Science.gov

Sample records for gas distribution pipe

  1. Gas pipe explorer robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A gas pipe explorer formed of a plurality of connecting elements, and an articulation element between the connected elements. The connected elements include drive capabilities, and the articulation element allows the connected elements to traverse gas pipes of arbitrary shapes and sizes. A sensor may sends the characteristics of the gas pipe, and the communication element may send back those sends characteristics. The communication can be wired, over a tether connecting the device to a remote end. Alternatively, the connection can be wireless, driven by either a generator or a battery.

  2. Small, Untethered, Mobile Robots for Inspecting Gas Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Small, untethered mobile robots denoted gas-pipe explorers (GPEXs) have been proposed for inspecting the interiors of pipes used in the local distribution natural gas. The United States has network of gas-distribution pipes with a total length of approximately 109 m. These pipes are often made of iron and steel and some are more than 100 years old. As this network ages, there is a need to locate weaknesses that necessitate repair and/or preventive maintenance. The most common weaknesses are leaks and reductions in thickness, which are caused mostly by chemical reactions between the iron in the pipes and various substances in soil and groundwater. At present, mobile robots called pigs are used to inspect and clean the interiors of gas-transmission pipelines. Some carry magnetic-flux-leakage (MFL) sensors for measuring average wall thicknesses, some capture images, and some measure sizes and physical conditions. The operating ranges of pigs are limited to fairly straight sections of wide transmission- type (as distinguished from distribution- type) pipes: pigs are too large to negotiate such obstacles as bends with radii comparable to or smaller than pipe diameters, intrusions of other pipes at branch connections, and reductions in diameter at valves and meters. The GPEXs would be smaller and would be able to negotiate sharp bends and other obstacles that typically occur in gas-distribution pipes.

  3. 24 CFR 3280.705 - Gas piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-Disconnect” Device (d) Gas pipe sizing. Gas piping systems shall be sized so that the pressure drop to any... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas piping systems. 3280.705... Systems § 3280.705 Gas piping systems. (a) General. The requirements of this section shall govern...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.705 - Gas piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-Disconnect” Device (d) Gas pipe sizing. Gas piping systems shall be sized so that the pressure drop to any... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas piping systems. 3280.705... Systems § 3280.705 Gas piping systems. (a) General. The requirements of this section shall govern...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.705 - Gas piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: Do Not Use Tools To Separate the “Quick-Disconnect” Device (d) Gas pipe sizing. Gas piping systems... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas piping systems. 3280.705... Systems § 3280.705 Gas piping systems. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73987, Dec. 9, 2013....

  6. Evaluation of cased and uncased gas distribution and transmission piping under railroads and highways, Phase 2. Annual report, November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, T.D.; Stewart, H.E.; Ingraffea, A.R.; Nyman, K.J.; Crossley, C.W.

    1987-11-01

    A comprehensive methodology is being developed for evaluating stresses in natural gas pipelines at railroad and highway crossings. The methodology accounts for soil-structure interaction and the three-dimensional distribution of pipeline stresses. The methodology involves delineating field loads and geometries through detailed site observations and discussions with industry personnel, and using computer graphics to analyze pipeline stresses under the complex three-dimensional conditions which prevail in the field. Field experiments will be performed to substantiate the predicted pipeline stresses at railroad crossings. Guidelines will be developed for pipeline crossings acceptable to representatives of gas, railroad, and highway industries.

  7. Nashville Gas treads carefully to replace pipe

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The private gas utility, Nashville Gas, was responsible for replacing damaged or inadequate 2- and 4-inch steel gas lines beneath Music City, USA. The line replacements required either size for size or upsizing. The first choice was directional drilling, which was quickly determined to be unpractical because of rocky soil conditions. The second option was open trenching. Undoubtedly, trenching would mean having to contend with angry residents and tourists, since gas lines ran beneath yards, mature trees, sidewalks, roadways, and railways. In addition to the negative social factors, trenching would require additional funds for substantial landscaping and pavement replacement. It at all possible, a no-dig alternative was desired. Nashville Gas found Grundomat piercing tools which create a bore, then pushes pipe back through it. These same tools can simultaneously pull in pipe. These tools were customized for the Nashville project.

  8. Hydrophobic liquid/gas separator for heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Perforated nonwetting plug of material such as polytetrafluoroethylene is mounted in gas reservoir feed tube, preferably at end which extends into heat pipe condenser section, to prevent liquid from entering gas reservoir of passively controlled heat pipe.

  9. GTRAN- TRANSIENT ANALYSIS OF GAS PIPING SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TROVILLION T A

    1994-01-01

    The GTRAN program was developed to solve transient, as well as steady state, problems for gas piping systems. GTRAN capabilities allow for the analysis of a variety of system configurations and components. These include: multiple pipe junctions; valves that change position with time; fixed restrictions (orifices, manual valves, filters, etc.); relief valves; constant pressure sources; and heat transfer for insulated piping and piping subjected to free or forced convection. In addition, boundary conditions can be incorporated to simulate specific components. The governing equations of GTRAN are the one-dimensional transient gas dynamic equations. The three equations for pressure, velocity, and density are reduced to numerical equations using an implicit Crank-Nicholson finite difference technique. Input to GTRAN includes a description of the piping network, the initial conditions, and any events (e.g. valve closings) occuring during the period of analysis. Output includes pressure, velocity, and density versus time. GTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer. GTRAN was developed in 1983.

  10. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  11. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  12. Spatial distribution of pipe collapses in Goodwin Creek Watershed, Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can induce pipe collapses that affect soil erosion process and landform evolution. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial distribution of pipe collapses in agricultural fields of Goodwin Creek watershed. Ground survey was carried out to detect pipe co...

  13. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must not pass through or terminate in an accommodation, service, or control space....

  14. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must not pass through or terminate in an accommodation, service, or control space....

  15. Fatal carbon monoxide intoxication after acetylene gas welding of pipes.

    PubMed

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Christensson, Bengt; Berge, Johan; Sjögren, Bengt

    2013-06-01

    Acetylene gas welding of district heating pipes can result in exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. A fatal case due to intoxication is described. Measurements of carbon monoxide revealed high levels when gas welding a pipe with closed ends. This fatality and these measurements highlight a new hazard, which must be promptly prevented.

  16. Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Harvey, Karen; Ferrada, Juan J

    2011-02-01

    A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

  17. The spatial distribution of pollutants in pipe-scale of large-diameter pipelines in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqing; Chen, Huanyu; Yao, Lingdan; Wei, Zongyuan; Lou, Liping; Shan, Yonggui; Endalkachew, Sahle-Demessie; Mallikarjuna, Nadagouda; Hu, Baolan; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-05

    In large-diameter drinking water pipelines, spatial differences in hydraulic and physiochemical conditions may also result in spatial variations in pipe corrosion, biofilm growth and pollutant accumulation. In this article, the spatial distributions of various metals and organic contaminants in two 19-year-old grey cast iron pipes which had an internal diameter of 600mm (DN600), were investigated and analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Energy Dispersive Spectrometer, X-ray Diffraction, etc. The spatial distribution of heavy metals varied significantly across the pipe section, and iron, manganese, lead, copper, and chromium were highest in concentration in the upper portion pipe-scales. However, the highest aluminum and zinc content was detected in the lower portion pipe-scales. Apart from some common types of hydrocarbons formed by microbial metabolites, there were also some microalgae metabolites and exogenous contaminants accumulated in pipe-scale, which also exhibited high diversity between different spatial locations. The spatial distributions of the physical and chemical properties of pipe-scale and contaminants were quite different in large-diameter pipes. The finding put forward higher requirements on the research method about drinking water distribution system chemical safety. And the scientific community need understand trend and dynamics of drinking water pipe systems better.

  18. Application experience of gas-thermal aluminum coatings to protect the pipes for underground construction and repair of heat networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    Questions of sacrificial protection for pipes of underground heat networks with aluminum against the external corrosion are considered. The description of pilot production of pipes with a plasma aluminum coating and the deposition of a sacrificial gas-plasma aluminum coating on weld joints of pipelines and the zone of their thermal influence during assemblage is presented. Examples of repairing the segments of distribution heat networks by the pipes with the tread protection are presented.

  19. 14. DETAIL OF CLEAN GAS MAIN (UPPER PIPE) AND ROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF CLEAN GAS MAIN (UPPER PIPE) AND ROUGH GAS MAIN FOR BLAST FURNACE No. 2 AT THE BASE OF HOT BLAST STOVES LOOKING EAST. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  20. Heat pipe temperature control utilizing a soluble gas absorption reservior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A new gas-controlled heat pipe design is described which uses a liquid matrix reservior, or sponge, to replace the standard gas reservior. Reservior volume may be reduced by a factor of five to ten for certain gas-liquid combinations, while retaining the same level of temperature control. Experiments with ammonia, butane, and carbon dioxide control gases with methanol working fluid are discussed.

  1. Overview of gas distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Long, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a concise overview of the nature of a natural gas distribution utility. To this end, gas distribution'' is defined, then the functions performed while distributing natural gas are discussed. Topics presented include: franchise; planning (layouts, load estimation, sizing, system supply points, and storage considerations); design (codes/standards, materials, corrosion mitigation considerations, valves and fittings, vaults and stations, and main routing); construction (work force, sequencing, testing, purge and tie-in, and setting meters); operations (gas dispatching, customer service,and maintenance); continuity of supply; and sales and marketing. The paper concludes with discussion of converting an existing manufactured gas system over to natural gas. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  2. CFD analysis of gas explosions vented through relief pipes.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, G; Di Benedetto, A; Salzano, E; Russo, G

    2006-09-21

    Vent devices for gas and dust explosions are often ducted to safe locations by means of relief pipes. However, the presence of the duct increases the severity of explosion if compared to simply vented vessels (i.e. compared to cases where no duct is present). Besides, the identification of the key phenomena controlling the violence of explosion has not yet been gained. Multidimensional models coupling, mass, momentum and energy conservation equations can be valuable tools for the analysis of such complex explosion phenomena. In this work, gas explosions vented through ducts have been modelled by a two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on the unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) approach in which the laminar, flamelet and distributed combustion models have been implemented. Numerical test have been carried out by varying ignition position, duct diameter and length. Results have evidenced that the severity of ducted explosions is mainly driven by the vigorous secondary explosion occurring in the duct (burn-up) rather than by the duct flow resistance or acoustic enhancement. Moreover, it has been found out that the burn-up affects explosion severity due to the reduction of venting rate rather than to the burning rate enhancement through turbulization.

  3. 24 CFR 3280.705 - Gas piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... designed for a pressure not exceeding 14 inch water column (1/2 psi) and not less than 7 inch water column (1/4 psi). The manufacturer shall indicate in his written installation instructions the design... protected. (c) Piping design. Each manufactured home requiring fuel gas for any purpose shall be...

  4. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  5. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  6. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  7. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  8. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  9. Phase Distribution Characteristics of Bubbly Flow in Mini Pipes Under Normal and Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazuku, Tatsuya; Takamasa, Tomoji; Hibiki, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    The axial development of the void fraction, interfacial area concentration and Sauter mean bubble diameter profiles of adiabatic air-water bubbly flows in 5.0 and 3.0 mm-diameter pipes were measured using a stereo image processing method under two gravity conditions, vertical upward (normal gravity) and microgravity. The flow measurements were performed at four axial locations. The axial distances from the pipe inlet ( z) normalized by the pipe diameter ( D) were z/ D = 5.5, 34, 72 and 110 for 5.0 mm-diameter pipe and z/ D = 15, 62, 120 and 188 for 3.0 mm-diameter pipe. Data were collected for superficial gas and liquid velocities respectively in the ranges of 0.00434-0.0500 m/s and 0.205-0.754 m/s. The effect of gravity on the radial distribution of bubbles and the axial development of two-phase flow parameters is discussed in detail, based on the obtained database. The phase distributions in pipe cross-sections were classified into 3 basic patterns: core peak, intermediate peak and wall peak distributions, based on two normalized parameters: a normalized void peak position and a normalized void peak intensity. Phase distribution pattern maps under normal and microgravity conditions were generated for bubbly flows in 5.0 and 3.0 mm-diameter pipes. The data obtained in the current experiment are expected to contribute to the benchmarking of CFD simulation of void fraction and interfacial area concentration distribution patterns in forced convective pipe flow under microgravity conditions.

  10. Solar corrosion control of distribution piping

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.

    1985-04-01

    Washington Natural Gas Company recognized that it could reduce cost and help insure public safety by cathodically protecting coated steel distribution systems. With 100% of mains protected from external corrosion, it could significantly reduce the number of corrosion leaks and, in the process, extend the life of the steel distribution system indefinitely. Washington Natural's franchise area has over 4000 miles of wrapped distribution main and over 250,000 service lines. These mains and services are in widely divergent areas geographically; they are also subject to widely divergent soil resistivities which range from 500 Ohms/cubic meter (very aggressive) to 350,000 Ohms/cubic meter (extremely mild). Each cathodic protection station must be designed for a particular installation. The company decided that large sections of mains would be cathodically protected between 50 and 400 feet below the surface. Small isolated sections of main would be protected with sacrificial magnesium anodes. This procedure worked very well for 90% of the system. The performance of the cathodic protection system is described.

  11. Experimental Testing and Modeling Analysis of Solute Mixing at Water Distribution Pipe Junctions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. Here we have categorized pipe junctions into five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for describing the solute mixing ...

  12. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Piping Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission supported the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop empirical data on the density and distribution of fabrication flaws in nuclear reactor components. These data are needed to support probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations and studies on component structural integrity. PNNL performed nondestructive examination inspections and destructive testing on archived piping welds to determine the fabrication flaw size and distribution characteristics of the flaws in nuclear power plant piping weldments. Eight different processes and product forms in piping weldments were studied including wrought stainless steel and dissimilar metal weldments. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit was performed on the data. Results were created as a function of the through-wall size of the fabrication flaws as well as the length distribution. The results are compared and contrasted with those developed for reactor pressure vessel processes and product forms. The most significant findings were that the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size was higher in piping weldments than that for the reactor pressure vessel weldments, and the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size in both reactor pressure vessel weld repairs and piping weldments were greater than the density in the original weldments. Curves showing these distributions are presented.

  13. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  14. Historic drawing. Oxygen Distribution Piping System, 1944. Photographic copy of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic drawing. Oxygen Distribution Piping System, 1944. Photographic copy of original. Boston National Historical Park. Charlestown Navy Yard. BOSTS 13520, #631-1 - Charlestown Navy Yard, Oxygen Plant, Midway along northern boundary of Charlestown Navy Yard, on Little Mystic Channel, near junction of Eighteenth Street & Fourth Avenue, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  15. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  16. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-10-31

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  17. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-12-01

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  18. Automated Gas Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Allen; Clark, Henry

    2012-10-01

    The cyclotron of Texas A&M University is one of the few and prized cyclotrons in the country. Behind the scenes of the cyclotron is a confusing, and dangerous setup of the ion sources that supplies the cyclotron with particles for acceleration. To use this machine there is a time consuming, and even wasteful step by step process of switching gases, purging, and other important features that must be done manually to keep the system functioning properly, while also trying to maintain the safety of the working environment. Developing a new gas distribution system to the ion source prevents many of the problems generated by the older manually setup process. This developed system can be controlled manually in an easier fashion than before, but like most of the technology and machines in the cyclotron now, is mainly operated based on software programming developed through graphical coding environment Labview. The automated gas distribution system provides multi-ports for a selection of different gases to decrease the amount of gas wasted through switching gases, and a port for the vacuum to decrease the amount of time spent purging the manifold. The Labview software makes the operation of the cyclotron and ion sources easier, and safer for anyone to use.

  19. Heat-pipe gas-combustion system endurance test for Stirling engine. Final report, May 1990-September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrle, P.

    1990-12-01

    Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., (STM) has been developing a general purpose Heat Pipe Gas Combustion System (HPGC) suitable for use with the STM4-120 Stirling engine. The HPGC consists of a parallel plate recuperative preheater, a finned heat pipe evaporator and a film cooled gas combustor. A principal component of the HPGC is the heat pipe evaporator which collects and distributes the liquid sodium over the heat transfer surfaces. The liquid sodium evaporates and flows to the condensers where it delivers its latent heat. The report presents test results of endurance tests run on a Gas-Fired Stirling Engine (GFSE). Tests on a dynamometer test stand yielded 67 hours of engine operation at power levels over 10 kW (13.5 hp) with 26 hours at power levels above 15 kW (20 hp). Total testing of the engine, including both motoring tests and engine operation, yielded 245 hours of engine run time.

  20. Chlorine decay in drinking-water transmission and distribution systems: pipe service age effect.

    PubMed

    Al-Jasser, A O

    2007-01-01

    Water quality can deteriorate in the transmission and distribution system beyond the treatment plant. Minimizing the potential for biological regrowth can be attained by chlorinating the finished water. While flowing through pipes, the chlorine concentration decreases for different reasons. Reaction with the pipe material itself and the reaction with both the biofilm and tubercles formed on the pipe wall are known as pipe wall demand, which may vary with pipe parameters. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of the service age of pipes on the effective chlorine wall decay constant. Three hundred and two pipe sections of different sizes and eight different pipe materials were collected and tested for their chlorine first-order wall decay constants. The results showed that pipe service age was an important factor that must not be ignored in some pipes such as cast iron, steel, cement-lined ductile iron (CLDI), and cement-lined cast iron (CLCI) pipes especially when the bulk decay is not significant relative to the wall decay. For the range of the 55 years of pipe service age used in this study, effective wall decay constants ranged from a decrease by -92% to an increase by +431% from the corresponding values in the recently installed pipes. The effect of service age on the effective wall decay constants was most evident in cast iron pipes, whereas steel pipes were less affected. Effective chlorine wall decay for CLCI and CLDI pipes was less affected by service age as compared to steel and cast iron pipes. Chlorine wall decay constants for PVC, uPVC, and polyethylene pipes were affected negatively by pipe service age and such effect was relatively small.

  1. Gas distribution safety development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, E.M.; Richardson, D.L.; Long, M.H.

    1981-12-01

    To identify the safety research needs of the gas distribution industry, ADL analysts reviewed recently completed and ongoing research projects related to gas distribution system safety, both in the US and abroad, compiled a list of existing projects that should be continued and 11 new projects that the Gas Research Institute should begin, and developed a method for ranking the importance of the projects elected for funding. GRI's current program satisfies most of the identified safety research needs.

  2. 46 CFR 61.15-10 - Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking. 61.15-10 Section 61.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-10...

  3. 46 CFR 61.15-10 - Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking. 61.15-10 Section 61.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-10...

  4. 46 CFR 61.15-10 - Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking. 61.15-10 Section 61.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-10...

  5. 46 CFR 61.15-10 - Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking. 61.15-10 Section 61.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-10...

  6. 46 CFR 61.15-10 - Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking. 61.15-10 Section 61.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-10...

  7. VESTA - gas distribution system for tomorrow and today

    SciTech Connect

    Huebler, J.; Rush, B.

    1983-01-01

    By combining hardware that has been developed for electronic games and home computers with straightforward modifications to currently used gas distribution equipment, it is possible to design a practical, cost-effective ''gas industry dream system'' with capabilities that include automatic meter reading and shut-off, simple buried pipe location, automatic leak location and repair without excavation, and remote pressure monitoring. The Institute of Gas Technology calls the System ''VESTA'', an acronym for Versatile Energy System Total Approach, whose two essential features are the total approach to problem solving and its distributed intelligence electronics. The authors describe current designs and costs of the VESTA system. 2 figures.

  8. Investigation of arterial gas occlusions. [effect of noncondensable gases on high performance heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of noncondensable gases on high-performance arterial heat pipes was investigated both analytically and experimentally. Models have been generated which characterize the dissolution of gases in condensate, and the diffusional loss of dissolved gases from condensate in arterial flow. These processes, and others, were used to postulate stability criteria for arterial heat pipes under isothermal and non-isothermal condensate flow conditions. A rigorous second-order gas-loaded heat pipe model, incorporating axial conduction and one-dimensional vapor transport, was produced and used for thermal and gas studies. A Freon-22 (CHCIF2) heat pipe was used with helium and xenon to validate modeling. With helium, experimental data compared well with theory. Unusual gas-control effects with xenon were attributed to high solubility.

  9. Diffusion-controlled startup of a gas-loaded liquid-metal heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnappan, R.; Boehman, L. I.; Mahefkey, E. T.

    1990-07-01

    Liquid-metal heat pipes have exhibited difficulties starting up from a frozen-state. Inert gas loading is a possible solution to the frozen-state startup problem. The present study deals with the diffusion-controlled startup analysis and testing of an argon-loaded, 2-m-long, stainless steel-sodium heat pipe of the double-walled type with artery channel and long adiabatic section. A two-dimensional, quasi-steady state, binary vapor-gas diffusion model determined the energy transport rate of vapor at the diffusion front. The analytical solution to the diffusion problem provided the vapor flux, which in turn was used in the one-dimensional transient thermal model of the heat pipe to predict the time rate-of-change of temperature and position of the hot front. The experimental test results successfully demonstrated the startup of a gas-loaded sodium heat pipe and validated the diffusion model of the startup.

  10. Pipe protection bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    Pipes and pipelines are being used for an ever widening range of materials, for increasing flows and in harsher applications. There is also more legal and social pressure to reduce the hazards associated with handling materials in pipes. All of this increases the demand for improved pipe reliability. Two of the major preventable causes of pipe failure are corrosion and wear. These may result from the pipe surroundings, or from the material which is carried and it is often impossible to prevent failure by the choice of pipe materials and design. However, additional pipe protection measures are available and it is these measures which are considered in this bibliography. The most common pipe protection methods are the application of coatings and the use of cathodic protection. Accordingly, much of this bibliography is devoted to these techniques. Articles dealing with other means of protecting pipes have also been included. The bibliography covers the protection of oil pipes, (both offshore and on land); water supply systems; gas distribution systems; sewer pipes; pipes for hydraulic and pneumatic transport of solids; power plant pipework; process plant pipework.

  11. Cryogenic & Gas System Piping Pressure Tests (A Collection of PT Permits)

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russell A.; /Fermilab

    2002-08-22

    This engineering note is a collection of pipe pressure testing documents for various sections of piping for the D-Zero cryogenic and gas systems. High pressure piping must conform with FESHM chapter 5031.1. Piping lines with ratings greater than 150 psig have a pressure test done before the line is put into service. These tests require the use of pressure testing permits. It is my intent that all pressure piping over which my group has responsibility conforms to the chapter. This includes the liquid argon and liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryogenic systems. It also includes the high pressure air system, and the high pressure gas piping of the WAMUS and MDT gas systems. This is not an all inclusive compilation of test documentation. Some piping tests have their own engineering note. Other piping section test permits are included in separate safety review documents. So if it isn't here, that doesn't mean that it wasn't tested. D-Zero has a back up air supply system to add reliability to air compressor systems. The system includes high pressure piping which requires a review per FESHM 5031.1. The core system consists of a pressurized tube trailer, supply piping into the building and a pressure reducing regulator tied into the air compressor system discharge piping. Air flows from the trailer if the air compressor discharge pressure drops below the regulator setting. The tube trailer is periodically pumped back up to approximately 2000 psig. A high pressure compressor housed in one of the exterior buildings is used for that purpose. The system was previously documented, tested and reviewed for Run I, except for the recent addition of piping to and from the high pressure compressor. The following documents are provided for review of the system: (1) Instrument air flow schematic, drg. 3740.000-ME-273995 rev. H; (2) Component list for air system; (3) Pressure testing permit for high pressure piping; (4) Documentation from Run I contained in D-Zero Engineering note

  12. Behavior of fast moving flow of compressible gas in cylindrical pipe in presence of cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varshavsky, G A

    1951-01-01

    For compressible flow with friction in a cylindrical pipe the momentum, continuity, and heat-transfer equations are examined to determine whether an increase in Mach number ("thermal" Laval nozzle) is obtainable through heat conduction from the gas through the pipe walls. The analysis is based on the assumption that the wall temperature is negligibly small in comparison with the stagnation temperature of the gas. The analysis leads to a negative result. When the gas cooling is increased by also considering radiation to the wall, a limited region at high temperatures is obtained where Mach number increases were theoretically possible. Obtaining this condition practically is considered impossible.

  13. Investigation of Freeze and Thaw Cycles of a Gas-Charged Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Krimchansky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The traditional constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) currently used on most spacecraft run the risk of bursting the pipe when the working fluid is frozen and later thawed. One method to avoid pipe bursting is to use a gas-charged heat pipe (GCHP) that can sustain repeated freeze/thaw cycles. The construction of the GCHP is similar to that of the traditional CCHP except that a small amount of non-condensable gas (NCG) is introduced and a small length is added to the CCHP condenser to serve as the NCG reservoir. During the normal operation, the NCG is mostly confined to the reservoir, and the GCHP functions as a passive variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP). When the liquid begins to freeze in the condenser section, the NCG will expand to fill the central core of the heat pipe, and ice will be formed only in the grooves located on the inner surface of the heat pipe in a controlled fashion. The ice will not bridge the diameter of the heat pipe, thus avoiding the risk of pipe bursting during freeze/thaw cycles. A GCHP using ammonia as the working fluid was fabricated and then tested inside a thermal vacuum chamber. The GCHP demonstrated a heat transport capability of more than 200W at 298K as designed. Twenty-seven freeze/thaw cycles were conducted under various conditions where the evaporator temperature ranged from 163K to 253K and the condenser/reservoir temperatures ranged from 123K to 173K. In all tests, the GCHP restarted without any problem with heat loads between 10W and 100W. No performance degradation was noticed after 27 freeze/thaw cycles. The ability of the GCHP to sustain repeated freeze/thaw cycles was thus successfully demonstrated.

  14. 24 CFR 3280.705 - Gas piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... joint compound. Screw joints shall be made up tight with listed pipe joint compound, insoluble in...″ 43 29 24 20 18 16 15 14 13 12 3/8″ 27 18 15 13 11 10 9 9 8 8 3/8″ 95 65 52 45 40 36 33 31 29 27...

  15. User's manual for the TRW gaspipe 2 program: A vapor-gas front analysis program for heat pipes containing non-condensible gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Fleischman, G. L.; Marcus, B. D.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program for design and analysis of heat pipes which contain non-condensible gases, either for temperature control or to aid in start-up from the frozen state, is presented. Some of the calculations which are possible with the program are: (1) wall temperature profile along a gas-loaded heat pipe, (2) amount of gas loading necessary to obtain desired evaporator temperature at a desired heat load, (3) heat load versus evaporator temperature for a fixed amount of gas in the pipe, and (4) heat and mass transfer along the pipe, including the vapor-gas front region.

  16. Bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along pipe wall in chlorinated drinking water distribution system of East China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqing; Ren, Hongxing; Ye, Xianbei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yan; Lou, Liping; Cheng, Dongqing; He, Xiaofang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Shangde; Fu, Liusong; Hu, Baolan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms in the pipe wall may lead to water quality deterioration and biological instability in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs). In this study, bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along the pipe wall in a chlorinated DWDS of East China was investigated. Three pipes of large diameter (300, 600, and 600 mm) were sampled in this DWDS, including a ductile cast iron pipe (DCIP) with pipe age of 11 years and two gray cast iron pipes (GCIP) with pipe ages of 17 and 19 years, and biofilms in the upper, middle, and lower parts of each pipe wall were collected. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and culture-based method were used to quantify bacteria. 454 pyrosequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that the biofilm density and total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) contents increased gradually from the top to the bottom along the pipe wall. Microorganisms were concentrated in the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, together accounting for more than 80 % of the total biomass in the biofilms. The bacterial communities in biofilms were significantly different in different areas of the pipe wall and had no strong interaction. Compared with the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, the bacterial community in the middle of the pipe wall was distributed evenly and had the highest diversity. The 16S rRNA genes of various possible pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica, were detected in the biofilms, and the abundances of these possible pathogens were highest in the middle of the pipe wall among three areas. The detachment of the biofilms is the main reason for the deterioration of the water quality in DWDSs. The results of this study suggest that the biofilms in the middle of the pipe wall have highly potential risk for drinking water safety, which provides new ideas for the study of the microbial ecology in

  17. A LOW-COST GPR GAS PIPE & LEAK DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    David Cist; Alan Schutz

    2005-03-30

    A light-weight, easy to use ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for tracking metal/non-metal pipes has been developed. A pre-production prototype instrument has been developed whose production cost and ease of use should fit important market niches. It is a portable tool which is swept back and forth like a metal detector and which indicates when it goes over a target (metal, plastic, concrete, etc.) and how deep it is. The innovation of real time target detection frees the user from having to interpret geophysical data and instead presents targets as dots on the screen. Target depth is also interpreted automatically, relieving the user of having to do migration analysis. In this way the user can simply walk around looking for targets and, by ''connecting the dots'' on the GPS screen, locate and follow pipes in real time. This is the first tool known to locate metal and non-metal pipes in real time and map their location. This prototype design is similar to a metal detector one might use at the beach since it involves sliding a lightweight antenna back and forth over the ground surface. The antenna is affixed to the end of an extension that is either clipped to or held by the user. This allows him to walk around in any direction, either looking for or following pipes with the antenna location being constantly recorded by the positioning system. Once a target appears on the screen, the user can locate by swinging the unit to align the cursor over the dot. Leak detection was also a central part of this project, and although much effort was invested into its development, conclusive results are not available at the time of the writing of this document. Details of the efforts that were made as a part of this cooperative agreement are presented.

  18. 76 FR 37109 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Mid-South Expansion Project The staff of the Federal Energy...

  19. Monitoring of leachate quality stored in gas ventilation pipes for evaluating the degree of landfill stabilization.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Yasumasa; Sato, Masahiro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of leachate quality is the essential measure in aftercare for evaluating landfill stabilization. Generally, the most common way of leachate monitoring is executed at the inlet of the leachate treatment facility. However, it does not necessarily reflect the actual state of the site. Thus, methodologies which focus on both the discharge, in order to determine when the post-closure care of the facility should terminate, and on the degree of waste stabilization in the landfill are required. In the present study, monitoring of leachate quality stored in 68 gas ventilation pipes was conducted and the degree of waste stabilization at each location in the landfill was estimated by a statistical approach using the results obtained by monitoring. Leachate characteristics varied significantly for each pipe but seemed to reflect the waste condition of the nearby location. Correlation among the analysed items was quite high. Namely, the difference of leachate quality seemed to be categorized only by the level of concentration but not by the specific characteristics. To confirm this, Euclidean distances of dissimilarity were calculated by multidimensional scaling using six items of leachate quality and temperature. Two factors (thickness of leachate and concentration of total organic carbon (TOC) and electric conductivity (EC)) that distinguish leachate characteristics appeared. To indicate the degree of stabilization by location, the spatial distribution of TOC, total nitrogen (TN), inorganic carbon (IC), and chloride ion were estimated by using the ordinary Kriging methodology. As the result, it was estimated that the concentration of leachate existing within the landfill, especially TN, was higher than the completion criteria for leachate in most parts of the investigated area.

  20. Radial Distribution of Absorption in a Cesium Heat Pipe with Axial Laser Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    medium is cesium while the laser is tuned to the D1 line for cesium mentioned later. Pulsed and CW DPALs have been compared in recent demonstrations by...RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ABSORPTION IN A CESIUM HEAT PIPE WITH AXIAL LASER HEATING THESIS...ABSORPTION IN A CESIUM HEAT PIPE WITH AXIAL LASER HEATING THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics Graduate School

  1. Method of long-term corrosion-mechanical tests of metal of gas industry pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, E.M.; Zainullin, R.S.

    1987-10-01

    The resistance of the metal of gas industry pipes to hydrogen-sulfide (sulfide) cracking is usually evaluated on the basis of the results of long-term corrosion-mechanical tests on cylindrical specimens (diameter 6 mm) in the conditions of uniaxial tensile loading generated by the force constant with time. Because of the comparatively large dimensions of devices for producing the stress state in these specimens, it is difficult to carry out large-scale corrosion-mechanical tests. The authors assume that it is more advantageous to evaluate the hydrogen-sulfide cracking resistance of gas industry pipes on the basis of the results of corrosion-mechanical tests on semicircular specimens compressed or tensile-loaded at the ends. The method proposed was used in long-term corrosion-mechanical tests on the metal of seamless pipes made of low-alloy (08G2SFT) and low-carbon (St20) steels. The steel with the lower ratio of the yield stress to ultimate strength k/sub TB/ is characterized by a higher limit of the long-term corrosion strength expressed in the fractions of the yield stress of the metal. This indicates that it is useful to take into account the k/sub TB/ ratio in determining the safety factor of the strength of the gas industry pipes.

  2. Relationship between collapse history and ore distribution in Sage Breccia pipe, northwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.A.; Mead, R.H.; McMurray, J.M. )

    1989-09-01

    The Sage pipe is similar to other collapse breccia pipes in northern Arizona which have their beginnings in cave systems in the Redwall Limestone. Stoping of successively younger units caused the upward propagation of the pipe and provided the pipe-filling breccia. The Sage pipe extends at least 2,500 ft (762 m) vertically; the horizontal dimensions range from 100 to 300 ft (30.5-91 m), depending on variations in the adjoining host stratigraphy. The composition and distribution of breccia facies suggest a complex collapse history and variability in the mechanics of collapse. Rock failure took place both by block stoping and by decementation of sandstone and siltstone followed by flow of unconsolidated grains. The resulting breccias range from matrix to fragment-dominated, to sand flow breccia resulting from flow of individual grains. Episodic secondary collapse or readjustment within the breccia pile complicated facies distribution. Paragenetic studies indicate multiple periods of mineralization at Sage resulting in enrichment in an extensive suite of elements. Ore-grade uranium mineralization extends vertically for nearly 700 ft (213 m). Lateral distribution of the ore is variable and is directly related to breccia facies distribution. In generally, the more permeable breccias tend to be the most highly mineralized. Fracture, intergranular, and interfragment permeability were important to mineral distribution. Breccia continuity or plumbing was also important to lateral and vertical mineral distribution.

  3. Strain Modal Analysis of Small and Light Pipes Using Distributed Fibre Bragg Grating Sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Zhou, Zude; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Juntao; Ji, Chunqian; Pham, Duc Truong

    2016-09-25

    Vibration fatigue failure is a critical problem of hydraulic pipes under severe working conditions. Strain modal testing of small and light pipes is a good option for dynamic characteristic evaluation, structural health monitoring and damage identification. Unique features such as small size, light weight, and high multiplexing capability enable Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to measure structural dynamic responses where sensor size and placement are critical. In this paper, experimental strain modal analysis of pipes using distributed FBG sensors ispresented. Strain modal analysis and parameter identification methods are introduced. Experimental strain modal testing and finite element analysis for a cantilever pipe have been carried out. The analysis results indicate that the natural frequencies and strain mode shapes of the tested pipe acquired by FBG sensors are in good agreement with the results obtained by a reference accelerometer and simulation outputs. The strain modal parameters of a hydraulic pipe were obtained by the proposed strain modal testing method. FBG sensors have been shown to be useful in the experimental strain modal analysis of small and light pipes in mechanical, aeronautic and aerospace applications.

  4. Strain Modal Analysis of Small and Light Pipes Using Distributed Fibre Bragg Grating Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Zhou, Zude; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Juntao; Ji, Chunqian; Pham, Duc Truong

    2016-01-01

    Vibration fatigue failure is a critical problem of hydraulic pipes under severe working conditions. Strain modal testing of small and light pipes is a good option for dynamic characteristic evaluation, structural health monitoring and damage identification. Unique features such as small size, light weight, and high multiplexing capability enable Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to measure structural dynamic responses where sensor size and placement are critical. In this paper, experimental strain modal analysis of pipes using distributed FBG sensors ispresented. Strain modal analysis and parameter identification methods are introduced. Experimental strain modal testing and finite element analysis for a cantilever pipe have been carried out. The analysis results indicate that the natural frequencies and strain mode shapes of the tested pipe acquired by FBG sensors are in good agreement with the results obtained by a reference accelerometer and simulation outputs. The strain modal parameters of a hydraulic pipe were obtained by the proposed strain modal testing method. FBG sensors have been shown to be useful in the experimental strain modal analysis of small and light pipes in mechanical, aeronautic and aerospace applications. PMID:27681728

  5. Microbial diversity in biofilms on water distribution pipes of different materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Kim, D; Lee, T

    2010-01-01

    The effects of pipe materials on biofilm formation potential (BFP) and microbial communities in biofilms were analyzed. Pipe coupons made of six different materials (CU, copper; CP, chlorinated poly vinyl chloride; PB, polybutylene; PE, polyethylene; SS, stainless steel; ST, steel coated with zinc) were incubated in drinking water, mixed water (inoculated with 10% (v/v) of river water) and drinking water inoculated with Escherichia coli JM109 (E. coli), respectively. The highest BFPs were observed from steel pipes, SS and ST, while CU showed the lowest BFP values. Of the plastic materials, the BFP of CP in drinking water (96 pg ATP/cm(2)) and mixed water (183 pg ATP/cm(2)) were comparable to those of CU, but the other plastic materials, PB and PE, displayed relatively high BFP. The Number of E. coli in the drinking water inoculated with cultures of E. coli strain showed similar trends with BFP values of the pipe coupons incubated in drinking water and mixed water. Molecular analysis of microbial communities indicated the presence of alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, actinobacteria and bacteroidetes in biofilm on the pipe materials. However, the DGGE profile of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments showed significant differences among different materials, suggesting that the pipe materials affect not only BFP but also microbial diversity. Some plastic materials, such as CP, would be suitable for plumbing, particularly for drinking water distribution pipes, due to its low BFP and little microbial diversity in biofilm.

  6. 75 FR 19963 - Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Florida Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... Company, LLC; Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental... environmental assessment (EA) of the Mobile Bay Lateral Extension Project (Mobile Bay Project) proposed by... potential environmental effects of the construction and operation of the proposed Mobile Bay Project and...

  7. Aluminum/ammonia heat pipe gas generation and long term system impact for the Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    In the Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC) project, eight heat pipes (HPs) are used to remove heat from the camera's inner electronic sensors to the spacecraft's outer, cold radiator surface. For proper device functioning and maximization of the signal-to-noise ratios, the Charge Coupled Devices (CCD's) must be maintained at -95 C or lower. Thermoelectric coolers (TEC's) cool the CCD's, and heat pipes deliver each TEC's nominal six to eight watts of heat to the space radiator, which reaches an equilibrium temperature between -15 C to -70 C. An initial problem was related to the difficulty to produce gas-free aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. An investigation was, therefore, conducted to determine the cause of the gas generation and the impact of this gas on CCD cooling. In order to study the effect of gas slugs in the WFPC system, a separate HP was made. Attention is given to fabrication, testing, and heat pipe gas generation chemistry studies.

  8. Experimental testing and modeling analysis of solute mixing at water distribution pipe junctions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Jeffrey Yang, Y; Jiang, Lijie; Yu, Tingchao; Shen, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. The effect can lead to different outcomes of water quality modeling and, hence, drinking water management in a distribution network. Here we have investigated solute mixing behavior in pipe junctions of five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for network modeling are proposed. First, based on experiments, the degree of mixing at a cross is found to be a function of flow momentum ratio that defines a junction flow distribution pattern and the degree of departure from complete mixing. Corresponding analytical solutions are also validated using computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) simulations. Second, the analytical mixing model is further extended to double-Tee junctions. Correspondingly the flow distribution factor is modified to account for hydraulic departure from a cross configuration. For a double-Tee(A) junction, CFD simulations show that the solute mixing depends on flow momentum ratio and connection pipe length, whereas the mixing at double-Tee(B) is well represented by two independent single-Tee junctions with a potential water stagnation zone in between. Notably, double-Tee junctions differ significantly from a cross in solute mixing and transport. However, it is noted that these pipe connections are widely, but incorrectly, simplified as cross junctions of assumed complete solute mixing in network skeletonization and water quality modeling. For the studied pipe junction types, analytical solutions are proposed to characterize the incomplete mixing and hence may allow better water quality simulation in a distribution network.

  9. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-04-01

    The West Virginia University natural gas transmission line leak detection research is only considering using readily available 1/2 inch pipeline access ports for the detection of leak generated signals. The main problem with leak signals is the low signal to noise ratio. One of the acoustic signals associated with gas escaping through a leak is only temporary and is in the form of a rarefaction wave originating when the leak is formed. Due to pipeline friction, over distance such a step function transitions to a ramp function. The ability to identify a leak by pipeline monitoring and signal processing depends a great deal on the quality and signal to noise ratio of the characteristics of the detectors used. Combinations of sensing devices are being used for the WVU sensor package and are contained in a removable sensor housing. The four sensors currently installed are a 1/2 inch 3 Hz-40 Khz microphone, an audible range moving coil sensor, a piezo-electric pressure transducer, and the WVU designed floating 3 inch diameter diaphragm to detect flow transient induced pressure ramp type signals. The WVU diaphragm sensor, which is currently under development, uses the same diaphragm principle as a high quality capacitance type microphone, but utilizes aerodynamic signal amplification. This type of amplification only amplifies the ramp-signal itself, not the random pipeline noise.

  10. The Challenge of Providing Safe Water with an Intermittently Supplied Piped Water Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpel, E.; Nelson, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    An increasing number of urban residents in low- and middle-income countries have access to piped water; however, this water is often not available continuously. 84% of reporting utilities in low-income countries provide piped water for fewer than 24 hours per day (van den Berg and Danilenko, 2010), while no major city in India has continuous piped water supply. Intermittent water supply leaves pipes vulnerable to contamination and forces households to store water or rely on alternative unsafe sources, posing a health threat to consumers. In these systems, pipes are empty for long periods of time and experience low or negative pressure even when water is being supplied, leaving them susceptible to intrusion from sewage, soil, or groundwater. Households with a non-continuous supply must collect and store water, presenting more opportunities for recontamination. Upgrading to a continuous water supply, while an obvious solution to these challenges, is currently out of reach for many resource-constrained utilities. Despite its widespread prevalence, there are few data on the mechanisms causing contamination in an intermittent supply and the frequency with which it occurs. Understanding the impact of intermittent operation on water quality can lead to strategies to improve access to safe piped water for the millions of people currently served by these systems. We collected over 100 hours of continuous measurements of pressure and physico-chemical water quality indicators and tested over 1,000 grab samples for indicator bacteria over 14 months throughout the distribution system in Hubli-Dharwad, India. This data set is used to explore and explain the mechanisms influencing water quality when piped water is provided for a few hours every 3-5 days. These data indicate that contamination occurs along the distribution system as water travels from the treatment plant to reservoirs and through intermittently supplied pipes to household storage containers, while real

  11. Some design aspects of plastics gas distribution pipeline systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wolters, M.

