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Sample records for gas evaporation method

  1. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases.

  2. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, J.J.; Halpern, B.L.

    1994-10-18

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases. 8 figs.

  3. A rapid method for simultaneously determining ethanol and methanol content in wines by full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Lin, Neng-Biao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhong-Li; Barnes, Donald G

    2015-09-15

    This work reports on a full evaporation headspace gas chromatographic (FE HS-GC) method for simultaneously determining the ethanol (EtOH) and methanol (MeOH) content in wines. A small sample (10μL) was placed in a headspace sample vial, and a near-complete mass transfer of ethanol and methanol from the liquid sample to the vapor phase was obtained within three minutes at a temperature of 105°C, which allowed the measurement of the EtOH and MeOH content in the sample by GC. The results showed excellent precision and accuracy, as shown by the reproducibilities of 1.02% and 2.11% for EtOH and MeOH, respectively, and recoveries that ranged from 96.1% to 104% for both alcohols. The method is efficient, accurate and suitable for the determination of EtOH and MeOH in wine production and quality control.

  4. Method of evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, Eugene R.

    1987-01-01

    Liquids, such as juices, milk, molten metal and the like are concentrated by forming uniformly-sized, small droplets in a precision droplet forming assembly and deploying the droplets in free fall downwardly as a central column within an evacuated column with cool walls. A portion of the solvent evaporates. The vapor flows to the wall, condenses, and usually flows down the wall as a film to condensate collector and drain. The vertical column of freely falling droplets enters the splash guard. The condensate can be collected, sent to other towers or recycled.

  5. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  6. Apparatus and method for evaporator defrosting

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Domitrovic, Ronald E.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for warm-liquid defrosting of the evaporator of a refrigeration system. The apparatus includes a first refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands refrigerant for cooling the evaporator, a second refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands the refrigerant after the refrigerant has passed through the evaporator, and a defrosting control for the first refrigerant expansion device and second refrigerant expansion device to selectively defrost the evaporator by causing warm refrigerant to flow through the evaporator. The apparatus is alternately embodied with a first refrigerant bypass and/or a second refrigerant bypass for selectively directing refrigerant to respectively bypass the first refrigerant expansion device and the second refrigerant expansion device, and with the defrosting control connected to the first refrigerant bypass and/or the second refrigerant bypass to selectively activate and deactivate the bypasses depending upon the current cycle of the refrigeration system. The apparatus alternately includes an accumulator for accumulating liquid and/or gaseous refrigerant that is then pumped either to a refrigerant receiver or the first refrigerant expansion device for enhanced evaporator defrosting capability. The inventive method of defrosting an evaporator in a refrigeration system includes the steps of compressing refrigerant in a compressor and cooling the refrigerant in the condenser such that the refrigerant is substantially in liquid form, passing the refrigerant substantially in liquid form through the evaporator, and expanding the refrigerant with a refrigerant expansion device after the refrigerant substantially passes through the evaporator.

  7. Isothermal evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Milev, Adriyan S; Wilson, Michael A; Kannangara, G S Kamali; Feng, Hai; Newman, Phillip A

    2012-01-12

    Optimization of evaporation and pyrolysis conditions for ethanol are important in carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis. The activation enthalpy (ΔH(‡)), the activation entropy (ΔS(‡)), and the free energy barrier (ΔG(‡)) to evaporation have been determined by measuring the molar coefficient of evaporation, k(evap), at nine different temperatures (30-70 °C) and four gas flow rates (25-200 mL/min) using nitrogen and argon as carrier gases. At 70 °C in argon, the effect of the gas flow rate on k(evap) and ΔG(‡) is small. However, this is not true at temperatures as low as 30 °C, where the increase of the gas flow rate from 25 to 200 mL/min results in a nearly 6 times increase of k(evap) and decrease of ΔG(‡) by ~5 kJ/mol. Therefore, at 30 °C, the effect of the gas flow rate on the ethanol evaporation rate is attributed to interactions of ethanol with argon molecules. This is supported by simultaneous infrared spectroscopic analysis of the evolved vapors, which demonstrates the presence of different amounts of linear and cyclic hydrogen bonded ethanol aggregates. While the amount of these aggregates at 30 °C depends upon the gas flow rate, no such dependence was observed during evaporation at 70 °C. When the evaporation was carried out in nitrogen, ΔG(‡) was almost independent of the evaporation temperature (30-70 °C) and the gas flow rate (25-200 mL/min). Thus the evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere at different temperatures may go via different mechanisms depending on the nature of the carrier gas.

  8. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporator of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B.

    2002-08-21

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods.

  9. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B. Jr.

    2003-10-23

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate and off-gas streams with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI ESP model is constrained by available literature data.

  10. Infiltration and evaporation of small hydrocarbon spills at gas stations.

    PubMed

    Hilpert, Markus; Breysse, Patrick N

    2014-12-01

    Small gasoline spills frequently occur at gasoline dispensing stations. We have developed a mathematical model to estimate both the amount of gasoline that infiltrates into the concrete underneath the dispensing stations and the amount of gasoline that evaporates into the typically turbulent atmosphere. Our model shows that the fraction of infiltrated gasoline can exceed the fraction that evaporates from the sessile droplets. Infiltrated gasoline then evaporates and is slowly released to the atmosphere via slow diffusive transport in pores. Tentative experiments show that our theoretical approach captures observed experimental trends. Predictions based on independently estimated model parameters roughly describe the experimental data, except for the very slow vapor release at the end of Stage II evaporation. Our study suggests that, over the lifespan of a gas station, concrete pads underneath gas dispensing stations accumulate significant amounts of gasoline, which could eventually break through into underlying soil and groundwater. Our model also shows that lifetimes of spilled gasoline droplets on concrete surfaces are on the order of minutes or longer. Therefore contamination can be carried away by foot traffic or precipitation runoff. Regulations and guidelines typically do not address subsurface and surface contaminations due to chronic small gasoline spills, even though these spills could result in non-negligible human exposure to toxic and carcinogenic gasoline compounds.

  11. Infiltration and evaporation of small hydrocarbon spills at gas stations.

    PubMed

    Hilpert, Markus; Breysse, Patrick N

    2014-12-01

    Small gasoline spills frequently occur at gasoline dispensing stations. We have developed a mathematical model to estimate both the amount of gasoline that infiltrates into the concrete underneath the dispensing stations and the amount of gasoline that evaporates into the typically turbulent atmosphere. Our model shows that the fraction of infiltrated gasoline can exceed the fraction that evaporates from the sessile droplets. Infiltrated gasoline then evaporates and is slowly released to the atmosphere via slow diffusive transport in pores. Tentative experiments show that our theoretical approach captures observed experimental trends. Predictions based on independently estimated model parameters roughly describe the experimental data, except for the very slow vapor release at the end of Stage II evaporation. Our study suggests that, over the lifespan of a gas station, concrete pads underneath gas dispensing stations accumulate significant amounts of gasoline, which could eventually break through into underlying soil and groundwater. Our model also shows that lifetimes of spilled gasoline droplets on concrete surfaces are on the order of minutes or longer. Therefore contamination can be carried away by foot traffic or precipitation runoff. Regulations and guidelines typically do not address subsurface and surface contaminations due to chronic small gasoline spills, even though these spills could result in non-negligible human exposure to toxic and carcinogenic gasoline compounds. PMID:25444115

  12. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  13. Determination of soil evaporation fluxes using distributed temperature sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, J. L.; Cristi Matte, F.; Munoz, J. F.; Suarez, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of evaporation fluxes in arid soils is an unresolved complex phenomenon that has a major impact on the basin's water availability. In arid zones, evaporation controls moisture contents near the soil surface and drives liquid water and water vapor fluxes through the vadose zone, playing a critical role in both the hydrological cycle and energy balance. However, determining soil evaporation in arid zones is a difficult undertaking. Thus, it is important to develop new measuring techniques that can determine evaporation fluxes. In the last decade, distributed temperature sensing (DTS) methods have been successfully used to investigate a wide range of hydrologic applications. In particular, DTS methods have been used indirectly to monitor soil moisture. Two methods have been developed: the passive and the active method. In the active mode, the DTS system uses cables with metal elements and a voltage difference is applied at the two ends to of the cable to heat it up for a defined time-period. Then, the cumulative temperature increase along the cable is computed and soil moisture is determined by using an empirical relation. DTS technology has also been used to determine water fluxes in porous media, but so far no efforts have been made to determine evaporation fluxes. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using the active DTS method to determine soil evaporation fluxes. To achieve this objective, column experiments were designed to study evaporation from sandy soils with shallow water tables. The soil columns were instrumented with traditional temperature and time-domain-reflectometry probes, and an armored fiber-optic cable that allows using the active method to estimate the soil moisture profile. In the experiments, the water table can be fixed at different depths and soil evaporation can be estimated by measuring the water added to the constant-head reservoir that feeds the column. Thus, allowing the investigation of soil evaporation fluxes from DTS

  14. Control methods and systems for indirect evaporative coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Jason; Kozubal, Erik

    2015-09-22

    A control method for operating an indirect evaporative cooler to control temperature and humidity. The method includes operating an airflow control device to provide supply air at a flow rate to a liquid desiccant dehumidifier. The supply air flows through the dehumidifier and an indirect evaporative cooler prior to exiting an outlet into a space. The method includes operating a pump to provide liquid desiccant to the liquid desiccant dehumidifier and sensing a temperature of an airstream at the outlet of the indirect evaporative cooler. The method includes comparing the temperature of the airstream at the outlet to a setpoint temperature at the outlet and controlling the pump to set the flow rate of the liquid desiccant. The method includes sensing space temperature, comparing the space temperature with a setpoint temperature, and controlling the airflow control device to set the flow rate of the supply air based on the comparison.

  15. Method and apparatus for flash evaporation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, D.

    1984-01-01

    A vertical tube flash evaporator for introducing a super-heated liquid into a flash evaporation chamber includes a vertical inlet tube with a flared diffuser portion at its upper outlet end. A plurality of annular screens are positioned in axially spaced-apart relation to each other around the periphery of the vertical tube and below the diffuser portion thereof. The screens are preferably curved upward in a cup-shaped configuration. These flash evaporators are shown in an ocean thermal energy conversion unit designed for generating electric power from differential temperature gradients in ocean water. The method of use of the flash evaporators of this invention includes flowing liquid upwardly through the vertical tube into the diffuser where initial expansion and boiling occurs quite violently and explosively. Unvaporized liquid sheets and drops collide with each other to enhance surface renewal and evaporation properties, and liquid flowing over the outlet end of the diffuser falls onto the curved screens for further surface renewal and evaporation.

  16. Method and apparatus for flash evaporation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan

    1984-01-01

    A vertical tube flash evaporator for introducing a superheated liquid into a flash evaporation chamber includes a vertical inlet tube with a flared diffuser portion at its upper outlet end. A plurality of annular screens are positioned in axially spaced-apart relation to each other around the periphery of the vertical tube and below the diffuser portion thereof. The screens are preferably curved upward in a cup-shaped configuration. These flash evaporators are shown in an ocean thermal energy conversion unit designed for generating electric power from differential temperature gradients in ocean water. The method of use of the flash evaporators of this invention includes flowing liquid upwardly through the vertical tube into the diffuser where initial expansion and boiling occurs quite violently and explosively. Unvaporized liquid sheets and drops collide with each other to enhance surface renewal and evaporation properties, and liquid flowing over the outlet end of the diffuser falls onto the curved screens for further surface renewal and evaporation.

  17. A predictive method for crude oil volatile organic compounds emission from soil: evaporation and diffusion behavior investigation of binary gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijing; Fischer, Thomas; Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Möller, Detlev

    2015-05-01

    Due to their mobility and toxicity, crude oil volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are representative components for oil pipeline contaminated sites detection. Therefore, contaminated location risk assessment, with airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) survey, in particular, requires ground-based determinative methods for oil VOCs, the interaction between oil VOCs and soil, and information on how they diffuse from underground into atmosphere. First, we developed a method for determination of crude oil VOC binary mixtures (take n-pentane and n-hexane as examples), taking synergistic effects of VOC mixtures on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers into consideration. Using this method, we further aim to extract VOCs from small volumes, for example, from soil pores, using a custom-made sampling device for nondestructive SPME fiber intrusion, and to study VOC transport through heterogeneous porous media. Second, specific surface Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis was conducted and used for estimation of VOC isotherm parameters in soil. Finally, two models were fitted for VOC emission prediction, and the results were compared to the experimental emission results. It was found that free diffusion mode worked well, and an empirical correction factor seems to be needed for the other model to adapt to our condition for single and binary systems.

  18. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the radionuclides that is volatile in the melter and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 (99Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentrations in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are 129I, 90Sr, 137Cs, and 241Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. At this time, these scoping tests did not evaluate the partitioning of the radionuclides to the evaporator condensate, since ample data are available separately from other experience in the DOE complex. Results from the evaporation testing show that the neutral SBS simulant first forms turbidity at ~7.5X concentration, while the alkaline-adjusted simulant became turbid at ~3X concentration. The major solid in both cases was Kogarkoite, Na3FSO4. Sodium and lithium fluorides were also detected. Minimal solids were formed in the evaporator bottoms until a substantial fraction of liquid was removed, indicating that evaporation could minimize storage volume issues. Achievable concentration factors without significant insoluble solids were 17X at alkaline pH, and 23X at neutral pH. In both runs, significant ammonia carried over and was captured in the condenser with the water condensate. Results also indicate that with low insoluble solids formation in the initial testing at neutral pH, the use of Reverse Osmosis is a potential alternate method for concentrating the solution, although an evaluation is needed to identify equipment that can tolerate insoluble solids. Most of the ammonia remains in the

  19. Simulation of Heterogeneous Atom Probe Tip Shapes Evolution during Field Evaporation Using a Level Set Method and Different Evaporation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Xu, Wei; Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Geiser, B. P.; Larson, David J.

    2015-04-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), accurate reconstruction of the spatial positions of field evaporated ions from measured detector patterns depends upon a correct understanding of the dynamic tip shape evolution and evaporation laws of component atoms. Artifacts in APT reconstructions of heterogeneous materials can be attributed to the assumption of homogeneous evaporation of all the elements in the material in addition to the assumption of a steady state hemispherical dynamic tip shape evolution. A level set method based specimen shape evolution model is developed in this study to simulate the evaporation of synthetic layered-structured APT tips. The simulation results of the shape evolution by the level set model qualitatively agree with the finite element method and the literature data using the finite difference method. The asymmetric evolving shape predicted by the level set model demonstrates the complex evaporation behavior of heterogeneous tip and the interface curvature can potentially lead to the artifacts in the APT reconstruction of such materials. Compared with other APT simulation methods, the new method provides smoother interface representation with the aid of the intrinsic sub-grid accuracy. Two evaporation models (linear and exponential evaporation laws) are implemented in the level set simulations and the effect of evaporation laws on the tip shape evolution is also presented.

  20. System and method for cooling a combustion gas charge

    DOEpatents

    Massey, Mary Cecelia; Boberg, Thomas Earl

    2010-05-25

    The present invention relates to a system and method for cooling a combustion gas charge prior. The combustion gas charge may include compressed intake air, exhaust gas, or a mixture thereof. An evaporator is provided that may then receive a relatively high temperature combustion gas charge and discharge at a relatively lower temperature. The evaporator may be configured to operate with refrigeration cycle components and/or to receive a fluid below atmospheric pressure as the phase-change cooling medium.

  1. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  2. Preparation of drug nanoparticles by emulsion evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, Le Thi Mai; Chi, Nguyen Tai; Triet, Nguyen Minh; Thanh Nhan, Le Ngoc; Mau Chien, Dang

    2009-09-01

    Polymeric drug nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. In this study, prepared the polymeric drug nanoparticles consist of ketoprofen and Eudragit E 100. The morphology structure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interactions between the drug and polymer were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The size distribution was measured by means of Dynamic Light Scattering. The nanoparticles have an average size of about 150 nm. The incorporation ability of drugs in the polymeric nanoparticles depended on the integration between polymer and drug as well as the glass transition temperature of the polymer.

  3. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-03-28

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  4. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory

    DOE PAGES

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2016-03-22

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Lastly, our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  5. A model coupling the liquid and gas phases for a totally wetting evaporative meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumenc, F.; Guerrier, B.

    2011-08-01

    An hydrodynamic model has been developed to get a complete description of an evaporative meniscus in complete wetting configuration. The coupling between the liquid and gas is explicitly taken into account. Scaling laws are derived for the different domains of the meniscus and validated by numerical simulations. Results are compared with previous models of the literature that use the electrostatic analogy proposed by Deegan and co-authors to describe the evaporative flux. We show that the different approaches differ for the description of the tip of the meniscus in the domain corresponding to the decrease of the evaporative flux but lead to the same scaling for the apparent macroscopic contact angle.

  6. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.H.

    2001-03-28

    The purposes of this work were to: (1) develop preliminary operating data such as expected concentration endpoints for flow sheet development and evaporator design, and (2) examine the regulatory off-gas emission impacts from the evaporation of relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 Envelope C waste simulant containing 14 volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide organic compounds potentially present in actual Hanford RPP waste.

  7. Evaporation of liquids from cylindrical vessels under conditions of free concentrational convection in a gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Izmailov, Yu.G.; Pisarev, N.M.; Vyatkin, G.P.

    1995-12-01

    An analytical solution is obtained for the axisymmetric problem of free concentrational convection in a vapor-gas mixture with isothermal evaporation of liquids from open cylindrical vessels. Formulas are derived to calculate concentration fields, local and integral mass fluxes of vapor. A comparative analysis of the results of analytical and numerical simulation is carried out for the processes of the evaporation of liquids under the conditions of convective mass transfer.

  8. Gas-phase reactions of charged phenyl radicals with neutral biomolecules evaporated by laser-induced acoustic desorption.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christopher J; Ramírez-Arizmendi, Luis E; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Pérez, James; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2002-02-01

    A generally applicable method for the study of phenyl radicals' reactions with neutral biomolecules in the gas phase is demonstrated. Neutral biomolecules were evaporated into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and subsequently reacted with trapped charged phenyl radicals. The structural integrity of the evaporated alanylalanine molecules was verified by reaction with dichlorophosphenium ions. Examination of the reactions of charged phenyl radicals with alanylalanine and thymidine evaporated via LIAD revealed hydrogen atom abstraction for both alanylalanine and thymidine as well as an addition/elimination product for the reaction with thymidine. These reactions are consistent with the results obtained by others in solution. Further, a previously unstudied reaction of the nucleotide of thymine (T1) with charged phenyl radical was found to yield analogous products as the reaction with thymidine.

  9. Effect of evaporation time on cellulose acetate membrane for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jami'an, W. N. R.; Hasbullah, H.; Mohamed, F.; Yusof, N.; Ibrahim, N.; Ali, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Throughout this decades, membrane technology has been the desirable option among the others gas separation technologies. However, few issues have been raised regarding the membrane gas separation application including the trade-off between its permeability and selectivity and also its effects towards environment. Therefore, for this research, a biopolymer membrane for gas separation application will be developed with reasonably high on both permeability and selectivity. The main objective of this research is to study the effect of solvent evaporation time on the flat sheet asymmetric membrane morphology and gas separation performance. The membranes were produced by a simple dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically controlled casting system. The dope solution for the membrane casting was prepared by dissolving the cellulose acetate (CA) polymer in N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and the solvent evaporation time was varied. Permeability and selectivity of the membrane was performed by using pure gases of carbon dioxide, CO2 and methane, CH4. The increase in solvent evaporation time had improved the membrane morphologies as the porosity of the membrane surface decrease and formation of a more mature skin layer. The gas permeation tests determined that increasing in solvent evaporation time had increased the selectivity of CO2/CH4 but reduce the permeability of both gases

  10. Modelling of evaporation of a dispersed liquid component in a chemically active gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, V. G.; Naumov, V. I.; Kotov, V. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    A model has been developed to investigate evaporation of dispersed liquids in chemically active gas flow. Major efforts have been directed at the development of algorithms for implementing this model. The numerical experiments demonstrate that, in the boundary layer, significant changes in the composition and temperature of combustion products take place. This gives the opportunity to more correctly model energy release processes in combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines, gas-turbine engines, and other power devices.

  11. Comparison of different methods for estimating soil surface evaporation in a bare field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haofang; Zhang, Chuan; Oue, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Hideki

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, three methods for estimating soil evaporation in a bare field were evaluated: evaporation ratio method ( k ratio), complementary relationship and bulk equation. Micro-lysimeters were used to measure the actual evaporation for validation of the three methods. For the k ratio method, pan evaporation was used as the reference evaporation instead of the value obtained from the Penman-Monteith equation. This result is important for areas where meteorological data are unavailable. The results showed that, for daytime evaporation, the k ratio and bulk equation produced a good fit with the observation data, while the complementary relationship generated a larger deviation from the measured data. We recommend that the k ratio method and bulk equation could be used to calculate daytime soil evaporation with high accuracy when soil water content and pan evaporation data or meteorological data are available, while the complementary relationship could be used for a rough estimation when pan evaporation is available. All the methods could be applied to calculate cumulative evaporation.

  12. Evaporation determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Likens, G.E.; Sturrock, A.M.; Mau, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Evaporation was determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake during the open water periods of 1982-1987. For all years, evaporation rates were low in spring and fall and highest during the summer. However, the times of highest evaporation rates varied during the 6 yr. Evaporation reached maximum rates in July for three of the years, in June for two of the years, and in August for one of the years. The highest evaporation rate during the 6-yr study was 0.46 cm d-1 during 27 May-4 June 1986 and 15-21 July 1987. Solar radiation and atmospheric radiation input to the lake and long-wave radiation emitted from the lake were by far the largest energy fluxes to and from the lake and had the greatest effect on evaporation rates. Energy advected to and from the lake by precipitation, surface water, and ground water had little effect on evaporation rates. In the energy-budget method, average evaporation rates are determined for energy-budget periods, which are bounded by the dates of thermal surveys of the lake. Our study compared evaporation rates calculated for short periods, usually ???1 week, with evaporation rates calculated for longer periods, usually ???2 weeks. The results indicated that the shorter periods showed more variability in evaporation rates, but seasonal patterns, with few exceptions, were similar.

  13. Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation During Evaporation of SiO2 in Vacuum and in H Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, H.; Young, E. D.; Hoering, T. C.; Mysen, B. O.

