids and gases associated with the San Andreas Fault zone (SAF). To gain information on fluids and gases at depth, we performed real-time mud gas monitoring during drilling of the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) Pilot Hole (PH) and Main Hole (MH). Gas extracted from returning drill mud was piped into a nearby laboratory trailer and analyzed on-line. Permanent gases were detected using a portable mass spectrometer, hydrocarbons with a gas chromatograph, and the 222Rn-activity with a Lucas-Cell detector. When significant amounts of non-atmospheric gases were detected, off-line gas samples were collected from the gas line for further isotope studies. The SAFOD PH and MH were drilled in only a few meter distance, but in contrast to the straight PH, which penetrates through 768 m of sediments into granites down to 2168 m target depth (TD), the nearby MH is deviated towards the SAF and returns into sedimentary strata below 1930 m. The MH drilled sedimentary rocks down to 3987 m TD, approximately 45 m northeast of the surface trace of the SAF. From surface to 1930 m, the depth distribution of gas is similar for SAFOD PH and MH. Shear zones, identified by geophysical logging, are often characterized by elevated concentrations of CH4, CO2, H2, Rn, and He. The same gases were found in the MH below 1930 m, but their concentrations were, with the exception of He, significantly higher: CH4, CO2, and H2 sometimes reach several volume percent. Generally, the gas composition is partly controlled by the lithology. Variation in the methane concentration in several depth intervals reflects the changes in lithology from low gas abundance in clays and silts to more gas rich shales, which are the source rocks for hydrocarbons. Highly porous and permeable sandstone yield the highest concentrations of hydrocarbons (up to 15 vol% methane), and may be regarded as reservoir rocks. We interpret high radon activities in mud gas as

  16. GPS Constraints on the Spatial Distribution of Extension in the Ethiopian Highlands and Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amere, Y. B.; Bendick, R. O.; Fisseha, S.; Lewi, E.; Reilinger, R. E.; King, R. W.; Kianji, G.

    2014-12-01

    27 campaign and 17 continuous GPS sites spanning the Ethiopian Highlands, Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), and Somali Platform in Ethiopia and Eritrea were measured for varying durations between 1995 and 2014. Velocities at these sites show that present day strain in NE Africa is not localized only in the Afar depression and MER system. Rather, velocities as high as 6 mm/yr relative to stable Nubia occur in the central Ethiopian highlands west of the rift bounding faults; the northern and southern Ethiopian highlands host velocities as high as 3 mm/yr. These approach the magnitude of Nubia-Somalia spreading accommodated within the rift itself of 6 + 1 mm/yr with an azimuth of N770E. The combination of distributed low strain rate deformation contiguous with higher strain rate plate boundary deformation is similar to that expressed in other tectonically active continental settings like Basin and Range and Tibetan Plateau.Keywords: deformation, localized, distributed, strain, stable Nubia.

  17. The gas distribution in the high-redshift cluster MS 1054-0321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhor, M. S.; Birkinshaw, M.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the gas mass distribution in the high-redshift cluster MS 1054-0321 using Chandra X-ray and One Centimetre Receiver array Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect data. We use a superposition of offset β-type models to describe the composite structure of MS 1054-0321. We find gas mass fractions f_{gas}^{X {-}ray} = 0.087_{-0.001}^{+0.005} and f_{gas}^SZ=0.094_{-0.001}^{+0.003} for the (main) eastern component of MS 1054-0321 using X-ray or SZ data, but f_{gas}^{X {-}ray}=0.030_{-0.014}^{+0.010} for the western component. The gas mass fraction for the eastern component is in agreement with some results reported in the literature, but inconsistent with the cosmic baryon fraction. The low-gas mass fraction for the western component is likely to be a consequence of gas stripping during the ongoing merger. The gas mass fraction of the integrated system is 0.060_{-0.009}^{+0.004}: we suggest that the missing baryons from the western component are present as hot diffuse gas which is poorly represented in existing X-ray images. The missing gas could appear in sensitive SZ maps.

  18. Geologic framework of oil and gas genesis in main sedimentary basins from Romania Oprea Dicea

    SciTech Connect

    Ionescu, N.; Morariu, C.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Oil and gas fields located in Moldavic nappes are encompassed in Oligocene and lower Miocene formations, mostly in the marginal folds nappe, where Kliwa Sandstone sequences have high porosity, and in the Black Sea Plateau. The origin of the hydrocarbon accumulations from the Carpathian foredeep seems to be connected to the Oligocene-lower Miocene bituminous formations of the marginal folds and sub-Carpathian nappes. In the Gethic depression, the hydrocarbon accumulations originate in Oligocene and Miocene source rocks and host in structural, stratigraphical, and lithological traps. The accumulations connected with tectonic lines that outline the areal extension of the Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene formations are in the underthrusted Moesian platform. The hydrocarbon accumulations related to the Carpathian foreland represent about 40% of all known accumulations in Romania. Most of them are located in the Moesian platform. In this unit, the oil and gas fields present a vertical distribution at different stratigraphic levels, from paleozoic to Neogene, and in all types of reservoirs, suggesting multicycles of oleogenesis, migration, accumulation, and sealing conditions. The hydrocarbon deposits known so far on the Black Sea continental plateau are confined in the Albian, Cenomanian, Turonian-Senonian, and Eocene formations. The traps are of complex type structural, lithologic, and stratigraphic. The reservoirs are sandstones, calcareous sandstones, limestones, and sands. The hydrocarbon source rocks are pelitic and siltic Oligocene formations. Other older source rocks are probably Cretaceous.

  19. Experimental evaluation of an advanced Space Shuttle Main Engine hot-gas manifold design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, D. G.; Lepore, F. F.; Oconnor, G. M.; Rao, G. V. R.; Ratekin, G. H.; Vogt, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine's hot gas manifold (HGM) has been the subject of an experimental study aimed at the establishment of an aerodynamic data base to support the development of an advanced, three-dimensional, fluid dynamic analysis computer model. The advanced HGM design used in the study demonstrated improved flow uniformity in the fuel-side turbine exit and transfer duct exit regions. Major modifications were incorporated in the HGM flow test article model, using two large transfer ducts on the fuel turbine side in place of the three small transfer ducts of the present design. The HGM flow field data were found to be essentially independent of Reynolds number over the range examined.

  20. Energy direct inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the main industrial trawl fishery of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Port, Dagoberto; Perez, Jose Angel Alvarez; de Menezes, João Thadeu

    2014-11-15

    This study provides first-time estimates of direct fuel inputs and greenhouse gas emissions produced by the trawl fishing fleet operating off southeastern and southern Brazil. Analyzed data comprised vessel characteristics, landings, fishing areas and trawling duration of 10,144 fishing operations monitored in Santa Catarina State from 2003 to 2011. Three main fishing strategies were differentiated: 'shrimp trawling', 'slope trawling' and 'pair trawling'. Jointly these operations burned over 9.1 million liters of diesel to land 342.3 million kilograms of fish and shellfish. Annually, 0.023-0.031 l were consumed for every kg of catch landed. Because all fishing strategies relied on multispecific catches to raise total incomes, estimates of fuel use intensity were generally low but increased 200-900% if only nominal targets were considered. In nine years, trawling operations emitted 6.69 GgC to the atmosphere, between 2300 and 3300 tons CO2 per year.

  1. Energy direct inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the main industrial trawl fishery of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Port, Dagoberto; Perez, Jose Angel Alvarez; de Menezes, João Thadeu

    2016-06-15

    This study provides first-time estimates of direct fuel inputs and greenhouse gas emissions produced by the trawl fishing fleet operating off southeastern and southern Brazil. Analyzed data comprised vessel characteristics, landings, fishing areas and trawling duration of 10,144 fishing operations monitored in Santa Catarina State from 2003 to 2011. Three main fishing strategies were differentiated: 'shrimp trawling', 'slope trawling' and 'pair trawling'. Jointly these operations burned over 141.5millionl of diesel to land 342.3millionkg of fish and shellfish. Annually, 0.36-0.48l were consumed for every kg of catch landed. Because all fishing strategies relied on multispecific catches to raise total incomes, estimates of fuel use intensity were generally low but increased 316-1025% if only nominal targets were considered. In nine years, trawling operations emitted 104.07GgC to the atmosphere, between 36,800-49,500tons CO2 per year.

  2. Energy direct inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the main industrial trawl fishery of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Port, Dagoberto; Perez, Jose Angel Alvarez; de Menezes, João Thadeu

    2016-06-15

    This study provides first-time estimates of direct fuel inputs and greenhouse gas emissions produced by the trawl fishing fleet operating off southeastern and southern Brazil. Analyzed data comprised vessel characteristics, landings, fishing areas and trawling duration of 10,144 fishing operations monitored in Santa Catarina State from 2003 to 2011. Three main fishing strategies were differentiated: 'shrimp trawling', 'slope trawling' and 'pair trawling'. Jointly these operations burned over 141.5millionl of diesel to land 342.3millionkg of fish and shellfish. Annually, 0.36-0.48l were consumed for every kg of catch landed. Because all fishing strategies relied on multispecific catches to raise total incomes, estimates of fuel use intensity were generally low but increased 316-1025% if only nominal targets were considered. In nine years, trawling operations emitted 104.07GgC to the atmosphere, between 36,800-49,500tons CO2 per year. PMID:27068561

  3. Concentration distribution around a growing gas bubble in tissue.

    PubMed

    Mohammadein, S A; Mohamed, K G

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the concentration distribution around a growing nitrogen gas bubble in the blood and other tissues of divers who surface too quickly, when the ambient pressure through the decompression process is variable and constant. This effort is a modification of Sirinivasan et al. model (1999) [9]. The mathematical model is solved analytically to find the growth rate of a gas bubble in a tissue after decompression in the ambient pressure. Moreover, the concentration distribution around the growing bubble is introduced. The growth process is affected by ascent rate alpha (t), tissue diffusivity D(T), initial concentration difference DeltaC(0), surface tension sigma and void fraction varphi(0).

  4. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

  5. Volcanic field elongation, vent distribution and tectonic evolution of continental rift: The Main Ethiopian Rift example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, Francesco; Le Corvec, Nicolas; Isola, Ilaria; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Magmatism and faulting operate in continental rifts and interact at a variety of scales, however their relationship is complex. The African rift, being the best example for both active continental rifting and magmatism, provides the ideal location to study the interplay between the two mechanisms. The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), which connects the Afar depression in the north with the Turkana depression and Kenya Rift to the south, consists of two distinct systems of normal faults and its floor is scattered with volcanic fields formed by tens to several hundreds monogenetic, generally basaltic, small volcanoes and composite volcanoes and small calderas. The distribution of vents defines the overall shape of the volcanic field. Previous work has shown that the distribution of volcanic vents and the shape of a field are linked to its tectonic environment and its magmatic system. In order to distinguish the impact of each mechanism, we analyzed four volcanic fields located at the boundary between the central and northern MER, three of them (Debre Zeyit, Wonji and Kone) grew in the rift valley and one (Akaki) on the western rift shoulder. The elongation and shape of the fields were analyzed based on their vent distribution using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the Vent-to-Vent Distance (VVD), and the two dimensional symmetric Gaussian kernel density estimate methods. We extracted from these methods several parameters characterizing the spatial distribution of points (e.g., eccentricity (e), eigenvector index (evi), angular dispersion (Da)). These parameters allow to define at least three types of shape for volcanic fields: strong elongate (line and ellipse), bimodal/medium elongate (ellipse) and dispersed (circle) shapes. Applied to the natural example, these methods well differentiate each volcanic field. For example, the elongation of the field increases from shoulder to rift axis inversely to the angular dispersion. In addition, the results show that none of

  6. Characterization of real gas properties for space shuttle main engine fuel turbine and performance calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Real thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen, steam, the SSME mixture, and air are developed. The SSME mixture properties are needed for the analysis of the space shuttle main engine fuel turbine. The mixture conditions for the gases, except air, are presented graphically over a temperature range from 800 to 1200 K, and a pressure range from 1 to 500 atm. Air properties are given over a temperature range of 320 to 500 K, which are within the bounds of the thermodynamics programs used, in order to provide mixture data which is more easily checked (than H2/H2O). The real gas property variation of the SSME mixture is quantified. Polynomial expressions, needed for future computer analysis, for viscosity, Prandtl number, and thermal conductivity are given for the H2/H2O SSME fuel turbine mixture at a pressure of 305 atm over a range of temperatures from 950 to 1140 K. These conditions are representative of the SSME turbine operation. Performance calculations are presented for the space shuttle main engine (SSME) fuel turbine. The calculations use the air equivalent concept. Progress towards obtaining the capability to evaluate the performance of the SSME fuel turbine, with the H2/H2O mixture, is described.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics as a design tool for the hot gas manifold of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, J. P.; Barson, S.; Rosen, R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the application of computational fluid dynamics as a design tool for the Hot Gas Manifold of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. An improved Hot Gas Manifold configuration was arrived at computationally. This configuration was then built and air flow tested. Testing verified this configuration to be a substantial improvement over existing flight designs.

  8. The historical distribution of main malaria foci in Spain as related to water bodies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Arturo; García-Barrón, Leoncio; Vetter, Mark; Morales, Julia

    2014-08-01

    The possible connectivity between the spatial distribution of water bodies suitable for vectors of malaria and endemic malaria foci in Southern Europe is still not well known. Spain was one of the last countries in Western Europe to be declared free of malaria by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1964. This study combines, by means of a spatial-temporal analysis, the historical data of patients and deceased with the distribution of water bodies where the disease-transmitting mosquitos proliferate. Therefore, data from historical archives with a Geographic Information System (GIS), using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method, was analyzed with the aim of identifying regional differences in the distribution of malaria in Spain. The reasons, why the risk of transmission is concentrated in specific regions, are related to worse socioeconomic conditions (Extremadura), the presence of another vector (Anopheles labranchiae) besides A. atroparvus (Levante) or large areas of water bodies in conditions to reproduce theses vectors (La Mancha and Western Andalusia). In the particular case of Western Andalusia, in 1913, the relatively high percentage of 4.73% of the surface, equal to 202362 ha, corresponds to wetlands and other unhealthy water bodies. These wetlands have been reduced as a result of desiccation policies and climate change such as the Little Ice Age and Global Climate Change. The comprehension of the main factors of these wetland changes in the past can help us interpret accurately the future risk of malaria re-emergence in temperate latitudes, since it reveals the crucial role of unhealthy water bodies on the distribution, endemicity and eradication of malaria in southern Europe. PMID:25101771

  9. The Historical Distribution of Main Malaria Foci in Spain as Related to Water Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Arturo; García-Barrón, Leoncio; Vetter, Mark; Morales, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The possible connectivity between the spatial distribution of water bodies suitable for vectors of malaria and endemic malaria foci in Southern Europe is still not well known. Spain was one of the last countries in Western Europe to be declared free of malaria by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1964. This study combines, by means of a spatial-temporal analysis, the historical data of patients and deceased with the distribution of water bodies where the disease-transmitting mosquitos proliferate. Therefore, data from historical archives with a Geographic Information System (GIS), using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method, was analyzed with the aim of identifying regional differences in the distribution of malaria in Spain. The reasons, why the risk of transmission is concentrated in specific regions, are related to worse socioeconomic conditions (Extremadura), the presence of another vector (Anopheles labranchiae) besides A. atroparvus (Levante) or large areas of water bodies in conditions to reproduce theses vectors (La Mancha and Western Andalusia). In the particular case of Western Andalusia, in 1913, the relatively high percentage of 4.73% of the surface, equal to 202362 ha, corresponds to wetlands and other unhealthy water bodies. These wetlands have been reduced as a result of desiccation policies and climate change such as the Little Ice Age and Global Climate Change. The comprehension of the main factors of these wetland changes in the past can help us interpret accurately the future risk of malaria re-emergence in temperate latitudes, since it reveals the crucial role of unhealthy water bodies on the distribution, endemicity and eradication of malaria in southern Europe. PMID:25101771

  10. Estimating Predictive Variance for Statistical Gas Distribution Modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Lilienthal, Achim J.; Asadi, Sahar; Reggente, Matteo

    2009-05-23

    Recent publications in statistical gas distribution modelling have proposed algorithms that model mean and variance of a distribution. This paper argues that estimating the predictive concentration variance entails not only a gradual improvement but is rather a significant step to advance the field. This is, first, since the models much better fit the particular structure of gas distributions, which exhibit strong fluctuations with considerable spatial variations as a result of the intermittent character of gas dispersal. Second, because estimating the predictive variance allows to evaluate the model quality in terms of the data likelihood. This offers a solution to the problem of ground truth evaluation, which has always been a critical issue for gas distribution modelling. It also enables solid comparisons of different modelling approaches, and provides the means to learn meta parameters of the model, to determine when the model should be updated or re-initialised, or to suggest new measurement locations based on the current model. We also point out directions of related ongoing or potential future research work.

  11. Estimating Predictive Variance for Statistical Gas Distribution Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilienthal, Achim J.; Asadi, Sahar; Reggente, Matteo

    2009-05-01

    Recent publications in statistical gas distribution modelling have proposed algorithms that model mean and variance of a distribution. This paper argues that estimating the predictive concentration variance entails not only a gradual improvement but is rather a significant step to advance the field. This is, first, since the models much better fit the particular structure of gas distributions, which exhibit strong fluctuations with considerable spatial variations as a result of the intermittent character of gas dispersal. Second, because estimating the predictive variance allows to evaluate the model quality in terms of the data likelihood. This offers a solution to the problem of ground truth evaluation, which has always been a critical issue for gas distribution modelling. It also enables solid comparisons of different modelling approaches, and provides the means to learn meta parameters of the model, to determine when the model should be updated or re-initialised, or to suggest new measurement locations based on the current model. We also point out directions of related ongoing or potential future research work.

  12. Main Power Distribution Unit for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papa, Melissa R.

    2004-01-01

    Around the year 2011, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) will be launched and on its way to orbit three of Jupiter s planet-sized moons. The mission goals for the JIMO project revolve heavily around gathering scientific data concerning ingredients we, as humans, consider essential: water, energy and necessary chemical elements. The JIM0 is an ambitious mission which will implore propulsion from an ION thruster powered by a nuclear fission reactor. Glenn Research Center is responsible for the development of the dynamic power conversion, power management and distribution, heat rejection and ION thrusters. The first test phase for the JIM0 program concerns the High Power AC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Test Bed. The goal of this testing is to support electrical performance verification of the power systems. The test bed will incorporate a 2kW Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) to simulate the nuclear reactor as well as two ION thrusters. The first module of the PMAD Test Bed to be designed is the Main Power Distribution Unit (MPDU) which relays the power input to the various propulsion systems and scientific instruments. The MPDU involves circuitry design as well as mechanical design to determine the placement of the components. The MPDU consists of fourteen relays of four different variations used to convert the input power into the appropriate power output. The three phase system uses 400 Vo1ts(sub L-L) rms at 1000 Hertz. The power is relayed through the circuit and distributed to the scientific instruments, the ION thrusters and other controlled systems. The mechanical design requires the components to be positioned for easy electrical wiring as well as allowing adequate room for the main buss bars, individual circuit boards connected to each component and power supplies. To accomplish creating a suitable design, AutoCAD was used as a drafting tool. By showing a visual layout of the components, it is easy to see where there is extra room or where the

  13. The Gas Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Laue, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r200 and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or treating gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We report for the first time the high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside cluster

  14. The Gas Distribution in the Outer Regions of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present our analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We have exploited the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius, We stacked the density profiles to detect a signal beyond T200 and measured the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also computed the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compared our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict density profiles that are too steep, whereas runs including additional physics and/ or treating gas clumping agree better with the observed gas distribution. We report high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non cool-core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only small differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the ENZO simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside

  15. Relation of adult size to movements and distribution of smallmouth bass in a central Maine Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, M.B.; Moring, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Forty-four smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu of three size-classes were radiotracked in Green Lake, Maine, during summer 1993 (10 June-1 September) to determine whether adult size influenced distribution and movement. Large smallmouth bass (>406 mm) used deep water (>8 m) more often than did small (248-279 mm) or medium-sized (305-356 mm) smallmouth bass during the late summer (15 July-1 September). Large smallmouth bass also were found at middepths (4-8 m) significantly more often than were small individuals during late summer. Small fish used cover more frequently than large ones during early summer (10 June-13 July). Both small and medium-sized individuals were associated with cover more frequently than large smallmouth bass were during the late summer. Small smallmouth bass exhibited significantly smaller summer total ranges than did large individuals, and mean active displacement differed among all three size-classes.

  16. LARGE SCALE DISTRIBUTED PARAMETER MODEL OF MAIN MAGNET SYSTEM AND FREQUENCY DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; MARNERIS, I.; SANDBERG, J.

    2007-06-25

    Large accelerator main magnet system consists of hundreds, even thousands, of dipole magnets. They are linked together under selected configurations to provide highly uniform dipole fields when powered. Distributed capacitance, insulation resistance, coil resistance, magnet inductance, and coupling inductance of upper and lower pancakes make each magnet a complex network. When all dipole magnets are chained together in a circle, they become a coupled pair of very high order complex ladder networks. In this study, a network of more than thousand inductive, capacitive or resistive elements are used to model an actual system. The circuit is a large-scale network. Its equivalent polynomial form has several hundred degrees. Analysis of this high order circuit and simulation of the response of any or all components is often computationally infeasible. We present methods to use frequency decomposition approach to effectively simulate and analyze magnet configuration and power supply topologies.

  17. Albedo distribution of main-belt asteroids based on IRAS, AKARI, and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, F.; Hasegawa, S.; Ishiguro, M.; Mueller, T.; Ootsubo, T.

    2014-07-01

    Presently, the number of asteroids is known to be more than 630,000, and more than 90 % of asteroids with known orbital elements are classified as main-belt asteroids (MBAs). The spatial distribution of compositions among MBAs is of particular interest, because the main belt is the largest reservoir of asteroids in the solar system. Asteroids are thought to be the remnants of planetesimals formed in the early solar system, and allow us to study the formation and evolution of asteroids, origin of meteoroids and the near-Earth asteroids, as well as the formation of the solar system. Size and albedo are one of the most basic physical quantities of asteroid. Knowledge of size and albedo is essential in many aspects of asteroid research, such as the chemical composition and mineralogy, the size-frequency distribution of dynamical families and populations of asteroids, and the relationship between small bodies in the outer solar system and comets. Several techniques have been developed to determine the size of asteroids; by direct imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope or large ground-based telescopes with adaptive optics, radar observations, speckle interferometry, stellar occultation combined with lightcurve inversion techniques, and spacecraft flyby / rendezvous / sample return. One of the most effective methods for measuring asteroid size and albedo indirectly is through the use of radiometry, which combines information of the thermal emission (infrared flux) and the reflected sunlight (absolute magnitude). This method can provide unique data for asteroid size and albedo. Using radiometric measurements, a large number of objects can be observed in a short period of time, providing coherent data for large populations of asteroids within the asteroid belt. Infrared observations can be made still better under ideal circumstances, from space. The first space-borne infrared telescope is the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS; [1]), launched in 1983 and performed a

  18. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

    2003-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

  19. Seismicity distribution and locking depth along the Main Marmara Fault, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, J.; Karabulut, H.; Lengliné, O.; Bouchon, M.

    2016-03-01

    The seismicity along the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) below the Marmara Sea is analyzed during the 2007-2012 period to provide insights on the recent evolution of this important regional seismic gap. High precision locations show that seismicity is strongly varying along strike and depth providing fine details of the fault behavior that are inaccessible from geodetic observations. The activity strongly clusters at the regions of transition between basins. The Central basin shows significant seismicity located below the shallow locking depth inferred from GPS measurements. Its b-value is low and the average seismic slip is high. All observations are consistent with a deep creep of this segment. On the contrary, the Kumburgaz basin at the center of the fault shows sparse seismicity with the hallmarks of a locked segment. In the eastern Marmara Sea, the seismicity distribution along the Princes Island segment in the Cinarcik basin, is consistent with the geodetic locking depth of 10 km and a low contribution to the regional seismic energy release. The assessment of the locked segment areas provide an estimate of the magnitude of the main forthcoming event to be about 7.3 assuming that the rupture will not enter significantly within creeping domains.

  20. Regional distribution of mercury in sediments of the main rivers of French Guiana (Amazonian basin).

    PubMed

    Laperche, Valérie; Hellal, Jennifer; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Joseph, Bernard; Laporte, Pierre; Breeze, Dominique; Blanchard, François

    2014-01-01

    Use of mercury (Hg) for gold-mining in French Guiana (up until 2006) as well as the presence of naturally high background levels in soils, has led to locally high concentrations in soils and sediments. The present study maps the levels of Hg concentrations in river sediments from five main rivers of French Guiana (Approuague River, Comté River, Mana River, Maroni River and Oyapock River) and their tributaries, covering more than 5 450 km of river with 1 211 sampling points. The maximum geological background Hg concentration, estimated from 241 non-gold-mined streams across French Guiana was 150 ng g(-1). Significant differences were measured between the five main rivers as well as between all gold-mining and pristine areas, giving representative data of the Hg increase due to past gold-mining activities. These results give a unique large scale vision of Hg contamination in river sediments of French Guiana and provide fundamental data on Hg distribution in pristine and gold-mined areas.

  1. Seismicity along the Main Marmara Fault, Turkey: from space-time distribution to repeating events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Lengliné, Olivier; Bouchon, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) poses a significant hazard for the large cities surrounding the Marmara Sea region particularly the megalopolis of Istanbul. Indeed, the NAF is presently hosting a long unruptured segment below the Sea of Marmara. This seismic gap is approximately 150 km long and corresponds to the Main Marmara Fault (MMF). The seismicity along the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) below the Marmara Sea is analyzed here during the 2007-2012 period to provide insights on the recent evolution of this important regional seismic gap. High precision locations show that seismicity is strongly varying along strike and depth providing fine details of the fault behavior that are inaccessible from geodetic inversions. The activity strongly clusters at the regions of transition between basins. The Central basin shows significant seismicity located below the shallow locking depth inferred from GPS measurements. Its b-value is low and the average seismic slip is high. Interestingly we found also several long term repeating earthquakes in this domain. Using a template matching technique, we evidenced two new families of repeaters: a first family that typically belongs to aftershock sequences and a second family of long lasting repeaters with a multi-month recurrence period. All observations are consistent with a deep creep of this segment. On the contrary, the Kumburgaz basin at the center of the fault shows sparse seismicity with the hallmarks of a locked segment. In the eastern Marmara Sea, the seismicity distribution along the Princes Island segment in the Cinarcik basin, is consistent with the geodetic locking depth of 10km and a low contribution to the regional seismic energy release. The assessment of the locked segment areas provide an estimate of the magnitude of the main forthcoming event to be about 7.3 assuming that the rupture will not enter significantly within creeping domains.

  2. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  3. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO(2), suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism.

  4. A scaling law of radial gas distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1990-01-01

    Based on the idea that local conditions within a galactic disk largely determine the region's evolution time scale, researchers built a theoretical model to take into account molecular cloud and star formations in the disk evolution process. Despite some variations that may be caused by spiral arms and central bulge masses, they found that many late-type galaxies show consistency with the model in their radial atomic and molecular gas profiles. In particular, researchers propose that a scaling law be used to generalize the gas distribution characteristics. This scaling law may be useful in helping to understand the observed gas contents in many galaxies. Their model assumes an exponential mass distribution with disk radius. Most of the mass are in atomic gas state at the beginning of the evolution. Molecular clouds form through a modified Schmidt Law which takes into account gravitational instabilities in a possible three-phase structure of diffuse interstellar medium (McKee and Ostriker, 1977; Balbus and Cowie, 1985); whereas star formation proceeds presumably unaffected by the environmental conditions outside of molecular clouds (Young, 1987). In such a model both atomic and molecular gas profiles in a typical galactic disk (as a result of the evolution) can be fitted simultaneously by adjusting the efficiency constants. Galaxies of different sizes and masses, on the other hand, can be compared with the model by simply scaling their characteristic length scales and shifting their radial ranges to match the assumed disk total mass profile sigma tot(r).

  5. Estimation of the main dill seeds odorant carvone by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zawirska-Wojtasiak, Renata; Wasowicz, Erwin

    2002-10-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was examined for its suitability for isolation of volatiles from seeds of dill in comparison with the traditional steam distillation procedure. Two main dill seeds volatiles, carvone and limonene, were taken into consideration. Two Supelco SPME fibers were used for the extraction: polyacrylic (PAc) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The time required to saturate the fibers was 3 min, while distillation took 3 h. Gas chromatography (GC) separation was reduced to 5 min by use of microcapillary column HP-5 cross-linked 5% Ph Me Siloxane. The standards of limonene and carvone were used to prepare calibration curves. PAc fiber responses were described by quadratic curves while PDMS responded linearly. Six varieties of dill were examined by distillation and SPME with both fibers. The good results were achieved for carvone by SPME-PDMS with significant regression between distillation and SPME. This compound can be measured in dill seeds samples within 10 min. The SPME-PDMS were also tested for its application to chiral resolution of carvone and limonene enantiomers in dill seeds oil. The enantiomeric separation was done with two chiral columns. The enantiomeric ratios measured by SPME were just the same as with distillation.

  6. Biomass Consumption, CO2, CO and Main Hydrocarbon Gas Emissions in an Amazonian Forest Clearing Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, E.; Soares Neto, T. G.; de Carvalho, J. A.; Gurgel Veras, C. A.; Lincoln, E. N.; Yokelson, R.; Hao, W. M.; Dos Santos, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Biomass consumption, CO2, CO and main hydrocarbon gas emissions in an Amazonian forest clearing fire are presented and discussed. The experiment was conducted in the arc of deforestation, near the city of Alta Floresta, in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The average carbon content of dry biomass used was 48% and the estimated average moisture content of fresh biomass was 42% on wet weight basis. The fresh biomass in the field test was estimated as 528 t.ha-1 and the amount of carbon on the ground before burning was 147 t.ha-1. The overall combustion efficiency for the experiment was 23.9%. The gases measured were: CO2, CO, CH4, C2-C3 hydrocarbons, and particulates. Concentrations of emitted CH4 and C2-C3 hydrocarbons were linearly correlated with those of CO. The combustion efficiencies for flaming, transitional, and smoldering phases were 0.949, 0.889 and 0.844, respectively. The average emission factors of CO2, CO, CH4, NMHC and PM2.5 were respectively 1,599, 111.3, 9.2, 5.57 and 4.84 grams per kg of burned dry biomass. One hectare of burnt forest released about 117,000 Kg of CO2, 8,100 Kg of CO, 675 Kg of CH4, 407 Kg of NMHC and 354 Kg of particulates.

  7. Limits on the size and orbit distribution of main belt comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnett, Sarah; Kleyna, Jan; Jedicke, Robert; Masiero, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    The first of a new class of objects now known as main belt comets (MBCs) or "activated asteroids" was identified in 1996. The seven known members of this class have orbital characteristics of main belt asteroids yet exhibit dust ejection like comets. In order to constrain their physical and orbital properties we searched the Thousand Asteroid Light Curve Survey (TALCS; Masiero, J.R., Jedicke, R., Durech, J., Gwyn, S., Denneau, L., Larsen, J. [2009]. Icarus 204, 145-171) for additional candidates using two diagnostics: tail and coma detection. This was the most sensitive MBC survey effort to date, extending the search from MBCs with H ˜ 18 ( D ˜ 1 km) to MBCs as small as H ˜ 21 ( D ˜ 150 m). We fit each of the 924 objects detected by TALCS to a PSF model incorporating both a coma and nuclear component to measure the fractional contribution of the coma to the total surface brightness. We determined the significance of the coma detection using the same algorithm on a sample of null detections of comparable magnitude and rate of motion. We did not identify any MBC candidates with this technique to a sensitivity limit on the order of cometary mass loss rate of about 0.1 kg/s. Our tail detection algorithm relied on identifying statistically significant flux in a segmented annulus around the candidate object. We show that the technique can detect tail activity throughout the asteroid belt to the level of the currently known MBCs. Although we did not identify any MBC candidates with this technique, we find a statistically significant detection of faint activity in the entire ensemble of TALCS asteroids. This suggests that many main belt asteroids are active at very low levels. Our null detection of MBCs allows us to set 90% upper confidence limits on the number distribution of MBCs as a function of absolute magnitude, semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination. There are ≲400,000 MBCs in the main belt brighter than HV = 21 (˜150-m in diameter) and the MBC

  8. Measuring volcanic gases at Taal Volcano Main Crater for monitoring volcanic activity and possible gas hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpa, M.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Reniva, P.; Bariso, E.; Padilla, G.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Barrancos, J.; Calvo, D.; Nolasco, D.; Padron, E.; Garduque, R.; Villacorte, E.; Fajiculay, E.; Perez, N.; Solidum, R.

    2012-12-01

    Taal is an active volcano located in southwest Luzon, Philippines. It consists of mainly tuff cones which have formed an island at the center of a 30 km wide Taal Caldera. Most historical eruptions, since 1572 on Taal Volcano Island, have been characterized as hydromagmatic eruptions. Taal Main Crater, produced during the 1911 eruption, is the largest crater in the island currently filled by a 1.2 km wide, 85 m deep acidic lake. The latest historical eruption occurred in 1965-1977. Monitoring of CO2 emissions from the Main Crater Lake (MCL) and fumarolic areas within the Main Crater started in 2008 with a collaborative project between ITER and PHIVOLCS. Measurements were done by accumulation chamber method using a Westsystem portable diffuse fluxmeter. Baseline total diffuse CO2 emissions of less than 1000 t/d were established for the MCL from 3 campaign-type surveys between April, 2008 to March, 2010 when seismicity was within background levels. In May, 2010, anomalous seismic activity from the volcano started and the total CO2 emission from the MCL increased to 2716±54 t/d as measured in August, 2010. The CO2 emission from the lake was highest last March, 2011 at 4670±159 t/d when the volcano was still showing signs of unrest. Because CO2 emissions increased significantly (more than 3 times the baseline value) at this time, this activity may be interpreted as magmatic and not purely hydrothermal. Most likely deep magma intrusions occurred but did not progress further to shallower depths and no eruption occurred. No large increase in lake water temperature near the surface (average for the whole lake area) during the period when CO2 was above background, it remained at 30-34°C and a few degrees lower than average ambient temperature. Total CO2 emissions from the MCL have decreased to within baseline values since October, 2011. Concentrations of CO2, SO2 and H2S in air in the fumarolic area within the Main Crater also increased in March, 2011. The measurements

  9. Effect of Dreissena mussels on the distribution of zooplankton as exemplified by the Main Kakhovka Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Grigorovich, I.A.; Shevtsova, L.V.

    1995-06-01

    In summer the abundance of zooplankton in the Main Kakhovka Canal varied in the range of 1,500-18,500 indiv.m{sup -3}, with a biomass of 15-240 mg m{sup -3}. From the upper reach of the canal to the end, the zooplankton become less diverse and there is a decrease in both abundance and biomass. In the initial sections of the canal, copepods predominated, owing to their considerable influxes from other sources, i.e., Kakhovka Reservoir. Whereas in the second half of the canal, the dominant complexes of zooplankton changed and consisted primarily of cladocerans and Dreissena veligers. With high abundance of Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas) and D. bugensis (Andrusov) (mean biomass was 4.2 kg m{sup -2}), with the maximum ca. 17.8 kg m{sup -2}, mussels had a significant effect on the spatial distribution of planktonic invertebrates. In different areas of the canal the measurable quantitive replenishment of zooplankton was proceeded by planktonic larvae of Dreissena. Being active filterers, Dreissena mollusks undermine food resources of filter-feeding zooplankton by accelerating sedimentation of suspended matter, including organic substances, by a factor of 1.4-3.0. Dreissena can control zooplankton density by consumption of some of the species. With predominating rotifers and juveniles cladocerans in the plankton, the total abundance of zooplankton influenced by Dreissena bugensis had decreased by 53% after 12 h, whereas the amount of dominant species, Euchlanis dilatata and Bosmina longirostris, had declined respectively by 92% and 64%. Dreissena individuals 14-18 mm long, are the predominant size group of mussels in the Main Kakhovka Canal and can filter off planktonic invertebrates with body lengths between 20 and 400 m. Zooplankton species of such size can pass through the bronchial siphon of Dreissena and so they are vulnerable to consumption by mussels. There is an inverse relationship between the biomass of zooplankton and the biomass of adult Dreissena mussels.

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETING GAS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM ONTO CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate gas accretion flow onto a circumplanetary disk from a protoplanetary disk in detail by using high-resolution three-dimensional nested-grid hydrodynamic simulations, in order to provide a basis of formation processes of satellites around giant planets. Based on detailed analyses of gas accretion flow, we find that most of gas accretion onto circumplanetary disks occurs nearly vertically toward the disk surface from high altitude, which generates a shock surface at several scale heights of the circumplanetary disk. The gas that has passed through the shock surface moves inward because its specific angular momentum is smaller than that of the local Keplerian rotation, while gas near the midplane in the protoplanetary disk cannot accrete to the circumplanetary disk. Gas near the midplane within the planet's Hill sphere spirals outward and escapes from the Hill sphere through the two Lagrangian points L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}. We also analyze fluxes of accreting mass and angular momentum in detail and find that the distributions of the fluxes onto the disk surface are well described by power-law functions and that a large fraction of gas accretion occurs at the outer region of the disk, i.e., at about 0.1 times the Hill radius. The nature of power-law functions indicates that, other than the outer edge, there is no specific radius where gas accretion is concentrated. These source functions of mass and angular momentum in the circumplanetary disk would provide us with useful constraints on the structure and evolution of the circumplanetary disk, which is important for satellite formation.

  11. Radial profile of the electron energy distribution function in RF capacitive gas-discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, M.; Popov, Tsv; Puac, N.; Skoro, N.; Spasic, K.; Malovic, G.; Dias, F. M.; Petrovic, Z. Lj

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports experimental results on low-pressure argon capacitive RF discharge (parallel-plate capacitively-coupled plasma - CCP) under different conditions, namely, gas pressure in the range 3 -r- 30 Pa and RF power in the range 10 - 100 W. The IV characteristics measured were processed by two different second-derivative probe techniques for determination of the plasma parameters and the electron energy distribution function. The radial profiles of the main plasma parameters are presented.

  12. Cost analysis of gas distribution industry with spatial variables

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tai-Yoo; Lee, Jeong-Dong

    1995-12-31

    Cost assessment is important in the regulatory process, but it is not easy to effect, especially for distribution sector, because the spatial conditions as well as the output quantity play a major role in determining the cost. The hedonic cost function is introduced to incorporate the spatial characteristics (or network configurations) in the analysis of cost behavior of the Korean gas industry. The findings in this paper are that (1) almost all of the firms are exhausting their scale economies, (2) the average cost trend can be expressed as a surface of output quantity and spatial characteristics, and (3) the imaginary firm`s cost trend is derived by the regression approach. Industries that are related to electricity (water, railroad, and telecommunications, etc.) have the same cost property as the gas distribution industry, and the basic result and methodology in this paper would be applicable to these industries.

  13. Modeling natural gas market volatility using GARCH with different distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaodong; Shan, Xian

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we model natural gas market volatility using GARCH-class models with long memory and fat-tail distributions. First, we forecast price volatilities of spot and futures prices. Our evidence shows that none of the models can consistently outperform others across different criteria of loss functions. We can obtain greater forecasting accuracy by taking the stylized fact of fat-tail distributions into account. Second, we forecast volatility of basis defined as the price differential between spot and futures. Our evidence shows that nonlinear GARCH-class models with asymmetric effects have the greatest forecasting accuracy. Finally, we investigate the source of forecasting loss of models. Our findings based on a detrending moving average indicate that GARCH models cannot capture multifractality in natural gas markets. This may be the plausible explanation for the source of model forecasting losses.

  14. Distribution of spin axes and shape elongations of main-belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulkova, Helena; Durech, Josef; Vokrouhlicky, David; Kaasalainen, Mikko; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna

    2016-10-01

    Photometric data that are sparse in time (typically few measurements per night over ~15 years) are a potential source of information about shapes and rotational states of asteroids. However, currently available data are usually not accurate enough to derive a unique sidereal rotation period and corresponding shape model by the lightcurve inversion method. To fully utilize sparse-in-time data, we have developed a new simplified model that provides an approximate solution for the orientation of the spin axis (λ, β) and ratios of axes of the ellipsoid, a/b, b/c (asteroids are modelled as geometrically scattering triaxial ellipsoids). The observed values of mean brightness (over one apparition) and the dispersion of brightness are compared with values computed from the model parameters (λ, β, a, b, setting c=1) which are optimized to get the best agreement. The model was applied on the data from Lowell photometric database. We found that the distribution of pole ecliptic longitude λ is nonuniform and that this nonuniformity is larger for asteroids with low inclination of their orbits. The second main result is that small asteroids (D<25 km) are on average more elongated (a/b ~ 1.6) than the large ones (for D>50 km the mean value of a/b is 1.3).

  15. A comprehensive study of metal distribution in three main classes of seaweed.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Siobhan; McLoughlin, Peter; O'Donovan, Orla

    2012-08-01

    This paper provides one of the most comprehensive studies of metal distributions in three main macroalgae species. In this novel study, levels of total, intracellular and surface bound Pb, Zn, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn and Ni associated with Polysiphonia lanosa (L) Tandy, Ascophyllum nodosum (L) Le Jolis, Fucus vesiculosus (L) and Ulva sp. were determined. Additionally, water and sediment metal levels were analysed to gain an insight into the relative uptake efficiencies of different macroalgal species. Samples were collected from a clean site in Fethard-on-Sea, Wexford, Ireland (52°11'53.68'N, 6°49'34.64'W), in May 2008. Results demonstrated that total, intracellular and surface bound metal levels varied according to metal and seaweed species, with the highest proportion of metals found to be intracellular. Inhibition of Mn uptake by Zn was indicated for P. lanosa. Furthermore, P. lanosa had enhanced bioaccumulation ability, with the highest Concentration Factor reported of any seaweed to date. PMID:22575098

  16. Spatial distribution of pelagic fish larvae in the northern main basin of Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, Edward F.; O'Brien, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Larval fish occurrence in inshore and offshore zones in the northern main basin of Lake Huron was assessed during 2007 as part of a larger ecological examination of Lake Huron foodwebs and habitats. Day and night collections using neuston and conical nets at inshore (1.5–15 m depths) and offshore (37 and 91 m depths) locations at De Tour and Hammond Bay to assess the abundance, phenology, and spatial distribution of pelagic ichthyoplankton during spring and early summer were made. In general, densities of larval fishes were higher at De Tour than Hammond Bay during daytime neuston net collections, with the exception of Longnose Sucker, which were only collected at Hammond Bay. Lake Whitefish, Burbot, and Rainbow Smelt dominated inshore catches in early spring with Cisco, Deepwater Sculpin, Emerald Shiner, Bloater, Slimy Sculpin, Ninespine Stickleback, and Yellow Perch larvae also collected. Nighttime nearshore and offshore sampling revealed that Rainbow Smelt and Burbot larvae were present in relatively high abundances compared to inshore densities. Concentrations of larvae of deepwater demersal fishes such as Lake Whitefish and Deepwater Sculpin suggest that inshore zones in northern Lake Huron are important nursery habitats emphasizing a critical production and recruitment linkage between inshore and deepwater zones.

  17. Residence time distributions of gas flowing through rotating drum bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hardin, M T; Howes, T; Mitchell, D A

    2001-07-20

    Residence time distribution studies of gas through a rotating drum bioreactor for solid-state fermentation were performed using carbon monoxide as a tracer gas. The exit concentration as a function of time differed considerably from profiles expected for plug flow, plug flow with axial dispersion, and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) models. The data were then fitted by least-squares analysis to mathematical models describing a central plug flow region surrounded by either one dead region (a three-parameter model) or two dead regions (a five-parameter model). Model parameters were the dispersion coefficient in the central plug flow region, the volumes of the dead regions, and the exchange rates between the different regions. The superficial velocity of the gas through the reactor has a large effect on parameter values. Increased superficial velocity tends to decrease dead region volumes, interregion transfer rates, and axial dispersion. The significant deviation from CSTR, plug flow, and plug flow with axial dispersion of the residence time distribution of gas within small-scale reactors can lead to underestimation of the calculation of mass and heat transfer coefficients and hence has implications for reactor design and scale-up. PMID:11370003

  18. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  19. The chemical evolution of Dwarf Galaxies with galactic winds - the role of mass and gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone

    2015-08-01

    Energetic feedback from Supernovae and stellar winds can drive galactic winds. Dwarf galaxies (DGs), due to their shallower potential wells, are assumed to be more vulnera-ble to these energetic processes. Metal loss through galactic winds is also commonly invoked to explain the low metal content of DGs.Our main aim in this presentation is to show that galactic mass cannot be the only pa-rameter determining the fraction of metals lost by a galaxy. In particular, the distribution of gas must play an equally important role. We perform 2-D chemo-dynamical simula-tions of galaxies characterized by different gas distributions, masses and gas fractions. The gas distribution can change the fraction of lost metals through galactic winds by up to one order of magnitude. In particular, disk-like galaxies tend to lose metals more easily than roundish ones. Consequently, also the final element abundances attained by models with the same mass but with different gas distributions can vary by up to one dex. Confirming previous studies, we also show that the fate of gas and freshly pro-duced metals strongly depends on the mass of the galaxy. Smaller galaxies (with shal-lower potential wells) more easily develop large-scale outflows; therefore, the fraction of lost metals tends to be higher.Another important issue is that the invoked mechanism to transform central cusps to cored dark-matter distributions by baryon loss due to strong galactic winds cannot work in general, must be critically tested, and should be clearly discernible by the chemical evolution of DGs.

  20. ANOMALOUSLY PRESSURED GAS DISTRIBUTION IN THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-03-31

    Anomalously pressured gas (APG) assets, typically called ''basin-center'' gas accumulations, represent either an underdeveloped or undeveloped energy resource in the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB). Historically, the exploitation of these gas resources has proven to be very difficult and costly. In this topical report, an improved exploration strategy is outlined in conjunction with a more detailed description of new diagnostic techniques that more efficiently detect anomalously pressured, gas-charged domains. The ability to delineate gas-charged domains occurring below a regional velocity inversion surface allows operators to significantly reduce risk in the search for APG resources. The Wind River Basin was chosen for this demonstration because of the convergence of public data availability (i.e., thousands of mud logs and DSTs and 2400 mi of 2-D seismic lines); the evolution of new diagnostic techniques; a 175 digital sonic log suite; a regional stratigraphic framework; and corporate interest. In the exploration scheme discussed in this topical report, the basinwide gas distribution is determined in the following steps: (1) A detailed velocity model is established from sonic logs, 2-D seismic lines, and, if available, 3-D seismic data. In constructing the seismic interval velocity field, automatic picking technology using continuous, statistically-derived interval velocity selection, as well as conventional graphical interactive methodologies are utilized. (2) Next, the ideal regional velocity/depth function is removed from the observed sonic or seismic velocity/depth profile. The constructed ideal regional velocity/depth function is the velocity/depth trend resulting from the progressive burial of a rock/fluid system of constant rock/fluid composition, with all other factors remaining constant. (3) The removal of the ideal regional velocity/depth function isolates the anomalously slow velocities and allows the evaluation of (a) the regional velocity

  1. Truncated shifted pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-11-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a J-shape, and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment.

  2. Use of the truncated shifted Pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a "J-shape," and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  3. Application of groundwater aggressiveness assessment method for estimation of the karst process at main gas pipeline construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Main pipelines maintenance is connected with hazard engineering and geological working conditions. The article deals with the use of groundwater aggressiveness assessment method to estimate the karst processes development during the construction of main gas pipelines. The possibility of using this method is analyzed on the example of the initial section of the designed gas pipeline “Power of Siberia” (section “Chayanda-Lensk"). The calculation of the nonequilibrium index Ca was made in accordance with the geotechnical survey data. The dependencies between the geomorphological features of the terrain and the natural waters aggressiveness were determined.

  4. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The

  5. Mass flow rate and pressure distribution of gas through three-dimensional micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianzheng; Fan, Jing

    2014-12-09

    An effective method to predict the mass flow rate and pressure distribution of gas through three dimensional micro-channels with different cross-section shapes has been proposed. For rectangular cross sections often employed in experiment, the present solutions versus measured data of Zohar et al. (2002) show that the side walls significantly affect the mass flow rates as the aspect ratio is smaller than 10, whereas the non-dimensional pressure distributions, mainly determined by the inlet-to-outlet pressure ratio, are insensitive to the aspect ratio.

  6. Seasonal Distribution and Movements of Atlantic and Shortnose Sturgeon in the Penobscot River Estuary, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Fernandes, Stephen J.; Zydlewski, Gayle B.; Wippelhauser, Gail S.; Kinnison, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the distribution and seasonal movement patterns of shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum and Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus occupying rivers in the northern part of their range. During 2006 and 2007, 40 shortnose sturgeon (66–113.4 cm fork length [FL]) and 8 Atlantic sturgeon (76.2–166.2 cm FL) were captured in the Penobscot River, Maine, implanted with acoustic transmitters, and monitored using an array of acoustic receivers in the Penobscot River estuary and Penobscot Bay. Shortnose sturgeon were present year round in the estuary and overwintered from fall (mid-October) to spring (mid-April) in the upper estuary. In early spring, all individuals moved downstream to the middle estuary. Over the course of the summer, many individuals moved upstream to approximately 2 km of the downstream-most dam (46 river kilometers [rkm] from the Penobscot River mouth [rkm 0]) by August. Most aggregated into an overwintering site (rkm 36.5) in mid- to late fall. As many as 50% of the tagged shortnose sturgeon moved into and out of the Penobscot River system during 2007, and 83% were subsequently detected by an acoustic array in the Kennebec River, located 150 km from the Penobscot River estuary. Atlantic sturgeon moved into the estuary from the ocean in the summer and concentrated into a 1.5-km reach. All Atlantic sturgeon moved to the ocean by fall, and two of these were detected in the Kennebec River. Although these behaviors are common for Atlantic sturgeon, regular coastal migrations of shortnose sturgeon have not been documented previously in this region. These results have important implications for future dam removals as well as for rangewide and river-specific shortnose sturgeon management.

  7. Distribution of Faint Atomic Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Yun, Min Su; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun; Braatz, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We present 21 cm H i observations of four Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H i emission in a region of 25‧ × 25‧ (140–650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of H i masses. In particular, we detected 65% more H i than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG 92. We also identify whether the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high surface brightness (HSB) H i features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the H i strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the H i observed with the GBT has a similar spatial distribution to the HSB structures in HCG 31 and HCG 68. Conversely, the observed H i distributions in HCG 44 and HCG 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG 44 lies to the northeast–southwest region and in HCG 92 lies in the northwest region of their respective groups. The spatial and dynamical similarities between the total (faint+HSB) and the HSB H i indicate that the faint gas is of tidal origin. We found that the gas will survive ionization by the cosmic UV background and the escaping ionizing photons from the star-forming regions and stay primarily neutral for at least 500 Myr.

  8. DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT ATOMIC GAS IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun; Yun, Min Su; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Braatz, James A.

    2015-10-10

    We present 21 cm H i observations of four Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H i emission in a region of 25′ × 25′ (140–650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of H i masses. In particular, we detected 65% more H i than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG 92. We also identify whether the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high surface brightness (HSB) H i features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the H i strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the H i observed with the GBT has a similar spatial distribution to the HSB structures in HCG 31 and HCG 68. Conversely, the observed H i distributions in HCG 44 and HCG 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG 44 lies to the northeast–southwest region and in HCG 92 lies in the northwest region of their respective groups. The spatial and dynamical similarities between the total (faint+HSB) and the HSB H i indicate that the faint gas is of tidal origin. We found that the gas will survive ionization by the cosmic UV background and the escaping ionizing photons from the star-forming regions and stay primarily neutral for at least 500 Myr.