    1988-01-01

    Plastics gas distribution systems are in use in the Netherlands for more than 25 years. Three different plastics pipe materials have been used, i.e. polyethylene (PE), rigid PVC and impact modified PVC (PVC/CPE). The gas authority must consider the many and varied factors which will influence the choice of a particular material. Each material has its characteristic properties which will determine its field of application and the design concepts of the system. Since this will be a compromise between material properties and design, the advantages and disadvantages of the system must be examined for each specific area of application. Factors which will influence the choice are a.o.: external loading conditions (soil and traffic loads, third party damage, etc.); internal loading (max. allowable internal pressure, gas composition); the material properties like long-term strength, ductility, stiffness, resistance to rapid crack propagation; jointing methods; materials costs and laying costs. These above mentioned factors are discussed for the plastics pipe materials in operation in the Netherlands.

  12. The decay of chlorine associated with the pipe wall in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Hallam, N B; West, J R; Forster, C F; Powell, J C; Spencer, I

    2002-08-01

    Free chlorine decay rates in water distribution systems for bulk and wall demands should be modelled separately as they have different functional dependencies. Few good quality determinations of in situ wall demand have been made due to the difficulty of monitoring live systems and due to their complexity. Wall demands have been calculated from field measurements at 11 locations in a distribution system fed from a single source. A methodology for the laboratory determination has been evolved and shown to give results that are similar to the in situ results. Pipe materials were classified as either having high reactivity (unlined iron mains) or low reactivity (PVC, MDPE and cement-lined ductile iron). The results indicate that wall decay rates for the former are limited by chlorine transport and for the latter by pipe material characteristics. The wall decay rate is inversely related to initial chlorine concentration for low reactivity pipes. In general, water velocity increases wall decay rates though the statistical confidence is low for low reactivity pipes. A moderate biofilm coating did not influence the wall decay rate for low reactivity pipes.

  13. MR Imaging of Apparent 3He Gas Transport in Narrow Pipes and Rodent Airways

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Laicher, Gernot; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2008-10-01

    High sensitivity makes hyperpolarized 3He an attractive signal source for visualizing gas flow with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its rapid Brownian motion, however, can blur observed flow lamina and alter measured diffusion rates when excited nuclei traverse shear-induced velocity gradients during data acquisition. Here, both effects are described analytically, and predicted values for measured transport during laminar flow through a straight, 3.2-mm-diameter pipe are validated using two-dimensional (2D) constant-time images of different binary gas mixtures. Results show explicitly how measured transport in narrow conduits is characterized by apparent values that depend on underlying gas dynamics and imaging time. In ventilated rats, this is found to obscure acquired airflow images. Flow splitting at airway branches is still evident, however, and use of 3D vector flow mapping is shown to provide a quantitative view of pulmonary gas supply that highlights the correlation of airflow dynamics with lung structure.

  14. Iron release from corroded iron pipes in drinking water distribution systems: effect of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sarin, P; Snoeyink, V L; Bebee, J; Jim, K K; Beckett, M A; Kriven, W M; Clement, J A

    2004-03-01

    Iron release from corroded iron pipes is the principal cause of "colored water" problems in drinking water distribution systems. The corrosion scales present in corroded iron pipes restrict the flow of water, and can also deteriorate the water quality. This research was focused on understanding the effect of dissolved oxygen (DO), a key water quality parameter, on iron release from the old corroded iron pipes. Corrosion scales from 70-year-old galvanized iron pipe were characterized as porous deposits of Fe(III) phases (goethite (alpha-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), and maghemite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3))) with a shell-like, dense layer near the top of the scales. High concentrations of readily soluble Fe(II) content was present inside the scales. Iron release from these corroded pipes was investigated for both flow and stagnant water conditions. Our studies confirmed that iron was released to bulk water primarily in the ferrous form. When DO was present in water, higher amounts of iron release was observed during stagnation in comparison to flowing water conditions. Additionally, it was found that increasing the DO concentration in water during stagnation reduced the amount of iron release. Our studies substantiate that increasing the concentration of oxidants in water and maintaining flowing conditions can reduce the amount of iron release from corroded iron pipes. Based on our studies, it is proposed that iron is released from corroded iron pipes by dissolution of corrosion scales, and that the microstructure and composition of corrosion scales are important parameters that can influence the amount of iron released from such systems.

  15. Practical aspects of acoustic plastic pipe location

    SciTech Connect

    Huebler, J.E.; Campbell, B.K.; Ching, G.K.

    1993-12-31

    Many gas distribution company operation and maintenance activities require precise knowledge of the location of buried plastic piping. Plastic pipe cannot be located if the tracer wire is gone or was never installed. Under sponsorship of the Southern California Gas Company, IGT successfully demonstrated an acoustic plastic pipe location technique and is developing the technique into a practical field instrument an acoustic signal is injected directly into the gas at a service. The acoustic signal travels in the gas in the pipes, not in the pipe wall. As the acoustic wave travels along the pipe, some of the sound radiates from the pipe through the soil to the surface of the ground. An array of sensors on the surface of the ground perpendicular to the pipe detects the acoustic signal, thereby locating the Pipe. Two different acoustic measurements are used. The first measurement locates the pipe to within {plus_minus} 3-ft. Then the second technique determines the location of the pipe to within {plus_minus} 6-in.

  16. Exterior Distribution of Utility Steam, High Temperature Water (HTW), Chilled Water (CHW), Fuel Gas, and Compressed Air.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    A~r-AIIO 408 NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND ALEXANDRIA VA FIG 13/11 EXTERIOR DISTRIBUTION OF UTILITY STEAM. HIGH TEMPERATURE WATER -ETC(U...PUBUC RELEASE JOF EXTERIOR DISTRIBUTION OF O UTILITY STEAM, HIGH 0 TEMPERATURE WATER (HTW), , CHILLED WATER (CHW), FUEL GAS, AND COMPRESSED AIR DESIGN...distribution piping system for supplying utility steam, high temperature water (HTW), chilled water (CRW), cooling or condensing water, fuel gas, and

  17. A study on organotin levels in Canadian drinking water distributed through PVC pipes.

    PubMed

    Sadiki, A I; Williams, D T

    1999-03-01

    A study on organotin compounds in Canadian drinking water was carried out in winter-spring 1996 (28 sites) and autumn 1996 (21 sites). Approximately 29% and 40% of distribution waters supplied through PVC pipes installed recently (typically less than 6 months) contained organotin compounds in the winter-spring and autumn surveys respectively. Monomethyl-, dimethyl-, monobutyl- and dibutyltin levels ranged up to 291 ng Sn/L, 49.1 ng Sn/L, 28.5 ng Sn/L and 52.3 ng Sn/L, respectively. An additional study in summer 1996, of locations where the highest organotin levels were detected in the winter-spring survey, indicated that organotin levels had decreased in most distribution water samples. Samples of PVC pipe/tubing contained organotin compounds consistent with the organotin patterns found in the distribution water samples.

  18. Distribution robotics in the gas industry: Issues and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetwood, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The new engineering field of ''Distribution Robotics'' is emerging in the gas industry. The purpose of this paper is to encourage the gas utility managers and engineers to take notice to this new technology and start factoring it into their planning strategies. The defined goal of distribution robotics is to improve the quality of service, lower operating costs, reduce work hazards, and perform in situ tasks. Applications of the distribution robotic system range from internal leak detection and repair to pipe condition assessment and cleaning; as stated, these applications are performed in a live system. To achieve the desired application missions, the robotic system requires robots of different designs along with appropriate tools, peripherals, and external support systems. The robot consists of several subsystems that allow motion, sensory perception, action and reaction, communication, and entering or existing the system. Each subsystem has several choices for robot configurations with advantages and trade-offs for the purpose, mode, range, and speed required by each mission. External support systems are required for a complete distribution robotic system. An external computer and human operator are needed as well as the physical hardware necessary to support a robot operation. Finally, issues raised by a distribution robotic system need consideration for proper planning. The major issues raised are robot miniaturization, obstacles, safety, coverage, and control.

  19. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Drill Pipes in Deep Drilling Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion fatigue (CF), hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sulfide stress cracking (SSC), or environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) have been identified as the most challenging causes of catastrophic brittle fracture of drill pipes during drilling operations of deep oil and natural gas wells. Although corrosion rates can be low and tensile stresses during service can be below the material yield stress, a simultaneous action between the stress and corrosive environment can cause a sudden brittle failure of a drill component. Overall, EAC failure consists of two stages: incubation and propagation. Defects, such as pits, second-phase inclusions, etc., serve as preferential sites for the EAC failure during the incubation stage. Deep oil and gas well environments are rich in chlorides and dissolved hydrogen sulfide, which are extremely detrimental to steels used in drilling operations. This article discusses catastrophic brittle fracture mechanisms due to EAC of drill pipe materials, and the corrosion challenges that need to be overcome for drilling ultra-deep oil and natural gas wells.

  20. A compressible two-layer model for transient gas-liquid flows in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demay, Charles; Hérard, Jean-Marc

    2017-03-01

    This work is dedicated to the modeling of gas-liquid flows in pipes. As a first step, a new two-layer model is proposed to deal with the stratified regime. The starting point is the isentropic Euler set of equations for each phase where the classical hydrostatic assumption is made for the liquid. The main difference with the models issued from the classical literature is that the liquid as well as the gas is assumed compressible. In that framework, an averaging process results in a five-equation system where the hydrostatic constraint has been used to define the interfacial pressure. Closure laws for the interfacial velocity and source terms such as mass and momentum transfer are provided following an entropy inequality. The resulting model is hyperbolic with non-conservative terms. Therefore, regarding the homogeneous part of the system, the definition and uniqueness of jump conditions is studied carefully and acquired. The nature of characteristic fields and the corresponding Riemann invariants are also detailed. Thus, one may build analytical solutions for the Riemann problem. In addition, positivity is obtained for heights and densities. The overall derivation deals with gas-liquid flows through rectangular channels, circular pipes with variable cross section and includes vapor-liquid flows.

  1. Analysis of the Velocity Distribution in Partially-Filled Circular Pipe Employing the Principle of Maximum Entropy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yulin; Li, Bin; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The flow velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe was investigated in this paper. The velocity profile is different from full-filled pipe flow, since the flow is driven by gravity, not by pressure. The research findings show that the position of maximum flow is below the water surface, and varies with the water depth. In the region of near tube wall, the fluid velocity is mainly influenced by the friction of the wall and the pipe bottom slope, and the variation of velocity is similar to full-filled pipe. But near the free water surface, the velocity distribution is mainly affected by the contractive tube wall and the secondary flow, and the variation of the velocity is relatively small. Literature retrieval results show relatively less research has been shown on the practical expression to describe the velocity distribution of partially-filled circular pipe. An expression of two-dimensional (2D) velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe flow was derived based on the principle of maximum entropy (POME). Different entropies were compared according to fluid knowledge, and non-extensive entropy was chosen. A new cumulative distribution function (CDF) of partially-filled circular pipe velocity in terms of flow depth was hypothesized. Combined with the CDF hypothesis, the 2D velocity distribution was derived, and the position of maximum velocity distribution was analyzed. The experimental results show that the estimated velocity values based on the principle of maximum Tsallis wavelet entropy are in good agreement with measured values.

  2. Effect of pipe corrosion scales on chlorine dioxide consumption in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Stout, Janet E; Yu, Victor L; Vidic, Radisav

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that temperature and total organic carbon in drinking water would cause chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) loss in a water distribution system and affect the efficiency of ClO(2) for Legionella control. However, among the various causes of ClO(2) loss in a drinking water distribution system, the loss of disinfectant due to the reaction with corrosion scales has not been studied in detail. In this study, the corrosion scales from a galvanized iron pipe and a copper pipe that have been in service for more than 10 years were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The impact of these corrosion scale materials on ClO(2) decay was investigated in de-ionized water at 25 and 45 degrees C in a batch reactor with floating glass cover. ClO(2) decay was also investigated in a specially designed reactor made from the iron and copper pipes to obtain more realistic reaction rate data. Goethite (alpha-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) were identified as the main components of iron corrosion scale. Cuprite (Cu(2)O) was identified as the major component of copper corrosion scale. The reaction rate of ClO(2) with both iron and copper oxides followed a first-order kinetics. First-order decay rate constants for ClO(2) reactions with iron corrosion scales obtained from the used service pipe and in the iron pipe reactor itself ranged from 0.025 to 0.083 min(-1). The decay rate constant for ClO(2) with Cu(2)O powder and in the copper pipe reactor was much smaller and it ranged from 0.0052 to 0.0062 min(-1). Based on these results, it can be concluded that the corrosion scale will cause much more significant ClO(2) loss in corroded iron pipes of the distribution system than the total organic carbon that may be present in finished water.

  3. Development of acoustic flow instruments for solid/gas pipe flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1986-05-01

    Two nonintrusive acoustic flow sensing techniques are reported. One technique, passive in nature, simply measures the bandpassed acoustic noise level produced by particle/particle and particle/wall collisions. The noise levels, given in true RMS voltages or in autocorrelations, show a linear relationship to particle velocity but increase with solid concentration. Therefore, the passive technique requires calibration and a separate measure of solid concentration before it can be used to monitor the particle velocity. The second technique is based on the active cross-correlation principle. It measures particle velocity directly by correlating flow-related signatures at two sensing stations. The velocity data obtained by this technique are compared with measurements by a radioactive-particle time-of-flight (TOF) method. A multiplier of 1.53 is required to bring the acoustic data into agreement with the radioactive TOF result. The difference may originate from the difference in flow fields where particles are detected. The radioactive method senses particles mainly in the turbulent region and essentially measures average particle velocity across the pipe, while the acoustic technique detects particles near the pipe wall, and so measures the particle velocity in the viscous sublayer. Both techniques were tested in flows of limestone and air and 1-mm glass beads and air at the Argonne National Laboratory Solid/Gas Test Facility (SGFTF). The test matrix covered solid velocities of 20 to 30 m/s in a 2-in. pipe and solid-to-gas loading ratios of 6 to 22. 37 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  5. Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of biofilm communities colonizing drinking water distribution pipes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J; Minalt, Nicole; Culotti, Alessandro; Pryor, Marsha; Packman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine) and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (3% distance) within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter.

  6. Temporal Variations in the Abundance and Composition of Biofilm Communities Colonizing Drinking Water Distribution Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John J.; Minalt, Nicole; Culotti, Alessandro; Pryor, Marsha; Packman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine) and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (3% distance) within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter. PMID:24858562

  7. Microbiology, chemistry and biofilm development in a pilot drinking water distribution system with copper and plastic pipes.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Markku J; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Keinänen, Minna M; Kekki, Tomi K; Laine, Olli; Hirvonen, Arja; Vartiainen, Terttu; Martikainen, Pertti J

    2004-10-01

    We studied the changes in water quality and formation of biofilms occurring in a pilot-scale water distribution system with two generally used pipe materials: copper and plastic (polyethylene, PE). The formation of biofilms with time was analysed as the number of total bacteria, heterotrophic plate counts and the concentration of ATP in biofilms. At the end of the experiment (after 308 days), microbial community structure, viable biomass and gram-negative bacterial biomass were analysed via lipid biomarkers (phospholipid fatty acids and lipopolysaccharide 3-hydroxy fatty acids), and the numbers of virus-like particles and total bacteria were enumerated by SYBR Green I staining. The formation of biofilm was slower in copper pipes than in the PE pipes, but after 200 days there was no difference in microbial numbers between the pipe materials. Copper ion led to lower microbial numbers in water during the first 200 days, but thereafter there were no differences between the two pipe materials. The number of virus-like particles was lower in biofilms and in outlet water from the copper pipes than PE pipes. Pipe material influenced also the microbial and gram-negative bacterial community structure in biofilms and water.

  8. Simultaneous velocity measurements of particle and gas phase in particle-laden co-flowing pipe jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saridakis, Isaac; Lau, Timothy; Djenidi, Lyazid; Nathan, Graham

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous planar velocity measurements of both the carrier gas and particles are reported of well-characterized particle-laden co-flowing pipe jets. It is proposed to present measurements that were obtained through application of a median-filter discrimination technique to separate the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) signals of the 0.5 μm diameter fluid tracers from those of the larger particles of diameter 20 μm and 40 μm. Instantaneous particle and fluid planar velocity distributions were measured for three Reynold's numbers ranging from 10,000 to 40,000 and five Stokes numbers from 1 to 22, at a jet bulk fluid velocity to co-flow velocity ratio of 12. Selected results will be presented which show that the slip velocity is dependent on the local Stokes number. These are the first simultaneous carrier gas and particle velocity measurements in particle-laden jets and provide new understanding of fluid-particle interactions. Financial support from Australian Research Council and Australian Renewable Energy Agency.

  9. Effect of sulfate on the transformation of corrosion scale composition and bacterial community in cast iron water distribution pipes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Bai, Yaohui; Sun, Huifang; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    The chemical stability of iron corrosion scales and the microbial community of biofilm in drinking water distribution system (DWDS) can have great impact on the iron corrosion and corrosion product release, which may result in "red water" issues, particularly under the situation of source water switch. In this work, experimental pipe loops were set up to investigate the effect of sulfate on the dynamical transformation characteristics of iron corrosion products and bacterial community in old cast iron distribution pipes. All the test pipes were excavated from existing DWDS with different source water supply histories, and the test water sulfate concentration was in the range of 50-350 mg/L. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that iron release increased markedly and even "red water" occurred for pipes with groundwater supply history when feed water sulfate elevated abruptly. However, the iron release of pipes with only surface water supply history changed slightly without noticeable color even the feed water sulfate increased multiply. The thick-layered corrosion scales (or densely distributed tubercles) on pipes with surface water supply history possessed much higher stability due to the larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe3O4) in their top shell layer; instead, the rather thin and uniform non-layered corrosion scales on pipes with groundwater supply history contained relatively higher proportion of less stable iron oxides (e.g. β-FeOOH, FeCO3 and green rust). The less stable corrosion scales tended to be more stable with sulfate increase, which was evidenced by the gradually decreased iron release and the increased stable iron oxides. Bacterial community analysis indicated that when switching to high sulfate water, iron reducing bacteria (IRB) maintained dominant for pipes with stable corrosion scales, while significant increase of sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB

  10. Numerical investigation of temperature distribution in an eroded bend pipe and prediction of erosion reduced thickness.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongjun; Feng, Guang; Wang, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of erosion thickness is essential for pipe engineering. The objective of the present paper is to study the temperature distribution in an eroded bend pipe and find a new method to predict the erosion reduced thickness. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations with FLUENT software are carried out to investigate the temperature field. And effects of oil inlet rate, oil inlet temperature, and erosion reduced thickness are examined. The presence of erosion pit brings about the obvious fluctuation of temperature drop along the extrados of bend. And the minimum temperature drop presents at the most severe erosion point. Small inlet temperature or large inlet velocity can lead to small temperature drop, while shallow erosion pit causes great temperature drop. The dimensionless minimum temperature drop is analyzed and the fitting formula is obtained. Using the formula we can calculate the erosion reduced thickness, which is only needed to monitor the outer surface temperature of bend pipe. This new method can provide useful guidance for pipeline monitoring and replacement.

  11. Examination of the CLIC drive beam pipe design for thermal distortion caused by distributed beam line

    SciTech Connect

    C. Johnson; K. Kloeppel

    1997-01-01

    Beam transport programs are widely used to estimate the distribution of power deposited in accelerator structures by particle beams, either intentionally as for targets or beam dumps or accidentally owing the beam loss incidents. While this is usually adequate for considerations of radiation safety, it does not reveal the expected temperature rise and its effect on structural integrity. To find this, thermal diffusion must be taken into account, requiring another step in the analysis. The method that has been proposed is to use the output of a transport program, perhaps modified, as input for a finite element analysis program that can solve the thermal diffusion equation. At Cern, the design of the CLIC beam pipe has been treated in this fashion. The power distribution produced in the walls by a distributed beam loss was found according to the widely-used electron shower code EGS4. The distribution of power density was then used to form the input for the finite element analysis pro gram ANSYS, which was able to find the expected temperature rise and the resulting thermal distortion. As a result of these studies, the beam pipe design can be modified to include features that will counteract such distortion.

  12. SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2003-11-21

    Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

  13. PGE distribution in deformed lherzolites of the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe (Yakutia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyina, O. V.; Tychkov, N. S.; Agashev, A. M.; Golovin, A. V.; Izokh, A. E.; Kozmenko, O. A.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-04-01

    The results of the first study of the PGE distribution in deformed lherzolites of the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe (Yakutia) are presented here. The complex character of evolution of the PGE composition in the Deformed lherzolites is assumed to be the result of silicate metasomatism. At the first stage, growth in the amount of clinopyroxene and garnet in the rock is accompanied by a decrease in the concentration of the compatible PGE (Os, Ir). During the final stage, the rock is enriched with incompatible PGE (Pt, Pd) and Re possible due to precipitation of submicron-sized particles of sulfides in the interstitial space of these mantle rocks.

  14. Simulation of external contamination into water distribution systems through defects in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, P. A.; Mora, J. J.; García, F. J.; López, G.

    2009-04-01

    Water quality can be defined as a set of properties (physical, biological and chemical) that determine its suitability for human use or for its role in the biosphere. In this contribution we focus on the possible impact on water distribution systems quality of external contaminant fluids entering through defects in pipes. The physical integrity of the distribution system is a primary barrier against the entry of external contaminants and the loss in quality of the treated drinking water, but this integrity can be broken. Deficiencies in physical and hydraulic integrity can lead into water losses, but also into the influx of contaminants through pipes walls, either through breaks coming from external subsoil waters, or via cross connections coming from sewerage or other facilities. These external contamination events (the so called pathogen intrusion phenomenon) can act as a source of income by introducing nutrients and sediments as well as decreasing disinfectant concentrations within the distribution system, thus resulting in a degradation of the distribution water quality. The objective of this contribution is to represent this pathogen intrusion phenomenon. The combination of presence of defects in the infrastructures (equipment failure), suppression and back-siphonage and lack of disinfection is the cause of propagation of contamination in the clean current of water. Intrusion of pathogenic microorganisms has been studied and registered even in well maintained services. Therefore, this situation can happen when negative pressure conditions are achieved in the systems combined with the presence of defects in pipes nearby the suppression. A simulation of the process by which the external fluids can come inside pipes across their defects in a steady-state situation will be considered, by using different techniques to get such a successful modeling, combining numerical and experimental simulations. The proposed modeling process is based on experimental and

  15. Effects of Pipe Wall Mass Distribution in Line-of-Sight Nuclear Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    helical lead ribbon ( spiral asymmetry) was placed around the pipe , the tar- get plate suffered only negligible damage. No conclusive ex- planation has been...the third calculation, a mass of iron equal to that used in the spiral case was placed symmetrically around the pipe . In slab geometry this corresponds...demonstrated that for explosively collapsed pipes , spiral asymmetries appear to significantly reduce the jetting down the pipe . In the "no pipe flow

  16. Singing Corrugated Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1974-01-01

    Presents theoretical and experimental observations made with a musical toy called Hummer consisting of a corrugated flexible plastic tube about three-feet long and one-inch diam open at both ends. Included are descriptions of three new instruments: the Water Pipe, the Gas-Pipe Corrugahorn Bugle, and the Gas-Pipe Blues Corrugahorn. (CC)

  17. Spatial and seasonal variability of tap water disinfection by-products within distribution pipe networks.

    PubMed

    Charisiadis, Pantelis; Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Christophi, Costas A; Skarlatos, Dimitrios; Vamvakousis, Vasilis; Kargaki, Sophia; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2015-02-15

    Gradually-changing shocks associated with potable water quality deficiencies are anticipated for urban drinking-water distribution systems (UDWDS). The impact of structural UDWDS features such as, the number of pipe leaking incidences on the formation of water trihalomethanes (THM) at the geocoded household level has never been studied before. The objectives were to: (i) characterize the distribution of water THM concentrations in households from two district-metered areas (DMAs) with contrasting UDWDS characteristics sampled in two seasons (summer and winter), and (ii) assess the within- and between-household, spatial variability of water THM accounting for UDWDS characteristics (household distance from chlorination tank and service pipe leaking incidences). A total of 383 tap water samples were collected from 193 households located in two DMAs within the UDWDS of Nicosia city, Cyprus, and analyzed for the four THM species. The higher intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values for water tribromomethane (TBM) (0.75) followed by trichloromethane (0.42) suggested that the two DMAs differed with respect to these analytes. On the other hand, the low ICC values for total THM levels between the two DMAs suggested a large variance between households. The effect of households nested under each DMA remained significant (p<0.05) for TBM (not for the rest of the THM species) in the multivariate mixed-effect models, even after inclusion of pipe network characteristics. Our results could find use by water utilities in overcoming techno-economic difficulties associated with the large spatiotemporal variability of THM, while accounting for the influence of UDWDS features at points of water use.

  18. A Comparison of Critical Regimes in Collapsible Tube, Pipe, Open Channel and Gas-Dynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, C. P.

    2003-11-01

    Though of considerable interest to clinical scientists, collapsible tubes are only recently receiving due interest by fluid physicists. The subject of critical phenomena in collapsible tube flow appears not to have been examined critically. For example, it has been proposed in the past that shock waves in physiological tubes are abnormal. We propose a classification of flow through collapsible tubes recognising that compressibility in gas-dynamic and pipe flow (cf.waterhammer) corresponds to distensibility in collapsible tube flow. Thus, opening and closing waves of collapsible tube flow (predistension regime) is subcritical flow and the post-distension regime, supercritical. Physiological tubes are often hyperelastic and contractile and often, when distension is very significant, a hypercritical regime corresponding to hypersonic gas-dynamic flow is admissible. Such a hypercritical regime would allow storage of energy and muscle contraction in the wall of the tube and hence continuance of propulsion in the essentially intermittent flow that is seen in collapsible tubes. Such a mechanism appears to be in operation in the human aorta, bowel and urethra. The present work offers a comparison of critical regimes in various fluid flow situations including collapsible tubes, that is in harmony with known phenomena seen in nature.

  19. Gas dynamic design of the pipe line compressor with 90% efficiency. Model test approval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y.; Rekstin, A.; Soldatova, K.

    2015-08-01

    Gas dynamic design of the pipe line compressor 32 MW was made for PAO SMPO (Sumy, Ukraine). The technical specification requires compressor efficiency of 90%. The customer offered favorable scheme - single-stage design with console impeller and axial inlet. The authors used the standard optimization methodology of 2D impellers. The original methodology of internal scroll profiling was used to minimize efficiency losses. Radically improved 5th version of the Universal modeling method computer programs was used for precise calculation of expected performances. The customer fulfilled model tests in a 1:2 scale. Tests confirmed the calculated parameters at the design point (maximum efficiency of 90%) and in the whole range of flow rates. As far as the authors know none of compressors have achieved such efficiency. The principles and methods of gas-dynamic design are presented below. The data of the 32 MW compressor presented by the customer in their report at the 16th International Compressor conference (September 2014, Saint- Petersburg) and later transferred to the authors.

  20. Epidemiology study of the use of asbestos-cement pipe for the distribution of drinking water in Escambia County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Millette, J.R.; Craun, G.F.; Stober, J.A.; Kraemer, D.F.; Tousignant, H.G.

    1983-11-01

    Cancer mortality for the population census tracts of Escambia County, Florida was compared with cancer mortality data collected from census tracts elsewhere within the same county. In the first group asbestos-cement (AC) pipe was used for public potable water distribution. In the second group other types of piping material are used. The differences in standard mortality ratios for seven cancer sites among three potential asbestos exposure groups based on the AC pipe usage was tested using an analysis of covariance. Twelve variables representing nonexposure-related influences on disease rates were combined in four independent factors and used as covariates in these analyses. To the level of sensitivity imposed by the limitations of the study no evidence was found for an association between the use of AC pipe for carrying drinking water and deaths due to gastrointestinal and related cancers in Escambia County, Florida. 15 references, 2 figures, 7 tables.

  1. The effect of white or grey PVC pipe and its joint solvents (primer and cement) on odour problems in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wiesenthal, K E; Suffet, I H

    2007-01-01

    A study of the production of odour-causing compounds was conducted from the leaching of polyvinylchloride (PVC) pipe and its joints, primer and cement, into drinking water distribution systems. Flavour Profile Analysis (FPA), closed-loop stripping analysis--gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (CLSA-GC/MS) and sensory-GC analysis of white or grey PVC alone found no odour-causing compounds produced during the leaching experiments. FPA analysis of the PVC's primer and cement leached alone and/or when applied to grey or white PVC pipes produced a glue/varnish odour. A sweet/phenolic odour replaced the glue/varnish odour after the leached media were diluted with Milli-Q water to threshold odour intensity. Three compounds were responsible for the sweet/phenolic odour and were observed by sensoryGC analysis. The leaching study of the PVC pipe with its joint solvents (primer and cement) concluded that the original solvent compounds, and their reaction products that formed during the bonding process on the PVC pipe, were a primary source of the glue/varnish odour. The original compounds of the PVC primer and cement were not detected by CLSA-GC/MS, due to their high volatility during the CLSA extraction method and/or these compounds appeared in a solvent peak of the GC/MS analysis. However, the original primer and cement chemicals (acetone, tetrahydrofuran, methyl ethyl ketone, and cyclohexanone) had a glue/varnish odour. A total of nine odorous GC peaks were produced as reaction products from leaching of primer in water and white or grey PVC pipe with primer and cement, and white or grey PVC with primer only. None of these compounds were among the chemical ingredients in the original primer or cement. Four GC peaks with a sweet/phenolic odour were present due to the reaction products of the cement leached with white or grey PVC. None of these compounds were positively identified.

  2. Design procedure prevents PE pipe rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Grigory, S.C.

    1995-12-01

    A rupture prevention design procedure for plastic gas distribution pipe is nearing completion at Southwest Research Institute (SWRI). Given the pipe size, polyethylene (PE) resin, and minimum operating temperature, the maximum safe operating pressure can be determined for which rapid crack propagation (RCP) cannot occur. A computer program, called PFRAC, has been developed for this purpose and uses Charpy energy as the measurement of fracture toughness of PE. Present efforts, however, involve replacing Charpy energy with a dynamic toughness measurement obtained from the Small Scale Steady State (S4) test that is required in ISO 4437. The program is being financed by the Gas Research Institute, Chicago. RCP events in PE pipe have been rare primarily because operating pressures are low and pipe diameters are small in most gas distribution systems. However, controlled RCP experiments in the US and other countries clearly demonstrate that as the gas industry moves toward higher line pressures and larger diameters, the likelihood of an RCP event increases. Recognizing this, ISO includes a requirement for RCP in its ISO 4437 standard for pipe greater than 10 inches in diameter or operating pressures greater than 58 psig. The S4 test may be used on all pipe diameters. A full scale test or the S4 test can be used on pipe greater than 10 inches diameter.

  3. Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial communities in biofilms from different pipe materials in a city drinking water distribution system of East China.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongxing; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Shuai; Lou, Liping; Cheng, Dongqing; He, Xiaofang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Shangde; Fu, Liusong; Liu, Jingqing; Hu, Baolan

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) could cause several types of problems, such as the deterioration of water quality, corrosion of pipe walls, and potential proliferation of opportunistic pathogens. In this study, ten biofilm samples from different pipe materials, including ductile cast iron pipe (DCIP), gray cast iron pipe (GCIP), galvanized steel pipe (GSP), stainless steel clad pipe (SSCP), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), were collected from an actual DWDS to investigate the effect of pipe material on bacterial community. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and culture-based method were used to quantify bacteria. 454 pyrosequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that the numbers of total bacteria and culturable heterotrophic bacteria from iron pipes were higher than that in PVC, while the numbers of Shigella and vibrios were low in biofilms from iron pipes. Bacterial community analysis showed that Hyphomicrobium or Desulfovibrio were the predominant microorganism in iron pipes, whereas Sphingomonas or Pseudomonas were dominant in other types of pipe. This study revealed differences in bacterial communities in biofilms among different pipe materials, and the results were useful for pipeline material selection in DWDSs.

  4. [Growth of microfungi on the external polyethylene anticorrosive coating of oil-gas pipes].

    PubMed

    Subbota, A G; Chuenko, A I; Ostapiuk, S N

    2014-01-01

    The authors have studied the resistance of external anticorrosive polyethylene coat of oil-gas pipes (based on the high-density polyethylene, HDPE) to the action of microfungi, natural contamination, fungistatic and fungicide activity. It was found that the intensity of growth of standard test cultures on the surface of polyethylene coat increases in terms which imitate mineral and organic contaminations, and this results in the decrease of the index of its resistance to the action of microfungi. The microfungi, found in the process of study of natural contamination of polyethylene coat and its components, are presented by six species, Alternaria sp. most frequently occurring among them. The presence of admixtures of nitrogenic and phosphoric organic substances in chemical composition of control standards of adhesive and HDPE, which were not exposed to the influence of microfungi, was established by the method of IR spectroscopy. Changes of the IR spectra were noticed in the surface layer of high density polyethylene pellets under the influence of Penicillium funiculosum 171703 that evidences for the process of its slow oxidation. It is assumed that the damaging of the coating components is due to the presence in their chemical composition of impurities of nitrogen- and phosphorus-containing compounds that are easily absorbed by microscopic fungi.

  5. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Stratified Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Horizontal Circular Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Faccini, J.L.H.; Sampaio, P.A.B. de

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports numerical and experimental investigation of stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow in horizontal circular pipes. The Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) with the k-{omega} model for a fully developed stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow are solved by using the finite element method. A smooth and horizontal interface surface is assumed without considering the interfacial waves. The continuity of the shear stress across the interface is enforced with the continuity of the velocity being automatically satisfied by the variational formulation. For each given interface position and longitudinal pressure gradient, an inner iteration loop runs to solve the nonlinear equations. The Newton-Raphson scheme is used to solve the transcendental equations by an outer iteration to determine the interface position and pressure gradient for a given pair of volumetric flow rates. The interface position in a 51.2 mm ID circular pipe was measured experimentally by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The numerical results were also compared with experimental results in a 21 mm ID circular pipe reported by Masala [1]. The good agreement between the numerical and experimental results indicates that the k-{omega} model can be applied for the numerical simulation of stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow. (authors)

  6. Measurement of Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Micro-Pipes by a Capacitance Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haifeng; Li, Huajun; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    A capacitance measurement system is developed for the measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow in glass micro-pipes with inner diameters of 3.96, 2.65 and 1.56 mm, respectively. As a typical flow regime in a micro-pipe two-phase flow system, slug flow is chosen for this investigation. A capacitance sensor is designed and a high-resolution and high-speed capacitance measurement circuit is used to measure the small capacitance signals based on the differential sampling method. The performance and feasibility of the capacitance method are investigated and discussed. The capacitance signal is analyzed, which can reflect the voidage variation of two-phase flow. The gas slug velocity is determined through a cross-correlation technique using two identical capacitance sensors. The simulation and experimental results show that the presented capacitance measurement system is successful. Research work also verifies that the capacitance sensor is an effective method for the measurement of gas liquid two-phase flow parameters in micro-pipes. PMID:25587879

  7. Inhibited glycols in piping distribution systems -- some disasters that could have been easily prevented

    SciTech Connect

    Denkmann, J.L.

    1997-12-31

    Use of an inhibited glycol (IG) as a freezing point depressant is common. Numerous chilled-water piping distribution systems, particularly in northern climates, use a small IG concentration to prevent rupture of chilled-water coils during winter months. Many ice-based thermal storage systems use higher IG concentrations as the primary heat transfer fluid for freezing water in the storage modules. When a system has been designed for inclusion of an IG fluid and all necessary precautions are taken, these systems perform at expected capacity and without difficulty. But there have been some rather notable disasters, all of which could have been prevented had proper precautions been taken. This paper will address several systems that are indicative of the first corollary of Murphy`s Law, which states, The cost of the fix varies to the cube of the cost had the system been correctly built from the outset.

  8. Occurrence of contaminant accumulation in lead pipe scales from domestic drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Schock, Michael R; Hyland, Robert N; Welch, Meghan M

    2008-06-15

    Previously, contaminants, such as AI, As, and Ra, have been shown to accumulate in drinking-water distribution system solids. Accumulated contaminants could be periodically released back into the water supply causing elevated levels at consumers taps, going undetected by most current regulatory monitoring practices and consequently constituting a hidden risk. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of over 40 major scale constituents, regulated metals, and other potential metallic inorganic contaminants in drinking-water distribution system Pb (lead) or Pb-lined service lines. The primary method of analysis was inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, following complete decomposition of scale material. Contaminants and scale constituents were categorized by their average concentrations, and many metals of potential health concern were found to occur at levels sufficient to result in elevated levels at the consumer's taps if they were to be mobilized. The data indicate distinctly nonconservative behavior for many inorganic contaminants in drinking-water distribution systems. This finding suggests an imminent need for further research into the transport and fate of contaminants throughout drinking-water distribution system pipes, as well as a re-evaluation of monitoring protocols in order to more accurately determine the scope and levels of potential consumer exposure.

  9. Gas distribution and starbursts in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Detailed maps of most elliptical galaxies reveal that, whereas the greatest part of their luminous mass originates from a smooth distribution with a surface brightness approximated by a de Vaucouleurs law, a small percentage of their light is contributed by low surface brightness distortions termed 'fine structures'. The sharp-edged features called 'shells' are successfully reproduced by merger and infall models involving accretion from less massive companions. In this context, dwarf spheroidal and compact disk galaxies are likely progenitors of these stellar phenomena. However, it is probable that the sources of shell-forming material also contain significant amounts of gas. This component may play an important role in constraining the formation and evolution of shell galaxies. To investigate the effects of the gaseous component, numerical simulations were performed to study the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars by more massive primaries, and the evolution of the ensuing debris. The calculations were performed with a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code. Collisionless matter is evolved using a conventional N-body technique and gas is treated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in which self-gravitating fluid elements are represented as particles evolving according to Lagrangian hydrodynamic equations. An isothermal equation of state is employed so the gas remains at a temperature 104 K. Owing to the large mass ratio between the primary and companion, the primary is modeled as a rigid potential and the self-gravity of both galaxies is neglected.

  10. Laser propagation through full-scale, high-gain MagLIF gas pipes using the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Bradley; Sefkow, Adam; Goyon, Clement; Strozzi, David; Khan, Shahab; Rosen, Mordy; Campbell, Mike; Logan, Grant; Peterson, Kyle; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    The first relevant measurements of laser propagation through surrogate high-gain MagLIF gas pipe targets at full scale have been performed at the NIF, using 30 kJ of laser drive from one quad in a 10 ns pulse at an intensity of 2e14 W/cm2. The unmagnetized pipe is filled with 1 atm of 99%/1% neopentane/Ar, and uses an entrance window of 0.75 um polyimide and an exit window of 0.3 um of Ta backed with 5 um of polyimide. Side-on x-ray emission from the plasma is imaged through the 100 um-thick epoxy wall onto a framing camera at four times during the drive, and is in excellent agreement with pre-shot HYDRA radiation-hydrodynamics modeling. X-ray emission from the Ta exit plane is imaged onto a streak camera to determine the timing and intensity of the laser burning through the pipe, and the Ar emission from the center of the pipe is spectrally- and temporally-resolved to determine the plasma electron temperature. Backscatter is measured throughout the laser drive, and is found to be of significance only when the laser reaches the Ta exit plane and produces SBS. These first results in unmagnetized surrogate gas fills are encouraging since they demonstrate sufficient laser energy absorption and low LPI losses within high-density long-scale-length plasmas for proposed high-gain MagLIF target designs. We will discuss plans to magnetize targets filled with high-density DT gas in future experiments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Effect of sulfate on the transformation of corrosion scale composition and bacterial community in cast iron water distribution pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability of iron corrosion products and the bacterial composition of biofilm in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could have great impact on the water safety at the consumer ends. In this work, pipe loops were setup to investigate the transformation characteristics ...

  12. Release of accumulated arsenic from distribution pipes into tap water after arsenic treatment of source water- presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic arsenic (As) is known to incorporate from source well water onto the scales of distribution system pipes such as iron, copper, galvanized steel and even plastic containing internal buildup of iron coatings (Lytle et al., 2010, 2004; Schock, 2015; Reiber and Dostal, 2000). W...

  13. Investigation of factors affecting the accumulation of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride piping used in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ryan K; Lin, Po-Hsun; Edwards, Marc; Richardson, Ruth E

    2011-04-01

    Plastic piping made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and chlorinated PVC (CPVC), is being increasingly used for drinking water distribution lines. Given the formulation of the material from vinyl chloride (VC), there has been concern that the VC (a confirmed human carcinogen) can leach from the plastic piping into drinking water. PVC/CPVC pipe reactors in the laboratory and tap samples collected from consumers homes (n = 15) revealed vinyl chloride accumulation in the tens of ng/L range after a few days and hundreds of ng/L after two years. While these levels did not exceed the EPA's maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 μg/L, many readings that simulated stagnation times in homes (overnight) exceeded the MCL-Goal of 0 μg/L. Considerable differences in VC levels were seen across different manufacturers, while aging and biofilm effects were generally small. Preliminary evidence suggests that VC may accumulate not only via chemical leaching from the plastic piping, but also as a disinfection byproduct (DBP) via a chlorine-dependent reaction. This is supported from studies with CPVC pipe reactors where chlorinated reactors accumulated more VC than dechlorinated reactors, copper pipe reactors that accumulated VC in chlorinated reactors and not in dechlorinated reactors, and field samples where VC levels were the same before and after flushing the lines where PVC/CPVC fittings were contributing. Free chlorine residual tests suggest that VC may be formed as a secondary, rather than primary, DBP. Further research and additional studies need to be conducted in order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and tease apart relative contributions of VC accumulation from PVC/CPVC piping and chlorine-dependent reactions.

  14. Characteristics of iron corrosion scales and water quality variations in drinking water distribution systems of different pipe materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Manjie; Liu, Zhaowei; Chen, Yongcan; Hai, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Interaction between old, corroded iron pipe surfaces and bulk water is crucial to the water quality protection in drinking water distribution systems (WDS). Iron released from corrosion products will deteriorate water quality and lead to red water. This study attempted to understand the effects of pipe materials on corrosion scale characteristics and water quality variations in WDS. A more than 20-year-old hybrid pipe section assembled of unlined cast iron pipe (UCIP) and galvanized iron pipe (GIP) was selected to investigate physico-chemical characteristics of corrosion scales and their effects on water quality variations. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze micromorphology and chemical composition of corrosion scales. In bench testing, water quality parameters, such as pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), alkalinity, conductivity, turbidity, color, Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+), were determined. Scale analysis and bench-scale testing results demonstrated a significant effect of pipe materials on scale characteristics and thereby water quality variations in WDS. Characteristics of corrosion scales sampled from different pipe segments show obvious differences, both in physical and chemical aspects. Corrosion scales were found highly amorphous. Thanks to the protection of zinc coatings, GIP system was identified as the best water quality stability, in spite of high zinc release potential. It is deduced that the complicated composition of corrosion scales and structural break by the weld result in the diminished water quality stability in HP system. Measurement results showed that iron is released mainly in ferric particulate form.