    1993-07-01

    Chondritic components, chondrules, CAIs, and some parts of the matrix are believed to have formed and/or thermally processed in the solar nebula. If this scenario is the case, they should be fractionated for major and minor elements and isotopes according to the formation temperature. This is true for major and trace elements, but is not the case for isotopes. Differences in oxygen isotopic composition among meteorite groups are interpreted to be the results of mixing of gas and dust from different oxygen reservoirs, and the effect of isotopic fractionation is negligible for most meteorites except for rare CAIs. Davis et al. [1] studied the isotopic fractionation of SiO2, MgO, and forsterite and showed that oxygen isotopic fractionation from solid materials is very small, but that from liquid is significant. Evaporation in the solar nebula should, however, be in hydrogen gas, which is reactive with silicates. Therefore, the effect of hydrogen gas on the evaporation behaviors of silicates, including mode of evaporation, evaporation rate, and compositional and isotopic fractionation, should be studied. Nagahara [2] studied the evaporation rate of SiO2 in equilibrium, in constant evacuation (free evaporation), and in hydrogen, and showed that the rate in hydrogen gas is orders of magnitude larger than that in vacuum; the mode of evaporation also differs from that in vacuum. Oxygen isotopic fractionation during evaporation of SiO2 in constant evacuation and in hydrogen gas at two different total pressures are studied in the present study. The starting material is a single crystal of natural quartz, which should transform into high cristobalite at experimental conditions. The powdered starting material was kept in a graphite capsule without a cap and set in a vacuum chamber with and without hydrogen gas flow. Experimental temperature was 1600 degrees C. Oxygen isotopic compositions (^18O/^16O) were measured with the CO2laser heating fluorination technique. Oxygen

  14. Gas scavenging of insoluble vapors: Condensation of methyl salicylate vapor onto evaporating drops of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaver, Mark; Peele, J. R.; Rubel, Glenn O.

    We have observed the evaporation of acoustically levitated water drops at 0 and 32% relative humidity in a moving gas stream which is nearly saturated with methyl salicylate vapor. The initial evaporation rate is characteristic of a pure water drop and gradually slows until the evaporation rate becomes that of pure methyl salicylate. The quantity of condensed methyl salicylate exceeds its Henry's law solubility in water by factors of more than 30-50. This apparent violation of Henry's law agrees with the concentration enhancements in the liquid phase found by glotfelty et al. (1987, Nature235, 602-605) during their field measurements of organophorus pesticides in fog water. Under our conditions, visual evidence demonstrates the presence of two liquid phases, thus invalidating the use of Henry's law. A continuum evaporation-condensation model for an immiscible two-component system which accounts for evaporative self-cooling of the drop correctly predicts the amount of methyl salicylate condensed onto the water drops.

  15. [Measurement and estimation methods and research progress of snow evaporation in forests].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Dong; Guan, De-Xin; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurement and estimation of snow evaporation (sublimation) in forests is one of the important issues to the understanding of snow surface energy and water balance, and it is also an essential part of regional hydrological and climate models. This paper summarized the measurement and estimation methods of snow evaporation in forests, and made a comprehensive applicability evaluation, including mass-balance methods (snow water equivalent method, comparative measurements of snowfall and through-snowfall, snow evaporation pan, lysimeter, weighing of cut tree, weighing interception on crown, and gamma-ray attenuation technique) and micrometeorological methods (Bowen-ratio energy-balance method, Penman combination equation, aerodynamics method, surface temperature technique and eddy covariance method). Also this paper reviewed the progress of snow evaporation in different forests and its influencal factors. At last, combining the deficiency of past research, an outlook for snow evaporation rearch in forests was presented, hoping to provide a reference for related research in the future.

  16. A comparative STM study of Ru nanoparticles deposited on HOPG by mass-selected gas aggregation versus thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, R. M.; Murphy, S.; Strebel, C.; Johansson, M.; Nielsen, J. H.; Chorkendorff, I.

    2009-12-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to compare the morphologies of Ru nanoparticles deposited onto highly-oriented graphite surfaces using two different physical vapour deposition methods; (1) pre-formed mass-selected Ru nanoparticles with diameters between 2 nm and 15 nm were soft-landed onto HOPG surfaces using a gas-aggregation source and (2) nanoparticles were formed by e-beam evaporation of Ru films onto HOPG. The particles generated by the gas-aggregation source are round in shape with evidence of facets resolved on the larger particles. Annealing these nanoparticles when they are supported on unsputtered HOPG resulted in the sintering of smaller nanoparticles, while larger particles remained immobile. Nanoparticles deposited onto sputtered HOPG surfaces were found to be stable against sintering when annealed. The size and shape of nanoparticles deposited by e-beam evaporation depend to a large extent on the state of the graphite support and the temperature. Ru deposition onto unsputtered HOPG is characterised by bimodal growth with large flat particles formed on the substrate terraces and smaller diameter particles aligned along the substrate steps. Evaporation onto sputtered HOPG results in the formation of 2 nm round particles with a narrow size distribution. Finally, thermal deposition onto both sputtered and unsputtered HOPG at 660 °C results in larger particles showing a flat Ru(0 0 0 1) top facet.

  17. Evaporation and heating of a single suspended coal-water slurry droplet in hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi-chune, Y.; Liu, L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaporation, heating, and burning of single coal-water slurry droplets are studied. The coal selected in this study is Pittsburgh Seam number 8 coal which is a medium volatile caking bituminous coal. The droplet is suspended on a microthermocouple and exposed to a hot gas stream. Temperature measurement and microscopic observation are performed in the parametric studies. The duration of water evaporation in CWS droplets decreases with the reduction of the droplet size, increasing of coal weight fraction, and increasing of gas temperature and velocity. The duration of heat-up is always significant due to the agglomeration. The CWS droplets are generally observed to swell like popcorn during heating. A model for the formation of the popped swelling is proposed and discussed.

  18. Evaporative depolarization and spin transport in a unitary trapped Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Meera M.; Huse, David A.

    2009-12-15

    We consider a partially spin-polarized atomic Fermi gas in a high-aspect-ratio trap, with a flux of predominantly spin-up atoms exiting the center of the trap. We argue that such a scenario can be produced by evaporative cooling, and we find that it can result in a substantially nonequilibrium polarization pattern for typical experimental parameters. We offer this as a possible explanation for the quantitative discrepancies in recent experiments on spin-imbalanced unitary Fermi gases.

  19. Numerical simulation and field test study of desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment through flue gas.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jia-Jia; Pan, Liang-Ming; Chen, De-Qi; Dong, Yu-Quan; Wang, Cheng-Mu; Liu, Hang; Kang, Mei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at cost saving and pollution reduction, a novel desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment system (DWETS) for handling wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) wastewater of a coal-fired power plant was studied. The system's advantages include simple process, and less investment and space. The feasibility of this system has been proven and the appropriate position and number of nozzles, the spray droplet size and flue gas temperature limitation have been obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulation results show that a longer duct, smaller diameter and higher flue gas temperature could help to increase the evaporation rate. The optimal DWETS design of Shangdu plant is 100 μm droplet sprayed by two nozzles located at the long duct when the flue gas temperature is 130 °C. Field tests were carried out based on the simulation results. The effects of running DWETS on the downstream devices have been studied. The results show that DWETS has a positive impact on ash removal efficiency and does not have any negative impact on the electrostatic precipitator (ESP), flue gas heat exchanger and WFGD. The pH values of the slurry of WFGD slightly increase when the DWETS is running. The simulation and field test of the DWETS show that it is a feasible future technology for desulfurization wastewater treatment.

  20. Numerical simulation and field test study of desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment through flue gas.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jia-Jia; Pan, Liang-Ming; Chen, De-Qi; Dong, Yu-Quan; Wang, Cheng-Mu; Liu, Hang; Kang, Mei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at cost saving and pollution reduction, a novel desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment system (DWETS) for handling wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) wastewater of a coal-fired power plant was studied. The system's advantages include simple process, and less investment and space. The feasibility of this system has been proven and the appropriate position and number of nozzles, the spray droplet size and flue gas temperature limitation have been obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulation results show that a longer duct, smaller diameter and higher flue gas temperature could help to increase the evaporation rate. The optimal DWETS design of Shangdu plant is 100 μm droplet sprayed by two nozzles located at the long duct when the flue gas temperature is 130 °C. Field tests were carried out based on the simulation results. The effects of running DWETS on the downstream devices have been studied. The results show that DWETS has a positive impact on ash removal efficiency and does not have any negative impact on the electrostatic precipitator (ESP), flue gas heat exchanger and WFGD. The pH values of the slurry of WFGD slightly increase when the DWETS is running. The simulation and field test of the DWETS show that it is a feasible future technology for desulfurization wastewater treatment. PMID:25325555

  1. Comparison of evaporation computation methods, Pretty Lake, Lagrange County, northeastern Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ficke, John F.

    1972-01-01

    The different methods, although poor, agree that evaporation when there is ice cover is generally small (less than 0.1 cm day" 1 ), but the evaporation rates during the few days just before freezeup or just after ice breakup are significant

  2. Evaporation model for beam based additive manufacturing using free surface lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Scharowsky, Thorsten; Körner, Carolin

    2014-07-01

    Evaporation plays an important role in many technical applications including beam-based additive manufacturing processes, such as selective electron beam or selective laser melting (SEBM/SLM). In this paper, we describe an evaporation model which we employ within the framework of a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method. With this method, we solve the hydrodynamics as well as thermodynamics of the molten material taking into account the mass and energy losses due to evaporation and the recoil pressure acting on the melt pool. Validation of the numerical model is performed by measuring maximum melt depths and evaporative losses in samples of pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V molten by an electron beam. Finally, the model is applied to create processing maps for an SEBM process. The results predict that the penetration depth of the electron beam, which is a function of the acceleration voltage, has a significant influence on evaporation effects.

  3. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOEpatents

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  4. A Ghost Fluid/Level Set Method for boiling flows and liquid evaporation: Application to the Leidenfrost effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Alis, Romain; Lepilliez, Mathieu; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2016-07-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase change, in the framework of interface capturing or interface tracking methods, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method, which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. Indeed, in some specific situations involving very heterogeneous thermodynamic conditions at the interface, the distinction between boiling and evaporation is not always possible. For instance, it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate whose temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. The situation can also be ambiguous for a superheated droplet or at the contact line between a liquid and a hot wall whose temperature is higher than the saturation temperature of the liquid. In these situations, the interface temperature can locally reach the saturation temperature (boiling point), for instance near a contact line, and be cooler in other places. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Standard numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accuracy validations against theoretical solutions and experimental results to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  5. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  6. Evaporative microdialysis: an effective improvement in an established method of protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Bunick, C; North, A C; Stubbs, G

    2000-11-01

    Evaporative dialysis is a simple variant of conventional microdialysis in which the reservoir solution is allowed to evaporate slowly. The slow increase in precipitant concentration allows crystals to grow without increasing nucleation. The method is useful for proteins that have a very narrow metastable zone (the range of solution conditions under which crystals grow but nuclei do not form at an appreciable rate). The method is demonstrated with the coat protein of potato virus X.

  7. Evaporation kinetics in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented; these results are applied to 18 different drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory, taking into account the chemical nature of the salt, the drop size and shape, the drop concentration, the well size, the well concentration, and the temperature. It is found that the rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and with the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves about 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  8. Correction of the heat loss method for calculating clothing real evaporative resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Zhang, Chengjiao; Lu, Yehu

    2015-08-01

    In the so-called isothermal condition (i.e., Tair [air temperature]=Tmanikin [manikin temperature]=Tr [radiant temperature]), the actual energy used for moisture evaporation detected by most sweating manikins was underestimated due to the uncontrolled fabric 'skin' temperature Tsk,f (i.e., Tsk,fevaporative resistance. In this study, correction of the real evaporative heat loss from the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system was proposed and experimentally validated on a 'Newton' sweating manikin. The real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the nude fabric 'skin' calculated by the corrected heat loss method was also reported and compared with that by the mass loss method. Results revealed that, depending on the types of tested clothing, different amounts of heat were drawn from the ambient environment. In general, a greater amount of heat was drawn from the ambient environment by the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system in lower thermal insulation clothing than that in higher insulation clothing. There were no significant differences between clothing real evaporative resistances calculated by the corrected heat loss method and those by the mass loss method. It was therefore concluded that the correction method proposed in this study has been successfully validated. PMID:26267497

  9. Comparison of 15 evaporation methods applied to a small mountain lake in the northeastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.; Likens, G.E.

    2007-01-01

    Few detailed evaporation studies exist for small lakes or reservoirs in mountainous settings. A detailed evaporation study was conducted at Mirror Lake, a 0.15 km2 lake in New Hampshire, northeastern USA, as part of a long-term investigation of lake hydrology. Evaporation was determined using 14 alternate evaporation methods during six open-water seasons and compared with values from the Bowen-ratio energy-budget (BREB) method, considered the standard. Values from the Priestley-Taylor, deBruin-Keijman, and Penman methods compared most favorably with BREB-determined values. Differences from BREB values averaged 0.19, 0.27, and 0.20 mm d-1, respectively, and results were within 20% of BREB values during more than 90% of the 37 monthly comparison periods. All three methods require measurement of net radiation, air temperature, change in heat stored in the lake, and vapor pressure, making them relatively data intensive. Several of the methods had substantial bias when compared with BREB values and were subsequently modified to eliminate bias. Methods that rely only on measurement of air temperature, or air temperature and solar radiation, were relatively cost-effective options for measuring evaporation at this small New England lake, outperforming some methods that require measurement of a greater number of variables. It is likely that the atmosphere above Mirror Lake was affected by occasional formation of separation eddies on the lee side of nearby high terrain, although those influences do not appear to be significant to measured evaporation from the lake when averaged over monthly periods. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Annatto Polymeric Microparticles: Natural Product Encapsulation by the Emulsion-Solvent Evaporation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Zaine; Duran, Nelson; Guterres, Silvia S.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, the extract from annatto seeds was encapsulated in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) particles by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The particles were washed and centrifuged to remove excess stabilizer and then freeze-dried. The main compound of annatto seeds, bixin, has antioxidant properties as well…

  11. The deposition of Sm1Ba2Cu3O7-δ on SrTiO3 using co-evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. S.; Ha, H. S.; Kim, T. H.; Yang, J. S.; Ko, R. K.; Song, K. J.; Ha, D. W.; Lee, N. J.; Oh, S. S.; Youm, D. J.; Park, Chan

    2007-09-01

    The SmBCO(Sm 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ) films were deposited on SrTiO 3 substrates using co-evaporation method. The deposition system was specially designed, that is named evaporation using drum in dual chambers, as the following features. The deposition system consists of reaction chamber and evaporation one. The role of reaction chamber is for the deposited materials to react with oxygen gas, and that of the evaporation chamber is to evaporate the composing elements of SmBCO, respectively. The composition ratio of SmBCO is controlled by the deposition rate of each element. The drum of 50 cm of diameter and 72 cm of length is located between the reaction chamber and the evaporation chamber. By rotating the drum, deposition and reaction process are repeated. In this system, SmBCO films were deposited on SrTiO 3 single crystal substrates. We obtained Ic and Jc results of 83.3 A/cm and 2.1 MA/cm 2 at 77 K in self-field.

  12. Measuring sub-canopy evaporation in a forested wetland using an ensemble of methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. T.; Edwards, B.; Reba, M. L.; Keim, R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation from the sub-canopy water surface is an integral but understudied component of the water balance in forested wetlands. Previous studies have used eddy covariance, energy balance approaches, and water-table fluctuations to assess whole-system evapotranspiration. However, partitioning evaporation from transpiration is necessary for modeling the system because of different controls over each process. Sub-canopy evaporation is a physically controlled process driven by relatively small gradients in residual energy transmitted through the canopy. The low-energy sub-canopy environment is characterized by a spatiotemporally varying light environment due to sunflecks, small and often inverse temperature and vapor gradients, and a high capacity for heat storage in flood water, which each present challenges to common evapotranspiration measurement techniques. Previous studies have examined wetland surface evaporation rates with small lysimeter experiments, but this approach does not encapsulate micrometeorological processes occurring at the scale of natural wetlands. In this study, we examine a one year time series of in situ sub-canopy flux measurements from a seasonally flooded cypress-tupelo swamp in southeast Louisiana. Our objective is to apply these data towards modeling sub-canopy energy flux responses to intra-annual hydrologic, phenologic, and climatic cycles. To assess and mitigate potential errors due to the inherent measurement challenges of this environment, we utilized multiple measurement approaches including eddy covariance, Bowen ratio energy balance (with both air to air gradients and water surface to air gradients) and direct measurement using a floating evaporation pan. Preliminary results show that Bowen ratio energy balance measurements are useful for constraining evaporation measurements when low wind speed conditions create a non-ideal setting for eddy covariance. However, Bowen ratios were often highly erratic due to the weak temperature

  13. Estimation of evaporation from open water - A review of selected studies, summary of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers data collection and methods, and evaluation of two methods for estimation of evaporation from five reservoirs in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwell, Glenn R.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations responsible for the management of water resources, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are tasked with estimation of evaporation for water-budgeting and planning purposes. The USACE has historically used Class A pan evaporation data (pan data) to estimate evaporation from reservoirs but many USACE Districts have been experimenting with other techniques for an alternative to collecting pan data. The energy-budget method generally is considered the preferred method for accurate estimation of open-water evaporation from lakes and reservoirs. Complex equations to estimate evaporation, such as the Penman, DeBruin-Keijman, and Priestley-Taylor, perform well when compared with energy-budget method estimates when all of the important energy terms are included in the equations and ideal data are collected. However, sometimes nonideal data are collected and energy terms, such as the change in the amount of stored energy and advected energy, are not included in the equations. When this is done, the corresponding errors in evaporation estimates are not quantifiable. Much simpler methods, such as the Hamon method and a method developed by the U.S. Weather Bureau (USWB) (renamed the National Weather Service in 1970), have been shown to provide reasonable estimates of evaporation when compared to energy-budget method estimates. Data requirements for the Hamon and USWB methods are minimal and sometimes perform well with remotely collected data. The Hamon method requires average daily air temperature, and the USWB method requires daily averages of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation. Estimates of annual lake evaporation from pan data are frequently within 20 percent of energy-budget method estimates. Results of evaporation estimates from the Hamon method and the USWB method were compared against historical pan data at five selected reservoirs in Texas (Benbrook Lake, Canyon Lake, Granger Lake, Hords Creek Lake, and Sam

  14. ARE LARGE, COMETARY-SHAPED PROPLYDS REALLY (FREE-FLOATING) EVAPORATING GAS GLOBULES?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, R.; Guesten, R.; Morris, M. R.

    2012-12-20

    We report the detection of strong and compact molecular line emission (in the CO J = 3-2, 4-3, 6-5, 7-6, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, HCN, and HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 transitions) from a cometary-shaped object (Carina-frEGG1) in the Carina star-forming region (SFR) previously classified as a photoevaporating protoplanetary disk (proplyd). We derive a molecular mass of 0.35 M{sub Sun} for Carina-frEGG1, which shows that it is not a proplyd, but belongs to a class of free-floating evaporating gas globules (frEGGs) recently found in the Cygnus SFR by Sahai et al. Archival adaptive optics near-IR (Ks) images show a central hourglass-shaped nebula. The derived source luminosity (about 8-18 L{sub Sun }), the hourglass morphology, and the presence of collimated jets seen in Hubble Space Telescope images imply the presence of a jet-driving, young, low-mass star deeply embedded in the dust inside Carina-frEGG1. Our results suggest that the true nature of many or most such cometary-shaped objects seen in massive SFRs and previously labeled as proplyds has been misunderstood, and that these are really frEGGs.

  15. Shocked and Scorched: Free-Floating Evaporating Gas Globules and Star Formation in Cygnus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, M. J.; Morris, M. R.

    2012-05-01

    We report molecular line observations of a new class of Free-floating Evaporating Gas Globules with tadpole shapes (i.e., FrEGGs), recently discovered in the Cygnus star-forming region. We serendipitously found two of these in an HST imaging survey, including one of the most prominent members of this class (IRAS20324+4057: the Tadpole). Our molecular-line observations, carried out with the Arizona Radio Observatory's mm-wave telescopes, include on-the-fly maps in the CO and 13CO J=2-1 lines as well as pointed observations in the J=3-2 line of the high-density tracers HCO+ and N2H+. These data show the presence of dense molecular cores with total masses of cold molecular gas exceeding one to a few Msun in almost all FrEGGs. Our radio continuum imaging of 3 FrEGGs, as well as Halpha images from the IPHAS survey reveal bright photo-ionized peripheries around these objects. We infer that FrEGGs are dense, star-forming molecular cores that originated in the Cygnus cloud and are now being photoevaporated by the ultraviolet radiation field of the Cyg OB2 cluster, and shaped by the ram pressure of strong wind sources. The extended tails in some of the largest objects show wiggles likely resulting from Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities. We find evidence for non-thermal radio emission in the Tadpole, with the radio emission peaking strongly along the shock/ionization front at its head, possibly as a result of a compressed magnetic layer in this front that is interacting with cosmic rays associated with the Cyg OB2 association.

  16. Method of Liquifying a gas

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Klingler, Kerry M.

    2006-02-14

    A method of liquefying a gas is disclosed and which includes the steps of pressurizing a liquid; mixing a reactant composition with the pressurized liquid to generate a high pressure gas; supplying the high pressure gas to an expansion engine which produces a gas having a reduced pressure and temperature, and which further generates a power and/or work output; coupling the expansion engine in fluid flowing relation relative to a refrigeration assembly, and wherein the gas having the reduced temperature is provided to the refrigeration assembly; and energizing and/or actuating the refrigeration assembly, at least in part, by supplying the power and/or work output generated by the expansion engine to the refrigeration assembly, the refrigeration assembly further reducing the temperature of the gas to liquefy same.

  17. A comparison of methods for estimating open-water evaporation in small wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, Jason R.; Stannard, David I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared evaporation measurements from a floating pan, land pan, chamber, and the Priestley-Taylor (PT) equation. Floating pan, land pan, and meteorological data were collected from June 6 to July 21, 2005, at a small wetland in the Canadian River alluvium in central Oklahoma, USA. Evaporation measured with the floating pan compared favorably to 12 h chamber measurements. Differences between chamber and floating pan rates ranged from −0.2 to 0.3 mm, mean of 0.1 mm. The difference between chamber and land pan rates ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 mm, mean of 1.5 mm. The mean chamber-to-floating pan ratio was 0.97 and the mean chamber-to-land pan ratio was 0.73. The chamber-to-floating pan ratio of 0.97 indicates the use of a floating pan to measure evaporation in small limited-fetch water bodies is an appropriate and accurate method for the site investigated. One-sided Paired t-Tests indicate daily floating pan rates were significantly less than land pan and PT rates. A two-sided Paired t-Test indicated there was no significant difference between land pan and PT values. The PT equation tends to overestimate evaporation during times when the air is of low drying power and tends to underestimate as drying power increases.

  18. Combining Heat and Mass Flux Methods for Estimating Real-Time Evaporation from a Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, T. J.; Schladow, G.; Hook, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the heat and mass fluxes associated with evaporation from lakes and reservoirs is achallenge for hydrologists and water managers. This is in large part due to a lack of comprehensivemeasurement data for most systems, which is itself related to the inherent difficulties associated withmeasuring turbulent quantities. An alternative to direct measurement is to develop better models for theevaporative flux, based on the mean terms (as opposed to the turbulent terms) that drive evaporation.Algorithms for the evaporative heat and mass flux must reflect changes in heat storage in the system aswell as the other components of a mass balance (inflow, outflow, and precipitation). The energy budget basedapproach requires records of all the other energy fluxes across the air-water interface to separateout the latent heat component. Other approaches utilize the similarity between atmospheric velocity,temperature and humidity profiles. This study seeks to combine these approaches to build and calibrateheat flux models that can be used to accurately recreate a long-term record of mass storage changefrom a sub-set of meteorological data, lake surface temperature data, and hydrologic observations. Highfrequency lake level data are used to check that the mass balance is in fact achieved. Good agreement isshown between the heat flux methods and the mass balance results through comparison with a three-yearrecord of lake level. The results demonstrate that a combination of mass and heat flux approaches canbe used to generate accurate values of evaporation on daily or even sub-daily time-scales.