  9. Distributed resource applications at San Diego Gas & Electric

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes some of the activities San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) is conducting in distributed resources (DR). Proposed changes in regulation of investor owned utilities in California by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) have prompted SDG&E and other utilities to consider their role in development of generation power technologies. SDG&E continues to perform activities in technology and product development of generation technologies applicable specifically to distributed resources. These activities include application assessments and demonstration of DR applications. Preliminary results from application assessments and economic evaluations indicate that for the near-term, DR applications in SDG&E system may fit as a peak displacement option in discrete locations to defer distribution system upgrades from one to three years. This application option may be used as an integrated resource planning strategy, however, additional work is needed to improve the acceptance of this technology application within traditional utility operations.

  10. Process for forming a long gas turbine engine blade having a main wall with a thin portion near a tip

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X; Thomaidis, Dimitrios

    2014-05-13

    A process is provided for forming an airfoil for a gas turbine engine involving: forming a casting of a gas turbine engine airfoil having a main wall and an interior cavity, the main wall having a wall thickness extending from an external surface of the outer wall to the interior cavity, an outer section of the main wall extending from a location between a base and a tip of the airfoil casting to the tip having a wall thickness greater than a final thickness. The process may further involve effecting movement, using a computer system, of a material removal apparatus and the casting relative to one another such that a layer of material is removed from the casting at one or more radial portions along the main wall of the casting.

  11. 3D modeling of gas/water distribution in water-bearing carbonate gas reservoirs: the Longwangmiao gas field, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Chenghua; Li, ChaoChun; Ma, Zhonggao

    2016-10-01

    A water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir is an important natural gas resource being developed worldwide. Due to the long-term water/rock/gas interaction during geological evolution, complex gas/water distribution has formed under the superposed effect of sedimentary facies, reservoir space facies and gravity difference of fluid facies. In view of these challenges, on the basis of the conventional three-stage modeling method, this paper presents a modelling method controlled by four-stage facies to develop 3D model of a water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir. Key to this method is the reservoir property modelling controlled by two-stage facies, and the fluid property modelling controlled by another two-stage facies. The prerequisite of this method is a reliable database obtained from solid geological investigation. On the basis of illustrating the principles of the modelling method controlled by four-stage facies, this paper further implements systematically modeling of the heterogeneous gas/water distribution of the Longwangmiao carbonate formation in the Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan basin, China.

  12. 78 FR 6318 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on January 15, 2013, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas) filed a rate election pursuant to section 284.123(b)(1) of the Commissions regulations. SourceGas states the rate election...

  13. 78 FR 56685 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on August 27, 2013, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas), 600 12th Street, Suite 300, Golden, Colorado 80401, filed in Docket No. CP13-540-000 an application pursuant to section 7(f) of the Natural Gas Act...

  14. 78 FR 41398 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on June 27, 2013, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas) filed a Rate Election and revised Statement of Operating... and 284.224). SourceGas proposes to revise its fuel reimbursement quantity percentage to reflect...

  15. Geological and geochemical controls on the formation and distribution of supergiant gas fields in the Russian sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, N.

    1996-12-31

    The West Siberian, Barents Sea and Northern Caspian sedimentary basins are the most prolific Russian gas producing regions and include 15 supergiant gas fields each of them content identified gas reserves between 1 x 10{sup 12} m{sup 3} to 11 x 10{sup 12} m{sup 3}. They are Urengoi, Yarnburg, Bovanenkov, Zapoljarnoye, Medvezhie, Charasavey, Kruzenshtern, N.Urengoi, S.Tambey, S.Russkoye, Rusanov, Shtockmanov, Lunin, Astrachan and Orenburg. The gas reserves in these basins exceed 70 x 10{sup 12} m{sup 3} and about 65% of them concentrated in supergiant fields. Among the geological prerequisites for largest gas accumulations note big size of trap (Urengoi 40x300 km{sup 2}; Astrachan l80x200 km{sup 2}), anticline type of tectonic structure (swell, megaswell, dome, arch) with amplitude from 110 m to 800 in. These tectonic structure were active long time include the latest period. The main gas productive reservoirs are slightly consulted non-marine sandstones of Cenomanian or Middle Jurassic ages (West Siberia and Barents Sea) or Middle Carboniferous reef carbonate buildups (Northern Caspian basin). The next geochemical parameters controlled of the gas accumulation histories: (1) West Siberia and Barents Sea regions gas genetically connect with dispersed or concentrated non-marine coal type kerogen distributed into productive complex under lower maturity conditions (before or early oil window zone). This is dry gas almost pure methane with {delta}{sup 13} C{sub 1} between -44,40{per_thousand}. In this case we observe widely distributed mainly sandstones reservoirs at same time gas source rocks also; (2) the Northern Caspian basin found supergiant wet gas-condensate accumulations into local distributed reef carbonate buildups. Gas source rocks is marine kerogen type II, which has a low concentration in marlaceous facies. It is gas high maturity zone.

  16. Geological and geochemical controls on the formation and distribution of supergiant gas fields in the Russian sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, N. )

    1996-01-01

    The West Siberian, Barents Sea and Northern Caspian sedimentary basins are the most prolific Russian gas producing regions and include 15 supergiant gas fields each of them content identified gas reserves between 1 x 10[sup 12] m[sup 3] to 11 x 10[sup 12] m[sup 3]. They are Urengoi, Yarnburg, Bovanenkov, Zapoljarnoye, Medvezhie, Charasavey, Kruzenshtern, N.Urengoi, S.Tambey, S.Russkoye, Rusanov, Shtockmanov, Lunin, Astrachan and Orenburg. The gas reserves in these basins exceed 70 x 10[sup 12] m[sup 3] and about 65% of them concentrated in supergiant fields. Among the geological prerequisites for largest gas accumulations note big size of trap (Urengoi 40x300 km[sup 2]; Astrachan l80x200 km[sup 2]), anticline type of tectonic structure (swell, megaswell, dome, arch) with amplitude from 110 m to 800 in. These tectonic structure were active long time include the latest period. The main gas productive reservoirs are slightly consulted non-marine sandstones of Cenomanian or Middle Jurassic ages (West Siberia and Barents Sea) or Middle Carboniferous reef carbonate buildups (Northern Caspian basin). The next geochemical parameters controlled of the gas accumulation histories: (1) West Siberia and Barents Sea regions gas genetically connect with dispersed or concentrated non-marine coal type kerogen distributed into productive complex under lower maturity conditions (before or early oil window zone). This is dry gas almost pure methane with [delta][sup 13] C[sub 1] between -44,40[per thousand]. In this case we observe widely distributed mainly sandstones reservoirs at same time gas source rocks also; (2) the Northern Caspian basin found supergiant wet gas-condensate accumulations into local distributed reef carbonate buildups. Gas source rocks is marine kerogen type II, which has a low concentration in marlaceous facies. It is gas high maturity zone.

  17. Distribution of Liquid Flow Rates in the Process of Bubbling with Gas Through Gas-Permeable Inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Valuev, D. V.; Dariev, R. S.; Trifonov, V. A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2016-08-01

    The authors studied the distribution of the vertical components of the rate in the ascending gas-liquid flow when blowing through the bottom nozzle at two levels under three modes of neutral gas supply. It was estimated that under the intensities of gas (nitrogen) of 2 and 4 L/min-t the type of rates distribution in both cross-sections does not differ from the generally accepted one and practically does not depend upon the intensity of gas supply.

  18. The investigation of dangerous geological processes resulting in land subsidence while designing the main gas pipeline in South Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strokova, L. A.; Ermolaeva, A. V.; Golubeva, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    The number of gas main accidents has increased recently due to dangerous geological processes in underdeveloped areas located in difficult geological conditions. The paper analyses land subsidence caused by karst and thermokarst processes in the right of way, reveals the assessment criteria for geological hazards and creates zoning schemes considering the levels of karst and thermorkarst hazards.

  19. Distribution and toxicity of Alexandrium ostenfeldii (Dinophyceae) in the Gulf of Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribble, Kristin E.; Keafer, Bruce A.; Quilliam, Michael A.; Cembella, Allan D.; Kulis, David M.; Manahan, Abigail; Anderson, Donald M.

    2005-09-01

    Alexandrium ostenfeldii is a thecate, mixotrophic dinoflagellate recently linked to a novel suite of toxins called spirolides. This study provides the first description of the regional distribution of A. ostenfeldii in the Gulf of Maine (GOM), and the first report and analysis of spirolide toxicity in A. ostenfeldii in waters south of Nova Scotia. Morphological examination of cells in field samples and of clonal cultures isolated from several stations in the GOM confirmed the presence of A. ostenfeldii. A genus-specific antibody probe, and an A. ostenfeldii species-specific oligonucleotide probe labeled these cells; a probe specific for the North American A. fundyense/tamarense/catenella species complex did not label A. ostenfeldii cells. Cell size ranged from 20 to nearly 90 μm, and most cells contained food vacuoles, with a total vacuole size from 1 to 48 μm. The hydrographic forcings controlling the distribution of A. ostenfeldii in the GOM are quite similar to those acting on the A. fundyense population at the same time of the year. The highest concentrations of A. ostenfeldii were observed nearshore, to the east of Penobscot Bay, at times with an offshore-turning branch of high cell concentration to the south of Penobscot Bay. Casco Bay appears to be an area of accumulation for A. ostenfeldii cells advected toward shore from the core of the population to the northeast. Concentrations of A. ostenfeldii were generally higher at the surface than deeper, except at locations where the pooling of lower-salinity water at the surface may have led to the subduction of the population flowing in from the east. PSP toxins were detected in field populations containing A. ostenfeldii and A. fundyense, but not in A. ostenfeldii cultures isolated from the GOM. Spirolide toxins were found in 36 of 60 field samples. More than 83% of samples containing A. ostenfeldii cells had one or more of spirolide congeners A, B, C2 and D2. The total concentration of spirolides per cell at

  20. Genetic algorithm to optimize the design of main combustor and gas generator in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Min; Ko, Sangho; Koo, Jaye

    2014-06-01

    A genetic algorithm was used to develop optimal design methods for the regenerative cooled combustor and fuel-rich gas generator of a liquid rocket engine. For the combustor design, a chemical equilibrium analysis was applied, and the profile was calculated using Rao's method. One-dimensional heat transfer was assumed along the profile, and cooling channels were designed. For the gas-generator design, non-equilibrium properties were derived from a counterflow analysis, and a vaporization model for the fuel droplet was adopted to calculate residence time. Finally, a genetic algorithm was adopted to optimize the designs. The combustor and gas generator were optimally designed for 30-tonf, 75-tonf, and 150-tonf engines. The optimized combustors demonstrated superior design characteristics when compared with previous non-optimized results. Wall temperatures at the nozzle throat were optimized to satisfy the requirement of 800 K, and specific impulses were maximized. In addition, the target turbine power and a burned-gas temperature of 1000 K were obtained from the optimized gas-generator design.

  1. Momentum distribution function of the electron gas at metallic densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami; Yasuhara, H.

    1991-10-01

    The momentum distribution function n(k) of the electron gas is calculated in the effective-potential-expansion method at metallic densities. The recently established self-consistency relation between n(k) and the correlation energy [Y. Takada and T. Kita, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 25 (1991)] is employed to check the accuracy of our results. This check shows that the effective-potential-expansion method provides probably the exact and at least more accurate results of n(k) than all the other methods that have given n(k) thus far.

  2. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    It is not widely acknowledged or appreciated that conventional, two-stage light-gas launchers do not efficiently apply their high breech pressures to the design intent: accelerating the projectile. Our objective in this project was to carry out the analysis, design, construction, and testing of a new class of launchers that will address this limitation. Our particular application is to expand the pressure range of the conventional, two-stage gas launcher to overlap and validate the pressure regimes previously attainable only with shock waves generated by nuclear explosions, lasers, or multistage conventional explosions. That is, these launchers would have the capability to conduct--in a laboratory setting--high-velocity-impact, equation-of-state (EOS) measurements at up to 2-TPa (20 Mbar) pressure levels in high-Z materials. Our design entailed a new class of distributed-injection, gas-dynamic launchers that are designed to use a boat-tail projectile to overcome the fundamental gas-expansion phenomena known as escape velocity (the Riemann limit). Our program included analytical, numerical, and experimental studies of the fast gas release flow technique that is central to the success of our approach. The analyses led us to believe that, in a typical configuration, the pressure will be effectively applied to the projectile in a time short relative to its few-microsecond traverse time; the experimental program we conducted during FY1999 supported these estimates. In addition, our program revealed dramatic increased efficiency in this process that was previously unknown to the launcher community. The most fundamental practical restrictions on the performance of any gas launcher are the ability of the launcher to (1) contain pressure in a reservoir, and (2) effectively apply that pressure to the base of a moving projectile. Our gas-release test-fixture experiments showed that our design was capable of applying nearly twice the pressure to the projectile that is

  3. The variation in molecular gas depletion time among nearby galaxies: what are the main parameter dependences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Ling; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2014-09-01

    We re-analyse correlations between global molecular gas depletion time (tdep) and galaxy parameters for nearby galaxies from the COLD GASS survey. We improve on previous work of Saintonge et al. by estimating star formation rates using the combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer 22 μm data and by deriving tdep within a fixed aperture set by the beam size of gas observation. In our new study, we find correlations with much smaller scatter. Dependences of the depletion time on galaxy structural parameters such as stellar surface density and concentration index are now weak or absent. We demonstrate that the primary global parameter correlation is between tdep and specific star formation rate (sSFR); all other remaining correlations can be shown to be induced by this primary dependence. This implies that galaxies with high current-to-past-averaged star formation activity, will drain their molecular gas reservoir sooner. We then analyse tdep on 1 kpc scales in galactic discs using data from the HERA CO-Line Extragalactic Survey survey. There is remarkably good agreement between the global tdep-sSFR relation for the COLD GASS galaxies and that derived for 1 kpc scale grids in discs. This leads to the conclusion that the local molecular gas depletion time in galactic discs is dependent on the local fraction of young-to-old stars.

  4. The confinement of star-forming galaxies into a main sequence through episodes of gas compaction, depletion and replenishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacchella, Sandro; Dekel, Avishai; Carollo, C. Marcella; Ceverino, Daniel; DeGraf, Colin; Lapiner, Sharon; Mandelker, Nir; Primack Joel, R.

    2016-04-01

    Using cosmological simulations, we address the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs) across their main sequence (MS) in the plane of star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass. We relate them to the evolution of galaxies through phases of gas compaction, depletion, possible replenishment, and eventual quenching. We find that the high-SFR galaxies in the upper envelope of the MS are compact, with high gas fractions and short depletion times (`blue nuggets'), while the lower SFR galaxies in the lower envelope have lower central gas densities, lower gas fractions, and longer depletion times, consistent with observed gradients across the MS. Stellar-structure gradients are negligible. The SFGs oscillate about the MS ridge on time-scales ˜0.4tHubble (˜1 Gyr at z ˜ 3). The propagation upwards is due to gas compaction, triggered, e.g. by mergers, counter-rotating streams, and/or violent disc instabilities. The downturn at the upper envelope is due to central gas depletion by peak star formation and outflows while inflow from the shrunken gas disc is suppressed. An upturn at the lower envelope can occur once the extended disc has been replenished by fresh gas and a new compaction can be triggered, namely as long as the replenishment time is shorter than the depletion time. The mechanisms of gas compaction, depletion, and replenishment confine the SFGs to the narrow (±0.3 dex) MS. Full quenching occurs in massive haloes (Mvir > 1011.5 M⊙) and/or at low redshifts (z < 3), where the replenishment time is long compared to the depletion time, explaining the observed bending down of the MS at the massive end.

  5. Method of fabricating an integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1988-03-22

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  6. Integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-03-19

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  7. The BLUEDISK Survey: molecular gas distribution and scaling relations in the context of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, D.; Bigiel, F.; Wang, J.; Pety, J.; Usero, A.; Roychowdhury, S.; Carton, D.; Hulst, J. M. van der; Józsa, G. I. G.; García, M. Gonzalez; Saintonge, A.

    2016-08-01

    One of the key goals of the BLUEDISK survey is to characterize the impact of gas accretion in disc galaxies in the context of galaxy evolution. It contains 50 disc galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010 - 1011 M⊙, of which half are bluer and more H I-rich galaxies than their H I-normal (control) counterparts. In this paper, we investigate how ongoing disc growth affects the molecular gas distribution and the star-formation efficiency in these galaxies. We present 12CO observations from the IRAM 30-m telescope in 26 galaxies of the BLUEDISK survey. We compare the amount and spatial distribution of the molecular gas to key quantities such as atomic gas, stellar mass and surface density, star-formation rate and metallicity. We analyse the star-formation rate per unit gas (SFR/H I and SFR/H2) and relate all those parameters to general galaxy properties (H I-rich/control disc, morphology, etc.). We find that the H I-rich galaxies have similar H2 masses as the control galaxies. In their centres, H I-rich galaxies have lower H2/H I ratios and marginally shorter molecular gas depletion times. However, the main differences between the two samples occur in the outer parts of the discs, with the H I-rich galaxies having slightly smaller CO discs (relative to the optical radius R25) and steeper CO and metallicity gradients than the control galaxies. The ongoing accretion of H I at large radii has thus not led to an appreciable growth of the CO discs in our sample. Based on depletion times, we estimate that this gas will contribute to star formation on time-scales of at least 5 Gyr.

  8. Gas and dust in the pre-main-sequence multiple system GG Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerner, D. W.; Sargent, A. I.; Beckwith, S. V. W.

    1993-01-01

    We present 1.4 and 2.7 mm aperture synthesis maps of the gas and dust continuum emission around GG Tauri, a very young component of a premain-sequence multiple star system; both GG Tau and its apparent companion, GG Tau/c, at 1500 AU separation, are themselves binaries. At 1.4 mm, dust continuum emission of about 750 AU in extent is associated with GG Tau, and a secondary peak is near GG Tau/c. Spectral line images reveal gaseous structure around GG Tau, elongated along the GG Tau-GG Tau/c axis. There is some suggestion that the gas associated with GG Tau/c alone is extended in a different direction. Marked changes in the morphology and velocity structure of the molecular emission near GG Tau/c also indicate that this system is differently oriented. Clumps between the two systems may be vestiges of a connecting bar. GG Tau and GG Tau/c appear to have originated in a common cloud; their different systemic orientations suggest that they formed from an initially prolate cloud rather than from an extensive and highly flattened disk.

  9. [Distribution of fine root biomass of main planting tree species in Loess Plateau, China].

    PubMed

    Jian, Sheng-Qi; Zhao, Chuan-Yan; Fang, Shu-Min; Yu, Kai

    2014-07-01

    The distribution of fine roots of Pinus tabuliformis, Populus tomentosa, Prunus armeniaca, Robinia pseudoacacia, Hippophae rhamnoides, and Caragana korshinskii was investigated by using soil core method and the fine root was defined as root with diameter less than 2 mm. The soil moisture and soil properties were measured. The results showed that in the horizontal direction, the distribution of fine root biomass of P. tabuliformis presented a conic curve, and the fine root biomass of the other species expressed logarithm correlation. Radial roots developed, the fine root biomass were concentrated within the scope of the 2-3 times crown, indicating that trees extended their roots laterally to seek water farther from the tree. In the vertical direction, the fine root biomass decreased with the increasing soil depth. Fine root biomass had significant negative correlation with soil water content and bulk density, while significant positive correlation with organic matter and total N contents.

  10. [Vertical distribution of main species captured by tuna longline fishery in the southeast Pacific Ocean].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-bo; Dai, Xiao-jie; Zhu, Jiang-feng; Gao, Chun-xia; Wu, Feng; Zheng, Xiao-chun

    2015-03-01

    Information of vertical distribution of longline-hook species is important for the development of effective measures to mitigate bycatch, and very helpful for better understanding of the oceanic ecosystem structure and implementation of ecosystem-based fisheries management. Based on depth data of longline hook and capture hook position of pelagic species, collected by on board scientific observer in the southeast Pacific Ocean from September 2013 to January 2014, shoaling rate of longline hook and vertical distribution of 14 pelagic species were analyzed. The results showed that the relative shoaling rate range of longline hook was 8.9% - 17.1%, and the average relative shoaling rate was 13.5%. The depth ranges of 14 capture species were different. The species with the deepest depth was Opah (Lampris guttatus), and the species with the shallowest depth was skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis). Except for yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax), the mean depth and depth distributions of bycatch species were significantly different from that of the targeted albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga).

  11. [Vertical distribution of main species captured by tuna longline fishery in the southeast Pacific Ocean].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-bo; Dai, Xiao-jie; Zhu, Jiang-feng; Gao, Chun-xia; Wu, Feng; Zheng, Xiao-chun

    2015-03-01

    Information of vertical distribution of longline-hook species is important for the development of effective measures to mitigate bycatch, and very helpful for better understanding of the oceanic ecosystem structure and implementation of ecosystem-based fisheries management. Based on depth data of longline hook and capture hook position of pelagic species, collected by on board scientific observer in the southeast Pacific Ocean from September 2013 to January 2014, shoaling rate of longline hook and vertical distribution of 14 pelagic species were analyzed. The results showed that the relative shoaling rate range of longline hook was 8.9% - 17.1%, and the average relative shoaling rate was 13.5%. The depth ranges of 14 capture species were different. The species with the deepest depth was Opah (Lampris guttatus), and the species with the shallowest depth was skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis). Except for yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax), the mean depth and depth distributions of bycatch species were significantly different from that of the targeted albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga). PMID:26211076

  12. Spectral class distribution of circumstellar material in main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed statistical evaluation of IRAS survey data of main-sequence stars within 25 pc indicates that the presence of cool shells around A, F, and G main-sequence stars is the rule, rather than the exception. While luminosity bias favors A and F stars, the typical G star still appears to have almost three orders of magnitude more excess than the excess of the solar system due to known zodiacal dust and all planets combined. The Vega effect is thus not restricted to stars of particularly young age. The finding that the 'archetypical' solar system appears to have much less far-IR excess than the majority of G stars supports a speculation that the sun could have a cloud of cold particles beyond the outer planets, undetected by IRAS viewing from earth.

  13. [Species composition and main populations spatial distribution pattern in Korean pine broadleaved forest in Xiaoxing' An Mountains of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Hou, Hong-Ya; Wang, Li-Hai

    2013-11-01

    Taking the Korean pine broadleaved forest in Liangshui Nature Reserve of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China as test object, this paper studied the species composition and diameter class structure, and by using point pattern analysis, analyzed the spatial distribution pattern and spatial association of the main populations. In the Reserve, there were a total of 16 species with diameter greater than 1 cm in tree layer, and great differences were observed in the densities of main populations. Coniferous trees such as Pinus koraiensis and Abies nephrolepis were dominant. The diameter class structure of the populations presented as an inverse "J" curve, indicating a good regeneration across the community. The main populations were mostly in aggregated distribution pattern, except that the P. koraiensis populations at the scales of 19-21 m and 44 m as well as the Acer tegmentosum populations close to the largest research scale were in random distribution. The P. koraiensis populations at all research scales were approximately in random distribution, and had the minimum aggregation. A. nephrolepis, Tilia amurensis, and A. tegmentosum populations all presented a random distribution trend. Except that the P. koraiensis and A. nephrolepis at 2-3 m scale and the A. nephrolepis and A. tegmentosum populations at 37-81 m scale had significant positive association, no significant associations were observed between other populations. All the tree species presented an overall non-significant positive association. PMID:24564130

  14. 77 FR 28374 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on April 30, 2012, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas) filed a revised Statement of Operating...

  15. Real gas properties and Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel turbine performance prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The H2/H2O mixture thermodynamic and transport properties variations for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuel turbine over a range of temperatures and pressures are examined. The variation of molecular viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, and Prandtl number for the hydrogen/steam mixture are fitted using polynominal relationships for future turbine performance use. The mixture property variations are calculated using GASP and WASP computer programs. The air equivalent performance of the SSME fuel turbine is computed.

  16. Kinetic Equation for Two-Particle Distribution Function in Boltzmann Gas Mixtures and Equation of Motion for Quasiparticle Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saveliev, V. L.

    2011-05-01

    Pair collisions is the main interaction process in the Boltzmann gas dynamics. By making use of exactly the same physical assumptions as was used by Ludwig Boltzmann we write the kinetic equation for two-particle distribution function of molecules in the gas mixtures. Instead of the collision integral, there are the linear scattering operator and the chaos projector in the right part of this equation. Because the scattering operator is more simple then Boltzmann collision integral this equation opens new opportunities for mathematical description of the Boltzmann gas dynamics.

  17. Main differences between volatiles of sparkling and base wines accessed through comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection and chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    Welke, Juliane Elisa; Zanus, Mauro; Lazzarotto, Marcelo; Pulgati, Fernando Hepp; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz

    2014-12-01

    The main changes in the volatile profile of base wines and their corresponding sparkling wines produced by traditional method were evaluated and investigated for the first time using headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection (GC×GC/TOFMS) and chemometric tools. Fisher ratios helped to find the 119 analytes that were responsible for the main differences between base and sparkling wines and principal component analysis explained 93.1% of the total variance related to the selected 78 compounds. It was also possible to observe five subclusters in base wines and four subclusters in sparkling wines samples through hierarchical cluster analysis, which seemed to have an organised distribution according to the regions where the wines came from. Twenty of the most important volatile compounds co-eluted with other components and separation of some of them was possible due to GC×GC/TOFMS performance.

  18. Potential effects of climate change on the distribution range of the main silicate sinker of the Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pinkernell, Stefan; Beszteri, Bánk

    2014-01-01

    Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, a dominant diatom species throughout the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, is coined to be one of the main drivers of the biological silicate pump. Here, we study the distribution of this important species and expected consequences of climate change upon it, using correlative species distribution modeling and publicly available presence-only data. As experience with SDM is scarce for marine phytoplankton, this also serves as a pilot study for this organism group. We used the maximum entropy method to calculate distribution models for the diatom F. kerguelensis based on yearly and monthly environmental data (sea surface temperature, salinity, nitrate and silicate concentrations). Observation data were harvested from GBIF and the Global Diatom Database, and for further analyses also from the Hustedt Diatom Collection (BRM). The models were projected on current yearly and seasonal environmental data to study current distribution and its seasonality. Furthermore, we projected the seasonal model on future environmental data obtained from climate models for the year 2100. Projected on current yearly averaged environmental data, all models showed similar distribution patterns for F. kerguelensis. The monthly model showed seasonality, for example, a shift of the southern distribution boundary toward the north in the winter. Projections on future scenarios resulted in a moderately to negligibly shrinking distribution area and a change in seasonality. We found a substantial bias in the publicly available observation datasets, which could be reduced by additional observation records we obtained from the Hustedt Diatom Collection. Present-day distribution patterns inferred from the models coincided well with background knowledge and previous reports about F. kerguelensis distribution, showing that maximum entropy-based distribution models are suitable to map distribution patterns for oceanic planktonic organisms. Our scenario projections indicate

  19. Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chih-Yuan; Diaz, Manuel; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-01

    The ideal quantum gas dynamics as manifested by the semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) equilibrium distribution derived in Wu et al. (Wu et al. 2012 Proc. R. Soc. A 468, 1799-1823 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0673)) is numerically studied for particles of three statistics. This anisotropic ES equilibrium distribution was derived using the maximum entropy principle and conserves the mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the standard Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein distribution. The present numerical method combines the discrete velocity (or momentum) ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock-capturing method in physical space. A decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. Computations of two-dimensional Riemann problems are presented, and various contours of the quantities unique to this ES model are illustrated. The main flow features, such as shock waves, expansion waves and slip lines and their complex nonlinear interactions, are depicted and found to be consistent with existing calculations for a classical gas. PMID:24399919

  20. Lithology and strontium distribution of De Queen limestone at main Highland Gypsum Quarry, Highland, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, T.A.; Ledger, E.B.; Sartin, A.A.

    1987-09-01

    The De Queen Limestone (Comanchean, Cretaceous) in the main Highland Gypsum quarry at Highland, Arkansas, consists of gypsum, limestone, and clastic sediments deposited along the landward margin of a broad, restricted, shallow lagoon. It grades downdip into the Ferry Lake Anhydrite. Gypsum, in the form of satin spar, selenite, and alabaster, is abundant in the lower part of the section. Limestones ranging from lime mudstones to grainstones contain fossil mollusks, ostracods, serpulid worm tubes, and foraminifera. The gypsum and limestone lithologies are interbedded with claystones and shales. Strontium concentration was determined on about 100 samples by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and was found to be controlled by diagenesis, not deposition. Strontium concentrations in the gypsum are likely controlled by the rate of recrystallization of secondary anhydrite. Levels of strontium in the limestones reflect the amount of celestite cement. The strontium content of the clastic beds correlates with the amount of strontium-rich microcrystals of strontianite, celestite, barite, and witherite.

  1. Distributed Nubia-Somalia relative motion and dike intrusion in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendick, R.; McClusky, S.; Bilham, R.; Asfaw, L.; Klemperer, S.

    2006-04-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) in central Ethiopia extended in the rift-normal direction at a mean rate of 4.0 +/- 0.9 mm yr-1 (1σ) during the period 1992-2003, nearly a factor of two slower than the opening rate estimated from global plate motion inversions. Rift opening near a geodetic array during this period was accommodated by a single dike injection event in 1993, spatially coincident with active magmatic segments, probably triggered by observed seismicity. Following dike injection, the crust in the rift relaxed as a layered medium, with a ~15-km-thick elastic lid over a viscous half space of 1018 Pa s. Diking, rather than normal faulting on rift-bounding faults, appears to be the predominant mechanism of extension in the MER, explaining the very low regional rates of moment release. The length scale and temporal behaviour of surface displacements require viscoelastic rheology in the rift.

  2. THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT OF z = 3 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: EVIDENCE OF A NON-EVOLVING GAS FRACTION IN MAIN-SEQUENCE GALAXIES AT z > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Daddi, E.; Sargent, M.; Elbaz, D.; Gobat, R.; Tan, Q.; Aussel, H.; Feruglio, C.; Charmandaris, V.; Dickinson, M.; Reddy, N.

    2012-10-10

    We present observations of the CO[J = 3 {yields} 2] emission toward two massive and infrared luminous Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 3.21 and z = 2.92, using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, placing first constraints on the molecular gas masses (M{sub gas}) of non-lensed LBGs. Their overall properties are consistent with those of typical (main-sequence) galaxies at their redshifts, with specific star formation rates {approx}1.6 and {approx}2.2 Gyr{sup -1}, despite their large infrared luminosities (L{sub IR} Almost-Equal-To (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) derived from Herschel. With one plausible CO detection (spurious detection probability of 10{sup -3}) and one upper limit, we investigate the evolution of the molecular gas-to-stellar mass ratio (M{sub gas}/M{sub *}) with redshift. Our data suggest that the steep evolution of M{sub gas}/M{sub *} of normal galaxies up to z {approx} 2 is followed by a flattening at higher redshifts, providing supporting evidence for the existence of a plateau in the evolution of the specific star formation rate at z > 2.5.

  3. Epipelic diatom spatial and temporal distribution and relationship with the main environmental parameters in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facca, C.; Sfriso, A.

    2007-10-01

    The benthic diatom abundance and taxonomic composition were investigated in the Venice lagoon to integrate the knowledge on the trophic food web of shallow coastal areas. Samples of surface sediment layer (ca. 1 cm) were collected and stored until inverted light microscope determination. One-year comparison was carried out in six sites with a monthly frequency. In summer 2003, sediment cores were also collected at 165 stations distributed throughout the whole lagoon. Abundance varied between 0.26 and 5.65 × 10 6 cells ml -1, whereas the Shannon diversity index ranged between 0.93 and 4.36 H' depending on seasonal and spatial variability. The seasonal variations were not correlated with water temperature, although it varied between 6 and 29 °C, but with nutrient concentrations, sediment re-suspension and grain size. The spatial fluctuations mostly were influenced by water turbidity. Amphora, Cocconeis, Navicula, Nitzschia and Thalassiosira were the most common genera. Thalassiosira sp. constituted an interesting case as it was quite abundant near the mainland and was correlated with nutrient concentrations. The community structure was investigated by applying univariate and multivariate statistical analysis such as cumulative dominance curves, cluster analysis and canonical correspondence analysis.

  4. Site inspection of gas mains by helical tomography (sight) phase I. Final report, June 1991-January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Keifer, K.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately 700,000 miles of buried gas pipes of varying sizes and materials exist day-to-day service. In most cases, the exact state of degradation of the mains is generally not known. This lack of information can result in leaks as well as wasted time locating the defect so that repairs can be made. Hence, a method of assessing the condition of gas mains and recording the data for future references and analysis is needed. With this capability, utilities can monitor the condition of mains and develop repair and/or replacement strategies. Phase 1 of the SIGHT contract produced good results on experiments that were designed to demonstrate the ability of a prototype ultrasonic sensor to `couple` ultrasonic energy from the transducer face to the pipe wall under test. This coupling was demonstrated while the sensor was moving over the surface of the material under test. Futher, it was shown that the coupling to steel and plastic pipe could take place without the use of liquid or grease between the transducer and the material-under-test.

  5. Nucleopolyhedrovirus detection and distribution in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitats of Appledore Island, Gulf of Maine.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Ian; Brown, Julia M; Gitlin, Shari A; Doud, Devin F

    2011-07-01

    Viruses in aquatic ecosystems comprise those produced by both autochthonous and allochthonous host taxa. However, there is little information on the diversity and abundance of viruses of allochthonous origin, particularly from non-anthropogenic sources, in freshwater and marine ecosystems. We investigated the presence of nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPV) (Baculovirus), which commonly infect terrestrial lepidopteran taxa, across the landscape of Appledore Island, Gulf of Maine. PCR and qPCR primers were developed around a 294-bp fragment of the polyhedrin (polH) gene, which is the major constituent protein of NPV multivirion polyhedral occlusion bodies. polH was successfully amplified from several aquatic habitats, and recovered polH sequences were most similar to known lepidopteran NPV. Using quantitative PCR designed around a cluster of detected sequences, we detected polH in Appledore Island soils, supratidal freshwater ponds, nearshore sediments, near- and offshore plankton, and in floatsam. This diverse set of locations suggests that NPVs are widely dispersed along the terrestrial--marine continuum and that free polyhedra may be washed into ponds and eventually to sea. The putative hosts of detected NPVs were webworms (Hyphantria sp.) which form dense nests in late summer on the dominant Appledore Island vegetation (Prunus virginiana). Our data indicate that viruses of terrestrial origin (i.e., allochthonous viruses) may be dispersed widely in coastal marine habitats. The dispersal of NPV polH and detection within offshore net plankton (>64 μm) demonstrates that terrestrial viruses may interact with larger particles and plankton of coastal marine ecosystem, which further suggests that viral genomic information may be transported between biomes.

  6. Development of colorless distributed combustion for gas turbine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arghode, Vaibhav Kumar

    Colorless Distributed Combustion (CDC) is investigated for gas turbine engine application due to its benefit for ultra-low pollutant emission, improved pattern factor, low noise emission, stable combustion and low pressure drop, alleviation of combustion instabilities and increased life of turbine blades with less air cooling requirements. The CDC is characterized by discrete and direct injection of fuel and air at high velocity and the reaction zone is stabilized due to controlled aerodynamics inside the combustor and wider (radially) shear layer mixing. Mixing between the injected air and product gases to form hot and diluted oxidant is required followed by rapid mixing with the fuel. This results in distributed reaction zone instead of a concentrated flame front as observed in conventional diffusion flames and hence, to avoid hot spot regions and provide reduced NOx and CO emissions. The focus of this dissertation is to develop and demonstrate CDC for application to stationary gas turbine combustors which generally operate at thermal intensity of 15MW/m3-atm. However, higher thermal intensity is desirable to reduce hardware costs due to smaller weight and volume of the combustors. Design of high thermal intensity CDC combustor requires careful control of critical parameters, such as, gas recirculation, fuel/oxidizer mixing and residence time characteristics via careful selection of different air and fuel injection configurations to achieve desirable combustion characteristics. This dissertation examines sequential development of low emission colorless distributed combustor operating from thermal intensity of 5MW/m3-atm up to 198MW/m3-atm. Initially, various fuel and air injection configurations were investigated at a low thermal intensity of 5MW/m 3-atm. Further investigations were performed for a simpler combustor having single air and fuel injection ports for medium thermal intensity range of 28-57MW/m3-atm. Among the flow configurations investigated, reverse

  7. Study of a distributed feedback diode laser based hygrometer combined Herriot-gas cell and waterless optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Chang, Jun; Lian, Jie; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A distributed feedback diode laser (DFB-DL) based hygrometer combined with a long-path-length Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components was proposed and investigated. The main function of this sensor was to simultaneously improve the measurement reliability and resolution. A comparison test between a 10-cm normal transmission-type gas cell and a 3-m Herriot gas cell was carried out to demonstrate the improvement. Reliability improvement was achieved by influence suppression of water vapor inside optical components (WVOC) through combined action of the Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components. The influence of WVOC was suppressed from 726 ppmv to 25 ppmv using the Herriot gas cell. Moreover, combined with waterless optical components, the influence of WVOC was further suppressed to no more than 4 ppmv. Resolution improvement from 11.7 ppmv to 0.32 ppmv was achieved mainly due to the application of the long-path-length Herriot gas cell. The results show that the proposed sensor has a good performance and considerable potential application in gas sensing, especially when probed gas possibly permeates into optical components.

  8. Structural and mechanical defects of materials of offshore and onshore main gas pipelines after long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruschak, Pavlo; Panin, Sergey; Danyliuk, Iryna; Poberezhnyi, Lyubomyr; Pyrig, Taras; Bishchak, Roman; Vlasov, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    The study has established the main regularities of a fatigue failure of offshore gas steel pipes installed using S-lay and J-lay methods.We have numerically analyzed the influence of preliminary deformation on the fatigue life of 09Mn2Si steel at different amplitudes of cyclic loading. The results have revealed the regularities of formation and development of a fatigue crack in 17Mn1Si steel after 40 years of underground operation. The quantitative analysis describes the regularities of occurrence and growth of fatigue cracks in the presence of a stress concentration.

  9. Anisotropies in the HI gas distribution toward 3C 196

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The local Galactic Hi gas was found to contain cold neutral medium (CNM) filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission. These filaments appear to be dominated by the magnetic field and in this case turbulence is expected to show distinct anisotropies. Aims: We use the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn Hi Survey (EBHIS) to derive 2D turbulence spectra for the Hi distribution in direction to 3C 196 and two more comparison fields. Methods: Prior to Fourier transform we apply a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window to apodize the data. We derive average as well as position angle dependent power spectra. Anisotropies in the power distribution are defined as the ratio of the spectral power in orthogonal directions. Results: We find strong anisotropies. For a narrow range in position angle, in direction perpendicular to the filaments and the magnetic field, the spectral power is on average more than an order of magnitude larger than parallel. In the most extreme case the anisotropy reaches locally a factor of 130. Anisotropies increase on average with spatial frequency as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995, ApJ, 438, 763), at the same time the Kolmogorov spectral index remains almost unchanged. The strongest anisotropies are observable for a narrow range in velocity and decay with a power law index close to -8/3, almost identical to the average isotropic spectral index of -2.9 <γ< -2.6. Conclusions: Hi filaments, associated with linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations in direction to 3C 196, show turbulence spectra with marked anisotropies. Decaying anisotropies appear to indicate that we witness an ongoing shock passing the Hi and affecting the observed Faraday depth.

  10. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into

  11. Effect of solids concentration distribution on the flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Zhang; Changfu You; Haiying Qi; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu

    2006-06-15

    A dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process at 600-800{sup o}C was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. Various fresh sorbent distribution types and internal structures were modeled numerically to investigate their effect on the gas-solid flow and sulfate reaction characteristics. Experimental results show that, after the fresh sorbent supply was stopped, the desulfurization efficiency declined rapidly even though the sorbent recirculation was maintained. Therefore, the fresh sorbent is the main contributor to the desulfurization process and the primary effect of the recirculated sorbent was to evenly distribute the fresh sorbent and to prolong the sorbent particle residence time. The numerical results demonstrate that the desulfurization efficiency varied greatly for the various fresh sorbent bottom injection methods. The desulfurization efficiency of the bottom-even injection method was 1.5 times that of the bottom two-sided injection method. Internal structures effectively improved the fresh sorbent solids concentration distribution and the desulfurization efficiency. Optimized internal structures increased the desulfurization efficiency of the bottom two-sided injection method by 46%, so that it was very close to that of the bottom-even injection method with only a 4.6% difference. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Geochemical constraints on the distribution of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W.; Lorenson, T.; Winters, W.; Dougherty, J.

    2005-01-01

    Gas hydrates are common within near-seafloor sediments immediately surrounding fluid and gas venting sites on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico. However, the distribution of gas hydrates within sediments away from the vents is poorly documented, yet critical for gas hydrate assessments. Porewater chloride and sulfate concentrations, hydrocarbon gas compositions, and geothermal gradients obtained during a porewater geochemical survey of the northern Gulf of Mexico suggest that the lack of bottom simulating reflectors in gas-rich areas of the gulf may be the consequence of elevated porewater salinity, geothermal gradients, and microbial gas compositions in sediments away from fault conduits. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  13. Determination of the main parameters of the cyclone separator of the flue gas produced during the smelting of secondary aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Gavlas, Stanislav

    2016-06-01

    One way how is possible to separate the solid particulate pollutants from the flue gas is use the cyclone separators. The cyclone separators are very frequently used separators due to the simplicity of their design and their low operating costs. Separation of pollutants in the form of solids is carried out using three types of forces: inertia force, centrifugal force, gravity force. The main advantage is that cyclone consist of the parts which are resistant to wear and have long life time, e.g. various rotating and sliding parts. Mostly are used as pre-separators, because they have low efficiency in the separation of small particles. Their function is to separate larger particles from the flue gases which are subsequently cleaned in the other device which is capable of removing particles smaller than 1 µm, which is limiting size of particle separation. The article will deal with the issue of calculating the basic dimensions and main parameters of the cyclone separator from flue gas produced during the smelting of secondary aluminum.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and

  15. Gas and dust hydrodynamical simulations of massive lopsided transition discs - I. Gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Baruteau, Clément

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by lopsided structures observed in some massive transition discs, we have carried out 2D numerical simulations to study vortex structure in massive discs, including the effects of disc self-gravity and the indirect force which is due to the displacement of the central star from the barycentre of the system by the lopsided structure. When only the indirect force is included, we confirm the finding by Mittal & Chiang that the vortex becomes stronger and can be more than two pressure scale heights wide, as long as the disc-to-star mass ratio is ≳1 per cent. Such wide vortices can excite strong density waves in the disc and therefore migrate inwards rapidly. However, when disc self-gravity is also considered in simulations, self-gravity plays a more prominent role on the vortex structure. We confirm that when the disc Toomre Q parameter is smaller than π/(2h), where h is the disc's aspect ratio, the vortices are significantly weakened and their inward migration slows down dramatically. Most importantly, when the disc is massive enough (e.g. Q ˜ 3), we find that the lopsided gas structure orbits around the star at a speed significantly slower than the local Keplerian speed. This sub-Keplerian pattern speed can lead to the concentration of dust particles at a radius beyond the lopsided gas structure (as shown in Paper II). Overall, disc self-gravity regulates the vortex structure in massive discs and the radial shift between the gas and dust distributions in vortices within massive discs may be probed by future observations.

  16. 77 FR 10490 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 14, 2012, SourceGas Distribution LLC submitted a revised baseline filing of their Statement of...

  17. 78 FR 10261 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for the revision of the gas distribution annual report... Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000, (65 FR 19477) or visit...

  18. 75 FR 51032 - National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing August 12, 2010. Take notice that on August 10, 2010, National fuel Gas Distribution Corporation submitted...

  19. [Distribution characteristics of phthalic acid esters in soils and peanut kernels in main peanut producing areas of Shandong Province, China].

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming-Ming; Wang, Kai-Rong; Wang, Lin-Lin; Shi, Yan-Xi

    2013-12-01

    Surface soil (0-20 cm) and peanut kernel samples were collected in four main peanut producing areas of Shandong Province, and the contents of six PAEs chemicals that classified by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants were determined by gas chromatography (GC). The results indicated that the total concentration of six PAEs (sigma PAEs) ranged from 0.34 to 2.81 mg x kg(-1), and the mean was 1.22 mg x kg(-1). In four different areas, the order of sigmaPAEs concentration in soil was hilly area of middle southern Shandong > western plain of Shandong > Jiaodong Peninsula > northern plain of Shandong. The concentration of DBP in four main peanut producing areas of Shandong Province seriously exceeded the control limit in USA. The content of PAEs ranged from 0.17 to 0.66 mg x kg(-1) in peanut kernels, with the average value 0.34 mg x kg(-1) which was less than the suggested targets in USA and Europe and of low health risk. DEHP and DBP were the main components of PAEs both in soils and peanut kernels, with higher percentage content and detection rate. The sigma PAEs contents in soils or peanut kernels under plastic mulching were significantly higher than that of open field cultivation pattern. The PAEs concentrations in peanut kernels and soils had significant correlation, with the Pearson coefficient 0. 786 (sigma PAEs), 0.747 (DBP) and 0.511 (DEHP), respectively.

  20. Mapping the Distribution of Taxonomies and Mineralogies in the Asteroid Main Belt Using the SDSS MOC4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, Daniela; Carvano, J.; Hasselmann, P. A.; Mothé-Diniz, T.

    2009-09-01

    In the present work we define a taxonomic scheme based on the SDSS colors [1] that seeks to be compatible with previous taxonomic schemes based on spectroscopic data [2,3]. This taxonomy is then applied to the asteroids listed on the forth release of the SDSS Moving Object Catalogue (MOC4) and to meteorite spectra from the RELAB database. These results are then used to analyze the distributions of taxonomies in the Main Asteroid Belt and, based on it, make inferences about the distribution of mineralogies. We also use the large number of asteroids that were observed multiple times in the MOC4 to analyze the issue of taxonomic variations among observations. Since no conclusions about mineralogy can be draw based solely on taxonomy, the ultimate goal here is to identify interesting targets for NIR spectroscopic follow up. [1] Ivezic et al., AJ 122, 2749 (2001) [2] Tholen and Barucci, Asteroids II, (1989) [3] Bus and Binzel, Icarus 158, 146 (2002)

  1. How is Order 636 affecting the gas distribution industry

    SciTech Connect

    Margossian, K.M. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper is part of a six part series on how interstate gas pipelines have been affected by Order 636. These papers are written in an interview format with different individuals representing the pipeline, natural gas, utility, and regulatory side of this new regulation. The issues deal with how it has affected these industries; how the relationships have changed between suppliers, marketers, distributors, etc.; the risks now involved in marketing, shipping, and buying gas products; and new technology developments have resulted to comply with the new regulations. This paper is an interview with Kenneth M. Magossian, president and chief operating officer of Commonwealth Gas Co. and Hopkinton LNG Corp.

  2. Effects of YORP-induced rotational fission on the small size end of the Main Belt asteroid size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Alessandro; Jacobson, S.; Marzari, F.; Scheeres, D.; Davis, D. R.

    2013-10-01

    From the results of a comprehensive asteroid population evolution model, we conclude that the YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis has strong repercussions for the small size end of the Main Belt asteroid size frequency distribution. These results are consistent with observed asteroid population statistics. The foundation of this model is the asteroid rotation model of Marzari et al. (2011), which incorporates both the YORP effect and collisional evolution. This work adds to that model the rotational fission hypothesis (i.e. when the rotation rate exceeds a critical value, erosion and binary formation occur). The YORP effect timescale for large asteroids with diameters D > ~6 km is longer than the collision timescale in the Main Belt, thus the frequency of large asteroids is determined by a collisional equilibrium (e.g. Bottke 2005), but for small asteroids with diameters D < ~6 km, the asteroid population evolution model confirms that YORP-induced rotational fission destroys small asteroids more frequently than collisions. Therefore, the frequency of these small asteroids is determined by an equilibrium between the creation of new asteroids out of the impact debris of larger asteroids and the destruction of these asteroids by YORP-induced rotational fission. By introducing a new source of destruction that varies strongly with size, YORP-induced rotational fission alters the slope of the size frequency distribution. Using the outputs of the asteroid population evolution model and a 1-D collision evolution model, we can generate this new size frequency distribution and it matches the change in slope observed by the SKADS survey (Gladman 2009). This agreement is achieved with both an accretional power-law or a truncated “Asteroids were Born Big” size frequency distribution (Weidenschilling 2010, Morbidelli 2009).

  3. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Seya, A.; Asano, A.

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  4. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Richard J.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hester, J. Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals.

  5. Power-law distributions for a trapped ion interacting with a classical buffer gas.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Ralph G

    2009-02-13

    Classical collisions with an ideal gas generate non-Maxwellian distribution functions for a single ion in a radio frequency ion trap. The distributions have power-law tails whose exponent depends on the ratio of buffer gas to ion mass. This provides a statistical explanation for the previously observed transition from cooling to heating. Monte Carlo results approximate a Tsallis distribution over a wide range of parameters and have ab initio agreement with experiment. PMID:19257583

  6. Concentration and distribution of platinum group elements (Pt, Pd, Rh) in airborne particulate matter in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

    PubMed

    Zereini, Fathi; Alt, Friedrich; Messerschmidt, Jürge; von Bohlen, Alex; Liebl, Karlheinz; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2004-03-15

    The concentrations and distribution of platinum group elements (Pt, Pd, Rh) in airborne particulate matter were studied in a period of one year from August 2001 to July 2002 in urban and in nonurban areas. Airborne dust samples were collected as a total amount (particles with an aerodynamic diameter <22 microm) and classified using an eight-stage Andersen impactor (<10 microm) at three locations with different traffic density roads in the Frankfurt am Main and nonurban areas. Sampling at the three locations was performed simultaneously for total airborne dust and fractionated airborne dust. Pd was determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence after Hg coprecipitation. Pt and Rh were analyzed by adsorptive striping voltammetry after HPA digestion. The results show that the PGE concentrations in airborne samples depend on the traffic density. The highest PGE concentrations in air were found in the vicinity of major roads with heavy traffic, and the lowest ones were found in the nonurban area. The presence of PGE at the sampling station relatively free of traffic in a nonurban area hints to a transport of some of the emitted PGE from the city to this station by wind. At all three sampling locations, a heterogeneous distribution of the Pd, Pt, and Rh concentrations during the sampling year can be observed. The sum of PGE concentrations in total airborne dust is comparable with the sum of impactor samples. However, the concentration of Pt and Rh in total airborne dust (<22 microm) is on average higher than in impactor samples (<10 microm). On the contrary, Pd concentration is higher in impactor samples in most cases. The airborne PGE distribution is dominated by Pt, followed by Pd and Rh. The impactor samples are dominated by Pd, followed by Pt and Rh. This fact indicates that palladium occurs mainly in relatively fine airborne particles. The main fraction of PGE is found on average in particle sizes between 1.1 and 4.7 microm. Knowledge of the size distribution of

  7. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields and the distribution of tight sandstone gas in the eastern Ordos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bingqiang; Zhang, Huaan; Zhang, Chunguan; Xu, Haihong; Yan, Yunkui

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform gas exploration and determine the distribution pattern of gas in the Yanchang Oil Field in the eastern part of the North Shaanxi Slope, Ordos Basin, China, gravity and magnetic survey data were systemically collated, processed and interpreted in combination with the drilling data and recent seismic data. The genesis of gravity and magnetic anomalies and the relationship between the characteristics of the gravity and magnetic fields and known gas distribution were explored in order to predict the favourable exploration targets for gas. Gravity anomalies resulted both from the lateral variation in density of the basement rock and lateral lithologic transformation in the sedimentary cover. The regional magnetic anomalies were mainly caused by the basement metamorphic rocks and the residual magnetic anomalies may reflect the amount and general location of the volcanic materials in the overlying strata. The residual gravity and magnetic anomalies generated by high-density sandstone and high content of volcanics in the gas reservoir of the upper Paleozoic distorted and deformed the anomaly curves when they were stacked onto the primary background anomaly. The gas wells were generally found to be located in the anomaly gradient zones, or the distorted part of contour lines, and the flanks of high and low anomalies, or the transitional zones between anomaly highs and lows. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields provide significant information that can be used for guidance when exploring the distribution of gas. Based on these characteristics, five favourable areas for gas exploration were identified; these are quasi-equally spaced like a strip extending from the southeast to the northwest.