  15. In Situ Corrosion and Heat Loss Assessment of Two Nonstandard Underground Heat Distribution System Piping Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    of this specific design consists of a carrier pipe, carrier pipe insulation ( mineral wool ), an annular air space, steel casing, a layer of exterior...excavation site agree with Perma-Pipe “Multi-Therm 500” nominal specs for 10” carrier with 2” mineral wool insulation. 3. Conduit Temperature: Supply...the ASHRAE calculation method or by manufacturer performance claims. MEC is reasonably certain that the mineral wool insulation used by the

  16. Speciation and distribution of vanadium in drinking water iron pipe corrosion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Tammie L.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Maynard, J. Barry

    2010-11-12

    Vanadium (V) when ingested from drinking water in high concentrations (> 15 {micro}g L{sup -1}) is a potential health risk and is on track to becoming a regulated contaminant. High concentrations of V have been documented in lead corrosion by-products as Pb{sub 5}(V{sup 5+}O{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl (vanadinite) which, in natural deposits is associated with iron oxides/oxyhydroxides, phases common in iron pipe corrosion by-products. The extent of potential reservoirs of V in iron corrosion by-products, its speciation, and mechanism of inclusion however are unknown. The aim of this study is to assess these parameters in iron corrosion by-products, implementing synchrotron-based {mu}-XRF mapping and {mu}-XANES along with traditional physiochemical characterization. The morphologies, mineralogies, and chemistry of the samples studied are superficially similar to typical iron corrosion by-products. However, we found V present as discrete grains of Pb{sub 5}(V{sup 5+}O{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl likely embedded in the surface regions of the iron corrosion by-products. Concentrations of V observed in bulk XRF analysis ranged from 35 to 899 mg kg{sup -1}. We calculate that even in pipes with iron corrosion by-products with low V concentration, 100 mg kg{sup -1}, as little as 0.0027% of a 0.1-cm thick X 100-cm long section of that corrosion by-product needs to be disturbed to increase V concentrations in the drinking water at the tap to levels well above the 15 {micro}g L{sup -1} notification level set by the State of California and could adversely impact human health. In addition, it is likely that large reservoirs of V are associated with iron corrosion by-products in unlined cast iron mains and service branches in numerous drinking water distribution systems.

  17. Speciation and distribution of vanadium in drinking water iron pipe corrosion by-products.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Scheckel, Kirk G; Maynard, J Barry

    2010-11-01

    Vanadium (V) when ingested from drinking water in high concentrations (>15 μg L(-1)) is a potential health risk and is on track to becoming a regulated contaminant. High concentrations of V have been documented in lead corrosion by-products as Pb(5)(V(5+)O(4))(3)Cl (vanadinite) which, in natural deposits is associated with iron oxides/oxyhydroxides, phases common in iron pipe corrosion by-products. The extent of potential reservoirs of V in iron corrosion by-products, its speciation, and mechanism of inclusion however are unknown. The aim of this study is to assess these parameters in iron corrosion by-products, implementing synchrotron-based μ-XRF mapping and μ-XANES along with traditional physiochemical characterization. The morphologies, mineralogies, and chemistry of the samples studied are superficially similar to typical iron corrosion by-products. However, we found V present as discrete grains of Pb(5)(V(5+)O(4))(3)Cl likely embedded in the surface regions of the iron corrosion by-products. Concentrations of V observed in bulk XRF analysis ranged from 35 to 899 mg kg(-1). We calculate that even in pipes with iron corrosion by-products with low V concentration, 100 mg kg(-1), as little as 0.0027% of a 0.1-cm thick X 100-cm long section of that corrosion by-product needs to be disturbed to increase V concentrations in the drinking water at the tap to levels well above the 15 μg L(-1) notification level set by the State of California and could adversely impact human health. In addition, it is likely that large reservoirs of V are associated with iron corrosion by-products in unlined cast iron mains and service branches in numerous drinking water distribution systems.

  18. Investigation of the causes for the measurement differences between the natural gas measurement systems of a gas distribution company and of a consumer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Kazuto; Silva Telles, Rubens

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the methodology used, the checked items and the results obtained in an investigation carried out to identify the causes that generated substantial differences between the natural gas volumes measured by two measuring systems, one from a gas distribution company and another from its industrial consumer, both installed in series in a gas pipeline. The investigation showed that the measurement of the volume of gas performed by the gas distributor metering system was influenced by an erroneous measurement of the gas temperature since it was affected by a complex thermodynamic process involving cooling by the Joule-Thomson effect caused by a pressure reducing valve and heating by heat exchange through the pipe walls.

  19. Primary and Aggregate Size Distributions of PM in Tail Pipe Emissions form Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masataka; Amagai, Kenji; Nakaji, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shinji

    Particulate matter (PM) emission exhausted from diesel engine should be reduced to keep the clean air environment. PM emission was considered that it consisted of coarse and aggregate particles, and nuclei-mode particles of which diameter was less than 50nm. However the detail characteristics about these particles of the PM were still unknown and they were needed for more physically accurate measurement and more effective reduction of exhaust PM emission. In this study, the size distributions of solid particles in PM emission were reported. PMs in the tail-pipe emission were sampled from three type diesel engines. Sampled PM was chemically treated to separate the solid carbon fraction from other fractions such as soluble organic fraction (SOF). The electron microscopic and optical-manual size measurement procedures were used to determine the size distribution of primary particles those were formed through coagulation process from nuclei-mode particles and consisted in aggregate particles. The centrifugal sedimentation method was applied to measure the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Aerodynamic diameters of nano and aggregate particles were measured with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The peak aggregate diameters detected by SMPS were fallen in the same size regime as the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Both of primary and Stokes diameters of dry-soot decreased with increases of engine speed and excess air ratio. Also, the effects of fuel properties and engine types on primary and aggregate particle diameters were discussed.

  20. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into

  1. Identification And Distribution Of Vanadinite (Pb5(V5+O4)3Cl) In Lead Pipe Corrosion By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the first detailed look at vanadium (V) speciation in drinking water pipe corrosion scales. A pool of 34 scale layers from 15 lead or lead-lined pipes representing eight different municipal drinking water distribution systems in the Northeastern and Midwester...

  2. Flooding characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in a horizontal U bend pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Hosokawa, S.; Fujii, Y.

    1995-09-01

    For next-generation nuclear reactors, hybrid safety systems which consist of active and passive safety systems have been planned. Steam generators with horizontal U bend pipelines will be used as one of the passive safety systems. It is required to clarify flow characteristics, especially the onset of flooding, in the horizontal U bend pipelines in order to examine their safety. Flooding in vertical pipes has been studied extensively. However, there is little study on flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines. It is supposed that the onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines is different from that in vertical pipes. On the other hand, liquid is generated due to condensation of steam in pipes of the horizontal steam generators at the loss of coolant accident because the steam generators will be used as a condenser of a cooling system of steam from the reactor. It is necessary to simulate this situation by the supply of water at the middle of horizontal pipe. In the present paper, experiments were carried out using a horizontal U bend pipeline with a liquid supply section in the midway of pipeline. The onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipeline was measured. Effects of the length of horizontal pipe and the radius of U bend on the onset of flooding were discussed.

  3. Study of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in non-Newtonian liquid-gas two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Non-Newtonian liquid-gas stratified flow data in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes were obtained. Interfacial level gradients between the two phases were observed. The Heywood-Charles model is found to be valid for pseudoplastic liquid-gas uniform stratified flow. Two-phase drag reduction in non-Newtonian systems was not achieved as the transition to semi-slug flow occurred before the model criteria were reached. Interfacial liquid and gas shear stresses were compared. A new parameter ..sigma../sup 2/ is introduced which is a numerical indication of the interfacial level gradient. Two-phase drag reduction was experimentally observed in polymer solution-air plug-slug flow in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes. The Hubbard-Dukler pressure drop model was extended to non-Newtonian systems. Reasonable agreement between the experiment and the model predictions is obtained. However, more work needs to be done in order to better understand the two-phase drag reduction phenomena. Liquid holdup correlations were developed for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian systems which successfully correlate the holdup over a wide range of parameters. The Petukhov correlation is found to be better than the Dittus-Boelter correlation in predicting the single-phase water heat-transfer coefficients.

  4. Heat Pipe Materials Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.; Fleischman, G. L.; Luedke, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program to evaluate noncondensable gas generation in ammonia heat pipes was completed. A total of 37 heat pipes made of aluminum, stainless steel and combinations of these materials were processed by various techniques, operated at different temperatures and tested at low temperature to quantitatively determine gas generation rates. In order of increasing stability are aluminum/stainless combination, all aluminum and all stainless heat pipes. One interesting result is the identification of intentionally introduced water in the ammonia during a reflux step as a means of surface passivation to reduce gas generation in stainless-steel/aluminum heat pipes.

  5. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  6. The use of finite element methods for determining the cross-sectional temperature distribution in heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, G. P.

    1986-01-01

    A model that is currently used to predict the priming and performance limitations of a monogroove heat pipe is expanded to include the boiling limitation and the cross-sectional temperature distribution as determined from a multidimensional finite element analysis technique. The improved model is verified experimentally and shown to accurately predict the cross-sectional temperature distribution when the heat flux distribution is known. The model provides a way to estimate the level at which nucleate boiling and the associated dryout of the capillary wick occurs.

  7. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints of Gas Transmission Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotinov, V. A.; Farber, V. M.; Morozova, A. N.; Valov, M. A.; Sharipov, G. A.

    2014-09-01

    Astudy is made of the structure and mechanical properties of welded joints of pipes of strength class K60 produced by three different manufacturers. A detailed analysis of the microstructure of the central weld, heat-affected zone, and base metal is performed with a scanning electron microscope by the method of electron back-scattered diffraction.

  8. Surface analysis of pilot distribution system pipe autopsies: The relationship of organic and inorganic deposits to input water quality.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Rolando; Denman, John; Braun, Kalan; Ho, Lionel; Drikas, Mary

    2015-12-15

    Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) surface analysis was conducted to characterise deposits in polyethylene pipes used in a novel pilot water distribution system (PDS). The system consisted of four (4) parallel distribution systems receiving water from different treatment processes, ranging from conventional coagulation through to an advanced membrane filtration system. After two years of operation, the distribution system was shut down and samples of pipe were collected for autopsy analysis. Inlet and outlet samples from each PDS were collected for purpose of comparison. ToF-SIMS was used to assess chemical differences in surface biofilm accumulation and particulate deposition, which resulted as a consequence of the treatment method and operational mode of each system. These data supplemented previously collected bacteriological and chemical water quality data. Results from the inorganic analysis of the pipes were consistent with corrosion and contamination events that occurred upstream in the corresponding treatment systems. Principal component analysis of data on organic constituents showed oxygen and nitrogen containing fragments were associated with the treatment inlet and outlet samples. These types of signals can often be ascribed to biofilm polysaccharides and proteins. A trend was observed when comparing samples from the same PDS, showing an association of lower molecular weight (MW) organic fragments with the inlet and higher MW organic fragments with the outlet samples.

  9. Clastic pipe characteristics and distributions throughout the Colorado Plateau: Implications for paleoenvironment and paleoseismic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, D. F.; Chan, M. A.; Sprinkel, D. A.

    2016-10-01

    Clastic pipes occur throughout much of the Phanerozoic strata of the Colorado Plateau and provide a unique opportunity to test the validly of various deformation and triggering mechanism hypotheses in the context of their tectono-stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental settings. Pipes dominantly occur in Jurassic strata and preferentially in eolian (especially interdune), sabkha, and fluvial deposits because these sediments contained interbedded fine-grained and water-saturated, high-porosity, coarse-grained facies. The greatest geographic concentrations of pipes occur in three trends: (1) a northeast trend from the Lake Powell to Moab areas of southern and southeastern Utah, (2) an east-west trend in northern Arizona within and north of the Grand Canyon, and (3) a west-northwest-east-southeast trend along Interstate 40 west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Many pipes formed due to liquefaction and fluidization and were potentially triggered by seismic activity originating from basement-cored uplifts within the Colorado Plateau, although other trigger mechanisms cannot be completely eliminated. Some breccia pipes within northern Arizona that are rooted in karst are the exception to this interpretation. Pipes possess unique depositional and triggering requirements and thus provide an excellent opportunity to understand the interplay of sedimentology and tectonics within continental systems.

  10. Mathematical models for quantifying eruption velocity in degassing pipes based on exsolution of a single gas and simultaneous exsolution of multiple gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Arturo S.

    2016-09-01

    After the limnic eruptions at Nyos and Monoun in the 1980s, degassing pipes were installed to reduce the continuous increase of CO2 at the bottom of these lakes. The degassing system consists of a vertical pipe from the lake bottom to the surface and a small pump located near the top of the pipe, which raises water in the pipe up to a level where it becomes saturated with gas, which in turn leads to volume expansion and eruption. This paper describes two new mathematical models for predicting eruption velocity in degassing pipes based on exsolution of a single gas and the simultaneous exsolution of multiple gases. The models were applied to the degassing system of lakes Nyos and Monoun, which contain two main gases, namely CO2 and CH4. Because the volume proportion of CH4 is significant only in Lake Monoun, the Lake Nyos test case considered the CO2 gas only, while as the Lake Monoun test case considered the simultaneous exsolution of CO2 and CH4. Good agreement between the results of the models and observed data is found for both test cases. The results for the eruption in Lake Monoun considering the two main gases measured in this lake (CO2 and CH4) were found to have a better agreement with the measurements compared to the model results obtained considering the main gas only (CO2).

  11. Feasibility of leakage detection in lake pressure pipes using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    This contribution describes a feasibility study carried out in the laboratory for the detection of leakages in lake pressure pipes using high-resolution fiber-optic temperature measurements (DTS). The usage of the DTS technology provides spatiotemporal high-resolution temperature measurements along a fibre optic cable. An opto-electrical device serves both as a light emitter as well as a spectrometer for measuring the scattering of light. The fiber optic cable serves as linear sensor. Measurements can be taken at a spatial resolution of up to 25 cm with a temperature accuracy of higher than 0.1 °C. The first warmer days after the winter stagnation provoke a temperature rise of superficial layers of lakes with barely stable temperature stratification. The warmer layer in the epilimnion differs 4 °C to 5 °C compared to the cold layers in the meta- or hypolimnion before water circulation in spring starts. The warmer water from the surface layer can be rinsed on the entire length of the pipe. Water intrudes at leakages by generating a slightly negative pressure in the pipe. This provokes a local temperature change, in case that the penetrating water (seawater) differs in temperature from the water pumped through the pipe. These temperature changes should be detectable and localized with a DTS cable introduced in the pipe. A laboratory experiment was carried out to determine feasibility as well as limits and problems of this methodology. A 6 m long pipe, submerged in a water tank at constant temperature, was rinsed with water 5-10 °C warmer than the water in the tank. Temperature measurements were taken continuously along the pipe. A negative pressure of 0.1 bar provoked the intrusion of colder water from the tank into the pipe through the leakages, resulting in local temperature changes. Experiments where conducted with different temperature gradients, leakage sizes, number of leaks as well as with different positioning of the DTS cable inside the pipe. Results

  12. Universal correlation for the rise velocity of long gas bubbles in round pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, Flavia; Pardo, Raimundo; Yánez, Rodolfo; Trallero, José L.; Joseph, Daniel D.

    2003-11-01

    We collected all of the published data we could find on the rise velocity of long gas bubbles in stagnant fluids contained in circular tubes. Data from 255 experiments from the literature and seven new experiments at PDVSA Intevep for fluids with viscosities ranging from 1 mPa s up to 3900 mPa s were assembled on spread sheets and processed in log log plots of the normalized rise velocity, Fr {=} U/(gD)(1/2) Froude velocity vs. buoyancy Reynolds number, R {=} (D(3) g (rho_{l}-rho_{g}) rho_{l})(1/2) /mu for fixed ranges of the Eötvös number, Eo {=} grho_{l}D(2) /sigma where D is the pipe diameter, rho_{l}, rho_{g} and sigma are densities and surface tension. The plots give rise to power laws in Eo; the composition of these separate power laws emerge as bi-power laws for two separate flow regions for large and small buoyancy Reynolds. For large R (>200) we find [hboxFr = {0.34}/(1+3805/hboxEo^{3.06})^{0.58}.] For small R (<10) we find [ hboxFr = frac{9.494times 10^{-3}}{({1+{6197}/hboxEo^{2.561}})^{0.5793}}R^{1.026}.] The flat region for high buoyancy Reynolds number and sloped region for low buoyancy Reynolds number is separated by a transition region (10 {<} R {<} 200) which we describe by fitting the data to a logistic dose curve. Repeated application of logistic dose curves leads to a composition of rational fractions of rational fractions of power laws. This leads to the following universal correlation: [ hboxFr = L[{R;A,B,C,G}] equiv frac{A}{({1+({{R}/{B}})^C})^G} ] where [ A = L[hboxEo;a,b,c,d],quad B = L[hboxEo;e,f,g,h],quad C = L[hboxEo;i,j,k,l],quad G = m/C ] and the parameters (a, b,...,l) are begin{eqnarray*} &&hspace*{-5pt}a hspace*{-0.8pt} {=} hspace*{-0.8pt} 0.34;quad bhspace*{-0.8pt} {=} hspace*{-0.8pt} 14.793;quad chspace*{-0.8pt} {=} hspace*{-0.6pt}{-}3.06;quad dhspace*{-0.6pt} {=} hspace*{-0.6pt}0.58;quad ehspace*{-0.6pt} {=} hspace*{-0.6pt} 31.08;quad fhspace*{-0.6pt} {=} hspace*{-0.6pt}29.868;quad ghspace*{-0.6pt} { =} hspace*{-0.6pt}{ -}1

  13. Propagation of Biot slow waves in heterogeneous pipe networks: Effect of the pipe radius distribution on the effective wave velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabé, Y.

    2009-11-01

    This paper extends a previous study of the harmonic (or AC) flow of a compressible fluid through a single, elastic, thick-wall pipe. The model previously developed is used to investigate propagation of pore-scale Biot slow waves through heterogeneous one-, two- and three-dimensional networks of pipes. A novel method is applied to the results of the network simulations to numerically determine the dispersion equation of the upscaled Biot slow waves and investigate its dependence on pore-scale heterogeneity. As a function of frequency, the phase velocity of the macroscale Biot slow waves displays an S-shaped curve, increasing from zero at low frequencies (i.e., nonpropagative regime) to C? at high frequencies (i.e., propagative regime with C? lower than the sound velocity in the fluid). The transition between these two regimes is marked by the inflection point at the frequency ωB (where ωB is inversely proportional to the length scale Λ characteristic of fluid flow and permeability). The high-frequency phase velocity C? depends on the dimensionality of the network considered and decreases with increasing heterogeneity. The wave attenuation (as measured by the inverse quality factor) also presents an S-shaped curve, decreasing from 2 (i.e., critical damping) to zero, with the same inflection point at ωB. This behavior is approximately independent on the pore radius distribution, provided that ωB (or the corresponding fluid flow length scale Λ) is held constant. A mechanism based on wave scattering and interferences of forward and backward traveling (pore-scale) Biot slow waves is proposed to explain the observations.

  14. Status of a broadly distributed endangered species: results and implications of the second International Piping Plover Census

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plissner, Jonathan H.; Haig, Susan M.

    2000-01-01

    Methods for monitoring progress toward recovery goals are highly variable and may be problematic for endangered species that are mobile and widely distributed. Recovery objectives for Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) include attainment of minimum population sizes within specified recovery units, as determined by two U.S. and two Canadian recovery teams. To assess progress toward these goals, complete surveys of the species' winter and breeding ranges in Canada, the United States, Mexico, the Bahamas, and the Greater Antilles are conducted every 5 years. In 1996, 1200 biologists and volunteers participated in the second International Piping Plover Census, tallying 2515 wintering birds and 5913 adults (2668 breeding pairs) during the breeding census. Winter numbers were 27% lower than those of the first international census conducted in 1991, with substantially fewer wintering birds along the Gulf of Mexico and an overall increase in numbers along the Atlantic Coast. Large numbers of wintering plovers remain undetected. In 1996, the total number of breeding adults was 7.7% higher than in 1991. Regionally, breeding numbers were 31% higher along the Atlantic Coast and 20% higher in the small Great Lakes population, but declined by 5% in the U.S. Great Plains and the Canadian Prairie. Target recovery numbers were met only for Saskatchewan but were approached in Alberta and New England. The results suggest that Piping Plover distribution and habitat use in the U.S. Great Plains/Canadian Prairie region may shift dramatically with water conditions.

  15. Vector magnetometry sensor for internal inspection of gas distribution mains. Final report, February 1995-August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Farra, R.; Fowler, T.

    1997-06-01

    There is a recognized need for an advanced distribution pipe inspection system which can operate in 4` and 6` diameter pipes. This program developed a prototype sensor car based on vector magnetometry. The prototype sensor system was tested in the laboratory. Test data is presented showing defect detection capability for defects as small as 25% of the pipe wall. Field tests were also conducted with mixed results. Varying corrosion levels were observed. However, specific defects were difficult to identify.

  16. Powder Size and Distribution in Ultrasonic Gas Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, G.; Lavernia, E.; Grant, N. J.

    1985-08-01

    Ultrasonic gas atomization (USGA) produces powder sizes dependent on the ratio of the nozzle jet diameter to the distance of spread dt/R, Powder size distribution is attributed to the spread of atomizing gas jets during travel from the nozzle exit to the metal stream. The spread diminishes at higher gas atomization pressures. In this paper, calculated powder sizes and distribution are compared with experimentally determined values.

  17. Coupled pressure and velocity distributions in a pressure-driven flow inside a long pipe with fluid injection through porous walls.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, Alexander L.; Bolshinskiy, Leonid

    2008-04-01

    We are studying steady flows of Newtonian liquids in pipes with porous walls. One end of the pipe is closed; the ambient liquid is injected through the pipe wall under the Darcy-Weisbach law and exits at the open end with a pressure that is kept below the uniform fluid pressure outside the pipe walls. The inside pressure varies with the axial coordinate and is coupled with the varying axial velocity averaged over the cross-section of the pipe. For a long pipe, the Karman-Polhausen averaging of Navier-Stokes equations is used for both laminar and turbulent flow regimes. We obtain a boundary value problem for a nonlinear second-order differential equation governing the velocity distribution and explore numerous flow regimes by numerically solving it. Hence, the pipe pressure is found as a quadratic expression in terms of the velocity derivative. At sufficiently high Reynolds numbers, quite unlike the standard pipe flow with uniform velocity, even the turbulent friction turns out negligible in comparison with the pressure gradient required for accelerating the liquid toward the exit. The inertial approximation allows for an analytic solution. The nonzero-gravity generalization is obtained, and applications to channels with fine-mesh screen walls utilized for the delivery of liquid propellant to the engine at low gravity, are discussed.

  18. Do estrogenic compounds in drinking water migrating from plastic pipe distribution system pose adverse effects to human? An analysis of scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Hua; Yin, Hua; Dang, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    With the widespread application of plastic pipes in drinking water distribution system, the effects of various leachable organic chemicals have been investigated and their occurrence in drinking water supplies is monitored. Most studies focus on the odor problems these substances may cause. This study investigates the potential endocrine disrupting effects of the migrating compound 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol (2,4-d-t-BP). The summarized results show that the migration of 2,4-d-t-BP from plastic pipes could result in chronic exposure and the migration levels varied greatly among different plastic pipe materials and manufacturing brands. Based on estrogen equivalent (EEQ), the migrating levels of the leachable compound 2,4-d-t-BP in most plastic pipes were relative low. However, the EEQ levels in drinking water migrating from four out of 15 pipes may pose significant adverse effects. With the increasingly strict requirements on regulation of drinking water quality, these results indicate that some drinking water transported with plastic pipes may not be safe for human consumption due to the occurrence of 2,4-d-t-BP. Moreover, 2,4-d-t-BP is not the only plastic pipe-migrating estrogenic compound, other compounds such as 2-tert-butylphenol (2-t-BP), 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP), and others may also be leachable from plastic pipes.

  19. [Effect of the change in sulphate and dissolved oxygen mass concentration on metal release in old cast iron distribution pipes].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-li; Shi, Bao-you; Sun, Hui-fang; Zhang, Zhi-huan; Gu, Jun-nong; Wang, Dong-sheng

    2013-09-01

    To understand the processes of corrosion by-product release and the consequent "red water" problems caused by the variation of water chemical composition in drinking water distribution system, the effect of sulphate and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on total iron release in corroded old iron pipe sections historically transporting groundwater was investigated in laboratory using small-scale pipe section reactors. The release behaviors of some low-level metals, such as Mn, As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni, in the process of iron release were also monitored. The results showed that the total iron and Mn release increased significantly with the increase of sulphate concentration, and apparent red water occurred when sulphate concentration was above 400 mg x L(-1). With the increase of sulfate concentration, the effluent concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni also increased obviously, however, the effluent concentrations of these metals were lower than the influent concentrations under most circumstances, which indicated that adsorption of these metals by pipe corrosion scales occurred. Increasing DO within a certain range could significantly inhibit the iron release.

  20. Detection and Characterization of Malathion Adherence to Piping Materials Used in Water Distribution Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    material is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-096...Dr. Michael Shelley, PhD Member v AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-096 Abstract " Protection of the public water supply is a national security priority...pipe materials with mass measurements and XPS." vi Acknowledgements First, I would like to thank the United States Environmental Protection

  1. Multi-risk assessment of L'Aquila gas distribution network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Iervolino, I.; Silvestri, F.; d'Onofrio, A.; Santo, A.; Franchin, P.; Cavalieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    This study focuses on the assessment of seismic risk for gas distribution networks. The basic function of a gas system is to deliver gas from sources to costumers and it is essentially composed of pipelines, reduction stations, and demand nodes, which are connected to end users to which the lifeline delivers gas. Because most of the components are spatially distributed and buried, seismic hazard has to account for both spatial correlation of ground motion intensity measures and effects induced by permanent ground deformation such as liquefaction and landslide, which determine localized ground failure. Different performance measures are considered in the study for the network, in terms of connectivity and flow reduction. Part of the gas distribution network operating in L'Aquila (central Italy), operated by ENEL Rete Gas spa has been chosen as case study. The whole network is distributed via a 621 km pipeline network: 234 km of pipes operating at medium pressure and the remaining 387 km with gas flowing at low pressure; it also consists of Metering/Pressure reduction stations, Reduction Groups and demand nodes. The framework presented makes use of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, both in terms of ground motion and permanent ground deformation, empirical relations to estimate pipeline response, fragility curves for the evaluation of reduction cabins vulnerability, performance indicators to characterize the functionality of the gas network. The analysis were performed through a computer code specific for risk assessment of distributed systems developed by the authors. Probabilistic hazard scenarios have been simulated for the region covering the case study considering the Paganica fault on which L'Aquila 2009 earthquake was originated as source. The strong motion has been evaluated using an European ground motion prediction equation and an associated spatial correlation model. Regarding geotechnical hazards the landslide potential of L'Aquila region, according

  2. 78 FR 55072 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all areas subject...

  3. Ultrasonic sensing for noninvasive characterization of oil-water-gas flow in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillara, Vamshi Krishna; Sturtevant, Blake T.; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2017-02-01

    A technique for noninvasive ultrasonic characterization of multiphase crude oil-water-gas flow is discussed. The proposed method relies on determining the sound speed in the mixture. First, important issues associated with making real-time noninvasive measurements are discussed. Then, signal processing approach adopted to determine the sound speed in the multiphase mixture is presented. Finally, results from controlled experiments on crude oil-water mixture in both the presence and absence of gas are presented.

  4. Heat Pipe With Interrupted Slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F.; Kosson, Robert L.; Edelstein, Fred

    1994-01-01

    Newer version of heat pipe slot interrupted by plug or, if heat pipe is cast, by bridge of heat-pipe material cast integrally across groove. Small barrier assists in priming heat pipe. Vapor and noncondensible gas still accumulates in liquid channel at evaporator before or during startup, but barrier keeps liquid out of small part of slot at bubble. Dry part of slot allows bubble to escape into vapor channel, making room for liquid to move in during startup.

  5. Heat pipe life and processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniuk, D.; Luedke, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    The merit of adding water to the reflux charge in chemically and solvent cleaned aluminum/slab wick/ammonia heat pipes was evaluated. The effect of gas in the performance of three heat pipe thermal control systems was found significant in simple heat pipes, less significant in a modified simple heat pipe model with a short wickless pipe section. Use of gas data for the worst and best heat pipes of the matrix in a variable conductance heat pipe model showed a 3 C increase in the source temperature at full on condition after 20 and 246 years, respectively.

  6. Modeling Gas Distribution in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Martin; Lewis, Josiah; Brittain, Sean

    2010-07-01

    Protoplanetary accretion disks are disks of dust and gas which surround and feed material onto a forming star in the earliest stages of its evolution. One of the most useful methods for studying these disks is near infrared spectroscopy of rovibrational CO emission. This paper presents the methods in which synthetically generated spectra are modeled and fit to spectral data gathered from protoplanetary disks. This paper also discussed the methods in which this code can be improved by modifying the code to run a Monte Carlo analysis of best fit across the CONDOR cluster at Clemson University, thereby allowing for the creation of a catalog of protoplanetary disks with detailed information about them as gathered from the model.

  7. Performance and reliability analysis of water distribution systems under cascading failures and the identification of crucial pipes.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Qing; Zhang, Mingyuan; Yuan, Yongbo

    2014-01-01

    As a mean of supplying water, Water distribution system (WDS) is one of the most important complex infrastructures. The stability and reliability are critical for urban activities. WDSs can be characterized by networks of multiple nodes (e.g. reservoirs and junctions) and interconnected by physical links (e.g. pipes). Instead of analyzing highest failure rate or highest betweenness, reliability of WDS is evaluated by introducing hydraulic analysis and cascading failures (conductive failure pattern) from complex network. The crucial pipes are identified eventually. The proposed methodology is illustrated by an example. The results show that the demand multiplier has a great influence on the peak of reliability and the persistent time of the cascading failures in its propagation in WDS. The time period when the system has the highest reliability is when the demand multiplier is less than 1. There is a threshold of tolerance parameter exists. When the tolerance parameter is less than the threshold, the time period with the highest system reliability does not meet minimum value of demand multiplier. The results indicate that the system reliability should be evaluated with the properties of WDS and the characteristics of cascading failures, so as to improve its ability of resisting disasters.

  8. Performance and Reliability Analysis of Water Distribution Systems under Cascading Failures and the Identification of Crucial Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Qing; Zhang, Mingyuan; Yuan, Yongbo

    2014-01-01

    As a mean of supplying water, Water distribution system (WDS) is one of the most important complex infrastructures. The stability and reliability are critical for urban activities. WDSs can be characterized by networks of multiple nodes (e.g. reservoirs and junctions) and interconnected by physical links (e.g. pipes). Instead of analyzing highest failure rate or highest betweenness, reliability of WDS is evaluated by introducing hydraulic analysis and cascading failures (conductive failure pattern) from complex network. The crucial pipes are identified eventually. The proposed methodology is illustrated by an example. The results show that the demand multiplier has a great influence on the peak of reliability and the persistent time of the cascading failures in its propagation in WDS. The time period when the system has the highest reliability is when the demand multiplier is less than 1. There is a threshold of tolerance parameter exists. When the tolerance parameter is less than the threshold, the time period with the highest system reliability does not meet minimum value of demand multiplier. The results indicate that the system reliability should be evaluated with the properties of WDS and the characteristics of cascading failures, so as to improve its ability of resisting disasters. PMID:24551102

  9. Structure and microbial diversity of biofilms on different pipe materials of a model drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Rożej, Agnieszka; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Kowalska, Beata; Kowalski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was conducted in three model drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) made of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC), silane cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes to which tap water was introduced. After 2 years of system operation, microbial communities in the DWDSs were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, heterotrophic plate count, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The most extensive biofilms were found in HDPE pipes where bacteria were either attached to mineral deposits or immersed in exopolymers. On PEX surfaces, bacteria did not form large aggregates; however, they were present in the highest number (1.24 × 10(7) cells cm(-2)). PVC biofilm did not contain mineral deposits but was made of single cells with a high abundance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can be harmful to human health. The members of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found in all biofilms and the water phase. Sphingomonadales and Methylophilaceae bacteria were found only in PEX samples, whereas Geothrix fermentans, which can reduce Fe(III), were identified only in PEX biofilm. The DNA sequences closely related to the members of Alphaproteobacteria were the most characteristic and intense amplicons detected in the HDPE biofilm.

  10. Distribution of the background gas in the MITICA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Dal Bello, S.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2013-02-01

    MITICA is the ITER neutral beam test facility to be built in Padova for the generation of a 40A D- ion beam with a 16×5×16 array of 1280 beamlets accelerated to 1MV. The background gas pressure distribution and the particle flows inside MITICA accelerator are critical aspects for stripping losses, generation of secondary particles and beam non-uniformities. To keep the stripping losses in the extraction and acceleration stages reasonably low, the source pressure should be 0.3 Pa or less. The gas flow in MITICA accelerator is being studied using a 3D Finite Element code, named Avocado. The gas-wall interaction model is based on the cosine law, and the whole vacuum system geometry is represented by a view factor matrix based on surface discretization and gas property definitions. Pressure distribution and mutual fluxes are then solved linearly. In this paper the result of a numerical simulation is presented, showing the steady-state pressure distribution inside the accelerator when gas enters the system at room temperature. The accelerator model is limited to a horizontal slice 400 mm high (1/4 of the accelerator height). The pressure profile at solid walls and through the beamlet axis is obtained, allowing the evaluation and the discussion of the background gas distribution and nonuniformity. The particle flux at the inlet and outlet boundaries (namely the grounded grid apertures and the lateral conductances respectively) will be discussed.

  11. The molecular gas content of the Pipe Nebula. I. Direct evidence of outflow-generated turbulence in B59?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Cabral, A.; Chrysostomou, A.; Peretto, N.; Fuller, G. A.; Matthews, B.; Schieven, G.; Davis, G. R.

    2012-07-01

    Context. Star forming regions may share many characteristics, but the specific interplay between gravity, magnetic fields, large-scale dynamics, and protostellar feedback will have an impact on the star formation history of each region. The importance of feedback from outflows is a particular subject to debate, as we are yet to understand the details of their impact on clouds and star formation. Aims: The Pipe Nebula is a nearby molecular cloud hosting the B59 region as its only active star-forming clump. This paper focuses on the global dynamics of B59, its temperature structure, and its outflowing gas, with the goal of revealing the local and global impact of the protostellar outflows. Methods: Using HARP at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, we have mapped the B59 region in the J = 3 → 2 transition of 12CO to study the kinematics and energetics of the outflows, and the same transitions of 13CO and C18O to study the overall dynamics of the ambient cloud, the physical properties of the gas, and the hierarchical structure of the region. Results: The B59 region has a total of ~30 M⊙ of cold and quiescent material, mostly gravitationally bound, with narrow line widths throughout. Such low levels of turbulence in the non-star-forming regions within B59 are indicative of the intrinsic initial conditions of the cloud. On the other hand, close to the protostars the impact of the outflows is observed as a localised increase of both C18O line widths from ~0.3 km s-1 to ~1 km s-1, and 13CO excitation temperatures by ~2-3 K. The impact of the outflows is also evident in the low column density material which shows signs of being shaped by the outflow bow shocks as they pierce their way out of the cloud. Much of this structure is readily apparent in a dendrogram analysis of the cloud and demonstrates that when decomposing clouds using such techniques a careful interpretation of the results is needed. Conclusions: The low mass of B59 together with its intrinsically

  12. A perspective on cost-effectiveness of greenhouse gas reduction solutions in water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Thomas P.; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Water distribution systems (WDSs) face great challenges as aging infrastructures require significant investments in rehabilitation, replacement, and expansion. Reducing environmental impacts as WDSs develop is essential for utility managers and policy makers. This study quantifies the existing greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of common WDS elements using life-cycle assessment (LCA) while identifying the greatest opportunities for emission reduction. This study addresses oversights of the related literature, which fails to capture several WDS elements and to provide detailed life-cycle inventories. The life-cycle inventory results for a US case study utility reveal that 81% of GHGs are from pumping energy, where a large portion of these emissions are a result of distribution leaks, which account for 270 billion l of water losses daily in the United States. Pipe replacement scheduling is analyzed from an environmental perspective where, through incorporating leak impacts, a tool reveals that optimal replacement is no more than 20 years, which is in contrast to the US average of 200 years. Carbon abatement costs (CACs) are calculated for different leak reduction scenarios for the case utility that range from -130 to 35 t-1 CO2(eq). Including life-cycle modeling in evaluating pipe materials identified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cement-lined ductile iron (DICL) as the Pareto efficient options, however; utilizing PVC presents human health risks. The model developed for the case utility is applied to California and Texas to determine the CACs of reducing leaks to 5% of distributed water. For California, annual GHG savings from reducing leaks alone (3.4 million tons of CO2(eq)) are found to exceed California Air Resources Board’s estimate for energy efficiency improvements in the state’s water infrastructure.

  13. Pyrosequencing reveals bacterial communities in unchlorinated drinking water distribution system: an integral study of bulk water, suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Bakker, G L; Li, S; Vreeburg, J H G; Verberk, J Q J C; Medema, G J; Liu, W T; Van Dijk, J C

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  14. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution W Table W Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum and Natural Gas... for Natural Gas Distribution Natural gas distribution Emission factor (scf/hour/component)...

  15. Methane Leaks from Natural Gas Systems Follow Extreme Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Adam R.; Heath, Garvin A.; Cooley, Daniel

    2016-10-14

    Future energy systems may rely on natural gas as a low-cost fuel to support variable renewable power. However, leaking natural gas causes climate damage because methane (CH4) has a high global warming potential. In this study, we use extreme-value theory to explore the distribution of natural gas leak sizes. By analyzing ~15,000 measurements from 18 prior studies, we show that all available natural gas leakage datasets are statistically heavy-tailed, and that gas leaks are more extremely distributed than other natural and social phenomena. A unifying result is that the largest 5% of leaks typically contribute over 50% of the total leakage volume. While prior studies used lognormal model distributions, we show that lognormal functions poorly represent tail behavior. Our results suggest that published uncertainty ranges of CH4 emissions are too narrow, and that larger sample sizes are required in future studies to achieve targeted confidence intervals. Additionally, we find that cross-study aggregation of datasets to increase sample size is not recommended due to apparent deviation between sampled populations. Finally, understanding the nature of leak distributions can improve emission estimates, better illustrate their uncertainty, allow prioritization of source categories, and improve sampling design. Also, these data can be used for more effective design of leak detection technologies.

  16. Methane Leaks from Natural Gas Systems Follow Extreme Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Brandt, Adam R.; Heath, Garvin A.; Cooley, Daniel

    2016-10-14

    Future energy systems may rely on natural gas as a low-cost fuel to support variable renewable power. However, leaking natural gas causes climate damage because methane (CH4) has a high global warming potential. In this study, we use extreme-value theory to explore the distribution of natural gas leak sizes. By analyzing ~15,000 measurements from 18 prior studies, we show that all available natural gas leakage datasets are statistically heavy-tailed, and that gas leaks are more extremely distributed than other natural and social phenomena. A unifying result is that the largest 5% of leaks typically contribute over 50% of the totalmore » leakage volume. While prior studies used lognormal model distributions, we show that lognormal functions poorly represent tail behavior. Our results suggest that published uncertainty ranges of CH4 emissions are too narrow, and that larger sample sizes are required in future studies to achieve targeted confidence intervals. Additionally, we find that cross-study aggregation of datasets to increase sample size is not recommended due to apparent deviation between sampled populations. Finally, understanding the nature of leak distributions can improve emission estimates, better illustrate their uncertainty, allow prioritization of source categories, and improve sampling design. Also, these data can be used for more effective design of leak detection technologies.« less

  17. Methane Leaks from Natural Gas Systems Follow Extreme Distributions.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam R; Heath, Garvin A; Cooley, Daniel

    2016-11-15

    Future energy systems may rely on natural gas as a low-cost fuel to support variable renewable power. However, leaking natural gas causes climate damage because methane (CH4) has a high global warming potential. In this study, we use extreme-value theory to explore the distribution of natural gas leak sizes. By analyzing ∼15 000 measurements from 18 prior studies, we show that all available natural gas leakage data sets are statistically heavy-tailed, and that gas leaks are more extremely distributed than other natural and social phenomena. A unifying result is that the largest 5% of leaks typically contribute over 50% of the total leakage volume. While prior studies used log-normal model distributions, we show that log-normal functions poorly represent tail behavior. Our results suggest that published uncertainty ranges of CH4 emissions are too narrow, and that larger sample sizes are required in future studies to achieve targeted confidence intervals. Additionally, we find that cross-study aggregation of data sets to increase sample size is not recommended due to apparent deviation between sampled populations. Understanding the nature of leak distributions can improve emission estimates, better illustrate their uncertainty, allow prioritization of source categories, and improve sampling design. Also, these data can be used for more effective design of leak detection technologies.

  18. Numerical simulation of landfill gas pressure distribution in landfills.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yonghui; Xiong, Hao

    2013-11-01

    Landfill gas emissions are recognized as one of the three major concerns in municipal solid waste landfills. There are many factors that affect the generation of landfill gas when the landfill is capped. In this article, a model has been developed based on the theory of porous media flow. The model could predict the pressure distribution of landfill gas in landfill, coupling the effect of landfill settlement. According to the simulation analysis of landfill, it was found that: (a) the landfill gas pressure would reach a peak after 1.5 years, then begin to decline, and the rate of decay would slow down after 10 years; (b) the influence radius of the gas wells is limited; (c) the peak value of landfill gas pressure is larger, it appears later and the rate of decay is slower when the landfill settlement is considered in the model; (d) the calculation of excess gas pressure in landfill under different negative pressures of the extraction well is compared between this model and another model, and the results show that the relative pressure distribution form and range are almost the same.

  19. 75 FR 59705 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Bay Gas Storage, LLC; Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Dow Intrastate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Distribution LLC; Bay Gas Storage, LLC; Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Dow Intrastate Gas Company; ONEOK Field Services Company, L.L.C.; Corning Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filings September 21,...

  20. Literature review and experimental investigation of heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsch, W. O.; Schoenhals, R. J.; Viskanta, R.; Winter, E. R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Tests on heat pipes determine operational limits, external boundary conditions, noncondensable gas effects, startup behavior, and geometric configurations. Experiment consists of design, construction, and testing of an apparatus for measuring wick properties, conventional heat pipes and coplanar heat pipes.

  1. Trans-Sahara pipe line would deliver Nigeria gas to Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Muenzler, M.H.

    1983-11-01

    Bechtel has made an in-house study of a natural gas transmission line extending from Nigeria to the Mediterranean and then on into Europe. Based upon the analysis, the pipeline project appears sufficiently viable to warrant further study. Perhaps the single most important element in design of pipelines crossing international borders is the political aspects involved in constructing, owning, and operating the line. These considerations not only effect the location of the pipeline, the manner of financing and ownership, but also whether the line will be constructed. The line crosses several international boundaries, depending upon the route selected. Each route crosses Niger. Case A crosses Algeria and into Tunisia where it ultimately would cross the Strait of Sicily into Italy. Case B crosses the Niger- Algerian border and then traverses Algeria to the Mediterranean where it is planned to connect to the Segamo pipeline and to link with the pipeline network in Spain. Case C crosses the countries of Niger, Mali, Mauritania, and into Morocco, and ultimately crosses the Mediterranean Sea close to the Strait of Gibraltar. Nigeria has proven natural gas reserves estimated to range from 2.5 to 4 trillion cu m (38 to 140 tcf).