  19. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin  = T a  = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. PMID:26542017

  20. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin.

  1. Gas-evaporation in low-gravity field (cogelation mechanism of metal vapors) (M-14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, N.

    1993-01-01

    When metal and alloy compounds are heated and vaporized in a rare gas such as helium, argon, or xenon, the vaporized substances diffused in the rare gas are supersaturated resulting in a smoke of fine particles of the material congealing as snow or fog. The gas vaporizing method is a fine particle generation method. Though the method has a variety of applications, the material vapor flow is disturbed by gravitational convection on Earth. The inability to elucidate the fine particle generation mechanism results in an obstruction to improving the method to mass production levels. As no convection occurs in microgravity in space, the fine particle generation mechanism influenced only by diffusion can be investigated. Investigators expect that excellent particles with homogeneous diameter distribution can be obtained. Experiment data and facts will assist in improving efficiency, quality, and scale or production processes including element processes such as vaporization, diffusion, and condensation. The objective of this experiment is to obtain important information related to the mechanism of particle formation in the gas atmosphere (smoke particles) and the production of submicron powders of extremely uniform size.

  2. Metal-catalyzed growth of In2O3 nanotowers using thermal evaporation and oxidation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Liu; Shihua, Huang; Lü, He

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale In2O3 nanotowers with different cross sections were synthesized by a thermal evaporation and oxidation technique using metal as the catalyst. The morphologies and structural characterizations of In2O3 nanotowers are dependent on growth processes, such as different metal (Au, Ag or Sn) catalysts, the relative position of the substrate and evaporation source, growth temperature, gas flow rate, and growth time. In2O3 nanotowers cannot be observed using Sn as the catalyst, which indicates that metal liquid droplets play an important role in the initial stages of the growth of In2O3 nanotowers. The formation of an In2O3 nanotower is attributed to the competitive growth model between a lateral growth controlled by vapor-solid mechanism and an axial vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism mediated by metal liquid nanodroplets. The synthesized In2O3 nanostructures with novel tower-shaped morphology may have potential applications in optoelectronic devices and gas sensors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61076055), the Open Project Program of Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory) of Fudan University (No. KF2015_02), the Zhejiang Provincial Science and Technology Key Innovation Team (No. 2011R50012), and the Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory (No. 2013E10022).

  3. Shocked and Scorched - Free-Floating Evaporating Gas Globules and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Morris, Mark R.; Claussen, Mark J.

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars have a strong feedback effect on their environment, via their winds, UV radiation, and ultimately, supernova blast waves, all of which can alter the likelihood for the formation of stars in nearby clouds and limit the accretion process of nearby protostars. Free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules, or frEGGs, are a newly recognized class of stellar nurseries embedded within the giant HII regions found in massive star-formation region (MSFRs). We recently discovered the prototype frEGG in the Cygnus MSFR with HST. Further investigation using the Spitzer and Herschel archives have revealed a much larger number (>50) in Cygnus and other MSFRs. Our molecular-line observations of these show the presence of dense clouds with total masses of cool molecular gas exceeding 0.5 to a few Msun associated with these objects, thereby disproving the initial hypothesis based on their morphology that these have an origin similar to the proplyds (cometary-shaped photoevaporating protoplanetary disks) found in Orion. We report the results of our molecular-line studies and detailed high-resolution optical (with HST) or near-IR (with AO at the Keck Observatory) imaging of a few frEGGs in Cygnus, Carina and the W5 MSFRs. The images show the presence of young stars with associated outflow cavities and/or jets in the heads of the tadpole-shaped frEGGs. These results support our hypothesis that frEGGs are density concentrations originating in giant molecular clouds, that, when subject to the compression by the strong winds and ionization from massive stars in these MSFRs, become active star-forming cores. In summary, by virtue of their distinct, isolated morphologies, frEGGs offer us a clean probe of triggered star formation on small scales in the vicinity of massive stars.

  4. Full evaporation headspace gas chromatography for sensitive determination of high boiling point volatile organic compounds in low boiling matrices.

    PubMed

    Mana Kialengila, Didi; Wolfs, Kris; Bugalama, John; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2013-11-01

    Determination of volatile organic components (VOC's) is often done by static headspace gas chromatography as this technique is very robust and combines easy sample preparation with good selectivity and low detection limits. This technique is used nowadays in different applications which have in common that they have a dirty matrix which would be problematic in direct injection approaches. Headspace by nature favors the most volatile compounds, avoiding the less volatile to reach the injector and column. As a consequence, determination of a high boiling solvent in a lower boiling matrix becomes challenging. Determination of VOCs like: xylenes, cumene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), benzyl alcohol (BA) and anisole in water or water soluble products are an interesting example of the arising problems. In this work, a headspace variant called full evaporation technique is worked out and validated for the mentioned solvents. Detection limits below 0.1 μg/vial are reached with RSD values below 10%. Mean recovery values ranged from 92.5 to 110%. The optimized method was applied to determine residual DMSO in a water based cell culture and DMSO and DMA in tetracycline hydrochloride (a water soluble sample).

  5. Evaporative thinning: a facile synthesis method for high quality ultrathin layers of 2D crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Kai; Cain, Jeffrey D; Peng, Lintao; Hao, Shiqiang; Chasapis, Thomas; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Wolverton, Christopher; Grayson, Matthew; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2014-10-28

    The palette of two-dimensional materials has expanded beyond graphene in recent years to include the chalcogenides among other systems. However, there is a considerable paucity of methods for controlled synthesis of mono- and/or few-layer two-dimensional materials with desirable quality, reproducibility, and generality. Here we show a facile top-down synthesis approach for ultrathin layers of 2D materials down to monolayer. Our method is based on controlled evaporative thinning of initially large sheets, as deposited by vapor mass-transport. Rather than optimizing conditions for monolayer deposition, our approach makes use of selective evaporation of thick sheets to control the eventual thickness, down to a monolayer, a process which appears to be self-stopping. As a result, 2D sheets with high yield, high reproducibility, and excellent quality can be generated with large (>10 μm) and thin (∼ 1-2 nm) dimensions. Evaporative thinning promises to greatly reduce the difficulty involved in isolating large, mono- and few-layers of 2D materials for subsequent studies.

  6. Quantifying Evaporation and Evaluating Runoff Estimation Methods in a Permeable Pavement System - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies on quantifying evaporation in permeable pavement systems are limited to few laboratory studies that used a scale to weigh evaporative losses and a field application with a tunnel-evaporation gauge. A primary objective of this research was to quantify evaporation for a la...

  7. Shock wave induced evaporation of water droplets in a gas-droplet mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, H. W. J.; Cleijne, J. W.; Smolders, H. J.; van Dongen, M. E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for the droplet evaporation process induced by a shock wave propagating in a fog. The model is based on the existence of a quasi-steady wet bulb state of the droplets during evaporation. It is shown that for moderate shock strength, Ma = less than 2, and droplet radii in the range of 1-5 microns, the major part of the evaporation process is governed by a balance between heat conduction and vapor diffusion. The formation of a fog by means of an unsteady adiabatic expansion of humid nitrogen is described. Experimental results of shock induced evaporation are shown for shock Mach numbers from 1.2 to 2.1, droplet mass fraction of 0.005, and initial droplet radii of 1-1.4 microns. The expected linear relation between droplet radius squared and time during evaporation is observed. Characteristic evaporation times appear to be strongly dependent on shock strength. A variation of about two decades, predicted by theory, was experimentally observed for the Mach number range studied.

  8. Double-layered target and identification method of individual target correlated with evaporation residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, D.; Morimoto, K.

    2015-08-01

    A double-layered target system and an identification method (target ID) for individual targets mounted on a rotating wheel using correlation with evaporation residues were newly developed for the study of superheavy elements (SHE). The target system can be used in three modes: conventional single-layered mode, double-layered mode, and energy-degrader mode. The target ID method can be utilized for masking a target, measuring an excitation function without changing the beam energy from the accelerator, and searching for SHE nuclides using multiple targets during a single irradiation.

  9. CO (J = 1-0) Observation of the cD Galaxy of AWM 7: Constraints on the Evaporation of Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Tosaki, Tomoka; Nakamichi, Akika; Kuno, Nario

    2000-04-01

    We have searched for molecular gas in the cD galaxy of a poor cluster of galaxies, AWM 7, using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We did not detect CO emission in the galaxy. Our limit of molecular gas in the inner 7.5 kpc is M_H_2< 4times 108 MO . We estimate the total mass of molecular gas left in the cD galaxy when the gas deposited by a cooling flow once becomes molecular gas and the molecular gas is continuously evaporated by the ambient hot gas. The observational limit of molecular gas requires f>~ 10-3, where f is the ratio of the heat conduction rate to that of Spitzer. However, this contradicts recent X-ray observations showing f<10-5. Thus, the non-detection of CO cannot be explained by evaporation, and most of the cooled gas predicted by a cooling flow model may not change into molecular gas in the cD galaxy. Moreover, we estimate the evaporation time of molecular clouds brought to a cD galaxy through the capture of gas-rich galaxies and find that these clouds should not be evaporated if f<~ 10-3-10-4. Therefore, the non-detection of CO in a cD galaxy could constrain the total mass of the molecular clouds brought into it.

  10. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL⁻¹ to μg mL⁻¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 μL of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L⁻¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL⁻¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 μg mL⁻¹ (RSD<7.4%, n=6). For a Japanese green tea sample, 48 compounds including 19 potent odorants were positively identified from only 100 μL of sample. Heat-induced artifact formation for potent odorants was also examined and the proposed method does not affect the additional formation of thermally generated compounds. Eighteen compounds including 12 potent odorants (e.g. coumarin, furaneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL⁻¹ (RSD<10%, n=6).

  11. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL⁻¹ to μg mL⁻¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 μL of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L⁻¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL⁻¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 μg mL⁻¹ (RSD<7.4%, n=6). For a Japanese green tea sample, 48 compounds including 19 potent odorants were positively identified from only 100 μL of sample. Heat-induced artifact formation for potent odorants was also examined and the proposed method does not affect the additional formation of thermally generated compounds. Eighteen compounds including 12 potent odorants (e.g. coumarin, furaneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL⁻¹ (RSD<10%, n=6). PMID:22542289

  12. Method of processing coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, A.

    1986-09-02

    A method is described of processing a gas containing a compound of sulfur and hydrocarbon material, comprising a first step of directing the gas through a fixed bed of hot lime material whose temperature is maintained above the cracking temperature of the hydrocarbon material to simultaneously (i) react the compound of sulfur with the hot lime to produce calcium sulfide in the fixed bed and (ii) crack the hydrocarbon material while impregnating the calcium sulfide with carbon in the same fixed bed, and a second step of reacting the carbon impregnated calcium sulfide with a gas containing oxygen in order to (i) convert the calcium sulfide back to hot lime through regeneration and (ii) produce elemental sulfur.

  13. Method and apparatus for fuel gas moisturization and heating

    DOEpatents

    Ranasinghe, Jatila; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    Fuel gas is saturated with water heated with a heat recovery steam generator heat source. The heat source is preferably a water heating section downstream of the lower pressure evaporator to provide better temperature matching between the hot and cold heat exchange streams in that portion of the heat recovery steam generator. The increased gas mass flow due to the addition of moisture results in increased power output from the gas and steam turbines. Fuel gas saturation is followed by superheating the fuel, preferably with bottom cycle heat sources, resulting in a larger thermal efficiency gain compared to current fuel heating methods. There is a gain in power output compared to no fuel heating, even when heating the fuel to above the LP steam temperature.

  14. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  15. CuO SnO2 element as hydrogen sulfide gas sensor prepared by a sequential electron beam evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Khanna, Atul; Tripathi, Pragya; Nandedkar, R. V.; Potdar, S. R.; Chaudhari, S. M.; Bhatti, S. S.

    2003-10-01

    CuO-SnO2 thin film elements were prepared by sequential evaporation of Sn and Cu metals in high vacuum conditions by an electron beam evaporation technique and subsequent oxidation of the metallic bilayer under flowing oxygen conditions. The electrical properties of the thin film element were studied by a two probe method in the temperature range 110-220°C. On exposing the CuO-SnO2 thin films to a H2S-air mixture, it is observed that the resistance decreases by several thousand times. The H2S sensitivity of the thin film element was measured at three sensor operating temperatures. While the sensitivity decreased with an increase in temperature, both the response and recovery times improved with increasing temperature. The sensor element was selective to H2S gas and did not show any sensitivity to hydrogen and ethanol. The extraordinarily high sensitivity to H2S gas is attributed to the outstanding promoter action of CuO along with the unique porous structure of the thin film element as revealed by scanning electron microscopy studies.

  16. Mucosal fluid evaporation is not the method of heat dissipation from fourth-degree laryngopharyngeal burns

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiang-bo; Zhang, Guo-an; Qiu, Yu-xuan; Wen, Chun-quan; Fu, Tai-ran

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to explore whether mucosal fluid evaporation represents a method of heat dissipation from thermal air inhalation injury and to assess laryngopharyngeal tissue damage according to heat quantity changes of dry air and vapour. Fifteen adult male beagles were divided into five groups to inhale heated air or vapour for 10 min as follows: control group (ordinary air), group I (91–110 °C heated air), group II (148–175 °C heated air), group III (209–227 °C heated air), and group IV (96 °C saturated vapour). The heat quantity changes of the dry air and vapour were calculated via thermodynamic formulas. The macroscopic and histological features of the laryngopharynxes were examined and assessed by various tissue damage grading systems. Group IV exhibited the most serious laryngopharyngeal damage, including cilia exfoliation, submucosal thrombosis, glandular atrophy, and chondrocyte degeneration, which is indicative of fourth-degree injury. The quality, heat quantity, and proportional reduction of heat quantity of vapour in group IV were all higher than those in the other groups. Furthermore, we found that mucosal fluid evaporation is not the method of heat dissipation from thermal air inhalation injury used by the airways. Laryngopharyngeal tissue damage depends chiefly on the heat quantity of vapour in the air. PMID:27349685

  17. The mechanism of PLA microparticle formation by water-in-oil-in-water solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Chen, J L; Chiang, C H; Yeh, M K

    2002-01-01

    Microparticles containing ovalbumin as a model protein drug were prepared using poly(L-lactide; PLA) with a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion/solvent evaporation technique. The dispersed phase was PLA dissolved in dichloromethane (DCM), and the continuous phase was water-containing polyvinyl pyrolidone (PVP) as stabilizer with sodium chloride. Microparticle characteristics, loading efficiencies, protein distribution in microparticles, and in-vitro release properties were investigated. The OVA leaking into the continuous phase during the formation of microparticle by DCM evaporation was also evaluated. Results show that OVA was successfully entrapped in the microparticles with trapping efficiencies up to 72%, loading level 8.7% w/v, and particle size 14 microm. The semi-solid suspension changes to a solid particle happened during a 10-min period. Total protein-leaking amount was reduced after addition of NaCl in the continuous aqueous phase, which resulted from reducing the solidification time and protein-leaking rate. Using 5% w/v NaCl in the continuous phase resulted in higher loading content (87.2 +/- 1.0 microg/mg), and loading efficiency (72.2%), which resulted from more protein in the deeper layer (50.2 +/- 2.3 microg/mg) and higher microparticle yield (75.2%) than without NaCl (loading content: 74.0 +/- 1.0 microg/mg; loading efficiency 51.8%; deeper layer content: 18.3 +/- 3.5 microg/mg; yield: 63.6%). These results constitute a step forward in the improvement of existing technology in controlling protein encapsulation and delivery from microparticles prepared by the multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method. PMID:12022499

  18. Reviving the Bowen Ratio method for Actual Evaporation with Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxemburg, W. M. J.; Euser, T.; Everson, C. S.; Mengistu, M. G.; Clulow, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    We have used the technique of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with a fiber optic cable to determine actual evaporation over land. The results were compared with measurements using a surface layer scintilometer, surface renewal and eddy covariance techniques. Dry and wetted sections of a fiber optic cable were suspended from a six meter high tower in a sugar beet trial in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. From the principle of a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapor pressure and temperature at 0.20 m intervals of a vertical column of air above the field could be derived. Subsequently it allowed accurate determination of the ratio of sensible and latent heat, i.e. the Bowen ratio over time and in the vertical. Using measurements of the net radiation, soil heat flux and the Bowen ratio sensible heat flux, the actual evaporation could be determined as the residual of the shortened energy balance equation. The advantage of the DTS method over the traditional Bowen ratio method is that one and the same sensor (the fiber optic cable) is used, with sufficient accuracy to discriminate small differences in temperature and vapor pressure respectively, hence giving numerous gradient measurements over the vertical. The traditional Bowen ratio method relies on only a few sensors that require careful calibration to detect the real differences of temperature and vapor pressure. Comparing the improved method with the traditional Bowen Ratio method, shows that the improved method gives more stable and constant results than the standard method. The DTS data were reliable, provided that water blown by strong wind from the wetted cable does not affect the temperature of air at the location of the dry cable. Under these conditions the vertical air temperature was not representative for the air temperature over the fetch of the crop. The experiments were carried out in South Africa, in November 2011 (summer) under varying radiation conditions. In this way it was

  19. Verifying the distributed temperature sensing Bowen ratio method for measuring evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Willem; Cisneros Vaca, César; Ucer, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation is an important process in the hydrological cycle, therefore measuring evaporation accurately is essential for water resource management, hydrological management and climate change models. Current techniques to measure evaporation, like eddy covariance systems, scintillometers, or lysimeters, have their limitations and therefore cannot always be used to estimate evaporation correctly. Also the conventional Bowen ratio surface energy balance method has as drawback that two sensors are used, which results in large measuring errors. In Euser et al. (2014) a new method was introduced, the DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS), that overcomes this drawback. It uses a distributed temperature sensing technique (DTS) whereby a fibre optic cable is placed vertically, going up and down along a measurement tower. One stretch of the cable is dry, the other wrapped with cloth and kept wet, akin to a psychrometer. Using this, the wet and dry bulb temperatures are determined every 12.5 cm over the height, from which the Bowen ratio can be determined. As radiation and wind have an effect on the cooling and heating of the cable's sheath as well, the DTS cables do not necessarily always measure dry and wet bulb temperature of the air accurately. In this study the accuracy in representing the dry and wet bulb temperatures of the cable are verified, and evaporation observations of the BR-DTS method are compared to Eddy Covariance (EC) measurements. Two ways to correct for errors due to wind and solar radiation warming up the DTS cables are presented: one for the dry cable and one for the wet cable. The measurements were carried out in a pine forest near Garderen (The Netherlands), along a 46-meter tall scaffold tower (15 meters above the canopy). Both the wet (Twet) and dry (Tdry) temperature of the DTS cable were compared to temperature and humidity (from which Twet is derived) observations from sensors placed along the height of the tower. Underneath the canopy, where there was

  20. Deposition of CuInSe2 by the hybrid sputtering and evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockett, A.; Agarwal, A.; Yang, L. Chung; Banda, E.; Kenshole, G.

    CuInSe2 thin films deposited by a hybrid process combining magnetron sputtering of Cu and In with evaporation of Se have been analyzed and solar cells have been fabricated. The hybrid technique is shown to produce CuInSe2 films of device quality. Heterojunction Mo/CuInSe2/CdS/ITO/Ni devices with photovoltaic conversion efficiencies as high as 7.7 percent have been tested. Device characteristics for the best device include Voc = 0.385 V, Jsc = 32.6 mA, and a fill factor of 61.3 percent. The device required an air anneal to achieve full efficiency. Results of microstructural analyses using transmission electron microscopy are reported. The results assist in determining what limits the performance of these devices. As-deposited CuInSe2 exhibits no measurable differences as compared with CuInSe2 produced by three-source evaporation. All films contain microtwins, stacking faults, and voids. No evidence was found for second phases in material with metal atom fractions as much as 4 percent off stoichiometry. Defect ordering produces features in the diffraction patterns of single-phase material at positions not normally allowed for the chalcopyrite structure. These measurements are compared with results for single crystals grown with the vertical Bridgeman method by Tomlinson (1986). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results characterizing the valence band as a function of film composition are also presented.

  1. Novel in situ method for locating virtual source in high-rate electron-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. S.

    1994-07-01

    The concept of virtual source simplifies calculation of thickness distribution on extended substrates in high rate vacuum coating employing electron-beam heating. The height of the point (virtual source), from which vapor can be assumed to emanate in accordance with Knudsen's cosine law, to yield the experimentally obtained thickness distribution, is calculated and this establishes the position of virtual source. Such as post facto determination is cumbersome as it is valid for the prescribed material evaporating at a certain rate in a specified geometry. A change in any of these entails a fresh measurement. Experimenters who use a large number of materials and deposit at different rates therefore have to carry out a number of trials before they can locate the virtual source at the desired deposition parameters. An in situ method for obtaining virtual source position can go a long way in reducing the labor of these experiments. A novel in situ method is described to locate the virtual source.

  2. One-step Double-layer Thermal Evaporation Method for Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Y. Y.; Yong, T. K.; Ong, D. S.; Tou, T. Y.

    2011-03-01

    A new one-step double-layer thermal evaporation method was used to fabricate organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with device structure of: ITO (anode)/N,N_-diphenyl-N,N_-bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1_-diphenyl-4,4_-diamine (TPD) /tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum(3) (Alq3)/Al (cathode). These OLEDs were fabricated in cleanroom on the ITO-coated glass with a sheet resistivity of 20Ω/sq and an optical transmittance of 90%. The I-V and brightness characteristic showed that the new method could produce better performance achieving lower turn-on voltage (-2V), higher peak current efficiency (+29%) and higher brightness (+36%).

  3. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  4. Method for hot gas conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Paisley, Mark A.

    1996-02-27

    A method for cracking and shifting a synthesis gas by the steps of providing a catalyst consisting essentially of alumina in a reaction zone; contacting the catalyst with a substantially oxygen free mixture of gases comprising water vapor and hydrocarbons having one or more carbon atoms, at a temperature between about 530.degree. C. (1000.degree. F.) to about 980.degree. C. (1800.degree. F.); and whereby the hydrocarbons are cracked to form hydrogen, carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide and the hydrogen content of the mixture increases with a corresponding decrease in carbon monoxide, and carbon formation is substantially eliminated.