  8. Stratospheric Trace Gas Distributions from Far Infrared Thermal Emission Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing

    1987-09-01

    An inversion algorithm has been developed to retrieve stratospheric trace gas distributions from high resolution far infrared limb thermal emission spectral data. The algorithm follows an onion peel approach and employs a non-linear least-square-fit spectral analysis technique. The infrared radiative transfer model used to compute the spectrum is based on full line-by-line and layer-by-layer calculations and includes curvature and refraction effects. Finite instrument field of view effects have been studied. An inversion algorithm has also been developed to correct observation angles. The spectral measurements were made in the Balloon Intercomparison Campaign (BIC), October, 1982, using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The observed spectra have an unapodized spectral resolution of 0.0033 cm ^{-1}, and cover the spectral region between 20-100 cm^{-1}. Spectral data for selected limb sequences have been calibrated. The instrument line shape function has been empirically determined. The observation angles of the spectra have been corrected from spectral lines of O_2 in the 23 -84 cm^{-1} region to have an accuracy within 4 arc minutes. The vertical profiles of O_3, H_2O, HDO, HCN, ^ {16}O^{16}O ^{18}O, and ^ {16}O^{18}O ^{16}O in the stratosphere have been retrieved with an altitude resolution of about 4-5 km in the 20-37 km range. The results are compared with available measurements in literature. The vertical profiles of O_3, H_2 O, and HDO are retrieved from spectral lines in the 20-100 cm^{-1} region. The variation of the D/H ratio of water vapor is derived. The vertical profile of HCN is retrieved from spectral lines in the 32-56 cm^{-1} region. The volume mixing ratio of HCN is found to be 139 pptv at 20 km, 127 pptv at 25 km, and increasing to 172 pptv at 37 km. The vertical profiles of stratospheric ^ {16}O^{16}O ^{18}O and ^ {16}O^{18}O ^{16}O are retrieved from spectral lines in the 39-76 cm^{-1 } region. The ratio of total heavy isotopic ozone ^{50}O_3 to

  9. Determination of the threshold odor concentration of main odorants in essential oils using gas chromatography-olfactometry incremental dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Benzo, Maurizio; Gilardoni, Gianluca; Gandini, Carlo; Caccialanza, Gabriele; Vita Finzi, Paola; Vidari, Giovanni; Abdo, Susana; Layedra, Patricia

    2007-05-25

    An essential oil, obtained by steam distillation of Clinopodium tomentosum (Kunth) Govaerts (Lamiaceae), collected in Ecuador, was analyzed by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and GC-MS techniques. To our knowledge, the composition of this essential oil is described here for the first time, both from the chemical and olfactometric viewpoints. A preliminary analysis by GC-MS and using Kovats' retention indexes, lead to characterize and quantify the oil constituents, while GC-O was then applied for the identification of the main odorants. By the incremental dilution method (AEDA, CHARM Analysis), applied to the GC-O technique, the flavor dilution (FD) chromatogram was obtained. In order to calculate the TOC values of the main odorants, the relationship between the odorant concentration at the sniffing port and that one in the injected solution was established. This relationship was calculated by comparing the injected amount with the TOC value of a reference compound (limonene), obtained by dynamic dilution olfactometry. A good agreement was found between calculated and measured TOC values of few odorants.

  10. Distribution of gas in the halo of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, J. C.; Cowie, L. L.; Morton, D. C.; York, D. G.; Wu, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented from a high-resolution, ultraviolet study of interstellar gas situated away from the plane of the Milky Way Galaxy, using the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies Mkn 509 and F9 as background probes. In these directions, low-velocity, galactic gas were detected as well as two extragalactic clouds, one probably associated with the Magellanic Stream and the other with Mkn 509. These data were combined with results from other lines of sight to show that the ultraviolet species extend about 10 kpc from the plane, assuming the high-latitude gas corotates with the galactic disk. Complimentary observations of the optical Ca II and Na I species suggests that these do not extend as far - perhaps 2 to 3 kpc from the plane. Further, the exceedingly complex velocity structure found only in Magellanic Cloud directions suggests that these sight-lines are not typical of high-latitude gas in general.

  11. Optimal Capacity and Location Assessment of Natural Gas Fired Distributed Generation in Residential Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Sarah My

    With ever increasing use of natural gas to generate electricity, installed natural gas fired microturbines are found in residential areas to generate electricity locally. This research work discusses a generalized methodology for assessing optimal capacity and locations for installing natural gas fired microturbines in a distribution residential network. The overall objective is to place microturbines to minimize the system power loss occurring in the electrical distribution network; in such a way that the electric feeder does not need any up-gradation. The IEEE 123 Node Test Feeder is selected as the test bed for validating the developed methodology. Three-phase unbalanced electric power flow is run in OpenDSS through COM server, and the gas distribution network is analyzed using GASWorkS. The continual sensitivity analysis methodology is developed to select multiple DG locations and annual simulation is run to minimize annual average losses. The proposed placement of microturbines must be feasible in the gas distribution network and should not result into gas pipeline reinforcement. The corresponding gas distribution network is developed in GASWorkS software, and nodal pressures of the gas system are checked for various cases to investigate if the existing gas distribution network can accommodate the penetration of selected microturbines. The results indicate the optimal locations suitable to place microturbines and capacity that can be accommodated by the system, based on the consideration of overall minimum annual average losses as well as the guarantee of nodal pressure provided by the gas distribution network. The proposed method is generalized and can be used for any IEEE test feeder or an actual residential distribution network.

  12. Changes in the distribution of atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) in the Gulf of Maine 1979-2005.

    PubMed

    Golet, Walter J; Galuardi, Benjamin; Cooper, Andrew B; Lutcavage, Molly E

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Maine, NW Atlantic Ocean, is a productive, seasonal foraging ground for Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), but commercial landings of adult size classes were up to 40% below the allocated total allowable catch between 2004 to 2008 for the rod and reel, harpoon, and purse seine categories in the Gulf of Maine. Reduction in Atlantic bluefin tuna catches in the Gulf of Maine could represent a decline in spawning stock biomass, but given wide-ranging, complex migration patterns, and high energetic requirements, an alternative hypothesis is that their dispersal patterns shifted to regions with higher prey abundance or profitability, reducing availability to U.S. fishing fleets. This study fit generalized linear models to Atlantic bluefin tuna landings data collected from fishermen's logbooks (1979-2005) as well as the distances between bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring (Clupeaharengus), a primary prey species, to test alternative hypotheses for observed shifts in Atlantic bluefin tuna availability in the Gulf of Maine. For the bluefin model, landings varied by day of year, latitude and longitude. The effect of latitude differed by day of year and the effect of longitude differed by year. The distances between Atlantic bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring schools were significantly smaller (p<0.05) than would be expected from a randomly distributed population. A time series of average bluefin tuna school positions was positively correlated with the average number of herring captured per tow on Georges Bank in spring and autumn surveys respectively (p<0.01, r(2)=0.24, p<0.01, r(2)=0.42). Fishermen's logbooks contributed novel spatial and temporal information towards testing these hypotheses for the bluefin tuna fishery.

  13. Changes in the Distribution of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) in the Gulf of Maine 1979-2005

    PubMed Central

    Golet, Walter J.; Galuardi, Benjamin; Cooper, Andrew B.; Lutcavage, Molly E.

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Maine, NW Atlantic Ocean, is a productive, seasonal foraging ground for Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), but commercial landings of adult size classes were up to 40% below the allocated total allowable catch between 2004 to 2008 for the rod and reel, harpoon, and purse seine categories in the Gulf of Maine. Reduction in Atlantic bluefin tuna catches in the Gulf of Maine could represent a decline in spawning stock biomass, but given wide-ranging, complex migration patterns, and high energetic requirements, an alternative hypothesis is that their dispersal patterns shifted to regions with higher prey abundance or profitability, reducing availability to U.S. fishing fleets. This study fit generalized linear models to Atlantic bluefin tuna landings data collected from fishermen’s logbooks (1979-2005) as well as the distances between bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring (Clupeaharengus), a primary prey species, to test alternative hypotheses for observed shifts in Atlantic bluefin tuna availability in the Gulf of Maine. For the bluefin model, landings varied by day of year, latitude and longitude. The effect of latitude differed by day of year and the effect of longitude differed by year. The distances between Atlantic bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring schools were significantly smaller (p<0.05) than would be expected from a randomly distributed population. A time series of average bluefin tuna school positions was positively correlated with the average number of herring captured per tow on Georges Bank in spring and autumn surveys respectively (p<0.01, r2=0.24, p<0.01, r2=0.42). Fishermen’s logbooks contributed novel spatial and temporal information towards testing these hypotheses for the bluefin tuna fishery. PMID:24069420

  14. A SIMPLE PHYSICAL MODEL FOR THE GAS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Patej, Anna; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The dominant baryonic component of galaxy clusters is hot gas whose distribution is commonly probed through X-ray emission arising from thermal bremsstrahlung. The density profile thus obtained has been traditionally modeled with a β-profile, a simple function with only three parameters. However, this model is known to be insufficient for characterizing the range of cluster gas distributions and attempts to rectify this shortcoming typically introduce additional parameters to increase the fitting flexibility. We use cosmological and physical considerations to obtain a family of profiles for the gas with fewer parameters than the β-model but which better accounts for observed gas profiles over wide radial intervals.

  15. Small turbines in distributed utility application: Natural gas pressure supply requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.L.

    1996-05-01

    Implementing distributed utility can strengthen the local distribution system and help avoid or delay the expense of upgrading transformers and feeders. The gas turbine-generator set is an attractive option based on its low front-end capital cost, reliable performance at unmanned stations, and environmental performance characteristics. This report assesses gas turbine utilization issues from a perspective of fuel supply pressure requirements and discusses both cost and operational factors. A primary operational consideration for siting gas turbines on the electric distribution system is whether the local gas distribution company can supply gas at the required pressure. Currently available gas turbine engines require gas supply pressures of at least 150 pounds per square inch gauge, more typically, 250 to 350 psig. Few LDCs maintain line pressure in excess of 125 psig. One option for meeting the gas pressure requirements is to upgrade or extend an existing pipeline and connect that pipeline to a high-pressure supply source, such as an interstate transmission line. However, constructing new pipeline is expensive, and the small volume of gas required by the turbine for the application offers little incentive for the LDC to provide this service. Another way to meet gas pressure requirements is to boost the compression of the fuel gas at the gas turbine site. Fuel gas booster compressors are readily available as stand-alone units and can satisfactorily increase the supply pressure to meet the turbine engine requirement. However, the life-cycle costs of this equipment are not inconsequential, and maintenance and reliability issues for boosters in this application are questionable and require further study. These factors may make the gas turbine option a less attractive solution in DU applications than first indicated by just the $/kW capital cost. On the other hand, for some applications other DU technologies, such as photovoltaics, may be the more attractive option.

  16. Tectonic Controls on Gas Hydrate Distribution off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, C.; Chi, W. C.; Jegen, M. D.; Muff, S.; Hölz, S.; Lebas, E.; Sommer, M.; Lin, S.; Liu, C. S.; Lin, A. T.; Klaucke, I.; Klaeschen, D.; Chen, L.; Kunath, P.; McIntosh, K. D.; Feseker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea is characterized by wide-spread occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), indicating the presence of marine gas hydrates. Because the area covers both the tectonically inactive passive margin and the northern termination of the Manila Trench subduction zone while sediment input is broadly similar, this area provides an excellent opportunity to study the influence of tectonic processes on the dynamics of gas hydrate systems. Long-offset multi-channel seismic data show that movement along thrust faults and blind thrust faults caused anticlinal ridges on the active margin, while faults are absent on the passive margin. This coincides with high-hydrate saturations derived from ocean bottom seismometer data and controlled source electromagnetic data, and conspicuous high-amplitude reflections in P-Cable 3D seismic data above the BSR in the anticlinal ridges of the active margin. On the contrary, all geophysical evidence for the passive margin points to normal- to low-hydrate saturations. Geochemical analysis of gas samples collected at seep sites on the active margin show methane with heavy δ13C isotope composition, while gas collected on the passive margin shows highly depleted (light) carbon isotope composition. Thus, we interpret the passive margin as a typical gas hydrate province fuelled by biogenic production of methane and the active margin gas hydrate system as a system that is fuelled not only by biogenic gas production but also by additional advection of thermogenic methane from the subduction system. The location of the highest gas hydrate saturations in the hanging wall next to the thrust faults suggests that the thrust faults represent pathways for the migration of methane. Our findings suggest that the most promising gas hydrate occurrences for exploitation of gas hydrate as an energy source may be found in the core of the active margin roll over anticlines immediately above the BSR and that high

  17. Study and optimization of gas flow and temperature distribution in a Czochralski configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, H. S.; Jin, Z. L.; Huang, X. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Czochralski (Cz) method has virtually dominated the entire production of bulk single crystals with high productivity. Since the Cz-grown crystals are cylindrical, axisymmetric hot zone arrangement is required for an ideally high-quality crystal growth. However, due to three-dimensional effects the flow pattern and temperature field are inevitably non-axisymmetric. The grown crystal suffers from many defects, among which macro-cracks and micro-dislocation are mainly related to inhomogeneous temperature distribution during the growth and cooling processes. The task of the paper is to investigate gas partition and temperature distribution in a Cz configuration, and to optimize the furnace design for the reduction of the three-dimensional effects. The general design is found to be unfavorable to obtain the desired temperature conditions. Several different types of the furnace designs, modified at the top part of the side insulation, are proposed for a comparative analysis. The optimized one is chosen for further study, and the results display the excellence of the proposed design in suppression of three-dimensional effects to achieve relatively axisymmetric flow pattern and temperature distribution for the possible minimization of thermal stress related crystal defects.

  18. Evolution of partial ring current ion pitch angle distributions during the main phase of a storm on 17 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runov, A.; Zhang, X. J.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-06-01

    During a severe magnetic storm from 17 to 19 March 2015, three identically instrumented Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms probes crossed the magnetosphere in a string-of-pearls configuration enabling sequential observations of same regions of the magnetosphere with a 2 h time separation. These observations allow us to study the temporal evolution of ion pitch angle distributions (PADs) in the dusk-premidnight sector (between 17 and 20 h magnetic local time) during the storm's main phase. We found that the ion PAD evolved from pancake to isotropic in fewer than 2 h. Analysis of electromagnetic wave spectra revealed the presence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves at frequencies below the helium cyclotron frequency. We conclude that the observed pitch angle evolution was due to ion scattering by EMIC waves.

  19. Distribution and effects of shallow gas on bulk estuarine sediment properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, J.M.; Halka, J.P.; Conkwright, R.; Koczot, K.; Coleman, S.

    1992-01-01

    Gas bubble are present in sediments covering approximately 30% of the main stem of Chesapeake Bay, with bubbles occurring at the sediment-water interface in 18% of the main stem sediments. This biogenic gas is found either in the sediments in the lower salinity reaches of the Bay, or confined to sediments which overline infilled palaeodrainage channels formed during the Wisconsinan low sea level stand (approximately 18 ka). Gas associated with the old drainage network does not correlate with present bathymetry or sedimentological patterns. Some differences between the gas-charged and gas-free sediments are: (1) gas-charged sediments have water contents 10-20% higher than comparable gas-free cores; (2) organic matter is better presented with depth in the gas-charged sediments (upwards of 60% more at one depth); (3 monosulphides are dominant sulphide mineral phase within the gas-charged sediments, comprising over 40% of the total sulphur. Within the gas-free sediments monosulphides are significant only near the sediment-water interface and rapidly become negligible with depth, and; (4) cores of gas-charged sediments are highly colour-banded due to preservation of sulphide mineral variations, while gas-free cores are diagenetically altered to pyrite. ?? 1992.

  20. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, R.J.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Hester, J.J. Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-03-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals. 19 refs.

  1. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  2. Just fracking: a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Emily; Bell, Derek

    2016-02-01

    This letter presents a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in the area of Pennsylvania lying over the Marcellus Shale, the largest shale gas formation in play in the United States. The extraction of shale gas using unconventional wells, which are hydraulically fractured (fracking), has increased dramatically since 2005. As the number of wells has grown, so have concerns about the potential public health effects on nearby communities. These concerns make shale gas development an environmental justice issue. This letter examines whether the hazards associated with proximity to wells and the economic benefits of shale gas production are fairly distributed. We distinguish two types of distributive environmental justice: traditional and benefit sharing. We ask the traditional question: are there a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells in Pennsylvania? However, we extend this analysis in two ways: we examine income distribution and level of education; and we compare before and after shale gas development. This contributes to discussions of benefit sharing by showing how the income distribution of the population has changed. We use a binary dasymetric technique to remap the data from the 2000 US Census and the 2009-2013 American Communities Survey and combine that data with a buffer containment analysis of unconventional wells to compare the characteristics of the population living nearer to unconventional wells with those further away before and after shale gas development. Our analysis indicates that there is no evidence of traditional distributive environmental injustice: there is not a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells. However, our analysis is consistent with the claim that there is benefit sharing distributive environmental injustice: the income distribution of the population nearer to shale gas wells

  3. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Shah, R.R.; Davis, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer.

  4. The implementation of rare events logistic regression to predict the distribution of mesophotic hard corals across the main Hawaiian Islands.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Lindsay M; Franklin, Erik C; Kelley, Christopher; Rooney, John; Frazer, L Neil; Toonen, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Predictive habitat suitability models are powerful tools for cost-effective, statistically robust assessment of the environmental drivers of species distributions. The aim of this study was to develop predictive habitat suitability models for two genera of scleractinian corals (Leptoserisand Montipora) found within the mesophotic zone across the main Hawaiian Islands. The mesophotic zone (30-180 m) is challenging to reach, and therefore historically understudied, because it falls between the maximum limit of SCUBA divers and the minimum typical working depth of submersible vehicles. Here, we implement a logistic regression with rare events corrections to account for the scarcity of presence observations within the dataset. These corrections reduced the coefficient error and improved overall prediction success (73.6% and 74.3%) for both original regression models. The final models included depth, rugosity, slope, mean current velocity, and wave height as the best environmental covariates for predicting the occurrence of the two genera in the mesophotic zone. Using an objectively selected theta ("presence") threshold, the predicted presence probability values (average of 0.051 for Leptoseris and 0.040 for Montipora) were translated to spatially-explicit habitat suitability maps of the main Hawaiian Islands at 25 m grid cell resolution. Our maps are the first of their kind to use extant presence and absence data to examine the habitat preferences of these two dominant mesophotic coral genera across Hawai'i.

  5. The implementation of rare events logistic regression to predict the distribution of mesophotic hard corals across the main Hawaiian Islands

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Erik C.; Kelley, Christopher; Frazer, L. Neil; Toonen, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Predictive habitat suitability models are powerful tools for cost-effective, statistically robust assessment of the environmental drivers of species distributions. The aim of this study was to develop predictive habitat suitability models for two genera of scleractinian corals (Leptoserisand Montipora) found within the mesophotic zone across the main Hawaiian Islands. The mesophotic zone (30–180 m) is challenging to reach, and therefore historically understudied, because it falls between the maximum limit of SCUBA divers and the minimum typical working depth of submersible vehicles. Here, we implement a logistic regression with rare events corrections to account for the scarcity of presence observations within the dataset. These corrections reduced the coefficient error and improved overall prediction success (73.6% and 74.3%) for both original regression models. The final models included depth, rugosity, slope, mean current velocity, and wave height as the best environmental covariates for predicting the occurrence of the two genera in the mesophotic zone. Using an objectively selected theta (“presence”) threshold, the predicted presence probability values (average of 0.051 for Leptoseris and 0.040 for Montipora) were translated to spatially-explicit habitat suitability maps of the main Hawaiian Islands at 25 m grid cell resolution. Our maps are the first of their kind to use extant presence and absence data to examine the habitat preferences of these two dominant mesophotic coral genera across Hawai‘i. PMID:27441122

  6. The implementation of rare events logistic regression to predict the distribution of mesophotic hard corals across the main Hawaiian Islands.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Lindsay M; Franklin, Erik C; Kelley, Christopher; Rooney, John; Frazer, L Neil; Toonen, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Predictive habitat suitability models are powerful tools for cost-effective, statistically robust assessment of the environmental drivers of species distributions. The aim of this study was to develop predictive habitat suitability models for two genera of scleractinian corals (Leptoserisand Montipora) found within the mesophotic zone across the main Hawaiian Islands. The mesophotic zone (30-180 m) is challenging to reach, and therefore historically understudied, because it falls between the maximum limit of SCUBA divers and the minimum typical working depth of submersible vehicles. Here, we implement a logistic regression with rare events corrections to account for the scarcity of presence observations within the dataset. These corrections reduced the coefficient error and improved overall prediction success (73.6% and 74.3%) for both original regression models. The final models included depth, rugosity, slope, mean current velocity, and wave height as the best environmental covariates for predicting the occurrence of the two genera in the mesophotic zone. Using an objectively selected theta ("presence") threshold, the predicted presence probability values (average of 0.051 for Leptoseris and 0.040 for Montipora) were translated to spatially-explicit habitat suitability maps of the main Hawaiian Islands at 25 m grid cell resolution. Our maps are the first of their kind to use extant presence and absence data to examine the habitat preferences of these two dominant mesophotic coral genera across Hawai'i. PMID:27441122

  7. Thermal Modeling of the Main Rings of Saturn through random distribution particle arrays and ray-tracing simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto; Spilker, Linda; Déau, Estelle

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's rings are a complex collection of icy particles with diameters from 1 m to few meters. Their natural window of study is the infrared because its temperatures are between 40K and 120K. The main driver of the temperature of these rings is the direct solar radiation as well as the solar radiation reflected off Saturn's atmosphere. The second most important energy source is the infrared radiation coming from Saturn itself. The study of the variations of temperatures of the rings, or, in general, their thermal behavior, may provide important information on their composition, their structure and their dynamics. Models that consider these and other energy sources are able to explain, to a first approximation, the observed temperature variations of the rings. The challenge for these models is to accurately describe the variation of illumination on the rings, i. e., how the illuminated and non-illuminated regions of the ring particles change at the different observation geometries. This shadowing mainly depends on the optical depth, as well as the general structure of the rings.In this work, We show a semi-analytical model that considers the main energy sources of the rings and their average properties (e.g., optical depth, particle size range and vertical distribution). In order to deal with the shadowing at specific geometries, the model uses the ray-tracing technique. The goal is to describe the ring temperatures observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer, CIRS, onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which is in orbit around Saturn since 2004. So far, the model is able to reproduce some of the general features of specific regions of the A, B and C rings.

  8. Comparing the equivalent particle number density distribution of gas and plasma flow fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-yun; Zhang, Ying-ying; Zhang, Cheng-yi; Li, Zhen-hua

    2013-04-20

    In this paper, the equivalent particle number density distribution of gas and plasma flow fields is investigated. For the purpose of facilitating comparison, argon gas and argon arc plasma are chosen as practical examples for experiment. The equivalent particle number density distributions of the argon gas and argon arc plasma are reconstructed from the experimentally measured refractive index distributions obtained by moiré tomography, while five cross sections, which are 7, 8.5, 10, 11.5, and 13 mm away from the jet nozzle are chosen for practical calculation and comparison. In experiment, the probe wavelength and the export pressure of argon gas and argon arc plasma are the same. The experimental results manifest that (1) the equivalent particle number density decreases with the distance away from the jet nozzle of the gas flow field, while (2) the equivalent particle number density of the plasma flow field has a different variation. Finally, the experimental results are theoretically explained and analyzed.

  9. Continuous distributions of specific ventilation recovered from inert gas washout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, S. M.; Evans, J. W.; Jalowayski, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    A new technique is described for recovering continuous distributions of ventilation as a function of tidal ventilation/volume ratio from the nitrogen washout. The analysis yields a continuous distribution of ventilation as a function of tidal ventilation/volume ratio represented as fractional ventilations of 50 compartments plus dead space. The procedure was verified by recovering known distributions from data to which noise had been added. Using an apparatus to control the subject's tidal volume and FRC, mixed expired N2 data gave the following results: (a) the distributions of young, normal subjects were narrow and unimodal; (b) those of subjects over age 40 were broader with more poorly ventilated units; (c) patients with pulmonary disease of all descriptions showed enlarged dead space; (d) patients with cystic fibrosis showed multimodal distributions with the bulk of the ventilation going to overventilated units; and (e) patients with obstructive lung disease fell into several classes, three of which are illustrated.

  10. Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  11. Observed oil and gas field size distributions: a consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions.

  12. 76 FR 72666 - Pipeline Safety: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Systems to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ...: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Systems to Applications Other Than Single-Family... several issues relating to the expanded use of excess flow valves (EFVs) in gas distribution systems.... Operators of gas distribution systems can also expand the use of EFVs to applications other than...

  13. Sedimentary style and oil-gas field distribution in Western Bohai Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Hansheng Qiao )

    1994-07-01

    Western Bohai Bay is located near Tianjing City and the Yanshan Mountains. Tectonically, it is part of the Bohai Bay rift, including the Qiku, Nanpu, and Cangdong depressions. The Paleogene strata consist of three cycles in the rift. Usually, the sublacustrine fans or basalts formed at the initial stage of every cycle. The dark shales and turbidites developed at the high level of lacustrine transgression. However, the deltas or evaporates appeared at the regressive stage. The sublacustrine fans or deltas generally distribute in the marginal part of a depression, with humic type kerogen. The dark shales of deep lacustrine facies in the inner part of it contain sapropel type kerogen. The transitional zone between them is interbedded shales and sandstones, with mixed type kerogen. The oil-gas fields mainly occur in the transitional zone around the oil-generating center. The great oil-gas fields are formed in areas where the big drape anticline coincided with the sublacustrine fan-front or delta-front sandstones and were sealed by shales or evaporates. A great number of small overpressured oil reservoirs are in the mature source rocks in the depression center.

  14. Impact of Higher Natural Gas Prices on Local Distribution Companies and Residential Customers

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This report examines some of the problems faced by natural gas consumers as a result of increasing heating bills in recent years and problems associated with larger amounts of uncollectible revenue and lower throughput for the local distribution companies (LDCs) supplying the natural gas.

  15. Edge seal for a porous gas distribution plate of a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Singh, Rajindar

    1984-01-01

    In an improved seal for a gas distribution plate of a fuel cell, a groove is provided extending along an edge of the plate. A member of resinous material is arranged within the groove and a paste comprising an immobilized acid is arranged surrounding the member and substantially filling the groove. The seal, which is impervious to the gas being distributed, is resistant to deterioration by the electrolyte of the cell.

  16. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  17. A numerical study of liquid film distribution in wet natural gas pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Q.; Zhao, Y. L.; Xu, W. W.; Guan, X. R.; Wang, J. J.; Jin, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    The software of FLUENT was used to simulate the gas-liquid turbulent flow in wet natural gas pipeline of the Puguang gas field. The RNG k- ɛ model was used to simulate the turbulent flow, the Mixture model was used to simulate gas-liquid mixed phase, and the Eulerian wall film model was used to simulate the formation and development of liquid film. The gas phase flow field characteristics, the distribution of the axial and circumferential film thickness, and the droplet distribution in the pipeline were studied when the gas Reynolds number is 7.72 × 106(10.8m/s). The results can be concluded as followed: Liquid film distributes unevenly along the circumferential direction and mostly distributes under the pipeline wall because of gravity. The impact of the dean vortex and centrifugal force in the straight section can also influence the liquid film distribution. The wall shear stress distributions in horizontal straight pipeline is concerned with liquid membrane volatility, and consistent with the film volatility period, the wall shear stress reached the maximum value in a certain position of wave front. The influence of the wall shear stress on the film fluctuation in inclined pipeline is weakened by gravity and other factors.

  18. Spatial distribution of interstellar dust in the Sun's vicinity. Comparison with neutral sodium-bearing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergely, J.-L.; Valette, B.; Lallement, R.; Raimond, S.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: 3D tomography of the interstellar dust and gas may be useful in many respects, from the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium itself to foreground decontamination of the cosmic microwave background, or various studies of the environments of specific objects. However, while spectral data cubes of the galactic emission become increasingly precise, the information on the distance to the emitting regions has not progressed as well and relies essentially on the galactic rotation curve. Our goal here is to bring more precise information on the distance to nearby interstellar dust and gas clouds within 250 pc. Methods: We apply the best available calibration methods to a carefully screened set of stellar Strömgren photometry data for targets possessing a Hipparcos parallax and spectral type classification. We combine the derived interstellar extinctions and the parallax distances for about 6000 stars to build a 3D tomography of the local dust. We use an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach and a least squares criterion, optimized for this specific data set. We apply the same inversion technique to a totally independent set of neutral sodium absorption data available for about 1700 target stars. Results: We obtain 3D maps of the opacity and the distance to the main dust-bearing clouds within 250 pc and identify in those maps well-known dark clouds and high galactic more diffuse entities. We calculate the integrated extinction between the Sun and the cube boundary and compare this with the total galactic extinction derived from infrared 2D maps. The two quantities reach similar values at high latitudes, as expected if the local dust content is satisfyingly reproduced and the dust is closer than 250 pc. Those maps show a larger high latitude dust opacity in the North compared to the South, reinforcing earlier evidences. Interestingly the gas maps do not show the same asymmetry, suggesting a polar asymmetry of the dust to gas

  19. Gas and particle size distributions of polychlorinated naphthalenes in the atmosphere of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingqing; Zhang, Xian; Dong, Shujun; Gao, Lirong; Liu, Guorui; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-05-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) were listed as persistent organic pollutants in the Stockholm Convention in 2015. Despite numerous studies on PCNs, little is known about their occurrence in atmospheric particulate matter of different sizes. In this study, 49 PCN congeners were investigated for their concentrations and size-specific distributions in an urban atmosphere, and preliminary exposure assessments were conducted. Ambient air samples were collected using a high-volume cascade impactor for division into a gas fraction and four particle size fractions. Samples were collected from October 2013 to June 2014 at an urban site in Beijing, China. The concentration range for PCNs in the atmosphere (gas + particle fractions) was 6.77-25.90 pg/m(3) (average 16.28 pg/m(3)). The particle-bound concentration range was 0.17-2.78 pg/m(3) (average 1.73 pg/m(3)). Therefore, PCNs were mainly found in the gas phase. The concentrations of PCNs in a fraction increased as the particle size decreased (dae > 10 μm, 10 μm ≥ dae > 2.5 μm, 2.5 μm ≥ dae > 1.0 μm and dae ≤ 1.0 μm). Consequently, PCNs were ubiquitous in inhalable fine particles, and the ΣPCNs associated with PM1.0 and PM2.5 reached 68.4% and 84.3%, respectively. Tetra-CNs and penta-CNs (the lower chlorinated homologues) predominated in the atmosphere. The homologue profiles in different size particles were almost similar, but the particulate profiles were different from those in the gas phase. Among the individual PCNs identified, CN38/40, CN52/60 and CN75 were the dominant compounds in the atmosphere. CN66/67 and CN73 collectively accounted for most of the total dioxin-like TEQ concentrations of the PCNs. Exposure to toxic compounds, such as PCNs present in PM1.0 or PM2.5, may affect human health. This work presents the first data on size-specific distributions of PCNs in the atmosphere.

  20. Distributed Control Architecture for Gas Turbine Engine. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    The transformation of engine control systems from centralized to distributed architecture is both necessary and enabling for future aeropropulsion applications. The continued growth of adaptive control applications and the trend to smaller, light weight cores is a counter influence on the weight and volume of control system hardware. A distributed engine control system using high temperature electronics and open systems communications will reverse the growing trend of control system weight ratio to total engine weight and also be a major factor in decreasing overall cost of ownership for aeropropulsion systems. The implementation of distributed engine control is not without significant challenges. There are the needs for high temperature electronics, development of simple, robust communications, and power supply for the on-board electronics.

  1. Importance of Pore Size Distribution of Fine-grained Sediments on Gas Hydrate Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T. H.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, G. C.; Park, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Gas hydrates have been considered as a new source of natural gases. For the gas hydrate production, the gas hydrate reservoir should be depressurized below the equilibrium pressure of gas hydrates. Therefore, it is important to predict the equilibrium of gas hydrates in the reservoir conditions because it can be affected by the pore size of the host sediments due to the capillary effect. In this study, gas hydrates were synthesized in fine-grained sediment samples including a pure silt sample and a natural clayey silt sample cored from a hydrate occurrence region in Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea. Pore size distributions of the samples were obtained by the nitrogen adsorption and desorption test and the mercury intrusion porosimetry. The equilibrium curve of gas hydrates in the fine-grained sediments were found to be significantly influenced by the clay fraction and the corresponding small pores (>50 nm in diameter). For the clayey silt sample, the equilibrium pressure was higher by ~1.4 MPa than the bulk equilibrium pressure. In most cases of oceanic gas hydrate reservoirs, sandy layers are found interbedded with fine-grained sediment layers while gas hydrates are intensively accumulated in the sandy layers. Our experiment results reveal the inhibition effect of fine-grained sediments against gas hydrate formation, in which greater driving forces (e.g., higher pressure or lower temperature) are required during natural gas migration. Therefore, gas hydrate distribution in interbedded layers of sandy and fine-grained sediments can be explained by such capillary effect induced by the pore size distribution of host sediments.

  2. Spring foraging distribution and habitat selection by Double-crested Cormorants on the Penobscot River, Maine USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackwell, B.F.; Krohn, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Restoration of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to New England rivers requires, in part, an understanding of the use of habitat and prey by potential and known predators. We examined variation in habitat use by Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritius), from April through June 1992-94 on ca. 288 km of the 2 primary tributaries and the mainstem of the Penobscot River, Maine. Our objectives were to quantify temporal and spatial variation in habitat use and test for selection of spring foraging habitats by cormorants. Cormorants forage during daylight hours only. To determine the distribution of foraging birds we conducted aerial surveys at intervals of 105 km north of the mouth of the mainstem. However, from late April through early June of all years, birds selected (P < 0.05) 4 of the 5 mainstem dams and the estuarine portion of the river. Cormorant use of dams remained at or above expected levels until the second week of June in all years. We suggest that cormorant selection for foraging areas adjacent to dams reflected a higher availability of prey, possibly due to delay and injury of migrating Atlantic salmon smolts. Cormorant selection of the estuarine portion of the Penobscot River was likely a response to a seasonally increasing availability and abundance of estuarine and marine prey, in addition to resident freshwater species and migrating smolts.

  3. Effects of carrier gas dynamics on single wall carbon nanotube chiral distributions during laser vaporization synthesis.

    PubMed

    Landi, Brian J; Raffaelle, Ryne P

    2007-03-01

    We report on the utility of modifying the carrier gas dynamics during laser vaporization synthesis to alter the single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) chiral distribution. SWNTs produced from an Alexandrite laser using conventional Ni/Co catalysts demonstrate marked differences in chiral distributions due to effects of helium gas and reactor chamber pressure, in comparison to conventional subambient pressures and argon gas. Optical absorption and Raman spectroscopies confirm that the SWNT diameter distribution decreases under higher pressure and with helium gas as opposed to argon. Fluorescence mapping of the raw soots in sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)-D2O was used to estimate the relative (n, m)-SWNT content of the semiconducting types. A predominance of type II structures for each synthesis condition was observed. The distribution of SWNT chiral angles was observed to shift away from near-armchair configurations under higher pressure and with helium gas. These results illustrate the importance of gas type and pressure on the condensation/cooling rate, which allows for synthesis of specific SWNT chiral distributions.

  4. Precision measurements of momentum distribution of Tonks-Girardeau gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joshua M.; Xia, Lin; Xu, Wei; Malvania, Neel; Zundel, Laura A.; Rigol, Marcos; Weiss, David S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on precision measurements of the momentum distributions of 1D Bose gases over a range of initial temperatures and coupling strengths. We compare our results with unbiased quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We use the comparison with theory to understand the nature of the adiabatic loading from a Bose-Einstein Condensate in 3D to an array of 1D tubes.

  5. Spatially and temporally resolved gas distributions around heterogeneous catalysts using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Johan; Blomberg, Sara; Gustafson, Johan; Evertsson, Jonas; Zhou, Jianfeng; Adams, Emma C.; Carlsson, Per-Anders; Aldén, Marcus; Lundgren, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing and measuring the gas distribution in close proximity to a working catalyst is crucial for understanding how the catalytic activity depends on the structure of the catalyst. However, existing methods are not able to fully determine the gas distribution during a catalytic process. Here we report on how the distribution of a gas during a catalytic reaction can be imaged in situ with high spatial (400 μm) and temporal (15 μs) resolution using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring, in real-time, the distribution of carbon dioxide during catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide above powder catalysts. Furthermore, we demonstrate the versatility and potential of the technique in catalysis research by providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of how the activity of several catalysts can be measured simultaneously, either in the same reactor chamber, or in parallel, in different reactor tubes. PMID:25953006

  6. Spatial distribution of venous gas emboli in the lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souders, J. E.; Doshier, J. B.; Polissar, N. L.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of gaseous pulmonary emboli is presumed to be determined by their buoyancy. We hypothesized that regional pulmonary blood flow may also influence their distribution. Therefore, pulmonary blood flow was measured in supine, anesthetized dogs with use of 15-microm fluorescent microspheres at baseline and during N(2) embolism. The animals were killed, and the lungs were excised, air-dried, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces with weights and spatial coordinates recorded. Embolism was defined as a >10% flow decrease relative to baseline. Vertically, the incidence of embolism increased substantially by 6 +/- 1% per additional centimeter in height compared with baseline (P = 0.0003). Embolism also increased radially by 3 +/- 1%/cm from the hilum (P = 0.002). There was a weaker but statistically significant increase in embolism to pieces with greater baseline flow, 9 +/- 2% for every 1. 0 increase in relative baseline flow (P = 0.008). We conclude that the distribution of gaseous emboli is influenced by buoyancy and flow dynamics within the pulmonary vasculature.

  7. STAR FORMATION AND DISTRIBUTIONS OF GAS AND DUST IN THE CIRCINUS CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito

    2011-04-10

    We present results of a study on the Circinus cloud based on {sup 13}CO (J = 1 - 0) data as well as visual to near-infrared (JHK{sub S}) extinction maps, to investigate the distributions of gas and dust around the cloud. The global {sup 13}CO distribution of the Circinus cloud is revealed for the first time, and the total molecular mass of the cloud is estimated to be 2.5 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun} for the assumed distance 700 pc. Two massive clumps in the cloud, called Circinus-W and Circinus-E, have a mass of {approx}5 x 10{sup 3} M{sub sun}. These clumps are associated with a number of young stellar objects (YSOs) searched for in the literature, indicating that they are the most active star-forming sites in Circinus. All of the extinction maps show good agreement with the {sup 13}CO distribution. We derived the average N({sup 13}CO)/A{sub V} ratio in the Circinus cloud to be 1.25 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1} by comparing the extinction maps with the {sup 13}CO data. The extinction maps also allowed us to probe into the reddening law over the Circinus cloud. We found that there is a clear change in dust properties in the densest regions of Circinus-W and Circinus-E, possibly due to grain growth in the dense cloud interior. Among the YSOs found in the literature, we attempted to infer the ages and masses of the H{alpha} emission-line stars forming in the two clumps, and found that they are likely to be younger than 1 Myr, having a relatively small mass of {approx}<2 M{sub sun} at the zero-age main sequence.

  8. Phthalate esters in main source water and drinking water of Zhejiang Province (China): Distribution and health risks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Lou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Nianhua; Ding, Gangqiang; Chen, Zhijian; Xu, Peiwei; Wu, Lizhi; Cai, Jianmin; Han, Jianlong; Qiu, Xueting

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the distributions and health risks of phthalate esters in the main source water and corresponding drinking water of Zhejiang Province, the concentrations of 16 phthalate esters in water samples from 19 sites were measured from samples taken in the dry season and wet season. The concentration of the total phthalate ester congeners in source water ranged from 1.07 μg/L to 7.12 μg/L in the wet season, from 0.01 μg/L to 1.58 μg/L in the dry season, from 1.18 μg/L to 15.28 μg/L from drinking water in the wet season, and from 0.16 μg/L to 1.86 μg/L from drinking water in the dry season. Of the 16 phthalate esters, dimethyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, di-(2-ethyl-hexyl) phthalate, di-iso-butyl phthalate, bis-2-n-butoxyethyl phthalate, and dicyclohexyl phthalate were present in the samples analyzed, dominated by di-iso-butyl phthalate and di-(2-ethyl-hexyl) phthalate. The concentrations of phthalate esters in the wet season were all relatively higher than those in the dry season, and the drinking water had higher concentrations of phthalate esters than source water. The phthalate ester congeners studied pose little health risk to nearby citizens. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2205-2212. © 2015 SETAC.

  9. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  10. Non-extensive distributions for a relativistic Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rożynek, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recently the non-extensive approach has been used in a variety of ways to describe dense nuclear matter. They differ in the methods of introducing the appropriate non-extensive single particle distributions inside a relativistic many-body system, in particular when one has to deal both with particles and antiparticles, as in the case of quark matter exemplified in the NJL approach. I present and discuss in detail the physical consequences of the methods used so far, which should be recognized before any physical conclusions can be reached from the results presented.

  11. Gas distribution industry survey: Costs of installation, maintenance and repair, and operations, version 1. Topical report, December 1993-March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Biederman, N.

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. natural gas distribution industry spends $40 - $45 billion each year to buy gas and deliver it to the customers and to expand and renew the distribution piping system. More than half of these expenditures are paid to suppliers and transporters of gas. The way in which the balance (nearly $18 billion) is spent is controlled by the local gas distribution companies. This research is aimed to provide a better understanding of how and why these costs are incurred. It is based on interviews with 24 gas distribution companies and the data collected on a wide variety of maintenance, installation, and operations activities.

  12. 76 FR 77223 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval and Revised Statement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... to utilize rates that are the same as those contained in SourceGas' transportation rate schedules for... Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval and Revised Statement of Operating Conditions Take notice that on December 1, 2011, SourceGas Distribution LLC...

  13. 77 FR 40609 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval and Revised Statement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... utilize rates that are the same as those contained in SourceGas' transportation rate schedules for... Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval and Revised Statement of Operating Conditions Take notice that on June 29, 2012, SourceGas Distribution LLC...

  14. Occurrence and distribution of gas vesicle genes among cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Damerval, T; Castets, A M; Guglielmi, G; Houmard, J; Tandeau de Marsac, N

    1989-01-01

    Gas vesicles (GV) are specialized cell inclusions providing many aquatic procaryotes with buoyancy. In the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp. strain PCC 7601, at least four genes are involved in GV formation. One of those, gvpA1, encodes the major structural GV protein (70 amino acids) and belongs to a multigene family (gvpA1, gvpA2, gvpD). The fourth gene, gvpC, encodes a 162-amino-acid protein, the function of which is still unclear. We used the Calothrix gvpA1 and gvpC genes as probes to perform Southern hybridization experiments with DNA extracted from various cyanobacterial strains. The gvpA gene was found in all the strains that synthesize GV, indicating that its product is an obligatory component of GV. Furthermore, it was found to occur as multiple copies in most of the strains tested. The gvpC gene was only detected in some strains able to synthesize a large amount of GV within a short period. This suggests that the gvpC gene product is a dispensable protein for GV formation and is involved in the efficiency of the assembly process. Based on the occurrence of the gvp genes and on DNA-DNA hybridization patterns, genus assignments are discussed. Images PMID:2493445

  15. A Lagrangian View of Stratospheric Trace Gas Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Sparling, L.; Dessler, A.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of photochemistry, some relationship between the stratospheric age-of-air and the amount of tracer contained within an air sample is expected. The existence of such a relationship allows inferences about transport history to be made from observations of chemical tracers. This paper lays down the conceptual foundations for the relationship between age and tracer amount, developed within a Lagrangian framework. In general, the photochemical loss depends not only on the age of the parcel but also on its path. We show that under the "average path approximation" that the path variations are less important than parcel age. The average path approximation then allows us to develop a formal relationship between the age spectrum and the tracer spectrum. Using the relation between the tracer and age spectra, tracer-tracer correlations can be interpreted as resulting from mixing which connects parts of the single path photochemistry curve, which is formed purely from the action of photochemistry on an irreducible parcel. This geometric interpretation of mixing gives rise to constraints on trace gas correlations, and explains why some observations are do not fall on rapid mixing curves. This effect is seen in the ATMOS observations.

  16. CO-dark gas and molecular filaments in Milky Way-type galaxies - II. The temperature distribution of the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the temperature distribution of CO-dark molecular hydrogen (H2) in a series of disc galaxies simulated using the AREPO moving-mesh code. In conditions similar to those in the Milky Way, we find that H2 has a flat temperature distribution ranging from 10 to 100 K. At T < 30 K, the gas is almost fully molecular and has a high CO content, whereas at T > 30 K, the H2 fraction spans a broader range and the CO content is small, allowing us to classify gas in these two regimes as CO-bright and CO-dark, respectively. The mean sound speed in the CO-dark H2 is cs, dark = 0.64 km s-1, significantly lower than the value in the cold atomic gas (cs, CNM = 1.15 km s-1), implying that the CO-dark molecular phase is more susceptible to turbulent compression and gravitational collapse than its atomic counterpart. We further show that the temperature of the CO-dark H2 is highly sensitive to the strength of the interstellar radiation field, but that conditions in the CO-bright H2 remain largely unchanged. Finally, we examine the usefulness of the [C II] and [O I] fine-structure lines as tracers of the CO-dark gas. We show that in Milky Way-like conditions, diffuse [C II] emission from this gas should be detectable. However, it is a problematic tracer of this gas, as there is only a weak correlation between the brightness of the emission and the H2 surface density. The situation is even worse for the [O I] line, which shows no correlation with the H2 surface density.

  17. Gas swelling and deuterium distribution in beryllium implanted with deuterium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chernikov, V.N.; Alimov, V.Kh.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    An extensive TEM study of the microstructure of Be TIP-30 irradiated with 3 and 10 keV D ions up to fluences, {Phi}, in the range from 3 x 10{sup 20} to 8 x 10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} at temperatures T{sub irr} = 300 K, 500 K and 700 K has been carried out. Depth distributions of deuterium in the form of separate D atoms and D{sub 2} molecules have been investigated by means of SIMS and RGA methods, correspondingly. D ion irradiation is accompanied by blistering and gives rise to different kind of destructions depending mainly on the irradiation temperature. Irradiation with D ions at 300 K leads to the formation of tiny highly pressurized D{sub 2} bubbles reminiscent of He bubbles in Be. Under 3 keV D ion irradiation D{sub 2} bubbles ({bar r}{sub b} {approx} 0.7 nm) appear at a fluence as low as 3x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2}. Irradiation at 500 K results in the development, along with relatively small facetted bubbles, of larger oblate gas-filled cavities accumulating most of injected D atoms and providing for much higher gas swelling values as compared to irradiation at 300 K. The increase of D and/or T{sub irr}, to 700 K causes the further coarsening of large cavities which are transformed into sub-surface labyrinth structures. D and He ion implantation leads to the enhanced growth of porous microcrystalline layers of c.p.h.-BeO oxide with a microstructure which differs considerably from that of oxide layers on electropolished surfaces of Be. Based on the analysis of experimental data questions of deuterium reemission, thermal desorption and trapping in Be have been discussed in detail.

  18. Minimization of Blast furnace Fuel Rate by Optimizing Burden and Gas Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2012-08-15

    The goal of the research is to improve the competitive edge of steel mills by using the advanced CFD technology to optimize the gas and burden distributions inside a blast furnace for achieving the best gas utilization. A state-of-the-art 3-D CFD model has been developed for simulating the gas distribution inside a blast furnace at given burden conditions, burden distribution and blast parameters. The comprehensive 3-D CFD model has been validated by plant measurement data from an actual blast furnace. Validation of the sub-models is also achieved. The user friendly software package named Blast Furnace Shaft Simulator (BFSS) has been developed to simulate the blast furnace shaft process. The research has significant benefits to the steel industry with high productivity, low energy consumption, and improved environment.

  19. The gas distribution of comet Halley and its relation to the nucleus rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Anita L.; Trout, Anthony P.

    1994-01-01

    We used a set of spatially resolved spectra of comet Halley to explore whether the gas distribution profile could be inverted to yield information on the rotation of the comet. The data were obtained both pre- and post-perihelion. The pre-perihelion data showed reasonable symmetry and so were used to define the lifetimes against photodissociation of the various molecules. These lifetimes were then used to define the lifetimes against photodissociation of the various molecules. These lifetimes were then used along with a nonsteady-state vectorial model to fit the post-perihelion gas distribution profiles. The resulting molecular lightcurves are compared with the photometric lightcurves of Schlicher et al. (1990) to show that the rotational information is encoded in the observed gas distribution within the coma. The molecular lightcurves can differentiate between the preferred Schlicher et al. average period and the period they find for the same time interval as the spectra.

  20. Pore scale distribution of gas hydrates in sediments by micro X-ray Computed Tomography (X-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, G.; Li, C.; Ye, Y.; Liu, C.; Best, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    A dedicated apparatus was developed to observe in-situ pore scale distribution of gas hydrate directly during hydrate formation in artificial cores. The high-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (type: GE Sensing & Inspection Technologies GmbH Phoenix x-ray V/tomex/s) was used and the effective resolution for observing gas hydrate bearing sediments can up to about 18μm. Methane gas hydrate was formed in 0.425-0.85mm sands under a pressure of 6MPa and a temperature of 3°C. During the process, CT scanning was conducted if there's a pressure drop (the scanning time is 66 minutes each time), so that the hydrate morphology could be detected. As a result, five scanning CT images of the same section during gas hydrate formation (i.e. hydrate saturation at 3.9%, 24.6%, 35.0%, 51.4% and 97.0%) were obtained. The result shows that at each hydrate saturation level, hydrate morphology models are complicated. The occurrence of 'floating model' (i.e. hydrate floats in pore fluid), 'contact model' (i.e. hydrate contact with the sediment particle), and the 'cementing model' (i.e. hydrates cement the sediment particles) can be found at the same time (Fig. 1). However, it shows that at different hydrate formation stages, the dominant hydrate morphology are not the same. For instance, at the first stage of hydrate formation, although there are some hydrates floating in the pore fluid, most hydrates connect the sediment particles. Consequently, the hydrate morphology at this moment can be described as a cementing model. With this method, it can be obtained that at the higher level of saturation (e.g., hydrate saturation at 24.6% and 35.0%), hydrates are mainly grow as a floating model. As hydrate saturation is much higher (e.g. after hydrate saturation is more than 51.4%), however, the floating hydrates coalesce with each other and the hydrates cement the sediment particle again. The direct observed hydrate morphology presented here may have significant impact on investigating

  1. Evolution of bubble size distribution from gas blowout in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Loney, Norman; Geng, Xiaolong

    2016-03-01

    Gas is often emanated from the sea bed during a subsea oil and gas blowout. The size of a gas bubble changes due to gas dissolution in the ambient water and expansion as a result of a decrease in water pressure during the rise. It is important to understand the fate and transport of gas bubbles for the purpose of environmental and safety concerns. In this paper, we used the numerical model, VDROP-J to simulate gas formation in jet/plume upon release, and dissolution and expansion while bubble rising during a relatively shallow subsea gas blowout. The model predictions were an excellent match to the experimental data. Then a gas dissolution and expansion module was included in the VDROP-J model to predict the fate and transport of methane bubbles rising due to a blowout through a 0.10 m vertical orifice. The numerical results indicated that gas bubbles would increase the mixing energy in released jets, especially at small distances and large distances from the orifice. This means that models that predict the bubble size distribution (BSD) should account for this additional mixing energy. It was also found that only bubbles of certain sizes would reach the water surfaces; small bubbles dissolve fast in the water column, while the size of the large bubbles decreases. This resulted in a BSD that was bimodal near the orifice, and then became unimodal.