  2. Distribution of Asellus aquaticus and microinvertebrates in a non-chlorinated drinking water supply system--effects of pipe material and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sarah C B; Nissen, Erling; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2011-05-01

    Danish drinking water supplies based on ground water without chlorination were investigated for the presence of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, microinvertebrates (<2 mm) and annelida. In total, 52 water samples were collected from fire hydrants at 31 locations, and two elevated tanks (6000 and 36,000 m(3)) as well as one clean water tank at a waterworks (700 m(3)) were inspected. Several types of invertebrates from the phyla: arthropoda, annelida (worms), plathyhelminthes (flatworms) and mollusca (snails) were found. Invertebrates were found at 94% of the sampling sites in the piped system with A. aquaticus present at 55% of the sampling sites. Populations of A. aquaticus were present in the two investigated elevated tanks but not in the clean water tank at a waterworks. Both adult and juvenile A. aquaticus (length of 2-10 mm) were found in tanks as well as in pipes. A. aquaticus was found only in samples collected from two of seven investigated distribution zones (zone 1 and 2), each supplied directly by one of the two investigated elevated tanks containing A. aquaticus. Microinvertebrates were distributed throughout all zones. The distribution pattern of A. aquaticus had not changed considerably over 20 years when compared to data from samples collected in 1988-89. Centrifugal pumps have separated the distribution zones during the whole period and may have functioned as physical barriers in the distribution systems, preventing large invertebrates such as A. aquaticus to pass alive. Another factor characterising zone 1 and 2 was the presence of cast iron pipes. The frequency of A. aquaticus was significantly higher in cast iron pipes than in plastic pipes. A. aquaticus caught from plastic pipes were mainly single living specimens or dead specimens, which may have been transported passively trough by the water flow, while cast iron pipes provided an environment suitable for relatively large populations of A. aquaticus. Sediment volume for each sample was

  3. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

  4. 78 FR 56685 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on August 27, 2013, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas), 600 12th Street, Suite 300, Golden, Colorado 80401..., without further commission authorization, provide natural gas distribution service. SourceGas...

  5. Plastic pipe insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Diskin, J.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1987 KPL changed all that when the utility inserted 1,000 ft of 16-in. SDR 15.5 Phillips Driscopipe 8000 pipe with a wall thickness of 1.032-in., into an abandoned 24-in. cast-iron line in downtown Kansas City. This is believed to be the largest diameter insert removal job ever done for gas distribution in the U.S. For KPL it was a natural progression from the smaller sizes used earlier. The procedure is the same, and the operation was quick and comparatively simple. Lower construction costs were the bottom line because with insert renewal there is no need to cut up the streets, a major expense in any urban pipeline work. There are other significant costs savings as well because the insert renewal construction process is faster than other techniques.

  6. 46 CFR 154.310 - Cargo piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo piping systems. 154.310 Section 154.310 Shipping... Arrangements § 154.310 Cargo piping systems. Cargo liquid or vapor piping must: (a) Be separated from other piping systems, except where an interconnection to inert gas or purge piping is required by §...

  7. The Gas Distribution in the Outer Regions of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present our analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We have exploited the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius, We stacked the density profiles to detect a signal beyond T200 and measured the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also computed the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compared our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict density profiles that are too steep, whereas runs including additional physics and/ or treating gas clumping agree better with the observed gas distribution. We report high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non cool-core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only small differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the ENZO simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside

  8. The Gas Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Laue, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r200 and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or treating gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We report for the first time the high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside cluster

  9. Heat pipes for spacecraft temperature control: An assessment of the state-of-the-art. [gas, vapor, liquid, and voltage control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groll, M.; Kirkpatrick, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Spacecraft applications that require the efficient cooling of high-powered components, the precise temperature control of sensitive electronic and optical components, and the protection of cooled components from temporary, adverse environmental conditions are increasing. Heat pipes using gas, vapor, liquid, or voltage control to provide variable conductance or diode thermal behavior have been and are continuing to be developed to meet increasingly difficult requirements. The various control techniques are critically evaluated using characteristic features and properties, including heat transport capability, volume and mass requirements, complexity and ease of fabrication, reliability, and control characteristics. As a result, advantages and disadvantages of specific approaches are derived and discussed. Using four development levels, the state-of-the-art of the various heat pipe temperature control techniques is assessed.

  10. Characterization of biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system with UV/Cl2 disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Li, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Chun; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-09-01

    The effect of UV/Cl2 disinfection on the biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). Passivation occurred more rapidly in the AR with UV/Cl2 than in the one with Cl2 alone, decreasing iron release for higher corrosivity of water. Based on functional gene, pyrosequencing assays and principal component analysis, UV disinfection not only reduced the required initial chlorine dose, but also enhanced denitrifying functional bacteria advantage in the biofilm of corrosion scales. The nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Dechloromonas exhibited the greatest corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4 in the AR with UV/Cl2, while the rhizobia Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium, and the NRB Sphingomonas, Brucella producing siderophores had weaker corrosion-inhibition effect by capturing iron in the AR with Cl2. These results indicated that the microbial redox cycling of iron was possibly responsible for higher corrosion inhibition and lower effect of water Larson-Skold Index (LI) changes on corrosion. This finding could be applied toward the control of water quality in drinking water distribution systems.

  11. Radon gas distribution in natural gas processing facilities and workplace air environment.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Shwiekani, R

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation was made of the distribution of radon gas and radiation exposure rates in the four main natural gas treatment facilities in Syria. The results showed that radiation exposure rates at contact of all equipment were within the natural levels (0.09-0.1 microSvh(-1)) except for the reflex pumps where a dose rate value of 3 microSvh(-1) was recorded. Radon concentrations in Syrian natural gas varied between 15.4 Bq m(-3) and 1141 Bq m(-3); natural gas associated with oil production was found to contain higher concentrations than the non-associated natural gas. In addition, radon concentrations were higher in the central processing facilities than the wellheads; these high levels are due to pressurizing and concentrating processes that enhance radon gas and its decay products. Moreover, the lowest 222Rn concentration was in the natural gas fraction used for producing sulfur; a value of 80 Bq m(-3) was observed. On the other hand, maximum radon gas and its decay product concentrations in workplace air environments were found to be relatively high in the gas analysis laboratories; a value of 458 Bq m(-3) was observed. However, all reported levels in the workplaces in the four main stations were below the action level set by IAEA for chronic exposure situations involving radon, which is 1000 Bq m(-3).

  12. Thermal blooming on laser propagation in an aspirating pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuyin; Wang, Jihong; Ren, Ge; Tan, Yufeng; Zhu, Nengbing; Ai, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    Thermal blooming effect of gas on laser propagation can seriously degrade performance of far-field beam quality and energy distribution. Numerical simulation is carried out to study the influences of thermal blooming on laser propagation in line pipes. A physical model of thermal blooming effect of gas on laser propagation in an aspirating pipe is established. Axial flow and suction in the outlet are used to attenuate the thermal blooming effect. Based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, stable calculation of flow field is carried out first, then the optical field and the fluent field is coupling calculated by means of user defined function (UDF). The results show that radial flow is enhanced in the aspirating pipe and the index of refraction gradient caused by thermal blooming effect is decreased. It is indicated that the beam quality of the outlet is improved compared with the pipe model without aspirating. The optical path difference (OPD) distribution of the outlet is analyzed and decomposed by Zernike polynomials. It is shown that the defocus item of 4m aspirating pipe is decreased more than an order of magnitude compared with the 4m pipe without aspirating.

  13. A scaling law of radial gas distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1990-01-01

    Based on the idea that local conditions within a galactic disk largely determine the region's evolution time scale, researchers built a theoretical model to take into account molecular cloud and star formations in the disk evolution process. Despite some variations that may be caused by spiral arms and central bulge masses, they found that many late-type galaxies show consistency with the model in their radial atomic and molecular gas profiles. In particular, researchers propose that a scaling law be used to generalize the gas distribution characteristics. This scaling law may be useful in helping to understand the observed gas contents in many galaxies. Their model assumes an exponential mass distribution with disk radius. Most of the mass are in atomic gas state at the beginning of the evolution. Molecular clouds form through a modified Schmidt Law which takes into account gravitational instabilities in a possible three-phase structure of diffuse interstellar medium (McKee and Ostriker, 1977; Balbus and Cowie, 1985); whereas star formation proceeds presumably unaffected by the environmental conditions outside of molecular clouds (Young, 1987). In such a model both atomic and molecular gas profiles in a typical galactic disk (as a result of the evolution) can be fitted simultaneously by adjusting the efficiency constants. Galaxies of different sizes and masses, on the other hand, can be compared with the model by simply scaling their characteristic length scales and shifting their radial ranges to match the assumed disk total mass profile sigma tot(r).

  14. 46 CFR 153.280 - Piping system design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping system design. 153.280 Section 153.280 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.280 Piping system design. (a) Each cargo piping system must...

  15. 46 CFR 153.280 - Piping system design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping system design. 153.280 Section 153.280 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.280 Piping system design. (a) Each cargo piping system must...

  16. 46 CFR 153.280 - Piping system design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping system design. 153.280 Section 153.280 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.280 Piping system design. (a) Each cargo piping system must...

  17. Heat Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction, function, and applications of heat pipes. Suggests using the heat pipe to teach principles related to heat transfer and gives sources for obtaining instructional kits for this purpose. (GS)

  18. Pipe Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of attention to plumbing in college facilities, offering examples from various campuses. Addresses preventive maintenance, technology, and piping materials, including the debate between cast iron and PVC for drain pipes. (EV)

  19. Application of Entropy Concept for Shear Stress Distribution in Laminar Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Yeon Moon; Choo, Tai Ho; Jung, Donghwi; Seon, Yun Gwan; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In the river fluid mechanics, shear stress is calculated from frictional force caused by viscosity and fluctuating velocity. Traditional shear stress distribution equations have been widely used because of their simplicity. However, they have a critical limitation of requiring energy gradient which is generally difficult to estimate in practice. Especially, measuring velocity/velocity gradient on the boundary layer is difficult in practice. It requires point velocity throughout the entire cross section to calculate velocity gradient. This study proposes shear stress distribution equations for laminar flow based on entropy theory using mean velocity and entropy coefficient. The proposed equations are demonstrated and compared with measured shear stress distribution using Nikuradse's data. Results showed that the coefficient of determination is around 0.99 indicating that the proposed method well describes the true shear stress distribution. Therefore, it was proved that shear stress distribution can be easily and accurately estimated by using the proposed equations. (This research was supported by a gran(13AWMP-B066744-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean Government)

  20. Multiobjective optimization of water distribution systems accounting for economic cost, hydraulic reliability, and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenyan; Maier, Holger R.; Simpson, Angus R.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, three objectives are considered for the optimization of water distribution systems (WDSs): the traditional objectives of minimizing economic cost and maximizing hydraulic reliability and the recently proposed objective of minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is particularly important to include the GHG minimization objective for WDSs involving pumping into storages or water transmission systems (WTSs), as these systems are the main contributors of GHG emissions in the water industry. In order to better understand the nature of tradeoffs among these three objectives, the shape of the solution space and the location of the Pareto-optimal front in the solution space are investigated for WTSs and WDSs that include pumping into storages, and the implications of the interaction between the three objectives are explored from a practical design perspective. Through three case studies, it is found that the solution space is a U-shaped curve rather than a surface, as the tradeoffs among the three objectives are dominated by the hydraulic reliability objective. The Pareto-optimal front of real-world systems is often located at the "elbow" section and lower "arm" of the solution space (i.e., the U-shaped curve), indicating that it is more economic to increase the hydraulic reliability of these systems by increasing pipe capacity (i.e., pipe diameter) compared to increasing pumping power. Solutions having the same GHG emission level but different cost-reliability tradeoffs often exist. Therefore, the final decision needs to be made in conjunction with expert knowledge and the specific budget and reliability requirements of the system.

  1. 78 FR 10261 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for the revision of the gas distribution annual report... Report PHMSA intends to revise the gas distribution annual report (PHMSA F 7100.1-1, gas...

  2. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETING GAS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM ONTO CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate gas accretion flow onto a circumplanetary disk from a protoplanetary disk in detail by using high-resolution three-dimensional nested-grid hydrodynamic simulations, in order to provide a basis of formation processes of satellites around giant planets. Based on detailed analyses of gas accretion flow, we find that most of gas accretion onto circumplanetary disks occurs nearly vertically toward the disk surface from high altitude, which generates a shock surface at several scale heights of the circumplanetary disk. The gas that has passed through the shock surface moves inward because its specific angular momentum is smaller than that of the local Keplerian rotation, while gas near the midplane in the protoplanetary disk cannot accrete to the circumplanetary disk. Gas near the midplane within the planet's Hill sphere spirals outward and escapes from the Hill sphere through the two Lagrangian points L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}. We also analyze fluxes of accreting mass and angular momentum in detail and find that the distributions of the fluxes onto the disk surface are well described by power-law functions and that a large fraction of gas accretion occurs at the outer region of the disk, i.e., at about 0.1 times the Hill radius. The nature of power-law functions indicates that, other than the outer edge, there is no specific radius where gas accretion is concentrated. These source functions of mass and angular momentum in the circumplanetary disk would provide us with useful constraints on the structure and evolution of the circumplanetary disk, which is important for satellite formation.

  3. Insulating Cryogenic Pipes With Frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Bova, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Crystallized water vapor fills voids in pipe insulation. Small, carefully controlled amount of water vapor introduced into dry nitrogen gas before it enters aft fuselage. Vapor freezes on pipes, filling cracks in insulation. Ice prevents gaseous nitrogen from condensing on pipes and dripping on structure, in addition to helping to insulate all parts. Industrial applications include large refrigeration plants or facilities that use cryogenic liquids.

  4. THE OCCURRENCE OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION IN LEAD PIPE SCALES FROM DOMESTIC DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that contaminants, such as Al, As and Ra, can accumulate in drinking water distribution system solids. The release of accumulated contaminants back into the water supply could result in elevated levels at consumers’ taps, and current monitoring practices d...

  5. The Adsorption of Arsenic on Iron Pipes in Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to remain compliant with the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper rule, it is pivotal to understand the relationship between factors affecting lead release in drinking water distribution systems. Lead solids were synthesized in cell experiments using a pH range of 6-11 with both 1...

  6. Mineralogical and Molecular Microbial Characterization of a Lead Pipe Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) Lead and Copper Rule established an action level for lead of 0.0 15 mg/L in a 1 liter first draw sample at the consumer's tap. Lead corrosion and solubility in drinking water distribution systems are largely controlled by the fo...

  7. Gas-leak localization using distributed ultrasonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseynov, Javid; Baliga, Shankar; Dillencourt, Michael; Bic, Lubomir; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    2009-03-01

    We propose an ultrasonic gas leak localization system based on a distributed network of sensors. The system deploys highly sensitive miniature Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) microphones and uses a suite of energy-decay (ED) and time-delay of arrival (TDOA) algorithms for localizing a source of a gas leak. Statistical tools such as the maximum likelihood (ML) and the least squares (LS) estimators are used for approximating the source location when closed-form solutions fail in the presence of ambient background nuisance and inherent electronic noise. The proposed localization algorithms were implemented and tested using a Java-based simulation platform connected to four or more distributed MEMS microphones observing a broadband nitrogen leak from an orifice. The performance of centralized and decentralized algorithms under ED and TDOA schemes is analyzed and compared in terms of communication overhead and accuracy in presence of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN).

  8. A novel radial anode layer ion source for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification—Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon coatings from butane gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, Peter P.; Markwitz, Andreas; Suschke, Konrad; Futter, John

    2014-08-01

    We report a new ion source development for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification. The ion source deposits coatings simultaneously in a 360° radial geometry and can be used to coat inner walls of pipelines by simply moving the ion source in the pipe. Rotating parts are not required, making the source ideal for rough environments and minimizing maintenance and replacements of parts. First results are reported for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on Si and stainless steel substrates deposited using a novel 360° ion source design. The ion source operates with permanent magnets and uses a single power supply for the anode voltage and ion acceleration up to 10 kV. Butane (C4H10) gas is used to coat the inner wall of pipes with smooth and homogeneous DLC coatings with thicknesses up to 5 μm in a short time using a deposition rate of 70 ± 10 nm min-1. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results showed that DLC coatings contain hydrogen up to 30 ± 3% indicating deposition of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) coatings. Coatings with good adhesion are achieved when using a multiple energy implantation regime. Raman spectroscopy results suggest slightly larger disordered DLC layers when using low ion energy, indicating higher sp3 bonds in DLC coatings. The results show that commercially interesting coatings can be achieved in short time.

  9. A novel radial anode layer ion source for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification--hydrogenated diamond-like carbon coatings from butane gas.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Peter P; Markwitz, Andreas; Suschke, Konrad; Futter, John

    2014-08-01

    We report a new ion source development for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification. The ion source deposits coatings simultaneously in a 360° radial geometry and can be used to coat inner walls of pipelines by simply moving the ion source in the pipe. Rotating parts are not required, making the source ideal for rough environments and minimizing maintenance and replacements of parts. First results are reported for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on Si and stainless steel substrates deposited using a novel 360° ion source design. The ion source operates with permanent magnets and uses a single power supply for the anode voltage and ion acceleration up to 10 kV. Butane (C4H10) gas is used to coat the inner wall of pipes with smooth and homogeneous DLC coatings with thicknesses up to 5 μm in a short time using a deposition rate of 70 ± 10 nm min(-1). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results showed that DLC coatings contain hydrogen up to 30 ± 3% indicating deposition of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) coatings. Coatings with good adhesion are achieved when using a multiple energy implantation regime. Raman spectroscopy results suggest slightly larger disordered DLC layers when using low ion energy, indicating higher sp(3) bonds in DLC coatings. The results show that commercially interesting coatings can be achieved in short time.

  10. Effects of disinfectant and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipes in a reclaimed water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Hu, Xuexiang; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2012-03-15

    The effects of disinfection and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipe in a model reclaimed water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). The corrosion scales formed under different conditions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the bacterial characteristics of biofilm on the surface were determined using several molecular methods. The corrosion scales from the ARs with chlorine included predominantly α-FeOOH and Fe2O3, while CaPO3(OH)·2H2O and α-FeOOH were the predominant phases after chloramines replaced chlorine. Studies of the consumption of chlorine and iron release indicated that the formation of dense oxide layers and biofilm inhibited iron corrosion, causing stable lower chlorine decay. It was verified that iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB) such as Sediminibacterium sp., and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) such as Shewanella sp., synergistically interacted with the corrosion product to prevent further corrosion. For the ARs without disinfection, α-FeOOH was the predominant phase at the primary stage, while CaCO3 and α-FeOOH were predominant with increasing time. The mixed corrosion-inducing bacteria, including the IRB Shewanella sp., the IOB Sediminibacterium sp., and the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) Limnobacter thioxidans strain, promoted iron corrosion by synergistic interactions in the primary period, while anaerobic IRB became the predominant corrosion bacteria, preventing further corrosion via the formation of protective layers.

  11. Visualization of the freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe - Effects of non-condensible gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1991-01-01

    The freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe of rectangular cross section were investigated experimentally to determine the effect of variations in the amount of non-condensible gases (NCG) present. The transient internal temperature profiles in both the liquid and vapor channels are presented along with contours of the frozen fluid configuration obtained through visual observation. Several interesting phenomena were observed including total blockage of the vapor channel by a solid plug, evaporator dryout during restart, and freezing blowby. In addition, the restart characteristics are shown to be strongly dependent upon the shutdown procedure used prior to freezing, indicating that accurate prediction of the startup or restart characteristics requires a complete thermal history. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the freeze/thaw characteristics of room temperature heat pipes may be significantly different from those occurring in higher temperature, liquid metal heat pipes due to differences in the vapor pressures in the frozen condition.

  12. 3D modeling of gas/water distribution in water-bearing carbonate gas reservoirs: the Longwangmiao gas field, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Chenghua; Li, ChaoChun; Ma, Zhonggao

    2016-10-01

    A water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir is an important natural gas resource being developed worldwide. Due to the long-term water/rock/gas interaction during geological evolution, complex gas/water distribution has formed under the superposed effect of sedimentary facies, reservoir space facies and gravity difference of fluid facies. In view of these challenges, on the basis of the conventional three-stage modeling method, this paper presents a modelling method controlled by four-stage facies to develop 3D model of a water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir. Key to this method is the reservoir property modelling controlled by two-stage facies, and the fluid property modelling controlled by another two-stage facies. The prerequisite of this method is a reliable database obtained from solid geological investigation. On the basis of illustrating the principles of the modelling method controlled by four-stage facies, this paper further implements systematically modeling of the heterogeneous gas/water distribution of the Longwangmiao carbonate formation in the Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan basin, China.

  13. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The

  14. NASA Glenn Steady-State Heat Pipe Code Users Manual, DOS Input. Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K.

    2000-01-01

    The heat pipe code LERCHP has been revised, corrected, and extended. New features include provisions for pipes with curvature and bends in "G" fields. Heat pipe limits are examined in detail and limit envelopes are shown for some sodium and lithium-filled heat pipes. Refluxing heat pipes and gas-loaded or variable conductance heat pipes were not considered.

  15. Sour gas distribution in the Amudaria Basin, Central Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, D.; Ivlev, A.; Shkutnik, E.

    1995-08-01

    The Amudaria Basin is the main sour-gas bearing region in Central Asia. In this region, sour gases occur in Upper Jurassic carbonate-reservoir rocks as well as in terrigenous rocks of Cretareous age, but the Upper Jurassic sulfate-carbonate complex is the main sour-gas bearing and producing complex. The chemical and isotopic composition of fluids in Upper Jurassic rocks show that sulfate reduction is the main process responsible for sour gas formation in the central part of the basin, where Kimmeridgian-Tithonian evaporites occur. The H{sub 2}S content of gases varies widely (0 to 10 percent by volume), even within similar carbonate traps located close to one another in the same temperature zone. Analyses of sour-gas distribution and composition in fluids in these areas indicate the main factors which control the variation of H{sub 2}S content in Upper Jurassic hydrocarbon pools in the same temperature zones. These factors include (1) the carbonate sediment facies type (shelf, barrier reef, deep water facies), and (2) within the same facies, the characteristics of traps and pools (tight, gentle, structural, phase-type, etc). The most favorable conditions for H{sub 2}S accumulation occur in hydrocarbon pools confined to the barrier reef flat and the parts of the shelf closest to it. The least favorable conditions are in pools confined to local reefs or carbonate build-ups located within the deep-water facies zone. These results are important for the prediction of H{sub 2}S in hydrocarbon pools. In most cases, H{sub 2}S in the Cretaceous complex is epigenetic. With the exception of Central Karakum zone H{sub 2}S distribution in this complex depends on the distribution and composition of Upper Jurassic evaporites.

  16. DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT ATOMIC GAS IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun; Yun, Min Su; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Braatz, James A.

    2015-10-10

    We present 21 cm H i observations of four Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H i emission in a region of 25′ × 25′ (140–650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of H i masses. In particular, we detected 65% more H i than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG 92. We also identify whether the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high surface brightness (HSB) H i features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the H i strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the H i observed with the GBT has a similar spatial distribution to the HSB structures in HCG 31 and HCG 68. Conversely, the observed H i distributions in HCG 44 and HCG 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG 44 lies to the northeast–southwest region and in HCG 92 lies in the northwest region of their respective groups. The spatial and dynamical similarities between the total (faint+HSB) and the HSB H i indicate that the faint gas is of tidal origin. We found that the gas will survive ionization by the cosmic UV background and the escaping ionizing photons from the star-forming regions and stay primarily neutral for at least 500 Myr.

  17. Compressed-fit linings renews 3,700 feet of 20-in. cast iron pipe

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Elizabethtown Gas Company and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) have successfully completed a project in Union, NJ, using the Swagelining process and set three records as a result. The 20-inch diameter medium-density polyethylene (MDPE) SDR-21 was the largest ever installed by this process in the U.S. Since one of the pulls was 980 feet, that set a new Swagelining world record, too. The third record was for the largest diameter electrofusion couplers (520mm) ever used to join PE pipe. The Swagelining process was specially developed by British Gas as a method of replacing its aging gas distribution network. Over six million feet have been installed worldwide and over 400,000 feet of that have been in the United States. The system uses polyethylene pipe that has an outside diameter slightly larger than the bore of the pipe to be renewed. the diameter of the PE pipe is temporarily reduced by a die, and then inserted into the old pipe. Once installed, the PE pipe expands to fit tightly against the old pipe. A full range of tapping, branching and connection methods has been developed to provide a total renewal system.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LADLE FILLING A PONT A MOUSSON PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LADLE FILLING A PONT A MOUSSON PIPE CASTING MACHINE (EITHER NO. 2 OR NO. 3) FOR PRODUCTION OF AN 8 INCH FASTTITE PIPE USED FOR GAS AND WATER TRANSMISSION. THIS FRENCH-MADE CASTING MACHINE MAKES 4, 6, 8, 10, AND 12 INCH PIPE. THE MACHINE CAN MAKE 48 EIGHT INCH PIPE AN HOUR AND UP TO 60 FOUR INCH PIPE PER HOUR. - American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Mixer Building, 1501 Thirty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Algeria to use gas to meet energy demands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Sonelgaz, Algeria's natural gas distribution monopoly, plans to supply all major towns in the country with natural gas for domestic energy demands by 1989. The utility uses copper tubing in residences and plastic pipe for distribution mains and services to the houses for new construction and conversion to natural gas from LPG systems.

  20. 33 CFR 127.1101 - Piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Piping systems. 127.1101 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1101 Piping systems. Each piping system within the marine transfer area for LHG used for the transfer of LHG must meet...

  1. Bag Test Measures Leakage From Insulated Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Kent D.; Easter, Barry P.

    1994-01-01

    Test quantifies leakage of gas from pipe even though pipe covered with insulation. Involves use of helium analyzer to measure concentration of helium in impermeable bag around pipe. Test administered after standard soap-solution bubble test indicates presence and general class of leakage.

  2. Characterization of industrial waste from a natural gas distribution company and management strategies: a case study of the East Azerbaijan Gas Company (Iran).

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Hassan; Aslhashemi, Ahmad; Assadi, Mohammad; Khodaei, Firoz; Mardangahi, Baharak; Mosaferi, Mohammad; Roshani, Babak

    2012-10-01

    Although a fundamental prerequisite for the successful implementation of any waste management plan is the availability of sufficient and accurate data, there are few available studies regarding the characterization and management of gas distribution company waste (GDCW). This study aimed to characterize the industrial waste generated by the East Azerbaijan Gas Distribution Company (EAGDC) and to present environmental management strategies. The EAGDC serves 57 cities and 821 villages with a total population of more than 2.5 million as well as numerous industrial units. The methodology of this study was based on a checklist of data collected from each zone of the company, site visits (observation), and quantity and quality analysis according to the formal data available from different zones. The results indicate that more than 35 different kinds of industrial solid waste are generated in different industrial installations. The most important types of generated waste include empty barrels (including mercaptans, diesel fuel, deionized waters and oil), faulty gas meters and regulators, a variety of industrial oils, sleeves, filter elements and faulty pipes, valves and fittings. The results indicated that, currently, GDCW is generally handled and disposed of with domestic waste, deposited in companies' installation yards and stores or, sometimes, recycled through non-scientific approaches that can create health risks to the public and the environment, even though most of the GDCW was determined to be recyclable or reusable materials. This study concludes that gas distribution companies must pay more attention to source reduction, recycling and reusing of waste to preserve natural resources, landfill space and the environment.

  3. Truncated shifted pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-11-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a J-shape, and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment.

  4. Use of the truncated shifted Pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a "J-shape," and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  5. 78 FR 34703 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...) published a notice in the Federal Register of its intent to revise the gas distribution annual report (PHMSA... information collection is titled: ``Annual Report for Gas Distribution Pipeline Operators.'' Summary of...

  6. Integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-03-19

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  7. Method of fabricating an integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1988-03-22

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  8. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  9. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  10. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  11. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    It is not widely acknowledged or appreciated that conventional, two-stage light-gas launchers do not efficiently apply their high breech pressures to the design intent: accelerating the projectile. Our objective in this project was to carry out the analysis, design, construction, and testing of a new class of launchers that will address this limitation. Our particular application is to expand the pressure range of the conventional, two-stage gas launcher to overlap and validate the pressure regimes previously attainable only with shock waves generated by nuclear explosions, lasers, or multistage conventional explosions. That is, these launchers would have the capability to conduct--in a laboratory setting--high-velocity-impact, equation-of-state (EOS) measurements at up to 2-TPa (20 Mbar) pressure levels in high-Z materials. Our design entailed a new class of distributed-injection, gas-dynamic launchers that are designed to use a boat-tail projectile to overcome the fundamental gas-expansion phenomena known as escape velocity (the Riemann limit). Our program included analytical, numerical, and experimental studies of the fast gas release flow technique that is central to the success of our approach. The analyses led us to believe that, in a typical configuration, the pressure will be effectively applied to the projectile in a time short relative to its few-microsecond traverse time; the experimental program we conducted during FY1999 supported these estimates. In addition, our program revealed dramatic increased efficiency in this process that was previously unknown to the launcher community. The most fundamental practical restrictions on the performance of any gas launcher are the ability of the launcher to (1) contain pressure in a reservoir, and (2) effectively apply that pressure to the base of a moving projectile. Our gas-release test-fixture experiments showed that our design was capable of applying nearly twice the pressure to the projectile that is

  12. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  13. Distribution of non-breeding great lakes piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) along Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines: Ten years of band sightings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stucker, J.H.; Cuthbert, F.J.; Winn, Brad; Noel, B.L.; Maddock, S.B.; Leary, P.R.; Cordes, J.; Wemmer, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    In 1993, a mark-recapture effort was initiated to band annually all Great Lakes Piping Plover nesting adults and offspring. With voluntary reporting by observers, >430 sightings of 154 individually-marked Great Lakes banded birds were documented on the wintering grounds during 19952005. This paper reports non-breeding distribution and site-fidelity and identifies Critical Habitat units used by this population during the winter. Information obtained through banded bird sightings indicates that the winter range of Great Lakes Piping Plovers extends from North Carolina to Texas, and the Bahamas, with the majority (75%) of reported individuals wintering in Georgia and Florida. About 95% of sightings were near or within federally-designated winter Critical Habitat for Piping Plovers. Within season (52%) and between-year (62%) site fidelity was documented for resightings within 3.5 km of initial sighting. Although breeding pairs do not winter in close association, there is some evidence to suggest that offspring winter closer to the male rather than the female parent (P-value = 0.03), and adult males and females appear to exhibit latitudinal segregation (P-value < 0.001). Females reach the winter grounds before males, arriving in July and staying through April (???9 months) or 75% of the annual cycle. The study is the first to identify winter distribution for the Great Lakes Piping Plover population. The significant proportion of the annual cycle spent on the wintering grounds emphasizes the importance of habitat protection during the non-breeding season for this federally-listed population.

  14. Stress Indices and Flexibility Factors for 90-Degree Piping Elbows with Straight Pipe Extensions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    FACTORS FOR 90-DEGREE PIPING ELBOWS WITH STRAIGHT PIPE EXTENS IONS cn by oA. J. Quezon and G. C. Everstine a% APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION...FLEXIBILITY FACTORS FOR 90-DEGREE PIPING ELBOWS WITH STRAIGHT PIPE EXTENSIONS 6. PERFORMING OrG. REPORT NUMBER = 7. AUTHOR(e S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e...NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse elde If neceeeary and Identify by bloc, number) Piping Finite Element Flexibility Factor Elbow NASTRAN Bend

  15. Pipe connector

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Thomas E.; Pardini, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated.

  16. Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Burkett; Hagen Schempf

    2006-01-31

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design of the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main NDE and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules and their arrangement, still allow the robot to configure itself to perform any-angle (up to 90 deg) turns in any orientation (incl. vertical), and enable the live launching and

  17. Advanced Systems development: New materials/systems for interior gas distribution. Phase 1. Advanced Systems Specifications. Final report, January 1989-May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.; Scocca, M.; Topping, R.

    1991-05-01

    As part of the Gas Research Institute's overall program to develop safe, low cost, semi rigid gas piping systems, their project is aimed at identifying and evaluating advanced high performance materials and components suitable for interior gas piping by the year 2000 and beyond. The report summarizes the results of Phase I - Advanced Systems Specifications Studies, which developed performance criteria, installed cost goals and a database of promising new metallic and non-metallic piping materials. Several candidate materials and systems are identified as well as the current status of gas monitoring, sensing and control technologies.

  18. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  19. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  20. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  1. Market hub technology in the domestic natural gas distribution system. [Natural gas market center or hub

    SciTech Connect

    Glicken, J.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes a panel discussion held on March 18, 1992 as part of a conference entitled Market Hub Technology'' . The purpose of the conference was to stimulate dialogue among various segments of the natural gas industry on the technology limits of an economic policy issue that has the potential to significantly alter the structure and functioning of the natural gas industry. Attendees included key US gas industry representatives, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) commissioners, and others. The conference explored the concept of market centers, or hubs, and related technologies. It covered the technology currently available for the establishment of an integrated system of physical market hubs, and explored technology requirements for the further development of useful and efficient hubs. The discussion identified two primary barriers to the acceptance and implementation of a market center distribution system for natural gas. The first barrier is the potential change in the configuration of the market such a system would introduce and the resistance various industry segments would mount to such change. The second is the lack of industry standardization in the physical and business infrastructures.

  2. 78 FR 6318 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on January 15, 2013, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas) filed a rate election pursuant...

  3. 78 FR 41398 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on June 27, 2013, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas) filed a Rate Election and revised Statement of...

  4. 77 FR 28374 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on April 30, 2012, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas) filed a revised Statement of Operating...

  5. Distribution of heavy metals from flue gas in algal bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napan, Katerine

    Flue gas from coal-fired power plants is a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Microalgae can use this enriched form of CO2 as carbon source and in turn the biomass can be used to produce food, feed, fertilizer and biofuels. However, along with CO2, coal-based flue gas will inevitably introduce heavy metals, which have a high affinity to bind algal cells, could be toxic to the organisms and if transferred to the products could limit their uses. This study seeks to address the distribution and impact of heavy metals present in flue gas on microalgae production systems. To comprehend its effects, algae Scenedesmus obliquus was grown in batch reactors in a multimetal system. Ten heavy metals (Cu, Co, Zn, Pb, As, Se, Cr, Hg, Ni and Cd) were selected and were evaluated at four concentrations (1X, 2X, 5X and 10X). Results show that most heavy metals accumulated mainly in biomass and were found in very low concentrations in media. Hg was shown to be lost from the culture, with low amounts present in the biomass. An upper limit for As uptake was observed, suggesting its likelihood to build-up in the system during medium recycle. The As limited bioaccumulation was overcome by addition of sulfur to the algal medium. Heavy metal at 2X, 5X and 10X inhibited both growth and lipid production, while at the reference concentration both biomass and lipids yields were increased. Heavy metal concentrations in the medium and biomass were time dependent, and at the end of the cultivation most heavy metals in the supernatant solution complied with the recommendations for irrigation water, while biomass was below limits for cattle and poultry feed, fertilizer, plastic and paper. This research shows that bioremediation of CO2 and heavy metals in combination with energy production can be integrated, which is an environmentally friendly form of biotechnology.

  6. CAIS standard manual. System number 24. Natural gas distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-28

    At this installation the list of facilities to be surveyed, including infrastructure, will be addressed on the basis of 32 unique systems that form the CAIS Engineering Deficiency Standards and Inspection Methods document. Each system deals with a specific technical aspect of the facility to be surveyed. Within each system a further breakdown is made to subsystems, each having a related list of components. Detailed observations of the listed defects are provided so as to allow the entry of observed quantification data. A DOD CAIS manual is provided for each of the 32 systems with an internal organization. The System Tree is a graphical representation of the Work Breakdown Structure, showing system, subsystem and component relationships for the Natural Gas Distribution System.

  7. 76 FR 39852 - Certain Large Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe (Over 41/2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... diameter, regardless of wall- thickness, manufacturing process (hot finished or cold-drawn), end finish... such as oil, gas, or water pipeline, or utility distribution systems. Seamless pressure pipes are intended for the conveyance of water, steam, petrochemicals, chemicals, oil products, natural gas and...

  8. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  9. Cross-sensitivity of metal oxide gas sensor to ambient temperature and humidity: Effects on gas distribution mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, K.; Bennetts, V. H.; Mamduh, S. M.; Visvanathan, R.; Yeon, A. S. A.; Shakaff, A. Y. M.; Zakaria, A.; Abdullah, A. H.; Kamarudin, L. M.

    2017-03-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors have been widely used in robotics application to perform remote and mobile gas sensing. However, previous researches have indicated that this type of sensor technology is cross-sensitive to environmental temperature and humidity. This paper therefore investigates the effects of these two factors towards gas distribution mapping and gas source localization domains. A mobile robot equipped with TGS2600 gas sensor was deployed to build gas distribution maps of indoor environment, where the temperature and humidity varies. The results from the trials in environment with and without gas source indicated that there is a strong relation between the fluctuation of the mean and variance map with respect to the variations in the temperature and humidity maps.

  10. Wedgethread pipe connection

    DOEpatents

    Watts, John D.

    2003-06-17

    Several embodiments of a wedgethread pipe connection are disclosed that have improved makeup, sealing, and non-loosening characteristics. In one embodiment, an open wedgethread is disclosed that has an included angle measured in the gap between the stab flank and the load flank to be not less than zero, so as to prevent premature wedging between mating flanks before the position of full makeup is reached, as does occur between trapped wedgethreads wherein the included angle is less than zero. The invention may be used for pipe threads large or small, as a flush joint, with collars, screwed into plates or it may even be used to reversibly connect such as solid posts to base members where a wide makeup torque range is desired. This Open wedgethread, as opposed to trapped wedgethreads, provides a threaded pipe connection that: is more cost-effective; can seal high pressure gas; can provide selectively a connection strength as high as the pipe strength; assures easy makeup to the desired position of full makeup within a wide torque range; may have a torque strength as high as the pipe torque strength; is easier to manufacture; is easier to gage; and is less subject to handling damage.

  11. Simultaneous determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their chlorination by-products in drinking water and the coatings of water pipes by automated solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Jocelyn; Hollard, Caroline; Bach, Cristina; Rosin, Christophe; Munoz, Jean-François; Dauchy, Xavier

    2013-11-08

    In this study, an automated method for the simultaneous determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their chlorination by-products in drinking water was developed based on online solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main focus was the optimisation of the solid-phase microextraction step. The influence of the agitation rate, type of fibre, desorption time, extraction time, extraction temperature, desorption temperature, and solvent addition was examined. The method was developed and validated using a mixture of 17 PAHs, 11 potential chlorination by-products (chlorinated and oxidised PAHs) and 6 deuterated standards. The limit of quantification was 10 ng/L for all target compounds. The validated method was used to analyse drinking water samples from three different drinking water distribution networks and the presumably coal tar-based pipe coatings of two pipe sections. A number of PAHs were detected in all three networks although individual compositions varied. Several PAH chlorination by-products (anthraquinone, fluorenone, cyclopenta[d,e,f]phenanthrenone, 3-chlorofluoranthene, and 1-chloropyrene) were also found, their presence correlating closely with that of their respective parent compounds. Their concentrations were always below 100 ng/L. In the coatings, all PAHs targeted were detected although concentrations varied between the two coatings (76-12,635 mg/kg and 12-6295 mg/kg, respectively). A number of chlorination by-products (anthraquinone, fluorenone, cyclopenta[d,e,f]phenanthrenone, 3-chlorofluoranthene, and 1-chloropyrene) were also detected (from 40 to 985 mg/kg), suggesting that the reaction of PAHs with disinfectant agents takes place in the coatings and not in the water phase after migration.

  12. A novel ECT-EST combined method for gas-solids flow pattern and charge distribution visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Zhang, J. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A non-invasive measurement method of visualizing the flow pattern and charge distribution of gas-solids two-phase flow has been studied and verified using gravity-dropping and pneumatic conveyance rigs with pulverized coal as solids. It has been proven that the permittivity distribution acquired from an electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system can be used to improve the accuracy in establishing charge sensitivity field of an electrostatic tomography (EST) system, and to reduce the uncertainty of charge distribution reconstruction. The experimental results show that, under the given experimental conditions for the gravity-dropping system, charge density increases with particles' concentration, whilst in the pneumatic conveyance system, charge density decreases in the area where the particles' concentration is higher, and the total charge intensity decreases with the increase of the concentration of pulverized coal in the pipe. The method proposed in this paper is potentially important in pneumatic processes for charge distribution measurement and safe operations. It is envisaged that with further development, this technique can provide information for investigation into the mechanism of inter-particle force on electrostatic attraction and repulsion.

  13. High temperature loop heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.G.; Bland, J.J.; Fershtater, Y.; Goncharov, K.A.; Nikitkin, M.; Juhasz, A.

    1995-12-31

    Advantages of loop heat pipes over conventional heat pipes include self-priming during start-up, improved tolerance for noncondensible gas, and ability for ground testing in any orientation. The applications for high temperature, alkali-metal working fluid loop heat pipes include space radiators, and bimodal systems. A high temperature loop heat pipe was fabricated and tested at 850 K, using cesium as the working fluid. Previous loop heat pipes were tested with ambient temperature working fluids at temperatures below about 450 K. The loop heat pipe had a titanium envelope, and a titanium aluminide wick. The maximum cesium loop heat pipe power was only about 600 watts, which was lower the predicted 1,000 W power. The power limitation may be due to a wettability problem with the cesium not completely wetting the titanium aluminide wick. This would reduce the pumping capability of the wick, and the maximum power that the heat pipe could carry. This problem could be solved by using a refractory metal powder wick, since the alkali metals are known to wet refractory metal wicks.