  5. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  6. Kinetic boundary layers in gas mixtures: Systems described by nonlinearly coupled kinetic and hydrodynamic equations and applications to droplet condensation and evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors consider a mixture of heavy vapor molecules and a light carrier gas surrounding a liquid droplet. The vapor is described by a variant of the Klein-Kramers equation; the gas is described by the Navier-Stokes equations; the droplet acts as a heat source due to the released heat of condensation. The exchange of momentum and energy between the constituents of the mixture is taken into account by force terms in the kinetic equation and source terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. These are chosen to obtain maximal agreement with the irreversible thermodynamics of a gas mixture. The structure of the kinetic boundary layer around the sphere is determined from the self-consistent solution of this set of coupled equations with appropriate boundary conditions at the surface of the sphere. The kinetic equation is rewritten as a set of coupled moment equations. A complete set of solutions of these moment equations is constructed by numerical integration inward from the region far away from the droplet, where the background inhomogeneities are small. A technique developed earlier is used to deal with the numerical instability of the moment equations. The solutions obtained for given temperature and pressure profiles in the gas are then combined linearly such that they obey the boundary conditions at the droplet surface; from this solution source terms for the Navier-Stokes equation of the gas are constructed and used to determine improved temperature and pressure profiles for the background gas. For not too large temperature differneces between the droplet and the gas at infinity, self-consistency is reached after a few iterations. The method is applied to the condensation of droplets from a supersaturated vapor as well as to strong evaporation of droplets under the influence of an external heat source, where corrections of up to 40% are obtained.

  7. Concerning the Velocity of Evaporation of Small Droplets in a Gas Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, N.

    1947-01-01

    The evaporation velocity of liquid droplets under various conditions is theoretically calculated and a number of factors are investigated which are neglected in carrying out the fundamental equation of Maxwell. It is shown that the effect of these factors at the small drop sizes and the small weight concentrations ordinarily occurring in fog can be calculated by simple corrections. The evaporation process can be regarded as quasi-stationary in most cases. The question at hand, and also the equivalent question of the velocity of growth of droplets in a supersaturated atmosphere, is highly significant in meteorology and for certain industrial purposes. Since the literature concerning this is very insufficient and many important aspects either are not considered at all or are reported incorrectly, it seems that a short discussion is not superfluous. A special consideration will be given to the various assumptions and neglections that are necessary in deriving the fundamental equation of Maxwell. The experimental work available, which is very insufficient and in part poorly dependable, can be used as an accurate check on the theory only in very few cases.

  8. Evaluation of the energy budget method of determining evaporation at Williams Lake, Minnesota, using alternative instrumentation and study approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Sturrock, A.M.; Winter, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Best estimates of evaporation were determined by the energy budget method using optimum sensors and optimum placement of sensors. For most of the data substitutions that affected the Bowen ratio, new values of evaporation differed little from best estimates. The three data substitution methods that caused the largest deviations from the best evaporation estimates were (1) using changes in the daily average surface water temperature as an indicator of the lake heat storage term, (2) using shortwave radiation, air temperature, and atmospheric vapor pressure data from a site 110 km away, and (3) using an analog surface water temperature probe. Recalculations based on these data substitutions resulted in differences from the best estimates as much as 89%, 21% and 10%, respectively. The data substitution method that provided evaporation values that most closely matched the best estimates was measurement of the lake heat storage term at one location in the lake, rather than at 16 locations. Evaporation values resulting from this substitution method usually were within 2% of the best estimates. -from Authors

  9. Alternative Methods for the Reduction of Evaporation: Practical Exercises for the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schouten, Peter; Putland, Sam; Lemckert, Charles J.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Downs, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Across the world, freshwater is valued as the most critically important natural resource, as it is required to sustain the cycle of life. Evaporation is one of the primary environmental processes that can reduce the amount of quality water available for use in industrial, agricultural and household applications. The effect of evaporation becomes…

  10. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  11. Synthesis gas method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2015-11-06

    A method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas product having one or more oxygen transport membrane elements thermally coupled to one or more catalytic reactors such that heat generated from the oxygen transport membrane element supplies endothermic heating requirements for steam methane reforming reactions occurring within the catalytic reactor through radiation and convention heat transfer. A hydrogen containing stream containing no more than 20 percent methane is combusted within the oxygen transport membrane element to produce the heat and a heated combustion product stream. The heated combustion product stream is combined with a reactant stream to form a combined stream that is subjected to the reforming within the catalytic reactor. The apparatus may include modules in which tubular membrane elements surround a central reactor tube.

  12. Synthesis gas method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2013-01-08

    A method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas product having one or more oxygen transport membrane elements thermally coupled to one or more catalytic reactors such that heat generated from the oxygen transport membrane element supplies endothermic heating requirements for steam methane reforming reactions occurring within the catalytic reactor through radiation and convention heat transfer. A hydrogen containing stream containing no more than 20 percent methane is combusted within the oxygen transport membrane element to produce the heat and a heated combustion product stream. The heated combustion product stream is combined with a reactant stream to form a combined stream that is subjected to the reforming within the catalytic reactor. The apparatus may include modules in which tubular membrane elements surround a central reactor tube.

  13. A Study for Health Hazard Evaluation of Methylene Chloride Evaporated from the Tear Gas Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun-Kyo; Yi, Gwang-Yong; Chung, Kwang-Jae; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, In-Seop

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the health hazard of those exposed to methylene chloride by assessing its atmospheric concentration when a tear gas mixture was aerially dispersed. The concentration of methylene chloride ranged from 311.1-980.3 ppm (geometric mean, 555.8 ppm), 30 seconds after the dispersion started. However, the concentration fell rapidly to below 10 ppm after dispersion was completed. The concentration during the dispersion did not surpass the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 'immediately dangerous to life or health' value of 2,300 ppm, but did exceed the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists excursion limit of 250 ppm. Since methylene chloride is highly volatile (vapor pressure, 349 mmHg at 20℃), the postdispersion atmospheric concentration can rise instantaneously. Moreover, the o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile formulation of tear gas (CS gas) is an acute upper respiratory tract irritant. Therefore, tear gas mixtures should be handled with delicate care. PMID:22953168

  14. Synthesis and optical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles grown on Sn-coated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somvanshi, Divya; Jit, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have been grown on n type silicon substrate using tin (Sn) metal as seed layer by a low cost thermal evaporation method. SEM images show that the ZnO nanoparticles have been uniformely grown on the whole substrate surface relatively perpendicular to the substrate. The Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum consists of strong UV emission at wavelength of 355 nm along with a broad near band edge (NBE) emission covering a wide range of wavelength from 370 to 550 nm. This broadening region exhibits blue, violet and green emission due to the presence of native defects such as zinc interstitial (Zni), oxygen vacancy (VO) and oxygen interstitial (Oi) in the band gap of ZnO. Raman spectroscopy shows the existence of E2 mode at 437 cm-1 which confirms the pure wurtzite hexagonal phase of ZnO. The optical and structural properties of ZnO nanoparticles could be explored for blue-violet light emitting diodes (LEDs) and gas sensing applications.

  15. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    PubMed

    Leitzinger, M; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Lammer, H; Wuchterl, G; Penz, T; Guarcello, M G; Micela, G; Khodachenko, M L; Weingrill, J; Hanslmeier, A; Biernat, H K; Schneider, J

    2011-10-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a "Hot Neptune" nor a "Hot Uranus"-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects. PMID:21969736

  16. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    PubMed Central

    Leitzinger, M.; Odert, P.; Kulikov, Yu.N.; Lammer, H.; Wuchterl, G.; Penz, T.; Guarcello, M.G.; Micela, G.; Khodachenko, M.L.; Weingrill, J.; Hanslmeier, A.; Biernat, H.K.; Schneider, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a “Hot Neptune” nor a “Hot Uranus”-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects. PMID:21969736

  17. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    PubMed

    Leitzinger, M; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Lammer, H; Wuchterl, G; Penz, T; Guarcello, M G; Micela, G; Khodachenko, M L; Weingrill, J; Hanslmeier, A; Biernat, H K; Schneider, J

    2011-10-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a "Hot Neptune" nor a "Hot Uranus"-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects.

  18. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  19. A comparison of short-term measurements of lake evaporation using eddy correlation and energy budget methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stannard, D.I.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    1991-01-01

    Concurrent short-term measurements of evaporation from a shallow lake, using eddy correlation and energy budget methods, indicate that sensible and latent heat flux between lake and atmosphere, and energy storage in the lake, may vary considerably across the lake. Measuring net radiation with a net radiometer on the lake appeared to be more accurate than measuring incoming radiation nearby and modeling outgoing radiation. Short-term agreement between the two evaporation measurements was obtained by using an energy storage term that was weighted to account for the area-of-influence of the eddy correlation sensors. Relatively short bursts of evaporation were indicated by the eddy correlation sensors shortly after midnight on two of three occasions. ?? 1991.

  20. Cellular uptake of beta-carotene from protein stabilized solid lipid nano-particles prepared by homogenization-evaporation method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a homogenization-evaporation method, beta-carotene (BC) loaded nano-particles were prepared with different ratios of food-grade sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), or soy protein isolate (SPI) to BC and evaluated for their physiochemical stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and cel...

  1. Evaporation of Binary Sessile Drops: Infrared and Acoustic Methods To Track Alcohol Concentration at the Interface and on the Surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Toubal, Malika; Carlier, Julien; Harmand, Souad; Nongaillard, Bertrand; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2016-09-27

    Evaporation of droplets of three pure liquids (water, 1-butanol, and ethanol) and four binary solutions (5 wt % 1-butanol-water-based solution and 5, 25, and 50 wt % ethanol-water-based solutions) deposited on hydrophobic silicon was investigated. A drop shape analyzer was used to measure the contact angle, diameter, and volume of the droplets. An infrared camera was used for infrared thermal mapping of the droplet's surface. An acoustic high-frequency echography technique was, for the first time, applied to track the alcohol concentration in a binary-solution droplet. Evaporation of pure alcohol droplets was executed at different values of relative humidity (RH), among which the behavior of pure ethanol evaporation was notably influenced by the ambient humidity as a result of high hygrometry. Evaporation of droplets of water and binary solutions was performed at a temperature of 22 °C and a mean humidity of approximately 50%. The exhaustion times of alcohol in the droplets estimated by the acoustic method and the visual method were similar for the water-1-butanol mixture; however, the time estimated by the acoustic method was longer when compared with that estimated by the visual method for the water-ethanol mixture due to the residual ethanol at the bottom of the droplet. PMID:27506399

  2. Evaporation of Binary Sessile Drops: Infrared and Acoustic Methods To Track Alcohol Concentration at the Interface and on the Surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Toubal, Malika; Carlier, Julien; Harmand, Souad; Nongaillard, Bertrand; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2016-09-27

    Evaporation of droplets of three pure liquids (water, 1-butanol, and ethanol) and four binary solutions (5 wt % 1-butanol-water-based solution and 5, 25, and 50 wt % ethanol-water-based solutions) deposited on hydrophobic silicon was investigated. A drop shape analyzer was used to measure the contact angle, diameter, and volume of the droplets. An infrared camera was used for infrared thermal mapping of the droplet's surface. An acoustic high-frequency echography technique was, for the first time, applied to track the alcohol concentration in a binary-solution droplet. Evaporation of pure alcohol droplets was executed at different values of relative humidity (RH), among which the behavior of pure ethanol evaporation was notably influenced by the ambient humidity as a result of high hygrometry. Evaporation of droplets of water and binary solutions was performed at a temperature of 22 °C and a mean humidity of approximately 50%. The exhaustion times of alcohol in the droplets estimated by the acoustic method and the visual method were similar for the water-1-butanol mixture; however, the time estimated by the acoustic method was longer when compared with that estimated by the visual method for the water-ethanol mixture due to the residual ethanol at the bottom of the droplet.

  3. Temperature Effect on Structural and Electronic Properties of Zinc Oxide Nanowires Synthesized by Carbothermal Evaporation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvatinia, Mohammad; Imani, Roghayeh

    2012-10-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanowires were synthesized on the Si substrates by carbothermal evaporation of ZnO + C at elevated temperatures. The syntheses were carried out at different temperatures from 750°C to 950°C. Characterizations of layers were performed to study the effect of synthesis temperature on morphology, crystal structure and electrical behavior of fabricated nanowires. The physical characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) methods. SEM micrograph of layers revealed that the samples grown at the lower temperatures have better quality. However, below 800°C the growth of nanowires was stopped. So the 800°C was concluded to be the optimum temperature for growth of high quality nanowires by proposed system. By recording the conductivity variations as a function of inverse temperature, 1/T, the semiconductor property of the samples was verified. It is demonstrated that two distinct factors affect the electrical conductivity of layers, which are due to the bulk and grain boundary. We experimentally proved that the activation energy corresponding to grain boundary is higher than that of the bulk. As another result we have established for the first time that by increasing synthesis temperatures, both activation energies shift to higher values.

  4. Biocompatible and Antibacterial SnO2 Nanowire Films Synthesized by E-Beam Evaporation Method.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R G S V; Phani, A R; Rao, K N; Kumar, R Rakesh; Prasad, S; Prabhakara, G; Sheeja, M S; Salins, C P; Endrino, J L; Raju, D B

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the biocompatibility and antibacterial activities of novel SnO2 nanowire coatings prepared by electron-beam (E-Beam) evaporation process at low temperatures were studied. The nanowire coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity and cell proliferation assays suggested that the SnO2 nanowire coatings were nontoxic and promoted the proliferation of C2C12 and L929 cells (> 90% viability). Cellular activities, cell adhesion, and lactate dehydrogenase activities were consistent with the superior biocompatibility of the nanowire materials. Notably, the nanowire coating showed potent antibacterial activity against six different bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of the SnO2 material was attributed to the photocatalytic nature of SnO2. The antibacterial activity and biocompatibility of the newly developed SnO2 nanowire coatings may enable their use as coating materials for biomedical implants. PMID:26353584

  5. FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS. Task 45. Final topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ames A. Grisanti; James A. Sorensen

    1999-05-01

    TASK 45 FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/ EVAPORATION (FTE ) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS coupling evaporation with freezing. This offers operators a year- round method for treating produced water. Treating water with the FTE process reduces the volume of water to be disposed of as well as purifying the water to a level acceptable for watering livestock and agricultural lands. This process is currently used at two evaporation facilities, one in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and one in the Green River Basin in Wyoming. the freezing point below that of pure water. When such a solution is cooled below 32EF, relatively pure ice crystals form, along with an unfrozen brine solution that contains elevated concentrations of salts. Because of the brine's high concentration of these constituents, its density is greater than that of the ice, and the purified ice and brine are easily separated. Coupling the natural processes of freezing and evaporation makes the FTE process a more cost- effective and efficient method for the treatment and disposal of produced water and allows for year-round operation of an FTE facility. drops below 32 F, produced water is automatically pumped from a holding pond and sprayed onto a freezing pad. The freezing pad consists of an elevated framework of piping with regularly placed, upright, extendable spray heads similar to those used to irrigate lawns. As the spray freezes, an ice pile forms over the elevated framework of pipes, and the brine, with an elevated constituent concentration, drains from the ice pile. The high-salinity brine, identified by its high electrical conductivity, is separated using automatic valves and pumped to a pond where it can subsequently be disposed of by conventional methods. As the ice pile increases in height, the sprayers are extended. When the ice on the freezing pad melts, the relatively pure water is pumped from the freezing pad and discharged or stored for later use . No new

  6. Alternative methods for the reduction of evaporation: practical exercises for the science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, Peter; Putland, Sam; Lemckert, Charles J.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Downs, Nathan

    2012-03-01

    Across the world, freshwater is valued as the most critically important natural resource, as it is required to sustain the cycle of life. Evaporation is one of the primary environmental processes that can reduce the amount of quality water available for use in industrial, agricultural and household applications. The effect of evaporation becomes intensified especially during conditions of drought, particularly in traditionally arid and semi-arid regions, such as those seen in a number of countries over the past ten years. In order to safeguard against the influence of droughts and to save water from being lost to the evaporative process, numerous water saving mechanisms have been developed and tested over the past century. Two of the most successful and widely used mechanisms have included floating hard covers and chemical film monolayers. This article describes a laboratory based project developed for senior high school and first year university classes, which has been designed to introduce students to the concepts of evaporation, evaporation modelling and water loss mitigation. Specifically, these ideas are delivered by simulating the large scale deployment of both monolayers and floating hard covers on a small water tank under numerous user defined atmospheric and hydrodynamic conditions, including varying surface wind speeds and underwater bubble plumes set to changing flow rates.

  7. Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium

    DOEpatents

    Albin, David S.; Noufi, Rommel

    2015-06-09

    Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating a thin film device comprises: providing a semiconductor film comprising indium (In) and selenium (Se) upon a substrate; heating the substrate and the semiconductor film to a desired temperature; and performing a mass transport through vapor transport of a copper chloride vapor and se vapor to the semiconductor film within a reaction chamber.

  8. Time-dependent Marangoni-Bénard instability of an evaporating binary-liquid layer including gas transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, H.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dauby, P. C.

    2013-08-01

    We are here concerned with Bénard instabilities in a horizontal layer of a binary liquid, considering as a working example the case of an aqueous solution of ethanol with a mass fraction of 0.1. Both the solvent and the solute evaporate into air (the latter being insoluble in the liquid). The system is externally constrained by imposing fixed "ambient" pressure, humidity, and temperature values at a certain effective transfer distance above the liquid-gas interface, while the ambient temperature is also imposed at the impermeable rigid bottom of the liquid layer. Fully transient and horizontally homogeneous solutions for the reference state, resulting from an instantaneous exposure of the liquid layer to ambient air, are first calculated. Then, the linear stability of these solutions is studied using the frozen-time approach, leading to critical (monotonic marginal stability) curves in the parameter plane spanned by the liquid layer thickness and the elapsed time after initial contact. This is achieved for different ratios of the liquid and gas thicknesses, and in particular yields critical times after which instability sets in (for given thicknesses of both phases). Conversely, the analysis also predicts a critical thickness of the liquid layer below which no instability ever occurs. The nature of such critical thickness is explained in detail in terms of mass fraction profiles in both phases, as it indeed appears that the most important mechanism for instability onset is the solutal Marangoni one. Importantly, as compared to the result obtained previously under the quasi-steady assumption in the gas phase [H. Machrafi, A. Rednikov, P. Colinet, and P. C. Dauby, Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 192, 71 (2011)], 10.1140/epjst/e2011-01361-y, it is shown that relaxing this assumption may yield essentially lower values of the critical liquid thickness, especially for large gas-to-liquid thickness ratios. A good-working analytical model is developed for the description of such

  9. A rapid HPLC with evaporative light scattering method for quantification of forskolin in multi-herbal weight-loss solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Virgona, N; Taki, Y; Umegaki, K

    2010-05-01

    A rapid reverse-phase HPLC method with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) was developed for the determination of forskolin in weight loss multi-herbals products. The analysis was performed by water-acetonitrile gradient elution at a temperature of 40 degrees C and a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The evaporator tube temperature of ELSD was set at 35 degrees C, and with the nebulizing gas flow-rate (pressure) of 3.0 bar. The method was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision and limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ). Good linear relationships were obtained with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.9995. The average recovery of forskolin ranged from 99.4% to 100.4% with RSDs below 3%. The percent relative standard deviations (%RSD) of intra- and inter-day precision varied by less than 2.1%. LOD and LOQ were 0.95 microg/ml and 3.21 microg/ml, respectively. The validated ELSD method permits a shorter determination time without compromising accuracy and demonstrates that it can be used for quantification of forskolin incorporated in multi-herbal solid oral dosage forms. PMID:20503921

  10. A new method dealing with hawking effects of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Dai, X. )

    1992-06-28

    This paper reports that, both the location and the temperature of event horizons of evaporating black holes can be easily given if one proposes the Klein-Gordon equation approaches the standard form of wave equation near event horizons by using tortoise-type coordinates.

  11. Instrumentation for measuring lake and reservoir evaporation by the energy-budget and mass-transfer methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturrock, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumentation currently used by the U.S. Geological Survey in studies of lake and reservoir evaporation is described in this paper. This instrumentation is used for the measurement of solar and terrestrial energy necessary to apply the mass-transfer or energy budget methods. The energy budget requires a quantative determination of all form of energy entering or leaving the lake as well as determination of the change in storage of energy within the lake. (USGS)

  12. Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

    2014-12-02

    A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

  13. Insight into the molecular mechanism of water evaporation via the finite temperature string method

    PubMed Central

    Musolino, Nicholas; Trout, Bernhardt L.

    2013-01-01

    The process of water's evaporation at its liquid/air interface has proven challenging to study experimentally and, because it constitutes a rare event on molecular time scales, presents a challenge for computer simulations as well. In this work, we simulated water's evaporation using the classical extended simple point charge model water model, and identified a minimum free energy path for this process in terms of 10 descriptive order parameters. The measured free energy change was 7.4 kcal/mol at 298 K, in reasonable agreement with the experimental value of 6.3 kcal/mol, and the mean first-passage time was 1375 ns for a single molecule, corresponding to an evaporation coefficient of 0.25. In the observed minimum free energy process, the water molecule diffuses to the surface, and tends to rotate so that its dipole and one O–H bond are oriented outward as it crosses the Gibbs dividing surface. As the water molecule moves further outward through the interfacial region, its local density is higher than the time-averaged density, indicating a local solvation shell that protrudes from the interface. The water molecule loses donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds, and then, with its dipole nearly normal to the interface, stops donating its remaining hydrogen bond. At that point, when the final, accepted hydrogen bond is broken, the water molecule is free. We also analyzed which order parameters are most important in the process and in reactive trajectories, and found that the relative orientation of water molecules near the evaporating molecule, and the number of accepted hydrogen bonds, were important variables in reactive trajectories and in kinetic descriptions of the process. PMID:23574252

  14. Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-09-04

    A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

  15. Use of GC/MS and Microtome Techniques as Methods to Evaluate ODC Free Cleaner Diffusion and Evaporation in Insulation and Phenolic Case Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegert, L. L.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) many chlorinated solvents used in the aerospace industry are being phased out. Replacement of the ODC (ozone-depleting chemicals) with less volatile, non-ozone depleting cleaners has been extensively studied over the past seven years at Thiokol Propulsion, a Division of Cordant Technologies, Inc. The down selection of ODC replacement cleaners has been based on several factors including the diffusion evaporation of the cleaners in selected substrates. Methodologies were developed to evaluate the cleaner content in substrates. Methods of cutting thin slices of material (microtoming) were combined with GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy) analysis. Substrates evaluated in this study include potential solid rocket motor materials: ASNBR (asbestos-filled nitrile butadiene rubber) and CFEPDM (carbon-filled ethylene propylene dimonomer) insulation and glass (GCP), carbon (CCP) and silica (SCP) cloth phenolic substrates with fibers either parallel (0 deg) or perpendicular (90 deg) to the surface. Residue profiles indicate both cleaner and substrate composition affect the diffusion and subsequent evaporation of the cleaner from the substrate surface.