  2. Quantification Approach of Gas Temperate Distribution in Atmospheric Positive DC Glow Discharge Measured by Spectroscopic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasamoto, Ryo; Orii, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Takao; Izawa, Yasuji; Nishijima, Kiyoto

    2015-09-01

    In our previous work, a two-dimensional (2D) gas temperature distribution in a positive DC steady-state glow corona was qualitatively measured by spectroscopic imaging. Spectral images of its glow corona were taken using ICCD camera with ultra-narrow band-pass filters, and they were corresponded to the head and tail of a second positive system bands of nitrogen (2PS N2 (0-2)). The qualitative gas temperature was obtained from the emission intensity ratio (I2 Ptail/I2 Phead) between the head and tail of 2PS N2 (0-2). This emission intensity ratio also equals the rotational temperature (TR) , and TR almost equals the gas temperature (TG) in atmospheric pressure. In this work, the qualitative 2D gas temperature distribution was derived from 2D I2 Ptail/I2 Phead plots, and the calibration date of I2 Ptail/I2 Phead for TR was accumulated by investigating the relationship between the spatially average absolute gas temperature (Tav) obtained by single-point spectroscopic measurement and the average value of I2 Ptail/I2 Phead plots. On the basis of the calibration date, a spectroscopically-imaged qualitative 2D I2 Ptail/I2 Phead distribution in a positive DC glow corona was converted to a quantitative 2D image of gas rotational temperature.

  3. Application and evaluation of foreign systems for lining gas distribution service pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.R.; Gauthier, S.W.; Spivey, A.J.

    1996-08-01

    This paper summarizes a Gas Research Institute program to test and evaluate trenchless rehabilitation technologies for lining gas distribution service pipes. The technical approach for the program was to evaluate foreign service lining systems, determine industry needs versus system capabilities, conduct controlled laboratory evaluations, and perform field evaluations. Two techniques in use at Japanese and British gas companies were investigated, and trials were conducted at six U.S. gas utilities. The reverse lining method of the Japanese utilities was successfully applied to service pipes of 1 to 4 inch diameter for lengths up to 90 feet. The RENU live insertion method used by British Gas is also a potentially viable option for service line renewal. 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Full-spectrum k-distribution look-up table for nonhomogeneous gas-soot mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaojun; Modest, Michael F.; He, Boshu

    2016-06-01

    Full-spectrum k-distribution (FSK) look-up tables provide great accuracy combined with outstanding numerical efficiency for the evaluation of radiative transfer in nonhomogeneous gaseous media. However, previously published tables cannot be used for gas-soot mixtures that are found in most combustion scenarios since it is impossible to assemble k-distributions for a gas mixed with nongray absorbing particles from gas-only full-spectrum k-distributions. Consequently, a new FSK look-up table has been constructed by optimizing the previous table recently published by the authors and then adding one soot volume fraction to this optimized table. Two steps comprise the optimization scheme: (1) direct calculation of the nongray stretching factors (a-values) using the k-distributions (k-values) rather than tabulating them; (2) deletion of unnecessary mole fractions at many thermodynamic states. Results show that after optimization, the size of the new table is reduced from 5 GB (including the k-values and the a-values for gases only) to 3.2 GB (including the k-values for both gases and soot) while both accuracy and efficiency remain the same. Two scaled flames are used to validate the new table. It is shown that the new table gives results of excellent accuracy for those benchmark results together with cheap computational cost for both gas mixtures and gas-soot mixtures.

  5. PHIBSS: MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT AND SCALING RELATIONS IN z {approx} 1-3 MASSIVE, MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.; Wuyts, S.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Lutz, D.; Saintonge, A.; Neri, R.; Cox, P.; Combes, F.; Bolatto, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Bournaud, F.; Comerford, J.; Davis, M.; Newman, S.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Naab, T.; Omont, A. E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-05-01

    We present PHIBSS, the IRAM Plateau de Bure high-z blue sequence CO 3-2 survey of the molecular gas properties in massive, main-sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) near the cosmic star formation peak. PHIBSS provides 52 CO detections in two redshift slices at z {approx} 1.2 and 2.2, with log(M{sub *}(M{sub Sun })) {>=} 10.4 and log(SFR(M{sub Sun }/yr)) {>=} 1.5. Including a correction for the incomplete coverage of the M{sub *} -SFR plane, and adopting a ''Galactic'' value for the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor, we infer average gas fractions of {approx}0.33 at z {approx} 1.2 and {approx}0.47 at z {approx} 2.2. Gas fractions drop with stellar mass, in agreement with cosmological simulations including strong star formation feedback. Most of the z {approx} 1-3 SFGs are rotationally supported turbulent disks. The sizes of CO and UV/optical emission are comparable. The molecular-gas-star-formation relation for the z = 1-3 SFGs is near-linear, with a {approx}0.7 Gyr gas depletion timescale; changes in depletion time are only a secondary effect. Since this timescale is much less than the Hubble time in all SFGs between z {approx} 0 and 2, fresh gas must be supplied with a fairly high duty cycle over several billion years. At given z and M{sub *}, gas fractions correlate strongly with the specific star formation rate (sSFR). The variation of sSFR between z {approx} 0 and 3 is mainly controlled by the fraction of baryonic mass that resides in cold gas.

  6. Process for forming integral edge seals in porous gas distribution plates utilizing a vibratory means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigenbaum, Haim (Inventor); Pudick, Sheldon (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A process for forming an integral edge seal in a gas distribution plate for use in a fuel cell. A seal layer is formed along an edge of a porous gas distribution plate by impregnating the pores in the layer with a material adapted to provide a seal which is operative dry or when wetted by an electrolyte of a fuel cell. Vibratory energy is supplied to the sealing material during the step of impregnating the pores to provide a more uniform seal throughout the cross section of the plate.

  7. Quality of the log-geometric distribution extrapolation for smaller undiscovered oil and gas pool size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chenglin, L.; Charpentier, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey procedure for the estimation of the general form of the parent distribution requires that the parameters of the log-geometric distribution be calculated and analyzed for the sensitivity of these parameters to different conditions. In this study, we derive the shape factor of a log-geometric distribution from the ratio of frequencies between adjacent bins. The shape factor has a log straight-line relationship with the ratio of frequencies. Additionally, the calculation equations of a ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary are deduced. For a specific log-geometric distribution, we find that the ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary is the same. We apply our analysis to simulations based on oil and gas pool distributions from four petroleum systems of Alberta, Canada and four generated distributions. Each petroleum system in Alberta has a different shape factor. Generally, the shape factors in the four petroleum systems stabilize with the increase of discovered pool numbers. For a log-geometric distribution, the shape factor becomes stable when discovered pool numbers exceed 50 and the shape factor is influenced by the exploration efficiency when the exploration efficiency is less than 1. The simulation results show that calculated shape factors increase with those of the parent distributions, and undiscovered oil and gas resources estimated through the log-geometric distribution extrapolation are smaller than the actual values. ?? 2010 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  8. Fractal analysis of the dark matter and gas distributions in the Mare-Nostrum universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gaite, José

    2010-03-01

    We develop a method of multifractal analysis of N-body cosmological simulations that improves on the customary counts-in-cells method by taking special care of the effects of discreteness and large scale homogeneity. The analysis of the Mare-Nostrum simulation with our method provides strong evidence of self-similar multifractal distributions of dark matter and gas, with a halo mass function that is of Press-Schechter type but has a power-law exponent -2, as corresponds to a multifractal. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the dark matter and gas distributions are indistinguishable as multifractals. To determine if there is any gas biasing, we calculate the cross-correlation coefficient, with negative but inconclusive results. Hence, we develop an effective Bayesian analysis connected with information theory, which clearly demonstrates that the gas is biased in a long range of scales, up to the scale of homogeneity. However, entropic measures related to the Bayesian analysis show that this gas bias is small (in a precise sense) and is such that the fractal singularities of both distributions coincide and are identical. We conclude that this common multifractal cosmic web structure is determined by the dynamics and is independent of the initial conditions.

  9. Measurement of Concentration Distribution of Hydrogen Gas Flow by Measuring the Intensity of Raman Scattering Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Ippei; Ninomiya, Hideki

    An experimental study to visualize and measure the concentration distribution of hydrogen gas flow using the Raman scattering was performed. A Nd:YAG laser of wavelength at 355 nm was used, and the beam pattern was transformed into a rectangle and a sheet beam was formed. The Raman scattered light was observed at a right angle with respect to the laser beam axis using a gated ICCD camera and an interference filter. Shadowgraph images were obtained at the same condition. The Raman scattering light image from atmospheric nitrogen was first acquired and the function of Raman scattering light acquisition and the background light suppression was confirmed. Next, images of the Raman scattering light image and shadowgraph of hydrogen gas discharged from a nozzle into the atmosphere were acquired. The two obtained Raman images were compared and the spatial concentration distribution of the flow of the hydrogen gas at different flow rates was calculated. This method is effective for visualizing the gas flow and measuring the concentration distribution of the Raman active molecules, such as hydrogen gas.

  10. [Spatial distribution pattern of main populations and gap makers in Picea koraiensis and Abies nephrolepis forest of Xiaoxing' an Mountains, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Jing, Xin; Duan, Wen-biao; Chen, Li-xin; Wang, Ting; Du, Shan; Zhang, Yu-shuan; Chen, Qi-min

    2015-10-01

    Species composition and diameter class structure were investigated in 1.5 hm2 (100 m x 150 n) permanent plot in Picea koraiensis and Abies nephrolepis forest of Xiaoxing' an Mountains. The spatial distribution pattern and spatial association of main populations and gap makers were analyzed by using point pattern analysis. The results showed that there were a total of 13 species with diameters at breast height greater than 2 cm in tree layer, and great differences were observed in the densities of main populations. The importance values of A. nephrolepis, P. koraiensis, Betula platyphylla and Acer ukurunduense were ranked in the first 4 in the plot. The diameter class structure of their populations presented an inverse 'J' curve. The spatial distribution patterns for A. nephrolepis and P. koraiensis were similar, which changed from aggregated, random to uniform distribution with the spatial scale. For B. platyphylla, the distribution was aggregated at ≤40 m scale, and random at >40 m scale, whereas A. ukurunduense presented an aggregated distribution pattern at the whole research scale. Except that the negative correlation between B. platyphylla and A. ukurunduense existed at the whole research scale, positive correlation between the other populations at small scale and negative correlation at large scale were observed. Only A. nephrolepis and B. platyphylla had significant positive correlation, and generally no significant correlation existed between other populations. Spatial distribution pattern of gap makers was characterized as aggregated distribution at small and middle scales, and random distribution with increasing scale. Spatial point pattern of gap makers formed by uprooting exhibited unimodal type distribution, and random, aggregated, and uniform distribution also occurred. Spatial point pattern of gap makers formed by breaking overall presented a little fluctuation, random and aggregated distributions alternatively appeared at small scale, and random

  11. Study On Temperature Distribution In T Fittings - Polyethylene Natural Gas Pipes Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigean, Eugen

    2015-09-01

    The present paper intends to approach theoretically and experimentally an important topic concerning the operational safety of the polyethylene pipes used in natural gas distribution. We discuss the influence of temperature in the high density polyethylene elbows during welding to the polyethylene pipes.

  12. 77 FR 34123 - Pipeline Safety: Public Meeting on Integrity Management of Gas Distribution Pipelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... published on December 4, 2009, (74 FR 63906). The rule required that operators of gas distribution pipelines... regulations by providing an overview of the rule, including expectations of regulatory definitions (such as identification of threats, methodologies for segmentation of assets for evaluation of risk, risk...

  13. Gas Chromatographic Verification of a Mathematical Model: Product Distribution Following Methanolysis Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, R. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated application of binomial statistics to equilibrium distribution of ester systems by employing gas chromatography to verify the mathematical model used. Discusses model development and experimental techniques, indicating the model enables a straightforward extension to symmetrical polyfunctional esters and presents a mathematical basis…

  14. Fish species and community distributions as proxies for sea-floor habitat distributions: the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary example (northwest Atlantic, Gulf Of Maine)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auster, Peter J.; Joy, Kevin; Valentine, Page C.

    2001-01-01

    Defining the habitats of fishes and associated fauna on outer continental shelves is problematic given the paucity of data on the actual types and distributions of seafloor habitats. However many regions have good data on the distributions of fishes from resource surveys or catch statistics because of the economic importance of the fisheries. Fish distribution data (species or communities) have been used as a proxy for the distribution of habitats to develop precautionary conservation strategies for habitat protection (e.g., marine protected areas, fishing gear restrictions). In this study we assessed the relationships between the distributions of fish communities and species derived from trawl survey data with the spatial distribution of sediment types determined by sampling and acoustic reflectance derived from multibeam sonar surveys in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Fish communities were correlated with reflectance values but all communities did not occur in unique sediment types. This suggests that use of community distributions as proxies for habitats should include the caveat that a greater number of communities within an area could indicate a greater range of habitat types. Single species distributions showed relationships between abundance and reflectance values. Trawl catches with low abundances had wide variations in reflectance values while those with high abundances had narrower ranges indicating habitat affinities. Significant non-random frequency-dependent relationships were observed for 17 of 20 species although only 12 of 20 species had significant relationships based on rank correlation. These results suggest that species distributions based on trawl survey data can be used as proxies for the distribution of seafloor habitats. Species with known habitat associations can be used to infer habitat requirements of co-occurring species and can be used to identify a range of habitat types.

  15. Fish species and community distributions as proxies for seafloor habitat distributions: The Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary example (Northwest Atlantic, Gulf of Maine)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auster, P.J.; Joy, K.; Valentine, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    Defining the habitats of fishes and associated fauna on outer continental shelves is problematic given the paucity of data on the actual types and distributions of seafloor habitats. However many regions have good data on the distributions of fishes from resource surveys or catch statistics because of the economic importance of the fisheries. Fish distribution data (species or communities) have been used as a proxy for the distribution of habitats to develop precautionary conservation strategies for habitat protection (e.g., marine protected areas, fishing gear restrictions). In this study we assessed the relationships between the distributions of fish communities and species derived from trawl survey data with the spatial distribution of sediment types determined by sampling and acoustic reflectance derived from multibeam sonar surveys in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Fish communities were correlated with reflectance values but all communities did not occur in unique sediment types. This suggests that use of community distributions as proxies for habitats should include the caveat that a greater number of communities within an area could indicate a greater range of habitat types. Single species distributions showed relationships between abundance and reflectance values. Trawl catches with low abundances had wide variations in reflectance values while those with high abundances had narrower ranges indicating habitat affinities. Significant non-random frequency-dependent relationships were observed for 17 of 20 species although only 12 of 20 species had significant relationships based on rank correlation. These results suggest that species distributions based on trawl survey data can be used as proxies for the distribution of seafloor habitats. Species with known habitat associations can be used to infer habitat requirements of co-occurring species and can be used to identify a range of habitat types.

  16. Catalogue of the main gas manifestations in the Hellenic territory: a first step towards the estimation of the nationwide geogenic gas output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; D'Alessandro, Walter; Calabrese, Sergio; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Parello, Franco

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of gaseous emissions in geological systems is an important branch because it is a major source of greenhouse gas to the atmospheric budget. Of geological environments, there are two different categories: the first category includes emissions of the predominant carbon dioxide (CO2), while the second includes emissions of the predominant methane (CH4). The Hellenic territory has a very complex geodynamic setting deriving from a long and complicated geological history. It is strongly characterized by intense seismic activity and enhanced geothermal gradient. This activity, with the contribution of an active volcanic arc, favours the existence of many cold and thermal gas manifestations. Geogenic sources release huge amounts of gases, which, apart from having important influences on the global climate, could also have a strong impact on human health. Geochemical studies based on the isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen, along with helium isotopic ratios have become a good indicator of the origin of the gas. The isotopic ratio 13C/12C of CO2 expressed in δ 13C (‰), provides important information about the amount of CO2 released from the Earth's crust or mantle. For methane, carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions and C1/(C2+C3) hydrocarbon ratios can characterize the origin of methane: biogenic (thermogenic or microbial) or abiogenic. Helium isotopic ratios provide additional information about crustal or mantle origin of the gas. In the present work, a large set of chemical and isotopic data is presented aiming at the identification of areas with geogenic gas emissions and their characterization in terms of different gas composition and origin. The present catalogue should be the base for the estimation total nationwide geogenic CO2 and CH4 fluxes.

  17. Numerical Study of the Gas Distribution in an Oxygen Blast Furnace. Part 1: Model Building and Basic Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-09-01

    Based on multifluid theory, transport phenomena theory, metallurgical reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, and computational fluid dynamics, a multifluid model for an oxygen blast furnace was established to evaluate the gas distribution in a furnace. The uneven distribution of recycling gas in oxygen blast furnaces was found to be a severe problem. This uneven distribution resulted from injecting a large amount of recycling gas into the furnace shaft. Gas distribution substantially affects the energy and heat utilization of an oxygen blast furnace. Therefore, the basic characteristics of the gas distribution in an oxygen blast furnace are illustrated. The results show that in the top of the oxygen blast furnace, the concentration differences of the CO and CO2 between the center and edge reach 7.8% and 11.7%, respectively. The recycling gas from the shaft tuyere only penetrates to two thirds the length of the radius.

  18. Diffused waveguiding capillary tube with distributed feedback for a gas laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    For use in a waveguide gas laser, a capillary tube of glass or ceramic has an inner surface defining a longitudinal capillary opening through which the laser gas flows. At least a portion of the inner surface is corrugated with corrugations or channels with a periodicity Lambda where Lambda = 1/2 Lambda, Lambda being the laser gas wavelength. The tube includes a diffused region extending outwardly from the opening. The diffused region of a depth d on the order of 1 Lambda to 3 Lambda acts as a waveguide for the waves, with the corrugations producing distributed feedback. The evanescent component of the waves traveling in the diffused region interact with the laser gas in the opening, gaining energy, and thereby amplifying the waves travelling in the diffused region, which exit the diffused region, surrounding the opening, as a beam of wavelength Lambda.

  19. Maps showing gas-hydrate distribution off the east coast of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Fehlhaber, Kristen L.; Coleman, Dwight F.; Lee, Myung W.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    1995-01-01

    These maps present the inferred distribution of natural-gas hydrate within the sediments of the eastern United States continental margin (Exclusive Economic Zone) in the offshore region from Georgia to New Jersey (fig. 1). The maps, which were created on the basis of seismic interpretations, represent the first attempt to map volume estimates for gas hydrate. Gas hydrate forms a large reservoir for methane in oceanic sediments. Therefore it potentially may represent a future source of energy and it may influence climate change because methane is a very effective greenhouse gas. Hydrate breakdown probably is a controlling factor for sea-floor landslides, and its presence has significant effect on the acoustic velocity of sea-floor sediments.

  20. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CAST IRON MAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    “Colored water” resulting from suspended iron particles is a common drinking water consumer complaint which is largely impacted by water chemistry. A bench scale study, performed on a 90 year-old corroded cast-iron pipe section removed from a drinking water distribution system, w...

  1. [Effects of wheat-oilseed rape intercropping and methyl salicylate application on the spatial distributions of Sitobion avenae and its main natural enemies].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Liu, Ying-Jie; Wang, Guang; Liu, Yong

    2012-07-01

    A field investigation was conducted on the spatial distributions of Sitobion avenae and its main natural enemies under wheat-oilseed rape intercropping and methyl salicylate application. With the development of wheat plant, an alternation from aggregation to uniform was observed in the spatial distribution of S. avenae under the intercropping and methyl salicylate application, being more obvious under the interaction of the two practices. The spatial distribution of S. avenae natural enemies was in accordance with that of the aphid. These results could be used for the reference of sampling investigation and forecast of wheat aphid and its natural enemies in field.

  2. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    PubMed

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  3. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively. PMID:21267082

  4. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  5. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    PubMed

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively. PMID:21267082

  6. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    SciTech Connect

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-12-15

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 {mu}F, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  7. Fluoride enrichment mechanism and geospatial distribution in the volcanic aquifers of the Middle Awash basin, Northern Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furi, Wakgari; Razack, Moumtaz; Abiye, Tamiru Alemayehu; Ayenew, Tenalem; Legesse, Dagnachew

    2011-07-01

    Considering the anomalous concentration of fluoride in the ground waters of the Middle Awash basin, a comprehensive survey of the enrichment mechanism as well as its association with common hydrochemical variables was conducted using multivariate statistical methods, Hierarchal Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The HCA results indicate a marked heterogeneous spatial distribution of the fluoride concentration, the magnitude of which varies more gradually in the SSW-NNE direction along the Wonji Fault Belt (WFB) than it does in the E-W direction away from this belt. This is strongly associated with the geothermal anomaly that is prominent in the basin interior area. Furthermore, the PCA results show that the magnitude of the fluoride concentration is higher in the groundwater derived from non-calcium bearing aquifers, which are widely distributed in the rift floor. Hydrochemical processes involving a cation exchange reaction cause a systematic Ca 2+ removal from solution from highland towards the rift floor. This geochemical reaction enhances the fluoride enrichment of groundwater along the same flow direction. In this regard, the geothermal belt of the basin interior area is a hydrogeological block marked by high loads of fluoride whereas the plateau areas are low-fluoride zones. The geospatial distribution of fluoride at the basin scale was estimated using the kriging procedure. Appropriate discrimination between local and regional aquifers is important in order to secure low-fluoride water supply for the community in the basin.

  8. Numerical Study of the Gas Distribution in an Oxygen Blast Furnace. Part 2: Effects of the Design and Operating Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-09-01

    Gas distribution plays a significant role in an oxygen blast furnace. The uneven distribution of recycling gas from the shaft tuyere has been shown to affect the heat distribution and energy utilization in an oxygen blast furnace. Therefore, the optimal design and operating parameters beneficial to the gas distribution in an oxygen blast furnace should be determined. In total, three parameters and 22 different conditions in an oxygen blast furnace multifluid model were considered. The gas and heat distributions in an oxygen blast furnace under different conditions were simulated and compared. The study revealed that when the height of shaft tuyere decreased from 7.8 m to 3.8 m, the difference in top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 11.6%. When the recycling gas temperature increased from 1123 K to 1473 K, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.9%. As the allocation ratio increased from 0.90 to 1.94, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.0%. Considering both gas and heat distributions, a shaft tuyere height of 3.8 m to 4.8 m, a recycling gas temperature of 1473 K and an allocation ratio of 1.94 are recommended in practice under the conditions of this study.

  9. Distribution and source of main contaminants in surface sediments of tidal flats in the Northern Shandong Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhijie; Li, Peiying; Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Ping; Xu, Yuanqin

    2014-10-01

    Twenty-nine samples of surface sediments from tidal flats in the Northern Shandong Province were collected for grain size, heavy metal (Hg, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cr), and oil pollution analyses. The geoaccumulation index ( I geo) and factor analysis were introduced to evaluate sediment quality and source of contaminants. The mean concentrations of Hg, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, and oil in the surface sediments in the study area are 0.033, 17.756, 19.121, 55.700, 0.291, 59.563, and 14.213 μg g-1, respectively. The heavy metal contamination in the old delta lobe is slightly higher than that in the abandoned delta lobe; however, the opposite was observed for oil pollution. The I geo results revealed that the overall quality of the surface sediments in the study area is in good condition. The heavy metal pollution levels show a descending order: Cd> Hg> Cr> Cu> Zn> Pb, Cd being the main pollutant. The contamination level for in the study area is relatively lower than those for China's other tidal flats. Heavy metals are mainly derived from natural sources of rock weathering and erosion, partly influenced by industrial and agricultural discharge. However, oil pollution is mainly from runoff input, motorized fishing boat sewage, and oil exploitation.

  10. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Distribution and origin of groundwater methane in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2014-01-01

    Public concerns over potential environmental contamination associated with oil and gas well drilling and fracturing in the Wattenberg field in northeast Colorado are increasing. One of the issues of concern is the migration of oil, gas, or produced water to a groundwater aquifer resulting in contamination of drinking water. Since methane is the major component of natural gas and it can be dissolved and transported with groundwater, stray gas in aquifers has elicited attention. The initial step toward understanding the environmental impacts of oil and gas activities, such as well drilling and fracturing, is to determine the occurrence, where it is and where it came from. In this study, groundwater methane data that has been collected in response to a relatively new regulation in Colorado is analyzed. Dissolved methane was detected in 78% of groundwater wells with an average concentration of 4.0 mg/L and a range of 0-37.1 mg/L. Greater than 95% of the methane found in groundwater wells was classified as having a microbial origin, and there was minimal overlap between the C and H isotopic characterization of the produced gas and dissolved methane measured in the aquifer. Neither density of oil/gas wells nor distance to oil/gas wells had a significant impact on methane concentration suggesting other important factors were influencing methane generation and distribution. Thermogenic methane was detected in two aquifer wells indicating a potential contamination pathway from the producing formation, but microbial-origin gas was by far the predominant source of dissolved methane in the Wattenberg field. PMID:24456231

  12. Distribution and origin of groundwater methane in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2014-01-01

    Public concerns over potential environmental contamination associated with oil and gas well drilling and fracturing in the Wattenberg field in northeast Colorado are increasing. One of the issues of concern is the migration of oil, gas, or produced water to a groundwater aquifer resulting in contamination of drinking water. Since methane is the major component of natural gas and it can be dissolved and transported with groundwater, stray gas in aquifers has elicited attention. The initial step toward understanding the environmental impacts of oil and gas activities, such as well drilling and fracturing, is to determine the occurrence, where it is and where it came from. In this study, groundwater methane data that has been collected in response to a relatively new regulation in Colorado is analyzed. Dissolved methane was detected in 78% of groundwater wells with an average concentration of 4.0 mg/L and a range of 0-37.1 mg/L. Greater than 95% of the methane found in groundwater wells was classified as having a microbial origin, and there was minimal overlap between the C and H isotopic characterization of the produced gas and dissolved methane measured in the aquifer. Neither density of oil/gas wells nor distance to oil/gas wells had a significant impact on methane concentration suggesting other important factors were influencing methane generation and distribution. Thermogenic methane was detected in two aquifer wells indicating a potential contamination pathway from the producing formation, but microbial-origin gas was by far the predominant source of dissolved methane in the Wattenberg field.

  13. Distribution and controls on gas hydrate in the ocean-floor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    Methane hydrate, a crystalline solid that is formed of water and gas molecules, is widespread in oceanic sediments. It occurs at water depths that exceed 300 to 500 m and in a zone that commonly extends from the sea floor, down several hundred meters - the base of the zone is limited by increased temperature. To determine factors that control gas hydrate concentration, we have mapped its distribution off the U.S. Atlantic coast using acoustic remote-sensing methods. Most natural gas hydrate is formed from biogenic methane, and therefore it is concentrated where there is a rapid accumulation of organic detritus and also where there is a rapid accumulation of sediments (which protect detritus from oxidation). When hydrate fills the pore space of sediment, it can reduce permeability and create a gas trap. Such trapping of gas beneath hydrate may cause the formation of the most concentrated hydrate deposits, perhaps because the gas that is held in the trap can slowly diffuse upwards or migrate through faults. Hydrate-sealed traps are formed by hills on the sea floor, by dipping strata, or by salt(?) domes. Off the southeastern United States, a small area (only 3000 km{sup 2}) beneath a ridge formed by rapidly-deposited sediments appears to contain a volume of methane in hydrate that is equivalent to {approximately}30 times the U.S. annual consumption of gas. The breakdown of hydrate can cause submarine landslides by converting the hydrate to gas plus water and generating a rise of pore pressure. Conversely, sea-floor landslides can cause breakdown of hydrate by reducing the pressure in sediments. These interacting processes may cause cascading slides, which would result in breakdown of hydrate and release of methane to the atmosphere. This addition of methane to the global greenhouse would significantly influence climate. Gas hydrate in sea-floor sediments is potentially significant to climate, energy resources, and sea-floor stability.

  14. 77 FR 5472 - Pipeline Safety: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Systems to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ...: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Systems to Applications Other Than Single-Family... Safety: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves (EFVs) in Gas Distribution Systems to Applications Other... FR 72666). The ANPRM sought public comment on several issues related to expanding the use of EFVs...

  15. Search for a Lorentz invariant velocity distribution of a relativistic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curado, Evaldo M. F.; Germani, Felipe T. L.; Soares, Ivano Damião

    2016-02-01

    We examine the problem of the relativistic velocity distribution in a 1-dim relativistic gas in thermal equilibrium. We use numerical simulations of the relativistic molecular dynamics for a gas with two components, light and heavy particles. However in order to obtain the numerical data our treatment distinguishes two approaches in the construction of the histograms for the same relativistic molecular dynamic simulations. The first, largely considered in the literature, consists in constructing histograms with constant bins in the velocity variable and the second consists in constructing histograms with constant bins in the rapidity variable which yields Lorentz invariant histograms, contrary to the first approach. For histograms with constant bins in the velocity variable the numerical data are fitted accurately by the Jüttner distribution which is also not Lorentz invariant. On the other hand, the numerical data obtained from histograms constructed with constant bins in the rapidity variable, which are Lorentz invariant, are accurately fitted by a Lorentz invariant distribution whose derivation is discussed in this paper. The histograms thus constructed are not fitted by the Jütter distribution (as they should not). Our derivation is based on the special theory of relativity, the central limit theorem and the Lobachevsky structure of the velocity space of the theory, where the rapidity variable plays a crucial role. For v2 /c2 ≪ 1 and 1 / β ≡kB T /m0c2 ≪ 1 the distribution tends to the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution.

  16. Central Appalachian basin natural gas database: distribution, composition, and origin of natural gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Román Colón, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled a database consisting of three worksheets of central Appalachian basin natural gas analyses and isotopic compositions from published and unpublished sources of 1,282 gas samples from Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The database includes field and reservoir names, well and State identification number, selected geologic reservoir properties, and the composition of natural gases (methane; ethane; propane; butane, iso-butane [i-butane]; normal butane [n-butane]; iso-pentane [i-pentane]; normal pentane [n-pentane]; cyclohexane, and hexanes). In the first worksheet, location and American Petroleum Institute (API) numbers from public or published sources are provided for 1,231 of the 1,282 gas samples. A second worksheet of 186 gas samples was compiled from published sources and augmented with public location information and contains carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic measurements of natural gas. The third worksheet is a key for all abbreviations in the database. The database can be used to better constrain the stratigraphic distribution, composition, and origin of natural gas in the central Appalachian basin.

  17. Influence of Permian salt dissolution on distribution of shallow Niobrara gas fields, eastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, D.W.; Smosna, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Subsurface analysis of Permian salt and related strata in the shallow Niobrara gas area on the eastern flank of the Denver basin reveals that the location of faulted anticlines which produce gas from porous chalk is related to the occurrence of six Nippewalla Group (Leonardian) salt zones. Salt distribution is controlled by the configuration of evaporate basins during the Leonardian, truncation at a sub-Jurassic unconformity (which has completely removed Guadalupian salts), and post-Jurassic subsurface dissolution. Significant dissolution took place in response to Laramide orogeny and subsequent eastward regional groundwater flow within the Lyons (Cedar Hills) Sandstone aquifer. Initially, dissolution occurred along a regional facies change from sandstone to salt. Solution collapse allowed for cross-formational flow and removal of younger salts. Shallow Niobrara gas fields are situated above salt outliers or along regionally updip salt edges. No significant Niobrara production exists in areas where salt is absent. Structural relief across fields is related to Leonardian thickness variations, rather than subsalt offset. Seismic data reveal abrupt Leonardian thinning at the regionally updip limit of Eckley field, which has produced over 33 BCFG. Thickness of residual salt may be important in controlling the amount of gas trapped within the Niobrara. Where thick salts are preserved, structural relief is greater, the gas-water transition zone is thicker, and gas saturation is higher at the crests of faulted anticlines.

  18. Distribution of Organophosphate Esters between the Gas and Particle Phase-Model Predictions vs Measured Data.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Wolschke, Hendrik; Diamond, Miriam L; Jantunen, Liisa M; Scheringer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Gas-particle partitioning is one of the key factors that affect the environmental fate of semivolatile organic chemicals. Many organophosphate esters (OPEs) have been reported to primarily partition to particles in the atmosphere. However, because of the wide range of their physicochemical properties, it is unlikely that OPEs are mainly in the particle phase "as a class". We compared gas-particle partitioning predictions for 32 OPEs made by the commonly used OECD POV and LRTP Screening Tool ("the Tool") with the partitioning models of Junge-Pankow (J-P) and Harner-Bidleman (H-B), as well as recently measured data on OPE gas-particle partitioning. The results indicate that half of the tested OPEs partition into the gas phase. Partitioning into the gas phase seems to be determined by an octanol-air partition coefficient (log KOA) < 10 and a subcooled liquid vapor pressure (log PL) > -5 (PL in Pa), as well as the total suspended particle concentration (TSP) in the sampling area. The uncertainty of the physicochemical property data of the OPEs did not change this estimate. Furthermore, the predictions by the Tool, J-P- and H-B-models agreed with recently measured OPE gas-particle partitioning. PMID:27144674

  19. JUPITER WILL BECOME A HOT JUPITER: CONSEQUENCES OF POST-MAIN-SEQUENCE STELLAR EVOLUTION ON GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Madhusudhan, Nikku E-mail: Nikku.Madhusudhan@yale.edu

    2012-09-10

    When the Sun ascends the red giant branch (RGB), its luminosity will increase and all the planets will receive much greater irradiation than they do now. Jupiter, in particular, might end up more highly irradiated than the hot Neptune GJ 436b and, hence, could appropriately be termed a 'hot Jupiter'. When their stars go through the RGB or asymptotic giant branch stages, many of the currently known Jupiter-mass planets in several-AU orbits will receive levels of irradiation comparable to the hot Jupiters, which will transiently increase their atmospheric temperatures to {approx}1000 K or more. Furthermore, massive planets around post-main-sequence stars could accrete a non-negligible amount of material from the enhanced stellar winds, thereby significantly altering their atmospheric chemistry as well as causing a significant accretion luminosity during the epochs of most intense stellar mass loss. Future generations of infrared observatories might be able to probe the thermal and chemical structure of such hot Jupiters' atmospheres. Finally, we argue that, unlike their main-sequence analogs (whose zonal winds are thought to be organized in only a few broad, planetary-scale jets), red-giant hot Jupiters should have multiple, narrow jets of zonal winds and efficient day-night redistribution.

  20. Distribution and Mass of Diffuse and Dense CO Gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Heyer, Mark; Brunt, Christopher M.; Clark, Paul; Klessen, Ralf; Shetty, Rahul

    2016-02-01

    Emission from carbon monoxide (CO) is ubiquitously used as a tracer of dense star-forming molecular clouds. There is, however, growing evidence that a significant fraction of CO emission originates from diffuse molecular gas. Quantifying the contribution of diffuse CO-emitting gas is vital for understanding the relation between molecular gas and star formation. We examine the Galactic distribution of two CO-emitting gas components, a high column density component detected in 13CO and 12CO, and a low column density component detected in 12CO, but not in 13CO. The “diffuse” and “dense” components are identified using a combination of smoothing, masking, and erosion/dilation procedures, making use of three large-scale 12CO and 13CO surveys of the inner and outer Milky Way. The diffuse component, which globally represents 25% (1.5 × 108M⊙) of the total molecular gas mass (6.5 × {10}8 M⊙), is more extended perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The fraction of diffuse gas increases from ˜10%-20% at a galactocentric radius of 3-4 kpc to 50% at 15 kpc, and increases with decreasing surface density. In the inner Galaxy, a yet denser component traced by CS emission represents 14% of the total molecular gas mass traced by 12CO emission. Only 14% of the molecular gas mass traced by 12CO emission is identified as part of molecular clouds in 13CO surveys by cloud identification algorithms. This study indicates that CO emission not only traces star-forming clouds, but also a significant diffuse molecular ISM component.

  1. Brightness variation distributions among main belt asteroids from sparse light-curve sampling with Pan-STARRS 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, A.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Jedicke, R.; Wainscoat, R.; Denneau, L.; Vereš, P.; Magnier, E.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Waters, C.

    2016-07-01

    The rotational state of asteroids is controlled by various physical mechanisms including collisions, internal damping and the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack effect. We have analysed the changes in magnitude between consecutive detections of ˜60 000 asteroids measured by the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (PanSTARRS) 1 survey during its first 18 months of operations. We have attempted to explain the derived brightness changes physically and through the application of a simple model. We have found a tendency towards smaller magnitude variations with decreasing diameter for objects of 1 < D < 8 km. Assuming the shape distribution of objects in this size range to be independent of size and composition our model suggests a population with average axial ratios 1 : 0.85 ± 0.13 : 0.71 ± 0.13, with larger objects more likely to have spin axes perpendicular to the orbital plane.

  2. Three-Dimensional Statistical Gas Distribution Mapping in an Uncontrolled Indoor Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Reggente, Matteo; Lilienthal, Achim J.

    2009-05-23

    In this paper we present a statistical method to build three-dimensional gas distribution maps (3D-DM). The proposed mapping technique uses kernel extrapolation with a tri-variate Gaussian kernel that models the likelihood that a reading represents the concentration distribution at a distant location in the three dimensions. The method is evaluated using a mobile robot equipped with three 'e-noses' mounted at different heights. Initial experiments in an uncontrolled indoor environment are presented and evaluated with respect to the ability of the 3D map, computed from the lower and upper nose, to predict the map from the middle nose.

  3. The dynamic wall and gas temperature distributions in a graphite furnace atomiser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademeyer, C. J.; Human, H. G. C.; Faure, P. K.

    A model is presented for calculation of the dynamic wall and gas temperature distribution of a heated graphite furnace used for analytical atomic absorption measurements. Numerical iterative procedures were used to obtain data for a furnace of specific dimensions (28 × 6 mm), as well as "shaped" variants of this bask design. Instrumental parameters such as the voltage applied and the resistivity of the graphite were measured accurately and the values used in the model so that the real situation on a commercial instrument was resembled well Results of absorbance-time measurements enabled the temperature distribution to be known at all stages of the evolution of the analyte absorbance pulse. It is shown that for shaped furnaces, the gas temperature at the centre of the furnace can be lower than that at some intermediate positions, as well as higher than the furnace wall temperature at the centre. Results for the gas temperature at tube centre agree reasonably well with that of another model put forward recently. Due to problems associated with experimental measurement of gas temperatures, such values do not compare well with the theoretically calculated ones.

  4. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  5. Gas exchange and intrapulmonary distribution of ventilation during continuous-flow ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Vettermann, J.; Brusasco, V.; Rehder, K.

    1988-05-01

    In 12 anesthetized paralyzed dogs, pulmonary gas exchange and intrapulmonary inspired gas distribution were compared between continuous-flow ventilation (CFV) and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV). Nine dogs were studied while they were lying supine, and three dogs were studied while they were lying prone. A single-lumen catheter for tracheal insufflation and a double-lumen catheter for bilateral endobronchial insufflation (inspired O2 fraction = 0.4; inspired minute ventilation = 1.7 +/- 0.3 (SD) 1.kg-1.min-1) were evaluated. Intrapulmonary gas distribution was assessed from regional 133Xe clearances. In dogs lying supine, CO2 elimination was more efficient with endobronchial insufflation than with tracheal insufflation, but the alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference was larger during CFV than during CMV, regardless of the type of insufflation. By contrast, endobronchial insufflation maintained both arterial PCO2 and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference at significantly lower levels in dogs lying prone than in dogs lying supine. In dogs lying supine, the dependent lung was preferentially ventilated during CMV but not during CFV. In dogs lying prone, gas distribution was uniform with both modes of ventilation. The alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference during CFV in dogs lying supine was negatively correlated with the reduced ventilation of the dependent lung, which suggests that increased ventilation-perfusion mismatching was responsible for the increase in alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference. The more efficient oxygenation during CFV in dogs lying prone suggests a more efficient matching of ventilation to perfusion, presumably because the distribution of blood flow is also nearly uniform.

  6. Distribution of enantiomers of methadone and its main metabolite EDDP in human tissues and blood of postmortem cases.

    PubMed

    Holm, Karen Marie Dollerup; Linnet, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the distribution of methadone in postmortem human tissue and the effect of postmortem redistribution on methadone is today limited making the choice of a suitable substitute for femoral blood difficult when this is not available. Cardiac blood, femoral blood, muscle, and brain tissue concentrations of the enantiomers of methadone and its metabolite 2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolinium were recorded for 155 postmortem cases. Brain and muscle tissue concentrations exceeded the femoral blood concentrations with a median fold of 2.3 and 1.6, respectively, but both had a better correlation than cardiac blood to femoral blood concentrations. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant dependency on time and body mass index for some of the matrix ratios over femoral blood. We conclude brain or muscle tissue may constitute a better alternative for measurement of methadone than cardiac blood for situations in which femoral blood is not available, despite concentrations in both matrices being systematically higher.

  7. Heat Transfer and Pressure Distributions on a Gas Turbine Blade Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azad, Gm S.; Han, Je-Chin; Teng, Shuye; Boyle, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and static pressure distributions are experimentally investigated on a gas turbine blade tip in a five-bladed stationary linear cascade. The blade is a 2-dimensional model of a first stage gas turbine rotor blade with a blade tip profile of a GE-E(sup 3) aircraft gas turbine engine rotor blade. The flow condition in the test cascade corresponds to an overall pressure ratio of 1.32 and exit Reynolds number based on axial chord of 1.1 x 10(exp 6). The middle 3-blade has a variable tip gap clearance. All measurements are made at three different tip gap clearances of about 1%, 1.5%, and 2.5% of the blade span. Heat transfer measurements are also made at two different turbulence intensity levels of 6.1 % and 9.7% at the cascade inlet. Static pressure measurements are made in the mid-span and the near-tip regions as well as on the shroud surface, opposite the blade tip surface. Detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions on the plane tip surface are measured using a transient liquid crystal technique. Results show various regions of high and low heat transfer coefficient on the tip surface. Tip clearance has a significant influence on local tip beat transfer coefficient distribution. Heat transfer coefficient also increases about 15-20% along the leakage flow path at higher turbulence intensity level of 9.7% over 6.1 %.

  8. Widely tunable Sampled Grating Distributed Bragg Reflector Quantum Cascade laser for gas spectroscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diba, Abdou Salam

    Since the advent of semiconductor lasers, the development of tunable laser sources has been subject of many efforts in industry and academia arenas. This interest towards broadly tunable lasers is mainly due to the great promise they have in many applications ranging from telecommunication, to environmental science and homeland security, just to name a few. After the first demonstration of quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the early nineties, QCL has experienced a rapid development, so much so that QCLs are now the most reliable and efficient laser source in the Mid-IR range covering between 3 microm to 30 microm region of the electromagnetic spectrum. QCLs have almost all the desirable characteristics of a laser for spectroscopy applications such as narrow spectral linewidth ideal for high selectivity measurement, high power enabling high sensitivity sensing and more importantly they emit in the finger-print region of most of the trace gases and large molecules. The need for widely tunable QCLs is now more pressing than ever before. A single mode quantum cascade laser (QCL) such as a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, is an ideal light source for gas sensing in the MIR wavelength range. Despite their performance and reliability, DFB QCLs are limited by their relatively narrow wavelength tuning range determined by the thermal rollover of the laser. An external cavity (EC) QCL, on the other hand, is a widely tunable laser source, and so far is the choice mid-infrared single frequency light sources for detecting multiple species/large molecules. However, EC QCLs can be complex, bulky and expensive. In the quest for finding alternative broadly wavelength tunable sources in the mid-infrared, many monolithic tunable QCLs are recently proposed and fabricated, including SG-DBR, DFB-Arrays, Slot-hole etc. and they are all of potentially of interest as a candidate for multi-gas sensing and monitoring applications, due to their large tuning range (>50 cm-1), and potentially low

  9. Mobile Methane Measurements of Natural Gas Distribution and End-use Emissions in Indianapolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. K.; Roscioli, J. R.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Ferrara, T.

    2015-12-01

    Indianapolis is the site of the INFLUX program to investigate greenhouse gas emissions from a large metropolitan area. A key question in INFLUX is the relative contributions of methane emissions from the local gas distribution system in comparison to biogenic sources, such as the wastewater treatment system and landfills, and of end use emissions from furnaces and other combustion devices downstream of customer gas meters. During February and March, 2015, the Aerodyne van was used to measure methane, ethane, CO2 and other trace gases during mobile sampling traverses through a number of urban and suburban Indianapolis neighborhoods. Signatures of distinct natural gas emissions, biogenic emissions, and combustion emissions were observed in small plumes. In a number of cases, these sources were identified as manhole covers in city streets, where nearby leaks can seep into the local wastewater system. Quantification of ethane and methane from 45 manholes reveal that some had emissions that were clearly biogenic while others had a distinct natural gas signature. This paper describes the results from the analysis of these mobile data in the context of the current Indianapolis methane emission inventory.

  10. DETERMINING ALL GAS PROPERTIES IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE DARK MATTER DISTRIBUTION ALONE

    SciTech Connect

    Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hansen, Steen H.; Host, Ole; Roncadelli, Marco

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that all properties of the hot X-ray emitting gas in galaxy clusters are completely determined by the underlying dark matter (DM) structure. Apart from the standard conditions of spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium for the gas, our proof is based on the Jeans equation for the DM and two simple relations which have recently emerged from numerical simulations: the equality of the gas and DM temperatures, and the almost linear relation between the DM velocity anisotropy profile and its density slope. For DM distributions described by the Navarro-Frenk-White or the Sersic profiles, the resulting gas density profile, the gas-to-total-mass ratio profile, and the entropy profile are all in good agreement with X-ray observations. All these profiles are derived using zero free parameters. Our result allows us to predict the X-ray luminosity profile of a cluster in terms of its DM content alone. As a consequence, a new strategy becomes available to constrain the DM morphology in galaxy clusters from X-ray observations. Our results can also be used as a practical tool for creating initial conditions for realistic cosmological structures to be used in numerical simulations.

  11. Economics of liquefied natural gas production, transport and distribution for end use as a transportation fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, R.E.; Sutton, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas vehicles have been operating in the United States for over 30 years. With few exceptions, these vehicles are owned and operated by local gas utilities that utilize the natural gas in the compressed form (CNG), at pressures of up to 3,600 psi. However, the limited range, system weight and the high cost of fueling facilities presents a serious handicap for these compressed fuel systems. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) automotive fuel systems, on the other hand, are a relatively new player in the emerging clean fuels market. While the technical feasibility, safety, and operational suitability of LNG fuel systems have been demonstrated during the past 20 years, in a variety of test projects including automotive, marine, aviation, and rail systems, little has been done to commercialize or promote this technology. Recent independent cost comparisons and technical evaluations have been conducted by several major transit organizations and national truck fleets with interesting results. They have concluded that LNG automotive fuel systems can meet the performance and operational criteria of their gasoline and diesel fuel systems without compromising vehicle range or imposing unacceptable weight and payload penalties on their vehicles. The purpose of this paper is to further define the economics of LNG production, transportation and distribution costs. The liquefaction of natural gas is a mature technology and was first accomplished by Faraday in 1855. The first large scale plants were installed in the United States in 1941 and this paper provides a summary of the issues and costs associated with the procurement, installation, and operation of modern day natural gas liquefaction systems. There are no technical barriers to building LNG plants where needed. In addition to these {open_quotes}peak shaving{close_quotes} liquefaction plants, operated by utilities, there are many liquefaction plants owned and operated by the industrial gas business sector.

  12. Evolution of assisted protein folding: the distribution of the main chaperoning systems within the phylogenetic domain archaea.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Malz, Mona; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2004-05-01

    Newly made proteins must achieve a functional shape, the native configuration, before they can play their physiological roles in the cell. Proteins must also travel to the locale (e.g., the mitochondrion) in the cell where their functions are required. In these processes of folding into the native configuration and translocation to the place of work, proteins may be assisted by molecules called molecular chaperones. Stressors can unfold (denature) proteins, and genetic defects can cause misfolding and, in addition, both abnormalities can lead to polypeptide aggregation. Chaperones play a role in assisting refolding of partially denatured or misfolded proteins, thus preventing aggregation. Clearly, molecular chaperones are key cell components under normal, physiological circumstances, as well as in potentially harmful situations resulting from environmental or inherited factors. Hence, molecular chaperones constitute attractive targets for a variety of efforts aiming at improving the cell's performance, particularly under stress, to prevent disease, or at least to slow down its progression and to contain the deleterious effects of stress. In our efforts in this direction, we have undertaken to investigate the chaperoning systems of cells belonging to the phylogenetic domain Archaea. The findings reported here pertain to the distribution of the molecular chaperone machine, the chaperonins, and the prefoldins, among archaea. The genes hsp70(dnaK), hsp40(dnaJ), and grpE encoding the components of the molecular chaperone machine were present only in some archeaeal species: this contrasts with bacteria and eucarya, which do have the genes with no known exception. The group I, or bacterial, chaperonin-genes groEL and groES occured in the genomes of Methanosarcina species but were not found in any of the other archaea whose genomes have been sequenced. While all the archaea studied had between one and three chaperonins of group II (thermosome subunits), Methanosarcina

  13. Noble gas composition and 40Ar/39Ar age in eclogites from the main hole of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Jens; Schwarz, Winfried H.; Trieloff, Mario; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Hanel, Michael; Altherr, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    We present the first comprehensive noble gas study on eclogites. The four eclogite samples were recovered during the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling and are from two distinct profile depth sections differing in their degree of interaction with meteoric water, based on their δ 18O-values (surface related and of mantle-type). Hence, noble gas analyses offer the potential to further discriminate between shallow (meteoric) and deep (mantle) fluid sources. Noble gas compositions reveal typical crustal fluid compositions, characterized by a variable mixture of atmospheric gases with significant contributions of nucleogenic neon, radiogenic 4He*, radiogenic 40Ar*, fissiogenic 131-136Xe, and presumably bariogenic 131Xe, but no significant addition of mantle gases. This signature can be also considered to represent one endmember component of eclogitic diamonds. Concentrations of non-radiogenic noble gases are rather low, with depletion of light relative to the heavier noble gases. Eclogites from lower depth which experienced a higher degree of interaction with meteoric water also showed higher contributions of atmospheric gas compared with eclogites recovered from greater depth. This is interpreted to result from interaction with high-salinity fluids during ultrahigh pressure (UH P). It demonstrates that the atmospheric noble gas abundance is a proxy for interaction with surface related fluids. 40Ar/39Ar (inverse) isochron ages of two phengite separates (241.2 ± 0.4 Ma and 275.0 ± 1.8 Ma, 1 σ-errors) predate the main phase of UH P metamorphism (ca. 220 Ma). Biotite yields an integrated age of about 1100 Ma. These age values are interpreted to reflect the likely addition of excess 40Ar without any chronological meaning.