  14. Development of colorless distributed combustion for gas turbine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arghode, Vaibhav Kumar

    Colorless Distributed Combustion (CDC) is investigated for gas turbine engine application due to its benefit for ultra-low pollutant emission, improved pattern factor, low noise emission, stable combustion and low pressure drop, alleviation of combustion instabilities and increased life of turbine blades with less air cooling requirements. The CDC is characterized by discrete and direct injection of fuel and air at high velocity and the reaction zone is stabilized due to controlled aerodynamics inside the combustor and wider (radially) shear layer mixing. Mixing between the injected air and product gases to form hot and diluted oxidant is required followed by rapid mixing with the fuel. This results in distributed reaction zone instead of a concentrated flame front as observed in conventional diffusion flames and hence, to avoid hot spot regions and provide reduced NOx and CO emissions. The focus of this dissertation is to develop and demonstrate CDC for application to stationary gas turbine combustors which generally operate at thermal intensity of 15MW/m3-atm. However, higher thermal intensity is desirable to reduce hardware costs due to smaller weight and volume of the combustors. Design of high thermal intensity CDC combustor requires careful control of critical parameters, such as, gas recirculation, fuel/oxidizer mixing and residence time characteristics via careful selection of different air and fuel injection configurations to achieve desirable combustion characteristics. This dissertation examines sequential development of low emission colorless distributed combustor operating from thermal intensity of 5MW/m3-atm up to 198MW/m3-atm. Initially, various fuel and air injection configurations were investigated at a low thermal intensity of 5MW/m 3-atm. Further investigations were performed for a simpler combustor having single air and fuel injection ports for medium thermal intensity range of 28-57MW/m3-atm. Among the flow configurations investigated, reverse

  15. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  16. Mapping Temperatures On Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunnerson, Fred S.; Thorncroft, Glen E.

    1993-01-01

    Paints containing thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC's) used to map temperatures on heat pipes and thermosyphons. Color of thermally sensitive TLC coat changes reversibly upon heating or cooling. Each distinct color indicates particular temperature. Transient and steady-state isotherms become visible as colored bands. Positions and movements of bands yield information about startup transients, steady-state operation, cooler regions containing noncondensible gas, and other phenomena relevant to performance of heat pipe.

  17. Heat Pipe Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heat pipe, a sealed chamber whose walls are lined with a "wick," a thin capillary network containing a working fluid in liquid form was developed for a heat distribution system for non-rotating satellites. Use of the heat pipe provides a continuous heat transfer mechanism. "Heat tubes" that improve temperature control in plastics manufacturing equipment incorporated the heat pipe technology. James M. Stewart, an independent consultant, patented the heat tubes he developed and granted a license to Kona Corporation. The Kona Nozzle for heaterless injection molding gets heat for its operation from an external source and has no internal heating bands, reducing machine maintenance and also eliminating electrical hazards associated with heater bands. The nozzles are used by Eastman Kodak, Bic Pen Corporation, Polaroid, Tupperware, Ford Motor Company, RCA, and Western Electric in the molding of their products.

  18. 75 FR 5244 - Pipeline Safety: Integrity Management Program for Gas Distribution Pipelines; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... implement integrity management programs. In addition to a minor correction in terminology, this document...: Integrity Management Program for Gas Distribution Pipelines; Correction AGENCY: Pipeline and...

  19. Identification and Distribution of Vanadinite (Pb[subscript 5](V[superscript 5+]O[subscript 4])[subscript 3]Cl) in Lead Pipe Corrosion By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Tammie L.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Schock, Michael R.

    2009-06-30

    This study presents the first detailed look at vanadium (V) speciation in drinking water pipe corrosion scales. A pool of 34 scale layers from 15 lead or lead-lined pipes representing eight different municipal drinking water distribution systems in the Northeastern and Midwestern portions of the United States were examined. Diverse synchrotron-based techniques, including bulk XANES (X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy), {mu}-XANES, {mu}-XRD (X-ray diffraction), and {mu}-XRF (X-ray fluorescence) mapping were employed along with traditional powder XRD, SEM-EDXA (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis), and ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry) to evaluate vanadium speciation and distribution in these deposits. Vanadinite (Pb{sub 5}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl) was positively identified, and occurred most frequently in the surface layers. Low V{sub tot} in these waters is likely the limiting factor in the abundance of vanadinite in the pipe scales, along with the existence of divalent lead. The occurrence of V in these samples as a discrete mineral is important because it is formed in the presence of very low concentrations of V in the finished water, it provides a mechanism to concentrate {mu}g{center_dot}L{sup -1} amounts of V from the water to near-percent levels in the pipe scales, and the robustness of V accumulation and release in response to water chemistry changes is likely different than it would be with a sorption accumulation mechanism. Extrapolation from limited existing water chemistry data in this study provides an estimate of {Delta}G{sub f}{sup o} for vanadinite as approximately -3443 kJ{center_dot}mol{sup -1}, or less, leading to a log K{sub s0} value of approximately -86 for the reaction Pb{sub 5}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}CI{sub (s)}{r_reversible} {l_brace}Pb{sup 2+}{r_brace}{sup 5} + {l_brace}VO{sup 3-}{sub 4}{r_brace}{sup 3} + {l_brace}Cl{sup -}{r_brace}, in which {l_brace}{r_brace} denotes activity.

  20. Blimp Robot for Three-Dimensional Gas Distribution Mapping in Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    Mobile robots equipped with gas sensors can be used for automated measurement tasks including odor trail following, gas source localization, and gas distribution mapping. This article reports on the development of a blimp robot for mapping three-dimensional gas distribution in indoor environments. The blimp robot is programmed to fly randomly so that its trajectory covers everywhere in the given indoor environment. The blimp is equipped with gas sensors to measure gas concentrations and an ultrasonic sonar to measure the height from the floor. The measured data are transmitted to an external PC via a wireless communication module. At the same time, a camera placed on the floor takes a picture of the blimp, and its location is recorded with the gas sensor responses. The experimental results indicate that the blimp robot is effective in mapping three-dimensional gas concentration distribution in indoor environments.

  1. Distributed and decentralized state estimation in gas networks as distributed parameter systems.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian Behrooz, Hesam; Boozarjomehry, R Bozorgmehry

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a framework for distributed and decentralized state estimation in high-pressure and long-distance gas transmission networks (GTNs) is proposed. The non-isothermal model of the plant including mass, momentum and energy balance equations are used to simulate the dynamic behavior. Due to several disadvantages of implementing a centralized Kalman filter for large-scale systems, the continuous/discrete form of extended Kalman filter for distributed and decentralized estimation (DDE) has been extended for these systems. Accordingly, the global model is decomposed into several subsystems, called local models. Some heuristic rules are suggested for system decomposition in gas pipeline networks. In the construction of local models, due to the existence of common states and interconnections among the subsystems, the assimilation and prediction steps of the Kalman filter are modified to take the overlapping and external states into account. However, dynamic Riccati equation for each subsystem is constructed based on the local model, which introduces a maximum error of 5% in the estimated standard deviation of the states in the benchmarks studied in this paper. The performance of the proposed methodology has been shown based on the comparison of its accuracy and computational demands against their counterparts in centralized Kalman filter for two viable benchmarks. In a real life network, it is shown that while the accuracy is not significantly decreased, the real-time factor of the state estimation is increased by a factor of 10.

  2. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than $57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was $28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  3. Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than 57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was 28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  4. Geothermal district piping - A primer

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1989-11-01

    Transmission and distribution piping constitutes approximately 40 -60% of the capital costs of typical geothermal district heating systems. Selections of economical piping suitable for the fluid chemistry is critical. Presently, most piping (56%) in geothermal systems is of asbestos cement construction. Some fiberglass (19%) and steel (19%) is also in use. Identification of an economical material to replace asbestos cement is important to future project development. By providing information on relative costs, purchase considerations, existing material performance and new products, this report seeks to provide a background of information to the potential pipe purchaser. A brief discussion of the use of uninsulated piping in geothermal district heating systems is also provided. 5 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and

  6. Water flows from slotted pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    Results of experiments and analyses that determine jet flow distribution from slotted pipes of dimensions typical for OC-OTEC evaporators or condensers are described. For a pipe with a 6.3-cm inside diameter and 0.64-cm wide slot, the measured and predicted jet flow was low and nearly parallel to the pipe at the entrance, and high and perpendicular to the pipe only near the closed end. Slot lengths ranged from 1.5 m to 4.6 m, and inlet flow rates varied from 6 kg/s to 17 kg/s. Friction reduces the pressure in the entrance and intermediate portions of the pipe, while the rapidly decelerating flow produces high pressure recovery as it approaches the closed end. In the region of high flow next to the closed end, the ratio of slot area (slot length times width) to pipe cross-sectional area is less than two. To use a slotted pipe for generating falling jets in an OC-OTEC plant, the slot length should be 1 m or less (for a pipe with a 6.3-cm inside diameter and a 0.64-cm wide slot).

  7. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  8. Piping Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A complex of high pressure piping at Stennis Space Center carries rocket propellants and other fluids/gases through the Center's Component Test Facility. Conventional clamped connectors tend to leak when propellant lines are chilled to extremely low temperatures. Reflange, Inc. customized an existing piping connector to include a secondary seal more tolerant of severe thermal gradients for Stennis. The T-Con connector solved the problem, and the company is now marketing a commercial version that permits testing, monitoring or collecting any emissions that may escape the primary seal during severe thermal transition.

  9. Pipe gripper

    DOEpatents

    Moyers, S.M.

    1975-12-16

    A device for gripping the exterior surface of a pipe or rod is described which has a plurality of wedges, each having a concave face which engages the outer surface of the pipe and each having a smooth face opposing the concave face. The wedges are seated on and their grooved concave faces are maintained in circular alignment by tapered axial segments of an opening extending through a wedge-seating member. The wedges are allowed to slide across the tapered axial segments so that such a sliding movement acts to vary the diameter of the circular alignment.

  10. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  11. Use of a GIS-based hybrid artificial neural network to prioritize the order of pipe replacement in a water distribution network.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-I; Lin, Min-Der; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2010-07-01

    A methodology based on the integration of a seismic-based artificial neural network (ANN) model and a geographic information system (GIS) to assess water leakage and to prioritize pipeline replacement is developed in this work. Qualified pipeline break-event data derived from the Taiwan Water Corporation Pipeline Leakage Repair Management System were analyzed. "Pipe diameter," "pipe material," and "the number of magnitude-3( + ) earthquakes" were employed as the input factors of ANN, while "the number of monthly breaks" was used for the prediction output. This study is the first attempt to manipulate earthquake data in the break-event ANN prediction model. Spatial distribution of the pipeline break-event data was analyzed and visualized by GIS. Through this, the users can swiftly figure out the hotspots of the leakage areas. A northeastern township in Taiwan, frequently affected by earthquakes, is chosen as the case study. Compared to the traditional processes for determining the priorities of pipeline replacement, the methodology developed is more effective and efficient. Likewise, the methodology can overcome the difficulty of prioritizing pipeline replacement even in situations where the break-event records are unavailable.

  12. 78 FR 13661 - National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on February 12, 2013, National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation filed...

  13. 77 FR 10490 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 14, 2012, SourceGas Distribution LLC submitted a revised baseline filing of their Statement of...

  14. 75 FR 51032 - National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing August 12, 2010. Take notice that on August 10, 2010, National fuel Gas Distribution Corporation submitted...

  15. Transverse flat plate heat pipe experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a Shuttle-launched flight experiment to evaluate the performance of a transverse flat plate heat pipe that serves as an integral temperature control/mounting panel for electronic equipment. A transverse heat pipe is a gas-controlled variable conductance heat pipe that can handle relatively large thermal loads. An experiment designed to flight test the concept over a 6-9 month period is self-sufficient with respect to electrical power, timing sequences, and data storage.

  16. Simulated Heat-Pipe Vapor Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    129 - viii - Notation A pipe area A porous pipe property (Eq 2.12) AR aspect ratio (Eq 6.27) B porous pipe property (Eq 2.12) C coefficient of...laminar flow, in circular porous tubes. He assumed a constant -5- - -t- -- - - - -- 5-- - - ’C -W property fluid and uniform wall mass transfer. He...two gas models studied by Levy. They found that assuming thermodynamic equilibrium of the two phase flow was valid -9- when compared with unpublished

  17. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W of Part 98-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution W Table W Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Natural Gas Systems Definitions. Pt. 98, Subpt. W, Table W-7 Table W-7 of Subpart W of Part 98—Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution Natural gas distribution Emission factor...

  18. 40 CFR Table W - 7 of Subpart W of Part 98-Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution W Table W Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Natural Gas Systems Definitions. Pt. 98, Subpt. W, Table W-7 Table W-7 of Subpart W of Part 98—Default Methane Emission Factors for Natural Gas Distribution Natural gas distribution Emission factor...

  19. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and an uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  20. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  1. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Richard J.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hester, J. Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals.

  2. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Seya, A.; Asano, A.

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  3. Monitoring pipes for residual alpha contamination

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.; Dockray, T.

    1996-09-01

    The sensitivity and application of traditional alpha monitors is limited by the short range of alpha particles in air and in solid materials. Detecting small amounts of alpha-emitting contamination inside pipes presents particular problems. The alpha particle cannot penetrate the walls of the pipe. Associated gamma-ray detection and active neutron interrogation is often used to detect large amounts of radioactive material in pipes, but these methods are of limited use for detecting small amounts of contamination. Insertion of a traditional alpha probes works well in large diameter straight pipes, but is increasingly difficult as the pipe network becomes smaller in diameter and more complex. Monitors based on long-range alpha detection (LRAD) detect ionization of the ambient air rather than the alpha particles themselves. A small fan draws the ions into an externally mounted ion detector. Thus, the air in the pipe serves as both the detector gas and the mechanism for transporting the alpha-induced ions to a detection grid outside the pipe. All of the ions created by all of the contamination in the pipe can be measured in a single detector. Since ambient air serves as the probe, crushed or twisted sections of pipe can be monitored almost as effectively as straight sections. The pipe monitoring system described in the paper was tested both at LANL and BNFL`s Sellafield reprocessing facility in the UK. In this paper, we report on the first field tests of the pipe monitoring system.

  4. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The start-up transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe start-up behaviors. Topics include the four start-up scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the start-up scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power start-up, and methods to enhance the start-up success. Also addressed are the thermodynamic constraint between the evaporator and reservoir in the loop heat pipe operation, the superheat requirement for nucleate boiling, pressure spike and pressure surge during the start-up transient, and repeated cycles of loop start-up andshutdown under certain conditions.

  5. Small turbines in distributed utility application: Natural gas pressure supply requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.L.

    1996-05-01

    Implementing distributed utility can strengthen the local distribution system and help avoid or delay the expense of upgrading transformers and feeders. The gas turbine-generator set is an attractive option based on its low front-end capital cost, reliable performance at unmanned stations, and environmental performance characteristics. This report assesses gas turbine utilization issues from a perspective of fuel supply pressure requirements and discusses both cost and operational factors. A primary operational consideration for siting gas turbines on the electric distribution system is whether the local gas distribution company can supply gas at the required pressure. Currently available gas turbine engines require gas supply pressures of at least 150 pounds per square inch gauge, more typically, 250 to 350 psig. Few LDCs maintain line pressure in excess of 125 psig. One option for meeting the gas pressure requirements is to upgrade or extend an existing pipeline and connect that pipeline to a high-pressure supply source, such as an interstate transmission line. However, constructing new pipeline is expensive, and the small volume of gas required by the turbine for the application offers little incentive for the LDC to provide this service. Another way to meet gas pressure requirements is to boost the compression of the fuel gas at the gas turbine site. Fuel gas booster compressors are readily available as stand-alone units and can satisfactorily increase the supply pressure to meet the turbine engine requirement. However, the life-cycle costs of this equipment are not inconsequential, and maintenance and reliability issues for boosters in this application are questionable and require further study. These factors may make the gas turbine option a less attractive solution in DU applications than first indicated by just the $/kW capital cost. On the other hand, for some applications other DU technologies, such as photovoltaics, may be the more attractive option.

  6. Tectonic Controls on Gas Hydrate Distribution off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, C.; Chi, W. C.; Jegen, M. D.; Muff, S.; Hölz, S.; Lebas, E.; Sommer, M.; Lin, S.; Liu, C. S.; Lin, A. T.; Klaucke, I.; Klaeschen, D.; Chen, L.; Kunath, P.; McIntosh, K. D.; Feseker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea is characterized by wide-spread occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), indicating the presence of marine gas hydrates. Because the area covers both the tectonically inactive passive margin and the northern termination of the Manila Trench subduction zone while sediment input is broadly similar, this area provides an excellent opportunity to study the influence of tectonic processes on the dynamics of gas hydrate systems. Long-offset multi-channel seismic data show that movement along thrust faults and blind thrust faults caused anticlinal ridges on the active margin, while faults are absent on the passive margin. This coincides with high-hydrate saturations derived from ocean bottom seismometer data and controlled source electromagnetic data, and conspicuous high-amplitude reflections in P-Cable 3D seismic data above the BSR in the anticlinal ridges of the active margin. On the contrary, all geophysical evidence for the passive margin points to normal- to low-hydrate saturations. Geochemical analysis of gas samples collected at seep sites on the active margin show methane with heavy δ13C isotope composition, while gas collected on the passive margin shows highly depleted (light) carbon isotope composition. Thus, we interpret the passive margin as a typical gas hydrate province fuelled by biogenic production of methane and the active margin gas hydrate system as a system that is fuelled not only by biogenic gas production but also by additional advection of thermogenic methane from the subduction system. The location of the highest gas hydrate saturations in the hanging wall next to the thrust faults suggests that the thrust faults represent pathways for the migration of methane. Our findings suggest that the most promising gas hydrate occurrences for exploitation of gas hydrate as an energy source may be found in the core of the active margin roll over anticlines immediately above the BSR and that high

  7. A SIMPLE PHYSICAL MODEL FOR THE GAS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Patej, Anna; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The dominant baryonic component of galaxy clusters is hot gas whose distribution is commonly probed through X-ray emission arising from thermal bremsstrahlung. The density profile thus obtained has been traditionally modeled with a β-profile, a simple function with only three parameters. However, this model is known to be insufficient for characterizing the range of cluster gas distributions and attempts to rectify this shortcoming typically introduce additional parameters to increase the fitting flexibility. We use cosmological and physical considerations to obtain a family of profiles for the gas with fewer parameters than the β-model but which better accounts for observed gas profiles over wide radial intervals.

  8. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, R.J.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Hester, J.J. Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-03-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals. 19 refs.

  9. The distribution of ionized gas in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Sadler, E. M.; Zeilinger, W. W.; Bertin, G.; Bertola, F.; Danzinger, J.; Dejonghe, H.; Saglia, R. P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    1993-12-01

    We present and discuss H-alpha+(N II) imaging observations of fifteen nearby elliptical and SO galaxies with extended optical emission lines. The morphology of the emitting regions suggests that the ionized gas usually lies in a disk which is often geometrically decoupled from the stellar body, as expected in a triaxial galaxy. The presence of a gaseous disk makes these galaxies suitable for testing their gravitational field in a straightforward way. The presence of dust in many of the disks, together with the observed morphological properties, suggests that the ionized gas in most of these galaxies is more closely associated with the cold Interstellar Medium (ISM) than with the hot X-ray component. The mass of ionized gas in the galaxies studied here is typically 10-100 times that in a 'normal' early-type galaxy of similar optical luminosity. These appear to be galaxies where an unusually high fraction of the cold gas has been ionized, rather than unusually gas-rich systems in an overall sense. The extra ionizing source may be related to an active nucleus, since the continuum radio emission from these galaxies is typically 10-15 times more powerful than in 'normal' ellipticals of the smae optical luminosity.

  10. Heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A bibliography of heat pipe technology to provide a summary of research projects conducted on heat pipes is presented. The subjects duscussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design and fabrication, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  11. Evaluating gas transfer velocity parameterizations using upper ocean radon distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Michael L.; Kinter, Saul; Cassar, Nicolas; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2011-02-01

    Sea-air fluxes of gases are commonly calculated from the product of the gas transfer velocity (k) and the departure of the seawater concentration from atmospheric equilibrium. Gas transfer velocities, generally parameterized in terms of wind speed, continue to have considerable uncertainties, partly because of limited field data. Here we evaluate commonly used gas transfer parameterizations using a historical data set of 222Rn measurements at 105 stations occupied on Eltanin cruises and the Geosecs program. We make this evaluation with wind speed estimates from meteorological reanalysis products (from National Centers for Environmental Prediction and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting) that were not available when the 22Rn data were originally published. We calculate gas transfer velocities from the parameterizations by taking into account winds in the period prior to the date that 222Rn profiles were sampled. Invoking prior wind speed histories leads to much better agreement than simply calculating parameterized gas transfer velocities from wind speeds on the day of sample collection. For individual samples from the Atlantic Ocean, where reanalyzed winds agree best with observations, three similar recent parameterizations give k values for individual stations with an rms difference of ˜40% from values calculated using 222Rn data. Agreement of basin averages is much better. For the global data set, the average difference between k constrained by 222Rn and calculated from the various parameterizations ranges from -0.2 to +0.9 m/d (average, 2.9 m/d). Averaging over large domains, and working with gas data collected in recent years when reanalyzed winds are more accurate, will further decrease the uncertainties in sea-air fluxes.

  12. Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  13. Observed oil and gas field size distributions: a consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions.

  14. Cured-in-place pipe reconstruction of existing underground systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knasel, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes InLiner USA{reg_sign} which is a cost effective process that allows pipes to be rebuilt without digging and avoids disturbing the area surrounding the pipe. This cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) technology is a unique process for reconstructing deteriorated pipe line systems in municipal and industry applications, which includes powerplants. The process uses a resin that coats and rebuilds th interior of the pipe to improve its structural integrity and corrosion resistance. CIPP creates continuous, seamless construction which increases flow capacities, stops infiltration, improves structural strength, resists long term corrosion and forms its own pipe within a pipe. It can be installed in a matter of hours or days and can be utilized in gravity and pressure pipes for storm sewers, sanitary sewers, combined sewers, water mains, gas mains and process piping.

  15. Just fracking: a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Emily; Bell, Derek

    2016-02-01

    This letter presents a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in the area of Pennsylvania lying over the Marcellus Shale, the largest shale gas formation in play in the United States. The extraction of shale gas using unconventional wells, which are hydraulically fractured (fracking), has increased dramatically since 2005. As the number of wells has grown, so have concerns about the potential public health effects on nearby communities. These concerns make shale gas development an environmental justice issue. This letter examines whether the hazards associated with proximity to wells and the economic benefits of shale gas production are fairly distributed. We distinguish two types of distributive environmental justice: traditional and benefit sharing. We ask the traditional question: are there a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells in Pennsylvania? However, we extend this analysis in two ways: we examine income distribution and level of education; and we compare before and after shale gas development. This contributes to discussions of benefit sharing by showing how the income distribution of the population has changed. We use a binary dasymetric technique to remap the data from the 2000 US Census and the 2009-2013 American Communities Survey and combine that data with a buffer containment analysis of unconventional wells to compare the characteristics of the population living nearer to unconventional wells with those further away before and after shale gas development. Our analysis indicates that there is no evidence of traditional distributive environmental injustice: there is not a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells. However, our analysis is consistent with the claim that there is benefit sharing distributive environmental injustice: the income distribution of the population nearer to shale gas wells

  16. Comparison of temperature distributions inside a PEM fuel cell with parallel and interdigitated gas distributors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. J.; Liu, S. J.

    A comparison of the temperature distributions in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell between the parallel-flow gas distributors and the interdigitated gas distributor has been discussed in detail. An electrochemical-thermal coupled numerical model in a five-layer membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) is developed. The temperatures for the reactant fuels as well as the carbon fibers in the porous electrode are predicted by using a CFD technique. The overpotential across the MEA is varied to examine its effect on the temperature distributions of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that both the fuel temperature and the carbon fiber temperature are increased with increasing the total overpotential. In addition, the fuel and carbon-fiber temperature distributions are significantly affected by the flow pattern that cast on the gas distributor. Replacing the parallel-flow gas distributor by the interdigitated gas distributor will increase the local maximum temperature inside the PEM fuel cell.

  17. Painting a Picture of Gas Hydrate Distribution with Thermal Images

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Jill L.; Brown, Kevin M.; Long, Philip E.

    2005-02-25

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, the entire gas hydrate stability zone was sampled in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space of 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs.

  18. Non-Intrusive, Distributed Gas Sensing Technology for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Jesus; Phillips, Straun; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    Chemical sensors for monitoring gas composition, including oxygen, humidity, carbon dioxide, and trace contaminants, are needed to characterize and validate spacesuit design and operating parameters. This paper reports on the first prototypes of a non-intrusive gas sensing technology based on flexible sensitive patches positioned inside spacesuit prototypes and interrogated via optical fibers routed outside the suit, taking advantage of the transparent materials of the suit prototypes. The sensitive patches are based on luminescent materials whose emission parameters vary with the partial pressure of a specific gas. Patches sensitive to carbon dioxide, humidity, and temperature have been developed, and their preliminary laboratory characterization in Mark III-like helmet parts is described. The first prototype system consists of a four-channel fiber optic luminescent detector that can be used to monitor any of the selected target gases at four locations. To switch from one gas to another we replace the (disposable) sensor patches and adjust the system settings. Repeatability among sensitive patches and of sensor performance from location to location has been confirmed, assuring that suit engineers will have flexibility in selecting multiple sensing points, fitting the sensor elements into the spacesuit, and easily repositioning the sensor elements as desired. The evaluation of the first prototype for monitoring carbon dioxide during washout studies in a spacesuit prototype is presented.

  19. Non-Intrusive, Distributed Gas Sensing Technology for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Jesus; Phillips, Straun; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    Chemical sensors for monitoring gas composition, including oxygen, humidity, carbon dioxide, and trace contaminants are needed to characterize and validate spacesuit design and operating parameters. This paper reports on the first prototypes of a non-intrusive gas sensing technology based on flexible sensitive patches positioned inside spacesuit prototypes and interrogated by optical fibers routed outside the suit, taking advantage of the transparent materials of the suit prototypes. The sensitive patches are based on luminescent materials whose emission parameters vary with the partial pressure of a specific gas. Patches sensitive to carbon dioxide, humidity, oxygen, and ammonia have been developed, and their preliminary characterization in the laboratory using Mark III-like helmet parts is described. The first prototype system consists of a four-channel fiber optic luminescent detector that can be used to monitor any of the selected target gases at four locations. To switch from one gas to another we replace the (disposable) sensor patches and adjust the system settings. Repeatability among sensitive patches and of sensor performance from location to location has been confirmed, assuring that suit engineers will have flexibility in selecting multiple sensing points, fitting the sensor elements into the spacesuit, and easily repositioning the sensor elements as desired. The evaluation of the first prototype for monitoring carbon dioxide during washout studies in a space suit prototype is presented.

  20. Leaf gas films, underwater photosynthesis and plant species distributions in a flood gradient.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Anders; Visser, Eric J W; Colmer, Timothy D; Brodersen, Klaus P; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Pedersen, Ole

    2016-07-01

    Traits for survival during flooding of terrestrial plants include stimulation or inhibition of shoot elongation, aerenchyma formation and efficient gas exchange. Leaf gas films form on superhydrophobic cuticles during submergence and enhance underwater gas exchange. The main hypothesis tested was that the presence of leaf gas films influences the distribution of plant species along a natural flood gradient. We conducted laboratory experiments and field observations on species distributed along a natural flood gradient. We measured presence or absence of leaf gas films and specific leaf area of 95 species. We also measured, gas film retention time during submergence and underwater net photosynthesis and dark respiration of 25 target species. The presence of a leaf gas film was inversely correlated to flood frequency and duration and reached a maximum value of 80% of the species in the rarely flooded locations. This relationship was primarily driven by grasses that all, independently of their field location along the flood gradient, possess gas films when submerged. Although the present study and earlier experiments have shown that leaf gas films enhance gas exchange of submerged plants, the ability of species to form leaf gas films did not show the hypothesized relationship with species composition along the flood gradient.

  1. Continuous distributions of specific ventilation recovered from inert gas washout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, S. M.; Evans, J. W.; Jalowayski, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    A new technique is described for recovering continuous distributions of ventilation as a function of tidal ventilation/volume ratio from the nitrogen washout. The analysis yields a continuous distribution of ventilation as a function of tidal ventilation/volume ratio represented as fractional ventilations of 50 compartments plus dead space. The procedure was verified by recovering known distributions from data to which noise had been added. Using an apparatus to control the subject's tidal volume and FRC, mixed expired N2 data gave the following results: (a) the distributions of young, normal subjects were narrow and unimodal; (b) those of subjects over age 40 were broader with more poorly ventilated units; (c) patients with pulmonary disease of all descriptions showed enlarged dead space; (d) patients with cystic fibrosis showed multimodal distributions with the bulk of the ventilation going to overventilated units; and (e) patients with obstructive lung disease fell into several classes, three of which are illustrated.

  2. Vector magnetometry and lightwave defect imaging sensor technologies for internal pipe inspection systems. Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study, conceptual design, and prototype development. Final report, March 1991-July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.; Fowler, T.; Peters, E.; Power, W.; Reed, M.

    1994-01-05

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been sponsoring the development of a vehicle and sensors for an integrated nondestructive internal inspection system for natural gas distribution pipes. Arthur D. Little has developed two sensor technologies, Vector Magnetometry (VM) and Lightwave Defect Imaging (LDI) for the system. The Vector Magnetometry sensor utilizes multiple arrays of miniature detection coils (fluxgate magnetometer elements); a three-axis array measures both the amplitude and phase of the magnetic leakage field that occurs in the vicinity of pipe wall defects. This technology is applicable to both cast iron and steel pipe.

  3. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  4. Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Zboray, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

  5. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  6. Comparing two micrometeorological techniques for estimating trace gas emissions from distributed sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring trace gas emission from distributed sources such as treatment lagoons, treatment wetlands, land spread of manure, and feedlots requires micrometeorological methods. In this study, we tested the accuracy of two relatively new micrometeorological techniques, vertical radial plume mapping (VR...

  7. 77 FR 34123 - Pipeline Safety: Public Meeting on Integrity Management of Gas Distribution Pipelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Public Meeting on Integrity Management of Gas Distribution Pipelines AGENCY: Office of Pipeline Safety, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pipeline and Hazardous...

  8. Measurements of gas hydrate formation probability distributions on a quasi-free water droplet.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Nobuo

    2014-06-01

    A High Pressure Automated Lag Time Apparatus (HP-ALTA) can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions from water in a glass sample cell. In an HP-ALTA gas hydrate formation originates near the edges of the sample cell and gas hydrate films subsequently grow across the water-guest gas interface. It would ideally be desirable to be able to measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a single water droplet or mist that is freely levitating in a guest gas, but this is technically challenging. The next best option is to let a water droplet sit on top of a denser, immiscible, inert, and wall-wetting hydrophobic liquid to avoid contact of a water droplet with the solid walls. Here we report the development of a second generation HP-ALTA which can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a water droplet which sits on a perfluorocarbon oil in a container that is coated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-Perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane. It was found that the gas hydrate formation probability distributions of such a quasi-free water droplet were significantly lower than those of water in a glass sample cell.

  9. Fugitive methane emissions from leak-prone natural gas distribution infrastructure in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Margaret F; Ackley, Robert; Sanaie-Movahed, Bahare; Tang, Xiaojing; Phillips, Nathan G

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive emissions from natural gas systems are the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. and contribute to the risk of explosions in urban environments. Here, we report on a survey of CH4 emissions from 100 natural gas leaks in cast iron distribution mains in Metro Boston, MA. Direct measures of CH4 flux from individual leaks ranged from 4.0 - 2.3 × 10(4) g CH4•day(-1). The distribution of leak size is positively skewed, with 7% of leaks contributing 50% of total CH4 emissions measured. We identify parallels in the skewed distribution of leak size found in downstream systems with midstream and upstream stages of the gas process chain. Fixing 'superemitter' leaks will disproportionately stem greenhouse gas emissions. Fifteen percent of leaks surveyed qualified as potentially explosive (Grade 1), and we found no difference in CH4 flux between Grade 1 leaks and all remaining leaks surveyed (p = 0.24). All leaks must be addressed, as even small leaks cannot be disregarded as 'safely leaking.' Key methodological impediments to quantifying and addressing the impacts of leaking natural gas distribution infrastructure involve inconsistencies in the manner in which gas leaks are defined, detected, and classified. To address this need, we propose a two-part leak classification system that reflects both the safety and climatic impacts of natural gas leaks.

  10. Impact of Higher Natural Gas Prices on Local Distribution Companies and Residential Customers

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This report examines some of the problems faced by natural gas consumers as a result of increasing heating bills in recent years and problems associated with larger amounts of uncollectible revenue and lower throughput for the local distribution companies (LDCs) supplying the natural gas.

  11. Sink or swim pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, B.C.; Rhines, J.A.

    1985-07-01

    The development of a six-inch ID flexible pipe system for use as a rapidly deployable offshore fuel delivery system is described. Pipe design data, pipe construction, and advantages of the offshore petroleum delivery system are discussed.

  12. Edge seal for a porous gas distribution plate of a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Singh, Rajindar

    1984-01-01

    In an improved seal for a gas distribution plate of a fuel cell, a groove is provided extending along an edge of the plate. A member of resinous material is arranged within the groove and a paste comprising an immobilized acid is arranged surrounding the member and substantially filling the groove. The seal, which is impervious to the gas being distributed, is resistant to deterioration by the electrolyte of the cell.

  13. 33 CFR 127.1101 - Piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1101 Piping systems... meet 49 CFR 195.248. (c) The transfer manifold of each liquid transfer line and of each vapor...

  14. Explorer-II: Wireless Self-Powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains

    SciTech Connect

    Carnegie Mellon University

    2008-09-30

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design, field-trial and Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) sensor evaluation program for the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The resulting robot-train system with CAD renderings of the individual modules. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules

  15. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  16. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera

  17. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  18. Importance of Pore Size Distribution of Fine-grained Sediments on Gas Hydrate Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T. H.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, G. C.; Park, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Gas hydrates have been considered as a new source of natural gases. For the gas hydrate production, the gas hydrate reservoir should be depressurized below the equilibrium pressure of gas hydrates. Therefore, it is important to predict the equilibrium of gas hydrates in the reservoir conditions because it can be affected by the pore size of the host sediments due to the capillary effect. In this study, gas hydrates were synthesized in fine-grained sediment samples including a pure silt sample and a natural clayey silt sample cored from a hydrate occurrence region in Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea. Pore size distributions of the samples were obtained by the nitrogen adsorption and desorption test and the mercury intrusion porosimetry. The equilibrium curve of gas hydrates in the fine-grained sediments were found to be significantly influenced by the clay fraction and the corresponding small pores (>50 nm in diameter). For the clayey silt sample, the equilibrium pressure was higher by ~1.4 MPa than the bulk equilibrium pressure. In most cases of oceanic gas hydrate reservoirs, sandy layers are found interbedded with fine-grained sediment layers while gas hydrates are intensively accumulated in the sandy layers. Our experiment results reveal the inhibition effect of fine-grained sediments against gas hydrate formation, in which greater driving forces (e.g., higher pressure or lower temperature) are required during natural gas migration. Therefore, gas hydrate distribution in interbedded layers of sandy and fine-grained sediments can be explained by such capillary effect induced by the pore size distribution of host sediments.

  19. Risk analysis of highly combustible gas storage, supply, and distribution systems in PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Simion, G.P.; VanHorn, R.L.; Smith, C.L.; Bickel, J.H.; Sattison, M.B.; Bulmahn, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the potential safety concerns for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) identified in Generic Safety Issue 106, Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas. A Westinghouse four-loop PWR plant was analyzed for the risk due to the use of combustible gases (predominantly hydrogen) within the plant. The analysis evaluated an actual hydrogen distribution configuration and conducted several sensitivity studies to determine the potential variability among PWRs. The sensitivity studies were based on hydrogen and safety-related equipment configurations observed at other PWRs within the United States. Several options for improving the hydrogen distribution system design were identified and evaluated for their effect on risk and core damage frequency. A cost/benefit analysis was performed to determine whether alternatives considered were justifiable based on the safety improvement and economics of each possible improvement.

  20. The gas distribution in the high-redshift cluster MS 1054-0321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhor, M. S.; Birkinshaw, M.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the gas mass distribution in the high-redshift cluster MS 1054-0321 using Chandra X-ray and One Centimetre Receiver array Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect data. We use a superposition of offset β-type models to describe the composite structure of MS 1054-0321. We find gas mass fractions f_{gas}^{X {-}ray} = 0.087_{-0.001}^{+0.005} and f_{gas}^SZ=0.094_{-0.001}^{+0.003} for the (main) eastern component of MS 1054-0321 using X-ray or SZ data, but f_{gas}^{X {-}ray}=0.030_{-0.014}^{+0.010} for the western component. The gas mass fraction for the eastern component is in agreement with some results reported in the literature, but inconsistent with the cosmic baryon fraction. The low-gas mass fraction for the western component is likely to be a consequence of gas stripping during the ongoing merger. The gas mass fraction of the integrated system is 0.060_{-0.009}^{+0.004}: we suggest that the missing baryons from the western component are present as hot diffuse gas which is poorly represented in existing X-ray images. The missing gas could appear in sensitive SZ maps.

  1. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CAST IRON PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Colored water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to red depending on water chemistry and particle properties. The release of iron from distribution system materials such a...

  2. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CAST IRON PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colored water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to red depending on water chemistry and particle properties. The release of iron from distribution system materials such as...

  3. Effect of Changing Treatment Disinfectants on the Microbiology of Distributed Water and Pipe Biofilm Communities using Conventional and Metagenomic Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research was to add to our knowledge of chlorine and monochloramine disinfectants, with regards to effects on the microbial communities in distribution systems. A whole metagenome-based approach using sophisticated molecular tools (e.g., next generation sequen...

  4. The Occurrence of Contaminant Accumulation in Lead Pipe Scales from Domestic Drinking Water Distribution Systems-ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that contaminants such as Al, As and Ra, can accumulate in drinking water distribution system solids. The release of accumulated contaminants back into the water supply could conceivably result in elevated levels at consumers’ taps. The current regulatory...

  5. 46 CFR 132.110 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS FIRE-PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Main § 132..., valve, and run of piping must meet the applicable requirements of part 128 of this subchapter. Piping...-resistant material. (b) Each distribution cut-off valve must be marked in compliance with § 131.820 of...

  6. 46 CFR 132.110 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS FIRE-PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Main § 132..., valve, and run of piping must meet the applicable requirements of part 128 of this subchapter. Piping...-resistant material. (b) Each distribution cut-off valve must be marked in compliance with § 131.820 of...

  7. Chemical laser exhaust pipe design research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunqiang; Huang, Zhilong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ren, Zebin; Guo, Longde

    2016-10-01

    In order to weaken the chemical laser exhaust gas influence of the optical transmission, a vent pipe is advised to emissions gas to the outside of the optical transmission area. Based on a variety of exhaust pipe design, a flow field characteristic of the pipe is carried out by numerical simulation and analysis in detail. The research results show that for uniform deflating exhaust pipe, although the pipeline structure is cyclical and convenient for engineering implementation, but there is a phenomenon of air reflows at the pipeline entrance slit which can be deduced from the numerical simulation results. So, this type of pipeline structure does not guarantee seal. For the design scheme of putting the pipeline contract part at the end of the exhaust pipe, or using the method of local area or tail contraction, numerical simulation results show that backflow phenomenon still exists at the pipeline entrance slit. Preliminary analysis indicates that the contraction of pipe would result in higher static pressure near the wall for the low speed flow field, so as to produce counter pressure gradient at the entrance slit. In order to eliminate backflow phenomenon at the pipe entrance slit, concerned with the pipeline type of radial size increase gradually along the flow, flow field property in the pipe is analyzed in detail by numerical simulation methods. Numerical simulation results indicate that there is not reflow phenomenon at entrance slit of the dilated duct. However the cold air inhaled in the slit which makes the temperature of the channel wall is lower than the center temperature. Therefore, this kind of pipeline structure can not only prevent the leak of the gas, but also reduce the wall temperature. In addition, compared with the straight pipe connection way, dilated pipe structure also has periodic structure, which can facilitate system integration installation.

  8. Recommended Aluminum Pipe Welding Procedures for Corps of Engineers Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    tungsten -arc welding process) (4) Use of the extended land joint configuration; O-s (5) Use of current limits set by the Aluminum Association and ALCOA. ~0...Design Used for the 1-In. Schedule 10 Pipe 9 3 Typical Metal Weld Made Using Gas Tungsten -Arc Welding 11 4 Typical Small-Diameter Pipe Tensile Test...aluminum pipe commonly Approach used in military applications (Table 1). The gas Available literature on aluminum welding was tungsten -arc welding

  9. Airflow, gas deposition, and lesion distribution in the nasal passages.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K T; Monticello, T M

    1990-01-01

    The nasal passages of laboratory animals and man are complex, and lesions induced in the delicate nasal lining by inhaled air pollutants vary considerably in location and nature. The distribution of nasal lesions is generally a consequence of regional deposition of the inhaled material, local tissue susceptibility, or a combination of these factors. Nasal uptake and regional deposition are are influenced by numerous factors including the physical and chemical properties of the inhaled material, such as water solubility and reactivity; airborne concentration and length of exposure; the presence of other air contaminants such as particulate matter; nasal metabolism, and blood and mucus flow. For certain highly water-soluble or reactive gases, nasal airflow patterns play a major role in determining lesion distribution. Studies of nasal airflow in rats and monkeys, using casting and molding techniques combined with a water-dye model, indicate that nasal airflow patterns are responsible for characteristic differences in the distribution of nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde in these species. Local tissue susceptibility is also a complex issue that may be a consequence of many factors, including physiologic and metabolic characteristics of the diverse cell populations that comprise each of the major epithelial types lining the airways. Identification of the principal factors that influence the distribution and nature of nasal lesions is important when attempting the difficult process of determining potential human risks using data derived from laboratory animals. Toxicologic pathologists can contribute to this process by carefully identifying the site and nature of nasal lesions induced by inhaled materials. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:2200663

  10. Spatially and temporally resolved gas distributions around heterogeneous catalysts using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Johan; Blomberg, Sara; Gustafson, Johan; Evertsson, Jonas; Zhou, Jianfeng; Adams, Emma C.; Carlsson, Per-Anders; Aldén, Marcus; Lundgren, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing and measuring the gas distribution in close proximity to a working catalyst is crucial for understanding how the catalytic activity depends on the structure of the catalyst. However, existing methods are not able to fully determine the gas distribution during a catalytic process. Here we report on how the distribution of a gas during a catalytic reaction can be imaged in situ with high spatial (400 μm) and temporal (15 μs) resolution using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring, in real-time, the distribution of carbon dioxide during catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide above powder catalysts. Furthermore, we demonstrate the versatility and potential of the technique in catalysis research by providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of how the activity of several catalysts can be measured simultaneously, either in the same reactor chamber, or in parallel, in different reactor tubes. PMID:25953006

  11. Spatial distribution of venous gas emboli in the lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souders, J. E.; Doshier, J. B.; Polissar, N. L.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of gaseous pulmonary emboli is presumed to be determined by their buoyancy. We hypothesized that regional pulmonary blood flow may also influence their distribution. Therefore, pulmonary blood flow was measured in supine, anesthetized dogs with use of 15-microm fluorescent microspheres at baseline and during N(2) embolism. The animals were killed, and the lungs were excised, air-dried, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces with weights and spatial coordinates recorded. Embolism was defined as a >10% flow decrease relative to baseline. Vertically, the incidence of embolism increased substantially by 6 +/- 1% per additional centimeter in height compared with baseline (P = 0.0003). Embolism also increased radially by 3 +/- 1%/cm from the hilum (P = 0.002). There was a weaker but statistically significant increase in embolism to pieces with greater baseline flow, 9 +/- 2% for every 1. 0 increase in relative baseline flow (P = 0.008). We conclude that the distribution of gaseous emboli is influenced by buoyancy and flow dynamics within the pulmonary vasculature.