  16. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2012-12-25

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO2 nanocrystals doped with In2O3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  17. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2014-07-15

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals doped with In.sub.2O.sub.3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  18. GLIMM'S METHOD FOR GAS DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip

    1980-07-01

    We investigate Glimm's method, a method for constructing approximate solutions to systems of hyperbolic conservation laws in one space variable by sampling explicit wave solutions. It is extended to several space variables by operator splitting. We consider two functional problems. 1) We propose a highly accurate form of the sampling procedure, in one space variable, based on the van der Corput sampling sequence. We test the improved sampling procedure numerically in the case of inviscid compressible flow in one space dimension and find that it gives high resolution results both in the smooth parts of the solution, as well as the discontinuities. 2) We investigate the operator splitting procedure by means of which the multidimensional method is constructed. An 0(1) error stemming from the use of this procedure near shocks oblique to the spatial grid is analyzed numerically in the case of the equations for inviscid compressible flow in two space dimensions. We present a hybrid method which eliminates this error, consisting of Glimm's method, used in continuous parts of the flow, and the nonlinear Godunov's method, used in regions where large pressure jumps are generated. The resulting method is seen to be a substantial improvement over either of the component methods for multidimensional calculations.

  19. Glimm's method for gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, P.

    1982-03-01

    We investigate Glimm's method, a method for constructing approximate solutions to systems of hyperbolic conservation laws in one space variable by sampling explicit wave solutions. It is extended to several space variables by operator splitting. We consider two problems: (1) we propose a highly accurate form of the sampling procedure, in one space variable, based on the van der Corput sampling sequence. We test the improved sampling procedure numerically in the case of inviscid compressible flow in one space dimension and find that it gives high resolution results both in the smooth parts of the solution, as well as at discontinuities; (2) we investigate the operator splitting procedure by means of which the multidimensional method is constructed. An O(1) error stemming from the use of this procedure near shocks oblique to the spatial grid is analyzed numerically in the case of the equations for inviscid compressible flow in two space dimensions. We present a hybrid method which eliminates this error, consisting of Glimm's method, used in continuous parts of the flow, and the nonlinear Godunov method, used in regions where large pressure jumps are generated. The resulting method is seen to be a substantial improvement over either of the component methods for multidimensional calculations.

  20. Effect of argon gas flow rate on properties of film electrodes prepared by thermal vacuum evaporation from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} source

    SciTech Connect

    Sabli, Nordin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hilal, Hikmat S.; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2014-03-05

    This work describes a new technique to enhance photoresponse of metal chalcogenide-based semiconductor film electrodes deposited by thermal vacuum evaporation under argon gas flow from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} sources. SnSe formation with Cu-doped was obtained under higher argon gas flow rate (V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min). Higher value of photoresponse was observed for films deposited under V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min which was 9.1%. This finding indicates that Cu atoms inside the SnSe film were important to increase carrier concentrations that promote higher photoresponse.

  1. Structural, morphological, gas sensing and photocatalytic characterization of MoO3 and WO3 thin films prepared by the thermal vacuum evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, A.; Touihri, S.; Mhamdi, A.; Labidi, A.; Manoubi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Thin films of molybdenum trioxide and tungsten trioxide were deposited on glass substrates using a simplified thermal evaporation under vacuum method monitored by heat treatment in flowing oxygen at 500 °C for 1 h. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the films of MoO3 and WO3 were well crystallized in orthorhombic and monoclinic phase respectively with the crystallites preferentially oriented toward (2 0 0) direction parallel a-axis for both samples. In literature, we have shown in previous papers that structural and surface morphology of metal thin films play an important role in the gas detection mechanism. In this article, we have studied the response evolution of MoO3 and WO3 thin films sensors ethanol versus time, working temperature and the concentration of the ethanol. It was found that these films had high sensitivity to ethanol, which made them as a good candidate for the ethanol sensor. Finally, the photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated with respect to the degradation reaction of a wastewater containing methylene blue (MB) under UV-visible light irradiation. The molybdenum trioxide exhibits a higher degradation rate than the tungsten trioxide thin films under similar experimental conditions.

  2. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multi-layer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: (1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), (2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and (3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. These salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar like amorphous phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material accumulates in the particle surface layer upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass transfer limited uptake of condensable organic compounds onto wall deposited particles or directly onto the Teflon chamber walls of smog chambers can have profound influence on the

  3. Consistent simulation of droplet evaporation based on the phase-field multiphase lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we extend and generalize our previous article [H. Safari, M. H. Rahimian, and M. Krafczyk, Phys. Rev. E 88, 013304 (2013)] to include the gradient of the vapor concentration at the liquid-vapor interface as the driving force for vaporization allowing the evaporation from the phase interface to work for arbitrary temperatures. The lattice Boltzmann phase-field multiphase modeling approach with a suitable source term, accounting for the effect of the phase change on the velocity field, is used to solve the two-phase flow field. The modified convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is employed to reconstruct the dynamics of the interface topology. The coupling between the vapor concentration and temperature field at the interface is modeled by the well-known Clausius-Clapeyron correlation. Numerous validation tests including one-dimensional and two-dimensional cases are carried out to demonstrate the consistency of the presented model. Results show that the model is able to predict the flow features around and inside an evaporating droplet quantitatively in quiescent as well as convective environments. PMID:25314562

  4. Co-solvent evaporation method for enhancement of solubility and dissolution rate of poorly aqueous soluble drug simvastatin: in vitro-in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Priyanka; Gattani, Surendra; Jain, Pankaj; Khirwal, Lokesh; Surana, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    A number of synthesized chemical molecules suffer from low aqueous solubility problems. Enhancement of aqueous solubility, dissolution rate, and bioavailability of drug is a very challenging task in drug development. In the present study, solubility and dissolution of poorly aqueous soluble drug simvastatin (SIM) was enhanced using hydrophilic, low viscosity grade polymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC K(3)LV). The co-solvent evaporation method was developed for efficient encapsulation of hydrophobic drug in polymer micelles of HPMC K(3)LV. Spray drying and rotaevaporation method were applied for solvent evaporation. Co-solvent-evaporated mixture in solid state was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction studies (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro-in vivo studies were performed on co-solvent-evaporated mixture and compared with SIM. In vivo study was conducted on healthy albino rats (Wister strain), and formulations were administered by oral route. Results of the study show the conversion of crystalline form of SIM into amorphous form. The dissolution rate was remarkably increased in co-solvent-evaporated mixtures compared to SIM. co-solvent-evaporated mixtures showed better reduction in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels than the SIM. The low-viscosity grade HPMC acts as a surfactant, which enhances the wetting of drug and thus improves the solubility of drug. The co-solvent evaporation method provides good encapsulation efficiency and produces amorphous form of SIM, which gave better solubility and dissolution than the crystalline SIM.

  5. A Method to Infer Interception Evaporation Using Eddy Covariance Measurements: Application Over an Eastern Amazon Old-growth Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czikowsky, M. J.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Sakai, R. K.; Moraes, O.; Acevedo, O.; Medeiros, L. E.

    2009-05-01

    We develop a general methodology to estimate rainfall interception using eddy covariance data that are available at a large number of worldwide flux tower sites. This method is then demonstrated using data from an old-growth rain forest site in the eastern Amazon. The approach is to estimate the 'excess' evaporation that occurs during and following individual precipitation events, using baseline evaporation time series obtained from long time series of flux data and creating ensemble averages from these precipitation events and base- state dry days. One advantage of this method over the traditional techniques of estimating interception using rain gauges alone is that the interception evaporation is directly measured and not determined as the residual of incident precipitation and throughfall. This method would also be useful in cases where rain gauge measures of precipitation are suspect, such as in fog or wind-driven conditions. Furthermore, the large differences in interception that can occur on a site due to varying forest canopy density, structure and the appearance of canopy gaps is smoothed out using the eddy covariance method as the size of the flux footprint area incorporates these variations, and provides an average interception value over the flux footprint area. Identification of light rainfall events not detected by an on-site tipping bucket rain gauge was aided by the use of a ceilometer. Results from an eastern Amazon old-growth rain forest site (the km67 site in LBA-ECO) show that for daytime events, interception percentages decrease with rainfall intensity, with mean interception for light (0-2 mm/hr), moderate (2-16 mm/hr), and heavy (greater than 16 mm/hr) rainfall-rate events being 18.0, 9.9, and 7.8 percent of incoming precipitation respectively. The mean interception for all events in the study (daytime and nighttime) was 11.6 %. Energy balance comparisons between dry and afternoon rain-days show an approximately 15 % increase of evaporative

  6. Evaporation-based method for preparing gelatin foams with aligned tubular pore structures.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Shane D; Srubar, Wil V

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin-based foams with aligned tubular pore structures were prepared via liquid-to-gas vaporization of tightly bound water in dehydrated gelatin hydrogels. This study elucidates the mechanism of the foaming process by investigating the secondary (i.e., helical) structure, molecular interactions, and water content of gelatin films before and after foaming using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. Experimental data from gelatin samples prepared at various gelatin-to-water concentrations (5-30 wt.%) substantiate that resulting foam structures are similar in pore diameter (approximately 350 μm), shape, and density (0.05-0.22 g/cm(3)) to those fabricated using conventional methods (e.g., freeze-drying). Helical structures were identified in the films but were not evident in the foamed samples after vaporization (~150 °C), suggesting that the primary foaming mechanism is governed by the vaporization of water that is tightly bound in secondary structures (i.e., helices, β-turns, β-sheets) that are present in dehydrated gelatin films. FTIR and TGA data show that the foaming process leads to more disorder and reduced hydrogen bonding to hydroxyl groups in gelatin and that no thermal degradation of gelatin occurs before or after foaming.

  7. Method of producing a high pressure gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing a high pressure gas is disclosed and which includes providing a container; supplying the container with a liquid such as water; increasing the pressure of the liquid within the container; supplying a reactant composition such as a chemical hydride to the liquid under pressure in the container and which chemically reacts with the liquid to produce a resulting high pressure gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of greater than about 100 pounds per square inch of pressure; and drawing the resulting high pressure gas from the container.

  8. RPC gas recovery by open loop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Avinash; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2009-05-01

    RPC detectors require to be flushed with small but continuous flow of gas mixture. Dealing with large number of detectors, gas consumption to very large volumes. Gas flow is a running expense and constituent gases are too expensive to be treated as consumables. Exhaust gas mixture from detectors is a potential environmental hazard if discharged directly into the atmosphere. Storage of gases on a large scale also leads to inventory- and safety-related problems. A solution to these problems is the recovery and reuse of exhaust gas mixture from RPC detectors. Close loop method employs recirculation of exhausted gas mixture after purification, analysis and addition of top-up quantities. In open loop method, under consideration here, individual component gases are separated from gas mixture and reused as source. During open loop process, gases liquefiable at low pressures are separated from ones liquefiable at high pressure. The gas phase components within each group are successively separated by either fractional condensation or gravity separation. Gas mixture coming from RPC exhaust is first desiccated by passage through molecular sieve adsorbent type (3A+4A). Subsequent scrubbing over basic activated alumina removes toxic and acidic contaminants such as S 2F 10 produced during corona (arcing) discharge. In the first stage of separation isobutane and freon are concentrated by diffusion and liquefied by fractional condensation by cooling upto -30 °C. Liquefied gases are returned to source tanks. In the second stage of separation, argon and sulphur hexafluoride, the residual gases, are concentrated by settling due to density difference. SF 6 is stored for recovery by condensation at high pressure while argon is further purified by thermal cracking of crossover impurities at 1000 °C followed by wet scrubbing.

  9. Utility of Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor, reference evapotranspiration, and pan evaporation methods to estimate pasture evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.; Jacobs, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was measured at 30-min resolution over a 19-month period (September 28, 2000-April 23, 2002) from a nonirrigated pasture site in Florida, USA, using eddy correlation methods. The relative magnitude of measured ETa (about 66% of long-term annual precipitation at the study site) indicates the importance of accurate ET a estimates for water resources planning. The time and cost associated with direct measurements of ETa and the rarity of historical measurements of ETa make the use of methods relying on more easily obtainable data desirable. Several such methods (Penman-Monteith (PM), modified Priestley-Taylor (PT), reference evapotranspiration (ET 0), and pan evaporation (Ep)) were related to measured ETa using regression methods to estimate PM bulk surface conductance, PT ??, ET0 vegetation coefficient, and Ep pan coefficient. The PT method, where the PT ?? is a function of green-leaf area index (LAI) and solar radiation, provided the best relation with ET a (standard error (SE) for daily ETa of 0.11 mm). The PM method, in which the bulk surface conductance was a function of net radiation and vapor-pressure deficit, was slightly less effective (SE=0.15 mm) than the PT method. Vegetation coefficients for the ET0 method (SE=0.29 mm) were found to be a simple function of LAI. Pan coefficients for the Ep method (SE=0.40 mm) were found to be a function of LAI and Ep. Historical or future meteorological, LAI, and pan evaporation data from the study site could be used, along with the relations developed within this study, to provide estimates of ETa in the absence of direct measurements of ETa. Additionally, relations among PM, PT, and ET0 methods and ETa can provide estimates of ETa in other, environmentally similar, pasture settings for which meteorological and LAI data can be obtained or estimated. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

    1990-11-13

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

  11. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, Charles L.; He, Bo X.

    1990-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from when it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel.

  12. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  13. A shortcut through the Coulomb gas method for spectral linear statistics on random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelan Cunden, Fabio; Facchi, Paolo; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, spectral linear statistics on large dimensional random matrices have attracted significant attention. Within the physics community, a privileged role has been played by invariant matrix ensembles for which a two-dimensional Coulomb gas analogy is available. We present a critical revision of the Coulomb gas method in random matrix theory (RMT) borrowing language and tools from large deviations theory. This allows us to formalize an equivalent, but more effective and quicker route toward RMT free energy calculations. Moreover, we argue that this more modern viewpoint is likely to shed further light on the interesting issues of weak phase transitions and evaporation phenomena recently observed in RMT.

  14. A simple method to make an electrical connection between ZnO microwire and substrate through nanoscale metal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hakseong; Lee, Jinkyung; Yun, Hoyeol; Lee, Sang; Nano Electonics and Nano Mechanics Team

    2013-03-01

    We developed a simple method to make an electrical connection with nanoscale electrodes on microscale wire using suspended Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) strings. Less than 90 nm height of Ti/Au made a complete electrical connection on the ZnO microwires of which diameter is around 2 μm. A cross linked PMMA string was bridged between ZnO microwire and substrate for making good electrical connection. The contact resistance of ZnO microwire fabricated by this method was much lower than that of device fabricated by standard E-beam lithography and evaporation. This fabrication method is readily extendible to prepare nano scale electrodes on various micro sized materials and serves as a pathway for studying their mesoscopic transport phenomena. This work is supported by WCU, BK21 and NRF.

  15. Solid dispersion of carbamazepine in PVP K30 by conventional solvent evaporation and supercritical methods.

    PubMed

    Sethia, S; Squillante, E

    2004-03-19

    This study compares the physicochemical properties of carbamazepine (CBZ) solid dispersions prepared by either a conventional solvent evaporation versus a supercritical fluid process. Solid dispersions of carbamazepine in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30 with either Gelucire 44/14 or Vitamin E TPGS, NF (d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate) were prepared and characterized by intrinsic dissolution, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. CBZ/PVP K30 and CBZ/PVP K30/TPGS solid dispersions showed increased dissolution rate. The best intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) was obtained for supercritically processed CBZ/PVP K30 that was four-fold higher than pure CBZ. Thermograms of various solid dispersions did not show the melting peak of CBZ, indicating that CBZ was in amorphous form inside the carrier system. This was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. Infrared spectroscopic studies showed interaction between CBZ and PVP K30 in solid dispersions. The amorphous state of CBZ coupled with presence of interaction between drug and PVP K30 suggests fewer, if any, stability problems. Because the supercritical-based process produced solid dispersions with IDR better than conventional solid dispersions augmented with amphiphilic carriers, stability issues associated with lipid carriers do not apply, which, in turn, implies easier scale up under current Good Manufacturing Practice for this technique.

  16. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1995-04-11

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

  17. Method for cleaning sinter plant gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, S.T.; Jassund, S.A.; Mazer, M.R.

    1981-03-17

    A method for cleaning sinter plant gas emissions using a wet electrostatic precipitator system having separate recirculating wash liquor loops for the high voltage precipitator section and the pre-scrubber section. The system is operated with acidic washing liquor to avoid scaling and deposition of solids within the system.

  18. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas-phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2 (MCMv3.2), an aerosol dynamics and particle-phase chemistry module (which considers acid-catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion-limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study (1) the evaporation of liquid dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, (2) the slow and almost particle-size-independent evaporation of α-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, (3) the mass-transfer-limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), and (4) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. In the smog chamber experiments, these salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar-like amorphous-phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if the concentration of low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material at the particle surface increases upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass-transfer-limited uptake of condensable organic compounds

  19. Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McKee, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

  20. Preparation of Nonionic Vesicles Using the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reverse Phase Evaporation Method and Analysis of Their Solution Properties.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Koji; Sakai, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiko; Sakai, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported a new preparation method for liposomes using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a solvent, referred to as the supercritical carbon dioxide reverse phase evaporation (scRPE) method. In our previous work, addition of ethanol to scCO2 as a co-solvent was needed, because lipid molecules had to be dissolved in scCO2 to form liposomes. In this new study, niosomes (nonionic surfactant vesicles) were prepared from various nonionic surfactants using the scRPE method. Among the nonionic surfactants tested were polyoxyethylene (6) stearylether (C18EO6), polyoxyethylene (5) phytosterolether (BPS-5), polyoxyethylene (6) sorbitan stearylester (TS-106V), and polyoxyethylene (4) sorbitan stearylester (Tween 61). All these surfactants have hydrophilic-lipophilic balance values (HLBs) around 9.5 to 9.9, and they can all form niosomes using the scRPE method even in the absence of ethanol. The high solubility of these surfactants in scCO2 was shown to be an important factor in yielding niosomes without ethanol addition. The niosomes prepared with the scRPE method had higher trapping efficiencies than those prepared using the conventional Bangham method, since the scRPE method gives a large number of unilamellar vesicles while the Bangham method gives multilamellar vesicles. Polyoxyethylene-type nonionic surfactants with HLB values from 9.5 to 9.9 were shown to be optimal for the preparation of niosomes with the scRPE method.

  1. Low NOx gas burner apparatus and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.E.; Napier, S.O.; Jones, A.P.

    1993-08-24

    An improved gas burner apparatus is described for discharging a mixture of fuel gas and air into a furnace space wherein said mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom comprising: a housing having an open end attached to said furnace space; means for introducing a controlled flow rate of said air into said housing attached thereto; a refractory burner tile attached to the open end of said housing having a base portion, an opening formed in said base portion for allowing air to pass there through and having a wall portion surrounding said opening which extends into said furnace space, the exterior sides of said wall portion being slanted towards said opening and the interior sides thereof being spaced from the periphery of said opening whereby a ledge is provided within the interior of said wall portion; at least one passage formed in said burner tile for conducting primary fuel gas and flue gases from the exterior of said wall portion to the interior thereof; means for forming a fuel gas jet in said passage and drawing flue gases there through adapted to be connected to a source of fuel gas and positioned with respect to said passage whereby a mixture of primary fuel gas and flue gases from said furnace space is discharged from said passage to within the interior of said wall portion; and at least one nozzle adapted to be connected to a source of fuel gas positioned outside said wall portion of said burner tile adjacent the intersection of an exterior slanted side of said wall portion with the surface of said base portion for discharging secondary fuel gas adjacent said external slanted side of said wall portion whereby said secondary fuel gas mixes with flue gases and air in said furnace space. A method is also described for discharging a mixture of fuel gas and air into a furnace space wherein said mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom.

  2. Conversion method for gas streams containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Mallinson, Richard G.; Lobban, Lance; Liu, Chang-jun

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method of using the apparatus are provided for converting a gas stream containing hydrocarbons to a reaction product containing effluent molecules having at least one carbon atom, having at least one interior surface and at least one exterior surface, a first electrode and a second electrode with the first and second electrodes being selectively movable in relation to each other and positioned within the housing so as to be spatially disposed a predetermined distance from each other, a plasma discharge generator between the first and second electrodes, gas stream introducer and a collector for collecting the reaction product effluent produced by the reaction of the gas stream containing hydrocarbons with the plasma discharge between the first and second electrodes.

  3. Dynamics of vapor plume in transient keyhole during laser welding of stainless steel: Local evaporation, plume swing and gas entrapment into porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Shao, Xinyu; Gong, Shuili; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2016-07-01

    In order to better understand the local evaporation phenomena of keyhole wall, vapor plume swing above the keyhole and ambient gas entrapment into the porosity defects, the 3D time-dependent dynamics of the metallic vapor plume in a transient keyhole during fiber laser welding is numerically investigated. The vapor dynamical parameters, including the velocity and pressure, are successfully predicted and obtain good agreements with the experimental and literature data. It is found that the vapor plume flow inside the keyhole has complex multiple directions, and this various directions characteristic of the vapor plume is resulted from the dynamic evaporation phenomena with variable locations and orientations on the keyhole wall. The results also demonstrate that because of this dynamic local evaporation, the ejected vapor plume from the keyhole opening is usually in high frequency swinging. The results further indicate that the oscillation frequency of the plume swing angle is around 2.0-8.0 kHz, which is of the same order of magnitude with that of the keyhole depth (2.0-5.0 kHz). This consistency clearly shows that the swing of the ejected vapor plume is closely associated with the keyhole instability during laser welding. Furthermore, it is learned that there is usually a negative pressure region (several hundred Pa lower than the atmospheric pressure) of the vapor flow around the keyhole opening. This pressure could lead to a strong vortex flow near the rear keyhole wall, especially when the velocity of the ejected metallic vapor from the keyhole opening is high. Under the effect of this flow, the ambient gas is involved into the keyhole, and could finally be entrapped into the bubbles within a very short time (<0.2 ms) due to the complex flow inside the keyhole.

  4. Structural and optical properties of titanium functionalized periodic mesostructured organosilica framework via evaporation-induced self-assembly method.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, M; He, Chaobin

    2013-04-01

    We describe an evaporation-induced self-assembly method for incorporating Ti into framework of ethane-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). The X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), solid-state 29Si and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to elucidate the optical and structural properties of Ti-incorporated PMO materials. The degree of mesopore ordering and the structural properties were found to be dependent on the loading of Ti into the framework of PMO materials, as confirmed by XRD, and surface structural properties. UV-vis spectra also support the incorporation of Ti into framework of PMO. TEM analyses suggested the formation of mesopores for the pure PMO and Ti-incorporated PMO samples. The solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectra have confirmed the presence of organic fragment in the final PMO framework.