  14. Free gas in the regional hydrate stability zone: Implications for hydrate distribution and fracturing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2010-12-01

    We show that hydrate distribution and fracture genesis in the hydrate stability zone are largely governed by the phase of methane supply. In systems where methane is supplied primarily as free gas, hydrate saturation increases upwards in the hydrate stability zone, and fractures nucleate in the middle of the stability zone where hydrate saturation is highest. In systems where methane is supplied primarily as a dissolved phase in the pore water, hydrate saturation decreases upwards in the stability zone, and fractures nucleate at the base of the stability zone. These interpretations are based on our one-dimensional model that incorporates multiphase flow and free gas within the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ). The RHSZ is defined as the interval in which methane hydrate may occur at seawater salinity (3.35% by mass). As hydrate forms and excludes salt from the crystal structure, the porewater salinity increases. Free gas enters the RHSZ when the porewater salinity increases to the value required for three-phase (dissolved methane + gas hydrate + free gas) equilibrium. Our model also incorporates changes to capillary pressure as hydrate forms and occludes the pore system. We model the system until the excess pore pressure exceeds the vertical effective stress in the domain due to capillary effects and pore occlusion, at which point we assume fractures nucleate. We test our model at Hydrate Ridge, where methane supply is dominantly in the gas phase, and show that hydrate saturation increases upwards and fractures nucleate high within the stability zone, eventually allowing gas to vent to the seafloor. We also model Blake Ridge, where methane supply is dominantly in the dissolved phase, and show that hydrate saturation is greatest at the base of the stability zone; fractures nucleate here and in some cases could propagate through the regional hydrate stability zone, allowing methane-charged water to vent to the seafloor. These two systems represent endmembers of

  15. Fabrication of gas impervious edge seal for a bipolar gas distribution assembly for use in a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Werth, John

    1986-01-01

    A bipolar gas reactant distribution assembly for use in a fuel cell is disclosed, the assembly having a solid edge seal to prevent leakage of gaseous reactants wherein a pair of porous plates are provided with peripheral slits generally parallel to, and spaced apart from two edges of the plate, the slit being filled with a solid, fusible, gas impervious edge sealing compound. The plates are assembled with opposite faces adjacent one another with a layer of a fusible sealant material therebetween the slits in the individual plates being approximately perpendicular to one another. The plates are bonded to each other by the simultaneous application of heat and pressure to cause a redistribution of the sealant into the pores of the adjacent plate surfaces and to cause the edge sealing compound to flow and impregnate the region of the plates adjacent the slits and comingle with the sealant layer material to form a continuous layer of sealant along the edges of the assembled plates.

  16. Regulatory reform for natural gas pipelines: The effect on pipeline and distribution company share prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurman, Elisabeth Antonie

    1997-08-01

    The natural gas shortages in the 1970s focused considerable attention on the federal government's role in altering energy consumption. For the natural gas industry these shortages eventually led to the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) in 1978 as part of the National Energy Plan. A series of events in the decade of the 1980s has brought about the restructuring of interstate natural gas pipelines which have been transformed by regulators and the courts from monopolies into competitive entities. This transformation also changed their relationship with their downstream customers, the LDCs, who no longer had to deal with pipelines as the only merchants of gas. Regulatory reform made it possible for LDCs to buy directly from producers using the pipelines only for delivery of their purchases. This study tests for the existence of monopoly rents by analyzing the daily returns of natural gas pipeline and utility industry stock price data from 1982 to 1990, a period of regulatory reform for the natural gas industry. The study's main objective is to investigate the degree of empirical support for claims that regulatory reforms increase profits in the affected industry, as the normative theory of regulation expects, or decrease profits, as advocates of the positive theory of regulation believe. I also test Norton's theory of risk which predicts that systematic risk will increase for firms undergoing deregulation. Based on a sample of twelve natural gas pipelines, and 25 utilities an event study concept was employed to measure the impact of regulatory event announcements on daily natural gas pipeline or utility industry stock price data using a market model regression equation. The results of this study provide some evidence that regulatory reforms did not increase the profits of pipeline firms, confirming the expectations of those who claim that excess profits result from regulation and will disappear, once that protection is removed and the firms are operating in

  17. Can a fermentation gas mainly produced by rumen Isotrichidae ciliates be a potential source of biohydrogen and a fuel for a chemical fuel cell?

    PubMed

    Piela, Piotr; Michałowski, Tadeusz; Miltko, Renata; Szewczyk, Krzysztof; Sikora, Radosław; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Sikora, Anna

    2010-07-01

    Bacteria, fungi and protozoa inhabiting the rumen, the largest chamber of the ruminants' stomach, release large quantities of hydrogen during the fermentation of carbohydrates. The hydrogen is used by coexisting methanogens to produce methane in energy-yielding processes. This work shows, for the first time, a fundamental possibility of using a hydrogen-rich fermentation gas produced by selected rumen ciliates to feed a low-temperature hydrogen fuel cell. A biohydrogen fuel cell (BHFC) was constructed consisting of (i) a bioreactor, in which a hydrogen-rich gas was produced from glucose by rumen ciliates, mainly of the Isotrichidae family, deprived of intra- and extracellular bacteria, methanogens, and fungi, and (ii) a chemical fuel cell of the polymer-electrolyte type (PEFC). The fuel cell was used as a tester of the technical applicability of the fermentation gas produced by the rumen ciliates for power generation. The average estimated hydrogen yield was ca. 1.15 mol H2 per mol of fermented glucose. The BHFC performance was equal to the performance of the PEFC running on pure hydrogen. No fuel cell poisoning effects were detected. A maximum power density of 1.66 kW/m2 (PEFC geometric area) was obtained at room temperature. The maximum volumetric power density was 128 W/m3 but the coulombic efficiency was only ca. 3.8%. The configuration of the bioreactor limited the continuous operation time of this BHFC to ca. 14 hours. PMID:20668402

  18. Effects of the neutral gas density distribution in a DPF neutron yield

    SciTech Connect

    Milanese, M.; Moroso, R.; Pouzo, J.

    1996-12-31

    The dense plasma gives an average neutron yield Y = 2 {times} 10{sup 8} when it is operated using D{sub 2} at an homogeneous pressure p = 1.5 mb in the discharge chamber, in this p-static operation, the frequency of good shots (Y > 10{sup 7}) is f {approx} 50%. In this work the authors show the results on Y and f when PACO is operated in gas-puff way with two different modalities: (1) A gas cloud is injected into the vacuum, from a set of holes distributed in a diameter of the inner electrode near the Pyrex insulator. The gas is introduced from the back of the hollow inner electrode by means of a fast valve. The cloud expands in the interelectrode space, and reaches the extreme of the coaxial cavity in some hundreds of microseconds from the valve aperture instant. In this way of operation the value of Y remains similar to the p-static operation, but the frequency f is improved up to f {approx} 80%. (2) With a relative low value of p in the discharge chamber a jet of high density D{sub 2} is injected along the axis from the inner electrode just in the focus zone. The jet is produced with a nozzle designed in order to obtain subsonic velocity, and the gas is injected through the same fast valve. In this jet operation mode the PACO performance was improved, reaching f {approx} 70% and Y {approx} 10{sup 9}.

  19. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - I. New observations of neutral and ionized gas kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (H I) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for 16 galaxies in the statistically representative Extended Disk Galaxy Explore Science kinematic sample. H I rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The H I rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in 12 galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  20. Systematic Studies of the Gas Humidification Effects on Spatial PEMFC Performance Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Reshetenko, T. V.; Bender, G.; Bethune, K.; Rocheleau, R.

    2012-05-01

    The overall current density that is measured in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) represents the average of the local reaction rates. The overall and local PEMFC performances are determined by several primary loss mechanisms, namely activation, ohmic, and mass transfer. Spatial performance and loss variabilities are significant and depend on the cell design and operating conditions. A segmented cell system was used to quantify different loss distributions along the gas channel to understand the effects of gas humidification. A reduction in the reactant stream humidification decreased cell performance and resulted in non-uniform distributions of overpotentials and performance along the flow field. Activation and ohmic overpotentials increased with a relative humidity decrease due to insufficient membrane and catalyst layer hydration. The relative humidity of the cathode had a strong impact on the mass transfer overpotential due to a lower oxygen permeability through the dry Nafion film covering the catalyst surface. The mass transfer loss distribution was non-uniform, and the mass transfer overpotential increased for the outlet segments due to the oxygen consumption at the inlet segments, which reduced the oxygen concentration downstream, and a progressive water accumulation from upstream segments. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and an equivalent electric circuit (EEC) facilitated the analysis and interpretation of the segmented cell data.

  1. Star forming regions towards Gum 31: distribution of the molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Rubio, M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas associated with IRAS and 2MASS sources, young stellar objects linked to the Hii region Gum31. We based our studies on observations obtained with the APEX telescope, located in the north of Chile. We used observations of different CO isotopologues, CS(7-6) and HCO(4-3) lines. The sources are located on the edge of the Gum31 Hii region, whose shock front substantially affects the morphology of their molecular environs. The observations revealed that in the surroundings of the sources there is molecular gas associated with the nebula, which is shown by the CO(3-2) emission, with small high density clumps detected in CO(3-2).

  2. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  3. THE SMOOTH Mg II GAS DISTRIBUTION THROUGH THE INTERSTELLAR/EXTRA-PLANAR/HALO INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Cooke, Jeff; Ryan-Weber, Emma V.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.

    2013-11-01

    We report the first measurements of Mg II absorption systems associated with spectroscopically confirmed z ∼ 0.1 star-forming galaxies at projected distances of D < 6 kpc. We demonstrate that the data are consistent with the well-known anti-correlation between rest-frame Mg II equivalent width, W{sub r} (2796), and impact parameter, D, represented by a single log-linear relation derived by Nielsen et al. (MAGIICAT) that converges to ∼2 Å at D = 0 kpc. Incorporating MAGIICAT, we find that the halo gas covering fraction is unity below D ∼ 25 kpc. We also report that our D < 6 kpc absorbers are consistent with the W{sub r} (2796) distributions of the Milky Way interstellar medium (ISM) and ISM+halo. In addition, quasar sight lines of intermediate redshift galaxies with 6 < D < 25 kpc have an equivalent width distribution similar to that of the Milky Way halo, implying that beyond ∼6 kpc, quasar sight lines are likely probing halo gas and not the ISM. As inferred by the Milky Way and our new data, the gas profiles of galaxies can be fit by a single log-linear W{sub r} (2796)-D relation out to large scales across a variety of gas-phase conditions and is maintained through the halo/extra-planar/ISM interfaces, which is remarkable considering their kinematic complexity. These low-redshift, small impact parameter absorption systems are the first steps to bridge the gap between quasar absorption-line studies and H I observations of the circumgalactic medium.

  4. Gas/particle Partitioning and Particle Size Distributions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (pahs) in the Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-Ping

    This study applied three different gas/particle (G/P) separation mechanisms (diffusion, filtration and impaction) to investigate G/P partitioning and particle size distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere. Because some PAHs such as benzo (a) pyrene have been shown to be carcinogenic to humans and persistent in the environment, it is important to have reliable methods to measure PAH G/P partitioning and particle size distributions for the purpose of understanding their atmospheric processing and their impact to environmental and human health. The objectives of this study include: (1) Development of a diffusion separator (DS) to separate a known fraction of the gas phase from the aerosol: The calibration experiment results reveal that the G/P separation performance of the DS agrees well with diffusion theory. True gas PAH concentrations are calculated by the measured PAH concentrations in the core exit of the DS and the diffusion factor at the sampling temperature. (2) Evaluation of sampling artifacts associated with high volume samplers and their effectiveness in measuring PAH G/P partitioning in the atmosphere: The comparison between the DS, a filter/adsorbent sampler (FA) and a microorifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) revealed both gaseous sorption onto filters and desorption from filters of the FA sampler for most PAHs. (3) Investigation of particle size distribution of PAHs in Chicago urban and Minnesota suburban areas: The results of MOUDI sampler showed that the PAH mass median diameters (MMDs) are smaller than atmospheric particle MMDs by 0.1-0.3 μm in both areas. The calculated PAH dry deposition fluxes and Lake Michigan sediment accumulation rates indicates that the atmospheric dry deposition contributes 15-50% of PAHs to nearby Lake Michigan sediment.

  5. Momentum Distribution and Condensate Fraction of a Fermion Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Astrakharchik, G.E.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.; Giorgini, S.

    2005-12-02

    By using the diffusion Monte Carlo method we calculate the one- and two-body density matrix of an interacting Fermi gas at T=0 in the BCS to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover. Results for the momentum distribution of the atoms, as obtained from the Fourier transform of the one-body density matrix, are reported as a function of the interaction strength. Off-diagonal long-range order in the system is investigated through the asymptotic behavior of the two-body density matrix. The condensate fraction of pairs is calculated in the unitary limit and on both sides of the BCS-BEC crossover.

  6. On the work distribution for the adiabatic compression of a diluteclassical gas

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2006-02-23

    We consider the adiabatic and quasi-static compression of adilute classical gas, confined in a piston and initially equilibratedwith a heat bath. We find that the work performed during this process isdescribed statistically by a gamma distribution. We use this result toshow that the model satisfies the non-equilibrium work and fluctuationtheorems, but not the fluctation-dissipation relation. We discuss therare but dominant realizations that contribute most to the exponentialaverage of the work, and relate our results to potentially universal workdistributions.

  7. Work distribution for the adiabatic compression of a dilute and interacting classical gas.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Gavin E; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2007-02-01

    We consider a simple, physically motivated model of a dilute classical gas of interacting particles, initially equilibrated with a heat bath, undergoing adiabatic and quasistatic compression or expansion. This provides an example of a thermodynamic process for which non-Gaussian work fluctuations can be computed exactly from microscopic principles. We find that the work performed during this process is described statistically by a gamma distribution, and we use this result to show that the model satisfies the nonequilibrium work and fluctuation theorems, but not a prediction based on linear response theory.

  8. Two-Dimensional Plasma Density Distributions in Low-Pressure Gas Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, E.V.; Dvinin, S.A.; Mikheev, V.V.; Omarov, M.O.; Sviridkina, V. S.

    2004-12-15

    The plasma density distribution in a two-dimensional nonuniform positive column of a low-pressure gas discharge is studied in the hydrodynamic approximation with allowance for ion inertia. Exact solutions are derived for discharges in a rectangular and a cylindrical chamber. Asymptotic solutions near the coordinate origin and near the critical surface are considered. It is shown that, for potential plasma flows, the flow velocity component normal to the plasma boundary is equal to the ion acoustic velocity. The results obtained can be used to analyze the processes occurring in low-pressure plasmochemical reactors.

  9. Momentum distribution of a trapped Fermi gas with large scattering length

    SciTech Connect

    Viverit, L.; Giorgini, S.; Stringari, S.; Pitaevskii, L.P.

    2004-01-01

    Using a scattering length parametrization of the crossover from a BCS state to a Bose-Einstein condensate as well as the local density approximation for the density profile, we calculate the momentum distribution of a harmonically trapped atomic Fermi gas at zero temperature. Various interaction regimes are considered, including the BCS phase, the unitarity limit, and the molecular regime. We show that the relevant parameter which characterizes the crossover is given by the dimensionless combination N{sup 1/6}a/a{sub ho}, where N is the number of atoms, a is the scattering length, and a{sub ho} is the oscillator length. The width of the momentum distribution is shown to depend in a crucial way on the value and sign of this parameter. Our predictions can be relevant for experiments on ultracold atomic Fermi gases near a Feshbach resonance.

  10. A Robust Distributed Multipoint Fiber Optic Gas Sensor System Based on AGC Amplifier Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Rende; Tao, Xuechen; Wang, Guangwei; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    A harsh environment-oriented distributed multipoint fiber optic gas sensor system realized by automatic gain control (AGC) technology is proposed. To improve the photoelectric signal reliability, the electronic variable gain can be modified in real time by an AGC closed-loop feedback structure to compensate for optical transmission loss which is caused by the fiber bend loss or other reasons. The deviation of the system based on AGC structure is below 4.02% when photoelectric signal decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is 20 times lower than the ordinary differential system. In addition, the AGC circuit with the same electric parameters can keep the baseline intensity of signals in different channels of the distributed multipoint sensor system at the same level. This avoids repetitive calibrations and streamlines the installation process. PMID:27483267

  11. A Robust Distributed Multipoint Fiber Optic Gas Sensor System Based on AGC Amplifier Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Rende; Tao, Xuechen; Wang, Guangwei; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    A harsh environment-oriented distributed multipoint fiber optic gas sensor system realized by automatic gain control (AGC) technology is proposed. To improve the photoelectric signal reliability, the electronic variable gain can be modified in real time by an AGC closed-loop feedback structure to compensate for optical transmission loss which is caused by the fiber bend loss or other reasons. The deviation of the system based on AGC structure is below 4.02% when photoelectric signal decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is 20 times lower than the ordinary differential system. In addition, the AGC circuit with the same electric parameters can keep the baseline intensity of signals in different channels of the distributed multipoint sensor system at the same level. This avoids repetitive calibrations and streamlines the installation process. PMID:27483267

  12. Generic features of the wealth distribution in ideal-gas-like markets.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, P K

    2006-07-01

    We provide an exact solution to the ideal-gas-like models studied in econophysics to understand the microscopic origin of Pareto law. In these classes of models the key ingredient necessary for having a self-organized scale-free steady-state distribution is the trading or collision rule where agents or particles save a definite fraction of their wealth or energy and invest the rest for trading. Using a Gibbs ensemble approach we could obtain the exact distribution of wealth in this model. Moreover we show that in this model (a) good savers are always rich and (b) every agent poor or rich invests the same amount for trading. Nonlinear trading rules could alter the generic scenario observed here. PMID:16907070

  13. Global distribution of gas hydrates in marine sediments: application of a general transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñero, Elena; Marquardt, Mathias; Hensen, Christian; Haeckel, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Many of the recently published estimates of the global inventory of marine methane hydrate are based on simplified diagenetic models, which were run for each grid point of a homogeneous grid of the seafloor. Since this is a very complex and time-consuming method, which may also be limited by data availability, we invented a simple transfer function, which calculates the amount of gas hydrates based on easily accessible data. The transfer function was derived from a large set of systematic runs of a numerical diagenetic model covering the wide range of environmental conditions that are typically met along the continental margins. An exhaustive parameter analysis established that the formation of gas hydrates from biogenic methane production can be sufficiently described by the total organic carbon accumulation rate and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (Marquardt et al., submitted). The resulting transfer function was applied to available global datasets of 1x1-degree resolution in order to derive global estimates of the distribution and total inventory of gas hydrates. The global grids include the seafloor bathymetry, TOC input (Seiter et al., 2004), bottom water temperature, and geothermal gradient estimated from heat flow (Hamza et al., 2008). The global amount of gas hydrate is predicted to be about 2400 Gt of C and is in good agreement with previously published results (e.g. Archer et al., 2009). So far, our calculations do not consider any thermogenic methane, but only microbially produced and hence, represent only a minimum estimate of the gas hydrate budget. References: Archer et al., 2009. Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle. PNAS 106 (49), 20596-20601. Hamza et al., 2008. Spherical harmonic analysis of the Earth's conductive heat flow. Intern. J. Earth Sci., 97, 205-226 Marquardt et al. Submitted. Estimation of gas hydrate inventories in marine sediments: derivation and testing of a transfer function

  14. Methodology to model the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of electronic software distributions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daniel R; Tang, Yinshan

    2012-01-17

    A new electronic software distribution (ESD) life cycle analysis (LCA) methodology and model structure were constructed to calculate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In order to counteract the use of high level, top-down modeling efforts, and to increase result accuracy, a focus upon device details and data routes was taken. In order to compare ESD to a relevant physical distribution alternative, physical model boundaries and variables were described. The methodology was compiled from the analysis and operational data of a major online store which provides ESD and physical distribution options. The ESD method included the calculation of power consumption of data center server and networking devices. An in-depth method to calculate server efficiency and utilization was also included to account for virtualization and server efficiency features. Internet transfer power consumption was analyzed taking into account the number of data hops and networking devices used. The power consumed by online browsing and downloading was also factored into the model. The embedded CO(2)e of server and networking devices was proportioned to each ESD process. Three U.K.-based ESD scenarios were analyzed using the model which revealed potential CO(2)e savings of 83% when ESD was used over physical distribution. Results also highlighted the importance of server efficiency and utilization methods.

  15. Simultaneous doping analysis of main urinary metabolites of anabolic steroids in horse by ion-trap gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Aramaki, Sugako; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Kijima-Suda, Isao; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-09-01

    The use of anabolic steroids in racehorses is strictly regulated. We have developed a method for the simultaneous analysis of 11 anabolic steroids: fluoxymesterone, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, mestanolone, methandienone, methandriol, oxymetholone, boldenone, furazabol, methenolone, nandrolone, and stanozolol, for possible application to a doping test in racehorses. We selected 15 kinds of target substances for a doping test from the main metabolites of these anabolic steroids, and established a method for simultaneous analysis. Urine was hydrolyzed and subjected to solid-phase extraction. Then, the residue from the extracts was derivatized by trimethylsilylation. The derivatized samples were subjected to ion-trap gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and their mass chromatograms and product ion spectra were obtained. The limit of detection of the target substances was 5-50 ng/mL, and the mean recovery and coefficient of variation were 71.3-104.8% and 1.1-9.5%, respectively.

  16. Characterization of gas hydrate distribution using conventional 3D seismic data in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Xiujuan; Qiang, Jin; Collett, Timothy S.; Shi, Hesheng; Yang, Shengxiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Duanxin

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D seismic reflection data volume acquired in 2012 has allowed for the detailed mapping and characterization of gas hydrate distribution in the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the South China Sea. Previous studies of core and logging data showed that gas hydrate occurrence at high concentrations is controlled by the presence of relatively coarse-grained sediment and the upward migration of thermogenic gas from the deeper sediment section into the overlying gas hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ); however, the spatial distribution of the gas hydrate remains poorly defined. We used a constrained sparse spike inversion technique to generate acoustic-impedance images of the hydrate-bearing sedimentary section from the newly acquired 3D seismic data volume. High-amplitude reflections just above the bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) were interpreted to be associated with the accumulation of gas hydrate with elevated saturations. Enhanced seismic reflections below the BSRs were interpreted to indicate the presence of free gas. The base of the BGHSZ was established using the occurrence of BSRs. In areas absent of well-developed BSRs, the BGHSZ was calculated from a model using the inverted P-wave velocity and subsurface temperature data. Seismic attributes were also extracted along the BGHSZ that indicate variations reservoir properties and inferred hydrocarbon accumulations at each site. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the inversion of acoustic impedance of conventional 3D seismic data, along with well-log-derived rock-physics models were also used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Our analysis determined that the gas hydrate petroleum system varies significantly across the Pearl River Mouth Basin and that variability in sedimentary properties as a product of depositional processes and the upward migration of gas from deeper thermogenic sources control the distribution of gas hydrates in this basin.

  17. A HIGHER EFFICIENCY OF CONVERTING GAS TO STARS PUSHES GALAXIES AT z ∼ 1.6 WELL ABOVE THE STAR-FORMING MAIN SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, J. D.; Rujopakarn, W.; Daddi, E.; Liu, D.; Sargent, M.; Renzini, A.; Feruglio, C.; Kashino, D.; Sanders, D.; Kartaltepe, J.; Nagao, T.; Arimoto, N.; Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Béthermin, M.; Koekemoer, A.; and others

    2015-10-20

    Local starbursts have a higher efficiency of converting gas into stars, as compared to typical star-forming galaxies at a given stellar mass, possibly indicative of different modes of star formation. With the peak epoch of galaxy formation occurring at z > 1, it remains to be established whether such an efficient mode of star formation is occurring at high redshift. To address this issue, we measure the molecular gas content of seven high-redshift (z ∼ 1.6) starburst galaxies with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and IRAM/Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our targets are selected from the sample of Herschel far-infrared-detected galaxies having star formation rates (∼300–800 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) elevated (≳4×) above the star-forming main sequence (MS) and included in the FMOS-COSMOS near-infrared spectroscopic survey of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 with Subaru. We detect CO emission in all cases at high levels of significance, indicative of high gas fractions (∼30%–50%). Even more compelling, we firmly establish with a clean and systematic selection that starbursts, identified as MS outliers, at high redshift generally have a lower ratio of CO to total infrared luminosity as compared to typical MS star-forming galaxies, although with a smaller offset than expected based on past studies of local starbursts. We put forward a hypothesis that there exists a continuous increase in star formation efficiency with elevation from the MS with galaxy mergers as a possible physical driver. Along with a heightened star formation efficiency, our high-redshift sample is similar in other respects to local starbursts, such as being metal rich and having a higher ionization state of the interstellar medium.

  18. PAHs distribution in sediments associated with gas hydrate and oil seepage from the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiping; Sun, Hongwen; Chang, Ying; Song, Zhiguang; Qin, Xuebo

    2011-12-01

    Six sediment samples collected from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed. Total concentrations of the PAHs ranged from 52 to 403 ng g(-1) dry weight. The lowest PAH concentration without 5-6 rings PAHs appeared in S-1 sample associated with gas hydrate or gas venting. Moreover, S-1 sample had the lowest organic carbon content with 0.85% and highest reduced sulfur level with 1.21% relative to other samples. And, analysis of the sources of PAHs in S-1 sample indicated that both pyrogenic and petrogenic sources, converserly, while S-8, S-10 and S-11 sample suggested petrogenic origin. The distribution of dibenzothiophene, fluorine and dibenzofuran and the maturity parameters of triaromatic steranes suggested that organic matters in S-1 sample were different from that in S-8, S-10 and S-11 sample. This study suggested that organic geochemical data could help in distinguish the characteristic of sediment associated with gas hydrate or with oil seepage. PMID:21982427

  19. Review of performance-based ratemaking plans for US gas distribution companies

    SciTech Connect

    Comnes, G.A.

    1994-11-01

    Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is receiving increasing attention by energy utilities and their regulators. PBR is the industry term for forms of regulation that increase financial incentive for performance relative to traditional cost-of-service/rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. In this report, PBR plans filed by US gas local distribution companies (LDCs) are described and reviewed. The rationale behind energy utility PBR is presented and discussed. Using nine plans that have been proposed by eight LDCs as a basis, a framework (typology) to facilitate understanding of gas utility PBR is presented. Plans are categorized according to the range of services covered by the PBR mechanism and the scope of the mechanism`s cost coverage within a service category. Pivotal design issues are identified and, based on the sample of plans, observations are made. Design issues covered include the length of time that the PBR is in effect (term); the relationship between PBR plans and status quo ratemaking; methods for formulating cost or rate indices, earnings sharing mechanisms, and service quality indices; and compatibility with gas utility DSM programs. The report summarizes observations that may be considered supportive of the rationale behind PBR. PBR is, however, not clearly superior to traditional regulation and few PBRs that are broad in scope have been adopted long enough to allow for a empirical analysis. Thus, the report concludes by identifying and describing commonly-cited pitfalls of PBR.

  20. The nature, distribution, and origin of gas hydrate in the Chile Triple Junction region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, K.M.; Bangs, N.L.; Froelich, P.N.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    A bottom simulating reflector (BSR) is regionally distributed throughout much of the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) region. Downhole temperature and logging data collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 141 suggest that the seismic BSR is generated by low seismic velocities associated with the presence of a few percent free gas in a ??? 10 m thick zone just beneath the hydrate-bearing zone. The data also indicate that the temperature and pressure at the BSR best corresponds to the seawater/methane hydrate stability field. The origin of the large amounts of methane required to generate the hydrates is, however, problematic. Low total organic carbon contents and low alkalinities argue against significant in situ biogenic methanogenesis, but additional input from thermogenic sources also appears to be precluded. Increasing thermal gradients, associated with the approach of the spreading ridge system, may have caused the base of the hydrate stability field to migrate 300 m upwards in the sediments. We propose that the upward migration of the base of the stability field has concentrated originally widely dispersed hydrate patches into the more continuous hydrate body we see today. The methane can be concentrated if the gas hydrates can form from dissolved methane, transported into the hydrate zone via diffusion or fluid advection. A strong gradient may exist in dissolved methane concentration across the BSR leading to the steady reabsorbtion of the free gas zone during the upward migration of the BSR even in the absence of fluid advection.

  1. PAH assessment in the main Brazilian offshore oil and gas production area using semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMD) and transplanted bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André Lourenço, Rafael; Francisco de Oliveira, Fábio; Haddad Nudi, Adriana; Rebello Wagener, Ângela de Luca; Guadalupe Meniconi, Maria de Fátima; Francioni, Eleine

    2015-06-01

    The Campos Basin is Brazil's main oil and gas production area. In 2013, more than 50 million cubic meters of produced water (PW) was discharged into these offshore waters. Despite the large volumes of PW that are discharged in the Campos Basin each day, the ecological concern of the chemicals in the PW are not completely understood. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are the most important contributors to the ecological hazards that are posed by discharged PW. This study aimed to evaluate the potential bioaccumulation of PAH using transplanted bivalves (Nodipecten nodosus) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMD). The study was conducted in two platforms that discharge PW (P19 and P40). Another platform that does not discharge PW (P25) was investigated for comparison with the obtained results. Time-integrated hydrocarbon concentrations using SPMD and transplanted bivalves were estimated from the seawater near the three platforms. The bioaccumulation of the PAH in the transplanted bivalves at platforms P19 and P40 were up to fivefold greater than the bioaccumulation of the PAH at platform P25. The lowest PAH concentrations were estimated for platform P25 (4.3-6.2 ng L-1), and the highest PAH concentrations were estimated for platform P19 (9.2-37.3 ng L-1). Both techniques were effective for determining the bioavailability of the PAH and for providing time-integrated hydrocarbon concentrations regarding oil and gas production activities.

  2. Measurements of radon flux and soil-gas radon concentration along the Main Central Thrust, Garhwal Himalaya, using SRM and RAD7 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourai, Abhay; Aswal, Sunita; Dangwal, Anoop; Rawat, Mukesh; Prasad, Mukesh; Naithani, Nagendra; Joshi, Veena; Ramola, Rakesh

    2013-08-01

    Radon in the Earth's crust or soil matrix is free to move only if its atoms find their way into pores or capillaries of the matrix. 222Rn atoms from solid mineral grains get into air, filling pores through emanation process. Then 222Rn enters into the atmosphere from air-filled pores by exhalation process. The estimation of radon flux from soil surface is an important parameter for determining the source term for radon concentration modeling. In the present investigation, radon fluxes and soil-gas radon concentration have been measured along and around the Main Central Thrust (MCT) in Uttarkashi district of Garhwal Himalaya, India, by using Scintillation Radon Monitor (SRM) and RAD7 devices, respectively. The soil radon gas concentration measured by RAD7 with soil probe at the constant depth was found to vary from 12 ± 3 to 2330 ± 48 Bq·m-3 with geometrical mean value of 302 ± 84 Bq·m-3. Th significance of this work is its usefulness from radiation protection point of view.

  3. Toward Measuring Galactic Dense Molecular Gas Properties and 3D Distribution with Hi-GAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's submillimeter dust continuum survey Hi-GAL provides a powerful new dataset for characterizing the structure of the dense interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Hi-GAL observed a 2° wide strip covering the entire 360° of the Galactic plane in broad bands centered at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm, with angular resolution ranging from 10 to 40 arcseconds. We are adapting a molecular cloud clump-finding algorithm and a distance probability density function distance-determination method developed for the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) to the Hi-GAL data. Using these methods we expect to generate a database of 105 cloud clumps, derive distance information for roughly half the clumps, and derive precise distances for approximately 20% of them. With five-color photometry and distances, we will measure the cloud clump properties, such as luminosities, physical sizes, and masses, and construct a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way's dense molecular gas distribution.The cloud clump properties and the dense gas distribution will provide critical ground truths for comparison to theoretical models of molecular cloud structure formation and galaxy evolution models that seek to emulate spiral galaxies. For example, such models cannot resolve star formation and use prescriptive recipes, such as converting a fixed fraction of interstellar gas to stars at a specified interstellar medium density threshold. The models should be compared to observed dense molecular gas properties and galactic distributions.As a pilot survey to refine the clump-finding and distance measurement algorithms developed for BGPS, we have identified molecular cloud clumps in six 2° × 2° patches of the Galactic plane, including one in the inner Galaxy along the line of sight through the Molecular Ring and the termination of the Galactic bar and one toward the outer Galaxy. Distances have been derived for the inner Galaxy clumps and compared to Bolocam Galactic Plane

  4. Preliminary design concepts for an advanced gas distribution system. Task report, August 1989-August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinsky, E.S.; Hattery, G.R.; Newaz, G.

    1991-01-01

    Studies that were conducted in 1989 (GRI-89/0107.2) showed that the major problems that face the industry are third-party damage, locatability, and pipe supportability. These needs were translated into performance criteria for materials and designs of gas distribution system components. In Phase 2 to date, the performance criteria were refined and used as the basis for generation of concepts for materials and designs for enhancement of the gas distribution system. The screening criteria include long service life, damage tolerance, installation, and manufacturability. A scoring model that allows the criteria to have variable weights was applied to attain normalized scores and rankings for the concepts. The leading concepts include puncture-resistant polyethylene pipe via wrapping with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fabric or fiber, toughened thermoplastics (especially polyamides or acetal resin or polyester), thermoplastic fiber-reinforced thermoplastic resins, fiberglass-reinforced hose designs, and honeycomb-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer designs. Tentative research and development plans were developed for the leading concepts in which simple tests of manufacturability, impact resistance, and joinability are to be used to determine which concepts should be pursued further and which appear to have serious flaws.

  5. Analysis of the spatial distribution of stars, gas and dust in nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    I summarize the main result of my thesis, which was awarded the Spanish Astronomical Society Award for the best thesis in Astronomy defended in 2010. This thesis was supervised by Armando Gil de Paz and Jaime Zamorano at Universidad Complutense de Madrid. In this work we quantified how the physical properties of stars, gas and dust vary with radius in nearby galactic disks, and used that information to infer the past assembly and evolution of galaxies. To do so we made use of spatially-resolved multi-wavelength images of nearby galaxies, all the way from the far-UV to the far-IR and radio. By comparing extinction- corrected profiles in the UV, optical and IR with models of disk evolution, we concluded that the current stellar population gradients are consistent with an inside-out growth of disks of ˜ 25% since z ˜ 1. We also found that the dust-to-gas ratio decreases with radius, and is tightly correlated with the local gas metallicity, which is again consistent with an inside-out assembly of disks. We measured the fraction of the dust mass which is in the form of PAHs at different radii. The resulting trend agrees with certain models of dust evolution, in which the abundance of PAHs is primarily determined by a delayed injection of carbon into the ISM by AGB stars.

  6. YORP and collisional shaping of the sub-populations, rotation rate and size-frequency distributions in the main-belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A.; Marzari, F.; Scheeres, D.; Jacobson, S.; Davis, D.

    In the last several years a comprehensive asteroid-population-evolution model was developed incorporating both the YORP effect and collisional evolution \\citep{rossi_2009}, \\citep{marz_2011}, \\citep{jac_mnras}. From the results of this model we were able to match the observed main belt rotation rate distribution and to give a first plausible explanation of the observed excess of slow rotators, through a random walk-like evolution of the spin, induced by repeated collisions with small projectiles. Moreover, adding to the model the rotational fission hypothesis (i.e. when the rotation rate exceeds a critical value, erosion and binary formation occur; \\citealt{sch_2007}) and binary-asteroid evolution \\citep{jac_sch}, we first showed that the YORP-induced rotational-fission hypothesis has strong repercussions for the small size end of the main-belt asteroid size-frequency distribution. We also concluded that this hypothesis is consistent with observed asteroid-population statistics and with the observed sub-populations of binary asteroids, asteroid pairs and contact binaries. An overview of the results obtained, the modelling uncertainties and the ongoing work will be given.

  7. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  8. Study on two-dimensional tomography algorithm for gas temperature distribution based on TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinwei; Zhou, Tao; Yao, Hongbao

    2013-09-01

    In the combustion flow field, the concentrations of temperature and water vapor are very important in determining combustion efficiency. The traditional contact measurement will induce shock so as to disturb the flow field, and most of the probe can't be used in the high temperature air. So the existing contact measurement method can't meet the measurement requirements of the combustion field, but the tunable laser absorption spectrum technology (TDLAS) can realize non-contact nondestructive measurement of the combustion flow field. Various parameters such as temperature, gas composition and concentration, flow velocity, can be measured at the same time. And there is no temperature limit. It is very good at measuring combustion field parameters in the high temperature and high speed environment. TDLAS can calculate the gas temperature in real-time by scanning both absorption signal of gas absorption lines, but this is one-dimensional path integral measurement, can't reflect the real information of the combustion field. So it can't be used to measure objects with distinct temperature gradient. In order to overcome this deficiency, tunable laser absorption spectrum technology combined with computer tomography technology (called TDLAT) is used to realize the measurement of the two dimensional temperature distribution in the burning flow field. In this paper, the measurement principle and algorithm of the two dimensional temperature field distribution are put forward. In TDLAT system, the measured area is divided into many grids. TDLAS is used to get the laser path integral spectrophotometry along the grid line. In succession, deeply grid information is gotten by non-negative constrained least squares. Thus, assuming that temperature measurement plane within is in smooth transition, interpolation algorithm is used to recreate the high spatial resolution of the two dimensional temperature field distribution. According to the measuring principle and measuring objects

  9. Impact of Intrafractional Bowel Gas Movement on Carbon Ion Beam Dose Distribution in Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Motoki; Hara, Ryusuke; Mori, Shinichiro Yanagi, Takeshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess carbon ion beam dose variation due to bowel gas movement in pancreatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten pancreatic cancer inpatients were subject to diagnostic contrast-enhanced dynamic helical CT examination under breath-holding conditions, which included multiple-phase dynamic CT with arterial, venous, and delayed phases. The arterial-venous phase and arterial-delayed phase intervals were 35 and 145 s, respectively. A compensating bolus was designed to cover the target obtained at the arterial phase. Carbon ion dose distribution was calculated by applying the bolus to the CT data sets at the other two phases. Results: Dose conformation to the clinical target volume was degraded by beam overshoot/undershoot due to bowel gas movement. The D95 for clinical target volume was degraded from 98.2% (range, 98.0-99.1%) of the prescribed dose to 94.7% (range, 88.0-99.0%) at 145 s. Excessive dosing to normal tissues varied among tissues and was, for example, 12.2 GyE/13.1 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the cord and 38.8 GyE/39.8 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the duodenum. The magnitude of beam overshoot/undershoot was particularly exacerbated from the anterior and left directions. Conclusions: Bowel gas movement causes dosimetric variation to the target during treatment for radiotherapy. The effect of bowel gas movement varies with beam angle, with greatest influence on the anterior-posterior and left-right beams.

  10. THE ORIGIN AND DISTRIBUTION OF COLD GAS IN THE HALO OF A MILKY-WAY-MASS GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Ximena; Joung, M. Ryan; Putman, Mary E.

    2012-04-20

    We analyze an adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic cosmological simulation of a Milky-Way-sized galaxy to study the cold gas in the halo. H I observations of the Milky Way and other nearby spirals have revealed the presence of such gas in the form of clouds and other extended structures, which indicates ongoing accretion. We use a high-resolution simulation (136-272 pc throughout) to study the distribution of cold gas in the halo, compare it with observations, and examine its origin. The amount ({approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} in H I), covering fraction, and spatial distribution of the cold halo gas around the simulated galaxy at z = 0 are consistent with existing observations. At z = 0, the H I mass accretion rate onto the disk is 0.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We track the histories of the 20 satellites that are detected in H I in the redshift interval 0.5 > z > 0 and find that most of them are losing gas, with a median mass-loss rate per satellite of 3.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This stripped gas is a significant component of the H I gas seen in the simulation. In addition, we see filamentary material coming into the halo from the intergalactic medium at all redshifts. Most of this gas does not make it directly to the disk, but part of the gas in these structures is able to cool and form clouds. The metallicity of the gas allows us to distinguish between filamentary flows and satellite gas. We find that the former accounts for at least 25%-75% of the cold gas in the halo seen at any redshift analyzed here. Placing constraints on cloud formation mechanisms allows us to better understand how galaxies accrete gas and fuel star formation at z = 0.

  11. Across-shelf distribution of blue mussel larvae in the northern Gulf of Maine: consequences for population connectivity and a species range boundary.

    PubMed

    Yund, Philip O; Tilburg, Charles E; McCartney, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Studies of population connectivity have largely focused on along-shelf, as opposed to across-shelf, processes. We hypothesized that a discontinuity in across-shelf mixing caused by the divergence of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) from shore acts as an ecological barrier to the supply of mussel larvae to the coast. Existing data on the relative abundance of two congeneric blue mussels, Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus, were analysed to quantify the association of M. trossulus with the colder temperature signal of the EMCC and generate larval distribution predictions. We then sampled the across-shelf distribution of larvae along two transects during 2011. Larvae were identified using restriction digests of PCR amplicons from the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Mytilus edulis larvae were consistently abundant on either the inshore and offshore transect ends, but not homogeneously distributed across the shelf, while M. trossulus larvae were less common throughout the study area. The divergence of the EMCC from shore appears to create a break in the connectivity of M. edulis populations by isolating those inshore of the EMCC from upstream larval sources. Across-shelf transport processes can thus produce connectivity patterns that would not be predicted solely on the basis of along-shelf processes.

  12. Across-shelf distribution of blue mussel larvae in the northern Gulf of Maine: consequences for population connectivity and a species range boundary

    PubMed Central

    Yund, Philip O.; Tilburg, Charles E.; McCartney, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of population connectivity have largely focused on along-shelf, as opposed to across-shelf, processes. We hypothesized that a discontinuity in across-shelf mixing caused by the divergence of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) from shore acts as an ecological barrier to the supply of mussel larvae to the coast. Existing data on the relative abundance of two congeneric blue mussels, Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus, were analysed to quantify the association of M. trossulus with the colder temperature signal of the EMCC and generate larval distribution predictions. We then sampled the across-shelf distribution of larvae along two transects during 2011. Larvae were identified using restriction digests of PCR amplicons from the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Mytilus edulis larvae were consistently abundant on either the inshore and offshore transect ends, but not homogeneously distributed across the shelf, while M. trossulus larvae were less common throughout the study area. The divergence of the EMCC from shore appears to create a break in the connectivity of M. edulis populations by isolating those inshore of the EMCC from upstream larval sources. Across-shelf transport processes can thus produce connectivity patterns that would not be predicted solely on the basis of along-shelf processes. PMID:27018654

  13. The velocity distribution of interstellar gas observed in strong UV absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of three strong interstellar UV absorption lines of N I (1199 A), N II (1083 A), and Si III (1206 A) in 47 stars of widely varying distance and a variety of spectral types are analyzed to obtain a velocity distribution function for the interstellar gas. A technique based on the maximum and minimum velocities observed along a line of sight is adopted because of heavy line blending, and results are discussed for both power-law and exponential distribution functions. The expected distribution of radiative-phase supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium is calculated as a function of SNR birthrate and of the interstellar density in which they evolve. The results are combined with observed distance estimates, and it is shown that an interstellar density in excess of 0.1 per cu cm would be required to keep the SNRs sufficiently confined so that their cross sections are consistent with the observed number of components. The alternative possibility is considered that SNRs do not enter the radiative phase before escaping from the Galaxy or colliding with neighboring remnants.

  14. Trace element concentrations and distributions in the main body tissues and the net requirements for maintenance and growth of Dorper × Hu lambs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Nie, H T; Wang, Q; Wang, Z Y; Zhang, Y L; Guo, R H; Wang, F

    2015-05-01

    A comparative slaughter trial was conducted to estimate the trace element concentrations and distributions in the main body tissues and the net requirements for maintenance and growth of Dorper × Hu crossbred lambs. Thirty-five lambs of each gender (19.2 ± 0.36 kg initial BW) were used. Seven lambs of each gender were randomly chosen and slaughtered at approximately 20 kg BW as the baseline group for measuring initial body composition. Another 7 lambs of each gender were also randomly chosen and offered a pelleted mixed diet for ad libitum intake and slaughtered at approximately 28 kg BW. The remaining 21 sheep of each gender were randomly divided into 3 groups with 7 sheep each and assigned to ad libitum or 40 or 70% of ad libitum intake of a pelleted mixed diet (42:58 concentrate:roughage, DM basis). The 3 groups of each gender were slaughtered when the sheep fed ad libitum reached approximately 35 kg BW. Empty body (head + feet, hide, viscera + blood, and carcass) trace element contents were determined after slaughter. The results showed that the trace elements were mainly distributed in viscera (blood included), except for Zn, which was mainly distributed in the muscle and bone tissues. The net requirements were calculated using the comparative slaughter technique. For males and females, the daily net trace element requirements for maintenance were 356.1 and 164.1 μg Fe, 4.3 and 3.4 μg Mn, 42.0 and 29.8 μg Cu, and 83.5 and 102.0 μg Zn per kilogram empty body weight (EBW), respectively. Net requirements for growth decreased from 65.67 to 57.27 mg Fe, 0.35 to 0.25 mg Mn, and 3.45 to 2.82 mg Cu and increased from 26.36 to 26.65 mg Zn per kilogram EBW gain (EBWG) for males. Net requirements for growth decreased from 30.66 to 22.14 mg Fe, 0.43 to 0.32 mg Mn, 2.86 to 2.18 mg Cu, and 27.71 to 25.83 mg Zn per kilogram EBWG for females from 20 to 35 kg BW. This study indicated that the net trace element requirements for Dorper × Hu crossbred lambs may be

  15. Pesticides in the atmosphere: a comparison of gas-particle partitioning and particle size distribution of legacy and current-use pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrendele, C.; Okonski, K.; Melymuk, L.; Landlová, L.; Kukučka, P.; Audy, O.; Kohoutek, J.; Čupr, P.; Klánová, J.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a comparison of seasonal variation, gas-particle partitioning, and particle-phase size distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in air. Two years (2012/2013) of weekly air samples were collected at a background site in the Czech Republic using a high-volume air sampler. To study the particle-phase size distribution, air samples were also collected at an urban and rural site in the area of Brno, Czech Republic, using a cascade impactor separating atmospheric particulates according to six size fractions. Major differences were found in the atmospheric distribution of OCPs and CUPs. The atmospheric concentrations of CUPs were driven by agricultural activities while secondary sources such as volatilization from surfaces governed the atmospheric concentrations of OCPs. Moreover, clear differences were observed in gas-particle partitioning; CUP partitioning was influenced by adsorption onto mineral surfaces while OCPs were mainly partitioning to aerosols through absorption. A predictive method for estimating the gas-particle partitioning has been derived and is proposed for polar and non-polar pesticides. Finally, while OCPs and the majority of CUPs were largely found on fine particles, four CUPs (carbendazim, isoproturon, prochloraz, and terbuthylazine) had higher concentrations on coarse particles ( > 3.0 µm), which may be related to the pesticide application technique. This finding is particularly important and should be further investigated given that large particles result in lower risks from inhalation (regardless the toxicity of the pesticide) and lower potential for long-range atmospheric transport.

  16. Three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen fluoride gas toward NGC 6334 I and I(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Naylor, D. A.; Makiwa, G.; Satta, M.; Abergel, A.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The HF molecule has been proposed as a sensitive tracer of diffuse interstellar gas, while at higher densities its abundance could be influenced heavily by freeze-out onto dust grains. Aims: We investigate the spatial distribution of a collection of absorbing gas clouds, some associated with the dense, massive star-forming core NGC 6334 I, and others with diffuse foreground clouds elsewhere along the line of sight. For the former category, we aim to study the dynamical properties of the clouds in order to assess their potential to feed the accreting protostellar cores. Methods: We use far-infrared spectral imaging from the Herschel SPIRE iFTS to construct a map of HF absorption at 243 μm in a 6'× 3.´5 region surrounding NGC 6334 I and I(N). Results: The combination of new mapping that is fully sampled spatially, but is spectrally unresolved with a previous, single-pointing, spectrally resolved HF signature yields a three-dimensional picture of absorbing gas clouds in the direction of NGC 6334. Toward core I, the HF equivalent width matches that of the spectrally resolved observation. At angular separations ≳20'' from core I, the HF absorption becomes weaker, which is consistent with three of the seven components being associated with this dense star-forming envelope. Of the remaining four components, two disappear beyond ~1' distance from the NGC 6334 filament, suggesting that these clouds are spatially associated with the star-forming complex. Our data also implies a lack of gas-phase HF in the envelope of core I(N). Using a simple description of adsorption onto and desorption from dust grain surfaces, we show that the overall lower temperature of the envelope of source I(N) is consistent with freeze-out of HF, while it remains in the gas phase in source I. Conclusions: We use the HF molecule as a tracer of column density in diffuse gas (nH ≈ 102-103cm-3), and find that it may uniquely trace a relatively low-density portion of the gas reservoir

  17. Global distribution and Gas-particle Partitioning of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - a Modelling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, G.; Sehili, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are emitted in all combustion processes. Some undergo re-volatilisation (multi-hopping). Little is known about degradation pathways and the processes determining gas-particle partitioning (Lohmann & Lammel, 2004). Distribution and fate have no been studied on the global scale so far (except for emissions in Europe and Russia; Sehili & Lammel, 2007). Anthracene (ANT), fluoranthene (FLT) and benzo[a]pyrene (BAP) have been studied under present-day climate and each 3 scenarios of atmospheric degradation and gas-particle partitioning using an atmospheric general circulation model with embedded dynamic aerosol submodel, ECHAM-HAM (Stier et al., 2005) and re-volatilization from ground compartments (Semeena et al., 2006). 10 years were simulated with a time-step of 30 min and 2.8°x2.8° and 19 levels. Emissions were compiled based on emission factors in 27 major types of combustion technologies, scaled to 141 combustion technologies and their global distribution as of 1996 (1°x1°) according to fuel type and the PM1 emission factor (Bond et al., 2004). The emissions were entried uniformly throughout the entire simulation time. Scenarios tested: AD = adsorption (according to the Junge empirical relationship; Pankow, 1987), OB = absorption in organic matter and adsorption to soot (Lohmann & Lammel, 2004) without and DP = with degradation in the atmospheric particulate phase. Gas-particle partitioning in air influences drastically the atmospheric cycling, total environmental fate (e.g. compartmental distributions) and the long-range transport potential (LRTP) of the substances studied. The LRTP is mostly regional. Comparison with observed levels indicate that degradation in the particulate phase must be slower than in the gas-phase. Furthermore, the levels of semivolatile PAHs (ANT and FLT) at high latitudes and a European mid latitude site cannot be explained by partitioning due to adsorption alone, but point to both absorption into

  18. Investigation of Colorless Distributed Combustion (CDC) with Swirl for Gas Turbine Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil Hasan, Ahmed Essam ElDin

    Colorless Distributed Combustion (CDC) with swirl is investigated for gas turbine engine applications due to its benefits for ultra-low pollutants emission, improved pattern factor and thermal field uniformity, low noise emission, and stable combustion with the alleviation of combustion instabilities. Adequate and fast mixing between the injected air and internally recirculated hot reactive gases to form hot and diluted oxidant is critical for CDC, followed by rapid mixing with the fuel. This results in distributed reaction zone instead of a concentrated thin flame front as observed in conventional diffusion flames, leading to avoidance of hot spot regions and providing reduced NOx and CO emissions. The focus of this dissertation is to develop and demonstrate CDC in a cylindrical combustor for application to stationary gas turbine combustors. The dissertation examines the sequential development of ultra-low emission colorless distributed combustor operating at a nominal thermal intensity of 36MW/m3-atm. Initially, the role of swirl is evaluated through comparing the performance of swirling and non-swirling configurations with focus on pollutants emission, stability, and isothermal flowfield through particle image velocimetry. Different fuel injection locations have also been examined, and based on performance a swirling configuration have been down selected for further investigations demonstrating emissions as low as 1 PPM of NO with a 40% reduction compared to non-swirling configuration. Further investigations were performed to outline the impact of inlet air temperature and combustor pressure on reaction distribution and combustor performance. Next, Fuel flexibility has been examined with view to develop CDC combustors that can handle different gaseous and liquid fuels, both traditional and renewable. These fuels included diluted methane, hydrogen enriched methane, propane, ethanol, kerosene, JP-8, Hydrogenated Renewable Jet fuel, and novel biofuel. Swirling CDC

  19. The frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy using UV absorption line measurements from archival high-dispersion IUE spectra and to identify particularly interesting regions for future study. Approximately 500 spectra have been examined. The study began with the creation of a database of all 0 and B stars with b less than or = to 30 deg observed with IUE at high dispersion over its 18-year lifetime. The original database of 2500 unique objects was reduced to 1200 objects which had optimal exposures available. The next task was to determine the distances of these stars so the high-velocity structures could be mapped in the Galaxy. Spectroscopic distances were calculated for each star for which photometry was available. The photometry was acquired for each star using the SIMBAD database. Preference was given to the ubvy system where available; otherwise the UBV system was used.