  12. The relations between natural gas hydrate distribution and structure on Muli basin Qinghai province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Li, Y.; Lu, Z.; Luo, S.; Qu, C.; Tan, S.; Zhang, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Muli area is located in a depression area which between middle Qilian and south Qilian tectonic elements. The natural gas hydrate stratum belongs the Jurassic series coal formation stratum, the main lithological character clamps the purple mudstone, the siltstone, the fine grain sandstone and the black charcoal mudstone for the green gray. The plutonic metamorphism is primarily deterioration function of the Muli area coal, is advantageous in forming the coal-bed gas. Cretaceous system, the Paleogene System and Neogene System mainly include the fine grain red clastic rock and clay stone. The distribution of Quaternary is widespread. The ice water - proluvial and glacier deposit are primarily depositional mode. The Qilian Montanan Muli permafrost area has the good gas source condition (Youhai Zhu 2006) and rich water resources. It is advantage to forming the natural gas hydrate. The natural gas hydrate is one kind of new latent energy, widely distributes in the mainland marginal sea bottom settlings and land permanent tundra. Through researching the area the structure ,the deposition carries on the analysis and responds the characteristic analysis simulation in the rock physics analysis and the seismic in the foundation, and then the reflected seismic data carried by tectonic analysis processing and the AVO characteristic analysis processing reveal that the research area existence natural gas hydrate (already by drilling confirmation) and the natural gas hydrate distribution and the structure relations is extremely close. In the structure development area, the fault and the crevasse crack growing, the natural gas hydrate distribution characteristic is obvious (this is also confirmed the storing space of natural gas hydrate in this area is mainly crevasse crack). This conclusion also agree with the actual drilling result. The research prove that the distribution of natural gas hydrate in this area is mainly controlled by structure control. The possibility of fault

  13. High temperature heat pipe experiments in low earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. ); Critchley, E. )

    1993-01-01

    Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most high power space power system designs, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro-gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation for testing in low earth orbit. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will be tested aborad the Space Shuttle in 1995. Three heat pipes will be tested in a cargo bay Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The heat pipes are SST/potassium, each with a different wick structure; homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap, the heat pipes have been designed, fabricated, and ground tested. In this paper, the heat pipe designs are specified, and transient and steady-state ground test data are presented.

  14. High temperature heat pipe experiments in low earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.; Critchley, E.

    1993-02-01

    Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most high power space power system designs, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro-gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation for testing in low earth orbit. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will be tested aborad the Space Shuttle in 1995. Three heat pipes will be tested in a cargo bay Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The heat pipes are SST/potassium, each with a different wick structure; homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap, the heat pipes have been designed, fabricated, and ground tested. In this paper, the heat pipe designs are specified, and transient and steady-state ground test data are presented.

  15. Mineralogical Evidence of Galvanic Corrosion in Domestic, Drinking Water Pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water distribution system (DWDS) piping contains numerous examples of galvanically-coupled metals (e.g., soldered copper pipe joints, copper-lead pipes joined during partial replacements of lead service lines). The possible role of galvanic corrosion in the release of l...

  16. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  17. Qualitative gas temperature distribution in positive DC glow corona using spectral image processing in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takao; Inada, Yoichi; Shimizu, Daisuke; Izawa, Yasuji; Nishijima, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method of determining a qualitative two-dimensional image of the gas temperature in stationary atmospheric nonthermal plasma by spectral image processing was presented. In the experiment, a steady-state glow corona discharge was generated by applying a positive DC voltage to a rod-plane electrode in synthetic air. The changes in the gas temperature distribution due to the amplitude of applied voltage and the ambient gas pressure were investigated. Spectral images of a positive DC glow corona were taken using a gated ICCD camera with ultranarrow band-pass filters, corresponding to the head and tail of a N2 second positive system band (0-2). The qualitative gas temperature was obtained from the emission intensity ratio between the head and tail of the N2 second positive system band (0-2). From the results, we confirmed that the gas temperature and its distribution of a positive DC glow corona increased with increasing applied voltage. In particular, just before the sparkover voltage, a distinctly high temperature region was formed in the positive DC glow at the tip of the rod electrode. In addition, the gas temperature decreased and its distribution spread diffusely with decreasing ambient gas pressure.

  18. CO-dark gas and molecular filaments in Milky Way-type galaxies - II. The temperature distribution of the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the temperature distribution of CO-dark molecular hydrogen (H2) in a series of disc galaxies simulated using the AREPO moving-mesh code. In conditions similar to those in the Milky Way, we find that H2 has a flat temperature distribution ranging from 10 to 100 K. At T < 30 K, the gas is almost fully molecular and has a high CO content, whereas at T > 30 K, the H2 fraction spans a broader range and the CO content is small, allowing us to classify gas in these two regimes as CO-bright and CO-dark, respectively. The mean sound speed in the CO-dark H2 is cs, dark = 0.64 km s-1, significantly lower than the value in the cold atomic gas (cs, CNM = 1.15 km s-1), implying that the CO-dark molecular phase is more susceptible to turbulent compression and gravitational collapse than its atomic counterpart. We further show that the temperature of the CO-dark H2 is highly sensitive to the strength of the interstellar radiation field, but that conditions in the CO-bright H2 remain largely unchanged. Finally, we examine the usefulness of the [C II] and [O I] fine-structure lines as tracers of the CO-dark gas. We show that in Milky Way-like conditions, diffuse [C II] emission from this gas should be detectable. However, it is a problematic tracer of this gas, as there is only a weak correlation between the brightness of the emission and the H2 surface density. The situation is even worse for the [O I] line, which shows no correlation with the H2 surface density.

  19. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  20. Internal cathodic protection of cement-lined steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, F.O. ); Tems, R.D. )

    1988-07-01

    Internally coated, cement-lined, carbon steel pipes have been used extensively for ballast- and service-water systems offshore. Mechanical cracking of the lining, undercutting, and erosion have resulted in corrosion and system leaks. Cathodic protection is one alternative that has been evaluated as a solution. Cathodic protection normally gives limited protection when applied internally to a pipeline system. Tests have been performed to evaluate this hypothesis and the possibility of improved current distribution due to the cement lining. This paper presents the test results as well as a solution to the problem. Internally coated, cement-lined steel pipes are used for ballast-water, service-water, and fire-water systems in the offshore oil and gas production industry.

  1. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  2. Occurrence and distribution of gas vesicle genes among cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Damerval, T; Castets, A M; Guglielmi, G; Houmard, J; Tandeau de Marsac, N

    1989-01-01

    Gas vesicles (GV) are specialized cell inclusions providing many aquatic procaryotes with buoyancy. In the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp. strain PCC 7601, at least four genes are involved in GV formation. One of those, gvpA1, encodes the major structural GV protein (70 amino acids) and belongs to a multigene family (gvpA1, gvpA2, gvpD). The fourth gene, gvpC, encodes a 162-amino-acid protein, the function of which is still unclear. We used the Calothrix gvpA1 and gvpC genes as probes to perform Southern hybridization experiments with DNA extracted from various cyanobacterial strains. The gvpA gene was found in all the strains that synthesize GV, indicating that its product is an obligatory component of GV. Furthermore, it was found to occur as multiple copies in most of the strains tested. The gvpC gene was only detected in some strains able to synthesize a large amount of GV within a short period. This suggests that the gvpC gene product is a dispensable protein for GV formation and is involved in the efficiency of the assembly process. Based on the occurrence of the gvp genes and on DNA-DNA hybridization patterns, genus assignments are discussed. Images PMID:2493445

  3. A Lagrangian View of Stratospheric Trace Gas Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Sparling, L.; Dessler, A.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of photochemistry, some relationship between the stratospheric age-of-air and the amount of tracer contained within an air sample is expected. The existence of such a relationship allows inferences about transport history to be made from observations of chemical tracers. This paper lays down the conceptual foundations for the relationship between age and tracer amount, developed within a Lagrangian framework. In general, the photochemical loss depends not only on the age of the parcel but also on its path. We show that under the "average path approximation" that the path variations are less important than parcel age. The average path approximation then allows us to develop a formal relationship between the age spectrum and the tracer spectrum. Using the relation between the tracer and age spectra, tracer-tracer correlations can be interpreted as resulting from mixing which connects parts of the single path photochemistry curve, which is formed purely from the action of photochemistry on an irreducible parcel. This geometric interpretation of mixing gives rise to constraints on trace gas correlations, and explains why some observations are do not fall on rapid mixing curves. This effect is seen in the ATMOS observations.

  4. Analytical and Experimental Investigation of Miniature Heat Pipes. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-24

    temperature distribution in the heat pipe was an infrared thermal measurement system. A Hughes Probe Eye TVS Model 3000 Infrared Camera in conjunction with...transient data shown in Fig. 19 and for several steady-state tests, the thermal history of the pipe, as measured by the IR thermography system, was also... drying out. The constant difference between the ultimate conductance value of the test pipe and the theoretical conductance of the uncharged pipe, can

  5. Development of a jet pump-assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is described. The concept utilizes a built-in capillary driven jet pump to remove vapor and gas from the artery and to prime it. The continuous pumping action also prevents depriming during operation of the heat pipe. The concept is applicable to fixed conductance and gas loaded variable conductance heat pipes. A theoretical model for the jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is presented. The model was used to design a prototype for laboratory demonstration. The 1.2 m long heat pipe was designed to transport 500 watts and to prime at an adverse elevation of up to 1.3 cm. The test results were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The heat pipe carried as much as 540 watts and was able to prime up to 1.9 cm. Introduction of a considerable amount of noncondensible gas had no adverse effect on the priming capability.

  6. Evolution of bubble size distribution from gas blowout in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Loney, Norman; Geng, Xiaolong

    2016-03-01

    Gas is often emanated from the sea bed during a subsea oil and gas blowout. The size of a gas bubble changes due to gas dissolution in the ambient water and expansion as a result of a decrease in water pressure during the rise. It is important to understand the fate and transport of gas bubbles for the purpose of environmental and safety concerns. In this paper, we used the numerical model, VDROP-J to simulate gas formation in jet/plume upon release, and dissolution and expansion while bubble rising during a relatively shallow subsea gas blowout. The model predictions were an excellent match to the experimental data. Then a gas dissolution and expansion module was included in the VDROP-J model to predict the fate and transport of methane bubbles rising due to a blowout through a 0.10 m vertical orifice. The numerical results indicated that gas bubbles would increase the mixing energy in released jets, especially at small distances and large distances from the orifice. This means that models that predict the bubble size distribution (BSD) should account for this additional mixing energy. It was also found that only bubbles of certain sizes would reach the water surfaces; small bubbles dissolve fast in the water column, while the size of the large bubbles decreases. This resulted in a BSD that was bimodal near the orifice, and then became unimodal.

  7. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  8. Pipe Leak Detection Technology Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that one of the nation’s biggest infrastructural needs is the replacement or rehabilitation of the water distribution and transmission systems. The institution of more effective pipe leak detection technology will im...

  9. Two modelling approaches to water-quality simulation in a flooded iron-ore mine (Saizerais, Lorraine, France): a semi-distributed chemical reactor model and a physically based distributed reactive transport pipe network model.

    PubMed

    Hamm, V; Collon-Drouaillet, P; Fabriol, R

    2008-02-19

    The flooding of abandoned mines in the Lorraine Iron Basin (LIB) over the past 25 years has degraded the quality of the groundwater tapped for drinking water. High concentrations of dissolved sulphate have made the water unsuitable for human consumption. This problematic issue has led to the development of numerical tools to support water-resource management in mining contexts. Here we examine two modelling approaches using different numerical tools that we tested on the Saizerais flooded iron-ore mine (Lorraine, France). A first approach considers the Saizerais Mine as a network of two chemical reactors (NCR). The second approach is based on a physically distributed pipe network model (PNM) built with EPANET 2 software. This approach considers the mine as a network of pipes defined by their geometric and chemical parameters. Each reactor in the NCR model includes a detailed chemical model built to simulate quality evolution in the flooded mine water. However, in order to obtain a robust PNM, we simplified the detailed chemical model into a specific sulphate dissolution-precipitation model that is included as sulphate source/sink in both a NCR model and a pipe network model. Both the NCR model and the PNM, based on different numerical techniques, give good post-calibration agreement between the simulated and measured sulphate concentrations in the drinking-water well and overflow drift. The NCR model incorporating the detailed chemical model is useful when a detailed chemical behaviour at the overflow is needed. The PNM incorporating the simplified sulphate dissolution-precipitation model provides better information of the physics controlling the effect of flow and low flow zones, and the time of solid sulphate removal whereas the NCR model will underestimate clean-up time due to the complete mixing assumption. In conclusion, the detailed NCR model will give a first assessment of chemical processes at overflow, and in a second time, the PNM model will provide more

  10. Minimization of Blast furnace Fuel Rate by Optimizing Burden and Gas Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2012-08-15

    The goal of the research is to improve the competitive edge of steel mills by using the advanced CFD technology to optimize the gas and burden distributions inside a blast furnace for achieving the best gas utilization. A state-of-the-art 3-D CFD model has been developed for simulating the gas distribution inside a blast furnace at given burden conditions, burden distribution and blast parameters. The comprehensive 3-D CFD model has been validated by plant measurement data from an actual blast furnace. Validation of the sub-models is also achieved. The user friendly software package named Blast Furnace Shaft Simulator (BFSS) has been developed to simulate the blast furnace shaft process. The research has significant benefits to the steel industry with high productivity, low energy consumption, and improved environment.

  11. Distribution of gas-oil-bitumen shows in the Yakutian diamond province

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, A.I.; Ivanov, V.A.; Bobrov, V.A.; Kropotova, O.I.

    1981-10-01

    The combination of carbon-bearing compounds in the kimberlite pipes may be divided into distinct geochemical groups, genetically associated with exogenic or endogenic geological processes. In analyzing the isotope composition of diamonds from eclogite and kimberlite, graphite in concentrated form from eclogite and ultrabasic inclusions in kimberlite, and postmagmaic carbonic acid from the matrix of kimberlite, it was established that these compounds have a distinctive endogenic nature. The isotope composition of the limestones of marine origin has been determined by the isotope-exchange reation /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ (gas) + /sup 12/CO/sub 3/ (solution) reverse arrow..-->.. /sup 12/CO/sub 2/ (gas) + /sup 13/CO/sub 3/ (solution), which is rigidly associated with temperature of sedimentation and has controlled the ''heavy'' isotope composition of these rocks. The isotope composition of the bitumens has not yet enabled us to resolve the problem of the origin of the bitumen shows (biogenic or abiogenic). However, the similarity of the isotope composition of bitumens examined from various bitumen shows indicates identical thermodynamic conditions of formation.

  12. Garrotxa simulations: Hot gas distribution around Milky Way size galaxies at z=0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Fàbrega, S.; Colin, P.,; Valenzuela, O.; Figueras, F.; Krongol, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new set of cosmological Milky Way size galaxy simulations using ART. In our simulations the main system has been evolved inside a 28 Mpc cosmological box with a spatial resolution of 109 pc. At z=0 our systems have an M_{vir}=6-8 × 10^{11} M_⊙. In several of our models we have observed how a well defined disk is formed inside the dark matter halo and the overall amount of gas and stars is comparable with MW observations. Several non-axisymmetric structures arise out of the disk: spirals, bars and also a warp. We have also observed that a huge reservoir of hot gas is present at large distances from the disk, embedded in the dark matter halo region, accounting for only a fraction of the ”missing baryons”. Gas column density, emission (EM) and dispersion (DM) measure have been computed from inside the simulated disk at a position of 8 kpc from the center and in several directions. Our preliminary results reveal that the distribution of hot gas is non- isotropic according with observations. Also its metallic content presents a clear bimodality what is a consequence of a recent accretion of a satellite galaxy among others. After a careful analysis we confirm that due to the anisotropy in the gas distribution a new observational parameter needs to be defined to recover the real distribution of hot gas in the galactic halo.

  13. Distribution of gas in the inner comae of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand the physical and chemical processes which produce the observed spatial morphology of the cometary coma, it is necessary to analyze observational data with physically meaningful models. Thus, a coupled program of theoretical modeling and complementary observational data analysis was undertaken regarding the spatial distributions of neutral gases in the coma. More, specifically, the particular topics of interest are: (1) the theoretical modeling of the nonequilibrium dynamics of the inner coma with emphasis on the region of the coma from the transition from collisional fluid flow out to the free-flow region and on observable conditions in the coma (i.e., density, outflow speed, and temperature); and (2) the model analysis of an important set of long-slit CCD spectra of comets. The side-by-side development of models along with the observation and analysis of data is an important and integral part of this project. The scientific community has in hand valuable observational and in situ data regarding one comet, Halley. It is important to use Halley as the benchmark by which other remotely observed comet data can be understood. Therefore, the self-consistant analysis of data with appropriate models is of the utmost importance. The data analysis work includes the analysis of the spatial profiles of (OI), NH2, CN, and C2.

  14. Jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an arterial heat pipe with a capillary driven jet pump. The jet pump generates a suction which pumps vapor and noncondensible gas from the artery. The suction also forces liquid into the artery and maintains it in a primed condition. A theoretical model was developed which predicts the existence of two stable ranges. Up to a certain tilt the artery will prime by itself once a heat load is applied to the heat pipe. At higher tilts, the jet pump can maintain the artery in a primed condition but self-priming is not possible. A prototype heat pipe was tested which self-primed up to a tilt of 1.9 cm, with a heat load of 500 watts. The heat pipe continued to prime reliably when operated as a VCHP, i.e., after a large amount of noncondensible gas was introduced.

  15. High performance flexible heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, R. M.; Gernert, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    A Phase I SBIR NASA program for developing and demonstrating high-performance flexible heat pipes for use in the thermal management of spacecraft is examined. The program combines several technologies such as flexible screen arteries and high-performance circumferential distribution wicks within an envelope which is flexible in the adiabatic heat transport zone. The first six months of work during which the Phase I contract goal were met, are described. Consideration is given to the heat-pipe performance requirements. A preliminary evaluation shows that the power requirement for Phase II of the program is 30.5 kilowatt meters at an operating temperature from 0 to 100 C.

  16. Process for forming integral edge seals in porous gas distribution plates utilizing a vibratory means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigenbaum, Haim (Inventor); Pudick, Sheldon (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A process for forming an integral edge seal in a gas distribution plate for use in a fuel cell. A seal layer is formed along an edge of a porous gas distribution plate by impregnating the pores in the layer with a material adapted to provide a seal which is operative dry or when wetted by an electrolyte of a fuel cell. Vibratory energy is supplied to the sealing material during the step of impregnating the pores to provide a more uniform seal throughout the cross section of the plate.

  17. Stage 1: Expression of interest and consultation document for natural gas distribution in New Brunswick

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The New Brunswick government intends to award a franchise to establish natural gas distribution in the province. To this end, the province wishes to invite bids from qualified entities to establish gas distribution facilities. The province will select the preferred bidder(s) through a two-stage competitive bidding process. This document details the province`s policy objectives, questions and issues to be addressed in stage 1 of the process, and the schedule for the process. Appendices include copies of relevant provincial statutes and regulations.

  18. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Person, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  19. Fee electricity - a new headache for the gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.

    1980-01-01

    Stray current from underground primary electric cables and electric grounds can occasionally cause unusually high voltages at certain points along gas-distribution systems. Because of the parallel paths and many sources of stray neutral currents, the circuitry and voltage drops are complex. Washington Power's experience shows that (1) bare gas pipe systems remain relatively free of neutral currents because they are grounded along their entire length, (2) plastic and coated-steel pipe systems pick up stray neutral currents through holidays, bare valves, etc., and develop hazardous voltages because the steel pipe or the tracer wire of the plastic pipe is insulated from the soil, (3) pipeline voltages occur in areas having very high soil resistivities because of the poor return circuit for neutral currents back to the electric substation, and (4) the pipelines most distant from the substation experience the highest voltages because those areas contain the greatest imbalance of primary currents.

  20. Heat Pipe Technology: A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This bibliography lists 149 references with abstracts and 47 patents dealing with applications of heat pipe technology. Topics covered include: heat exchangers for heat recovery; electrical and electronic equipment cooling; temperature control of spacecraft; cryosurgery; cryogenic, cooling; nuclear reactor heat transfer; solar collectors; laser mirror cooling; laser vapor cavitites; cooling of permafrost; snow melting; thermal diodes variable conductance; artery gas venting; and venting; and gravity assisted pipes.

  1. Diffusion of dilute gas in arrays of randomly distributed, vertically aligned, high-aspect-ratio cylinders.

    PubMed

    Szmyt, Wojciech; Guerra, Carlos; Utke, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    In this work we modelled the diffusive transport of a dilute gas along arrays of randomly distributed, vertically aligned nanocylinders (nanotubes or nanowires) as opposed to gas diffusion in long pores, which is described by the well-known Knudsen theory. Analytical expressions for (i) the gas diffusion coefficient inside such arrays, (ii) the time between collisions of molecules with the nanocylinder walls (mean time of flight), (iii) the surface impingement rate, and (iv) the Knudsen number of such a system were rigidly derived based on a random-walk model of a molecule that undergoes memoryless, diffusive reflections from nanocylinder walls assuming the molecular regime of gas transport. It can be specifically shown that the gas diffusion coefficient inside such arrays is inversely proportional to the areal density of cylinders and their mean diameter. An example calculation of a diffusion coefficient is delivered for a system of titanium isopropoxide molecules diffusing between vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Our findings are important for the correct modelling and optimisation of gas-based deposition techniques, such as atomic layer deposition or chemical vapour deposition, frequently used for surface functionalisation of high-aspect-ratio nanocylinder arrays in solar cells and energy storage applications. Furthermore, gas sensing devices with high-aspect-ratio nanocylinder arrays and the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes need the fundamental understanding and precise modelling of gas transport to optimise such processes.

  2. Diffusion of dilute gas in arrays of randomly distributed, vertically aligned, high-aspect-ratio cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In this work we modelled the diffusive transport of a dilute gas along arrays of randomly distributed, vertically aligned nanocylinders (nanotubes or nanowires) as opposed to gas diffusion in long pores, which is described by the well-known Knudsen theory. Analytical expressions for (i) the gas diffusion coefficient inside such arrays, (ii) the time between collisions of molecules with the nanocylinder walls (mean time of flight), (iii) the surface impingement rate, and (iv) the Knudsen number of such a system were rigidly derived based on a random-walk model of a molecule that undergoes memoryless, diffusive reflections from nanocylinder walls assuming the molecular regime of gas transport. It can be specifically shown that the gas diffusion coefficient inside such arrays is inversely proportional to the areal density of cylinders and their mean diameter. An example calculation of a diffusion coefficient is delivered for a system of titanium isopropoxide molecules diffusing between vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Our findings are important for the correct modelling and optimisation of gas-based deposition techniques, such as atomic layer deposition or chemical vapour deposition, frequently used for surface functionalisation of high-aspect-ratio nanocylinder arrays in solar cells and energy storage applications. Furthermore, gas sensing devices with high-aspect-ratio nanocylinder arrays and the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes need the fundamental understanding and precise modelling of gas transport to optimise such processes. PMID:28144565

  3. Angular Momentum Distribution of Hot Gas and Implications for Disk Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. N.; Jing, Y. P.; Yoshikaw, Kohji

    2003-11-01

    We study the angular momentum profiles both for dark matter and for gas within virialized halos using a statistical sample of halos drawn from cosmological hydrodynamics simulations. Three simulations have been analyzed: one is the nonradiative simulation and the other two have radiative cooling. We find that the gas component, on average, has a larger spin and contains a smaller fraction of mass with negative angular momentum than its dark matter counterpart in the nonradiative model. As to the cooling models, the gas component shares approximately the same spin parameter as its dark matter counterpart, but the hot gas has a higher spin and is more aligned in angular momentum than dark matter, while the opposite holds for the cold gas. After the mass of negative angular momentum is excluded, the angular momentum profile of the hot gas component approximately follows the universal function originally proposed by Bullock et al. for dark matter, though the shape parameter μ is much larger for hot gas and is comfortably in the range required by observations of disk galaxies. Since disk formation is related to the distribution of hot gas that will cool, our study may explain the fact that the disk component of observed galaxies contains a smaller fraction of low angular momentum material than dark matter in halos.

  4. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  5. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  6. Quality of the log-geometric distribution extrapolation for smaller undiscovered oil and gas pool size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chenglin, L.; Charpentier, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey procedure for the estimation of the general form of the parent distribution requires that the parameters of the log-geometric distribution be calculated and analyzed for the sensitivity of these parameters to different conditions. In this study, we derive the shape factor of a log-geometric distribution from the ratio of frequencies between adjacent bins. The shape factor has a log straight-line relationship with the ratio of frequencies. Additionally, the calculation equations of a ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary are deduced. For a specific log-geometric distribution, we find that the ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary is the same. We apply our analysis to simulations based on oil and gas pool distributions from four petroleum systems of Alberta, Canada and four generated distributions. Each petroleum system in Alberta has a different shape factor. Generally, the shape factors in the four petroleum systems stabilize with the increase of discovered pool numbers. For a log-geometric distribution, the shape factor becomes stable when discovered pool numbers exceed 50 and the shape factor is influenced by the exploration efficiency when the exploration efficiency is less than 1. The simulation results show that calculated shape factors increase with those of the parent distributions, and undiscovered oil and gas resources estimated through the log-geometric distribution extrapolation are smaller than the actual values. ?? 2010 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  7. Lead Water Pipes and Infant Mortality at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troesken, Werner

    2008-01-01

    In 1897, about half of all American municipalities used lead pipes to distribute water. Employing data from Massachusetts, this paper compares infant death rates in cities that used lead water pipes to rates in cities that used nonlead pipes. In the average town in 1900, the use of lead pipes increased infant mortality by 25 to 50 percent.…

  8. Recycling of excavated asphalt from gas-pipeline installations to Gas Research Institute. Final report - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lucido, J.; Tobin, A.

    1988-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that over 11,500 miles of gas distribution piping is installed under existing asphalt pavement annually. This estimate includes 25% of all new installations and 60% of all replacement work. As gas distribution systems grow to meet demands, more projects will involve restoration of asphalt pavements. Because gas distribution piping installed and/or replaced under asphalt pavement can be significantly more expensive than an installation in unpaved soil--it is cause for major concern to the gas industry. The Phase I study addressed the concept of on-site recycling of excavated asphalt for gas utility trenching applications. Commercialization of this concept will eliminate the need for disposal of existing asphalt concrete and the importing of new asphalt concrete, creating potentially significant advantages to the industry.

  9. Computer Program For Variable-Conductance Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniuk, D.

    1992-01-01

    VCHPDA provides accurate mathematical models of transient as well as steady-state performance of variable-conductance heat pipes over wide range of operating conditions. Applies to heat pipes with either cold, wicked or hot, nonwicked gas reservoirs and uses ideal-gas law and "flat-front" (negligible vapor diffusion) gas theory. Calculates length of gas-blocked region and temperature of vapor in active portion of heat pipe by solving set of nonlinear equations for conservation of energy and mass. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOEpatents

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  11. Inspecting an ethylene pipe line

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsvig, D.M. ); Duncan, J.; Zillinger, L. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on the Alberta Gas Ethylene Co. (AGEC), completion of intensive internal cleaning and inspection program on their 112-mi ethylene pipe line. AGEC operates two ethylene manufacturing facilities in central Alberta, Canada. The ethylene plants are located 12.4 mi east of Red Deer, Alta., at Joffre, and supply two customers in Joffre. The remaining ethylene is shipped by the 112-mi, 12-in. line to a storage cavern near Edmonton.

  12. Fractal analysis of the dark matter and gas distributions in the Mare-Nostrum universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gaite, José

    2010-03-01

    We develop a method of multifractal analysis of N-body cosmological simulations that improves on the customary counts-in-cells method by taking special care of the effects of discreteness and large scale homogeneity. The analysis of the Mare-Nostrum simulation with our method provides strong evidence of self-similar multifractal distributions of dark matter and gas, with a halo mass function that is of Press-Schechter type but has a power-law exponent -2, as corresponds to a multifractal. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the dark matter and gas distributions are indistinguishable as multifractals. To determine if there is any gas biasing, we calculate the cross-correlation coefficient, with negative but inconclusive results. Hence, we develop an effective Bayesian analysis connected with information theory, which clearly demonstrates that the gas is biased in a long range of scales, up to the scale of homogeneity. However, entropic measures related to the Bayesian analysis show that this gas bias is small (in a precise sense) and is such that the fractal singularities of both distributions coincide and are identical. We conclude that this common multifractal cosmic web structure is determined by the dynamics and is independent of the initial conditions.

  13. Trans-Asian pipe line; A prefeasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, N. )

    1991-11-01

    Building a 2,100 mi Trans-Asian natural gas system to transport 36 Bm{sup 3}/y Iranian natural gas from the Sarkhum field to Calcutta is under consideration by Iran, Pakistan and India. As proposed in this paper, the pipe line will pass through desert, alluvial plains, mountainous, rocky and marshy terrain, dense rain forests and agricultural lands, and will cross numerous rail, road, and major river crossings. Depending on the gas volume distributed along the route, the trunkline diameter is estimated at 66-in., 54-in. and 48-in. about 24 compressor stations will be located along the line approximately 80 mi apart. A SCADA communication and control system will operate on UHF radio link between microwave towers or through a satellite network. Microwave towers are estimated at 492-ft with some 6,562-ft towers required in mountainous regions.

  14. Gas Chromatographic Verification of a Mathematical Model: Product Distribution Following Methanolysis Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, R. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated application of binomial statistics to equilibrium distribution of ester systems by employing gas chromatography to verify the mathematical model used. Discusses model development and experimental techniques, indicating the model enables a straightforward extension to symmetrical polyfunctional esters and presents a mathematical basis…

  15. Ecosystem Warming Affects Vertical Distribution of Leaf Gas Exchange Properties and Water Relations of Spring Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vertical distribution of gas exchange and water relations responses to full-season in situ infrared (IR) warming were evaluated for hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) grown in an open field in a semiarid desert region of the Southwest USA. A Temperature Free-Air Contro...

  16. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    DOEpatents

    McConnell, Robert D.; Vansant, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  17. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.D.; Vansant, J.H.

    1984-10-02

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  18. Phase behavior and splitting analysis: An operational tool in gas transmission and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez A., F.F.; Infantini S., M.

    1998-12-31

    Most of the natural gas produced by Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA) is associated gas that flows from the gathering systems to the processing plants, before it arrives at the transmission systems. Even if the gas transmission occurs after the necessary processing of the gas has been completed, condensation still happens in the transmission, regulating stations and/or distribution systems. The quantity of condensate will not only depend on composition, pressure and temperature, but also on the unequal splitting phenomenon that takes place at tee junctions in a network system. The splitting phenomenon determines the liquid distribution at the junction. This situation is more drastic when the processing plant is partially or totally shut down in a maintenance program. This work shows how the gas transmission and distribution engineer has to use the phase behavior and splitting analysis as an operational tool, in order to predict and prevent the presence of liquid in the system. Using process simulators, the phase behavior analysis is conducted to determine the bubble and dew point curve and to perform flash calculations at any pressure and temperature. Then, the operational pressure-temperature profile is over-plotted on the phase envelope diagram in order to evaluate the condensation possibility into the gas pipeline. Afterwards, the pressure and temperature drops in regulating stations are incorporated in the phase envelope diagram and the two-phase gas condensate study is completed. Finally, considering the concepts of the splitting phenomenon and the knowledge that it can really happen, the presence of liquid in particular customers can be explained and solved. Operational experiences are included to evaluate the methodology and to present the effectiveness of the results.

  19. Diffused waveguiding capillary tube with distributed feedback for a gas laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    For use in a waveguide gas laser, a capillary tube of glass or ceramic has an inner surface defining a longitudinal capillary opening through which the laser gas flows. At least a portion of the inner surface is corrugated with corrugations or channels with a periodicity Lambda where Lambda = 1/2 Lambda, Lambda being the laser gas wavelength. The tube includes a diffused region extending outwardly from the opening. The diffused region of a depth d on the order of 1 Lambda to 3 Lambda acts as a waveguide for the waves, with the corrugations producing distributed feedback. The evanescent component of the waves traveling in the diffused region interact with the laser gas in the opening, gaining energy, and thereby amplifying the waves travelling in the diffused region, which exit the diffused region, surrounding the opening, as a beam of wavelength Lambda.

  20. Probing Milky Way's hot gas halo density distribution using the dispersion measure of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhezher, Ya. V.; Nugaev, E. Ya.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-03-01

    A number of recent studies indicates a significant amount of ionized gas in a form of the hot gas halo around the Milky Way. The halo extends over the region of 100 kpc and may be acountable for the missing baryon mass. In this paper we calculate the contribution of the proposed halo to the dispersion measure (DM) of the pulsars. The Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW), Maller and Bullock (MB), and Feldmann, Hooper, and Gnedin (FHG) density distibutions are considered for the gas halo. The data set includes pulsars with the distance known independently from the DM, e.g., pulsars in globular clusters, LMC, SMC and pulsars with known parallax. The results exclude the NFW distribution for the hot gas, while the more realisticMB and FHG models are compatible with the observed dispersion measure.

  1. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  2. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    PubMed

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  3. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively. PMID:21267082

  4. Heat pipe technology development for high temperature space radiator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Elder, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Technology requirements for heat pipe radiators, potentially among the lightest weight systems for space power applications, include flexible elements, and improved specific radiator performance(kg/kW). For these applications a flexible heat pipe capable of continuous operation through an angle of 180/sup 0/ has been demonstrated. The effect of bend angle on the heat pipe temperature distribution is reviewed. An analysis of lightweight membrane heat pipe radiators that use surface tension forces for fluid containment has been conducted. The design analysis of these lightweight heat pipes is described and a potential application in heat rejection systems for space nuclear power plants outlined.

  5. Heat pipe technology development for high temperature space radiator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

    1984-08-01

    Technology requirements for heat pipe radiators, potentially among the lightest weight systems for space power applications, include flexible elements, and improved specific radiator performance (kg/kW). For these applications a flexible heat pipe capable of continuous operation through an angle of 180/sup 0/ has been demonstrated. The effect of bend angle on the heat pipe temperature distribution is reviewed. An analysis of light weight membrane heat pipe radiators that use surface tension forces for fluid containment has been conducted. The design analysis of these lightweight heat pipes is described and a potential application in heat rejection systems for space nuclear power plants outlined.

  6. Pipe-to-pipe impact program

    SciTech Connect

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Bampton, M.C.C.; Friley, J.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1984-06-01

    This report documents the tests and analyses performed as part of the Pipe-to-Pipe Impact (PTPI) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This work was performed to assist the NRC in making licensing decisions regarding pipe-to-pipe impact events following postulated breaks in high energy fluid system piping. The report scope encompasses work conducted from the program's start through the completion of the initial hot oil tests. The test equipment, procedures, and results are described, as are analytic studies of failure potential and data correlation. Because the PTPI Program is only partially completed, the total significance of the current test results cannot yet be accurately assessed. Therefore, although trends in the data are discussed, final conclusions and recommendations will be possible only after the completion of the program, which is scheduled to end in FY 1984.

  7. Heat pipes. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of heat pipes are described, including space requirements and contributions. Controllable heat pipes, and designs for automatically maintaining a selected constant temperature, are discussed which would add to the versatility and usefulness of heat pipes in industrial processing, manufacture of integrated circuits, and in temperature stabilization of electronics.

  8. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Distribution and controls on gas hydrate in the ocean-floor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    Methane hydrate, a crystalline solid that is formed of water and gas molecules, is widespread in oceanic sediments. It occurs at water depths that exceed 300 to 500 m and in a zone that commonly extends from the sea floor, down several hundred meters - the base of the zone is limited by increased temperature. To determine factors that control gas hydrate concentration, we have mapped its distribution off the U.S. Atlantic coast using acoustic remote-sensing methods. Most natural gas hydrate is formed from biogenic methane, and therefore it is concentrated where there is a rapid accumulation of organic detritus and also where there is a rapid accumulation of sediments (which protect detritus from oxidation). When hydrate fills the pore space of sediment, it can reduce permeability and create a gas trap. Such trapping of gas beneath hydrate may cause the formation of the most concentrated hydrate deposits, perhaps because the gas that is held in the trap can slowly diffuse upwards or migrate through faults. Hydrate-sealed traps are formed by hills on the sea floor, by dipping strata, or by salt(?) domes. Off the southeastern United States, a small area (only 3000 km{sup 2}) beneath a ridge formed by rapidly-deposited sediments appears to contain a volume of methane in hydrate that is equivalent to {approximately}30 times the U.S. annual consumption of gas. The breakdown of hydrate can cause submarine landslides by converting the hydrate to gas plus water and generating a rise of pore pressure. Conversely, sea-floor landslides can cause breakdown of hydrate by reducing the pressure in sediments. These interacting processes may cause cascading slides, which would result in breakdown of hydrate and release of methane to the atmosphere. This addition of methane to the global greenhouse would significantly influence climate. Gas hydrate in sea-floor sediments is potentially significant to climate, energy resources, and sea-floor stability.

  10. Distribution and origin of groundwater methane in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2014-01-01

    Public concerns over potential environmental contamination associated with oil and gas well drilling and fracturing in the Wattenberg field in northeast Colorado are increasing. One of the issues of concern is the migration of oil, gas, or produced water to a groundwater aquifer resulting in contamination of drinking water. Since methane is the major component of natural gas and it can be dissolved and transported with groundwater, stray gas in aquifers has elicited attention. The initial step toward understanding the environmental impacts of oil and gas activities, such as well drilling and fracturing, is to determine the occurrence, where it is and where it came from. In this study, groundwater methane data that has been collected in response to a relatively new regulation in Colorado is analyzed. Dissolved methane was detected in 78% of groundwater wells with an average concentration of 4.0 mg/L and a range of 0-37.1 mg/L. Greater than 95% of the methane found in groundwater wells was classified as having a microbial origin, and there was minimal overlap between the C and H isotopic characterization of the produced gas and dissolved methane measured in the aquifer. Neither density of oil/gas wells nor distance to oil/gas wells had a significant impact on methane concentration suggesting other important factors were influencing methane generation and distribution. Thermogenic methane was detected in two aquifer wells indicating a potential contamination pathway from the producing formation, but microbial-origin gas was by far the predominant source of dissolved methane in the Wattenberg field.

  11. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: constraints from ODP Leg 204

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tréhu, A. M.; Long, P. E.; Torres, M. E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F. R.; Collett, T. S.; Goldberg, D. S.; Milkov, A. V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N. L.; Barr, S. R.; Borowski, W. S.; Claypool, G. E.; Delwiche, M. E.; Dickens, G. R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J. E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M.; Weinberger, J. L.

    2004-06-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ˜10 m thick, and may occur in up to ˜20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change.

  12. Arctic production to put demands on line pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The launching of offshore production in the high Arctic will bring with it increased demand for the line pipe exhibiting good weldability and toughness characteristics in extremely low temperatures. West German steelmakers long have been recognized for supplying pipe and structural materials to the offshore market. Increased emphasis on arctic oil and gas exploration has seen the Germans increase research and development efforts on arctic grade steels, particularly line pipe. These R and D efforts are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of commercially-available spacecraft-type heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, W. B.; Tower, L. K.

    1978-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop reliable, cost effective spacecraft thermal control heat pipes, life tests on 30 commercially available heat pipes in 10 groups of different design and material combinations were conducted. Results for seven groups were reported herein. Materials are aluminum and stainless steel, and working fluids are methanol and ammonia. The formation of noncondensible gas was observed for times exceeding 11,000 hours. The heat transport capacities of the pipes were also determined.

  14. Numerical Study of the Gas Distribution in an Oxygen Blast Furnace. Part 2: Effects of the Design and Operating Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-09-01

    Gas distribution plays a significant role in an oxygen blast furnace. The uneven distribution of recycling gas from the shaft tuyere has been shown to affect the heat distribution and energy utilization in an oxygen blast furnace. Therefore, the optimal design and operating parameters beneficial to the gas distribution in an oxygen blast furnace should be determined. In total, three parameters and 22 different conditions in an oxygen blast furnace multifluid model were considered. The gas and heat distributions in an oxygen blast furnace under different conditions were simulated and compared. The study revealed that when the height of shaft tuyere decreased from 7.8 m to 3.8 m, the difference in top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 11.6%. When the recycling gas temperature increased from 1123 K to 1473 K, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.9%. As the allocation ratio increased from 0.90 to 1.94, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.0%. Considering both gas and heat distributions, a shaft tuyere height of 3.8 m to 4.8 m, a recycling gas temperature of 1473 K and an allocation ratio of 1.94 are recommended in practice under the conditions of this study.

  15. Heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a FORTRAN based computer model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that can be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. Proposed designs feature either a Brayton or a K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with rotary alternators. Both ion and magnetoplasmodynamic (MPD) thrusters will be considered in the model. In support of the NEP model, Rocketdyne is developing power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutines. The subroutines will be incorporated into the NEP vehicle model which will be written by NASA LeRC. The purpose is to document the heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model and its supporting subroutines. The heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model is designed to provide estimate of the mass and performance of the equipment used to reject heat from Brayton and Rankine cycle power conversion systems. The subroutine models the ductwork and heat pipe cooled manifold for a gas cooled Brayton; the heat sink heat exchanger, liquid loop piping, expansion compensator, pump and manifold for a liquid loop cooled Brayton; and a shear flow condenser for a K-Rankine system. In each case, the final heat rejection is made by way of a heat pipe radiator. The radiator is sized to reject the amount of heat necessary.

  16. Heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.

    1993-11-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a FORTRAN based computer model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that can be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. Proposed designs feature either a Brayton or a K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with rotary alternators. Both ion and magnetoplasmodynamic (MPD) thrusters will be considered in the model. In support of the NEP model, Rocketdyne is developing power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutines. The subroutines will be incorporated into the NEP vehicle model which will be written by NASA LeRC. The purpose is to document the heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model and its supporting subroutines. The heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model is designed to provide estimate of the mass and performance of the equipment used to reject heat from Brayton and Rankine cycle power conversion systems. The subroutine models the ductwork and heat pipe cooled manifold for a gas cooled Brayton; the heat sink heat exchanger, liquid loop piping, expansion compensator, pump and manifold for a liquid loop cooled Brayton; and a shear flow condenser for a K-Rankine system. In each case, the final heat rejection is made by way of a heat pipe radiator. The radiator is sized to reject the amount of heat necessary.