  5. Simulation of temporal and spatial distribution of required irrigation water by crop models and the pan evaporation coefficient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan-min; Yang, Yonghui; Han, Shu-min; Hu, Yu-kun

    2009-07-01

    Hebei Plain is the most important agricultural belt in North China. Intensive irrigation, low and uneven precipitation have led to severe water shortage on the plain. This study is an attempt to resolve this crucial issue of water shortage for sustainable agricultural production and water resources management. The paper models distributed regional irrigation requirement for a range of cultivated crops on the plain. Classic crop models like DSSAT- wheat/maize and COTTON2K are used in combination with pan-evaporation coefficient method to estimate water requirements for wheat, corn, cotton, fruit-trees and vegetables. The approach is more accurate than the static approach adopted in previous studies. This is because the combination use of crop models and pan-evaporation coefficient method dynamically accounts for irrigation requirement at different growth stages of crops, agronomic practices, and field and climatic conditions. The simulation results show increasing Required Irrigation Amount (RIA) with time. RIA ranges from 5.08×109 m3 to 14.42×109 m3 for the period 1986~2006, with an annual average of 10.6×109 m3. Percent average water use by wheat, fruit trees, vegetable, corn and cotton is 41%, 12%, 12%, 11%, 7% and 17% respectively. RIA for April and May (the period with the highest irrigation water use) is 1.78×109 m3 and 2.41×109 m3 respectively. The counties in the piedmont regions of Mount Taihang have high RIA while the central and eastern regions/counties have low irrigation requirement.

  6. Evaporating firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

  7. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  8. Evaporative Light Scattering Detection Based HPLC Method for the Determination of Polysorbate 80 in Therapeutic Protein Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Vikram S.; Tan, Zhijun; Ihnat, Peter M.; Russell, Reb J.; Grace, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    An evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) based high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method is developed for the determination of polysorbate 80 (tween 80) in therapeutic protein formulations. The method is simple and overcomes the difficulties associated with specificity and sensitivity. The method is suitable for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 in the usual formulation range (0.01–0.1%) as well as in trace amounts ≥13 µg/mL. The analysis is based on the removal of protein first by solid-phase extraction using Oasis HLB cartridges followed by HPLC analysis using Inertsil ODS-3 C 18 column (4.6×150 mm, 5 µm) using reversed-phase conditions. The detector response changes exponentially with an increase in polysorbate concentration. A very good linear fit of log ELSD response against log polysorbate 80 concentration is observed. The specificity, sensitivity, precision, and accuracy of the method are suitable for the quantitation of polysorbate 80 in protein formulations. PMID:22291052

  9. Miniature electron bombardment evaporation source: evaporation rate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehasil, V.; Mašek, K.; Moreau, O.; Matolín, V.

    1997-03-01

    Miniature electron beam evaporation sources which operate on the principle of vaporization of source material, in the form of a tip, by electron bombardment are produced by several companies specialised in UHV equipment. These sources are used primarily for materials that are normally difficult to deposit due to their high evaporation temperature. They are appropriate for special applications, like heteroepitaxial thin films growth that require very low and well controlled deposition rate. We propose a simple and easily applicable method of evaporation rate control. The method is based on the measurement of ion current produced by electron bombardment of evaporated atoms. In order to be able to determine the ion current - evaporation flux calibration curves we measured the absolute values of evaporation flux by means of Bayard-Alpert ion gauge.

  10. Collisional electron spectroscopy method for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, M. S.; Pramatarov, P. M.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Peyeva, R. A.; Patrikov, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, based on identification of gas impurities by registration of groups of nonlocal fast electrons released by Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms, is verified experimentally. Detection and identification of atoms and molecules of gas impurities in helium at pressures of 14 - 90 Torr with small admixtures of Ar, Kr, CO2, and N2 are carried out. The nonlocal negative glow plasma of short dc microdischarge is used as most suitable medium. Records of the energy spectra of penning electrons are performed by means of an additional electrode - sensor, located at the boundary of the discharge volume. Maxima appear in the electron energy spectra at the characteristic energies corresponding to Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms.

  11. Method and apparatus for producing synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Hemmings, John William; Bonnell, Leo; Robinson, Earl T.

    2010-03-03

    A method and apparatus for reacting a hydrocarbon containing feed stream by steam methane reforming reactions to form a synthesis gas. The hydrocarbon containing feed is reacted within a reactor having stages in which the final stage from which a synthesis gas is discharged incorporates expensive high temperature materials such as oxide dispersed strengthened metals while upstream stages operate at a lower temperature allowing the use of more conventional high temperature alloys. Each of the reactor stages incorporate reactor elements having one or more separation zones to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing feed to support combustion of a fuel within adjacent combustion zones, thereby to generate heat to support the endothermic steam methane reforming reactions.

  12. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Nerney, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of heating near the top of streamers in ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, where the plasma is weakly contained by the magnetic field. Heating causes slow opening of field lines and release of new solar wind. It was discovered in simulations and, due to the absence of loss mechanisms, the ultimate end point is the complete evaporation of the streamer. Of course streamers do not behave in this way because there are losses by thermal conduction and radiation. Physically, heating is also expected to depend on ambient conditions. We use our global MHD model with thermal conduction to examine the effect of changing the heating scale height. We also apply and extend an analytic model of streamers developed by Pneuman (1968) to show that steady streamers are unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than approximately 2 x 10(exp 6) K.

  13. A method to determine photosynthetic activity from oxygen microsensor data in biofilms subjected to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Podola, Björn; de Beer, Dirk; Melkonian, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Phototrophic biofilms are widely distributed in nature and their ecological importance is well recognized. More recently, there has been a growing interest in using artificial phototrophic biofilms in innovative photobioreactors for production of microalgal biomass in biotechnological applications. To study physiological processes within these biofilms, microsensors have been applied in several studies. Here, the 'light-dark shift method' relies on measurement of photosynthetic activity in terms of light-induced oxygen production. However, when applied to non-submerged biofilms that can be found in numerous locations in nature, as well as in some types of photobioreactors, limitations of this approach are obvious due to rapid removal of gaseous species at the biofilm surface. Here, we introduce a mathematical correction to recover the distribution of the actual photosynthetic activity along the depth gradient in the biofilm, based on a numerical solution of the inversed diffusion equation of oxygen. This method considers changes in mass transport during the measurement period as can found on biofilms possessing a thin flow/mass transfer boundary layer (e. g., non-submerged biofilms). Using both simulated and real microsensor data, the proposed method was shown to be much more accurate than the classical method, which leads to underestimations of rates near the biofilm surface. All test profiles could be recovered with a high fit. According to our simulated microsensor measurements, a depth resolution of ≤20 μm is recommended near the surface. We conclude that our method strongly improves the quality of data acquired from light-dark measurements of photosynthetic activity in biofilms.

  14. Analysis of the climate variability on Lake Nasser evaporation based on the Bowen ratio energy budget method.

    PubMed

    Elsawwaf, Mohamed; Willems, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Variations in lake evaporation have a significant impact on the energy and water budgets of lakes. Understanding these variations and the role of climate is important for water resources management as well as predicting future changes in lake hydrology as a result of climate change. This study presents a comprehensive, 10-year analysis of seasonal, intraseasonal, and interannual variations in lake evaporation for Lake Nasser in South Egypt. Meteorological and lake temperature measurements were collected from an instrumented platform (Raft floating weather station) at 2 km upstream ofthe Aswan High Dam. In addition to that, radiation measurements at three locations on the lake: Allaqi, Abusembel and Arqeen (respectively at 75, 280 and 350 km upstream of the Aswan High Dam) are used. The data were analyzed over 14-day periods from 1995 to 2004 to provide bi-weekly energy budget estimates of evaporation rate. The mean evaporation rate for lake Nasser over the study period was 5.88 mm day(-1), with a coefficient of variation of 63%. Considerable variability in evaporation rates was found on a wide range of timescales, with seasonal changes having the highest coefficient of variation (32%), followed by the intraseasonal (28%) and interannual timescales (11.6%; for summer means). Intraseasonal changes in evaporation were primarily associated with synoptic weather variations, with high evaporation events tending to occur during incursions of cold, dry air (due, in part, to the thermal lag between air and lake temperatures). Seasonal variations in evaporation were largely driven by temperature and net energy advection, but are out-of-phase with changes in wind speed. On interannual timescales, changes in summer evaporation rates were strongly associated with changes in net energy advection and showed only moderate connections to variations in temperature or humidity.

  15. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  16. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  18. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  19. A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples

  20. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  1. Development of a method to control the water evaporation of hatching eggs during incubation.

    PubMed

    Ohi, A; Inoue, N; Furuta, H; Sugawara, M; Ohta, Y

    2010-03-01

    Three experiments were conducted to develop methods to control the amount of water loss and to evaluate the metabolic effects of water condition in the White Leghorn breeder eggs during incubation. One hundred twenty, 54, and 90 Julia strain White Leghorn breeder eggs were incubated at 37.8 degrees C, 60% RH in experiments 1, 2, and 3. In experiment 1, eggs were drilled with various bore diameters of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm on the blunt end of the eggshell. In experiment 2, 4 x 4 mm(2) windows were cut into the eggs or the eggs were drilled with 5 holes of bore diameter 2 mm on the blunt end of eggshell. In experiment 3, eggs were drilled with 1, 3, 5, and 7 holes of diameter 2 mm on the blunt end of eggshell. Eggs were treated on d 3 of each experiment and the amount of water loss was recorded on d 19 of incubation. Embryo growth was evaluated in experiments 2 and 3. In addition, the livers of embryos were collected in the 0-, 1-, 3-, and 5-hole treatment groups after weighing eggs to determine 3-hydroxy acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase activity. In experiment 1, although higher water loss was observed in all windowed eggs than in control, there were no differences in amount of water loss among all bore diameters. Accordingly, that was not successful to control amount of water loss. In experiment 2, higher water loss was observed in drilled eggs at the same levels in windowed eggs as in control. Drilling holes was a more useful treatment to control amount of water loss on incubated eggs than windowing. In experiment 3, amount of water loss increased linearly with increasing number of holes on the blunt end of eggshell. Hepatic 3-hydroxy acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase activity increased with increasing the number of drilled holes. PMID:20181873

  2. Kinetic approach to the evaporation and condensation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, M.; Oshima, K.

    1974-01-01

    In the paper, the Boltzmann equation governing the evaporation and condensation phenomena is solved by the Monte Carlo method. Based on the kinetic theory of gas the role of the non-equilibrium Knudsen layer and the growth of the hydrodynamic region outside the layer as time proceeds are simulated. Results show two possible types of transient developments in the vapor phase. The effects of the molecular absorption coefficient of the phase surface are examined. Except in the case of very strong evaporation the kinematic effects of binary collisions among vapor molecules on the mass flux rate are not serious. The limiting case of the quasi-steady evaporation and the maximal value of the evaporation rate are obtained.

  3. Efficiency of methods for Karl Fischer determination of water in oils based on oven evaporation and azeotropic distillation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, William; Jalbert, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Roland; Cedergren, Anders

    2003-03-15

    The efficiency of azeotropic distillation and oven evaporation techniques for trace determination of water in oils has recently been questioned by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), on the basis of measurements of the residual water found after the extraction step. The results were obtained by volumetric Karl Fischer (KF) titration in a medium containing a large excess of chloroform (> or = 65%), a proposed prerequisite to ensure complete release of water from the oil matrix. In this work, the extent of this residual water was studied by means of a direct zero-current potentiometric technique using a KF medium containing more than 80% chloroform, which is well above the concentration recommended by NIST. A procedure is described that makes it possible to correct the results for dilution errors as well as for chemical interference effects caused by the oil matrix. The corrected values were found to be in the range of 0.6-1.5 ppm, which should be compared with the 12-34 ppm (uncorrected values) reported by NIST for the same oils. From this, it is concluded that the volumetric KF method used by NIST gives results that are much too high. PMID:12659179

  4. Efficiency of methods for Karl Fischer determination of water in oils based on oven evaporation and azeotropic distillation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, William; Jalbert, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Roland; Cedergren, Anders

    2003-03-15

    The efficiency of azeotropic distillation and oven evaporation techniques for trace determination of water in oils has recently been questioned by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), on the basis of measurements of the residual water found after the extraction step. The results were obtained by volumetric Karl Fischer (KF) titration in a medium containing a large excess of chloroform (> or = 65%), a proposed prerequisite to ensure complete release of water from the oil matrix. In this work, the extent of this residual water was studied by means of a direct zero-current potentiometric technique using a KF medium containing more than 80% chloroform, which is well above the concentration recommended by NIST. A procedure is described that makes it possible to correct the results for dilution errors as well as for chemical interference effects caused by the oil matrix. The corrected values were found to be in the range of 0.6-1.5 ppm, which should be compared with the 12-34 ppm (uncorrected values) reported by NIST for the same oils. From this, it is concluded that the volumetric KF method used by NIST gives results that are much too high.

  5. Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction

    DOEpatents

    Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

    1975-11-18

    An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

  6. JV TASK 7-FIELD APPLICATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF NATURAL GAS PRODUCED WATER IN WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Sorensen; John Boysen; Deidre Boysen; Tim Larson

    2002-10-01

    The freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE{reg_sign}) process treats oil and gas produced water so that the water can be beneficially used. The FTE{reg_sign} process is the coupling of evaporation and freeze-crystallization, and in climates where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur, this coupling improves process economics compared to evaporation alone. An added benefit of the process is that water of a quality suited for a variety of beneficial uses is produced. The evolution, from concept to successful commercial deployment, of the FTE{reg_sign} process for the treatment of natural gas produced water has now been completed. In this document, the histories of two individual commercial deployments of the FTE{reg_sign} process are discussed. In Wyoming, as in many other states, the permitting and regulation of oil and gas produced water disposal and/or treatment facilities depend upon the legal relationship between owners of the facility and the owners of wells from which the water is produced. An ''owner-operated'' facility is regulated by the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) and is defined as an entity which only processes water which comes from the wells in fields of which they have an equity interest. However, if a facility processes water from wells in which the owners of the facility have no equity interest, the facility is considered a ''commercial'' facility and is permitted and regulated by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. For this reason, of the two commercial FTE{reg_sign} process deployments discussed in this document, one is related to an ''owner-operated'' facility, and the other relates to a ''commercial'' facility. Case 1 summarizes the permitting, design, construction, operation, and performance of the FTE{reg_sign} process at an ''owner-operated'' facility located in the Jonah Field of southwestern Wyoming. This facility was originally owned by the McMurry Oil Company and was later purchased by the Alberta Energy

  7. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  8. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  9. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, Thomas F.; Parsons, Jr., Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  10. Solutal Marangoni instability in a binary liquid layer evaporating into air: the importance of transients in the gas for highly unstable cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dauby, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    This study considers an evaporating horizontal binary-liquid layer (aqueous solution of ethanol; mass fraction 0.1) in contact with air with an imposed transfer distance. Fully transient and horizontally homogeneous solutions for the reference state are first calculated. Then, the linear stability of these solutions is studied using the frozen-time approach. Solutal and thermal Rayleigh-Bénard-Marangoni instabilities are taken into account together with the Soret effect, although the solutal Marangoni mechanism appeared to be the most important one. Considering several gas-to-liquid thickness ratios (H) , we calculate the critical times for the instability onset in a liquid layer of a given thickness. We also uncover the minimum liquid thicknesses under which no instability can ever occur. We subsequently observe that two distinctly different types of minimum thicknesses exist depending on H, examining each one of them. Then a closed-form analysis of the instability at small times has been developed. Finally, it has also been observed that, regardless of the gas-to-liquid thickness ratio, an asymptotic value of the critical time exists as the liquid layer increases, this critical time being approximately 1 μs.

  11. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A. H.; Wu, Shi T.; Nerney, S.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of slow plasma heating near the tops of streamers where the plasma is only weakly contained by the magnetic field. The form it takes is the slow opening of field lines at the top of the streamer and transient formation of new solar wind. It was discovered in polytropic model calculations, where due to the absence of other energy loss mechanisms in magnetostatic streamers, its ultimate endpoint is the complete evaporation of the streamer. This takes, for plausible heating rates, weeks to months in these models. Of course streamers do not behave this way, for more than one reason. One is that there are losses due to thermal conduction to the base of the streamer and radiation from the transition region. Another is that streamer heating must have a characteristic time constant and depend on the ambient physical conditions. We use our global Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model with thermal conduction to examine a few examples of the effect of changing the heating scale height and of making ad hoc choices for how the heating depends on ambient conditions. At the same time, we apply and extend the analytic model of streamers, which showed that streamers will be unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than about 2xl0(exp 6) K. Slow solar wind is observed to come from streamers through transient releases. A scenario for this that is consistent with the above physical process is that heating increases the near-cusp temperature until field lines there are forced open. The subsequent evacuation of the flux tubes by the newly forming slow wind decreases the temperature and heating until the flux tubes are able to reclose. Then, over a longer time scale, heating begins to again refill the flux tubes with plasma and increase the temperature until the cycle repeats itself. The calculations we report here are first steps towards quantitative evaluation of this scenario.

  12. Method for mapping a natural gas leak

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2009-02-03

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formatted into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimposed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  13. Method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Walker, William E.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine in response to the rapid loss of applied load is disclosed. The method involves diverting gas from the inlet of the turbine, bypassing the same around the turbine and thereafter injecting the diverted gas at the turbine exit in a direction toward or opposing the flow of gas through the turbine. The injected gas is mixed with the gas exiting the turbine to thereby minimize the thermal shock upon equipment downstream of the turbine exit.

  14. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1996-12-17

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

  15. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Laug, Matthew T.

    1996-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

  16. Full evaporation dynamic headspace in combination with selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of suspected fragrance allergens in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Devos, Christophe; Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Sandra, Pat; David, Frank

    2012-09-14

    Suspected fragrance allergens were determined in cosmetic products using a combination of full evaporation-dynamic headspace (FEDHS) with selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional GC-MS. The full evaporation dynamic headspace approach allows the non-discriminating extraction and injection of both apolar and polar fragrance compounds, without contamination of the analytical system by high molecular weight non-volatile matrix compounds. The method can be applied to all classes of cosmetic samples, including water containing matrices such as shower gels or body creams. In combination with selectable (1)D/(2)D GC-MS, consisting of a dedicated heart-cutting GC-MS configuration using capillary flow technology (CFT) and low thermal mass GC (LTM-GC), a highly flexible and easy-to-use analytical solution is offered. Depending on the complexity of the perfume fraction, analyses can be performed in one-dimensional GC-MS mode or in heart-cutting two-dimensional GC-MS mode, without the need of hardware reconfiguration. The two-dimensional mode with independent temperature control of the first and second dimension column is especially useful to confirm the presence of detected allergen compounds when mass spectral deconvolution is not possible.

  17. Gas stream cleaning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kunchal, S. Kumar; Erck, Louis J.; Harris, Harry A.

    1979-04-13

    An oil mist and solid particle laden gas from an oil shale retorting operation is initially treated with a temperature controlled oil spray and then by a coalescer to reduce the quantity of oil mist and remove most of the solid particle content of the gas stream and then finally treated by an electrostatic precipitator to essentially remove the oil mist remaining in the gas.

  18. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine activation energies for the catalyst-assisted systems. PMID:22408484

  19. A method of determining combustion gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bon Tempi, P. J.

    1968-01-01

    Zirconium oxide coating enables the determination of hot gas flow patterns on liquid rocket injector face and baffle surfaces to indicate modifications that will increase performance and improve combustion stability. The coating withstands combustion temperatures and due to the coarse surface and coloring of the coating, shows the hot gas patterns.

  20. A numerical method for integrating the kinetic equations of droplet spectra evolution by condensation/evaporation and by coalescence/breakup processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emukashvily, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    An extension of the method of moments is developed for the numerical integration of the kinetic equations of droplet spectra evolution by condensation/evaporation and by coalescence/breakup processes. The number density function n sub k (x,t) in each separate droplet packet between droplet mass grid points (x sub k, x sub k+1) is represented by an expansion in orthogonal polynomials with a given weighting function. In this way droplet number concentrations, liquid water contents and other moments in each droplet packet are conserved and the problem of solving the kinetic equations is replaced by one of solving a set of coupled differential equations for the number density function moments. The method is tested against analytic solutions of the corresponding kinetic equations. Numerical results are obtained for different coalescence/breakup and condensation/evaporation kernels and for different initial droplet spectra. Also droplet mass grid intervals, weighting functions, and time steps are varied.

  1. [Method for study of phase transitions in evaporating drop and its application for evaluation of physical-chemical properties of water and water solutions].

    PubMed

    Iakhno, T A; Sanin, A G; Sanina, O A; Iakhno, V G

    2012-01-01

    Spatial-temporal crystallization features of inorganic chlorides in evaporating drops of water solutions, considering solid surface wettability, were studied using a microscopic technique and the acoustical impedansometry. Physical-chemical mechanisms responsible for the difference in "dynamical portraits" of distilled water and salt solutions, as well as relaxation effects in water were discussed. The study demonstrated the potential use of a drying drop method in registration of changes in water properties under the action of physical and chemical factors.

  2. DWPF RECYCLE EVAPORATOR FLOWSHEET EVALUATION (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-30

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the high level waste slurries stored at the Savannah River Site into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. The vitrification process results in the generation of approximately five gallons of dilute recycle streams for each gallon of waste slurry vitrified. This dilute recycle stream is currently transferred to the H-area Tank Farm and amounts to approximately 1,400,000 gallons of effluent per year. Process changes to incorporate salt waste could increase the amount of effluent to approximately 2,900,000 gallons per year. The recycle consists of two major streams and four smaller streams. The first major recycle stream is condensate from the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), and is collected in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT). The second major recycle stream is the melter offgas which is collected in the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT). The four smaller streams are the sample flushes, sump flushes, decon solution, and High Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME) dissolution solution. These streams are collected in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) or the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). All recycle streams are currently combined in the RCT and treated with sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide prior to transfer to the tank farm. Tank Farm space limitations and previous outages in the 2H Evaporator system due to deposition of sodium alumino-silicates have led to evaluation of alternative methods of dealing with the DWPF recycle. One option identified for processing the recycle was a dedicated evaporator to concentrate the recycle stream to allow the solids to be recycled to the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the condensate from this evaporation process to be sent and treated in the Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). In order to meet process objectives, the recycle stream must be concentrated to 1/30th of the feed volume during the evaporation process. The concentrated stream

  3. Direct numerical simulations of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates direct numerical simulations of evaporating two phase flows, with applications to studying combustion in aircraft engines. Inside the engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber where it atomizes into droplets and evaporates. Combustion occurs as the fuel vapor mixes with the surrounding flow of turbulent gas. Understanding combustion, therefore, requires studying evaporation in a turbulent flow and the resulting vapor distribution. We study the problem using a finite volume framework to solve the Navier-Stokes and scalar transport equations under a low-Mach assumption [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008]. The liquid-gas interface is tracked using a conservative level-set method [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008] which allows for a sharp reconstruction of the discontinuity across the interface. Special care is taken in the discretization of cells near the liquid-gas interface to ensure the stability and accuracy of the solution. Results are discussed for non-reacting simulations of liquid droplets evaporating into a turbulent field of inert gas.

  4. Spark discharge method of liquid rare-gas purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokachalov, S. G.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Kruglov, A. A.; Obodovski, I. M.

    1993-03-01

    The spark disharge method of liquid rare-gas purification is describe. The method is sufficiently more simple than those widely used. Physical aspects of the method are discussed, and examples of its application are presented.