  20. Space Transportation Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Jan C.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) definition, design philosophy, robust design, maximum design condition, casting vs. machined and welded forgings, operability considerations, high reliability design philosophy, engine reliability enhancement, low cost design philosophy, engine systems requirements, STME schematic, fuel turbopump, liquid oxygen turbopump, main injector, and gas generator. The major engine components of the STME and the Space Shuttle Main Engine are compared.

  1. Planning replacement of natural gas distribution systems under constraints on acceptable risk from explosions.

    PubMed

    Noonan, F

    1991-12-01

    Natural gas distribution systems in the United States were developed primarily in the first half of this century, utilizing materials such as cast iron and then steel. Over time, cast iron and steel pipe sections became weak from corrosion and are subject to failure which in turn can lead to explosions and possible injury and loss of life. Gas utilities maintain system integrity through repair-replacement programs where pipe sections are prioritized for replacement in any given year through cost-benefit analysis; however, the total annual amount to be budgeted for replacement is left to engineering judgment. This approach has left some utilities vulnerable to criticism that their current replacement rate on cast iron pipe is not great enough and that public safety is being compromised. This paper addresses the problem situation by formulating a linear programming replacement decision model which augments cost-benefit analysis with explicit constraints on acceptable risk to human life from fire/explosion. The model is illustrated for a hypothetical utility.

  2. The Case for Natural Gas Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Weimar, Mark R.; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Natural-gas-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (NGSOFC) power systems yield electrical conversion efficiencies exceeding 60% and may become a viable alternative for distributed generation (DG) if stack life and manufacturing economies of scale can be realized. Currently, stacks last approximately 2 years and few systems are produced each year because of the relatively high cost of electricity from the systems. If mass manufacturing (10,000 units per year) and a stack life of 15 years can be reached, the cost of electricity from an NGSOFC system is estimated to be about 7.7 ¢/kWh, well within the price of commercial and residential retail prices at the national level (9.9-10¢/kWh and 11-12 ¢/kWh, respectively). With an additional 5 ¢/kWh in estimated additional benefits from DG, NGSOFC could be well positioned to replace the forecasted 59-77 gigawatts of capacity loss resulting from coal plant closures due to stricter emissions regulations and low natural gas prices.

  3. The current distribution and thermal stability of natural gas hydrates in the Canadian polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, A.; Smith, S.L.; Majorowicz, J.

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates may contribute to both future energy supplies and to the increase of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Evaluation of the importance of gas hydrates requires an improved knowledge of the present hydrate distribution. Analysis of thermal and geophysical logs from 369 wells in the Canadian Arctic Islands and the Beaufort Sea-Mackenzie Delta regions indicates that a maximum of 1,900 to 3,900 Gt of methane may be stored as hydrate in this region. Consideration of the recent geological and climatic history of the area demonstrates that the volume of hydrate is variable with time. Decomposition of hydrates is possibly occurring beneath approximately 73,000 km{sup 2} of the Canadian Beaufort Shelf. Approximately 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} hydrate/km{sup 2} may become unstable over a 100 year period due to marine transgression. In contrast, cooling of sediments and hydrate formation is occurring in the Arctic Islands as new land emerges from the ocean in response to isostatic rebound.

  4. Absorption Line Studies and the Distribution of Neutral Gas in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Previous published absorption line studies performed at ultraviolet and visual wavelengths are combined with new ultraviolet data in order to map out the distribution of HI within 150 pc of the Sun. Newly presented data for distances less than 50 pc further support the local cloud model as presented by Bruhweiler (1982). The Sun is embedded, near the edge of a diffuse cloud with total column density 2 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm. Most observed directions within 50 pc away from the cloud body reveal trace amounts of gas (N)HI) approximately 10 to the 18th power/sq cm presumably arising in the outer skin of the local cloud. At greater distances (50 approximately or d approximately or 150 pc) most directions show significant absorption with N(HI) 10(19)/sq cm. Two directions, one toward the northern galactic pole (NGP), the other toward beta CMa exhibit unusually low HI column densities out to distances of 150 to 200 pc. However, substantial amounts of gas N(HI) 10 to the 19th power/sq cm, are seen toward the NGP at greater distances. The implicatons of these results on astronomy at wavelengths shortward of 912A are discussed.

  5. Both size-frequency distribution and sub-populations of the main-belt asteroid population are consistent with YORP-induced rotational fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S.; Scheeres, D.; Rossi, A.; Marzari, F.; Davis, D.

    2014-07-01

    From the results of a comprehensive asteroid-population-evolution model, we conclude that the YORP-induced rotational-fission hypothesis has strong repercussions for the small size end of the main-belt asteroid size-frequency distribution and is consistent with observed asteroid-population statistics and with the observed sub-populations of binary asteroids, asteroid pairs and contact binaries. The foundation of this model is the asteroid-rotation model of Marzari et al. (2011) and Rossi et al. (2009), which incorporates both the YORP effect and collisional evolution. This work adds to that model the rotational fission hypothesis (i.e. when the rotation rate exceeds a critical value, erosion and binary formation occur; Scheeres 2007) and binary-asteroid evolution (Jacobson & Scheeres, 2011). The YORP-effect timescale for large asteroids with diameters D > ˜ 6 km is longer than the collision timescale in the main belt, thus the frequency of large asteroids is determined by a collisional equilibrium (e.g. Bottke 2005), but for small asteroids with diameters D < ˜ 6 km, the asteroid-population evolution model confirms that YORP-induced rotational fission destroys small asteroids more frequently than collisions. Therefore, the frequency of these small asteroids is determined by an equilibrium between the creation of new asteroids out of the impact debris of larger asteroids and the destruction of these asteroids by YORP-induced rotational fission. By introducing a new source of destruction that varies strongly with size, YORP-induced rotational fission alters the slope of the size-frequency distribution. Using the outputs of the asteroid-population evolution model and a 1-D collision evolution model, we can generate this new size-frequency distribution and it matches the change in slope observed by the SKADS survey (Gladman 2009). This agreement is achieved with both an accretional power-law or a truncated ''Asteroids were Born Big'' size-frequency distribution

  6. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Wheat (Triticum spp.) and Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Cultivars: Distribution of Major Cell Wall Polysaccharides According to Their Main Structural Features.

    PubMed

    Veličković, Dušan; Saulnier, Luc; Lhomme, Margot; Damond, Aurélie; Guillon, Fabienne; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2016-08-17

    Arabinoxylans (AX) and (1→3),(1→4)-β-glucans (BG) are the main components of cereal cell walls and influence many aspects of their end uses. Important variations in the composition and structure of these polysaccharides have been reported among cereals and cultivars of a given species. In this work, the spatial distribution of AX and BG in the endosperm of mature grains was established for nine wheat varieties and eight barley varieties using enzymatically assisted mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Important structural features of the AX and BG polymers that were previously shown to influence their physicochemical properties were assessed. Differences in the distribution of AX and BG structures were observed, both within the endosperm of a given cultivar and between wheat and barley cultivars. This study provides a unique picture of the structural heterogeneity of AX and BG polysaccharides at the scale of the whole endosperm in a series of wheat and barley cultivars. Thus, it can participate meaningfully in a strategy aiming at understanding the structure-function relationships of these two polymers.

  7. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Wheat (Triticum spp.) and Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Cultivars: Distribution of Major Cell Wall Polysaccharides According to Their Main Structural Features.

    PubMed

    Veličković, Dušan; Saulnier, Luc; Lhomme, Margot; Damond, Aurélie; Guillon, Fabienne; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2016-08-17

    Arabinoxylans (AX) and (1→3),(1→4)-β-glucans (BG) are the main components of cereal cell walls and influence many aspects of their end uses. Important variations in the composition and structure of these polysaccharides have been reported among cereals and cultivars of a given species. In this work, the spatial distribution of AX and BG in the endosperm of mature grains was established for nine wheat varieties and eight barley varieties using enzymatically assisted mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Important structural features of the AX and BG polymers that were previously shown to influence their physicochemical properties were assessed. Differences in the distribution of AX and BG structures were observed, both within the endosperm of a given cultivar and between wheat and barley cultivars. This study provides a unique picture of the structural heterogeneity of AX and BG polysaccharides at the scale of the whole endosperm in a series of wheat and barley cultivars. Thus, it can participate meaningfully in a strategy aiming at understanding the structure-function relationships of these two polymers. PMID:27463368

  8. The concentration distribution around a growing gas bubble in a bio tissue under the effect of suction process.

    PubMed

    Mohammadein, S A

    2014-07-01

    The concentration distribution around a growing nitrogen gas bubble in the blood and other bio tissues of divers who ascend to surface too quickly is obtained by Mohammadein and Mohamed model (2010) for variant and constant ambient pressure through the decompression process. In this paper, the growing of gas bubbles and concentration distribution under the effect of suction process are studied as a modification of Mohammadein and Mohamed model (zero suction). The growth of gas bubble is affected by ascent rate, tissue diffusivity, initial concentration difference, surface tension and void fraction. Mohammadein and Mohamed model (2010) is obtained as a special case from the present model. Results showed that, the suction process activates the systemic blood circulation and delay the growth of gas bubbles in the bio tissues to avoid the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS).

  9. Larval development sites of the main Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in northern Europe and distribution of coprophilic species larvae in Belgian pastures.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Brostaux, Yves; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric

    2014-10-15

    Some Culicoides species of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological virus vectors worldwide and have indeed been associated with outbreaks of important epizoonoses in recent years, such as bluetongue and Schmallenberg disease in northern Europe. These diseases, which affect domestic and wild ruminants, have caused considerable economic losses. Knowledge of substrates suitable for Culicoides larval development is important, particularly for the main vector temperate species. This study, realized during two years, aimed to highlight the larval development sites of these biting midge species in the immediate surroundings of ten Belgian cattle farms. Moreover, spatial distribution of the coprophilic Culicoides larvae (C. chiopterus and C. dewulfi) within pastures was studied with increasing distance from farms along linear transects (farm-pasture-woodland). A total of 4347 adult specimens belonging to 13 Culicoides species were obtained by incubation of 2131 soil samples belonging to 102 different substrates; 18 of these substrates were suitable for larval development. The Obsoletus complex (formed by two species) was observed in a wide range of substrates, including silage residues, components of a chicken coop, dung adhering to walls inside stables, leftover feed along the feed bunk, a compost pile of sugar beet residues, soil of a livestock trampling area, and decaying wood, while the following served as substrates for the other specimens: C. chiopterus, mainly cow dung; C. dewulfi, cow dung and molehill soil; C. circumscriptus, algae; C. festivipennis, algae and soil in stagnant water; C. nubeculosus, algae and silt specifically from the edge of a pond; C. punctatus, mainly wet soil between silage reserves; C. salinarius, algae; and C. stigma, algae and wet soil between silage reserves. We also recorded significantly higher densities of coprophilic larvae within pastures in cow dung located near forests, which is likely due to the localization of

  10. Effect of liquid distribution on gas-water phase mass transfer in an unsaturated sand during infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1994-09-01

    Gas-water phase mass transfer was examined in a homogeneous sand with both the gas and water phase mobile: water was infiltrated from the top of the sand column while benzene-laden air flowed upward from the bottom. Mass-transfer limitations for this situation may be important for applications of bioventing, where water and nutrients are added at the ground surface simultaneously with induced air movement to carry oxygen and volatile organics to microbial populations. Gas- and water-phase samples indicate that gas-water phase mass transfer was sufficiently fast that equilibrium between gas and water phases was achieved at all sampling locations within the porous medium. Lower-bound estimates for the gas-water mass-transfer rate coefficient show that mass transfer was at least 10-40 times larger than predictions made from an empirical model developed for gas-water phase mass transfer in an identical porous medium. A water-phase tracer test demonstrates that water flow was much more uniform in this study than in those earlier experiments, which is a likely explanation for the differing rates of gas-water phase mass transfer. It is hypothesized that the liquid distribution in previous laboratory experiments was less uniform because of preferential flow paths due to wetting front instabilities. Gas-water phase mass-transfer rate coefficients reported in this investigation are for an ideal situation of uniform water infiltration: mass-transfer rates in field soils are expected to be significantly smaller.

  11. Trace quantification of 1-octacosanol and 1-triacontanol and their main metabolites in plasma by liquid-liquid extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haim, Daniela; Berríos, Miriam; Valenzuela, Alfonso; Videla, Luis A

    2009-12-15

    A method for the simultaneous determination of 1-octacosanol and 1-triacontanol and their main metabolites in rat plasma was developed. The procedure involved ethanolic NaOH saponification of the sample, acidification, liquid-liquid extraction, and derivatization of the analytes to its trimethylsilylether/ester, followed analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Quantification was performed by the internal standard method using betulin. The method had a good linearity over the range 8.4-540ng/ml (r>or=0.998) and showed an excellent intra-day (R.S.D.=0.59-3.06%) and inter-day (R.S.D.=2.99-5.22%) precision according to the acceptance criteria. The detection limits ranged between 1.32 and 3.47ng/ml. The method was applied successfully to study the total plasmatic concentration of 1-octacosanol, octacosanoic acid, 1-triacontanol, and triacontanoic acid, after an oral dose of policosanols mixture, using plasma samples of 100microl.

  12. MRI investigation of subcellular water compartmentalization and gas distribution in apples.

    PubMed

    Winisdorffer, Guillaume; Musse, Maja; Quellec, Stéphane; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Lahaye, Marc; Mariette, François

    2015-06-01

    Water status and distribution at subcellular level in whole apple fruit were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurement of the multi-exponential transverse (T2) relaxation of water protons. Apparent microporosity, also estimated by MRI, provided mapping of gas distribution in fruit tissues. Measuring for the first time the multi-exponential relaxation of water and apparent tissue microporosity in whole fruit and combining these with histological measurements provided a more reliable interpretation of the origins of variations in the transverse relaxation time (T2) and better characterization of the fruit tissue. Measurements were performed on 54 fruits from 3 different cultivars. Fruits of different sizes were selected for each cultivar to provide tissues with cells of different dimensions. Macrovision measurements were carried out on parenchymal tissue from all fruits to investigate the impact of cell size on T2 value. The results showed that the MRI transverse relaxation signal is well fitted by a tri-exponential decay curve that reflects cell compartmentalization. Variations in cell size partially explained the different T2 observed. This study highlighted the heterogeneity of apple tissues in terms of relaxation parameters, apparent microporosity and cell morphology and in relation to specific variations between fruit of different cultivars.

  13. Measurement of gas density and temperature distributions in strongly rotating UF/sub 6/ using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, R.A.; Caldwell, S.E.; White, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique for using Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) signals to measure the distribution of gas density and temperature in strongly rotating UF/sub 6/ gas is presented. An external pulsed laser is used to excite the rotating UF/sub 6/ gas, producing an exponentially decaying fluorescence signal. A multi-channel fiber optics system simultaneously collects the fluorescence signals emanating from a number of points in the gas. The signals from each optical channel are digitized and processed to determine the fluorescence signal intensity and decay lifetime at each of the points of observation by means of a least squares fitting process. Gas densities and temperatures are then determined from the intensity and lifetime data. A recently constructed LIF probe system is described and an analysis of the unfolding techniques necessary to process the signal data is presented. Preliminary data, obtained in tests of the probe system in a laboratory rotor, are presented.

  14. A perspective on cost-effectiveness of greenhouse gas reduction solutions in water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Thomas P.; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Water distribution systems (WDSs) face great challenges as aging infrastructures require significant investments in rehabilitation, replacement, and expansion. Reducing environmental impacts as WDSs develop is essential for utility managers and policy makers. This study quantifies the existing greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of common WDS elements using life-cycle assessment (LCA) while identifying the greatest opportunities for emission reduction. This study addresses oversights of the related literature, which fails to capture several WDS elements and to provide detailed life-cycle inventories. The life-cycle inventory results for a US case study utility reveal that 81% of GHGs are from pumping energy, where a large portion of these emissions are a result of distribution leaks, which account for 270 billion l of water losses daily in the United States. Pipe replacement scheduling is analyzed from an environmental perspective where, through incorporating leak impacts, a tool reveals that optimal replacement is no more than 20 years, which is in contrast to the US average of 200 years. Carbon abatement costs (CACs) are calculated for different leak reduction scenarios for the case utility that range from -130 to 35 t-1 CO2(eq). Including life-cycle modeling in evaluating pipe materials identified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cement-lined ductile iron (DICL) as the Pareto efficient options, however; utilizing PVC presents human health risks. The model developed for the case utility is applied to California and Texas to determine the CACs of reducing leaks to 5% of distributed water. For California, annual GHG savings from reducing leaks alone (3.4 million tons of CO2(eq)) are found to exceed California Air Resources Board’s estimate for energy efficiency improvements in the state’s water infrastructure.

  15. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life

  16. Effect of through-plane polytetrafluoroethylene distribution in gas diffusion layers on performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Iwamura, Takuya; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo; Nakano, Akihiro; Heo, Yun; Ishida, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Hironori; Kitahara, Tatsumi

    2016-02-01

    This experimental study identifies the effect of through-plane polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) distribution in gas diffusion backing (GDB) on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). PTFE-drying under vacuum pressure created a relatively uniform PTFE distribution in GDB compared to drying under atmospheric pressure. Carbon paper samples with different PTFE distributions due to the difference in drying conditions were prepared and used for the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) of PEMFCs. Also investigated is the effect of MPL application on the performance for those samples. The current density (i) - voltage (V) characteristics of these PEMFCs measured under high relative humidity conditions clearly showed that, with or without MPL, the cell using the GDL with PTFE dried under vacuum condition showed better performance than that dried under atmospheric condition. It is suggested that this improved performance is caused by the efficient transport of liquid water through the GDB due to the uniform distribution of PTFE.

  17. Distributions of the particle/gas and dust/gas partition coefficients for seventy-two semi-volatile organic compounds in indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjuan; Mandin, Corinne; Blanchard, Olivier; Mercier, Fabien; Pelletier, Maud; Le Bot, Barbara; Glorennec, Philippe; Ramalho, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Particle/gas and dust/gas partition coefficients (Kp and Kd) are two key parameters that address the partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between gas-phase, airborne particles, and settled dust in indoor environment. A number of empirical equations to calculate the values of Kp and Kd have been reported in the literature. Therefore, the difficulty lies in the selection of a specific empirical equation in a given situation. In this study, we retrieved from the literature 38 empirical equations for calculating Kp and Kd values from the SVOC saturation vapor pressure and octanol/air partition coefficient. These values were calculated for 72 SVOCs: 9 phthalates, 9 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 11 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 22 biocides, 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 3 alkylphenols, 2 synthetic musks, tributylphosphate, and bisphenol A. The mean and median values of log10Kp or log10Kd for most SVOCs were of the same order of magnitude. The distribution of log10Kp values was fitted to either a normal distribution (for 27 SVOCs) or a log-normal distribution (for 45 SVOCs). This work provides a reference distribution of the log10Kp for 72 SVOCs, and its use may reduce the bias associated with the selection of a specific value or equation. PMID:27016817

  18. Impact of routine episodic emissions on the expected frequency distribution of emissions from oil and gas production sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N.; Blewitt, D.; Hebert, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    In coordination with oil and gas operators, we developed a high resolution (< 1 min) simulation of temporal variability in well-pad oil and gas emissions over a year. We include routine emissions from condensate tanks, dehydrators, pneumatic devices, fugitive leaks and liquids unloading. We explore the variability in natural gas emissions from these individual well-pad sources, and find that routine short-term episodic emissions such as tank flashing and liquids unloading result in the appearance of a skewed, or 'fat-tail' distribution of emissions, from an individual well-pad over time. Additionally, we explore the expected variability in emissions from multiple wells with different raw gas composition, gas/liquids production volumes and control equipment. Differences in well-level composition, production volume and control equipment translate into differences in well-level emissions leading to a fat-tail distribution of emissions in the absence of operational upsets. Our results have several implications for recent studies focusing on emissions from oil and gas sources. Time scale of emission estimates are important and have important policy implications. Fat tail distributions may not be entirely driven by avoidable mechanical failures, and are expected to occur under routine operational conditions from short-duration emissions (e.g., tank flashing, liquid unloading). An understanding of the expected distribution of emissions for a particular population of wells is necessary to evaluate whether the observed distribution is more skewed than expected. Temporal variability in well-pad emissions make comparisons to annual average emissions inventories difficult and may complicate the interpretation of long-term ambient fenceline monitoring data. Sophisticated change detection algorithms will be necessary to identify when true operational upsets occur versus routine short-term emissions.

  19. Searching for gas giant planets on Solar system scales - a NACO/APP L'-band survey of A- and F-type main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkat, T.; Kenworthy, M. A.; Reggiani, M.; Quanz, S. P.; Mamajek, E. E.; Meyer, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of a direct imaging survey of A- and F-type main-sequence stars searching for giant planets. A/F stars are often the targets of surveys, as they are thought to have more massive giant planets relative to solar-type stars. However, most imaging is only sensitive to orbital separations >30 au, where it has been demonstrated that giant planets are rare. In this survey, we take advantage of the high-contrast capabilities of the Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph on NACO at the Very Large Telescope. Combined with optimized principal component analysis post-processing, we are sensitive to planetary-mass companions (2-12 MJup) at Solar system scales (≤30 au). We obtained data on 13 stars in the L' band and detected one new companion as part of this survey: an M6.0 ± 0.5 dwarf companion around HD 984. We re-detect low-mass companions around HD 12894 and HD 20385, both reported shortly after the completion of this survey. We use Monte Carlo simulations to determine new constraints on the low-mass (<80 MJup) companion frequency, as a function of mass and separation. Assuming solar-type planet mass and separation distributions, normalized to the planet frequency appropriate for A-stars, and the observed companion mass-ratio distribution for stellar companions extrapolated to planetary masses, we derive a truncation radius for the planetary mass companion surface density of <135 au at 95 per cent confidence.

  20. Alexandrium fundyense cysts in the Gulf of Maine: Long-term time series of abundance and distribution, and linkages to past and future blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Donald M.; Keafer, Bruce A.; Kleindinst, Judith L.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Norton, Kerry; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.; Smith, Juliette L.; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Butman, Bradford

    2014-05-01

    Here we document Alexandrium fundyense cyst abundance and distribution patterns over nine years (1997 and 2004-2011) in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Maine (GOM) and identify linkages between those patterns and several metrics of the severity or magnitude of blooms occurring before and after each autumn cyst survey. We also explore the relative utility of two measures of cyst abundance and demonstrate that GOM cyst counts can be normalized to sediment volume, revealing meaningful patterns equivalent to those determined with dry weight normalization. Cyst concentrations were highly variable spatially. Two distinct seedbeds (defined here as accumulation zones with>300 cysts cm-3) are evident, one in the Bay of Fundy (BOF) and one in mid-coast Maine. Overall, seedbed locations remained relatively constant through time, but their area varied 3-4 fold, and total cyst abundance more than 10 fold among years. A major expansion of the mid-coast Maine seedbed occurred in 2009 following an unusually intense A. fundyense bloom with visible red-water conditions, but that feature disappeared by late 2010. The regional system thus has only two seedbeds with the bathymetry, sediment characteristics, currents, biology, and environmental conditions necessary to persist for decades or longer. Strong positive correlations were confirmed between the abundance of cysts in both the 0-1 and the 0-3 cm layers of sediments in autumn and geographic measures of the extent of the bloom that occurred the next year (i.e., cysts→blooms), such as the length of coastline closed due to shellfish toxicity or the southernmost latitude of shellfish closures. In general, these metrics of bloom geographic extent did not correlate with the number of cysts in sediments following the blooms (blooms→cysts). There are, however, significant positive correlations between 0-3 cm cyst abundances and metrics of the preceding bloom that are indicative of bloom intensity or vegetative cell abundance (e

  1. Alexandrium fundyense cysts in the Gulf of Maine: long-term time series of abundance and distribution, and linkages to past and future blooms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Donald M.; Keafer, Bruce A.; Kleindinst, Judith L.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Norton, Kerry; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.; Smith, Juliette L.; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Butman, Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Here we document Alexandrium fundyense cyst abundance and distribution patterns over nine years (1997 and 2004–2011) in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Maine (GOM) and identify linkages between those patterns and several metrics of the severity or magnitude of blooms occurring before and after each autumn cyst survey. We also explore the relative utility of two measures of cyst abundance and demonstrate that GOM cyst counts can be normalized to sediment volume, revealing meaningful patterns equivalent to those determined with dry weight normalization. Cyst concentrations were highly variable spatially. Two distinct seedbeds (defined here as accumulation zones with>300 cysts cm−3) are evident, one in the Bay of Fundy (BOF) and one in mid-coast Maine. Overall, seedbed locations remained relatively constant through time, but their area varied 3–4 fold, and total cyst abundance more than 10 fold among years. A major expansion of the mid-coast Maine seedbed occurred in 2009 following an unusually intense A. fundyense bloom with visible red-water conditions, but that feature disappeared by late 2010. The regional system thus has only two seedbeds with the bathymetry, sediment characteristics, currents, biology, and environmental conditions necessary to persist for decades or longer. Strong positive correlations were confirmed between the abundance of cysts in both the 0–1 and the 0–3 cm layers of sediments in autumn and geographic measures of the extent of the bloom that occurred the next year (i.e., cysts→blooms), such as the length of coastline closed due to shellfish toxicity or the southernmost latitude of shellfish closures. In general, these metrics of bloom geographic extent did not correlate with the number of cysts in sediments following the blooms (blooms→cysts). There are, however, significant positive correlations between 0–3 cm cyst abundances and metrics of the preceding bloom that are indicative of bloom intensity or vegetative cell

  2. Maine Ingredients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2009-01-01

    This article features Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI), the nation's first-ever statewide 1-to-1 laptop program which marks its seventh birthday by expanding into high schools, providing an occasion to celebrate--and to examine the components of its success. The plan to put laptops into the hands of every teacher and student in grades 7…

  3. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W of Part 98-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 0.772 Open-ended Line 26.131 Population Emission Factors—Below Grade Metering-Regulating station 1..., Inlet Pressure 100 to 300 psig 0.20 Below Grade M&R Station, Inlet Pressure Population....13 Cast Iron 27.25 Population Emission Factors—Distribution Services, Gas Service 4 Unprotected...

  4. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W of Part 98-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 0.772 Open-ended Line 26.131 Population Emission Factors—Below Grade Metering-Regulating station 1..., Inlet Pressure 100 to 300 psig 0.20 Below Grade M&R Station, Inlet Pressure Population....13 Cast Iron 27.25 Population Emission Factors—Distribution Services, Gas Service 4 Unprotected...

  5. Distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-chlorine dioxide gas during the fumigation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-ClO2 gas subsequent to fumigation of tomatoes or cantaloupe was investigated as was major factors that affect the formation of chloroxyanion byproducts. Approximately 22% of the generated 36Cl-ClO2 was present on fumigated tomatoes after a 2-hour exposure t...

  6. The use of multibeam and split-beam echo sounders for assessing biomass and distribution of spring-spawning Atlantic cod in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurshin, Christopher William Damon

    This research focused on advancing the application of split-beam and multibeam echo sounding to remotely locate and describe spatial distribution, and to provide a relative measure of abundance of the spring-spawning Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the western Gulf of Maine. Specifically, the main objectives of this research were 1) to test the feasibility of a multibeam echo sounder to detect changes in volume backscatter proportional to incrementally decreasing quantities of cod held in a submerged cage, and to compare results to a split-beam echo sounder; 2) to describe the spatio-temporal distribution and estimate biomass of spring-spawning cod in the Gulf of Maine cod spawning protection area (GOMCSPA) by repeated acoustic and trawl surveys; and 3) to determine a predictive relation between target strength and length for 38-kHz and 120-kHz split-beam echo sounders and a 300-kHz multibeam echo sounder, and characterize other factors affecting backscattering of sound. The multibeam echo sounder detected a small and large reduction in volume backscatter proportional to reductions in stocking density of caged cod, while the split-beam echo sounder only detected a large reduction in stocking density. The spatial information from the multibeam echo sounder helped interpret and explain results from the split-beam echo sounder. Repeated acoustic and trawl surveys showed cod were relatively widespread in the survey area in May, but congregated at higher densities in areas adjacent to two elevated bathymetric features. Most cod converged to a single location in June, and were at a higher concentration than observations in May. This congregation decreased in size and density in July. Survey estimates of cod biomass ranged 184-494 mt in May, 138-617 mt in June, and 39-135 mt in July, depending on the estimation method. Based on echo classification and extrapolation, cod biomass to the GOMCSPA ranged 260-466 mt in May, 196-513 mt in June, and 91-198 mt in July. The biomass

  7. Main Report

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    scientific literature. The criteria were distributed among three main categories for each condition: The availability and characteristics of the screening test;The availability and complexity of diagnostic services; andThe availability and efficacy of treatments related to the conditions. A survey process utilizing a data collection instrument was used to gather expert opinion on the conditions in the first tier of the assessment. The data collection format and survey provided the opportunity to quantify expert opinion and to obtain the views of a diverse set of interest groups (necessary due to the subjective nature of some of the criteria). Statistical analysis of data produced a score for each condition, which determined its ranking and initial placement in one of three categories (high scoring, moderately scoring, or low scoring/absence of a newborn screening test). In the second tier of these analyses, the evidence base related to each condition was assessed in depth (e.g., via systematic reviews of reference lists including MedLine, PubMed and others; books; Internet searches; professional guidelines; clinical evidence; and cost/economic evidence and modeling). The fact sheets reflecting these analyses were evaluated by at least two acknowledged experts for each condition. These experts assessed the data and the associated references related to each criterion and provided corrections where appropriate, assigned a value to the level of evidence and the quality of the studies that established the evidence base, and determined whether there were significant variances from the survey data. Survey results were subsequently realigned with the evidence obtained from the scientific literature during the second-tier analysis for all objective criteria, based on input from at least three acknowledged experts in each condition. The information from these two tiers of assessment was then considered with regard to the overriding principles and other technology or condition

  8. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  9. GARROTXA Cosmological Simulations of Milky Way-sized Galaxies: General Properties, Hot-gas Distribution, and Missing Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Fàbrega, Santi; Valenzuela, Octavio; Colín, Pedro; Figueras, Francesca; Krongold, Yair; Velázquez, Héctor; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Ibarra-Medel, Hector

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a new set of simulations of Milky Way (MW)-sized galaxies using the AMR code ART + hydrodynamics in a Λ cold dark matter cosmogony. The simulation series is called GARROTXA and it follows the formation of a halo/galaxy from z = 60 to z = 0. The final virial mass of the system is ˜7.4 × 1011 M ⊙. Our results are as follows. (a) Contrary to many previous studies, the circular velocity curve shows no central peak and overall agrees with recent MW observations. (b) Other quantities, such as M\\_\\ast (6 × 1010 M ⊙) and R d (2.56 kpc), fall well inside the observational MW range. (c) We measure the disk-to-total ratio kinematically and find that D/T = 0.42. (d) The cold-gas fraction and star formation rate at z = 0, on the other hand, fall short of the values estimated for the MW. As a first scientific exploitation of the simulation series, we study the spatial distribution of hot X-ray luminous gas. We have found that most of this X-ray emitting gas is in a halo-like distribution accounting for an important fraction but not all of the missing baryons. An important amount of hot gas is also present in filaments. In all our models there is not a massive disk-like hot-gas distribution dominating the column density. Our analysis of hot-gas mock observations reveals that the homogeneity assumption leads to an overestimation of the total mass by factors of 3-5 or to an underestimation by factors of 0.7-0.1, depending on the used observational method. Finally, we confirm a clear correlation between the total hot-gas mass and the dark matter halo mass of galactic systems.

  10. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 6; Computed Temperature Distribution Through Cross Section of Water-Cooled Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, John N. B.; Sams, Eldon W.

    1947-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the cross-sectional temperature distribution of a water-cooled turbine blade was made using the relaxation method to solve the differential equation derived from the analysis. The analysis was applied to specific turbine blade and the studies icluded investigations of the accuracy of simple methods to determine the temperature distribution along the mean line of the rear part of the blade, of the possible effect of varying the perimetric distribution of the hot gas-to -metal heat transfer coefficient, and of the effect of changing the thermal conductivity of the blade metal for a constant cross sectional area blade with two quarter inch diameter coolant passages.

  11. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 10: METERING AND PRESSURE REGULATING STATIONS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSIONS AND DISTRIBUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  12. Spatially distributed flame transfer functions for predicting combustion dynamics in lean premixed gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper describes a methodology to improve the accuracy of prediction of the eigenfrequencies and growth rates of self-induced instabilities and demonstrates its application to a laboratory-scale, swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed, gas turbine combustor. The influence of the spatial heat release distribution is accounted for using local flame transfer function (FTF) measurements. The two-microphone technique and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence intensity measurements are used to determine the input (inlet velocity perturbation) and the output functions (heat release oscillation), respectively, for the local flame transfer functions. The experimentally determined local flame transfer functions are superposed using the flame transfer function superposition principle, and the result is incorporated into an analytic thermoacoustic model, in order to predict the linear stability characteristics of a given system. Results show that when the flame length is not acoustically compact the model prediction calculated using the local flame transfer functions is better than the prediction made using the global flame transfer function. In the case of a flame in the compact flame regime, accurate predictions of eigenfrequencies and growth rates can be obtained using the global flame transfer function. It was also found that the general response characteristics of the local FTF (gain and phase) are qualitatively the same as those of the global FTF. (author)

  13. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Gianfranco; Collodi, Giovanni; Gelpi, Leonardo; Fusco, Rosanna; Ricci, Giuseppe; Manes, Antonio; Passafiume, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant’s critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks) gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events. PMID:26805832

  14. Gas-liquid Phase Distribution and Void Fraction Measurements Using the MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daidzic, N. E.; Schmidt, E.; Hasan, M. M.; Altobelli, S.

    2004-01-01

    We used a permanent-magnet MRI system to estimate the integral and spatially- and/or temporally-resolved void-fraction distributions and flow patterns in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Air was introduced at the bottom of the stagnant liquid column using an accurate and programmable syringe pump. Air flow rates were varied between 1 and 200 ml/min. The cylindrical non-conducting test tube in which two-phase flow was measured was placed in a 2.67 kGauss MRI with MRT spectrometer/imager. Roughly linear relationship has been obtained for the integral void-fraction, obtained by volume-averaging of the spatially-resolved signals, and the air flow rate in upward direction. The time-averaged spatially-resolved void fraction has also been obtained for the quasi-steady flow of air in a stagnant liquid column. No great accuracy is claimed as this was an exploratory proof-of-concept type of experiment. Preliminary results show that MRI a non-invasive and non-intrusive experimental technique can indeed provide a wealth of different qualitative and quantitative data and is especially well suited for averaged transport processes in adiabatic and diabatic multi-phase and/or multi-component flows.

  15. Momentum distribution of the uniform electron gas: Improved parametrization and exact limits of the cumulant expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Ziesche, Paul

    2002-12-01

    The momentum distribution of the unpolarized uniform electron gas in its Fermi-liquid regime, n(k,rs), with the momenta k measured in units of the Fermi wave number kF and with the density parameter rs, is constructed with the help of the convex Kulik function G(x). It is assumed that n(0,rs),n(1±,rs), the on-top pair density g(0,rs), and the kinetic energy t(rs) are known (respectively, from accurate calculations for rs=1,…,5, from the solution of the Overhauser model, and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations via the virial theorem). Information from the high- and the low-density limit, corresponding to the random-phase approximation and to the Wigner crystal limit, is used. The result is an accurate parametrization of n(k,rs), which fulfills most of the known exact constraints. It is in agreement with the effective-potential calculations of Takada and Yasuhara [Phys. Rev. B 44, 7879 (1991)], is compatible with quantum Monte Carlo data, and is valid in the density range rs≲12. The corresponding cumulant expansions of the pair density and of the static structure factor are discussed, and some exact limits are derived.

  16. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Manes, Gianfranco; Collodi, Giovanni; Gelpi, Leonardo; Fusco, Rosanna; Ricci, Giuseppe; Manes, Antonio; Passafiume, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant's critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks) gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events. PMID:26805832

  17. Numerical investigation of oxygen impurity distribution during multicrystalline silicon crystal growth using a gas flow guidance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Ying-Yang; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Chi-Yung

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen is one of the most important types of impurities that can cause thermal donor or light-induced degradation in mc-Si solar cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect that installing a gas flow guidance device in a mc-Si crystal-growth furnace would have on the oxygen impurity distribution in the melt during the growth process. The installation of such a gas flow guidance device can enhance the gas flow near the free surface, which would allow the argon to carry a greater amount of evaporated SiO gas outside the furnace. Furthermore, the enhanced motion of the gas flow also improves heat transfer near the free surface, which would make the melt vortex separate more easily. The separated melt vortex, which is located near the central region of the melt-crystal interface, directs any oxygen impurity towards the central region of the melt-crystal interface. This is why the oxygen concentration can be reduced by installing the gas flow guidance device. The effectiveness of the gas flow guidance device depends on the vertical distance between it and the free surface (h) as well as the gap between the crucible sidewall and the tip of the device (d). The effect on the oxygen concentration in the melt is significant when smaller values for h and d are adopted.

  18. Performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte fuel cells by combining liquid removal mechanisms of a gas diffusion layer with wettability distribution and a gas channel with microgrooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utaka, Yoshio; Koresawa, Ryo

    2016-08-01

    Although polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are commercially available, there are still many problems that need to be addressed to improve their performance and increase their usage. At a high current density, generated water accumulates in the gas diffusion layer and in the gas channels of the cathode. This excess water obstructs oxygen transport, and as a result, cell performance is greatly reduced. To improve the cell performance, the effective removal of the generated water and the promotion of oxygen diffusion in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) are necessary. In this study, two functions proposed in previous reports were combined and applied to a PEFC: a hybrid GDL to form an oxygen diffusion path using a wettability distribution and a gas separator with microgrooves to enhance liquid removal. For a PEFC with a hybrid GDL and a gas separator with microgrooves, the concentration overvoltage of the PEFC was reduced, and the current density limit and maximum power density were increased compared with a conventional PEFC. Moreover, the stability of the cell voltage was markedly improved.

  19. Gas chromatographic simulated distillation-mass spectrometry for the determination of the boiling point distributions of crude oils

    PubMed

    Roussis; Fitzgerald

    2000-04-01

    The coupling of gas chromatographic simulated distillation with mass spectrometry for the determination of the distillation profiles of crude oils is reported. The method provides the boiling point distributions of both weight and volume percent amounts. The weight percent distribution is obtained from the measured total ion current signal. The total ion current signal is converted to weight percent amount by calibration with a reference crude oil of a known distillation profile. Knowledge of the chemical composition of the crude oil across the boiling range permits the determination of the volume percent distribution. The long-term repeatability is equivalent to or better than the short-term repeatability of the currently available American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) gas chromatographic method for simulated distillation. Results obtained by the mass spectrometric method are in very good agreement with results obtained by conventional methods of physical distillation. The compositional information supplied by the method can be used to extensively characterize crude oils.

  20. Combustion of Biosolids in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed, Part 1: Main Ash-Forming Elements and Ash Distribution with a Focus on Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of three papers describing combustion of biosolids in a 5-kW bubbling fluidized bed, the ash chemistry, and possible application of the ash produced as a fertilizing agent. This part of the study aims to clarify whether the distribution of main ash forming elements from biosolids can be changed by modifying the fuel matrix, the crystalline compounds of which can be identified in the raw materials and what role the total composition may play for which compounds are formed during combustion. The biosolids were subjected to low-temperature ashing to investigate which crystalline compounds that were present in the raw materials. Combustion experiments of two different types of biosolids were conducted in a 5-kW benchscale bubbling fluidized bed at two different bed temperatures and with two different additives. The additives were chosen to investigate whether the addition of alkali (K2CO3) and alkaline-earth metal (CaCO3) would affect the speciation of phosphorus, so the molar ratios targeted in modified fuels were P:K = 1:1 and P:K:Ca = 1:1:1, respectively. After combustion the ash fractions were collected, the ash distribution was determined and the ash fractions were analyzed with regards to elemental composition (ICP-AES and SEM-EDS) and part of the bed ash was also analyzed qualitatively using XRD. There was no evidence of zeolites in the unmodified fuels, based on low-temperature ashing. During combustion, the biosolid pellets formed large bed ash particles, ash pellets, which contained most of the total ash content (54%–95% (w/w)). This ash fraction contained most of the phosphorus found in the ash and the only phosphate that was identified was a whitlockite, Ca9(K,Mg,Fe)(PO4)7, for all fuels and fuel mixtures. With the addition of potassium, cristobalite (SiO2) could no longer be identified via X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the bed ash particles and leucite (KAlSi2O6) was formed. Most of the alkaline-earth metals calcium and

  1. Distribution of Trichloroethylene and Geologic Controls on Contaminant Pathways near the Royal River, McKin Superfund Site Area, Gray, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, Forest P.; Flight, L.E.; Stone, Janet Radway; Clifford, Scott

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-diffusion samplers were used in the autumn of 1997 to determine the lateral extent and distribution of concentrations of a trichloroethylene (TCE) plume in the ground-water discharge area near the McKin Superfund Site, Gray, Maine. Analyses of vapor in the samplers identified a plume about 800 feet wide entering the river near Boiling Springs, an area of ground-water discharge on the flood plain of the Royal River. The highest observed concentration of TCE in vapor was in an area of sand boils on the western bank of the river and about 200 feet downstream from Boiling Springs. Previous studies showed that most of the TCE load in the river originated in the area of the sand boils. In general, highest concentrations were observed on the western side of the river on the upgradient side of the plume, but TCE also was detected at numerous locations in the center and eastern bank of the river. The TCE plume discharges to the river where fine-grained glaciomarine sediments of the Presumpscot Formation are absent and where coarse-grained facies of buried glaciomarine fan deposits provide a pathway for ground-water flow. Based on results of analyses of vapor-diffusion samples and other previous studies, the plume appears to pass under and beyond the river near Boiling Springs and along the river for about 300 feet downstream from the sand boils. A coarse-grained, organic-rich layer at the base of the alluvial flood plain sediments is confined by overlying fine-grained alluvial sediments and may provide a conduit for ground-water leaking upward from buried glaciomarine fan deposits.

  2. Temperature distributions and thermal stresses in a graded zirconia/metal gas path seal system for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, C. M.; Bill, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic/metallic aircraft gas turbine outer gas path seal designed for improved engine performance was studied. Transient temperature and stress profiles in a test seal geometry were determined by numerical analysis. During a simulated engine deceleration cycle from sea-level takeoff to idle conditions, the maximum seal temperature occurred below the seal surface, therefore the top layer of the seal was probably subjected to tensile stresses exceeding the modulus of rupture. In the stress analysis both two- and three-dimensional finite element computer programs were used. Predicted trends of the simpler and more easily usable two-dimensional element programs were borne out by the three-dimensional finite element program results.

  3. Gas distribution, star formation and giant molecular cloud evolution in nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo Lara, David Andres

    2013-12-01

    In this thesis, I present a detailed study of the resolved properties of the cold gas in nearby galaxies at different size scales, starting from the whole galactic disk to the size of the Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). Differences in the shape and width of global CO and HI spectra of resolved disks of spiral galaxies are systematically investigated using a nearby sample for which high-resolution CO and HI maps are available. I find that CO line widths can be wider than HI widths in galaxies where the rotation curve declines in the outer parts, while they can be narrower in galaxies where the CO does not adequately sample the flat part of the rotation curve. Limited coverage of the CO emission by the telescope beam can mimic the latter effect. A physically based prescription linking the CO and HI radial profiles with the stellar disk is consistent with these findings. Then, I present an analysis performed on high spatial resolution observations of Giant Molecular Clouds in the three nearby spiral galaxies NGC 6946, NGC 628 and M101 obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). Using the automated CPROPS algorithm I identified 112 CO cloud complexes in the CO(1 → 0) map and 145 GMCs in the CO(2 → 1) maps. The properties of the GMCs are similar to values found in other extragalactic studies. Clouds located on-arm present in general higher star formation rates than clouds located in inter-arm regions. Also, I find differences in the distribution of star formation efficiencies in the disk of these galaxies. These differences may be related to the underlying dynamical process that drives the observed spiral arm structure in the disks. In this scenario, in galaxies with nearly symmetric arm shape (e. g., NGC 628), the spiral shocks are triggering star formation along the arms. On other hand, galaxies with flocculent or multi-arm spiral structure (e. g., NGC 6946 and M101) show regions of high star formation efficiency at specific

  4. The greenhouse gas balance of a drained fen peatland is mainly controlled by land-use rather than soil organic carbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, T.; Heinichen, J.; Drösler, M.

    2015-04-01

    Drained organic soils are considered as hotspots for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Particularly arable lands and intensively used grasslands have been regarded as the main producers of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O). However, GHG balances of former peatlands and associated organic soils not considered as peatland according to the definition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have not been investigated so far. Therefore, our study addressed the question to what extent the soil organic carbon (SOC) content affects the GHG release of drained organic soils under two different land-use types (arable land and intensively used grassland). Both land-use types were established on a mollic Gleysol (named Cmedium) as well as on a sapric Histosol (named Chigh). The two soil types significantly differed in their SOC contents in the topsoil (Cmedium: 9.4-10.9% SOC; Chigh: 16.1-17.2% SOC). We determined GHG fluxes (CO2, N2O and methane (CH4)) over a period of 2 years. The daily and annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 was determined with the closed dynamic chamber technique and by modeling the ecosystem respiration (RECO) and the gross primary production (GPP). N2O and CH4 were determined by the close chamber technique. Estimated NEE of CO2 significantly differed between the two land-use types with lower NEE values (-6 to 1707 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the arable sites and higher values (1354 to 1823 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the grassland sites. No effect on NEE was found regarding the SOC content. Significantly higher annual N2O exchange rates were observed at the arable sites (0.23-0.86 g N m-2 yr-1) compared to the grassland sites (0.12-0.31 g N m-2 yr-1). Furthermore, N2O fluxes from the Chigh sites significantly exceeded those of the Cmedium sites. CH4 fluxes were found to be close to zero at all plots. Estimated global warming potential, calculated for a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100) revealed a very high release of GHGs from all plots

  5. The greenhouse gas balance of a drained fen peatland is mainly controlled by land-use rather than soil organic carbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, T.; Heinichen, J.; Drösler, M.

    2015-09-01

    Drained organic soils are considered to be hotspots for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Arable lands and intensively used grasslands, in particular, have been regarded as the main producers of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O). However, GHG balances of former peatlands and associated organic soils not considered to be peatland according to the definition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have not been investigated so far. Therefore, our study addressed the question to what extent the soil organic carbon (SOC) content affects the GHG release of drained organic soils under two different land-use types (arable land and intensively used grassland). Both land-use types were established on a Mollic Gleysol (labeled Cmedium) as well as on a Sapric Histosol (labeled Chigh). The two soil types differed significantly in their SOC contents in the topsoil (Cmedium: 9.4-10.9 % SOC; Chigh: 16.1-17.2 % SOC). We determined GHG fluxes over a period of 1 or 2 years in case of N2O or methane (CH4) and CO2, respectively. The daily and annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 was determined by measuring NEE and the ecosystem respiration (RECO) with the closed dynamic chamber technique and by modeling the RECO and the gross primary production (GPP). N2O and CH4 were measured with the static closed chamber technique. Estimated NEE of CO2 differed significantly between the two land-use types, with lower NEE values (-6 to 1707 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the arable sites and higher values (1354 to 1823 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the grassland sites. No effect on NEE was found regarding the SOC content. Significantly higher annual N2O exchange rates were observed at the arable sites (0.23-0.86 g N m-2 yr-1) than at the grassland sites (0.12-0.31 g N m-2 yr-1). Furthermore, N2O fluxes from the Chigh sites significantly exceeded those of the Cmedium sites. CH4 fluxes were found to be close to zero at all plots. Estimated global warming potential, calculated for a time

  6. The Carina Nebula and Gum 31 molecular complex - I. Molecular gas distribution, column densities, and dust temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, David; Burton, Michael; Green, Anne; Braiding, Catherine; Molinari, Sergio; Wong, Graeme; Blackwell, Rebecca; Elia, Davide; Schisano, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    We report high-resolution observations of the 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) molecular lines in the Carina Nebula and the Gum 31 region obtained with the 22-m Mopra telescope as part of The Mopra Southern Galactic Plane CO Survey. We cover 8 deg2 from l = 285° to 290°, and from b = -1.5° to +0.5°. The molecular gas column density distributions from both tracers have a similar range of values. By fitting a grey-body function to the observed infrared spectral energy distribution from Herschel maps, we derive gas column densities and dust temperatures. The gas column density has values in the range from 6.3 × 1020 to 1.4 × 1023 cm-2, while the dust temperature has values in the range from 17 to 43 K. The gas column density derived from the dust emission is approximately described by a lognormal function for a limited range of column densities. A high-column-density tail is clearly evident for the gas column density distribution, which appears to be a common feature in regions with active star formation. There are regional variations in the fraction of the mass recovered by the CO emission lines with respect to the total mass traced by the dust emission. These variations may be related to changes in the radiation field strength, variation of the atomic to molecular gas fraction across the observed region, differences in the CO molecule abundance with respect to H2, and evolutionary stage differences of the molecular clouds that compose the Carina Nebula-Gum 31 complex.

  7. Role of in situ organic matter degradation and fluid flow in the global gas hydrate distribution: application of general functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinero, E.; Hensen, C.; Marquardt, M.; Haeckel, M.; Wallmann, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decades several estimates of the global gas hydrate budget have been published. The published results range by several orders of magnitude and thus, the total gas hydrate inventory is still poorly known. In order to elucidate the global gas hydrate amount we applied a recently published transfer function that calculates the amount of gas hydrate produced by in situ generated methane through organic matter degradation (Marquardt et al., accepted). The transfer function was derived from a large set of systematic runs of a numerical diagenetic model (Wallmann et al., 2006) covering a wide range of environmental conditions that are typical for the continental margins. The transfer function only includes two variables: the accumulation rate of particulate organic carbon and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone. We tested various approaches to calculate both parameters on the global scale. The global grids used include seafloor bathymetry, TOC input, organic rain rate, bottom water temperature, geothermal gradient estimated from heat flow, sediment thickness, and age of the oceanic crust. The results obtained lead to the conclusion that only minor amounts of gas hydrates (<10 Gt of C) are formed by in situ methane production. An extended function considering fluid flow was developed applying the same transport-reaction model. The resulting global distribution map gives a total inventory of gas hydrate ranging from 400 to 2500 Gt of C. So far, some of our calculations are slightly lower than previously published results (e.g. Archer et al., 2009) and suggest that only <2 % of the global gas hydrate budget forms from an autochthonous source of methane. The results presented here suggest that where gas does not migrate into the gas hydrate stability zone only minor negligible concentrations of gas hydrate accumulate. References: Wallmann, K., Aloisi, G. Haeckel, M., Obzhirov, A., Pavlova, G., Tishchenko, P.: Kinetics of organic matter degradation

  8. 49 CFR 192.1005 - What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to implement this subpart? 192.1005 Section 192.1005...) § 192.1005 What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do...