  17. Investigation of bubbles in arterial heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of gas occlusions in arterial heat pipes has been studied experimentally and theoretically. Specifically, the gas-liquid system properties, solubility and diffusivity, have been measured from -50 to 100 C for helium and argon in ammonia, Freon-21 (CHC12F), and methanol. Properties values obtained were then used to experimentally test models for gas venting from a heat pipe artery under isothermal conditions (i.e., no-heat flow), although the models, as developed, are also applicable to heat pipes operated at power, with some minor modifications. Preliminary calculations indicated arterial bubbles in a stagnant pipe require from minutes to days to collapse and vent. It has been found experimentally that a gas bubble entrapped within an artery structure has a very long lifetime in many credible situations. This lifetime has an approximately inverse exponential dependence on temperature, and is generally considerably longer for helium than for argon. The models postulated for venting under static conditions were in general quantitative agreement with experimental data. Factors of primary importance in governing bubble stability are artery diameter, artery wall thickness, noncondensible gas partial pressure, and the property group (the Ostwald solubility coefficient multiplied by the gas/liquid diffusivity).

  18. 76 FR 77223 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval and Revised Statement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval and Revised Statement of Operating Conditions Take notice that on December 1, 2011, SourceGas Distribution LLC...

  19. Influence of Permian salt dissolution on distribution of shallow Niobrara gas fields, eastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, D.W.; Smosna, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Subsurface analysis of Permian salt and related strata in the shallow Niobrara gas area on the eastern flank of the Denver basin reveals that the location of faulted anticlines which produce gas from porous chalk is related to the occurrence of six Nippewalla Group (Leonardian) salt zones. Salt distribution is controlled by the configuration of evaporate basins during the Leonardian, truncation at a sub-Jurassic unconformity (which has completely removed Guadalupian salts), and post-Jurassic subsurface dissolution. Significant dissolution took place in response to Laramide orogeny and subsequent eastward regional groundwater flow within the Lyons (Cedar Hills) Sandstone aquifer. Initially, dissolution occurred along a regional facies change from sandstone to salt. Solution collapse allowed for cross-formational flow and removal of younger salts. Shallow Niobrara gas fields are situated above salt outliers or along regionally updip salt edges. No significant Niobrara production exists in areas where salt is absent. Structural relief across fields is related to Leonardian thickness variations, rather than subsalt offset. Seismic data reveal abrupt Leonardian thinning at the regionally updip limit of Eckley field, which has produced over 33 BCFG. Thickness of residual salt may be important in controlling the amount of gas trapped within the Niobrara. Where thick salts are preserved, structural relief is greater, the gas-water transition zone is thicker, and gas saturation is higher at the crests of faulted anticlines.

  20. Central Appalachian basin natural gas database: distribution, composition, and origin of natural gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Román Colón, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled a database consisting of three worksheets of central Appalachian basin natural gas analyses and isotopic compositions from published and unpublished sources of 1,282 gas samples from Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The database includes field and reservoir names, well and State identification number, selected geologic reservoir properties, and the composition of natural gases (methane; ethane; propane; butane, iso-butane [i-butane]; normal butane [n-butane]; iso-pentane [i-pentane]; normal pentane [n-pentane]; cyclohexane, and hexanes). In the first worksheet, location and American Petroleum Institute (API) numbers from public or published sources are provided for 1,231 of the 1,282 gas samples. A second worksheet of 186 gas samples was compiled from published sources and augmented with public location information and contains carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic measurements of natural gas. The third worksheet is a key for all abbreviations in the database. The database can be used to better constrain the stratigraphic distribution, composition, and origin of natural gas in the central Appalachian basin.

  1. Distribution of Zeros and the Equation of State. IV ---Ideal Bose-Einstein Gas---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.

    1982-09-01

    The ideal Bose-Einstein gas is investigated on the basis of the fundamental concept of the distribution of zeros of the grand partition function on the complex z(= activity) plane. For this gas there are no zeros; but poles play essentially the same role as zeros from an analytical point of view, and are distributed on the part of the positive real axis from λ-3(>0) to +∞, where λ=h(2π mkT)-1/2. The distribution function of poles is calculated, and the function-theoretical structure of the equation of state is discussed. The Bose-Einstein condensation (especially the continuity of the slope of the p-v isotherm at the condensation point and the continuity of the specific heat at the transition temperature) is examined from the point of view of the distribution of poles. From the same point of view the two-dimensional and one-dimensional ideal Bose-Einstein gases are treated. Finally, the n-dimensional (n≥ 4) ideal Bose-Einstein gas is discussed, and it is shown that for n≥ 5 the specific heat is discontinuous at the transition temperature.

  2. The effect of gas double-dynamic on mass distribution in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Li, Hong-Qiang

    2014-05-10

    The mass distribution regularity in substrate of solid-state fermentation (SSF) has rarely been reported due to the heterogeneity of solid medium and the lack of suitable instrument and method, which limited the comprehensive analysis and enhancement of the SSF performance. In this work, the distributions of water, biomass, and fermentation product in different medium depths of SSF were determined using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the developed models. Based on the mass distribution regularity, the effects of gas double-dynamic on heat transfer, microbial growth and metabolism, and product distribution gradient were systematically investigated. Results indicated that the maximum temperature of substrate and the maximum carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) were 39.5°C and 2.48mg/(hg) under static aeration solid-state fermentation (SASSF) and 33.9°C and 5.38mg/(hg) under gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation (GDSSF), respectively, with the environmental temperature for fermentation of 30±1°C. The fermentation production (cellulase activity) ratios of the upper, middle, and lower levels were 1:0.90:0.78 at seventh day under SASSF and 1:0.95:0.89 at fifth day under GDSSF. Therefore, combined with NIRS analysis, gas double-dynamic could effectively strengthen the solid-state fermentation performance due to the enhancement of heat transfer, the stimulation of microbial metabolism and the increase of the homogeneity of fermentation products.

  3. Pipe Line Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The array of tanks, pipes and valves in the photo below is a petroleum tank farm in Georgia, part of a petrochemical pipe line system that moves refined petroleum products from Texas and Louisiana to the mid-Eastern seaboard. The same pipes handle a number of different products, such as gasoline, kerosene, jet fuel or fuel oil. The fluids are temporarily stored in tanks, pumped into the pipes in turn and routed to other way stations along the pipe line. The complex job of controlling, measuring and monitoring fuel flow is accomplished automatically by a computerized control and communications system which incorporates multiple space technologies.

  4. Reliability Estimation for Double Containment Piping

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cadwallader; T. Pinna

    2012-08-01

    Double walled or double containment piping is considered for use in the ITER international project and other next-generation fusion device designs to provide an extra barrier for tritium gas and other radioactive materials. The extra barrier improves confinement of these materials and enhances safety of the facility. This paper describes some of the design challenges in designing double containment piping systems. There is also a brief review of a few operating experiences of double walled piping used with hazardous chemicals in different industries. This paper recommends approaches for the reliability analyst to use to quantify leakage from a double containment piping system in conceptual and more advanced designs. The paper also cites quantitative data that can be used to support such reliability analyses.

  5. Identification of sewer pipes to be cleaned for reduction of CSO pollutant load.

    PubMed

    Nagaiwa, Akihiro; Settsu, Katsushi; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    To reduce the CSO (Combined Sewer Overflow) pollutant discharge, one of the effective options is cleaning of sewer pipes before rainfall events. To maximize the efficiency, identification of pipes to be cleaned is necessary. In this study, we discussed the location of pipe deposit in dry weather in a combined sewer system using a distributed model and investigated the effect of pipe cleaning to reduce the pollutant load from the CSO. First we simulated the dry weather flow in a combined sewer system. The pipe deposit distribution in the network was estimated after 3 days of dry weather period. Several specific pipes with structural defect and upper end pipes tend to have an accumulation of deposit. Wet weather simulations were conducted with and without pipe cleaning in rainfall events with different patterns. The SS loads in CSO with and without the pipe cleaning were compared. The difference in the estimated loads was interpreted as the contribution of wash-off in the cleaned pipe. The effect of pipe cleaning on reduction of the CSO pollutant load was quantitatively evaluated (e.g. the cleaning of one specific pipe could reduce 22% of total CSO load). The CSO simulations containing pipe cleaning options revealed that identification of pipes with accumulated deposit using the distributed model is very useful and informative to evaluate the applicability of pipe cleaning option for CSO pollutant reduction.

  6. Mixing in Helical Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Michael B.; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2001-11-01

    We consider advection and diffusion of a passive scalar in a helical pipe. By assuming that the curvature and torsion are small (equivalent to small Dean number) and the Reynolds number is moderate, we can use a closed form approximation, due to Dean (1927) and Germano (1982), for the induced recirculation. We investigate the problem numerically using a split-step particle method for a variety of localized initial conditions. The problem is governed by two parameters: a nondimensional diffusion constant D (typically small), and the scaled ratio of torsion to curvature λ. At small times, the longitudinal width of the particle distribution, σ, is governed by diffusive effects (σ ∝ √Dt). At large times, Taylor diffusion dominates (σ ∝ √t/D). However, at intermediate times, a ballistic region exists where the width spreads linearly, as postulated by Mezic & Wiggins (1994). We also discuss how these various behaviors scale with the parameters D and λ.

  7. Cooling Acoustic Transcucer with Heat Pipes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-19

    pipes. [0013] Most transducer packages involve a stack of active ceramic. A Tonpilz transducer 10 in the prior art, as depicted in FIG. 1...identical or corresponding parts throughout the several views and wherein: [0023] FIG. 1 is a prior art depiction of a Tonpilz transducer design...Distribution is unlimited 20090916027 Attorney Docket No. 97001 COOLING ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER WITH HEAT PIPES STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001

  8. Variable-Conductance Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniuk, D.

    1986-01-01

    In response to need to accurately and efficiently predict performance of variable-conductance heat pipes (VCHP's) incorporated in spacecraft thermalcontrol systems, computer code VCHPDA developed to interact with thermal analyzer programs such as SINDA (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer). Calculates length of gas-blocked region and vapor temperature in active portion. Advantages of VCHPDA over prior programs improved accuracy, unconditional stability, and increased efficiency of solution resulting from novel approach and use of state-of-the-art numerical techniques for solving VCHP mathematical model. Code valuable tool in design and evaluation of advanced thermal-control systems using variable-conductance heat pipes. Written in FORTRAN IV for use on CDC 600 computers.

  9. Gas hydrate and P-Wave Velocity Distribution in the Yaquina Basin at the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebscher, C.; Gajewski, D.; Grobys, J.; Kukowski, N.; Netzeband, G.; Wagner, M.; Bialas, J.

    2003-04-01

    The lower boundary of the methane hydrate stability zone in continental margin sediments is often marked by a strong, phase reversed reflection subparallel to the seafloor, called the bottom simulating reflector (BSR). High resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) data from the Yaquina Basin offshore Peru at 8 deg S show a BSR that is varying laterally in amplitude as well as in continuity. The amplitudes of the reflections above the BSR also vary with the appearance of the BSR. Where the BSR is strong, the reflections above it are weaker compared to areas where the BSR is weak. And although the strong part of the BSR is underlain immediately by strong reflections, reflections several hundred meters beneath the BSR appear weaker than those where the BSR is weak. This variation indicates significant heterogeneity in the distribution of gas and gas hydrate in this area. Chemoherms observed at the Yaquina Basin sea floor indicate the presence of free gas in the sediments up to the seafloor. The presence of gas and gas hydrate within the sediment sequence significantly influences the P-wave velocity in the affected layers. Therefore a detailed analysis of velocity variations enables to understand the apparently different conditions for the formation of gas hydrate along the BSR and the migration paths of the free gas. Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from profiles coincident with the MCS data can provide such detailed velocity depth information. Velocity analysis from OBS data included 2D-ray tracing and 1D-interval-velocity analysis by means of DIX-inversion. In order to find a trade-off between vertical resolution and minimization of errors caused by the sensitivity of the DIX' formula to velocity variations in thin layers, the data have undergone a Kirchhoff wave-equation datuming and adjacent coherence filtering was applied to the data to eliminate the one sided travel path through the water column of the OBS-observations. The derived velocity structure confirms

  10. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  11. Genetic algorithm for the pair distribution function of the electron gas.

    PubMed

    Vericat, Fernando; Stoico, César O; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Renzi, Danilo G

    2011-12-01

    The pair distribution function of the electron gas is calculated using a parameterized generalization of hypernetted chain approximation with the parameters being obtained by optimizing the system energy with a genetic algorithm. The functions so obtained are compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed by other authors in its variational and di_usion versions showing a very good agreement especially with the di_usion Monte Carlo results.

  12. Symptoms of hand-arm vibration syndrome in gas distribution operatives

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, K.; Crane, G.; Inskip, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To survey the prevalence and severity of hand-arm vibration syndrome symptoms (HAVS), and to estimate past and current exposure to hand held vibrating tools in a sample of gas distribution operatives breaking and re-instating road surfaces. METHODS: 153 gas distribution operatives (participation rate 81%) from three company districts were assessed by an administered questionnaire, a clinical examination, and a simple cold challenge test to the hands. Exposure histories were taken aided by a picture album of past and current tools. Information was obtained from several sources on the likely vibratory characteristics of those tools. Estimates were thus obtained of the frequency of blanching and neurological complaints in operatives, and of their lifetime hours of exposure and lifetime dose of vibration. RESULTS: On average, the sample had spent 16 years in employment involving use of vibratory tools. 24% had symptoms or signs of blanching after use of tools in the industry; 46% had troublesome persistent complaints of paraesthesiae or numbness, and these symptoms extended into the hands or arms in 18% of workers. In 5.9% the distribution of symptoms was suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome; and of ulnar nerve entrapment in a further 3.9%. The risks of blanching and neurological complaints rose significantly with lifetime hours of use of vibrating tools and lifetime dose of vibration. Symptoms were generally mild and apparent only after a prolonged interval, but there were exceptions, and cases had occurred after lower recent exposures. CONCLUSIONS: It has been suggested that aspects of the gas distribution operative's work mitigate against the risk normally anticipated from use of pneumatic road breaking tools. By contrast our data suggest that symptoms of HAVS do occur, given sufficient exposure, a finding relevant not only to gas supply workers, but also to workers from other industries who break and repair road surfaces.   PMID:9930095

  13. Fabrication of gas impervious edge seal for a bipolar gas distribution assembly for use in a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Werth, John

    1986-01-01

    A bipolar gas reactant distribution assembly for use in a fuel cell is disclosed, the assembly having a solid edge seal to prevent leakage of gaseous reactants wherein a pair of porous plates are provided with peripheral slits generally parallel to, and spaced apart from two edges of the plate, the slit being filled with a solid, fusible, gas impervious edge sealing compound. The plates are assembled with opposite faces adjacent one another with a layer of a fusible sealant material therebetween the slits in the individual plates being approximately perpendicular to one another. The plates are bonded to each other by the simultaneous application of heat and pressure to cause a redistribution of the sealant into the pores of the adjacent plate surfaces and to cause the edge sealing compound to flow and impregnate the region of the plates adjacent the slits and comingle with the sealant layer material to form a continuous layer of sealant along the edges of the assembled plates.

  14. Altitude Investigation of Gas Temperature Distribution at Turbine of Three Similar Axial-Flow Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, W.R.; Schulze, F.W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of inlet pressure, corrected engine speed, and turbine temperature level on turbine-inlet gas temperature distributions was conducted on a J40-WE-6, interim J40-WE-6, and prototype J40-WE-8 turbojet engine in the altitude wind tunnel at the NAC.4 Lewis laboratory. The engines were investigated over a range of simulated pressure altitudes from 15,000 to 55,000 feet, flight Mach numbers from 0.12 to 0.64, and corrected engine speeds from 7198 to 8026 rpm, The gas temperature distribution at the turbine of the three engines over the range of operating conditions investigated was considered satisfactory from the standpoint of desired temperature distribution with one exception - the distribution for the J40-WE-6 engine indicated a trend with decreasing engine-inlet pressure for the temperature to exceed the desired in the region of the blade hub. Installation of a compressor-outlet mixer vane assembly remedied this undesirable temperature distribution, The experimental data have shown that turbine-inlet temperature distributions are influenced in the expected manner by changes in compressor-outlet pressure or mass-flow distribution and by changes in combustor hole-area distribution. The similarity between turbine-inlet and turbine-outlet temperature distribution indicated only a small shift in temperature distribution imposed by the turbine rotors. The attainable jet thrusts of the three engines were influenced in different degrees and directions by changes in temperature distributions with change in engine-inlet pressure. Inability to match the desired temperature distribution resulted, for the J40-WE-6 engine, in an 11-percent thrust loss based on an average turbine-inlet temperature of 1500 F at an engine-inlet pressure of 500 pounds per square foot absolute. Departure from the desired temperature distribution in the Slade tip region results, for the prototype J40-WE-8 engine, in an attainable thrust increase of 3 to 4 percent as

  15. Pressure drop and gas distribution in compost based biofilters: medium mixing and composition effects.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Revah, S; Noyola, A

    2003-07-01

    The pressure drop and gas distribution in four different filter media for compost biofilters were studied as a function of three superficial loading rates of moist air and by carrying out the filter medium homogenization by mixing. The filter media used were compost, compost with cane bagasse, lava rock and aerobic sludge previously dried to 60% of water content. The pressure drop increased when lava rock and cane bagasse were used as bulking agents. The same trend was observed when water was added to the filter medium. Pressure drop tended to decrease with time as flow channels were formed inthe filter media. Tracer studies were carried out to quantify the gas distribution and the effect of channel formation. For the biofilters submitted to an airflow of 10, 40 and 70 l min(-1), an average normalized time of 0.96, 0.89 and 0.82, respectively were obtained. The results showed that channel formation was increased as the superficial loading rate was also increased. An operational practice that this work proposes and evaluates to improve gas distribution and medium moisture control is to carry out intermittent medium mixing. The medium moisture and void volume achieved under mixing condition were around 50% and 0.40, respectively with an average constant pressure drop of 11, 45 and 78 cm of water m(-1) for air velocities of 75, 300 and 525 m h(-1).

  16. Heat Transfer and Pressure Distributions on a Gas Turbine Blade Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azad, Gm S.; Han, Je-Chin; Teng, Shuye; Boyle, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and static pressure distributions are experimentally investigated on a gas turbine blade tip in a five-bladed stationary linear cascade. The blade is a 2-dimensional model of a first stage gas turbine rotor blade with a blade tip profile of a GE-E(sup 3) aircraft gas turbine engine rotor blade. The flow condition in the test cascade corresponds to an overall pressure ratio of 1.32 and exit Reynolds number based on axial chord of 1.1 x 10(exp 6). The middle 3-blade has a variable tip gap clearance. All measurements are made at three different tip gap clearances of about 1%, 1.5%, and 2.5% of the blade span. Heat transfer measurements are also made at two different turbulence intensity levels of 6.1 % and 9.7% at the cascade inlet. Static pressure measurements are made in the mid-span and the near-tip regions as well as on the shroud surface, opposite the blade tip surface. Detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions on the plane tip surface are measured using a transient liquid crystal technique. Results show various regions of high and low heat transfer coefficient on the tip surface. Tip clearance has a significant influence on local tip beat transfer coefficient distribution. Heat transfer coefficient also increases about 15-20% along the leakage flow path at higher turbulence intensity level of 9.7% over 6.1 %.

  17. DETERMINING ALL GAS PROPERTIES IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE DARK MATTER DISTRIBUTION ALONE

    SciTech Connect

    Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hansen, Steen H.; Host, Ole; Roncadelli, Marco

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that all properties of the hot X-ray emitting gas in galaxy clusters are completely determined by the underlying dark matter (DM) structure. Apart from the standard conditions of spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium for the gas, our proof is based on the Jeans equation for the DM and two simple relations which have recently emerged from numerical simulations: the equality of the gas and DM temperatures, and the almost linear relation between the DM velocity anisotropy profile and its density slope. For DM distributions described by the Navarro-Frenk-White or the Sersic profiles, the resulting gas density profile, the gas-to-total-mass ratio profile, and the entropy profile are all in good agreement with X-ray observations. All these profiles are derived using zero free parameters. Our result allows us to predict the X-ray luminosity profile of a cluster in terms of its DM content alone. As a consequence, a new strategy becomes available to constrain the DM morphology in galaxy clusters from X-ray observations. Our results can also be used as a practical tool for creating initial conditions for realistic cosmological structures to be used in numerical simulations.

  18. Mobile Methane Measurements of Natural Gas Distribution and End-use Emissions in Indianapolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. K.; Roscioli, J. R.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Ferrara, T.

    2015-12-01

    Indianapolis is the site of the INFLUX program to investigate greenhouse gas emissions from a large metropolitan area. A key question in INFLUX is the relative contributions of methane emissions from the local gas distribution system in comparison to biogenic sources, such as the wastewater treatment system and landfills, and of end use emissions from furnaces and other combustion devices downstream of customer gas meters. During February and March, 2015, the Aerodyne van was used to measure methane, ethane, CO2 and other trace gases during mobile sampling traverses through a number of urban and suburban Indianapolis neighborhoods. Signatures of distinct natural gas emissions, biogenic emissions, and combustion emissions were observed in small plumes. In a number of cases, these sources were identified as manhole covers in city streets, where nearby leaks can seep into the local wastewater system. Quantification of ethane and methane from 45 manholes reveal that some had emissions that were clearly biogenic while others had a distinct natural gas signature. This paper describes the results from the analysis of these mobile data in the context of the current Indianapolis methane emission inventory.

  19. 65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL MAST IN LOWER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO LAUNCHER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO FLAME BUCKET IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. POTABLE WATER PIPING IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. Towards an in-situ measurement of wave velocity in buried plastic water distribution pipes for the purposes of leak location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Fabrício C. L.; Brennan, Michael J.; Joseph, Phillip F.; Dray, Simon; Whitfield, Stuart; Paschoalini, Amarildo T.

    2015-12-01

    Water companies are under constant pressure to ensure that water leakage is kept to a minimum. Leak noise correlators are often used to help find and locate leaks. These devices correlate acoustic or vibration signals from sensors which are placed either side the location of a suspected leak. The peak in the cross-correlation function of the measured signals gives the time difference between the arrival times of the leak noise at the sensors. To convert the time delay into a distance, the speed at which the leak noise propagates along the pipe (wave-speed) needs to be known. Often, this is estimated from historical wave-speed data measured on other pipes obtained at various times and under various conditions, or it is estimated from tables which are calculated using simple formula. Usually, the wave-speed is not measured directly at the time of the correlation measurement and is therefore potentially a source of significant error in the localisation of the leak. In this paper, a new method of measuring the wave-speed in-situ in the presence of a leak, that is robust and simple, is explored. Experiments were conducted on a bespoke large scale buried pipe test-rig, in which a leak was also induced in the pipe between the measurement positions to simulate a condition that is likely to occur in practice. It is shown that even in conditions where the signal to noise ratio is very poor, the wave-speed estimate calculated using the new method is less than 5% different from the best estimate of 387 m s-1.

  1. Theory and design of variable conductance heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive review and analysis of all aspects of heat pipe technology pertinent to the design of self-controlled, variable conductance devices for spacecraft thermal control is presented. Subjects considered include hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, heat transfer into and out of the pipe, fluid selection, materials compatibility and variable conductance control techniques. The report includes a selected bibliography of pertinent literature, analytical formulations of various models and theories describing variable conductance heat pipe behavior, and the results of numerous experiments on the steady state and transient performance of gas controlled variable conductance heat pipes. Also included is a discussion of VCHP design techniques.

  2. 49 CFR 178.338-8 - Pressure relief devices, piping, valves, and fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Piping, valves, and fittings. (1) The burst pressure of all piping, pipe fittings, hoses and other... pressure of the tank. Additionally, the burst pressure may not be less than 4 times any higher pressure to..., and fittings have been tested after installation with gas or air and proved leak tight at not...

  3. 49 CFR 178.338-8 - Pressure relief devices, piping, valves, and fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Piping, valves, and fittings. (1) The burst pressure of all piping, pipe fittings, hoses and other... pressure of the tank. Additionally, the burst pressure may not be less than 4 times any higher pressure to..., and fittings have been tested after installation with gas or air and proved leak tight at not...

  4. 49 CFR 178.338-8 - Pressure relief devices, piping, valves, and fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Piping, valves, and fittings. (1) The burst pressure of all piping, pipe fittings, hoses and other... pressure of the tank. Additionally, the burst pressure may not be less than 4 times any higher pressure to..., and fittings have been tested after installation with gas or air and proved leak tight at not...

  5. 49 CFR 192.175 - Pipe-type and bottle-type holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.175 Pipe-type and bottle-type holders. (a) Each pipe-type and bottle-type holder must be designed so... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe-type and bottle-type holders. 192.175...

  6. Free gas in the regional hydrate stability zone: Implications for hydrate distribution and fracturing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2010-12-01

    We show that hydrate distribution and fracture genesis in the hydrate stability zone are largely governed by the phase of methane supply. In systems where methane is supplied primarily as free gas, hydrate saturation increases upwards in the hydrate stability zone, and fractures nucleate in the middle of the stability zone where hydrate saturation is highest. In systems where methane is supplied primarily as a dissolved phase in the pore water, hydrate saturation decreases upwards in the stability zone, and fractures nucleate at the base of the stability zone. These interpretations are based on our one-dimensional model that incorporates multiphase flow and free gas within the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ). The RHSZ is defined as the interval in which methane hydrate may occur at seawater salinity (3.35% by mass). As hydrate forms and excludes salt from the crystal structure, the porewater salinity increases. Free gas enters the RHSZ when the porewater salinity increases to the value required for three-phase (dissolved methane + gas hydrate + free gas) equilibrium. Our model also incorporates changes to capillary pressure as hydrate forms and occludes the pore system. We model the system until the excess pore pressure exceeds the vertical effective stress in the domain due to capillary effects and pore occlusion, at which point we assume fractures nucleate. We test our model at Hydrate Ridge, where methane supply is dominantly in the gas phase, and show that hydrate saturation increases upwards and fractures nucleate high within the stability zone, eventually allowing gas to vent to the seafloor. We also model Blake Ridge, where methane supply is dominantly in the dissolved phase, and show that hydrate saturation is greatest at the base of the stability zone; fractures nucleate here and in some cases could propagate through the regional hydrate stability zone, allowing methane-charged water to vent to the seafloor. These two systems represent endmembers of

  7. Temperature, pressure critical in PE line pipe use

    SciTech Connect

    Oney, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) line pipe is used for low-pressure gas (gathering, supply gas, etc.) and water lines and, in some cases for flow lines. API Spec 15LE specifies minimum requirements for qualification of product and quality control by manufacturers of polyethylene pipe. Spec 15LE also provides guidelines for design of polyethylene. Thermoplastic pipe (PE and PVC) is manufactured by melting resin pellets or powder and extruding the melt through dies. Thermoplastic pipe pressure classes are designated by ''standard dimension ratios'' (SDR). The SDR is the average OD divided by the wall thickness (w.t.). Thus 2 3/8-in. OD pipe (nominal 2 in.) with 0.216-in. w.t. is SDR 11. Nominal 3-in. pipe (3 1/2-in. OD) must have a minimum 0.318-in. w.t. to be SDR 11. Table 5.1 in Spec 15LE lists the most commonly used SDRs. Quality control during manufacture required by Spec 15LE for PE pipe includes short-term hydrostatic tests and dimensional checks. Frequency of tests depend on whether the pipe is coiled or cut into lengths. PE pipe sizes of 3 in. and smaller sizes usually are coiled. In addition, annual tests for verification of long-term pressure rating are required by Spec 15LE.

  8. Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chih-Yuan; Diaz, Manuel; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-01

    The ideal quantum gas dynamics as manifested by the semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) equilibrium distribution derived in Wu et al. (Wu et al. 2012 Proc. R. Soc. A 468, 1799–1823 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0673)) is numerically studied for particles of three statistics. This anisotropic ES equilibrium distribution was derived using the maximum entropy principle and conserves the mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the standard Fermi–Dirac or Bose–Einstein distribution. The present numerical method combines the discrete velocity (or momentum) ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock-capturing method in physical space. A decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. Computations of two-dimensional Riemann problems are presented, and various contours of the quantities unique to this ES model are illustrated. The main flow features, such as shock waves, expansion waves and slip lines and their complex nonlinear interactions, are depicted and found to be consistent with existing calculations for a classical gas. PMID:24399919

  9. Modeling of Transient Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, G. T.; Hartley, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to develop mathematical models of heat pipes which can be used to predict transient behavior under normal and adverse conditions. The models and solution techniques are to be formulated so that they can be incorporated into existing NASA structural design codes. The major parameters of interest are heat flux distribution, temperature distribution, working fluid pressure distribution, fluid and containment thermal and mechanical properties and geometry. Normal transient operation is taken to be operating conditions where the capillary structure remains fully wetted. Adverse transient operation occurs when drying, re-wetting, choking, non-continuum flow, thawing, freezing, etc., occur in the internal heat pipe working fluid.

  10. Lead Pipe Scale Analysis Using Broad-Beam Argon Ion Milling to Elucidate Drinking Water Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we compared the characterization of lead pipe scale removed from a drinking water distribution system using two different cross section methods (conventional polishing and argon ion beam etching). The pipe scale solids were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM...

  11. Welding needs specified for X-80 offshore line pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.C. )

    1993-12-20

    High-quality, defect-free welds can be deposited in API Grade 5L X-80 line pipe with pulsed gas-metal-arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) processes. The newly developed Grade X-80 combines higher yield-strength pipe with thinner walls to reduce fabrication costs and improve some projects' economics. Use of X-80 pipe can yield as much as 7.5% cost savings over construction with X-65 steel. Increased demand of natural gas has prompted development of large gas fields which will require large-diameter pipelines at higher operating pressures. API 5L X-80 line pipe could, therefore, become commonplace by the end of the decade if welding technology can be developed to match mechanical properties without affecting productivity. The paper discusses large-diameter projects, welding processes, GMAW shielding gas, SMAW filler wires, hardness and weldability, toughness and corrosion resistance, economics, and what's been learned.

  12. 50. Taken from highline; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Taken from high-line; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is main blast furnace gas line from "C" furnace dust catcher; levy, slag hauler, removing slag. Looking east - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  13. 15. Detail of Well Head Showing Horizontal Release Pipe for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail of Well Head Showing Horizontal Release Pipe for Natural Gas, Looking North - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  14. Quenched Dynamics of the Momentum Distribution of the Unitary Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancilotto, Francesco; Rossi, Maurizio; Salasnich, Luca; Toigo, Flavio

    2015-12-01

    We study the quenched dynamics of the momentum distribution of a unitary Bose gas under isotropic harmonic confinement within a time-dependent density functional approach based on our recently calculated Monte Carlo bulk equation of state. In our calculations the inter-atomic s-wave scattering length of the trapped bosons is suddenly increased to a very large value and the real-time evolution of the system is studied. Prompted by the very recent experimental data of 85Rb atoms at unitarity (Makotyn et al. in Nat Phys 10:116, 2014) we focus on the momentum distribution as a function of time. Our results suggest that at low momenta, a quasi-stationary momentum distribution is reached after a long transient, contrary to what found experimentally for large momenta which equilibrate on a time scale shorter than the one for three body losses.

  15. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  16. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  17. Distribution of sulfur deposition near a wellbore in a sour gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinghong; Yang, Xuefeng; He, ShunLi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-02-01

    Elemental sulfur precipitates from sour gas when reservoir pressure and temperature decrease. Sulfur deposition in a formation may significantly reduce the inflow performance of sour gas wells. This paper develops a micro-mechanical migration model and experiments which describe the law of sulfur precipitation, plugging and distribution near a wellbore. Based on the analysis of the sulfur deposition law and micro-mechanical migration theory, elemental sulfur mechanical models in pores are presented. The critical velocity of sulfur is calculated and the rule of precipitated sulfur distribution near a wellbore is deduced. Reservoir cores and supersaturated sour gas are utilized to observe sulfur precipitation and plugging in sulfur damage experiments, and the main influential factor is analysed. According to the models and experimental results, precipitated sulfur can decrease reservoir permeability. The liquid bridge force is the most important factor to affect reservoir permeability due to sulfur deposition. Precipitated sulfur cannot be carried away from pores if the liquid bridge force is considered; the critical velocity increases as the diameter of the sulfur particles increases, which may cause serious formation damage. Moreover, it can be seen from the results that the biggest volume of sulfur deposition does not occur at the bottom but near the bottom of a borehole. These results can be used to describe the profile of dynamic sulfur deposition and help a reservoir engineer to develop a plan for removing the sulfur near a wellbore.

  18. Gas composition influence on ion energy distribution functions in an industrial ICP reactor with biased cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Shannon, Steven; Coumou, David; White, Scott

    2016-09-01

    An industrial ICP reactor consisting of a top planar coil and RF biased lower electrode has been characterized using a hairpin resonator probe and gridded ion energy analyzer to measure electron density in the bulk plasma and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) at the surface of the biased cathode. Argon and oxygen were run at constant total flow with 20mTorr downstream pressure control with varying flow ratios between the two gases ranging from 0% to 100% oxygen content. ICP and bias power were adjusted to maintain constant electron density and sheath bias over this mixing matrix at four different setpoints reflecting high density / high bias, high density / low bias, low density / high bias, and low density / low bias. Although the fundamental parameters governing RF sheath behavior were held constant, several trends in ion energy distribution are observed with respect to gas composition (aside from the obvious influence of ion mass) that show considerable variation in measured IEDF particularly that can be attributed to ion collisions in the sheath as well as gas heating variation due to gas composition.

  19. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  20. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  1. Pipe crawler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Gregory L.; Erickson, Scott A.; Blackmon, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    A pipe crawler apparatus particularly useful for 3-inch and 4-inch diameter pipes is provided. The pipe crawler apparatus uses a gripping apparatus in which a free end of a piston rod is modified with a bearing retaining groove. Bearings, placed within the groove, are directed against a camming surface of three respective pivoting support members. The non-pivoting ends of the support members carry a foot-like gripping member that, upon pivoting of the support member, engages the interior wall of the pipe.

  2. Heat Pipe Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, William B.; Simon, Justin I.; Webb, A. Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    When volcanism dominates heat transport, a terrestrial body enters a heat-pipe mode, in which hot magma moves through the lithosphere in narrow channels. Even at high heat flow, a heat-pipe planet develops a thick, cold, downwards-advecting lithosphere dominated by (ultra-)mafic flows and contractional deformation at the surface. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an episode of heat-pipe cooling early in their histories.

  3. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

    1994-12-13

    An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

  4. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, Richard M.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Henning, Carl D.; Lennon, Joseph P.; Pastrnak, John W.; Smith, Joseph A.

    1994-01-01

    An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

  5. Distribution Integrity Management Plant (DIMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Jerome F.

    2012-05-07

    This document is the distribution integrity management plan (Plan) for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 192, Subpart P Distribution Integrity Management Programs (DIMP) for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan was developed by reviewing records and interviewing LANL personnel. The records consist of the design, construction, operation and maintenance for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. The records system for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System is limited, so the majority of information is based on the judgment of LANL employees; the maintenance crew, the Corrosion Specialist and the Utilities and Infrastructure (UI) Civil Team Leader. The records used in this report are: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) 7100.1-1, Report of Main and Service Line Inspection, Natural Gas Leak Survey, Gas Leak Response Report, Gas Leak and Repair Report, and Pipe-to-Soil Recordings. The specific elements of knowledge of the infrastructure used to evaluate each threat and prioritize risks are listed in Sections 6 and 7, Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization respectively. This Plan addresses additional information needed and a method for gaining that data over time through normal activities. The processes used for the initial assessment of Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization are the methods found in the Simple, Handy Risk-based Integrity Management Plan (SHRIMP{trademark}) software package developed by the American Pipeline and Gas Agency (APGA) Security and Integrity Foundation (SIF). SHRIMP{trademark} uses an index model developed by the consultants and advisors of the SIF. Threat assessment is performed using questions developed by the Gas Piping Technology Company (GPTC) as modified and added to by the SHRIMP{trademark} advisors. This Plan is required to be reviewed every 5 years to be continually refined and improved. Records

  6. 46 CFR 76.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping. 76.15-15 Section 76.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide... forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2)...

  7. 46 CFR 76.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping. 76.15-15 Section 76.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide... forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2)...

  8. 46 CFR 76.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping. 76.15-15 Section 76.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide... forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2)...

  9. 46 CFR 76.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping. 76.15-15 Section 76.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide... forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2)...

  10. 46 CFR 76.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping. 76.15-15 Section 76.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide... forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2)...

  11. Large variable conductance heat pipe. Transverse header

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of gas-loaded, variable conductance heat pipes (VCHP) are discussed. The difficulties involved in developing a large VCHP header are analyzed. The construction of the large capacity VCHP is described. A research project to eliminate some of the problems involved in large capacity VCHP operation is explained.

  12. Integrated resource planning for local gas distribution companies: A critical review of regulatory policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Harunuzzaman, M.; Islam, M.

    1994-08-01

    According to the report, public utility commissions (PUCs) are increasingly adopting, or considering the adoption of integrated resource planning (IRP) for local gas distribution companies (LDCs). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires PUCs to consider IRP for gas LDCs. This study has two major objectives: (1) to help PUCs develop appropriate regulatory approaches with regard to IRP for gas LDCs; and (2) to help PUCs respond to the EPAct directive. The study finds that it is appropriate for PUCs to pursue energy efficiency within the traditional regulatory framework of minimizing private costs of energy production and delivery; and PUCs should play a limited role in addressing environmental externalities. The study also finds that in promoting energy efficiency, PUCs should pursue policies that are incentive-based, procompetitive, and sensitive to rate impacts. The study evaluates a number of traditional and nontraditional ratemaking mechanisms on the basis of cost minimization, energy efficiency, competitiveness, and other criteria. The mechanisms evaluated include direct recovery of DSM expenses, lost revenue adjustments for DSM options, revenue decoupling mechanisms, sharing of DSM cost savings, performance-based rate of return for DSM, provision of DSM as a separate service, deregulation of DSM service, price caps, and deregulation of the noncore gas market. The study concludes with general recommendations for regulatory approaches and ratemaking mechanisms that PUCs may wish to consider in advancing IRP objectives.

  13. Market hub technology in the domestic natural gas distribution system. A panel discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Glicken, J.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes a panel discussion held on March 18, 1992 as part of a conference entitled ``Market Hub Technology`` . The purpose of the conference was to stimulate dialogue among various segments of the natural gas industry on the technology limits of an economic policy issue that has the potential to significantly alter the structure and functioning of the natural gas industry. Attendees included key US gas industry representatives, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) commissioners, and others. The conference explored the concept of market centers, or hubs, and related technologies. It covered the technology currently available for the establishment of an integrated system of physical market hubs, and explored technology requirements for the further development of useful and efficient hubs. The discussion identified two primary barriers to the acceptance and implementation of a market center distribution system for natural gas. The first barrier is the potential change in the configuration of the market such a system would introduce and the resistance various industry segments would mount to such change. The second is the lack of industry standardization in the physical and business infrastructures.

  14. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne

    2006-07-19

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

  15. Distribution of Zeros and the Equation of State. III ---Cluster Series, the Ideal Fermi-Dirac Gas and Other Problems---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.

    1982-08-01

    The radius of convergence of the cluster series (expressing the equation of state) is discussed in connection with the distribution of zeros of the grand partition function on the complex z(=activity) plane, by giving various examples of circular distribution. Anomalous phase transitions and phase transitions of third order are considered by showing some examples of circular distribution of zeros. For the ideal Fermi-Dirac gas, the distribution function of zeros, lying on the part of the negative real axis from -λ-3 to -∞ [where λ=h(2 π mkT)-1/ 2], is calculated , and the function-theoretical structure of the equation of state is investigated. The distribution of zeros for this gas is compared with that for Tonks' gas (having purely repulsive interparticle forces). The two-dimensional and one-dimensional Fermi-Dirac gases are dealt with from the point of view of the distribution of zeros.

  16. Heat Pipe with Axial Wick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Jay H. (Inventor); Holmes, Rolland (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A heat pipe has an evaporator portion, a condenser portion, and at least one flexible portion that is sealingly coupled between the evaporator portion and the condenser portion. The flexible portion has a flexible tube and a flexible separator plate held in place within the flexible tube so as to divide the flexible tube into a gas-phase passage and a liquid-phase artery. The separator plate and flexible tube are configured such that the flexible portion is flexible in a plane that is perpendicular to the separator plate.

  17. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  18. Star forming regions towards Gum 31: distribution of the molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Rubio, M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas associated with IRAS and 2MASS sources, young stellar objects linked to the Hii region Gum31. We based our studies on observations obtained with the APEX telescope, located in the north of Chile. We used observations of different CO isotopologues, CS(7-6) and HCO(4-3) lines. The sources are located on the edge of the Gum31 Hii region, whose shock front substantially affects the morphology of their molecular environs. The observations revealed that in the surroundings of the sources there is molecular gas associated with the nebula, which is shown by the CO(3-2) emission, with small high density clumps detected in CO(3-2).

  19. Large-momentum distribution of a polarized Fermi gas and p -wave contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2016-12-01

    We present a derivation of the adiabatic energy relations as well as the large momentum distribution of a polarized Fermi gas near p -wave Feshbach resonances. The leading asymptotic behavior k-2 and subleading behavior k-4 of the large momentum distribution have recently been predicted by Z. Yu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 135304 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.135304] and by M. Y. He et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 045301 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.045301] using two different approaches. Here, we show that the subleading asymptotic behavior (˜k-4 ) cannot fully be captured by the contact defined from the adiabatic energy relation related to the p -wave effective range, and there should be an extra term resulting from the center-of-mass motion of the pairs. The omission of this extra term is perhaps a reasonable approximation at zero temperature. However, it should be taken into account at finite temperature and should have significant importance to understand the recently measured momentum distribution in a resonant p -wave Fermi gas of ultracold 40K atoms [C. Luciuk et al., Nat. Phys. 12, 599 (2016), 10.1038/nphys3670].

  20. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Tulsa Fluid Flow

    2008-08-31

    The developments of fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) is a common occurrence. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas-oil-and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of the hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. The recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is very crucial to any multiphase separation technique that is employed either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole to know inlet conditions such as the flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. The overall objective was to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict the flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). The project was conducted in two periods. In Period 1 (four years), gas-oil-water flow in pipes were investigated to understand the fundamental physical mechanisms describing the interaction between the gas-oil-water phases under flowing conditions, and a unified model was developed utilizing a novel modeling approach. A gas-oil-water pipe flow database including field and laboratory data was formed in Period 2 (one year). The database was utilized in model performance demonstration. Period 1 primarily consisted of the development of a unified model and software to predict the gas-oil-water flow, and experimental studies of the gas-oil-water project, including flow behavior description and

  1. Inspection of Fusion Joints in Plastic Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Connie Reichert

    2005-09-01

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost-effective method exists for assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field. Visual examination and pressure testing are current nondestructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project developed, demonstrated, and validated an in-situ nondestructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system includes a laser-based image-recognition system that automatically generates and interprets digital images of pipe joints and assigns them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. An EWI-patented process, the Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) was developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation, which reveals the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and nonstandard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and two destructive forms of testing: short-term tensile testing and long-term creep rupture testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and the destructive testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than destructive testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  2. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2005-07-13

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and nonstandard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  3. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2004-07-13

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and non-standard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  4. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2004-10-29

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and non-standard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  5. THE SMOOTH Mg II GAS DISTRIBUTION THROUGH THE INTERSTELLAR/EXTRA-PLANAR/HALO INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Cooke, Jeff; Ryan-Weber, Emma V.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.