  5. Thickness and annealing effects on thermally evaporated InZnO thin films for gas sensors and blue, green and yellow emissive optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumaran, Sathish; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Bellan, Chandar Shekar; Sivaraj, Manoj

    2016-08-01

    Indium zinc oxide (InZnO) thin films with thicknesses of 100 nm and 200 nm were deposited on glass plate by thermal evaporation technique. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed a strong metal-oxide bond. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed amorphous nature for as-deposited film whereas polycrystalline structure for annealed films. Scanning electron microscope images showed a uniform distribution of spherical shape grains. Grain size was found to be higher for 200 nm film than 100 nm film. The presence of elements (In, Zn and O) was confirmed from energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Photoluminescence study of 200 nm film showed a blue, blue-green and blue-yellow emission whereas 100 nm film showed a broad green and green-yellow emissions. Both 100 nm and 200 nm films showed good oxygen sensitivity from room temperature to 400 °C. The observed optical and sensor results indicated that the prepared InZnO films are highly potential for room temperature gas sensor and blue, green and yellow emissive opto-electronic devices.

  6. Method for the production of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Deuser, N.; Diemer, P.

    1982-09-28

    Crude gas obtained through partial oxidation of carboncontaining material is subjected to catalytic conversion in an apparatus containing a moistening-demoistering system connected by means of a combined water circulation. To reduce the required amount of steam and process heating, a partial stream of water coming from the moistener is branched off, heated by indirect heat exchange with converted, hot synthesis gas, and then united with the partial stream of water coming from the demoistener for re-delivery to the moistener.

  7. Measurement of leaf hydraulic conductance and stomatal conductance and their responses to irradiance and dehydration using the Evaporative Flux Method (EFM).

    PubMed

    Sack, Lawren; Scoffoni, Christine

    2012-12-31

    Water is a key resource, and the plant water transport system sets limits on maximum growth and drought tolerance. When plants open their stomata to achieve a high stomatal conductance (gs) to capture CO2 for photosynthesis, water is lost by transpiration(1,2). Water evaporating from the airspaces is replaced from cell walls, in turn drawing water from the xylem of leaf veins, in turn drawing from xylem in the stems and roots. As water is pulled through the system, it experiences hydraulic resistance, creating tension throughout the system and a low leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)). The leaf itself is a critical bottleneck in the whole plant system, accounting for on average 30% of the plant hydraulic resistance(3). Leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf) = 1/ leaf hydraulic resistance) is the ratio of the water flow rate to the water potential gradient across the leaf, and summarizes the behavior of a complex system: water moves through the petiole and through several orders of veins, exits into the bundle sheath and passes through or around mesophyll cells before evaporating into the airspace and being transpired from the stomata. K(leaf) is of strong interest as an important physiological trait to compare species, quantifying the effectiveness of the leaf structure and physiology for water transport, and a key variable to investigate for its relationship to variation in structure (e.g., in leaf venation architecture) and its impacts on photosynthetic gas exchange. Further, K(leaf) responds strongly to the internal and external leaf environment(3). K(leaf) can increase dramatically with irradiance apparently due to changes in the expression and activation of aquaporins, the proteins involved in water transport through membranes(4), and K(leaf) declines strongly during drought, due to cavitation and/or collapse of xylem conduits, and/or loss of permeability in the extra-xylem tissues due to mesophyll and bundle sheath cell shrinkage or aquaporin deactivation(5

  8. Growth of (CH 3) 2NH 2CuCl 3 single crystals using evaporation method with different temperatures and solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. M.; Tao, W.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Li, Q. J.; Ke, W. P.; Wang, X. M.; Liu, X. G.; Fan, C.; Sun, X. F.

    2010-10-01

    The bulk single crystals of low-dimensional magnet (CH 3) 2NH 2CuCl 3 (DMACuCl 3 or MCCL) are grown by a slow evaporation method with different kinds of solvents, different degrees of super-saturation of solution and different temperatures of solution, respectively. Among three kinds of solvent, methanol, alcohol and water, alcohol is found to be the best one for growing MCCL crystals because of its structural similarity to the raw materials and suitable evaporation rate. The best growth temperature is in the vicinity of 35 °C. The problem of the crystals deliquescing in air has been solved through recrystallization process. The crystals are characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, specific heat and magnetic susceptibility.

  9. Numerical simulation of evaporating liquid jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soteriou, Marios; Li, Xiaoyi

    2014-11-01

    Atomization of liquid fuel jets by cross-flowing air is critical to combustor performance. Ability to experimentally probe the fundamentals of this multiscale two phase flows has been hampered by limitations in experimental techniques and the challenges posed by operating conditions. Direct numerical simulation has recently emerged as a promising alternative due to advances in computer hardware and numerical methods. Using this approach, we recently demonstrated the ability to reproduce the physics of atomization of a liquid jet in cross-flow (LJIC) under ambient conditions. In this work we consider this flow in a high temperature environment. The inclusion of evaporation is the major new element. The numerical approach employs the CLSVOF method to capture the liquid-gas interface. Interface evaporation is solved directly with proper treatment of interface conditions and reproduces the relevant species/temperature fields there. A Lagrangian droplet tracking approach is used for the small droplets which are transferred from the Eulerian phase and evaporate using a traditional d2 law model. Other key algorithms of the massively parallelized solver include a ghost fluid method, a multi-grid preconditioned conjugate gradient approach and an adaptive mesh refinement technique. The overall method is verified using canonical problems. Simulations of evaporating LJIC point to the significant effect that evaporation has on the evolution of this flow and elucidate the downstream fuel species patterns.

  10. Downhole oil/gas separator and method of separating oil and gas downhole

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J. E.

    1985-07-30

    For low pressure gaseous wells, an oil/gas separator is mounted at the end of a production string to provide a continuous upwardly spiralling separating velocity to the oil/gas entering the tool in order to separate outwardly at least sufficient gas to reduce gas lock in the sucker rod pump mounted in the production string. The oil/gas separator of this invention includes a separation chamber having a continuously upwardly spiralling ramp and an internal collection tube to collect the separated gas and move the gas upwardly and out of the tool and into the annulus of the oil well. The method of this invention is practiced by directing an oil/gas mixture from a producing zone in a helical direction to impart centrifugal separating velocity at varying levels to the mixture to cause gas to separate from the mixture.

  11. Evaporation from open microchannel grooves.

    PubMed

    Kachel, Sibylle; Zhou, Ying; Scharfer, Philip; Vrančić, Christian; Petrich, Wolfgang; Schabel, Wilhelm

    2014-02-21

    The evaporation of water from open u-shaped microchannel grooves was investigated with particular emphasis on the roles of channel width and air flow conditions. Given the small dimensions of the microchannels, all measurements were conducted in a range where convection and diffusion are of equal importance and known correlations for the calculation of mass transfer coefficients cannot be applied. The evaporation rates were measured using a new optical method and a gravimetric method. Both measurement methods yielded mass transfer coefficients that are in agreement with each other. The observed relation between mass transfer coefficient, air velocity and channel width vastly differs from the predictions obtained from macroscopic structures. With respect to diagnostic devices we conclude that analyte concentration in an open microchannel groove strongly increases even within short times due to the evaporation process and we show that wider channels are more favourable in terms of minimizing the relative evaporation rate.

  12. Heterodyne method for high specificity gas detection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Donaldson, R. W.; Gunter, W. D., Jr.; Jaynes, D. N.; Margozzi, A. P.; Deboo, G. J.; Mcclatchie, E. A.; Williams, K. G.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique for measuring trace quantities of gases. The technique involves the use of a reference cell (containing a known amount of the gas being sought) and a sample cell (containing an unknown amount of the same gas) wherein the gas densities are modulated. Light passing through the two cells in sequence is modulated in intensity at the vibrational-rotational lines characteristic of the absorption spectrum for the gas of interest. Since the absorption process is nonlinear, modulating the two absorption cells at two different frequencies gives rise to a heterodyning effect, which in turn introduces sum and difference frequencies in the detected signal. Measuring the ratio of the difference frequency signal for example, to the signal introduced by the reference cell provides a normalized measure of the amount of the gas in the sample cell. The readings produced are thereby independent of source intensity, window transparency, and detector sensitivity. Experimental evaluation of the technique suggests that it should be applicable to a wide range of gases, that it should be able to reject spurious signals due to unwanted gases, and that it should be sensitive to concentrations of the order of 10 to the minus 8th power when used with a sample cell of only 20 cm length.

  13. Energy requirements for methods improving gas detection by modulating physical properties of resistive gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawka, M.; Kotarski, M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important disadvantage of resistive gas sensors is their limited gas selectivity. Therefore, various methods modulating their physical properties are used to improve gas detection. These methods are usually limited to temperature modulation or UV light irradiation for the layers exhibiting photocatalytic effect. These methods cause increased energy consumption. In our study we consider how much energy has to be supplied to utilize such methods and what kind of additional information can be gathered. We present experimental results of selected resistive gas sensors, including commercial and prototype constructions, and practical solutions of modulating their physical properties.

  14. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  15. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  16. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  17. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  18. Lattice gas methods for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the lattice gas solution to the category 1 problems of the ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics. The first and second problems were solved for Delta t = Delta x = 1, and additionally the second problem was solved for Delta t = 1/4 and Delta x = 1/2. The results are striking: even for these large time and space grids the lattice gas numerical solutions are almost indistinguishable from the analytical solutions. A simple bug in the Mathematica code was found in the solutions submitted for comparison, and the comparison plots shown at the end of this volume show the bug. An Appendix to the present paper shows an example lattice gas solution with and without the bug.

  19. Characterization of sulfur compounds in whisky by full evaporation dynamic headspace and selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous element-specific detection.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; MacNamara, Kevin

    2012-12-28

    A method is described for characterization of sulfur compounds in unaged and aged whisky. The method is based on full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) of 100 μL of whisky samples followed by selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) retention-time-locked (RTL) gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) with simultaneous element-specific detection using a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) and a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). Sequential heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to identify each individual sulfur compound in the unaged whisky. Twenty sulfur compounds were positively identified by a MS library search, linear retention indices (LRI), and formula identification using MS calibration software. Additionally eight formulas were also identified for unknown sulfur compounds. Simultaneous heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to produce the (2)D RTL GC-SCD chromatograms for principal component analysis. PCA of the (2)D RTL GC-SCD data clearly demonstrated the difference between unaged and aged whisky, as well as two different whisky samples. Fourteen sulfur compounds could be characterized as key sulfur compounds responsible for the changes in the aging step and/or the difference between two kinds of whisky samples. The determined values of the key sulfur compounds were in the range of 0.3-210 ng mL(-1) (RSD: 0.37-12%, n=3).

  20. Development of comprehensive numerical schemes for predicting evaporating gas-droplets flow processes of a liquid-fueled combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics code for simulating complex turbulent flows inside a liquid rocket combustion chamber was validated and further developed. The Advanced Rocket Injector/Combustor Code (ARICC) is simplified and validated against benchmark flow situations for laminar and turbulent flows. The numerical method used in ARICC Code is re-examined for incompressible flow calculations. For turbulent flows, both the subgrid and the two equation k-epsilon turbulence models are studied. Cases tested include idealized Burger's equation in complex geometries and boundaries, a laminar pipe flow, a high Reynolds number turbulent flow, and a confined coaxial jet with recirculations. The accuracy of the algorithm is examined by comparing the numerical results with the analytical solutions as well as experimented data with different grid sizes.

  1. Method and apparatus for pressurizing a liquefied gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.

    2005-07-26

    Apparatus providing at least one thermoelectric device for pressurizing a liquefied gas container and methods employing same are disclosed. A thermoelectric device including a heating surface and a cooling surface is used for pressurizing a container by vaporizing liquefied gas within the container by transferring heat energy from a portion of the liquefied gas in contact with the cooling surface to another portion of the liquefied gas in contact with the heating surface of the thermoelectric device to convert some of the liquefied gas to a vapor state. Liquefied gas vapor and/or liquid phase may be supplied by disclosed apparatus and methods. The apparatus may also be used as a vapor pump or a liquid pump, or fluid pump. Methods of operation are also disclosed.

  2. Effects of fuel evaporation on the octane number of methanol-gasoline blended fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, D.P.

    1994-10-01

    A procedure is described to estimate the influence of end-gas temperature on Octane Number. Blending methanol with gasoline is known to cause a disproportionate increase in Research Octane Number, and this is found to correlate well with the evaporative cooling characteristics of these blends. The Motor Octane Number test eliminates evaporative effects, and the difference between the two test methods is evaluated in terms of evaporative cooling. It is concluded that the high heat of vaporization of methanol is largely responsible for the excellent RON performance of methanol-gasoline blended fuels. 17 refs., 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. THE FLAMMABILITY ANALYSIS AND TIME TO REACH LOWER FLAMMABILITY LIMIT CALCULATIONS ON THE WASTE EVAPORATION AT 242-A EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect

    HU TA

    2007-10-31

    This document describes the analysis of the waste evaporation process on the flammability behavior. The evaluation calculates the gas generation rate, time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), and minimum ventilation rates for the 242-A Evaporator facility during the normal evaporation process and when vacuum is lost. This analysis performs flammability calculations on the waste currently within all 28 double-shell tanks (DST) under various evaporation process conditions to provide a wide spectrum of possible flammable gas behavior. The results of this analysis are used to support flammable gas control decisions and support and upgrade to Documented Safety Analysis for the 242-A Evaporator.

  4. Endwall Treatment and Method for Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D. (Inventor); Strazisar, Anthony J. (Inventor); Suder, Kenneth L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An endwall treatment for a gas turbine engine having at least one rotor blade extending from a rotatable hub and a casing circumferentially surrounding the rotor and the hub, the endwall treatment including, an inlet formed in an endwall of the gas turbine engine adapted to ingest fluid from a region of a higher-pressure fluid, an outlet formed in the endwall and located in a region of lower pressure than the inlet, wherein the inlet and the outlet are in a fluid communication with each other, the outlet being adapted to inject the fluid from the inlet in the region of lower pressure, and wherein the outlet is at least partially circumferentially offset relative to the inlet.

  5. Computations of turbulent evaporating sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, S. K.; Chitre, S.

    1989-01-01

    A computational study of turbulent evaporating sprays is reported. The major focus is to examine the sensitivity of the vaporization behavior of turbulent sprays to the transient liquid-phase processes. Three models considered to represent these processes are the thin skin, infinite diffusion, and diffusion limit models. Favre-averaged equations with k-epsilon-g turbulence model are employed for the gas phase. The Lagrangian approach with a stochastic separated flow method is used for the liquid phase where the effects of gas turbulence on droplet trajectories and interphase transport rates are considered using random-walk computations. Also the variable-property effects are considered in detail. Results indicate that, depending upon the boiling temperature and heat of vaporization of the fuel considered, the vaporization behavior of turbulent sprays may be quite sensitive to the modeling of transient liquid-phase processes. Thus, it is important that for most hydrocarbon fuels these processes be adequately represented in any comprehensive spray computations. The present results also provide further support to the conclusions of earlier studies which have been based on simplified spray configurations.

  6. Method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate located on the ocean floor

    DOEpatents

    Wyatt, Douglas E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate on the ocean floor includes a flexible cover, a plurality of steerable base members secured to the cover, and a steerable mining module. A suitable source for inflating the cover over the gas hydrate deposit is provided. The mining module, positioned on the gas hydrate deposit, is preferably connected to the cover by a control cable. A gas retrieval conduit or hose extends upwardly from the cover to be connected to a support ship on the ocean surface.

  7. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOEpatents

    Chen, T.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.

    1998-01-06

    A method and system are disclosed for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established. 6 figs.

  8. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ting; Gross, Kenny C.; Wegerich, Stephan

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established.

  9. System and method for producing substitute natural gas from coal

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, Raymond

    2012-08-07

    The present invention provides a system and method for producing substitute natural gas and electricity, while mitigating production of any greenhouse gasses. The system includes a hydrogasification reactor, to form a gas stream including natural gas and a char stream, and an oxygen burner to combust the char material to form carbon oxides. The system also includes an algae farm to convert the carbon oxides to hydrocarbon material and oxygen.

  10. Shadow mask assisted direct growth of ZnO nanowires as a sensing medium for surface acoustic wave devices using a thermal evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achath Mohanan, Ajay; Parthiban, R.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires were directly synthesized on high temperature stable one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators made of LiNbO3 substrate and Pt/Ti electrodes using a self-seeding catalyst-free thermal evaporation method. To enhance post-growth device functionality, one half of an SAW resonator was masked along the interdigital transducer aperture length during the nanowire growth process using a stainless steel shadow mask, while the other half was used as the ZnO nanowire growth site. This was achieved by employing a precisely machined stainless steel sleeve to house the chip and mask in the reaction chamber during the nanowire growth process. The ZnO nanowire integrated SAW resonator exhibited ultraviolet radiation sensing abilities which indicated that the ZnO nanowires grown on the SAW device were able to interact with SAW propagation on the substrate even after the device was exposed to extremely harsh conditions during the nanowire growth process. The use of a thermal evaporation method, instead of the conventionally used solution-grown method for direct growth of ZnO nanowires on SAW devices, paves the way for future methods aimed at the fabrication of highly sensitive ZnO nanowire-LiNbO3 based SAW sensors utilizing coupled resonance phenomenon at the nanoscale.

  11. Apparatus and method for excluding gas from a liquid

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for preventing diffusion of a gas under high pressure into the bulk of a liquid filling a substantially closed chamber. This apparatus and method is particularly useful in connection with test devices for testing fluid characteristics under harsh conditions of extremely high pressure and high temperature. These devices typically pressurize the liquid by placing the liquid in pressure and fluid communication with a high pressure inert gas. The apparatus and method of the present invention prevent diffusion of the pressurizing gas into the bulk of the test liquid by decreasing the chamber volume at a rate sufficient to maintain the bulk of the liquid free of absorbed or dissolved gas by expelling that portion of the liquid which is contaminated by the pressurizing gas.

  12. The effect of induced strains on photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by thermal evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, Yaser; Eshghi, Hosein

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, ZnO nanostructures have been synthesized by thermal evaporation process using metallic zinc powder in the presence of oxygen on p-Si (100) at different distances from the boat. The structural and optical characterizations have been carried out. The morphological study shows various shape nanostructures. XRD data indicate that all samples have a polycrystalline wurtzite hexagonal structure in such a way that the closer sample has a preferred orientation along (101) while the ones farther are grown along (002) direction. From the structural and optical data analysis, we found that the induced strains are the main parameter controlling the UV/green peaks ratios in the PL spectra of the studied samples.

  13. Effects of gold catalysts and thermal evaporation method modifications on the growth process of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefi, Ramin; Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the roles of gold catalysts and thermal evaporation method modifications in the growth process of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O nanowires. Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O nanowires are fabricated on silicon substrates with and without using a gold catalyst. Characterizations reveal that Mg acts in a self-catalyst role during the growth process of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O nanowires grown on catalyst-free substrate. The optical properties and crystalline quality of the Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O nanowires are characterized by room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The Raman and PL studies demonstrate that the Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O nanowires grown using the catalyst-free method have good crystallinity with excellent optical properties and have a larger band-gap in comparison to those grown with the assistance of gold. - Graphical abstract: ZnMgO nanowires can be formed with and without gold catalyst by a modified thermal evaporation method.

  14. Observed and modeled multi-year evaporation from three field-scale experiments using water balance and Penman-Monteith methods: Profound effect of material type and wind exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, H. E.; Fretz, N.; Bay, D.; Mayer, K. U.; Smith, L.; Beckie, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Three instrumented experimental waste-rock piles at the Cu-Zn-Mo Antamina Mine in Peru are composed of distinct types of waste rock but are otherwise almost identical in size and geometry and experience the same atmospheric conditions with the exception of wind exposure. Evaporation from the piles was calculated using the water balance method over three- and four-year periods to determine the effect of material type and meteorological variability on evaporation. Annual changes in water storage were low or negligible except as a result of unusually high annual precipitation. Observed evaporation was high (44% - 75% of precipitation) and was extremely variable annually in the coarsest-grained waste-rock pile 1, most likely as a result of greater wind exposure and air circulation in that pile. Observed evaporation was moderate (36% - 48% of precipitation) with moderate annual variability in the finer-grained, relatively homogeneous waste-rock pile 2. Observed evaporation was low (24% - 32% of precipitation) with low annual variability in the finer-grained, relatively heterogeneous waste-rock pile 3, most likely as a result of low air circulation coupled with complex flow regimes that include high-velocity preferential flow paths. Slightly higher evaporation was observed on the slopes than on the crowns of Pile 2, while much lower evaporation was observed on the slopes than on the crowns of Piles 1 and 3. Evidence suggests that Piles 1 and 3 slope water-balance evaporation estimates are skewed by non-vertical flow and that, in general, evaporation is higher on the slopes than on the crowns of the piles. Evaporation was also estimated using the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations modified Penman-Monteith method (FAO-PM; Allen et al., 1998) using base-case laboratory- and software- derived parameters. The base-case method underestimated observed evaporation calculated by the water balance method for Pile 1, overestimated observed evaporation for Pile

  15. A Gas-Kinetic Method for Hyperbolic-Elliptic Equations and Its Application in Two-Phase Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    A gas-kinetic method for the hyperbolic-elliptic equations is presented in this paper. In the mixed type system, the co-existence and the phase transition between liquid and gas are described by the van der Waals-type equation of state (EOS). Due to the unstable mechanism for a fluid in the elliptic region, interface between the liquid and gas can be kept sharp through the condensation and evaporation process to remove the "averaged" numerical fluid away from the elliptic region, and the interface thickness depends on the numerical diffusion and stiffness of the phase change. A few examples are presented in this paper for both phase transition and multifluid interface problems.

  16. An on-line calibration method for process gas chromatographs

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, M.; Wang, F.

    1995-05-01

    Gas chromatographs (GCs) used to measure gas concentrations in process streams usually need calibration for a wide range of concentrations. The gas chromatographs used in process applications are usually equipped with automatic samplers using sample loops. The sampling system can be modified to provide on-line calibration, by adding a vacuum system and a precision pressure gage. In this paper, the authors describe a method using pure gases for the calibration of automatic GCs by varying and measuring precisely the pressure of the sample loop, thus sending known quantities of gas into the column. The concentration of the gas is calculated using the ideal gas law, and they are able to calibrate GCs in a range from 1,000 ppm to 100 vol %.

  17. Shallow gas cloud illumination analysis by the focal beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latiff, Abdul Halim Abdul

    2016-02-01

    This research will address the illumination issue of seismic data below a shallow gas cloud, also known as shallow gas accumulation. In general, poor and distorted seismic data underneath gas zones depend on four major factors; namely the velocity of the gas zones, the depth of the target reflector, the location of the source and the receiver during seismic acquisition, and the frequency of the seismic signals. These factors will be scrutinized in detail by using the focal beam method. The focal beam method incorporates the double focusing concept in order to obtain two important attributes for illumination analysis: (i) Resolution function beam, (ii) amplitude versus ray parameter (AVP) imprint, which is obtained by transforming the modelled data into the radon domain. Both illumination attributes are then applied to a gas-affected field in the Malaysia Basin. The results show well-defined illumination beneath the shallow anomalies and provide a better representation of the subsurface.