  9. 49 CFR 192.1005 - What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to implement this subpart? 192.1005 Section 192.1005...) § 192.1005 What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do...

  10. 49 CFR 192.1005 - What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to implement this subpart? 192.1005 Section 192.1005...) § 192.1005 What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do...

  11. 49 CFR 192.1005 - What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to implement this subpart? 192.1005 Section 192.1005...) § 192.1005 What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do...

  12. Evaluation of cased and uncased gas distribution and transmission piping under railroads and highways, Phase 2. Annual report, November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, T.D.; Stewart, H.E.; Ingraffea, A.R.; Nyman, K.J.; Crossley, C.W.

    1987-11-01

    A comprehensive methodology is being developed for evaluating stresses in natural gas pipelines at railroad and highway crossings. The methodology accounts for soil-structure interaction and the three-dimensional distribution of pipeline stresses. The methodology involves delineating field loads and geometries through detailed site observations and discussions with industry personnel, and using computer graphics to analyze pipeline stresses under the complex three-dimensional conditions which prevail in the field. Field experiments will be performed to substantiate the predicted pipeline stresses at railroad crossings. Guidelines will be developed for pipeline crossings acceptable to representatives of gas, railroad, and highway industries.

  13. Obtaining the cumulative k-distribution of a gas mixture from those of its components. [radiative transfer in stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstell, M. F.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the convolution theorem for obtaining the cumulative k-distribution of a gas mixture proven in Goody et al. (1989) and a discussion of its application to natural spectra are presented. Computational optimizations for use in analyzing high-altitude gas mixtures are introduced. Comparisons of the results of the optimizations, and criteria for deciding what altitudes are 'high' in this context are given. A few relevant features of the testing support software are examined. Some spectrally integrated results, and the circumstances the might permit substituting the method of principal absorbers are examined.

  14. Temperature and vibrational distribution function in high-pressure diatomic gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Guofeng; Lempert, Walter R; Adamovich, Igor V; Rich, William J

    2009-03-01

    Temperatures and vibrational populations are investigated experimentally and numerically in a CO-N2-O2 gas mixture. By spatially resolved Raman Q-branch spectra measurement, the strong vibrational excitation was observed in the gas mixtures at a high gas pressure. Numerical calculation, which incorporates both major processes of molecular energy transfer and diffusion of vibrationally excited species across the spatially nonuniform excitation region, provides indepth perception of vibrational kinetics of these diatomic molecular gas mixtures and is verified by the experimental data. The results demonstrate that strong vibrational nonequilibrium for all diatomic species can be sustained by the optical pumping method with a focused CO laser in a relatively cold (300-400 K) molecular gas mixture up to one atmospheric pressure. However, the results also demand further investigations on determining accurate rates of the V-V exchange gas mixture such as for N2-O2.

  15. Neutronic analysis stochastic distribution of fuel particles in Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei

    The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is a promising candidate for Generation IV designs due to its inherent safety, efficiency, and its proliferation-resistant and waste minimizing fuel cycle. A number of these advantages stem from its unique fuel design, consisting of a stochastic mixture of tiny (0.78mm diameter) microspheres with multiple coatings. However, the microsphere fuel regions represent point absorbers for resonance energy neutrons, resulting in the "double heterogeneity" for particle fuel. Special care must be taken to analyze this fuel in order to predict the spatial and spectral dependence of the neutron population in a steady-state reactor configuration. The challenges are considerable and resist brute force computation: there are over 1010 microspheres in a typical reactor configuration, with no hope of identifying individual microspheres in this stochastic mixture. Moreover, when individual microspheres "deplete" (e.g., burn the fissile isotope U-235 or transmute the fertile isotope U-238 (eventually) to Pu-239), the stochastic time-dependent nature of the depletion compounds the difficulty posed by the stochastic spatial mixture of the fuel, resulting in a prohibitive computational challenge. The goal of this research is to develop a methodology to analyze particle fuel randomly distributed in the reactor, accounting for the kernel absorptions as well as the stochastic depletion of the fuel mixture. This Ph.D. dissertation will address these challenges by developing a methodology for analyzing particle fuel that will be accurate enough to properly model stochastic particle fuel in both static and time-dependent configurations and yet be efficient enough to be used for routine analyses. This effort includes creation of a new physical model, development of a simulation algorithm, and application to real reactor configurations.

  16. Mapping distribution and thickness of supraglacial debris in the Central Karakoram National Park: main features and implications to model glacier meltwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minora, Umberto; Mayer, Christoph; Bocchiola, Daniele; D'Agata, Carlo; Maragno, Davide; Lambrecht, Astrid; Vuillermoz, Elisa; smiraglia, claudio; diolaiuti, guglielmina

    2014-05-01

    Supraglacial debris plays a not negligible role in controlling magnitude and rates of buried ice melt (Østrem, 1959; Mattson et al., 1993). Knowledge on rock debris is essential to model ice melt (and consequently meltwater discharge) upon wide glacierized areas, as melt rates are mainly driven by debris thickness variability. This is particularly important for the Pamir-Himalaya-Karakoram area (PHK), where debris-covered glaciers are frequent (Smiraglia et al., 2007; Scherler et al., 2011) and where melt water from glaciers supports agriculture and hydropower production. By means of remote sensing techniques and field data, supraglacial debris can be detected, and then quantified in area and thickness. Supervised classifications of satellite imagery can be used to map debris on glaciers. They use different algorithms to cluster an image based on its pixel values, and Region Of Interests (ROIs) previously selected by the human operator. This can be used to obtain a supraglacial debris mask by which surface extension can be calculated. Moreover, kinetic surface temperature data derived from satellites (such as ASTER and Landsat), can be used to quantify debris thicknesses (Mihalcea et al., 2008). Ground Control Points (GCPs) are essential to validate the obtained debris thicknesses. We took the Central Karakoram National Park (CKNP) as a representative sample for PHK area. The CKNP is 12,000 km2 wide, with more than 700 glaciers, mostly debris covered (Minora et al., 2013). Among those we find some of the widest glaciers of the World (e.g: Baltoro). To improve the knowledge on these glaciers and to better model their melt and water discharge we proceeded as follows. Firstly we ran a Supervised Maximum Likelihood (SML) classification on 2001 and 2010 Landsat images to detect debris presence and distribution. Secondly we analyzed kinetic surface temperature (from Landsat) to map debris depth. This latter attempt took also advantage from field data of debris thickness

  17. Peculiarities of distribution of gas-dynamic manifestations in mines of the Kuznetsk coal basin by days of the weekly cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oparin, V.N.; Ludzish, V.S.; Kulakov, G.I.; Rudakov, V.A.

    2005-04-01

    The peculiarities of the origin of gas-dynamic events (rock, coal, and gas outbursts, methane ignition) in the Kuznetsk Basin mines in 1988 - 2004 are analyzed. A review is presented for information on recent accident and injury rate caused by disastrous gas-dynamic manifestations. The effect of bimodal frequency distribution of gas-dynamic events generated by explosion and burning of methane is revealed within a generalized weekly cycle.

  18. A new systems approach to optimizing investments in gas production and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, E.L.

    1983-03-01

    This paper presents a new analytical approach for determining the optimal sequence of investments to make in each year of an extended planning horizon in each of a group of reservoirs producing gas and gas liquids through an interconnected trunkline network and a gas processing plant. The optimality criterion is to maximize net present value while satisfying fixed offtake requirements for dry gas, but with no limits on gas liquids production. The planning problem is broken into n + 2 separate but interrelated subproblems; gas reservoir development and production, gas flow in a trunkline gathering system, and plant separation activities to remove undesirable gas (CO/sub 2/) or to recover valuable liquid components. The optimal solution for each subproblem depends upon the optimal solutions for all of the other subproblems, so that the overall optimal solution is obtained iteratively. The iteration technique used is based upon a combination of heuristics and the decompostion algorithm of mathematical programming. Each subproblem is solved once during each overall iteration. In addition to presenting some mathematical details of the solution approach, this paper describes a computer system which has been developed to obtain solutions.

  19. Gamma densitometry tomography of gas holdup spatial distribution in industrial scale bubble columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shollenberger, K.A.; Torczynski, J.R.; Adkins, D.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Jackson, N.B.

    1995-12-31

    Gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) experiments have been performed to measure gas holdup spatial variations in two bubble columns: a 0.19 m inside diameter Lucite column and a 0.48 m inside diameter stainless steel vessel. Air and water were used for the measurements. Horizontal scans at one vertical position in each column were made for several air flow rates. An axi-symmetric tomographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Abel transform has been used to calculate the time averaged gas holdup radial variation. Integration of these profiles over the column cross section has yielded area-averaged gas holdup results, which have been compared with volume-averaged gas holdups determined from differential pressure measurements and from the rise in the air/water interface during gas flow. The results agree reasonably well.

  20. Application of the Junge- and Pankow-equation for estimating indoor gas/particle distribution and exposure to SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salthammer, Tunga; Schripp, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    In the indoor environment, distribution and dynamics of an organic compound between gas phase, particle phase and settled dust must be known for estimating human exposure. This, however, requires a detailed understanding of the environmentally important compound parameters, their interrelation and of the algorithms for calculating partitioning coefficients. The parameters of major concern are: (I) saturation vapor pressure (PS) (of the subcooled liquid); (II) Henry's law constant (H); (III) octanol/water partition coefficient (KOW); (IV) octanol/air partition coefficient (KOA); (V) air/water partition coefficient (KAW) and (VI) settled dust properties like density and organic content. For most of the relevant compounds reliable experimental data are not available and calculated gas/particle distributions can widely differ due to the uncertainty in predicted Ps and KOA values. This is not a big problem if the target compound is of low (<10-6 Pa) or high (>10-2 Pa) volatility, but in the intermediate region even small changes in Ps or KOA will have a strong impact on the result. Moreover, the related physical processes might bear large uncertainties. The KOA value can only be used for particle absorption from the gas phase if the organic portion of the particle or dust is high. The Junge- and Pankow-equation for calculating the gas/particle distribution coefficient KP do not consider the physical and chemical properties of the particle surface area. It is demonstrated by error propagation theory and Monte-Carlo simulations that parameter uncertainties from estimation methods for molecular properties and variations of indoor conditions might strongly influence the calculated distribution behavior of compounds in the indoor environment.

  1. Methane Content and Distribution of Natural Gas Hydrate Accumulations in the Deep-Water Basins of the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, G. A.; Scholl, D. W.; Childs, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic reflection images from the deep-water (>3500 m) Aleutian and Bowers Basins of the Bering Sea indicate an abundant presence of natural gas and gas hydrate. Distinctive velocity-amplitude anomalies, or VAMPs, stand out as both velocity pseudostructures and gas bright spots within the otherwise horizontal and uniform sedimentary reflection sequences. These are interpreted as methane chimneys overlain by interstitial gas hydrate caps. Hundreds of VAMPs have been imaged throughout the Bering Sea; several thousand are inferred to exist. Ongoing USGS development of an interpretive seismic database presents an opportunity to quantify the hydrate content of individual VAMPs and to explore the distribution of major and minor anomalies relative to basement topography, silica diagenesis features, ancient subduction boundary structures and sediment sources. We present quantitative estimates of the size and methane content of representative large VAMP structures, based on seismic reflection interval-time anomalies. Time-average and frame-component effective medium velocity models are used to relate hydrate concentration to velocity anomaly. For this specific case, differences between the two models are minimal for hydrate concentrations <35% of pore space. To facilitate modeling of sediment dominated by diatomaceous ooze, grain-scale elastic moduli for diatom frustules are back-calculated to be ~5 GPa, assuming shear and bulk modulus are equal. Maximum velocity anomaly observed within the VAMPs is +235 m/s in the hydrate zone, relative to a background P-wave velocity of 1600 m/s. This corresponds to hydrate concentration ~40% of pore space (or ~20% of bulk rock). Hydrate distribution appears to be lithologically controlled within a section of alternating turbidite and diatomaceous sediments. It is preferentially located in a zone ~40 to 90 m above the gas hydrate BSR. Free gas is most concentrated immediately below the hydrate BSR, which lies at ~360 m bsf. Evidence for

  2. Reconstruction of combustion temperature and gas concentration distributions using line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Pengshuai; Pang, Tao; Xia, Hua; Cui, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhe; Han, Luo; Wu, Bian; Wang, Yu; Sigrist, Markus W.; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-07-01

    Spatial temperature and gas concentration distributions are crucial for combustion studies to characterize the combustion position and to evaluate the combustion regime and the released heat quantity. Optical computer tomography (CT) enables the reconstruction of temperature and gas concentration fields in a flame on the basis of line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LOS-TDLAS). A pair of H2O absorption lines at wavelengths 1395.51 and 1395.69 nm is selected. Temperature and H2O concentration distributions for a flat flame furnace are calculated by superimposing two absorption peaks with a discrete algebraic iterative algorithm and a mathematical fitting algorithm. By comparison, direct absorption spectroscopy measurements agree well with the thermocouple measurements and yield a good correlation. The CT reconstruction data of different air-to-fuel ratio combustion conditions (incomplete combustion and full combustion) and three different types of burners (one, two, and three flat flame furnaces) demonstrate that TDLAS has the potential of short response time and enables real-time temperature and gas concentration distribution measurements for combustion diagnosis.

  3. Reconstruction of combustion temperature and gas concentration distributions using line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Pengshuai; Pang, Tao; Xia, Hua; Cui, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhe; Han, Luo; Wu, Bian; Wang, Yu; Sigrist, Markus W.; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-07-01

    Spatial temperature and gas concentration distributions are crucial for combustion studies to characterize the combustion position and to evaluate the combustion regime and the released heat quantity. Optical computer tomography (CT) enables the reconstruction of temperature and gas concentration fields in a flame on the basis of line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LOS-TDLAS). A pair of H2O absorption lines at wavelengths 1395.51 and 1395.69 nm is selected. Temperature and H2O concentration distributions for a flat flame furnace are calculated by superimposing two absorption peaks with a discrete algebraic iterative algorithm and a mathematical fitting algorithm. By comparison, direct absorption spectroscopy measurements agree well with the thermocouple measurements and yield a good correlation. The CT reconstruction data of different air-to-fuel ratio combustion conditions (incomplete combustion and full combustion) and three different types of burners (one, two, and three flat flame furnaces) demonstrate that TDLAS has the potential of short response time and enables real-time temperature and gas concentration distribution measurements for combustion diagnosis.

  4. Investigating Friction as a Main Source of Entropy Generation in the Expansion of Confined Gas in a Piston-and-Cylinder Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Dun-Yen; Liou, Kai-Hsin; Chang, Wei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    The expansion or compression of gas confined in a piston-and-cylinder device is a classic working example used for illustrating the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. The balance of energy and entropy enables the estimation of a number of thermodynamic properties. The entropy generation (also called entropy production) resulting from this…

  5. The alignment and shape of dark matter, stellar, and hot gas distributions in the EAGLE and cosmo-OWLS simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velliscig, Marco; Cacciato, Marcello; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A.; Bower, Richard G.; van Daalen, Marcel P.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Frenk, Carlos S.; Furlong, Michelle; McCarthy, I. G.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2015-10-01

    We report the alignment and shape of dark matter, stellar, and hot gas distributions in the EAGLE (Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments) and cosmo-OWLS (OverWhelmingly Large Simulations) simulations. The combination of these state-of-the-art hydrodynamical cosmological simulations enables us to span four orders of magnitude in halo mass (11 ≤ log10(M200/[ h-1 M⊙]) ≤ 15), a wide radial range (-2.3 ≤ log10(r/[ h-1 Mpc]) ≤ 1.3) and redshifts 0 ≤ z ≤ 1. The shape parameters of the dark matter, stellar and hot gas distributions follow qualitatively similar trends: they become more aspherical (and triaxial) with increasing halo mass, radius, and redshift. We measure the misalignment of the baryonic components (hot gas and stars) of galaxies with their host halo as a function of halo mass, radius, redshift, and galaxy type (centrals versus satellites and early- versus late-type). Overall, galaxies align well with the local distribution of the total (mostly dark) matter. However, the stellar distributions on galactic scales exhibit a median misalignment of about 45-50 deg with respect to their host haloes. This misalignment is reduced to 25-30 deg in the most massive haloes (13 ≤ log10(M200/[ h-1 M⊙]) ≤ 15). Half of the disc galaxies in the EAGLE simulations have a misalignment angle with respect to their host haloes larger than 40 deg. We present fitting functions and tabulated values for the probability distribution of galaxy-halo misalignment to enable a straightforward inclusion of our results into models of galaxy formations based on purely collisionless N-body simulations.

  6. The role of nonlocal electron energy transport in the formation of spatial distributions of the two-chamber plasma density of ICP discharge at change of gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Serditov, Konstantin

    2012-10-01

    2D simulations of the two-chamber ICP source where power is supplied in the small discharge chamber and extends by electron thermal conductivity mechanism to the big diffusion chamber is performed. Depending on pressure two main scenarios of plasma density and its spatial distribution behavior were identified. The first case of higher pressure is characterized by localization of plasma in small driver chamber where power is deposed and corresponds to small thermal conductivity length compared with diffusion length. The second case of lower pressure represents diffusion chamber as a main source of plasma with maximum of electron density with greater thermal conductivity length compared with diffusion length. The differences in spatial distribution are caused by local or non-local behavior of energy transport in discharge volume due to the different characteristic scale of heat transfer with electronic conductivity. As a result changing of geometrics and gas pressure gives the possibility to set ratio between diffusion and thermal conductivity characteristic lengths. Thus, one can control heat input and, in turn, obtain several types of plasma profiles.

  7. Gas phase condensation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica nanoparticles - control of the intraparticle phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötzel, C.; Kurland, H.-D.; Grabow, J.; Müller, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    consisting of a γ-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to γ-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Infrared absorption of the raw powders hematite and quartz (section S1), TEM investigation of the spatial distribution of the γ-Fe2O3 inclusions (section S2), particle size distributions of the Fe2O3@SiO2 nanopowder samples (section S3), ζ-potentials of aqueous dispersions of all γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 nanopowder samples (section S4), silanization of Fe2O3@SiO2 composite nanopowders with [3-(2,3-epoxypropoxy)-propyl]trimethoxysilane (section S5), and animation composed of TEM micrographs of Fe2O3@SiO2 NPs recorded at incrementally altered tilt angles (``Rotating Fe2O3@SiO2 NP.avi''). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00845j

  8. TOWARD A DETERMINISTIC MODEL OF PLANETARY FORMATION. VII. ECCENTRICITY DISTRIBUTION OF GAS GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, S.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2013-09-20

    The ubiquity of planets and diversity of planetary systems reveal that planet formation encompasses many complex and competing processes. In this series of papers, we develop and upgrade a population synthesis model as a tool to identify the dominant physical effects and to calibrate the range of physical conditions. Recent planet searches have led to the discovery of many multiple-planet systems. Any theoretical models of their origins must take into account dynamical interactions between emerging protoplanets. Here, we introduce a prescription to approximate the close encounters between multiple planets. We apply this method to simulate the growth, migration, and dynamical interaction of planetary systems. Our models show that in relatively massive disks, several gas giants and rocky/icy planets emerge, migrate, and undergo dynamical instability. Secular perturbation between planets leads to orbital crossings, eccentricity excitation, and planetary ejection. In disks with modest masses, two or less gas giants form with multiple super-Earths. Orbital stability in these systems is generally maintained and they retain the kinematic structure after gas in their natal disks is depleted. These results reproduce the observed planetary mass-eccentricity and semimajor axis-eccentricity correlations. They also suggest that emerging gas giants can scatter residual cores to the outer disk regions. Subsequent in situ gas accretion onto these cores can lead to the formation of distant (∼> 30 AU) gas giants with nearly circular orbits.

  9. Size distribution and concentration of soot generated in oil and gas-fired residential boilers under different combustion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Santiago; Barroso, Jorge; Pina, Antonio; Ballester, Javier

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the relevance of residential heating burners in the global emission of soot particles to the atmosphere, relatively little information on their properties (concentration, size distribution) is available in the literature, and even less regarding the dependence of those properties on the operating conditions. Instead, the usual procedure to characterize those emissions is to measure the smoke opacity by several methods, among which the blackening of a paper after filtering a fixed amount of gas (Bacharach test) is predominant. In this work, the size distributions of the particles generated in the combustion of a variety of gaseous and liquid fuels in a laboratory facility equipped with commercial burners have been measured with a size classifier coupled to a particle counter in a broad range of operating conditions (air excesses), with simultaneous determination of the Bacharach index. The shape and evolution of the distribution with progressively smaller oxygen concentrations depends essentially on the state of the fuel: whereas the combustion of the gases results in monomodal distributions that 'shift' towards larger diameters, in the case of the gas-oils an ultrafine mode is always observed, and a secondary mode of coarse particle grows in relevance. In both cases, there is a strong, exponential correlation between the total mass concentration and the Bacharach opacity index, quite similar for both groups of fuels. The empirical expressions proposed may allow other researchers to at least estimate the emissions of numerous combustion facilities routinely characterized by their smoke opacities.

  10. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-Main Sequence and Related Stars. II. Variability in the Gas and Dust Emission of the Herbig Fe Star SAO 206462

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Day, Amanda N.; Kimes, Robin L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Martus, Cameron; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Grady, Carol A.; Schneider, Glenn; Lisse, Carey M.; Nuth, Joseph A.; Cure, Michel; Henden, Arne A.; Kraus, Stefan; Motta, Veronica; Tamura Motohide; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Williger, Gerard M.; Fugazza, Dino

    2011-01-01

    We present thirteen epochs of near-infrared (0.8-5 microns) spectroscopic observations of the pre-transitional, "gapped" disk system in SAO 206462 (=HD 135344B). In all, six gas emission lines (Br(alpha) , Br(gamma), Pa(beta), Pa(delta), Pa(epsilon), and the 0.8446 microns line of O I) along with continuum measurements made near the standard J, H, K, and L photometric bands were measured. A mass accretion rate of approximately 2 x 10(exp 8)Solar Mass/yr was derived from the Br(gamma) and Pa(beta) lines. However, the fluxes of these lines varied by a factor of over two during the course of a few months. The continuum also varied, but by only approx.30%, and even decreased at a time when the gas emission was increasing. The H I line at 1.083 microns was also found to vary in a manner inconsistent with that of either the hydrogen lines or the dust. Both the gas and dust variabilities indicate significant changes in the region of the inner gas and the inner dust belt that may be common to many young disk systems. If planets are responsible for defining the inner edge of the gap, they could interact with the material on time scales commensurate with what is observed for the variations in the dust, while other disk instabilities (thermal, magneto-rotational) would operate there on longer time scales than we observe for the inner dust belt. For SAO 206462, the orbital period would likely be 1-3 years. If the changes are being induced in the disk material closer to the star than the gap, a variety of mechanisms (disk instabilities, interactions via planets) might be responsible for the changes seen. The He I feature is most likely due to a wind whose orientation changes with respect to the observer on time scales of a day or less. To further constrain the origin of the gas and dust emission will require multiple spectroscopic and interferometric observations on both shorter and longer time scales that have been sampled so far.

  11. Distribution and geological control of mud volcanoes and other fluid/free gas seepage features in the Mediterranean Sea and nearby Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascle, Jean; Mary, Flore; Praeg, Daniel; Brosolo, Laetitia; Camera, Laurent; Ceramicola, Silvia; Dupré, Stéphanie

    2014-06-01

    Existing knowledge on the distribution of mud volcanoes (MVs) and other significant fluid/free gas-venting features (mud cones, mud pies, mud-brine pools, mud carbonate cones, gas chimneys and, in some cases, pockmark fields) discovered on the seafloor of the Mediterranean Sea and in the nearby Gulf of Cadiz has been compiled using regional geophysical information (including multibeam coverage of most deepwater areas). The resulting dataset comprises both features proven from geological sampling, or in situ observations, and many previously unrecognized MVs inferred from geophysical evidence. The synthesis reveals that MVs clearly have non-random distributions that correspond to two main geodynamic settings: (1) the vast majority occur along the various tectono-sedimentary accretionary wedges of the Africa-Eurasia subduction zone, particularly in the central and eastern Mediterranean basins (external Calabrian Arc, Mediterranean Ridge, Florence Rise) but also along its westernmost boundary in the Gulf of Cadiz; (2) other MVs characterize thick depocentres along parts of the Mesozoic passive continental margins that border Africa from eastern Tunisia to the Levantine coasts, particularly off Egypt and, locally, within some areas of the western Mediterranean back-arc basins. Meaningfully accounting for MV distribution necessitates evidence of overpressured fluids and mud-rich layers. In addition, cross-correlations between MVs and other GIS-based data, such as maps of the Messinian evaporite basins and/or active (or recently active) tectonic trends, stress the importance of assessing geological control in terms of the presence, or not, of thick seals and potential conduits. It is contended that new MV discoveries may be expected in the study region, particularly along the southern Ionian Sea continental margins.

  12. Local ISM 3D distribution and soft X-ray background. Inferences on nearby hot gas and the North Polar Spur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S. L.

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and that are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D maps of the IS dust distribution to the ROSAT diffuse X-ray background maps after removing heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust-to-gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled the 0.25 keV surface brightness in a simple way along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking the absorption by the mapped clouds into account. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred average mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be on the order of 10 000 cm-3 K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust-to-CaII ratio is very low in this region, implying there is a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and, as a consequence, a reduction in the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the main two brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of

  13. Fast spatially resolved exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) distribution measurements in an internal combustion engine using absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz. PMID:26253286

  14. Fast spatially resolved exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) distribution measurements in an internal combustion engine using absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  15. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P.

    2015-09-01

    One effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines. But, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder nonuniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. Furthermore, a sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in themore » intake manifold. Our study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.« less

  16. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P.

    2015-09-01

    One effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines. But, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder nonuniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. Furthermore, a sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. Our study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  17. Atlas of Northern Gulf of Mexico Gas and Oil Reservoirs: Procedures and examples of resource distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of the program is to produce a reservoir atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico that (1) classifies and groups offshore oil and gas reservoirs into a series of geologically defined reservoir plays, (2) compiles comprehensive reservoir play information that includes descriptive and quantitative summaries of play characteristics, cumulative production, reserves, original oil and gas in place, and various other engineering and geologic data, (3) provides detailed summaries of representative type reservoirs for each play, and (4) organizes computerized tables of reservoir engineering data into a geographic information system (GIS). The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas series of the offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location.

  18. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  19. CFD assisted simulation of temperature distribution and laser power in pulsed and CW pumped static gas DPALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, Karol; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2015-10-01

    An analysis of radiation, kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is reported. The analysis is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) model. The CFD code which solves the gas conservation equations includes effects of natural convection and temperature diffusion of the species in the DPAL mixture. The gas flow conservation equations are coupled to the equations for DPAL kinetics and to the Beer-Lambert equations for pump and laser beams propagation. The DPAL kinetic processes in the Cs/CH4 (K/He) gas mixtures considered involve the three low energy levels, (1) n2S1/2, (2) n2P3/2 and (3) n2P1/2 (where n=4,6 for K and Cs, respectively), three excited alkali states and two alkali ionic states. Using the CFD model, the gas flow pattern and spatial distributions of the pump and laser intensities in the resonator were calculated for end-pumped CW and pulsed Cs and K DPALs. The DPAL power and medium temperature were calculated as a function of pump power and pump pulse duration. The CFD model results were compared to experimental results of Cs and K DPALs.

  20. Main tank injection pressurization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program predicts performance of fluorine-hydrogen main tank injection pressurization system for full range of liquid-hydrogen-fueled space vehicles. Analytical model includes provisions for heat transfer, injectant jet penetration, and ullage gas mixing. Analysis predicts GF2 usage, ullage gas and tank wall temperatures, and LH2 evaporation.

  1. On-line purge and trap gas chromatography for monitoring of trihalomethanes in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael A; Miller, Sarah; Emmert, Gary L

    2007-06-01

    A method using an automated on-line purge and trap gas chromatograph with a dry electrolytic conductivity detector (DELCD) has been developed for monitoring four regulated trihalomethanes in drinking water distribution systems. This analyzer samples trihalomethanes from drinking water by pervaporation through a silicone capillary membrane contained within a gas extraction cell (GEC) followed by preconcentration using an adsorbent trap. Trihalomethanes are subsequently desorbed from the trap onto a capillary column, separated and detected. The analyzer operates in real-time, samples directly from the drinking water distribution system and is fully automated. The optimization, operation, and evaluation of the analyzer and method are discussed. Method detection limits (MDL) are less than 1.0 microg L(-1) with acceptable estimates for accuracy, and precision. The results from two on-line monitoring studies in chlorinated and chloraminated distribution systems are presented. The performance of the method is compared directly to United Stated Environmental Protection Agency Method 502.2 and shows a very slight, but acceptable bias.

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Twin-Wire Arc Spraying Process: Modeling the High Velocity Gas Flow Field Distribution and Droplets Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongxiong; Liang, Xiubing; Wei, Shicheng; Chen, Xi; Xu, Binshi

    2012-03-01

    During the twin-wire arc spraying, a high velocity gas stream is used to accelerate the arc-melting materials and propel the droplets toward the substrate surface. This study is aimed at investigating the gas flow formation and droplets transport processes using numerical simulation method. Results from the 3-D gas flow field model show that the distribution of the gas flow velocity on the twin-wire intersection plane is quite different from that on the twin-wire vertical plane. Based on the 3-D model, the convergence amplitude of the high velocity zone in the jet center is improved by modifying the gun head design. It is also observed that a flat substrate existed downstream from the gas nozzle exit results in decreasing close to zero in velocity of the gas jet near the substrate. In addition, the predicted droplet trajectories and velocity distributions exhibited good agreement with experimentally observations.

  3. Soil-gas and indoor radon distribution related to geology in Frederick County, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Szarzi, S.L.; Reimer, G.M.; Been, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    Soil-gas radon concentrations vary in response to geologic controls in Frederick County, Maryland, and the variation leads to different radon availabilities for potential indoor accumulations. Quartzites, which form from the core of ridges and mountains of the southern and western part of the county, have a mean soil-gas radon concentration of 26 kBq m{sup -3} (700 pCi L{sup -1}). Phyllites, found in the Piedmont province in the eastern part of the county, have a mean soil-gas radon concentration of 59 kBq m{sup -3} (1600 pCi L{sup -1}). Many indoor radon measurements for homes in the southeast portion of the county, made by means of charcoal canisters, exceeded 1850 Bq m{sup -3} (50 pCi L{sup -1}). Homes built in areas where the soil-gas radon concentrations were greater than 75 kBq m{sup -3} (2000 pCi L{sup -1}) may have indoor radon concentrations that exceed 150 Bq m{sup -3} (4 pCi L{sup -1}), the current action level recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Data obtained in studies like ours throughout the United States are essential to identify {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} which may produce elevated indoor radon levels of significant risk.

  4. 75 FR 36615 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Gas Distribution Annual Report Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... and Instructions, and clarify the Excess Flow Valve (EFV) metric to be reported by operators of gas... Revisions and Request for Comments I. Background On December 4, 2009, (74 FR 34906), PHMSA published a final...; 74 FR 69286) to allow for a total comment period of 60 days. PHMSA is developing a final rule...

  5. Simulation of real-gas effects on pressure distributions for aeroassist flight experiment vehicle and comparison with prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure distributions measured on a 60 degree half-angle elliptic cone, raked off at an angle of 73 degrees from the cone centerline and having an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane) are presented for angles of attack from -10 degrees to 10 degrees. The high normal shock density ratio aspect of a real gas was simulated by testing in Mach 6 air and CF sub 4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). The effects of Reynolds number, angle of attack, and normal shock density ratio on these measurements are examined, and comparisons with a three dimensional Euler code known as HALIS are made. A significant effect of density ratio on pressure distributions on the cone section of the configuration was observed; the magnitude of this effect decreased with increasing angle of attack. The effect of Reynolds number on pressure distributions was negligible for forebody pressure distributions, but a measurable effect was noted on base pressures. In general, the HALIS code accurately predicted the measured pressure distributions in air and CF sub 4.

  6. Improvement of oxygen diffusion characteristic in gas diffusion layer with planar-distributed wettability for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koresawa, Ryo; Utaka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Mass transfer characteristics of gas diffusion layer (GDL) are closely related to performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics of water distribution relating to the microscopic conformation and oxygen diffusivity of GDL. A hybrid type carbon paper GDL with planar-distributed wettability is investigated for control of liquid water movement and distribution due to hydrophobic to hydrophilic areas that provide wettability differences in GDL and to achieve enhancement of both oxygen diffusion and moisture retention. Hybrid GDLs with different PTFE content were fabricated in an attempt to improve the oxygen diffusion characteristics. The effects of different PTFE contents on the oxygen diffusivity and water distribution were simultaneously measured and observed using galvanic cell oxygen absorber and X-ray radiography. The PTFE distribution was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The formation of oxygen diffusion paths was confirmed by X-ray radiography, where voids in the hybrid GDL were first formed in the hydrophobic regions and then spread to the untreated wetting region. Thus, the formation of oxygen diffusion paths enhanced the oxygen diffusion. In addition, the effects of local PTFE content in the hydrophobic region and the optimal amount of PTFE for hybrid GDL were elucidated.

  7. Distribution of Hg, As and Se in material and flue gas streams from preheater-precalciner cement kilns and vertical shaft cement kilns in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dahai; Peng, Zheng; Ding, Qiong; Karstensen, Kåre Helge; Engelsen, Christian J; Li, Li; Ren, Yong; Jiang, Chen

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of Hg, As, and Se in cement production. Two types of cement plants were studied, including the vertical shaft kiln (VSK) and preheater-precalciner kiln (PPK) processes. Determination of Hg, As, and Se in the main material and gas streams were performed. It was found that recycling of particulate matter captured by an air pollution control device caused a significant enrichment of Hg and As inside both processes. The total quantity of Hg entering the process and the quantity emitted to the atmosphere were found to be 10-109 and 6.3-38 mg, respectively, per ton of clinker produced. The average Hg emission was calculated to be around 41% of the total mercury input. The emissions found complied with the European Union (EU) limit and exceeded partly the U.S. limit. Furthermore, it was found that oxidized mercury was the dominant species in the PPK process, whereas the reduced form was dominant in the VSK process, due to the oxidizing and reducing gas conditions, respectively. Regarding the distribution of As and Se, the major amounts were bound to the solid materials, that is, cement clinker and particulate matter. Based on cement production data in China in 2013, the annual emissions of Hg and As were estimated to be in the range of 8.6-52 and 4.1-9.5 tons, respectively. PMID:26037967

  8. Deev Jahi Model of the Permian Triassic boundary mass extinction: a case for gas hydrates as the main cause of biological crisis on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, E.; Hassanzadeh, J.

    2003-12-01

    The smoking gun revealing the secrets of the end-Permian mass mortality is a unique 1-2-m-thick layer consisting of 5-20-cm-long crystals of calcite that occurs precisely at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) in Iran, Armenia, Turkey, and China. This layer is interpreted as synsedimentary, abiotic, seafloor cement indicative of precipitation from a highly carbonate supersaturated seawater. Its δ13C composition ( δ13C=0‰ PDB) is 4‰ to 5‰ PDB lower than the typical Upper Permian values (4‰ to 5‰ PDB), suggesting the involvement of massive amounts of gas hydrate CH 4 ( δ13C=-60‰ PDB). The temporal coincidence of the cement layer with the PTB suggests that the process that promoted seafloor cementation was also responsible for the biological crisis. A cementation model is developed based on accumulation-dissociation cycle of gas hydrates which also explains the mass extinction at the PTB. The Upper Permian accumulation period of gas hydrates ended abruptly adjacent to the PTB and the dissociation event began releasing 3.2 to 4.7×10 18 g CH 4 into the ocean. Oxidation of CH 4 in the water column created a seawater that was charged with CO 2 (an oceanic acid bath) and had lower than normal O 2 content (but not anoxic). This oceanic acid bath first dissolved suspended fine-grained carbonate particles and small calcareous organisms, followed by extensive dissolution of platform carbonates raising Ca 2+ and HCO 3- concentrations of seawater. When the release of CH 4 declined, the acid-bath ocean became a soda ocean precipitating massive amount of seafloor cements observed globally at the PTB. The study suggests that prior to cement precipitation, the PTB ocean was charged with CO 2, warm, had low oxygen, high Ca 2+, and high HCO 3- concentrations. These conditions collectively created stressful conditions causing the marine mass mortality. The leakage of CH 4 to the atmosphere produced a super-hot climate resulting in the biological devastation on land. The

  9. Size and Perihelion Distribution of S and Q-type Asteroid Spectral Slopes from the Near Earth Region Through the Main Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Kevin; Minton, David A.; Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Carry, Benoit; DeMeo, Francesca E.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution spectral observations of small S-type and Q-type Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) have shown two important trends. The spectral slope of these asteroids, which is a good indication of the amount of space weathering the surface has received, has been shown to decrease with decreasing perihelion and size. Specifically, these trends show that there are less weathered surfaces at low perihelion and small sizes. With recent results from all-sky surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's (SDSS) Moving Object Catalog, we have gained an additional data set to test the presence of these trends in the NEAs as well as the Mars Crossers (MCs) and the Main Belt. We use an analog to the spectral slope in the SDSS data which is the slope through the g', r' and i' filters, known as the gri-slope, to investigate the amount of weathering that is present among small asteroids throughout the inner solar system. We find that the trend of the gri-slope decreases with decreasing size at nearly the same rate in the Main Belt as in the MC and NEA regions. We propose that these results suggest a ubiquitous presence of Q-types and S-types with low spectral slopes at small sizes throughout the inner solar system, from the Main Belt to the NEA region. Additionally, we suggest that the trend of decreasing spectral slope with perihelion may only be valid at perihelia of approximately less than 1 AU. These results suggest a change in the interpretation for the formation of Q-type asteroids. Planetary encounters may help to explain the high fraction of Q-types at low perihelia, but another process which is present everywhere must also be refreshing the surfaces of these asteroids. We suggest the Yarkovsky–O'Keefe–Radzievskii–Paddack (YORP) effect as a possible mechanism.

  10. Reinforcement learning in continuous time and space: interference and not ill conditioning is the main problem when using distributed function approximators.

    PubMed

    Baddeley, Bart

    2008-08-01

    Many interesting problems in reinforcement learning (RL) are continuous and/or high dimensional, and in this instance, RL techniques require the use of function approximators for learning value functions and policies. Often, local linear models have been preferred over distributed nonlinear models for function approximation in RL. We suggest that one reason for the difficulties encountered when using distributed architectures in RL is the problem of negative interference, whereby learning of new data disrupts previously learned mappings. The continuous temporal difference (TD) learning algorithm TD(lambda) was used to learn a value function in a limited-torque pendulum swing-up task using a multilayer perceptron (MLP) network. Three different approaches were examined for learning in the MLP networks; 1) simple gradient descent; 2) vario-eta; and 3) a pseudopattern rehearsal strategy that attempts to reduce the effects of interference. Our results show that MLP networks can be used for value function approximation in this task but require long training times. We also found that vario-eta destabilized learning and resulted in a failure of the learning process to converge. Finally, we showed that the pseudopattern rehearsal strategy drastically improved the speed of learning. The results indicate that interference is a greater problem than ill conditioning for this task.

  11. Riser simulation and radial porosity distribution characterization for gas-fluidized bed of cork particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guorong; Ouyang, Jie; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out for gas-solid fluidized bed of cork particles, using discrete element method. Results exhibit the existence of a so-called anti core-annular porosity profile with lower porosity in the core and higher porosity near the wall for non-slugging fluidization. The tendency to form this unfamiliar anti core-annular porosity profile is stronger when the solid flux is higher. There exist multiple inflection points in the simulated axial solid volume fraction profile for non-slugging fluidization. Results also show that the familiar core-annular porosity profile still appears for slugging fluidization. In addition, the classical choking phenomenon can be captured at the superficial gas velocity slightly lower than the correlated transport velocity.

  12. NIHAO VIII: Circum-galactic medium and outflows - The puzzles of HI and OVI gas distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutcke, Thales A.; Stinson, Greg S.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Wang, Liang; Dutton, Aaron A.

    2016-10-01

    We study the hot and cold circum-galactic medium (CGM) of 86 galaxies of the cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation suite NIHAO. NIHAO allows a study of how the z = 0 CGM varies across 5 orders of magnitude of stellar mass using OVI and HI as proxies for hot and cold gas. The cool HI covering fraction and column density profiles match observations well, particularly in the inner CGM. OVI shows increasing column densities with mass, a trend seemingly echoed in the observations. As in multiple previous simulations, the OVI column densities in simulations are lower than observed and optically thick HI does not extend as far out as in observations. We take a look at the collisional ionisation fraction of OVI as a function of halo mass. We make observable predictions of the bipolarity of outflows and their effect on the general shape of the CGM. Bipolar outflows can be seen out to around 40 kpc in intermediate and low mass halos (MHalo < 1011 M⊙), but outside that radius, the CGM is too well mixed to detect an elongated shape. Larger halos have extended gas discs beyond the stellar disc that dominate the shape of the inner CGM. The simulated CGM is remarkably spherical even in low mass simulations. The chemical enrichment of both halo and disc gas follow expected increasing trends as a function of halo mass that are well fit with power laws. These relations can be used in non-hydrodynamic models, such as semi-analytic models.

  13. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and trace As2O3 from flue gas: mechanism, kinetics study, and effect of main gases on arsenic capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhong; Tong, Huiling; Zhuo, Yuqun; Li, Yan; Xu, Xuchang

    2007-04-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and trace elements are pollutants derived from coal combustion. This study focuses on the simultaneous removal of S02 and trace arsenic oxide (As2O3) from flue gas by calcium oxide (CaO) adsorption in the moderate temperature range. Experiments have been performed on a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The interaction mechanism between As2O3 and CaO is studied via XRD detection. Calcium arsenate [Ca3(AsO4)2] is found to be the reaction product in the range of 600-1000 degrees C. The ability of CaO to absorb As2O3 increases with the increasing temperature over the range of 400-1000 degrees C. Through kinetics analysis, it has been found that the rate constant of arsenate reaction is much higher than that of sulfate reaction. SO2 presence does not affect the trace arsenic capture either in the initial reaction stage when CaO conversion is relatively low or in the later stage when CaO conversion is very high. The product of sulfate reaction, CaS04, is proven to be able to absorb As2O3. The coexisting CO2 does not weaken the trace arsenic capture either.

  14. Controlling the electron energy distribution function of electron beam generated plasmas with molecular gas concentration: II. Numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Boris, D. R.; Petrova, Tz B.; Lock, E. H.; Fernsler, R. F.; Walton, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the second in a series of two, a spatially averaged model of an electron beam generated Ar-N2 plasma is developed to identify the processes behind the measured influence of trace amounts of N2 on the development of the electron energy distribution function. The model is based on the numerical solution of the electron Boltzmann equation self-consistently coupled to a set of rate balance equations for electrons, argon and nitrogen species. Like the experiments, the calculations cover only the low-energy portion (<50 eV) of the electron energy distribution, and therefore a source term is added to the Boltzmann equation to represent ionization by the beam. Similarly, terms representing ambipolar diffusion along and across the magnetic field are added to allow for particle loss and electrostatic cooling from the ambipolar electric field. This work focuses on the changes introduced by adding a small admixture of nitrogen to an argon background. The model predictions for the electron energy distribution function, electron density and temperature are in good agreement with the experimentally measured data reported in part I, where it was found that the electron and ion energy distributions can be controlled by adjusting the fraction of nitrogen in the gas composition.

  15. A novel ECT-EST combined method for gas-solids flow pattern and charge distribution visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Zhang, J. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A non-invasive measurement method of visualizing the flow pattern and charge distribution of gas-solids two-phase flow has been studied and verified using gravity-dropping and pneumatic conveyance rigs with pulverized coal as solids. It has been proven that the permittivity distribution acquired from an electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system can be used to improve the accuracy in establishing charge sensitivity field of an electrostatic tomography (EST) system, and to reduce the uncertainty of charge distribution reconstruction. The experimental results show that, under the given experimental conditions for the gravity-dropping system, charge density increases with particles' concentration, whilst in the pneumatic conveyance system, charge density decreases in the area where the particles' concentration is higher, and the total charge intensity decreases with the increase of the concentration of pulverized coal in the pipe. The method proposed in this paper is potentially important in pneumatic processes for charge distribution measurement and safe operations. It is envisaged that with further development, this technique can provide information for investigation into the mechanism of inter-particle force on electrostatic attraction and repulsion.

  16. Transition in Gas Turbine Control System Architecture: Modular, Distributed, and Embedded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Controls systems are an increasingly important component of turbine-engine system technology. However, as engines become more capable, the control system itself becomes ever more constrained by the inherent environmental conditions of the engine; a relationship forced by the continued reliance on commercial electronics technology. A revolutionary change in the architecture of turbine-engine control systems will change this paradigm and result in fully distributed engine control systems. Initially, the revolution will begin with the physical decoupling of the control law processor from the hostile engine environment using a digital communications network and engine-mounted high temperature electronics requiring little or no thermal control. The vision for the evolution of distributed control capability from this initial implementation to fully distributed and embedded control is described in a roadmap and implementation plan. The development of this plan is the result of discussions with government and industry stakeholders

  17. Constraining the volatility distribution and gas-particle partitioning of combustion aerosols using isothermal dilution and thermodenuder measurements.

    PubMed

    Grieshop, Andrew P; Miracolo, Marissa A; Donahue, Niel M; Robinson, Allen L

    2009-07-01

    The gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions from a diesel engine and the combustion of hard- and soft-woods in a stove was investigated by isothermally diluting them in a smog chamber or by passing them through a thermodenuder and measuring the extent of evaporation. The experiments were conducted at atmospherically relevant conditions: low concentrations and small temperature perturbations. The partitioning of the POA emissions from both sources varied continuously with changing concentration and temperature. Although the POA emissions are semivolatile, they do not completely evaporate at typical atmospheric conditions. The overall partitioning characteristics of diesel and wood smoke POA are similar, with wood smoke being somewhat less volatile than the diesel exhaust. The gas-particle partitioning of aerosols formed from flash-vaporized engine lubricating oil was also studied; diesel POA is somewhat more volatile than the oil aerosol. The experimental data from the dilution- and thermodenuder-based techniques were fit using absorptive partitioning theory to derive a volatility distribution of the POA emissions from each source. These distributions are suitable for use in chemical transport models that simulate POA concentrations.

  18. Gas hydrate distribution and hydrocarbon maturation north of the Knipovich Ridge, western Svalbard margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Ines; Burwicz, Ewa B.; Berndt, Christian; Klaeschen, Dirk; Feseker, Tomas; Geissler, Wolfram H.; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) occurs west of Svalbard in water depths exceeding 600 m, indicating that gas hydrate occurrence in marine sediments is more widespread in this region than anywhere else on the eastern North Atlantic margin. Regional BSR mapping shows the presence of hydrate and free gas in several areas, with the largest area located north of the Knipovich Ridge, a slow spreading ridge segment of the Mid Atlantic Ridge system. Here heat flow is high (up to 330 mW m-2), increasing toward the ridge axis. The coinciding maxima in across-margin BSR width and heat flow suggest that the Knipovich Ridge influenced methane generation in this area. This is supported by recent finds of thermogenic methane at cold seeps north of the ridge termination. To evaluate the source rock potential on the western Svalbard margin, we applied 1-D petroleum system modeling at three sites. The modeling shows that temperature and burial conditions near the ridge were sufficient to produce hydrocarbons. The bulk petroleum mass produced since the Eocene is at least 5 kt and could be as high as ~0.2 Mt. Most likely, source rocks are Miocene organic-rich sediments and a potential Eocene source rock that may exist in the area if early rifting created sufficiently deep depocenters. Thermogenic methane production could thus explain the more widespread presence of gas hydrates north of the Knipovich Ridge. The presence of microbial methane on the upper continental slope and shelf indicates that the origin of methane on the Svalbard margin varies spatially.

  19. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Wang, Ran; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2013-11-15

    The fetus is exposed to atrazine/its main metabolite at levels similar to the dam. • The nursing neonate is exposed primarily to atrazine's main metabolite DACT.

  20. Distribution and chemical fate of chlorine dioxide gas during sanitation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of studies was conducted to establish the 1) distribution and chemical fate of 36-ClO2 on tomatoes and cantaloupe; and 2) the magnitude of residues in kilogram quantities of tomatoes and cantaloupe sanitized with a slow-release chlorine dioxide formulation. Tomatoes and cantaloupe were resp...

  1. Evaluation of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} distribution inside the main clinker minerals by the application of EPMA method

    SciTech Connect

    Ifka, Tomáš; Palou, Martin; Baraček, Jan; Šoukal, František; Boháč, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The formation of Portland clinker phases has taken place in thermodynamically non-equilibrium state between macro-oxides CaO, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO from raw meal and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} from bone meal. The paper deals with the study of clinker minerals as solid solutions with P{sub 2}O{sub 5} during the clinkerization of raw mixture containing bone meal (BM). The ash of BM has contributed as a raw material to the formation of different clinker phases. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) method was used to determine the preferential distribution of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} inside calcium silicate phases and its influence upon C{sub 2}S/C{sub 3}S ratio. Basing on these results, composition of solid solution of C{sub 2}S and C{sub 3}S was established.

  2. Spatial and diurnal distribution of invertebrate and fish fauna of a Zostera marina bed and nearby unvegetated sediments in Damariscotta River, Maine (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, Johanna; Chaplin, Glen; Eilers, Michele R.; Heck, Kenneth L.; O'Neal, Jonathan P.; Valentine, John F.

    1999-06-01

    Fish, epibenthos and macroinfauna were collected in a Zostera marina bed and nearby unvegetated sediments in the estuary of the Damariscotta River, on the mid-coast of Maine. Samples of epibenthic fauna and fish were collected at low tides both during day and night, and samples of infauna at low tides during the day. The mean density of Zostera shoots in the study area was 335 m -2. Abundance and species number of fish were greater at night than during the day and greater in eelgrass beds ( Z. marina) than in unvegetated habitats. Daytime fish collections were dominated by Atlantic silversides ( Medinia medinia), while juvenile winter flounder ( Pseudopleuronectes americanus) dominated night collections. Also Zostera-associated epifaunal abundances and number of species were significantly higher at night than during the day. Mysis stenolepis, Idotea balthica and Littorina obtusata were dominant species in the epifauna samples. Of the total of 37 invertebrate species encountered, only five occurred both in the infaunal and epifaunal samples. Nineteen different taxa were collected from the benthic core samples. The most abundant invertebrate infaunal taxa were sipunculids, the polychaete Nereis virens, and oligochaetes. Infaunal invertebrate abundances and species diversity were significantly higher in eelgrass beds than in unvegetated sediments. The abundance and number of species of benthic invertebrates were also positively correlated to seagrass biomass. Community diversity values ( H') were relatively low but fit well in the general pattern of decreasing diversity towards northern latitudes.