    2013-11-01

    We report the first measurements of Mg II absorption systems associated with spectroscopically confirmed z ∼ 0.1 star-forming galaxies at projected distances of D < 6 kpc. We demonstrate that the data are consistent with the well-known anti-correlation between rest-frame Mg II equivalent width, W{sub r} (2796), and impact parameter, D, represented by a single log-linear relation derived by Nielsen et al. (MAGIICAT) that converges to ∼2 Å at D = 0 kpc. Incorporating MAGIICAT, we find that the halo gas covering fraction is unity below D ∼ 25 kpc. We also report that our D < 6 kpc absorbers are consistent with the W{sub r} (2796) distributions of the Milky Way interstellar medium (ISM) and ISM+halo. In addition, quasar sight lines of intermediate redshift galaxies with 6 < D < 25 kpc have an equivalent width distribution similar to that of the Milky Way halo, implying that beyond ∼6 kpc, quasar sight lines are likely probing halo gas and not the ISM. As inferred by the Milky Way and our new data, the gas profiles of galaxies can be fit by a single log-linear W{sub r} (2796)-D relation out to large scales across a variety of gas-phase conditions and is maintained through the halo/extra-planar/ISM interfaces, which is remarkable considering their kinematic complexity. These low-redshift, small impact parameter absorption systems are the first steps to bridge the gap between quasar absorption-line studies and H I observations of the circumgalactic medium.

  6. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high... STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.197 Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high... external static or control lines. (b) If the maximum actual operating pressure of the distribution...

  7. Spatial Density Distributions and Correlations in a Quasi-one-Dimensional Polydisperse Granular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Duan-Ming

    2009-02-01

    By Monte Carlo simulations, the effect of the dispersion of particle size distribution on the spatial density distributions and correlations of a quasi one-dimensional polydisperse granular gas with fractal size distribution is investigated in the same inelasticity. The dispersive degree of the particle size distribution can be measured by a fractal dimension df, and the smooth particles are constrained to move along a circle of length L, colliding inelastically with each other and thermalized by a viscosity heat bath. When the typical relaxation time τ of the driving Brownian process is longer than the mean collision time τc, the system can reach a nonequilibrium steady state. The average energy of the system decays exponentially with time towards a stable asymptotic value, and the energy relaxation time τB to the steady state becomes shorter with increasing values of df. In the steady state, the spatial density distribution becomes more clusterized as df increases, which can be quantitatively characterized by statistical entropy of the system. Furthermore, the spatial correlation functions of density and velocities are found to be a power-law form for small separation distance of particles, and both of the correlations become stronger with the increase of df. Also, the density clusterization is explained from the correlations.

  8. On the work distribution for the adiabatic compression of a diluteclassical gas

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2006-02-23

    We consider the adiabatic and quasi-static compression of adilute classical gas, confined in a piston and initially equilibratedwith a heat bath. We find that the work performed during this process isdescribed statistically by a gamma distribution. We use this result toshow that the model satisfies the non-equilibrium work and fluctuationtheorems, but not the fluctation-dissipation relation. We discuss therare but dominant realizations that contribute most to the exponentialaverage of the work, and relate our results to potentially universal workdistributions.

  9. Gas-Recovery System

    DOEpatents

    Heckman, R. A.

    1971-12-14

    Nuclear explosions have been proposed as a means for recovering gas from underground gas-bearing rock formations. In present practice, the nuclear device is positioned at the end of a long pipe which is subsequently filled with grout or concrete. After the device is exploded, the grout is drilled through to provide a flow path for the released gas to the ground surface. As settled grout is brittle, often the compressive shock of the explosion fractures the grout and deforms the pipe so that it may not be removed nor reused. In addition, the pipe is sometimes pinched off completely and the gas flow is totally obstructed. (2 claims)

  10. Gas-recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Heckman, R.A.

    1971-12-14

    Nuclear explosions have been proposed as a means for recovering gas from underground gas-bearing rock formations. In present practice, the nuclear device is positioned at the end of a long pipe which is subsequently filled with grout or concrete. After the device is exploded, the grout is drilled through to provide a flow path for the released gas to the ground surface. As settled grout is brittle, often the compressive shock of the explosion fractures the grout and deforms the pipe so that it may not be removed nor reused. In addition, the pipe is sometimes pinched off completely and the gas flow is totally obstructed. (2 claims)

  11. Remote sensing of high temperature H2O CO2 CO mixture with a correlated k-distribution fictitious gas method and the single-mixture gas assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliot, C.; Le Maoult, Y.; El Hafi, M.; Flamant, G.

    2006-11-01

    Infrared spectra of high temperature H2O CO2 CO mixtures are calculated using narrow band models in order to simulate hot jet signature at long distance. The correlated k-distribution with fictitious gas (CKFG) approach generally gives accurate data in such situations (especially for long atmospheric paths) but results in long computation time in cases involving mixtures of gases. This time may be reduced if the mixture is treated as a single gas (single-mixture gas assumption, SMG). Thus the lines of the single-mixture gas are assigned to the fictitious gases. In this study, the accuracy of two narrow band models is evaluated. The first narrow band model considers one single-mixture gas and no fictitious gas (CK-SMG) whereas the second model accounts for one single-mixture gas and three fictitious gases (CKFG-SMG). Both narrow band models are compared with reference spectra calculated with a line-by-line (LBL) approach. As expected, the narrow band accuracy is improved by the fictitious gas (FG) assumption particularly when long atmospheric paths are involved. Concerning the SMG assumption, it may lead to an underestimation of about 10% depending on the variation of the gas mixture composition ratio. Nevertheless, in most of realistic situations the SMG assumption results in negligible errors and may be used for remote sensing of plume signature.

  12. Splayed mirror light pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, P.D.

    2010-02-15

    An expression is given for the transmission of the rectangular-section mirror light pipe. The expression is used to model throughputs for simulated solar conditions over a calender year. It is found that the splaying of a mirror light pipe results in a significant increase in throughputs particularly in winter months. (author)

  13. These Pipes Are "Happening"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The author is blessed with having the water pipes for the school system in her office. In this article, the author describes how the breaking of the pipes had led to a very worthwhile art experience for her students. They practiced contour and shaded drawing techniques, reviewed patterns and color theory, and used their reasoning skills--all while…

  14. Global distribution of gas hydrates in marine sediments: application of a general transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñero, Elena; Marquardt, Mathias; Hensen, Christian; Haeckel, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Many of the recently published estimates of the global inventory of marine methane hydrate are based on simplified diagenetic models, which were run for each grid point of a homogeneous grid of the seafloor. Since this is a very complex and time-consuming method, which may also be limited by data availability, we invented a simple transfer function, which calculates the amount of gas hydrates based on easily accessible data. The transfer function was derived from a large set of systematic runs of a numerical diagenetic model covering the wide range of environmental conditions that are typically met along the continental margins. An exhaustive parameter analysis established that the formation of gas hydrates from biogenic methane production can be sufficiently described by the total organic carbon accumulation rate and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (Marquardt et al., submitted). The resulting transfer function was applied to available global datasets of 1x1-degree resolution in order to derive global estimates of the distribution and total inventory of gas hydrates. The global grids include the seafloor bathymetry, TOC input (Seiter et al., 2004), bottom water temperature, and geothermal gradient estimated from heat flow (Hamza et al., 2008). The global amount of gas hydrate is predicted to be about 2400 Gt of C and is in good agreement with previously published results (e.g. Archer et al., 2009). So far, our calculations do not consider any thermogenic methane, but only microbially produced and hence, represent only a minimum estimate of the gas hydrate budget. References: Archer et al., 2009. Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle. PNAS 106 (49), 20596-20601. Hamza et al., 2008. Spherical harmonic analysis of the Earth's conductive heat flow. Intern. J. Earth Sci., 97, 205-226 Marquardt et al. Submitted. Estimation of gas hydrate inventories in marine sediments: derivation and testing of a transfer function

  15. A Robust Distributed Multipoint Fiber Optic Gas Sensor System Based on AGC Amplifier Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Rende; Tao, Xuechen; Wang, Guangwei; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    A harsh environment-oriented distributed multipoint fiber optic gas sensor system realized by automatic gain control (AGC) technology is proposed. To improve the photoelectric signal reliability, the electronic variable gain can be modified in real time by an AGC closed-loop feedback structure to compensate for optical transmission loss which is caused by the fiber bend loss or other reasons. The deviation of the system based on AGC structure is below 4.02% when photoelectric signal decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is 20 times lower than the ordinary differential system. In addition, the AGC circuit with the same electric parameters can keep the baseline intensity of signals in different channels of the distributed multipoint sensor system at the same level. This avoids repetitive calibrations and streamlines the installation process. PMID:27483267

  16. Effects of temperature distribution and elastic properties of materials on gas-turbine-disk stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holms, Arthur G; Faldetta, Richard D

    1947-01-01

    Calculations were made to determine the influence of changes in temperature distribution and in elastic material properties on calculated elastic stresses for a typical gas-turbine disk. Severe temperature gradients caused thermal stresses of sufficient magnitude to reduce the operating safety of the disk. Small temperature gradients were found to be desirable because they produced thermal stresses that subtracted from the centrifugal stresses in the region of the rim. The thermal gradients produced a tendency for a severe stress condition to exist near the rim but this stress condition could be shifted away from the region of blade attachment by altering the temperature distribution. The investigation of elastic material properties showed that centrifugal stresses are slightly affected by changes in modulus of elasticity, but that thermal stresses are approximately proportional to modulus of elasticity and to coefficient of thermal expansion.

  17. Generic features of the wealth distribution in ideal-gas-like markets.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, P K

    2006-07-01

    We provide an exact solution to the ideal-gas-like models studied in econophysics to understand the microscopic origin of Pareto law. In these classes of models the key ingredient necessary for having a self-organized scale-free steady-state distribution is the trading or collision rule where agents or particles save a definite fraction of their wealth or energy and invest the rest for trading. Using a Gibbs ensemble approach we could obtain the exact distribution of wealth in this model. Moreover we show that in this model (a) good savers are always rich and (b) every agent poor or rich invests the same amount for trading. Nonlinear trading rules could alter the generic scenario observed here.

  18. Cavitation flow through a rotating pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumowski, A.; Laake, A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1986-07-01

    A one-dimensional cavitation flow (without Coriolis accelaration) in a rotating pipe was investigated with a view to cooling of gas turbine blades and compressors. This flow becomes unsteady and oscillates. Thereby, and unsteady cavitation domain is produced, separating the two partial water columns. At increasing rotation speed the oscillation frequency decreases and the extension of the cavitation domain increases. Above a critical rotation speed the water column is pressed out of the pipe, and the cavitation domain disappears. The flow computation was performed using the Runge-Kutta method for an incompressible model, and the characteristics method for a compressible model. The results of the calculations are supported by experimental results.

  19. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.

    1991-05-28

    A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

  20. The monster sound pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2017-03-01

    Producing a deep bass tone by striking a large 3 m (10 ft) flexible corrugated drainage pipe immediately grabs student attention. The fundamental pitch of the corrugated tube is found to be a semitone lower than a non-corrugated smooth pipe of the same length. A video (https://youtu.be/FU7a9d7N60Y) of the demonstration is included, which illustrates how an Internet keyboard can be used to estimate the fundamental pitches of each pipe. Since both pipes have similar end corrections, the pitch discrepancy between the smooth pipe and drainage tube is due to the corrugations, which lower the speed of sound inside the flexible tube, dropping its pitch a semitone.

  1. Artery heat pipes for space-power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.; Prenger, C.; Martinez, H.E.; Runyan, J.

    1982-01-01

    High-temperature liquid-metal heat pipes are being developed as part of the SP-100 space power system. The operating temperature of the heat pipes is in the 1400 to 1500 K range and the design power level is 15kW per pipe. Baseline design for the heat pipes is an arterial configuration using a fine mesh screen for the arteries and distribution wick. Performance predictions for this configuration have been conducted and the designs characterized as a function of artery geometry, distribution wick thickness, porosity, pore size, and permeability. In parallel with this effort the screen wick materials have been characterized experimentally in terms of pore size and permeability. As a verification of the performance predictions a heat pipe employing two tubular arteries and a distribution wick of tightly compacted, 150-mesh molybdenum screen has been assembled and operated with sodium as a working fluid.

  2. Characterization of gas hydrate distribution using conventional 3D seismic data in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Xiujuan; Qiang, Jin; Collett, Timothy S.; Shi, Hesheng; Yang, Shengxiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Duanxin

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D seismic reflection data volume acquired in 2012 has allowed for the detailed mapping and characterization of gas hydrate distribution in the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the South China Sea. Previous studies of core and logging data showed that gas hydrate occurrence at high concentrations is controlled by the presence of relatively coarse-grained sediment and the upward migration of thermogenic gas from the deeper sediment section into the overlying gas hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ); however, the spatial distribution of the gas hydrate remains poorly defined. We used a constrained sparse spike inversion technique to generate acoustic-impedance images of the hydrate-bearing sedimentary section from the newly acquired 3D seismic data volume. High-amplitude reflections just above the bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) were interpreted to be associated with the accumulation of gas hydrate with elevated saturations. Enhanced seismic reflections below the BSRs were interpreted to indicate the presence of free gas. The base of the BGHSZ was established using the occurrence of BSRs. In areas absent of well-developed BSRs, the BGHSZ was calculated from a model using the inverted P-wave velocity and subsurface temperature data. Seismic attributes were also extracted along the BGHSZ that indicate variations reservoir properties and inferred hydrocarbon accumulations at each site. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the inversion of acoustic impedance of conventional 3D seismic data, along with well-log-derived rock-physics models were also used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Our analysis determined that the gas hydrate petroleum system varies significantly across the Pearl River Mouth Basin and that variability in sedimentary properties as a product of depositional processes and the upward migration of gas from deeper thermogenic sources control the distribution of gas hydrates in this basin.

  3. Effect of distribution of electric field on low-pressure gas breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Yang, Shuo; Zou, Xiaobing; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2017-02-01

    A low-pressure gas breakdown in a gap of the non-uniform electric field between two plane-parallel electrodes was studied. The experiments were specially designed to neatly separate the effect of a centered dielectric tube in between the electrodes on the breakdown from the effect of the electric field distribution determined by the electrode geometry on the breakdown. For a given electrode radius and an interelectrode distance, when the diameter of the centered dielectric tube in between the electrodes is smaller, the breakdown voltage is lower, which is most possibly as a result of the flashover more easily happening along the surface of the smaller tube on which the more charged particles are accumulated. When the dielectric tube in between the electrodes is removed, the breakdown voltage depends not only on the product of gas pressure and gap length but also on the aspect ratio of the gas gap, i.e., Ub = f(pd, d/r). Furthermore, Ub = f(pd, d/r) was proved to automatically fulfill two necessary conditions for the similar discharges in the non-uniform electric field, which implies that Ub = f(pd, d/r) is an expression of the similarity theorem in the breakdown of a gap between two plane-parallel electrodes and confirms Townsend's prediction that the general similarity theorem can be applied equally to the breakdowns in non-uniform fields.

  4. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Çakır, M Cihan; Çalışkan, Deniz; Bütün, Bayram; Özbay, Ekmel

    2016-09-29

    Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO) heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption-dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  5. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, M. Cihan; Çalışkan, Deniz; Bütün, Bayram; Özbay, Ekmel

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO) heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption–dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively. PMID:27690048

  6. Review of performance-based ratemaking plans for US gas distribution companies

    SciTech Connect

    Comnes, G.A.

    1994-11-01

    Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is receiving increasing attention by energy utilities and their regulators. PBR is the industry term for forms of regulation that increase financial incentive for performance relative to traditional cost-of-service/rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. In this report, PBR plans filed by US gas local distribution companies (LDCs) are described and reviewed. The rationale behind energy utility PBR is presented and discussed. Using nine plans that have been proposed by eight LDCs as a basis, a framework (typology) to facilitate understanding of gas utility PBR is presented. Plans are categorized according to the range of services covered by the PBR mechanism and the scope of the mechanism`s cost coverage within a service category. Pivotal design issues are identified and, based on the sample of plans, observations are made. Design issues covered include the length of time that the PBR is in effect (term); the relationship between PBR plans and status quo ratemaking; methods for formulating cost or rate indices, earnings sharing mechanisms, and service quality indices; and compatibility with gas utility DSM programs. The report summarizes observations that may be considered supportive of the rationale behind PBR. PBR is, however, not clearly superior to traditional regulation and few PBRs that are broad in scope have been adopted long enough to allow for a empirical analysis. Thus, the report concludes by identifying and describing commonly-cited pitfalls of PBR.

  7. The nature, distribution, and origin of gas hydrate in the Chile Triple Junction region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, K.M.; Bangs, N.L.; Froelich, P.N.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    A bottom simulating reflector (BSR) is regionally distributed throughout much of the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) region. Downhole temperature and logging data collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 141 suggest that the seismic BSR is generated by low seismic velocities associated with the presence of a few percent free gas in a ??? 10 m thick zone just beneath the hydrate-bearing zone. The data also indicate that the temperature and pressure at the BSR best corresponds to the seawater/methane hydrate stability field. The origin of the large amounts of methane required to generate the hydrates is, however, problematic. Low total organic carbon contents and low alkalinities argue against significant in situ biogenic methanogenesis, but additional input from thermogenic sources also appears to be precluded. Increasing thermal gradients, associated with the approach of the spreading ridge system, may have caused the base of the hydrate stability field to migrate 300 m upwards in the sediments. We propose that the upward migration of the base of the stability field has concentrated originally widely dispersed hydrate patches into the more continuous hydrate body we see today. The methane can be concentrated if the gas hydrates can form from dissolved methane, transported into the hydrate zone via diffusion or fluid advection. A strong gradient may exist in dissolved methane concentration across the BSR leading to the steady reabsorbtion of the free gas zone during the upward migration of the BSR even in the absence of fluid advection.

  8. Sodium heat pipe use in solar Stirling power conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Divakaruni, S. M.; Won, Y. S.

    1980-01-01

    Sodium heat pipes were selected for use as a thermal transport method in a focus-mounted, distributed concentrator solar Stirling power conversion system intended to produce 15-20 kWe per unit. Heat pipes were used both to receive thermal power in the solar receiver and to transmit it to a secondary heat pipe containing both latent heat salt (for up to 1.25 hours of thermal storage) and the heat exchanger of the Stirling engine. Experimental tests were performed on five solar receiver heat pipes with various internal wicking configurations. The performance of the heat pipes at various power levels and operating attitudes was investigated at temperatures near 1550 F; the unidirectional heat transfer in these heat pipes was demonstrated in normal operating attitudes and particularly in the inverted position required during overnight stowage of the concentrator.

  9. Toward Measuring Galactic Dense Molecular Gas Properties and 3D Distribution with Hi-GAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's submillimeter dust continuum survey Hi-GAL provides a powerful new dataset for characterizing the structure of the dense interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Hi-GAL observed a 2° wide strip covering the entire 360° of the Galactic plane in broad bands centered at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm, with angular resolution ranging from 10 to 40 arcseconds. We are adapting a molecular cloud clump-finding algorithm and a distance probability density function distance-determination method developed for the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) to the Hi-GAL data. Using these methods we expect to generate a database of 105 cloud clumps, derive distance information for roughly half the clumps, and derive precise distances for approximately 20% of them. With five-color photometry and distances, we will measure the cloud clump properties, such as luminosities, physical sizes, and masses, and construct a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way's dense molecular gas distribution.The cloud clump properties and the dense gas distribution will provide critical ground truths for comparison to theoretical models of molecular cloud structure formation and galaxy evolution models that seek to emulate spiral galaxies. For example, such models cannot resolve star formation and use prescriptive recipes, such as converting a fixed fraction of interstellar gas to stars at a specified interstellar medium density threshold. The models should be compared to observed dense molecular gas properties and galactic distributions.As a pilot survey to refine the clump-finding and distance measurement algorithms developed for BGPS, we have identified molecular cloud clumps in six 2° × 2° patches of the Galactic plane, including one in the inner Galaxy along the line of sight through the Molecular Ring and the termination of the Galactic bar and one toward the outer Galaxy. Distances have been derived for the inner Galaxy clumps and compared to Bolocam Galactic Plane

  10. An historical prospective study of mortality within a cohort of gas distribution workers.

    PubMed

    Liveright, T; Stanbury, M

    1983-01-01

    An historical prospective study of mortality within a cohort of 1,410 gas distribution workers was conducted. This cohort was followed for ten years (1971-1980) and data on 118 deaths were obtained. Five-year (1973-1977) averages of both St. Louis and United States age-specific mortality figures were used to create "expected" mortality rates for comparison with the observed deaths in the cohort. Analyses of the cohort were done according to: 1) person-years contributed during the study period (the "age-attained" method) and 2) the number of years from commencement of work in the company until the end of the study period (1980) or death (the "latency" methods of analysis, Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were calculated for all causes of death, all malignant neoplasms, and for cardiovascular disease and malignant neoplasms of the respiratory and digestive systems. In no case was the SMR found to be beyond the range of what would be expected in the "standard" populations. While the present study does not contradict the negative findings of the one previous investigation of mortality of gas distribution workers, the limitations of small cohort size, reliance on death certificates and non-industrial comparison populations make any conclusions at best provisional.

  11. Methodology to model the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of electronic software distributions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daniel R; Tang, Yinshan

    2012-01-17

    A new electronic software distribution (ESD) life cycle analysis (LCA) methodology and model structure were constructed to calculate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In order to counteract the use of high level, top-down modeling efforts, and to increase result accuracy, a focus upon device details and data routes was taken. In order to compare ESD to a relevant physical distribution alternative, physical model boundaries and variables were described. The methodology was compiled from the analysis and operational data of a major online store which provides ESD and physical distribution options. The ESD method included the calculation of power consumption of data center server and networking devices. An in-depth method to calculate server efficiency and utilization was also included to account for virtualization and server efficiency features. Internet transfer power consumption was analyzed taking into account the number of data hops and networking devices used. The power consumed by online browsing and downloading was also factored into the model. The embedded CO(2)e of server and networking devices was proportioned to each ESD process. Three U.K.-based ESD scenarios were analyzed using the model which revealed potential CO(2)e savings of 83% when ESD was used over physical distribution. Results also highlighted the importance of server efficiency and utilization methods.

  12. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  13. Impact of Intrafractional Bowel Gas Movement on Carbon Ion Beam Dose Distribution in Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Motoki; Hara, Ryusuke; Mori, Shinichiro Yanagi, Takeshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess carbon ion beam dose variation due to bowel gas movement in pancreatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten pancreatic cancer inpatients were subject to diagnostic contrast-enhanced dynamic helical CT examination under breath-holding conditions, which included multiple-phase dynamic CT with arterial, venous, and delayed phases. The arterial-venous phase and arterial-delayed phase intervals were 35 and 145 s, respectively. A compensating bolus was designed to cover the target obtained at the arterial phase. Carbon ion dose distribution was calculated by applying the bolus to the CT data sets at the other two phases. Results: Dose conformation to the clinical target volume was degraded by beam overshoot/undershoot due to bowel gas movement. The D95 for clinical target volume was degraded from 98.2% (range, 98.0-99.1%) of the prescribed dose to 94.7% (range, 88.0-99.0%) at 145 s. Excessive dosing to normal tissues varied among tissues and was, for example, 12.2 GyE/13.1 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the cord and 38.8 GyE/39.8 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the duodenum. The magnitude of beam overshoot/undershoot was particularly exacerbated from the anterior and left directions. Conclusions: Bowel gas movement causes dosimetric variation to the target during treatment for radiotherapy. The effect of bowel gas movement varies with beam angle, with greatest influence on the anterior-posterior and left-right beams.

  14. Design of Refractory Metal Heat Pipe Life Test Environment Chamber, Cooling System, and Radio Frequency Heating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Reid, R. S.; Stewart, E. T.; Davis, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 16 Mo-44.5%Re alloy/sodium heat pipes will be experimentally tested to examine heat pipe aging. To support this evaluation, an environmental test chamber and a number of auxiliary subsystems are required. These subsystems include radio frequency (RF) power supplies/inductive coils, recirculation water coolant loops, and chamber gas conditioning. The heat pipes will be grouped, based on like power and gas mixture requirements, into three clusters of five units each, configured in a pentagonal arrangement. The highest powered heat pipe will be tested separately. Test chamber atmospheric purity is targeted at <0.3 ppb oxygen at an approximate operating pressure of 76 torr (.1.5 psia), maintained by active purification (oxygen level is comparable to a 10(exp -6) torr environment). Treated water will be used in two independent cooling circuits to remove .85 kW. One circuit will service the RF hardware while the other will maintain the heat pipe calorimetry. Initial procedures for the startup and operation of support systems have been identified. Each of these subsystems is outfitted with a variety of instrumentation, integrated with distributed real-time controllers and computers. A local area network provides communication between all devices. This data and control network continuously monitors the health of the test hardware, providing warning indicators followed by automatic shutdown should potentially damaging conditions develop. During hardware construction, a number of checkout tests.many making use of stainless steel prototype heat pipes that are already fabricated.will be required to verify operation.

  15. 46 CFR 108.441 - Piping and discharge rates for CO2 systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping and discharge rates for CO2 systems. 108.441... Systems § 108.441 Piping and discharge rates for CO2 systems. (a) The size of branch lines to spaces protected by a CO2 system must meet Table 108.441. (b) Distribution piping within a space must...

  16. 46 CFR 108.441 - Piping and discharge rates for CO2 systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping and discharge rates for CO2 systems. 108.441... Systems § 108.441 Piping and discharge rates for CO2 systems. (a) The size of branch lines to spaces protected by a CO2 system must meet Table 108.441. (b) Distribution piping within a space must...

  17. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  18. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

  19. Experimenting with a "Pipe" Whistle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Olga

    2012-01-01

    A simple pipe whistle can be made using pieces of PVC pipe. The whistle can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of open or closed pipes. A slightly modified version of the device can be used to also investigate the interesting dependence of the sound frequencies produced on the orifice-to-edge distance. The pipe whistle described here…

  20. Characterizing the accumulation and distribution of gas hydrate in marine sediments using numerical models and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimblett, Jillian Nicole

    Despite the increasing availability of geophysical, geochemical, geotechnical, and biological data that characterize in situ properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the fundamental physical processes associated with gas hydrate formation, accumulation, distribution and dissociation in porous marine sediments remain poorly understood. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal accumulation of gas hydrate in marine sediments through (1) a numerical model that explores the impact of hydraulic parameters on permeability evolution during hydrate formation; and (2) tomographic analysis of multichannel seismic data that constrain the local concentration of gas hydrate. The results constrain the hydraulic parameters pertinent to the hydrodynamics of gas hydrate reservoirs and provide insight about the physical and elastic properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments relevant for estimating hydrate concentration in porous assemblages.

  1. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-11-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each as well as field testing of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. The field tests were conducted August 23-26, 2004 in Oradell, New Jersey. The field tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small

  2. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast-iron test pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported last quarter.) These tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large

  3. An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    A heat pipe of new design, using an electrode structure to orient and guide the dielectric liquid phase flow, is proposed. Analysis indicates that the operation of the electrohydrodynamic heat pipe is in direct analogy to capillary devices, with the polarization force acting in place of capillarity. Advantages of these new heat pipes include greatly reduced liquid friction, electrohydrodynamically enhanced evaporation and condensation heat transfer, and a possible voltage-controlled on/off feature. Preliminary calculations indicate that relatively high performance devices are possible.

  4. Electrohydrodynamic heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe of radical design is proposed which substitutes polarization electrohydrodynamic force effects for capillarity in collecting, guiding, and pumping a condensate liquid phase. The discussed device is restricted to the use of dielectric liquids as working fluids. Because of the relatively poor thermal transport properties of these liquids, capillary heat pipes using these liquids have not been high performance devices. The employment of the electrohydrodynamic concept should enhance this performance and help fill the performance gap that exists in the temperature range from 250 F to 750 F for 'conventional' capillary heat pipes.

  5. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed previously. Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in test cast-iron pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to be focused on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported previously.) Several design issues were identified which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair

  6. Smaller cities can now benefit from landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Florence, Alabama, population 38,000, has developed a system with the help of the Monsanto company, to use the gas generated in it's 21 acre landfill of household waste. A compressor and prism separator system is used to separate methane from the gas generated under anaerobic conditions in the waste. The methane is then piped into the city's gas distribution system and a number of it's vehicles have been equipped to run on natural gas. Payback for the prism system is reckoned at five years, but is site specific although it is well adapted for landfills of various sizes.

  7. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  8. Gas and particle size distributions of polychlorinated naphthalenes in the atmosphere of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingqing; Zhang, Xian; Dong, Shujun; Gao, Lirong; Liu, Guorui; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-05-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) were listed as persistent organic pollutants in the Stockholm Convention in 2015. Despite numerous studies on PCNs, little is known about their occurrence in atmospheric particulate matter of different sizes. In this study, 49 PCN congeners were investigated for their concentrations and size-specific distributions in an urban atmosphere, and preliminary exposure assessments were conducted. Ambient air samples were collected using a high-volume cascade impactor for division into a gas fraction and four particle size fractions. Samples were collected from October 2013 to June 2014 at an urban site in Beijing, China. The concentration range for PCNs in the atmosphere (gas + particle fractions) was 6.77-25.90 pg/m(3) (average 16.28 pg/m(3)). The particle-bound concentration range was 0.17-2.78 pg/m(3) (average 1.73 pg/m(3)). Therefore, PCNs were mainly found in the gas phase. The concentrations of PCNs in a fraction increased as the particle size decreased (dae > 10 μm, 10 μm ≥ dae > 2.5 μm, 2.5 μm ≥ dae > 1.0 μm and dae ≤ 1.0 μm). Consequently, PCNs were ubiquitous in inhalable fine particles, and the ΣPCNs associated with PM1.0 and PM2.5 reached 68.4% and 84.3%, respectively. Tetra-CNs and penta-CNs (the lower chlorinated homologues) predominated in the atmosphere. The homologue profiles in different size particles were almost similar, but the particulate profiles were different from those in the gas phase. Among the individual PCNs identified, CN38/40, CN52/60 and CN75 were the dominant compounds in the atmosphere. CN66/67 and CN73 collectively accounted for most of the total dioxin-like TEQ concentrations of the PCNs. Exposure to toxic compounds, such as PCNs present in PM1.0 or PM2.5, may affect human health. This work presents the first data on size-specific distributions of PCNs in the atmosphere.

  9. Spatial distribution of interstellar dust in the Sun's vicinity. Comparison with neutral sodium-bearing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergely, J.-L.; Valette, B.; Lallement, R.; Raimond, S.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: 3D tomography of the interstellar dust and gas may be useful in many respects, from the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium itself to foreground decontamination of the cosmic microwave background, or various studies of the environments of specific objects. However, while spectral data cubes of the galactic emission become increasingly precise, the information on the distance to the emitting regions has not progressed as well and relies essentially on the galactic rotation curve. Our goal here is to bring more precise information on the distance to nearby interstellar dust and gas clouds within 250 pc. Methods: We apply the best available calibration methods to a carefully screened set of stellar Strömgren photometry data for targets possessing a Hipparcos parallax and spectral type classification. We combine the derived interstellar extinctions and the parallax distances for about 6000 stars to build a 3D tomography of the local dust. We use an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach and a least squares criterion, optimized for this specific data set. We apply the same inversion technique to a totally independent set of neutral sodium absorption data available for about 1700 target stars. Results: We obtain 3D maps of the opacity and the distance to the main dust-bearing clouds within 250 pc and identify in those maps well-known dark clouds and high galactic more diffuse entities. We calculate the integrated extinction between the Sun and the cube boundary and compare this with the total galactic extinction derived from infrared 2D maps. The two quantities reach similar values at high latitudes, as expected if the local dust content is satisfyingly reproduced and the dust is closer than 250 pc. Those maps show a larger high latitude dust opacity in the North compared to the South, reinforcing earlier evidences. Interestingly the gas maps do not show the same asymmetry, suggesting a polar asymmetry of the dust to gas

  10. Direct measurements show decreasing methane emissions from natural gas local distribution systems in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Brian K; Edburg, Steven L; Ferrara, Thomas W; Howard, Touché; Harrison, Matthew R; Kolb, Charles E; Townsend-Small, Amy; Dyck, Wesley; Possolo, Antonio; Whetstone, James R

    2015-04-21

    Fugitive losses from natural gas distribution systems are a significant source of anthropogenic methane. Here, we report on a national sampling program to measure methane emissions from 13 urban distribution systems across the U.S. Emission factors were derived from direct measurements at 230 underground pipeline leaks and 229 metering and regulating facilities using stratified random sampling. When these new emission factors are combined with estimates for customer meters, maintenance, and upsets, and current pipeline miles and numbers of facilities, the total estimate is 393 Gg/yr with a 95% upper confidence limit of 854 Gg/yr (0.10% to 0.22% of the methane delivered nationwide). This fraction includes emissions from city gates to the customer meter, but does not include other urban sources or those downstream of customer meters. The upper confidence limit accounts for the skewed distribution of measurements, where a few large emitters accounted for most of the emissions. This emission estimate is 36% to 70% less than the 2011 EPA inventory, (based largely on 1990s emission data), and reflects significant upgrades at metering and regulating stations, improvements in leak detection and maintenance activities, as well as potential effects from differences in methodologies between the two studies.

  11. The velocity distribution of interstellar gas observed in strong UV absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of three strong interstellar UV absorption lines of N I (1199 A), N II (1083 A), and Si III (1206 A) in 47 stars of widely varying distance and a variety of spectral types are analyzed to obtain a velocity distribution function for the interstellar gas. A technique based on the maximum and minimum velocities observed along a line of sight is adopted because of heavy line blending, and results are discussed for both power-law and exponential distribution functions. The expected distribution of radiative-phase supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium is calculated as a function of SNR birthrate and of the interstellar density in which they evolve. The results are combined with observed distance estimates, and it is shown that an interstellar density in excess of 0.1 per cu cm would be required to keep the SNRs sufficiently confined so that their cross sections are consistent with the observed number of components. The alternative possibility is considered that SNRs do not enter the radiative phase before escaping from the Galaxy or colliding with neighboring remnants.

  12. Distributions of Gas and Galaxies from Galaxy Clusters to Larger Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patej, Anna

    2017-01-01

    We address the distributions of gas and galaxies on three scales: the outskirts of galaxy clusters, the clustering of galaxies on large scales, and the extremes of the galaxy distribution. In the outskirts of galaxy clusters, long-standing analytical models of structure formation and recent simulations predict the existence of density jumps in the gas and dark matter profiles. We use these features to derive models for the gas density profile, obtaining a simple fiducial model that is in agreement with both observations of cluster interiors and simulations of the outskirts. We next consider the galaxy density profiles of clusters; under the assumption that the galaxies in cluster outskirts follow similar collisionless dynamics as the dark matter, their distribution should show a steep jump as well. We examine the profiles of a low-redshift sample of clusters and groups, finding evidence for the jump in some of these clusters. Moving to larger scales where massive galaxies of different types are expected to trace the same large-scale structure, we present a test of this prediction by measuring the clustering of red and blue galaxies at z 0.6, finding low stochasticity between the two populations. These results address a key source of systematic uncertainty - understanding how target populations of galaxies trace large-scale structure - in galaxy redshift surveys. Such surveys use baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) as a cosmological probe, but are limited by the expense of obtaining sufficiently dense spectroscopy. With the intention of leveraging upcoming deep imaging data, we develop a new method of detecting the BAO in sparse spectroscopic samples via cross-correlation with a dense photometric catalog. This method will permit the extension of BAO measurements to higher redshifts than possible with the existing spectroscopy alone. Lastly, we connect galaxies near and far: the Local Group dwarfs and the high redshift galaxies observed by Hubble and Spitzer. We

  13. Three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen fluoride gas toward NGC 6334 I and I(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Naylor, D. A.; Makiwa, G.; Satta, M.; Abergel, A.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The HF molecule has been proposed as a sensitive tracer of diffuse interstellar gas, while at higher densities its abundance could be influenced heavily by freeze-out onto dust grains. Aims: We investigate the spatial distribution of a collection of absorbing gas clouds, some associated with the dense, massive star-forming core NGC 6334 I, and others with diffuse foreground clouds elsewhere along the line of sight. For the former category, we aim to study the dynamical properties of the clouds in order to assess their potential to feed the accreting protostellar cores. Methods: We use far-infrared spectral imaging from the Herschel SPIRE iFTS to construct a map of HF absorption at 243 μm in a 6'× 3.´5 region surrounding NGC 6334 I and I(N). Results: The combination of new mapping that is fully sampled spatially, but is spectrally unresolved with a previous, single-pointing, spectrally resolved HF signature yields a three-dimensional picture of absorbing gas clouds in the direction of NGC 6334. Toward core I, the HF equivalent width matches that of the spectrally resolved observation. At angular separations ≳20'' from core I, the HF absorption becomes weaker, which is consistent with three of the seven components being associated with this dense star-forming envelope. Of the remaining four components, two disappear beyond ~1' distance from the NGC 6334 filament, suggesting that these clouds are spatially associated with the star-forming complex. Our data also implies a lack of gas-phase HF in the envelope of core I(N). Using a simple description of adsorption onto and desorption from dust grain surfaces, we show that the overall lower temperature of the envelope of source I(N) is consistent with freeze-out of HF, while it remains in the gas phase in source I. Conclusions: We use the HF molecule as a tracer of column density in diffuse gas (nH ≈ 102-103cm-3), and find that it may uniquely trace a relatively low-density portion of the gas reservoir

  14. Design characteristics of a heat pipe test chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Jang, J. Hoon; Yu, Juin S.

    1992-01-01

    LeRC has designed a heat pipe test facility which will be used to provide data for validating heat pipe computer codes. A heat pipe test chamber that uses helium gas for enhancing heat transfer was investigated. The conceptual design employs the technique of guarded heating and guarded cooling to facilitate accurate measurements of heat transfer rates to the evaporator and from the condenser. The design parameters are selected for a baseline heat pipe made of stainless steel with an inner diameter of 38.10 mm and a wall thickness of 1.016 mm. The heat pipe operates at a design temperature of 1000 K with an evaporator radial heat flux of 53 W/sq. cm.

  15. Latest methods in preinsulated underground chilled water piping

    SciTech Connect

    Maffei, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    In a District Cooling facility, the chilled water distribution piping is an important and integral part of the system. Based on the cost of energy, the high temperature of the ground in many areas, and colder fluid temperatures being used in some systems, many owners and engineers are choosing to insulate their distribution piping. Once the decision has been made to insulate the piping, many options exist as to materials and methods. Some common carrier pipes are steel, ductile iron, PVC or polyethylene. The most common insulation for chilled water is polyurethane foam, but other options exist. Finally, there are a variety of jacketing materials including fiberglass, PVC and polyethylene. Since there are pros and cons to each method, a thorough understanding is required to make an informed decision. Factors such as piping cost, installation cost, and long term reliability must all be considered.

  16. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies

  17. Global distribution and Gas-particle Partitioning of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - a Modelling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, G.; Sehili, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are emitted in all combustion processes. Some undergo re-volatilisation (multi-hopping). Little is known about degradation pathways and the processes determining gas-particle partitioning (Lohmann & Lammel, 2004). Distribution and fate have no been studied on the global scale so far (except for emissions in Europe and Russia; Sehili & Lammel, 2007). Anthracene (ANT), fluoranthene (FLT) and benzo[a]pyrene (BAP) have been studied under present-day climate and each 3 scenarios of atmospheric degradation and gas-particle partitioning using an atmospheric general circulation model with embedded dynamic aerosol submodel, ECHAM-HAM (Stier et al., 2005) and re-volatilization from ground compartments (Semeena et al., 2006). 10 years were simulated with a time-step of 30 min and 2.8°x2.8° and 19 levels. Emissions were compiled based on emission factors in 27 major types of combustion technologies, scaled to 141 combustion technologies and their global distribution as of 1996 (1°x1°) according to fuel type and the PM1 emission factor (Bond et al., 2004). The emissions were entried uniformly throughout the entire simulation time. Scenarios tested: AD = adsorption (according to the Junge empirical relationship; Pankow, 1987), OB = absorption in organic matter and adsorption to soot (Lohmann & Lammel, 2004) without and DP = with degradation in the atmospheric particulate phase. Gas-particle partitioning in air influences drastically the atmospheric cycling, total environmental fate (e.g. compartmental distributions) and the long-range transport potential (LRTP) of the substances studied. The LRTP is mostly regional. Comparison with observed levels indicate that degradation in the particulate phase must be slower than in the gas-phase. Furthermore, the levels of semivolatile PAHs (ANT and FLT) at high latitudes and a European mid latitude site cannot be explained by partitioning due to adsorption alone, but point to both absorption into

  18. Miniature pipe crawler tractor

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Anderson, Matthew O.; Ferrante, Todd A.; Willis, W. David

    2000-01-01

    A pipe crawler tractor may comprise a half tractor assembly having a first base drive wheel, a second base drive wheel, and a top drive wheel. The drive wheels are mounted in spaced-apart relation so that the top drive wheel is positioned between the first and second base drive wheels. The mounting arrangement is also such that the first and second base drive wheels contact the inside surface of the pipe at respective first and second positions and so that the top drive wheel contacts the inside surface of the pipe at a third position, the third position being substantially diametrically opposed to the first and second positions. A control system connected to the half tractor assembly controls the rotation of the first base wheel, the second base wheel, and the top drive wheel to move the half tractor assembly within the pipe.

  19. An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Dielectric liquid for transfer of heat provides liquid flow from the condenser section to the evaporator section in conventional heat pipes. Working fluid is guided or pumped by an array of wire electrodes connected to a high-voltage source.

  20. The pipes of pan.

    PubMed

    Chalif, David J

    2004-12-01

    The pipes of pan is the crowning achievement of Pablo Picasso's neoclassical period of the 1920s. This monumental canvas depicts a mythological Mediterranean scene in which two sculpted classical giants stare out, seemingly across the centuries, toward a distant and lost Arcadia. Picasso was influenced by Greco-Roman art during his travels in Italy, and his neoclassical works typically portray massive, immobile, and pensive figures. Pan and his pipes are taken directly from Greek mythological lore by Picasso and placed directly into 20th century art. He frequently turned to various mythological figures throughout his metamorphosing periods. The Pipes of Pan was also influenced by the painter's infatuation with the beautiful American expatriate Sara Murphy, and the finished masterpiece represents a revision of a previously conceived neoclassical work. The Pipes of Pan now hangs in the Musee Picasso in Paris.