  3. Noninvasive identification of left main and triple vessel coronary artery disease: improved accuracy using quantitative analysis of regional myocardial stress distribution and washout of thallium-201

    SciTech Connect

    Maddahi, J.; Abdulla, A.; Garcia, E.V.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of visual and quantitative analysis of stress redistribution thallium-201 scintigrams, exercise electrocardiography and exercise blood pressure response were compared for correct identification of extensive coronary disease, defined as left main or triple vessel coronary artery disease, or both (50% or more luminal diameter coronary narrowing), in 105 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Extensive disease was present in 56 patients and the remaining 49 had either less extensive coronary artery disease (n = 34) or normal coronary arteriograms (n = 15). Although exercise blood pressure response, exercise electrocardiography and visual thallium-201 analysis were highly specific (98, 88 and 96%, respectively), they were insensitive for identification of patients with extensive disease (14, 45 and 16%, respectively). Quantitative thallium-201 analysis significantly improved the sensitivity of visual thallium-201 analysis for identification of patients with extensive disease (from 16 to 63%, p less than 0.001) without a significant loss of specificity (96 versus 86%, p = NS). Eighteen (64%) of the 28 patients who were misclassified by visual analysis as having less extensive disease were correctly classified as having extensive disease by virtue of quantitative analysis of regional myocardial thallium-201 washout. When the results of quantitative thallium-201 analysis were combined with those of blood pressure and electrocardiographic response to exercise, the sensitivity and specificity for identification of patients with extensive disease was 86 and 76%, respectively, and the highest overall accuracy (0.82) was obtained.

  4. Reaction of α-cedrene with ozone: mechanism, gas and particulate products distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Sexton, K. G.; Kamens, R. M.

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with α-cedrene ( I) in the absence and presence of an OH radical scavenger (cyclohexane) has been studied in the outdoor 25 m 3 Teflon film chambers at the UNC smog chamber facility. Twenty-two compounds were identified for the first time in this study. Important products identified and semi-quantified were α-cedronaldehyde ( VI), α-cedronic acid ( VIII), α-cedrinic acid ( X), α-norcedronaldehyde ( VII), 8-hydroxy-9-α-cedranone ( III), and α-norcedronic acid ( IX). Acetone, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde also were identified in this study. On average, measured gas and particle phase products accounted for ˜56% of the reacted α-cedrene. The total yield of products bearing hydroxy groups (e.g. 8-hydroxy-9-α-cedranone ( III)) and aldehydes (e.g. α-cedronaldehyde ( VI), α-norcedronaldehyde ( VII)) was found to be slightly dependent on the presence of an OH radical scavenger. Generally, the aldehyde yield was found to be higher when cyclohexane was present, and the hydroxy compounds yield was higher when cyclohexane was absent. All products identified in this study were found in the particle phase. α-Cedrinic acid ( X), α-cedronic acid ( VIII), and α-cedronaldehyde (VI) were observed in the early stage in the aerosol phase and may play an important role in the early formation of SOA. Detailed reaction schemes leading to most reaction products observed here are presented and discussed.

  5. Distribution of gas-oil-bitumen shows in the Yakutian diamond province

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, A.I.; Ivanov, V.A.; Bobrov, V.A.; Kropotova, O.I.

    1981-10-01

    The combination of carbon-bearing compounds in the kimberlite pipes may be divided into distinct geochemical groups, genetically associated with exogenic or endogenic geological processes. In analyzing the isotope composition of diamonds from eclogite and kimberlite, graphite in concentrated form from eclogite and ultrabasic inclusions in kimberlite, and postmagmaic carbonic acid from the matrix of kimberlite, it was established that these compounds have a distinctive endogenic nature. The isotope composition of the limestones of marine origin has been determined by the isotope-exchange reation /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ (gas) + /sup 12/CO/sub 3/ (solution) reverse arrow..-->.. /sup 12/CO/sub 2/ (gas) + /sup 13/CO/sub 3/ (solution), which is rigidly associated with temperature of sedimentation and has controlled the ''heavy'' isotope composition of these rocks. The isotope composition of the bitumens has not yet enabled us to resolve the problem of the origin of the bitumen shows (biogenic or abiogenic). However, the similarity of the isotope composition of bitumens examined from various bitumen shows indicates identical thermodynamic conditions of formation.

  6. WITNESSING GAS MIXING IN THE METAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE HICKSON COMPACT GROUP HCG 31

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Flores, S.; Alfaro-Cuello, M.; De Oliveira, C. Mendes; Amram, P.; Carrasco, E. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies.

  7. Do not disturb the animals! or, how Con Edison saved $300,000 using a trenchless technology to renew 3,000 feet of leaking gas main at the Bronx Zoo

    SciTech Connect

    Bufe, M.

    1995-07-01

    Every leaking gas main presents a challenge. But when that leaking main follows a series of sweeping bends on its route through North America`s largest urban wildlife park, it presents a special challenge. That was the situation Consolidated Edison Company of New York Inc. recently faced when numerous leaks were discovered along 3,000 feet of a 95-year-old, 12-inch cast-iron main that winds through New York City`s Bronx Zoo. Con Edison knew it needed a long-term solution to this increasingly common problem. Thanks to the cooperative efforts of the utility`s operations and research departments and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), Con Edison also knew about a trenchless technology that could renew the pipe with minimal impact to the environment--while saving the utility a substantial sum of money in the process. In the Paltem system, a woven polyester hose is injected with an epoxy resin and then inverted (turned inside out) into a pipe at an access pit. The liner then bonds to the inside wall of the pipe, forming a smooth, flexible and pressure-resistant lining. The process is environmentally safe, requires very little excavation and can be installed in days, rather than the weeks or months it can take to dig up and replace existing pipe.

  8. Desmosterol, the main sterol in rabbit semen: distribution among semen subfractions and its role in the in vitro spermatozoa acrosome reaction and motility

    PubMed Central

    Mourvaki, Evangelia; Cardinali, Raffaella; Roberti, Rita; Dal Bosco, Alessandro; Castellini, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of the cell membrane lipid bilayer that include molecules such as cholesterol and desmosterol, which are significantly found in the spermatozoa of several animal species. However, the presence of desmosterol in rabbit semen has never been investigated. The aims of this study were to characterize the sterol composition of subfractions of ejaculated rabbit semen and evaluate the in vitro effects of sterol on the spermatozoa acrosome reaction and motility. Two sterols, occurring prevalently in the free form (94.3%), were identified in whole semen collected from 10 fertile New Zealand White rabbits, specifically desmosterol (58.5% of total sterols) and cholesterol (35.9% of total sterols). Desmosterol was the predominant sterol found in all subfractions of rabbit semen, varying from 56.7% (in the prostatic secretory granules, PSGs) to 63.8% (in the seminal plasma). Spermatozoa contained an intermediate proportion of desmosterol (59.8%), which was asymmetrically distributed between the heads (52.0% of the total content of sterols) and the tails (81.8%). Results showed that both desmosterol and cholesterol can be transferred from the PSGs to the spermatozoa and are equally effective in inhibiting in vitro spermatozoa capacitation at a concentration higher than 1 mg L−1. In contrast, neither desmosterol nor cholesterol had a significant effect on spermatozoa motility. Thus, it was concluded that, the various fractions of rabbit seminal fluid differ from each other in sterol composition and quantity, probably due to their different functional properties, and these fractions may undergo significant sterol changes depending on the stage of spermatozoa capacitation. PMID:20729867

  9. Trends during a half century in relative squamous cell carcinoma distribution by body site in the Swedish population: support for accumulated sun exposure as the main risk factor.

    PubMed

    Dal, Henrik; Boldemann, Cecilia; Lindelöf, Bernt

    2008-02-01

    There is a strong relationship between squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation in terms of accumulated exposure. In this study, data from the Swedish Cancer Registry are surveyed to discern a reflection of behavioral and societal changes in relative distribution of SCC by body site. Data for the time period 1960-2004, including a total of 66 221 cases (56 669 people) were analyzed by body site for age and gender cohorts. The age-standardized (European population) incidence per 100 000 of SCC in the year 2004 was 30.4 in males and 15.4 in females. In the year 1960, the corresponding incidences were 7.7 and 3.8; that is, SCC has become four times more frequent in Sweden for both sexes during this period. The standardized incidence of SCC increased on all body sites except eyelids (men and women) and ears (women). Head tumors dominated among patients aged 70 years or more and diagnosed 1960-1964. Among patients less than 70 years old at diagnosis in 2000-2004, tumors of the trunk and limbs dominated. A relative increase of tumors of the scalp and neck was observed in all age groups (men), and of tumors of the trunk and upper limbs in all age groups and both sexes except among patients aged more than 90 years of age. In contrast, a relative decrease of tumors on the face (including the ears) was seen in all age groups. The relative increase of SCC of the trunk and upper limbs is a plausible reflection of intentional tanning.

  10. The spatiotemporal distribution of dissolved carbon in the main stems and their tributaries along the lower reaches of Heilongjiang River Basin, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Song, Changchun; Guo, Yuedong

    2016-01-01

    The Heilongjiang River Basin in the eastern Siberia, one of the largest river basins draining to the North Pacific Ocean, is a border river between China, Mongolia, and Russia. In this study, we examined the spatial and seasonal variability in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and dissolved total carbon (DTC) concentrations along lower reaches of Heilongjiang River Basin, China. Water samples were collected monthly along the mouths of main rivers (Heilongjiang River, Wusuli River, and Songhua River) and their ten tributary waters for 2 years. The DOC concentrations of waters ranged from 1.74 to 16.64 mg/L, with a mean value of 8.90 ± 0.27 mg/L (n = 165). Notably, mean DIC concentrations were 9.08 ± 0.31 mg/L, accounting for 13.26∼83.27% of DTC. DIC concentrations increased significantly after the Heilongjiang River passed through Northeast China, while DOC concentrations decreased. Over 50% of DIC concentrations were decreased during exports from groundwater to rice fields and from rice fields to ditches. Water dissolved carbon showed large spatial and temporal variations during the 2-year measurement, suggesting that more frequently samplings were required. Carbon (DIC + DOC) loads from the Heilongjiang River to the Sea of Okhotsk were estimated to be 3.26 Tg C/year in this study, accounting for 0.64% of the global water dissolved carbon flux. DIC export contributed an average of 51.84% of the estimated carbon load in the Heilongjiang River, acting as an important carbon component during riverine transport. Our study could provide some guides on agricultural water management and contribute to more accurately estimate global carbon budgets.

  11. Risk analysis of highly combustible gas storage, supply, and distribution systems in PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Simion, G.P.; VanHorn, R.L.; Smith, C.L.; Bickel, J.H.; Sattison, M.B.; Bulmahn, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the potential safety concerns for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) identified in Generic Safety Issue 106, Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas. A Westinghouse four-loop PWR plant was analyzed for the risk due to the use of combustible gases (predominantly hydrogen) within the plant. The analysis evaluated an actual hydrogen distribution configuration and conducted several sensitivity studies to determine the potential variability among PWRs. The sensitivity studies were based on hydrogen and safety-related equipment configurations observed at other PWRs within the United States. Several options for improving the hydrogen distribution system design were identified and evaluated for their effect on risk and core damage frequency. A cost/benefit analysis was performed to determine whether alternatives considered were justifiable based on the safety improvement and economics of each possible improvement.

  12. On the Distribution of Free Path Lengthsfor the Periodic Lorentz Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, Jean; Golse, François; Wennberg, Bernt

    Consider the domain and let the free path length be defined as The distribution of values of is studied in the limit as for all . It is shown that the value is critical for this problem: in other words, the limiting behavior of depends only on whether γ is larger or smaller than .

  13. Instability in the dense supernova neutrino gas with flavor-dependent angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2012-06-01

    The usual description of self-induced flavor conversions for neutrinos (ν's) in supernovae is based on the simplified assumption that all the ν's of the different species are emitted "half-isotropically" by a common neutrinosphere, in analogy to a blackbody emission. However, realistic supernova simulations show that ν angular distributions at decoupling are far from being half-isotropic and, above all, are flavor dependent. We show that flavor-dependent angular distributions may lead to crossing points in the angular spectra of different ν species (where F(ν(e))=F(ν(x)) and F(ν(e))=F(ν(x))) around which a new multiangle instability can develop. To characterize this effect, we carry out a linearized flavor stability analysis for different supernova neutrino angular distributions. We find that this instability can shift the onset of the flavor conversions toward low radii and produce a smearing of the splitting features found with trivial ν emission models. As a result the spectral differences among ν's of different flavors could be strongly reduced.

  14. Distribution of gas and galaxies around the distant quasar PKS 1614 + 051

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, E.M.; Cowie, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    The results of narrow-band and broad-band filter observations of the region surrounding the z = 3.21 quasars, PKS 1614 + 051, made under subarcsec seeing conditions with the 3.6 m CFHT telescope at Mauna Kea are reported. The nuclear region of the Lyman-alpha companion to the quasar is resolved with a FWHM of about 0.9 arcsec A magnitude fainter. Limits on detectable continuum flux from this object suggest that it is a gas cloud interacting with the quasar, and its emission is consistent with simple photoionization by the quasar. However, the presence of several galaxies around the periphery of the quasar is noted. A search of 11 additional quasars at z greater than 3 has failed to show any other such systems. It is argued that this is consistent with the statistics of extended emission line systems in low-z quasars. 11 references.

  15. Element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorite Allan Hills A81005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraehenbuehl, U.; Eugster, O.; Niedermann, S.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite ALLAN HILLS A81005, an anorthositic breccia, is recognized to be of lunar origin. The noble gases in this meteorite were analyzed and found to be solar-wind implanted gases, whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to those in lunar regolith samples. A sample of this meteorite was obtained for the analysis of the noble gas isotopes, including Kr(81), and for the determination of the elemental abundances. In order to better determine the volume derived from the surface correlated gases, grain size fractions were prepared. The results of the instrumental measurements of the gamma radiation are listed. From the amounts of cosmic ray produced noble gases and respective production rates, the lunar surface residence times were calculated. It was concluded that the lunar surface time is about half a billion years.

  16. Prediction of acute toxicity of chemicals in mixtures: worms Tubifex tubifex and gas/liquid distribution.

    PubMed

    Tichý, M; Borek-Dohalský, V; Matousová, D; Rucki, M; Feltl, L; Roth, Z

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this contribution is to support our proposal of the procedure for predicting acute toxicity of binary mixtures by QSAR analysis techniques. The changes of a mixture composition are described by molar ratio R and visualized in the R-plot (QCAR--quantitative composition-activity relationships). The approach was inspired by Rault and Dalton's laws, their positive and negative deviations in the behavior of a mixture of real gases, by Loewe and Muischnek isoboles and by the Finney test of additivity. Acute toxicity was determined by the laboratory test with woms Tubifex tubifex. The additivity of the acute toxicity in the binary mixture benzene + nitrobenzene was confirmed and a new interaction is described: "mixed interaction" with the binary mixture aniline + ethanol. The "mixed interaction" means that depending on mixture composition, both potentiation and inhibition can occur. As the first physicochemical descriptor of the changes caused by the changing composition of binary mixtures, the gas/liquid equilibrium was studied and a composition of the gaseous phase was determined by a gas chromatographic method. The method for determination of concentrations in the gaseous phase was described. The gaseous phase composition of benzene + nitrobenzene. benzene + ethanol, benzene + aniline and ethanol + aniline mixtures was analyzed. It was found that if the concentrations of the mixture's components in the gaseous phase behave nonideally (they are not additive), the acute toxicity of the same mixture is not additive as well. Another descriptor to distinguish between potentiation and inhibition will be, however, necessary. The properties, both gaseous phase composition and the acute toxicity, of the benzene + nitrobenzene mixture are additive. In mixtures with the mixed interaction, the R-plot of the composition of the gaseous phase is complex with a large variation of results.

  17. Witnessing Gas Mixing in the Metal Distribution of the Hickson Compact Group HCG 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Amram, P.; Alfaro-Cuello, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; de Mello, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina) - Observing run: GS-2012B-Q-60.

  18. Abnormal distribution of microhardness in tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Nan; Shen Jun; Xie Weidong; Wang Linzhi; Wang Dan; Min Dong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the effects of heat input on the distribution of microhardness of tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welded hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy joints were investigated. The results show that with an increase of heat input, the distributions of microhardness at the top and bottom of the welded joints are different because they are determined by both the effect of grain coarsening and the effect of dispersion strengthening. With an increase of the heat input, the microhardness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) at the top and bottom of welded joints and the fusion zone (FZ) at the bottom of welded joints decreased gradually, while the microhardness of the FZ at the top of welded joints decreased initially and then increased sharply. The reason for the abnormal distribution of microhardness of the FZ at the top of the welded joints is that this area is close to the heat source during welding and then large numbers of hard {beta}-Mg{sub 17}(Al,Zn){sub 12} particles are precipitated. Hence, in this case, the effect of dispersion strengthening dominated the microhardness.

  19. On the Distribution of Free Path Lengths for the Periodic Lorentz Gas III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglioti, Emanuele; Golse, François

    For r(0,1), let Zr={xR2|dist(x,Z2)>r/2} and define τr(x,v)=inf{t>0|x+tv∂Zr}. Let Φr(t) be the probability that τr(x,v)>=t for x and v uniformly distributed in Zr and §1 respectively. We prove in this paper that as t-->+∞. This result improves upon the bounds on Φr in Bourgain-Golse-Wennberg [Commun. Math. Phys. 190, 491-508 (1998)]. We also discuss the applications of this result in the context of kinetic theory.

  20. Aerosol and gas re-distribution by shallow cumulus clouds: An investigation using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna; Sorooshian, Armin; Ervens, Barbara; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Feingold, Graham; Murphy, Shane M.; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2012-09-01

    Aircraft measurements during the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) are used to examine the influence of shallow cumulus clouds on vertical profiles of aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and secondary aerosol precursor gases. The data show signatures of convective transport of particles, gases and moisture from near the surface to higher altitudes, and of aqueous-phase production of aerosol mass (sulfate and organics) in cloud droplets and aerosol water. In cloudy conditions, the average aerosol volume concentration at an altitude of 2850 m, above typical cloud top levels, was found to be 34% of that at 450 m; for clear conditions, the same ratio was 13%. Both organic and sulfate mass fractions were on average constant with altitude (around 50%); however, the ratio of oxalate to organic mass increased with altitude (from 1% at 450 m to almost 9% at 3450 m), indicative of the influence of in-cloud production on the vertical abundance and characteristics of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. A new metric termed "residual cloud fraction" is introduced as a way of quantifying the "cloud processing history" of an air parcel. Results of a parcel model simulating aqueous phase production of sulfate and organics reproduce observed trends and point at a potentially important role of SOA production, especially oligomers, in deliquesced aerosols. The observations emphasize the importance of shallow cumulus clouds in altering the vertical distribution of aerosol properties that influence both their direct and indirect effect on climate.

  1. Origin and Distribution of Thiophenes and Furans in Gas Discharges from Active Volcanoes and Geothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-01-01

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C2–C20 species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C4H8O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection. PMID:20480029

  2. Origin and distribution of thiophenes and furans in gas discharges from active volcanoes and geothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-03-31

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C(2)-C(20) species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C(4)H(8)O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection.

  3. Possible health effects of liquefied petroleum gas on workers at filling and distribution stations of Gaza governorates.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al Laham, N A; El Madhoun, R A

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is widely used in the Gaza Strip for domestic purposes, in agriculture and industry and, illegally, in cars. This study aimed to identify possible health effects on workers exposed to LPG in Gaza governorates. Data were collected by a questionnaire interview, and haematological and biochemical analyses of venous blood samples were made from 30 workers at filling and distribution stations and 30 apparently healthy controls. Statistically significant differences were found in all self-reported health-related complaints among LPG workers versus controls. LPG workers had significantly higher values of red blood cell counts, haemoglobin, haematocrit mean corpuscular haemoglobin and platelet counts. They also had significantly higher values of kidney function tests (urea, creatinine and uric acid) and liver function enzyme activities (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase). LPG workers at Gaza Strip petroleum stations are at higher risk for health-related symptoms and clinical abnormalities.

  4. [Mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic detection of trace methane gas].

    PubMed

    Tan, Song; Liu, Wan-feng; Wang, Li-jun; Zhang, Jin-chuan; Li, Lu; Liu, Jun-qi; Liu, Feng-qi; Wang, Zhan-guo

    2012-05-01

    There have been considerable interests in methane detection based on infrared absorption spectroscopy for industrial and environment monitoring. The authors report on the realization of photoacoustic detection of methane (CH4) using mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL). The absorption line at 1316.83 cm(-1) was selected for CH4 detection, which can be reached by the self-manufactured DFB-QCL source operating in pulsed mode near 7.6 microm at room-temperature. The CH4 gas is filled to a Helmholtz resonant photoacoustic cell, which was equipped with a commercial electret microphone. The DFB-QCL was operated at 234 Hz with an 80 mW optical peak power. A detection limit of 189 parts per billion in volume was derived when the signal-to-noise ratio equaled 1. PMID:22827065

  5. Yet Another Spectro-Interferometric Study of The Gas Distribution in The Enigmatic Semi-Detached Binary β Lyrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemravová, J.; Mourard, D.; Harmanec, P.; Meilland, A.

    2015-12-01

    The majority of close binaries undergo episodes of mass transfer between their components, which completely change their further evolution. Simulations and observations agree that the mass transfer has two phases: i) short and rapid one, and ii) long and slow one. The bulk of the mass is likely exchanged during the rapid phase, but due to its shortness, systems undergoing this phase are rare, but they hold the key to understanding of the process. One system that is either undergoing the rapid mass transfer phase or is in a transient phase between the two phases is β Lyrae. Our goal is to map the distribution of circumstellar gas in the system. To achieve it, a series of spectro-interferometric observations acquired with the optical instrument VEGA/CHARA are investigated. Here we present our tools and preliminary results of our analysis.

  6. [Mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic detection of trace methane gas].

    PubMed

    Tan, Song; Liu, Wan-feng; Wang, Li-jun; Zhang, Jin-chuan; Li, Lu; Liu, Jun-qi; Liu, Feng-qi; Wang, Zhan-guo

    2012-05-01

    There have been considerable interests in methane detection based on infrared absorption spectroscopy for industrial and environment monitoring. The authors report on the realization of photoacoustic detection of methane (CH4) using mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL). The absorption line at 1316.83 cm(-1) was selected for CH4 detection, which can be reached by the self-manufactured DFB-QCL source operating in pulsed mode near 7.6 microm at room-temperature. The CH4 gas is filled to a Helmholtz resonant photoacoustic cell, which was equipped with a commercial electret microphone. The DFB-QCL was operated at 234 Hz with an 80 mW optical peak power. A detection limit of 189 parts per billion in volume was derived when the signal-to-noise ratio equaled 1.

  7. Possible health effects of liquefied petroleum gas on workers at filling and distribution stations of Gaza governorates.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al Laham, N A; El Madhoun, R A

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is widely used in the Gaza Strip for domestic purposes, in agriculture and industry and, illegally, in cars. This study aimed to identify possible health effects on workers exposed to LPG in Gaza governorates. Data were collected by a questionnaire interview, and haematological and biochemical analyses of venous blood samples were made from 30 workers at filling and distribution stations and 30 apparently healthy controls. Statistically significant differences were found in all self-reported health-related complaints among LPG workers versus controls. LPG workers had significantly higher values of red blood cell counts, haemoglobin, haematocrit mean corpuscular haemoglobin and platelet counts. They also had significantly higher values of kidney function tests (urea, creatinine and uric acid) and liver function enzyme activities (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase). LPG workers at Gaza Strip petroleum stations are at higher risk for health-related symptoms and clinical abnormalities. PMID:23879082

  8. Leaf gas exchange and nutrient use efficiency help explain the distribution of two Neotropical mangroves under contrasting flooding and salinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardona-Olarte, Pablo; Krauss, Ken W.; Twilley, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa co-occur along many intertidal floodplains in the Neotropics. Their patterns of dominance shift along various gradients, coincident with salinity, soil fertility, and tidal flooding. We used leaf gas exchange metrics to investigate the strategies of these two species in mixed culture to simulate competition under different salinity concentrations and hydroperiods. Semidiurnal tidal and permanent flooding hydroperiods at two constant salinity regimes (10 g L−1 and 40 g L−1) were simulated over 10 months. Assimilation (A), stomatal conductance (gw), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), instantaneous photosynthetic water use efficiency (PWUE), and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE) were determined at the leaf level for both species over two time periods. Rhizophora mangle had significantly higher PWUE than did L. racemosa seedlings at low salinities; however, L. racemosa had higher PNUE and stomatal conductance and gw, accordingly, had greater intercellular CO2 (calculated) during measurements. Both species maintained similar capacities for assimilation at 10 and 40 g L−1 salinity and during both permanent and tidal hydroperiod treatments. Hydroperiod alone had no detectable effect on leaf gas exchange. However, PWUE increased and PNUE decreased for both species at 40 g L−1 salinity compared to 10 g L−1. At 40 g L−1 salinity, PNUE was higher for L. racemosa than R. mangle with tidal flooding. These treatments indicated that salinity influences gas exchange efficiency, might affect how gases are apportioned intercellularly, and accentuates different strategies for distributing leaf nitrogen to photosynthesis for these two species while growing competitively.

  9. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... designed to withstand abrasion of the gas, impurities in gas, cutting by the valve, and to resist permanent... connected and properly adjusted gas utilization equipment. (6) A self-contained service regulator with...

  10. Two and three-dimensional segmentation of hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydarian, Mohammadreza; Kirby, Miranda; Wheatley, Andrew; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2012-03-01

    A semi-automated method for generating hyperpolarized helium-3 (3He) measurements of individual slice (2D) or whole lung (3D) gas distribution was developed. 3He MRI functional images were segmented using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical K-means clustering of the 3He MRI signal and in addition a seeded region-growing algorithm was employed for segmentation of the 1H MRI thoracic cavity volume. 3He MRI pulmonary function measurements were generated following two-dimensional landmark-based non-rigid registration of the 3He and 1H pulmonary images. We applied this method to MRI of healthy subjects and subjects with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). The results of hierarchical K-means 2D and 3D segmentation were compared to an expert observer's manual segmentation results using linear regression, Pearson correlations and the Dice similarity coefficient. 2D hierarchical K-means segmentation of ventilation volume (VV) and ventilation defect volume (VDV) was strongly and significantly correlated with manual measurements (VV: r=0.98, p<.0001 VDV: r=0.97, p<.0001) and mean Dice coefficients were greater than 92% for all subjects. 3D hierarchical K-means segmentation of VV and VDV was also strongly and significantly correlated with manual measurements (VV: r=0.98, p<.0001 VDV: r=0.64, p<.0001) and the mean Dice coefficients were greater than 91% for all subjects. Both 2D and 3D semi-automated segmentation of 3He MRI gas distribution provides a way to generate novel pulmonary function measurements.

  11. ZTEK`s ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine system for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, M.; Nathanson, D.; Bradshaw, D.T.

    1996-12-31

    Ztek`s Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system has exceptional potential for utility electric power generation because of: simplicity of components construction, capability for low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of very high quality by-product heat (up to 1000{degrees}C), and system integration simplicity. Utility applications of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell are varied and include distributed generation units (sub-MW to 30MW capacity), repowering existing power plants (i.e. 30MW to 100MW), and multi-megawatt central power plants. A TVA/EPRI collaboration program involved functional testing of the advanced solid oxide fuel cell stacks and design scale-up for distributed power generation applications. The emphasis is on the engineering design of the utility modules which will be the building blocks for up to megawatt scale power plants. The program has two distinctive subprograms: Verification test on a 1 kW stack and 25kW module for utility demonstration. A 1 kW Planar SOFC stack was successfully operated for 15,000 hours as of December, 1995. Ztek began work on a 25kW SOFC Power System for TVA, which plans to install the 25kW SOFC at a host site for demonstration in 1997. The 25kW module is Ztek`s intended building block for the commercial use of the Planar SOFC. Systems of up to megawatt capacity can be obtained by packaging the modules in 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional arrays.

  12. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  13. Dual Layer Monolith ATR of Pyrolysis Oil for Distributed Synthesis Gas Production

    SciTech Connect

    Lawal, Adeniyi

    2012-09-29

    We have successfully demonstrated a novel reactor technology, based on BASF dual layer monolith catalyst, for miniaturizing the autothermal reforming of pyrolysis oil to syngas, the second and most critical of the three steps for thermochemically converting biomass waste to liquid transportation fuel. The technology was applied to aged as well as fresh samples of pyrolysis oil derived from five different biomass feedstocks, namely switch-grass, sawdust, hardwood/softwood, golden rod and maple. Optimization of process conditions in conjunction with innovative reactor system design enabled the minimization of carbon deposit and control of the H2/CO ratio of the product gas. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis of the integrated process using in part, experimental data from the project, indicates (1) net energy recovery of 49% accounting for all losses and external energy input, (2) weight of diesel oil produced as a percent of the biomass to be ~14%, and (3) for a demonstration size biomass to Fischer-Tropsch liquid plant of ~ 2000 daily barrels of diesel, the price of the diesel produced is ~$3.30 per gallon, ex. tax. However, the extension of catalyst life is critical to the realization of the projected economics. Catalyst deactivation was observed and the modes of deactivation, both reversible and irreversible were identified. An effective catalyst regeneration strategy was successfully demonstrated for reversible catalyst deactivation while a catalyst preservation strategy was proposed for preventing irreversible catalyst deactivation. Future work should therefore be focused on extending the catalyst life, and a successful demonstration of an extended (> 500 on-stream hours) catalyst life would affirm the commercial viability of the process.

  14. Subarcsecond Observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1: Continuum Distribution and Dynamics of Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Wright, M. C. H.; Sandell, Göran; Shi, Hui; Wu, Yue-Fang; Brogan, Crystal; Corder, Stuartt

    2013-12-01

    We report new results based on the analysis of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1 at 1.3 and 3.4 mm with subarcsecond resolutions. With angular resolutions ~0.''7, the SMA and CARMA observations show that the continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.4 mm from the hyper-compact H II region IRS 1 is dominated by a compact source with a tail-like extended structure to the southwest of IRS 1. With a CARMA B-array image at 1.3 mm convolved to 0.''1, we resolve the hyper-compact H II region into two components: an unresolved hyper-compact core, and a north-south extension with linear sizes of <270 AU and ~2000 AU, respectively. The fine structure observed with CARMA is in good agreement with the previous Very Large Array results at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the hyper-compact H II region at the center of IRS 1 is associated with an ionized bipolar outflow. We image the molecular lines OCS(19-18) and CH3CN(12-11) as well as 13CO(2-1) surrounding IRS 1, showing a velocity gradient along the southwest-northeast direction. The spectral line profiles in 13CO(2-1), CO(2-1), and HCN(1-0) observed toward IRS 1 show broad redshifted absorption, providing evidence for gas infall with rates in the range of 3-10 × 10-3 M ⊙ yr-1 inferred from our observations.

  15. Subarcsecond observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1: Continuum distribution and dynamics of molecular gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lei; Shi, Hui; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Wright, M. C. H.; Sandell, Göran; Wu, Yue-Fang; Brogan, Crystal; Corder, Stuartt

    2013-12-10

    We report new results based on the analysis of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1 at 1.3 and 3.4 mm with subarcsecond resolutions. With angular resolutions ∼0.''7, the SMA and CARMA observations show that the continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.4 mm from the hyper-compact H II region IRS 1 is dominated by a compact source with a tail-like extended structure to the southwest of IRS 1. With a CARMA B-array image at 1.3 mm convolved to 0.''1, we resolve the hyper-compact H II region into two components: an unresolved hyper-compact core, and a north-south extension with linear sizes of <270 AU and ∼2000 AU, respectively. The fine structure observed with CARMA is in good agreement with the previous Very Large Array results at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the hyper-compact H II region at the center of IRS 1 is associated with an ionized bipolar outflow. We image the molecular lines OCS(19-18) and CH{sub 3}CN(12-11) as well as {sup 13}CO(2-1) surrounding IRS 1, showing a velocity gradient along the southwest-northeast direction. The spectral line profiles in {sup 13}CO(2-1), CO(2-1), and HCN(1-0) observed toward IRS 1 show broad redshifted absorption, providing evidence for gas infall with rates in the range of 3-10 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} inferred from our observations.

  16. A Comprehensive Archive of Aerosol and Trace Gas Spatial Distributions for Model and Satellite Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Meland, B. S.; Axisa, D.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Denver Aerosol Group has assembled measured aerosol size distributions, gaseous concentrations, and atmospheric state variables covering a 30 year time period into one comprehensive archive. Measurements were made during the period 1987-2013 and include data from a total of 21 NASA field campaigns. Measurements were taken from the ground to over 21 km in altitude, from 72 S Latitude to 90 N latitude on over 300 individual flights on NASA Research Aircraft. Aerosol measurements were made with the University of Denver's Nucleation-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer (NMASS), Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer, and/or a low-pressure Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) depending on the specific campaign. The science payloads varied with the campaign objectives, but the aerosol data were invariably acquired in conjunction with measurements by other investigators placing them in the context of atmospheric composition. The archive includes location and time of the measurements along with the tropopause heights and selected atmospheric composition and state data such as ambient temperatures and pressures, abundances of ozone, N2O, oxides of nitrogen, water vapor, CO2 etc. The data archive is stored in NetCDF format and includes all relevant metadata for measured quantities. This archive will be hosted by NASA and will be available to the public for model validation. The data includes indexing by scientific campaign, date, and spatial coordinates. This will facilitate comparisons across the available range of times, locations and related measurements. This data set has been used for validation of satellite remote sensing data. Coincident measurements of aerosol size distributions were used to calculate extinction profiles which were compared to those retrieved with the SAGE II satellite. Agreement between extinctions derived from the in situ size measurements and those provided by SAGE II was good for the 452, 525, and 1020 nm wavelength channels, but poor for

  17. Two-dimensional radiation MHD modeling assessment of designs for argon gas puff distributions for future experiments on the refurbished Z machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Chong, Y. K.; Velikovich, A. L.; Dasgupta, A.; Apruzese, J. P.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jennings, C. A.; Waisman, E. M.; Lamppa, D. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Cuneo, M. E.; Krishnan, M.; Coleman, P. L.; Madden, R. E.; Elliott, K. W.

    2012-09-01

    Argon Z-pinch experiments are to be performed on the refurbished Z machine (which we will refer to as ZR here in order to distinguish between pre-refurbishment Z) at Sandia National Laboratories with a new 8 cm diameter double-annulus gas puff nozzle constructed by Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC). The gas exits the nozzle from an outer and inner annulus and a central jet. The amount of gas present in each region can be varied. Here a two-dimensional radiation MHD (2DRMHD) model, MACH2-TCRE, with tabular collisional radiative equilibrium atomic kinetics is used to theoretically investigate stability and K-shell emission properties of several measured (interferometry) initial gas distributions emanating from this new nozzle. Of particular interest is to facilitate that the distributions employed in future experiments have stability and K-shell emission properties that are at least as good as the Titan nozzle generated distribution that was successfully fielded in earlier experiments on the Z machine before it underwent refurbishment. The model incorporates a self-consistent calculation for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium kinetics and ray-trace based radiation transport. This level of detail is necessary in order to model opacity effects, non-local radiation effects, and the high temperature state of K-shell emitting Z-pinch loads. Comparisons of radiation properties and stability of measured AASC gas profiles are made with that of the distribution used in the pre-refurbished Z experiments. Based on these comparisons, an optimal K-shell emission producing initial gas distribution is determined from among the AASC nozzle measured distributions and predictions are made for K-shell yields attainable from future ZR experiments.

  18. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  19. Three-Dimensional Measurements of Fuel Distribution in High-Pressure, High- Temperature, Next-Generation Aviation Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.

    1998-01-01

    In our world-class, optically accessible combustion facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center, we have developed the unique capability of making three-dimensional fuel distribution measurements of aviation gas turbine fuel injectors at actual operating conditions. These measurements are made in situ at the actual operating temperatures and pressures using the JP-grade fuels of candidate next-generation advanced aircraft engines for the High Speed Research (HSR) and Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) programs. The inlet temperature and pressure ranges used thus far are 300 to 1100 F and 80 to 250 psia. With these data, we can obtain the injector spray angles, the fuel mass distributions of liquid and vapor, the degree of fuel vaporization, and the degree to which fuel has been consumed. The data have been used to diagnose the performance of injectors designed both in-house and by major U.S. engine manufacturers and to design new fuel injectors with overall engine performance goals of increased efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Mie scattering is used to visualize the liquid fuel, and laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize both liquid and fuel vapor.

  20. Near-infrared remote sensing of Los Angeles trace gas distributions from a mountaintop site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Pongetti, T. J.; Blavier, J.-F. L.; Crawford, T. J.; Manatt, K. S.; Toon, G. C.; Wong, K. W.; Sander, S. P.

    2013-10-01

    The Los Angeles basin is a significant anthropogenic source of major greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) and the pollutant CO, contributing significantly to regional and global climate change. We present a novel approach for monitoring the spatial and temporal distributions of greenhouse gases in the Los Angeles basin using a high-resolution spectroscopic remote sensing technique. A new Fourier Transform Spectrometer called CLARS-FTS has been deployed since May 2010 at JPL's California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) on Mt. Wilson, California for automated long-term measurements of greenhouse gases. The instrument design and performance of CLARS-FTS are presented. From its mountaintop location at an altitude of 1673 m, the instrument points at a programmed sequence of ground target locations in the Los Angeles basin, recording spectra of reflected near-IR solar radiation. Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of greenhouse gases (XGHG) including XCO2, XCH4, and XCO are retrieved several times per day for each target. Spectra from a local Spectralon® scattering plate are also recorded to determine background (free tropospheric) column abundances above the site. Comparisons between measurements from LA basin targets and the Spectralon® plate provide estimates of the boundary layer partial column abundances of the measured species. Algorithms are described for transforming the measured interferograms into spectra, and for deriving column abundances from the spectra along with estimates of the measurement precision and accuracy. The CLARS GHG measurements provide a means to infer relative, and possibly absolute, GHG emissions.

  1. Near-infrared remote sensing of Los Angeles trace gas distributions from a mountaintop site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Pongetti, T. J.; Blavier, J.-F. L.; Crawford, T. J.; Manatt, K. S.; Toon, G. C.; Wong, K. W.; Sander, S. P.

    2014-03-01

    The Los Angeles basin is a significant anthropogenic source of major greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) and the pollutant CO, contributing significantly to regional and global climate change. We present a novel approach for monitoring the spatial and temporal distributions of greenhouse gases in the Los Angeles basin using a high-resolution spectroscopic remote sensing technique. A new Fourier transform spectrometer called CLARS-FTS has been deployed since May, 2010, at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)'s California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) on Mt. Wilson, California, for automated long-term measurements of greenhouse gases. The instrument design and performance of CLARS-FTS are presented. From its mountaintop location at an altitude of 1673 m, the instrument points at a programmed sequence of ground target locations in the Los Angeles basin, recording spectra of reflected near-IR solar radiation. Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of greenhouse gases (XGHG) including XCO2, XCH4, and XCO are retrieved several times per day for each target. Spectra from a local Spectralon scattering plate are also recorded to determine background (free tropospheric) column abundances above the site. Comparisons between measurements from LA basin targets and the Spectralon plate provide estimates of the boundary layer partial column abundances of the measured species. Algorithms are described for transforming the measured interferograms into spectra, and for deriving column abundances from the spectra along with estimates of the measurement precision and accuracy. The CLARS GHG measurements provide a means to infer relative, and possibly absolute, GHG emissions.

  2. Analysis of polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2010-09-17

    Sulfide and polysulfides are strong nucleophiles and reducing agents that participate in many environmentally significant processes such as the formation of sulfide minerals and volatile organic sulfur compounds. Their presence in drinking water distribution systems are of particular concern and need to be assessed, since these species consume disinfectants and dissolved oxygen, react with metal ions to produce insoluble metal sulfides, and cause taste and odour problems. The analysis of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems is challenging due to their low concentrations, thermal instability and their susceptibility to undergo oxidation and disproportionation reactions. This paper reports on the development and optimisation of a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for the determination of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems. The method uses methyl iodide to derivatize sulfide and polysulfides into their corresponding dimethyl(poly)sulfides, which are then extracted using solid-phase microextraction in the headspace mode and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Good sensitivity was achieved for the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides, with detection limits ranging from 50 to 240 ng L(-1). The method also demonstrated good precision (repeatability: 3-7%) and good linearity over two orders of magnitude. Matrix effects from raw drinking water containing organic carbon (3.8 mg L(-1)) and from sediment material from a drinking water distribution system were shown to have no interferences in the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides. The method provides a rapid, robust, and reliable mean to analyse trace levels of sulfides and polysulfides in aqueous systems. The new method described here is more accessible and user-friendly than methods based on closed-loop stripping analysis, which have been traditionally used for the analysis of these compounds. The optimised method was used to analyse samples collected

  3. Analysis of polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2010-09-17

    Sulfide and polysulfides are strong nucleophiles and reducing agents that participate in many environmentally significant processes such as the formation of sulfide minerals and volatile organic sulfur compounds. Their presence in drinking water distribution systems are of particular concern and need to be assessed, since these species consume disinfectants and dissolved oxygen, react with metal ions to produce insoluble metal sulfides, and cause taste and odour problems. The analysis of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems is challenging due to their low concentrations, thermal instability and their susceptibility to undergo oxidation and disproportionation reactions. This paper reports on the development and optimisation of a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for the determination of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems. The method uses methyl iodide to derivatize sulfide and polysulfides into their corresponding dimethyl(poly)sulfides, which are then extracted using solid-phase microextraction in the headspace mode and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Good sensitivity was achieved for the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides, with detection limits ranging from 50 to 240 ng L(-1). The method also demonstrated good precision (repeatability: 3-7%) and good linearity over two orders of magnitude. Matrix effects from raw drinking water containing organic carbon (3.8 mg L(-1)) and from sediment material from a drinking water distribution system were shown to have no interferences in the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides. The method provides a rapid, robust, and reliable mean to analyse trace levels of sulfides and polysulfides in aqueous systems. The new method described here is more accessible and user-friendly than methods based on closed-loop stripping analysis, which have been traditionally used for the analysis of these compounds. The optimised method was used to analyse samples collected

  4. Multi-gas interaction modeling on decorated semiconductor interfaces: A novel Fermi distribution-based response isotherm and the inverse hard/soft acid/base concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laminack, William; Gole, James

    2015-12-01

    A unique MEMS/NEMS approach is presented for the modeling of a detection platform for mixed gas interactions. Mixed gas analytes interact with nanostructured decorating metal oxide island sites supported on a microporous silicon substrate. The Inverse Hard/Soft acid/base (IHSAB) concept is used to assess a diversity of conductometric responses for mixed gas interactions as a function of these nanostructured metal oxides. The analyte conductometric responses are well represented using a combination diffusion/absorption-based model for multi-gas interactions where a newly developed response absorption isotherm, based on the Fermi distribution function is applied. A further coupling of this model with the IHSAB concept describes the considerations in modeling of multi-gas mixed analyte-interface, and analyte-analyte interactions. Taking into account the molecular electronic interaction of both the analytes with each other and an extrinsic semiconductor interface we demonstrate how the presence of one gas can enhance or diminish the reversible interaction of a second gas with the extrinsic semiconductor interface. These concepts demonstrate important considerations in the array-based formats for multi-gas sensing and its applications.

  5. Tropospheric chemistry over the lower Great Plains of the United States. 2. Trace gas profiles and distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, W.T.; Dickerson, R.R.; Ryan, W.F.; Pickering, K.E.; Nunnermacker, L.J. )

    1992-12-20

    Convective clouds and thunderstorms redistribute air pollutants vertically, and by altering the chemistry and radiative balance of the upper troposphere, these local actions can have global consequences. To study these effects, measurements of trace gases ozone, O[sub 3], carbon monoxide, CO, and odd nitrogen were made aboard the NCAR Sabreliner on 18 flights over the southern Great Plains during June 1985. To demonstrate chemical changes induced by vertical motions in the atmosphere and to facilitate comparison with computer model calculations, these data were categorized according to synoptic flow patterns. Part 1 of this two-part paper details the alternating pulses of polar and maritime air masses that dominate the vertical mixing in this region. In this paper, trace gas measurements are presented as altitude profiles (0-12 km) with statisitcal distributions of mixing ratios for each species in each flow pattern. The polar flow regime is characterized by northwesterly winds, subsiding air, and convective stability. The maritime regime is characterized by southerly surface winds, convective instability, and a deep planetary boundary layer PBL; uniformly high concentrations of trace gases were found up to 4 km on one flight. During frontal passage both stratiform and convective clouds mix pollutants more uniformly into the middle and upper levels; high mixing ratios of CO are found at all altitudes, and O[sub 3] levels are highest of any category, implicating photochemical production. These results illustrate the importance of convection in tropospheric chemistry. Use of average trace gas profiles or eddy diffusion parameterized vertical mixing can lead to errors of 30 to 50% in O[sub 3] and CO concentrations and an order of magnitude for odd nitrogen. 80 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Sparger Effects on Gas Volume Fraction Distributions in Vertical Bubble-Column Flows as Measured by Gamma-Densitometry Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-01-18

    Gamma-densitometry tomography is applied to study the effect of sparger hole geometry, gas flow rate, column pressure, and phase properties on gas volume fraction profiles in bubble columns. Tests are conducted in a column 0.48 m in diameter, using air and mineral oil, superficial gas velocities ranging from 5 to 30 cm s{sup -1}, and absolute column pressures from 103 to 517 kPa. Reconstructed gas volume fraction profiles from two sparger geometries are presented. The development length of the gas volume fraction profile is found to increase with gas flow rate and column pressure. Increases in gas flow rate increase the local gas volume fraction preferentially on the column axis, whereas increases in column pressure produce a uniform rise in gas volume fraction across the column. A comparison of results from the two spargers indicates a significant change in development length with the number and size of sparger holes.

  7. Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: The Distribution and Properties of Dense Molecular Gas in the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.

    The Milky Way Galaxy serves as a vast laboratory for studying the dynamics and evolution of the dense interstellar medium and the processes of and surrounding massive star formation. From our vantage point within the Galactic plane, however, it has been extremely difficult to construct a coherent picture of Galactic structure; we cannot see the forest for the trees. The principal difficulties in studying the structure of the Galactic disk have been obscuration by the ubiquitous dust and molecular gas and confusion between objects along a line of sight. Recent technological advances have led to large-scale blind surveys of the Galactic plane at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths, where Galactic dust is generally optically thin, and have opened a new avenue for studying the forest. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) observed over 190 deg 2 of the Galactic plane in dust continuum emission near lambda = 1.1 mm, producing a catalog of over 8,000 dense molecular cloud structures across a wide swath of the Galactic disk. Deriving the spatial distribution and physical properties of these objects requires knowledge of distance, a component lacking in the data themselves. This thesis presents a generalized Bayesian probabilistic distance estimation method for dense molecular cloud structures, and demonstrates it with the BGPS data set. Distance probability density functions (DPDFs) are computed from kinematic distance likelihoods (which may be double- peaked for objects in the inner Galaxy) and an expandable suite of prior information to produce a comprehensive tally of our knowledge (and ignorance) of the distances to dense molecular cloud structures. As part of the DPDF formalism, this thesis derives several prior DPDFs for resolving the kinematic distance ambiguity in the inner Galaxy. From the collection of posterior DPDFs, a set of objects with well-constrained distance estimates is produced for deriving Galactic structure and the physical properties of dense molecular

  8. Analysis on Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by the Introduction of a Bio-methane Production Plant Using Dairy Cow Slurry as the Main Ingredient, and Management Balance of the Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Takashi; Hideshima, Yoshiaki; Shudo, Yukoh; Ohmiya, Kazuhiko

    A study was conducted on a system to refine biogas generated from a biogas plant, which uses cow slurry as its main ingredient, and use the bio-methane as a regional energy supply source. Based on the data obtained by the demonstrative operation of the biogas plant and bio-methane production experiments, a bio-methane production plant that can process waste from 1,000 dairy cows was assumed, and optimization of plant operation was attempted using the linear programming method with maximum environmental friendliness (reduction of greenhouse gas emissions) and economic efficiency (management balance of the plant) as the target functions. The results revealed that plant operation methods varied according to the target of optimization. Environmental friendliness and economic efficiency were in a trade-off relationship with each other, but in the case where the greatest importance was placed on economic efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions were equivalent to that in the case where the greatest importance was placed on environmental friendliness itself. However, the values of economic efficiency were negative in both cases, indicating that it is difficult to make the plant management economically feasible under the current circumstances. To make the plant management balance positive, it is necessary to take measures, such as reduction of plant construction costs and exemption from interest costs. In addition, as a future direction for such regional bio-methane use, a micro grid system with a dispersed power source using bio-methane as raw fuel was presented.

  9. Pesticides in the atmosphere: a comparison of gas-particle partitioning and particle size distribution of legacy and current-use pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrendele, C.; Okonski, K.; Melymuk, L.; Landlová, L.; Kukučka, P.; Audy, O.; Kohoutek, J.; Čupr, P.; Klánová, J.

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a comparison of seasonal variation, gas-particle partitioning and particle-phase size distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in air. Two years (2012/2013) of weekly air samples were collected at a background site in the Czech Republic using a high-volume air sampler. To study the particle-phase size distribution, air samples were also collected at an urban and rural site in the area of Brno, Czech Republic, using a cascade impactor separating atmospheric particulates according to six size fractions. The timing and frequencies of detection of CUPs related to their legal status, usage amounts and their environmental persistence, while OCPs were consistently detected throughout the year. Two different seasonal trends were noted: certain compounds had higher concentrations only during the growing season (April-September) and other compounds showed two peaks, first in the growing season and second in plowing season (October-November). In general, gas-particle partitioning of pesticides was governed by physicochemical properties, with higher vapor pressure leading to higher gas phase fractions, and associated seasonality in gas-particle partitioning was observed in nine pesticides. However, some anomalous partitioning was observed for fenpropimorph and chlorpyrifos suggesting the influence of current pesticide application on gas-particle distributions. Nine pesticides had highest particle phase concentrations on fine particles (< 0.95 μm) and four pesticides on coarser (> 1.5 μm) particles.

  10. 49 CFR 192.1005 - What must a gas distribution operator (other than a master meter or small LPG operator) do to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must a gas distribution operator (other than... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  11. Effect of carrier gas properties on aerosol distribution in a CT-based human airway numerical model

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2012-01-01

    The effect of carrier gas properties on particle transport in the human lung is investigated numerically in an imaging based airway model. The airway model consists of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT)-based upper and intra-thoracic central airways. The large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted for simulation of transitional and turbulent flows. The image-registration-derived boundary condition is employed to match regional ventilation of the whole lung. Four different carrier gases of helium (He), a helium-oxygen mixture (He-O2), air, and a xenon-oxygen mixture (Xe-O2) are considered. A steady inspiratory flow rate of 342 ml/s is imposed at the mouthpiece inlet to mimic aerosol delivery on inspiration, resulting in the Reynolds number at the trachea of Ret ≈ 190, 460, 1300, and 2800 for the respective gases of He, He-O2, air and Xe-O2. Thus, the flow for the He case is laminar, transitional for He-O2, and turbulent for air and Xe-O2. The instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields and the laminar/transitional/turbulent characteristics resulting from the four gases are discussed. With increasing Ret, the high-speed jet formed at the glottal constriction is more dispersed around the peripheral region of the jet and its length becomes shorter. In the laminar flow the distribution of 2.5-µm particles in the central airways depends on the particle release location at the mouthpiece inlet, whereas in the turbulent flow the particles are well mixed before reaching the first bifurcation and their distribution is strongly correlated with regional ventilation. PMID:2224646