  18. Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Paul John; Miller, Bruce G.; Wincek, Ronald T.; Decker, Glenn E.; Johnson, David K.

    2009-04-07

    The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

  19. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

    1999-07-27

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

  20. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  1. A steady-state non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach for the study of evaporation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Yahia-Ouahmed, Méziane; Leroy, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Two non-equilibrium methods (called bubble method and splitting method, respectively) have been developed and tested to study the steady state evaporation of a droplet surrounded by its vapor, where the evaporation continuously occurs at the vapor-liquid interface while the droplet size remains constant. In the bubble method, gas molecules are continuously reinserted into a free volume (represented by a bubble) located at the centre of mass of the droplet to keep the droplet size constant. In the splitting method, a molecule close to the centre of mass of the droplet is split into two: In this way, the droplet size is also maintained during the evaporation. By additional local thermostats confined to the area of insertion, the effect of frequent insertions on properties such as density and temperature can be limited to the immediate insertion area. Perturbations are not observed in other parts of the droplet. In the end, both the bubble method and the splitting method achieve steady-state droplet evaporation. Although these methods have been developed using an isolated droplet, we anticipate that they will find a wide range of applications in the study of the evaporation of isolated films and droplets or thin films on heated substrates or under confinement. They can in principle also be used to study the steady-state of other physical processes, such as the diffusion or permeation of gas molecules or ions in a pressure gradient or a concentration gradient. PMID:24116576

  2. Evaporator Cleaning Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1999-04-15

    Operation of the 242-16H High Level Waste Evaporator proves crucial to liquid waste management in the H-Area Tank Farm. Recent operational history of the Evaporator showed significant solid formation in secondary lines and in the evaporator pot. Additional samples remain necessary to ensure material identity in the evaporator pot. Analysis of these future samples will provide actinide partitioning information and dissolution characteristics of the solid material from the pot to ensure safe chemical cleaning.

  3. Method of preparing pure fluorine gas

    DOEpatents

    Asprey, Larned B.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for purifying and storing pure fluorine is described. The method utilizes alkali metal-nickel fluorides to absorb tank fluorine by forming nickel complex salts and leaving the gaseous impurities which are pumped away. The complex nickel fluoride is then heated to evolve back pure gaseous fluorine.

  4. Low NO[sub x] gas burner apparatus and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.E.; Napier, S.O.; Jones, A.P.

    1994-01-04

    Improved gas burner apparatus and methods of burning fuel gas-air mixtures are provided whereby flue gases having low NO[sub x] contents are formed. The burner apparatus includes a refractory burner tile having an air discharge opening therein and a wall surrounding the opening which extends into the furnace space and provides a mixing zone therein. At least one passage is formed in the burner tile which opens into the mixing zone and fuel gas is jetted through the passage whereby flue gases are drawn there through and a fuel gas-flue gases mixture is discharged into the mixing zone. The fuel gas-flue gases mixture is swirled in the mixing zone and mixes with air therein, and the resulting mixture is discharged and burned in a primary reaction zone in the furnace space. 11 figs.

  5. Development of Porosity Measurement Method in Shale Gas Reservoir Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswandani, Alita; Nurhandoko, BagusEndar B.

    2016-08-01

    The pore scales have impacts on transport mechanisms in shale gas reservoirs. In this research, digital helium porosity meter is used for porosity measurement by considering real condition. Accordingly it is necessary to obtain a good approximation for gas filled porosity. Shale has the typical effective porosity that is changing as a function of time. Effective porosity values for three different shale rocks are analyzed by this proposed measurement. We develop the new measurement method for characterizing porosity phenomena in shale gas as a time function by measuring porosity in a range of minutes using digital helium porosity meter. The porosity of shale rock measured in this experiment are free gas and adsorbed gas porosoty. The pressure change in time shows that porosity of shale contains at least two type porosities: macro scale porosity (fracture porosity) and fine scale porosity (nano scale porosity). We present the estimation of effective porosity values by considering Boyle-Gay Lussaac approximation and Van der Waals approximation.

  6. Method of gas purification and system therefor

    DOEpatents

    Szwarc, Raphael

    1985-04-23

    A method and device for conducting gettering. The gettering is conducted with one of an LiB, LiSi or LiAl system. Preferably the LiB system is of the formula Li.sub.x B.sub.1-x wherein 0

  7. Method of gas purification and system therefor

    DOEpatents

    Szwarc, R.

    1983-12-29

    A method and device are disclosed for conducting gettering. The gettering is conducted with one of an LiB, LiSi or LiAl system. Preferably the LiB system is of the formula Li/sub x/B/sub 1-x/ wherein 0 < x < 1 with gettering conducted at room or slightly elevated temperature of about 100 to 200/sup 0/C.

  8. Direct synthesis of Cu{sub 2}O-RGO nanocomposite on Cu foil by thermal evaporation method and its field emission study

    SciTech Connect

    Bansode, Sanjeewani; Khare, Ruchita; Harpale, Kashmira; Kolhe, Pankaj; More, Mahendra

    2015-06-24

    In this work, a facile one step thermal evaporation method for deposition of Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles on RGO sheets to form Cu{sub 2}O-RGO nanocomposite is discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on Cu{sub 2}O-RGO nanocomposite, directly grown on Cu foil by a simple thermal evaporation route. The as –prepared nanocomposite exhibits well dispersed Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles distributed all over the graphene sheet. Field emission properties of the nanocomposite were investigated at a base pressure of 1*10{sup −8} torr. The turn on field, required to draw emission current density of 0.1µA/cm2, was found to be 3.8V/µm with a maximum emission current density of 80 µA/cm2 at an applied field of 6.8 V/µm. Moreover, the nanocomposite shows fairly good emission stability without significant degradation of emission current. The FE results seem to be encouraging, indicative of potential candidature of the Cu{sub 2}O-RGO nanocomposite emitter as an electron source for practical applications in vacuum nanoelectronic devices.

  9. A component prediction method for flue gas of natural gas combustion based on nonlinear partial least squares method.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Yan, Xingyu; Li, Yaojiang; Wang, Yanxia; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Sanchun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis for the flue gas of natural gas-fired generator is significant for energy conservation and emission reduction. The traditional partial least squares method may not deal with the nonlinear problems effectively. In the paper, a nonlinear partial least squares method with extended input based on radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used for components prediction of flue gas. For the proposed method, the original independent input matrix is the input of RBFNN and the outputs of hidden layer nodes of RBFNN are the extension term of the original independent input matrix. Then, the partial least squares regression is performed on the extended input matrix and the output matrix to establish the components prediction model of flue gas. A near-infrared spectral dataset of flue gas of natural gas combustion is used for estimating the effectiveness of the proposed method compared with PLS. The experiments results show that the root-mean-square errors of prediction values of the proposed method for methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are, respectively, reduced by 4.74%, 21.76%, and 5.32% compared to those of PLS. Hence, the proposed method has higher predictive capabilities and better robustness. PMID:24772020

  10. A component prediction method for flue gas of natural gas combustion based on nonlinear partial least squares method.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Yan, Xingyu; Li, Yaojiang; Wang, Yanxia; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Sanchun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis for the flue gas of natural gas-fired generator is significant for energy conservation and emission reduction. The traditional partial least squares method may not deal with the nonlinear problems effectively. In the paper, a nonlinear partial least squares method with extended input based on radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used for components prediction of flue gas. For the proposed method, the original independent input matrix is the input of RBFNN and the outputs of hidden layer nodes of RBFNN are the extension term of the original independent input matrix. Then, the partial least squares regression is performed on the extended input matrix and the output matrix to establish the components prediction model of flue gas. A near-infrared spectral dataset of flue gas of natural gas combustion is used for estimating the effectiveness of the proposed method compared with PLS. The experiments results show that the root-mean-square errors of prediction values of the proposed method for methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are, respectively, reduced by 4.74%, 21.76%, and 5.32% compared to those of PLS. Hence, the proposed method has higher predictive capabilities and better robustness.

  11. A Component Prediction Method for Flue Gas of Natural Gas Combustion Based on Nonlinear Partial Least Squares Method

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hui; Yan, Xingyu; Li, Yaojiang; Wang, Yanxia; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Sanchun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis for the flue gas of natural gas-fired generator is significant for energy conservation and emission reduction. The traditional partial least squares method may not deal with the nonlinear problems effectively. In the paper, a nonlinear partial least squares method with extended input based on radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used for components prediction of flue gas. For the proposed method, the original independent input matrix is the input of RBFNN and the outputs of hidden layer nodes of RBFNN are the extension term of the original independent input matrix. Then, the partial least squares regression is performed on the extended input matrix and the output matrix to establish the components prediction model of flue gas. A near-infrared spectral dataset of flue gas of natural gas combustion is used for estimating the effectiveness of the proposed method compared with PLS. The experiments results show that the root-mean-square errors of prediction values of the proposed method for methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are, respectively, reduced by 4.74%, 21.76%, and 5.32% compared to those of PLS. Hence, the proposed method has higher predictive capabilities and better robustness. PMID:24772020

  12. Laboratory Methods For The Investigation of Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulenkampff, J.; Spangenberg, E.

    Sediments in gas hydrate zones are complex composites of solid material and fluids. They may consist of unconsolidated sediments, gas hydrate, water or ice, and gas, depending on hydrostatic pressure and temperature, the sediment type, and genesis. Therefore, petrophysical properties as ultrasonic velocities and electrical resistivity, as well as porosity and permeability may vary within a broad range, and estimates of the gas content and models of gas hydrate deposits are very problematic. Evaluation methods for logging and geophysical field data in gas hydrate deposits are not yet available. This is due to the lack of laboratory measurements of physical pa- rameters in relation to the gas content and the sediment type. Standard interpretation methods have been applied with questionable success. Thus a transportable laboratory system (FLECAS: field laboratory experimental core analysis system) has been developed at the GFZ for the investigation of hydrate bear- ing cores. It consists of a thermostatted vessel (-10C to 60C) with pressure control (max. 70 MPa) and measurement setups for pore volume, sample volume, permeabil- ity, electrical resistivity, ultrasonic compressional and shear wave velocity. Measurements were done on synthetic gas hydrate bearing sands: During the temper- ature increase at first the frozen water melts, resulting in a decrease of resistivity and velocity. A further decrease in pressure causes the hydrate to dissociate, which tem- porarily decreases the temperature, and then again resistivity and velocity decrease, because water is released. At last the material looses its mechanical strength. Presently the system is used for core analysis of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the permafrost region at the Mallik gas hydrate production test well in Canada.

  13. Analytical and numerical studies on a single-droplet evaporation and combustion under forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.; Li, K.

    2015-08-01

    Existing droplet evaporation/combustion models in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of spray combustion are based on simplified 1-D models. Both these models and recently developed 3-D models of single-droplet combustion do not give the conditions for the different existing droplet combustion modes. In this paper, droplet evaporation and combustion are studied both analytically and numerically. In the analytical solution, a 2-D axisymmetric flow surrounding an evaporating and combusting droplet was considered. The governing equations were solved using an integral method, similar to the Karman-Pohlhausen method for solving boundary-layer flows with pressure gradient. The results give a local evaporation rate and flame radius in agreement with experimental results. In numerical simulation, 3-D combusting gas flows surrounding an ethanol droplet were studied. The prediction results show three modes of droplet combustion under different relative velocities, explaining the change in the evaporation constant with an increase in relative velocity observed in experiments. This implies that different droplet combustion models should be developed in simulating spray combustion. The predicted local evaporation rate and flame radius by numerical simulation are in agreement with the analytical solution in the range of azimuthal angles . The numerical results indicate that the drag force of an evaporating and combusting droplet is much smaller than that of a cold solid particle, and thus the currently used drag models should be modified.

  14. Exhaust gas recirculation method for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanabe, T.; Kimura, K.; Asakura, M.; Shiina, T.

    1988-07-19

    This patent describes a method of controlling exhaust gas recirculation in an internal combustion engine having an exhaust passage, an intake passage, an exhaust gas recirculating passage communicating the exhaust passage with the intake passage, and exhaust gas recirculating valve; and a transmission having a shift lever. The valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve is controlled in response to operating conditions of the engine so as to regulate the amount of exhaust gas recirculation to values appropriate to the operating conditions of the engine. The method comprising the steps of (1) determining whether or not the engine is in at least one of a predetermined accelerating condition and a predetermined decelerating condition; (2) varying the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve by a predetermined value when the engine is determined to be in at least one of the predetermined accelerating condition and the predetermined decelerating condition; (3) detecting a position of the shift lever of the transmission; and (4) correcting the predetermined value in accordance with the detected position of the shift lever so as to increase the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve as the shift lever of the transmission is set to a higher speed position.

  15. Chemotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometric method as a field method for volatile arsenic in natural gas.

    PubMed

    Uroic, M Kalle; Krupp, Eva M; Johnson, Charlie; Feldmann, Jörg

    2009-12-01

    Volatile arsenic compounds in natural gas, existing in the form of trimethylarsine (TMAs), have been determined using gas cryo-trapping gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (CT-GC-ICP-MS). The results from a number of different gas wells revealed a huge concentration spread ranging from below the detection limit of 0.2 up to 1800 microg/m(3) TMAs (as As) in the gas. Due to the toxicity and corrosive nature of these arsines, they need near real time monitoring via a method that can easily be implemented on site, i.e. during gas exploitation. Here, we introduce a novel method which utilises silver nitrate impregnated silica gel tubes for quantitative chemotrapping of trimethylarsine (TMAs) from a natural gas matrix. Subsequent elution with hot nitric acid followed by online photo-oxidation hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) is used for the determination of TMAs gas standards in nitrogen and natural gas samples, respectively. The chemotrapping method was validated using CT-GC-ICP-MS as a reference method. The recovery of arsenic from nitrogen or natural gas matrix ranged from 85 to 113% for a range of 20 to 2000 ng As. Trapping efficiency was >98%, from the methods LOD of 20 ng to 4.8 microg (absolute amount As) with sample sizes of 0.02 and 2 L gas. Method performance was established by comparing the results obtained for eight natural gas samples containing between 1 and 140 microg As/m(3) with those achieved by the reference method (CT-GC-ICP-MS). PMID:20024020

  16. Evaluation of a rapid method for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Misir, R; Laarveld, B; Blair, R

    1985-08-30

    The major limitation to fatty acid analysis by gas-liquid chromatography is associated with preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). In the present study, FAME preparations were made from plant oils (corn, olive, sunflower), sunflower oil margarine, lard and various animal tissue fats by a rapid transesterification involving tetramethylammonium hydroxide in methanol, and also by a longer conventional saponification-esterification method. Fats from animal (beef, mutton, pork) adipose tissues were extracted by a simpler modified procedure and also by the Folch method prior to the rapid and the conventional FAME preparations, respectively. FAME analysis on a gas-liquid chromatograph equipped with a Silar 10C glass capillary column indicated similar fatty acid composition of a given fat or oil, whether FAME was prepared by the rapid or the longer conventional method. The data obtained by both methods were very highly correlated for all the fats (r = 0.9895 - 0.9999). However, the rapid method showed a tendency for enhanced recoveries of lower chain fatty acids (e.g. 14:0), and also of unsaturated C18 isomers. Possibly, losses of fatty acids that occurred during the lengthy fat extraction, fatty acid esterification or ether-evaporation FAME concentration steps (conventional method) were minimised by the single transesterification step (rapid method). This rapid transesterification method appears to be an attractive alternative to FAME preparation from a wide variety of different fats for gas-liquid chromatographic analysis. PMID:4044736

  17. Direct synthesis of Ti-containing SBA-16-type mesoporous material by the evaporation-induced self-assembly method and its catalytic performance for oxidative desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Asma Tufail; Li, Baoshan; Abdalla, Zaki Eldin Ali

    2009-08-15

    A novel Ti-containing SBA-16-type mesoporous material (with various Ti loadings of 5, 10, and 15 wt%) was synthesized by an evaporation-induced self-assembly method using F127 copolymer as template. The materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA, N(2) adsorption, SEM, HRTEM, and XPS. The characterization results show that the material possesses high thermal stability, thick pore walls (10.43-10.68 nm), and high surface area (642.26-691.5 m(2)/g) with a mesoporous worm-like structure, and titanium was successfully incorporated into the silica matrix with a tetrahedral environment. The material showed high activity in the oxidative desulfurization of DBT and its activity was not reduced even after three times recycling; further reuse resulted in a gradual decrease in its activity. PMID:19450808

  18. Direct synthesis of Ti-containing SBA-16-type mesoporous material by the evaporation-induced self-assembly method and its catalytic performance for oxidative desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Asma Tufail; Li, Baoshan; Abdalla, Zaki Eldin Ali

    2009-08-15

    A novel Ti-containing SBA-16-type mesoporous material (with various Ti loadings of 5, 10, and 15 wt%) was synthesized by an evaporation-induced self-assembly method using F127 copolymer as template. The materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA, N(2) adsorption, SEM, HRTEM, and XPS. The characterization results show that the material possesses high thermal stability, thick pore walls (10.43-10.68 nm), and high surface area (642.26-691.5 m(2)/g) with a mesoporous worm-like structure, and titanium was successfully incorporated into the silica matrix with a tetrahedral environment. The material showed high activity in the oxidative desulfurization of DBT and its activity was not reduced even after three times recycling; further reuse resulted in a gradual decrease in its activity.

  19. Preparation of PbTiO3 Films Utilizing Self-Control Mechanism of Stoichiometric Composition in Dual-Beam Vacuum Evaporation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Satoshi; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    1992-09-01

    Optimum conditions for preparing PbTiO3 films on Si and SrTiO3 substrates are investigated in the dual-beam vacuum evaporation method using PbO and TiO2. It has been found that tetragonal PbTiO3 films are formed on Si substrates at temperatures ranging from 550°C to 600°C, and that the stoichiometric composition of the films is easily obtained at 600°C by supplying excess PbO molecules to the substrate. It has also been found that PbTiO3 films grow epitaxially on SrTiO3 substrates at temperatures around 550°C.

  20. Method for eliminating gas blocking in electrokinetic pumping systems

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2001-09-11

    A method for eliminating gas bubble blockage of current flow during operation of an electrokinetic pump. By making use of the ability to modify the surface charge on the porous dielectric medium used in electrokinetic pumps, it becomes possible to place electrodes away from the pressurized region of the electrokinetic pump. While gas is still generated at the electrodes they are situated such that the generated gas can escape into a larger buffer reservoir and not into the high pressure region of the pump where the gas bubbles can interrupt current flow. Various combinations of porous dielectric materials and ionic conductors can be used to create pumps that have desirable electrical, material handling, and flow attributes.

  1. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  2. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine an activation energy for the catalyst-assisted systems.

  3. Investigation on the Electrical and Methane Gas-Sensing Properties of ZnO Thin Films Produced by Different Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimoori, F.; Khojier, K.; Dehnavi, N. Z.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the influence of deposition method on the structural, electrical, and methane gas-sensing properties of ZnO thin films is investigated. Sol-gel spin coating, direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering, and e-beam evaporation techniques are employed for production of Zn thin films post-annealed at 500°C with a constant flow of oxygen. Detailed morphological, chemical, and structural investigations are carried out on all samples by field emission electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. DC electrical resistivity of the samples was measured using a four-point probe instrument while a Hall effect instrument was used for the Hall effect measurements. The sensing performance was optimized with respect to the deposition method as well as the operating temperature. Detection limit, reproducibility, and stability of all samples produced using different methods are also identified. An optimum operating temperature of 350°C is obtained. The best sensitivity was attributed to the deposited film by the e-beam evaporation method due to its different surface morphology, which provided a larger ratio of surface-to-bulk area, and a lower carrier concentration, which caused higher electrical resistance. All ZnO thin films deposited by different methods also showed good reproducibility and stability.

  4. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Pence, Dallas T.; Chou, Chun-Chao

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

  5. Standard test method for water in lint cotton by oven evaporation combined with volumetric Karl Fischer Titration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The referenced test method for total water content and water regain in lint cotton was developed by USDA scientists in New Orleans at the request of the cotton industry. The method covers the determination of the total water (free and bound) in raw and lint cotton at moisture equilibrium from con...

  6. Methods for gas detection using stationary hyperspectral imaging sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Conger, James L.; Henderson, John R.

    2012-04-24

    According to one embodiment, a method comprises producing a first hyperspectral imaging (HSI) data cube of a location at a first time using data from a HSI sensor; producing a second HSI data cube of the same location at a second time using data from the HSI sensor; subtracting on a pixel-by-pixel basis the second HSI data cube from the first HSI data cube to produce a raw difference cube; calibrating the raw difference cube to produce a calibrated raw difference cube; selecting at least one desired spectral band based on a gas of interest; producing a detection image based on the at least one selected spectral band and the calibrated raw difference cube; examining the detection image to determine presence of the gas of interest; and outputting a result of the examination. Other methods, systems, and computer program products for detecting the presence of a gas are also described.

  7. Alignment nature of ZnO nanowires grown on polished and nanoscale etched lithium niobate surface through self-seeding thermal evaporation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanan, Ajay Achath; Parthiban, R.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanowires were grown directly on LiNbO{sub 3} surface for the first time by thermal evaporation. • Self-alignment of the nanowires due to step bunching of LiNbO{sub 3} surface is observed. • Increased roughness in surface defects promoted well-aligned growth of nanowires. • Well-aligned growth was then replicated in 50 nm deep trenches on the surface. • Study opens novel pathway for patterned growth of ZnO nanowires on LiNbO{sub 3} surface. - Abstract: High aspect ratio catalyst-free ZnO nanowires were directly synthesized on lithium niobate substrate for the first time through thermal evaporation method without the use of a buffer layer or the conventional pre-deposited ZnO seed layer. As-grown ZnO nanowires exhibited a crisscross aligned growth pattern due to step bunching of the polished lithium niobate surface during the nanowire growth process. On the contrary, scratches on the surface and edges of the substrate produced well-aligned ZnO nanowires in these defect regions due to high surface roughness. Thus, the crisscross aligned nature of high aspect ratio nanowire growth on the lithium niobate surface can be changed to well-aligned growth through controlled etching of the surface, which is further verified through reactive-ion etching of lithium niobate. The investigations and discussion in the present work will provide novel pathway for self-seeded patterned growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowires on lithium niobate based micro devices.

  8. PARTICLE-GAS DYNAMICS WITH ATHENA: METHOD AND CONVERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xuening; Stone, James M. E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-10-15

    The Athena magnetohydrodynamics code has been extended to integrate the motion of particles coupled with the gas via aerodynamic drag in order to study the dynamics of gas and solids in protoplanetary disks (PPDs) and the formation of planetesimals. Our particle-gas hybrid scheme is based on a second-order predictor-corrector method. Careful treatment of the momentum feedback on the gas guarantees exact conservation. The hybrid scheme is stable and convergent in most regimes relevant to PPDs. We describe a semi-implicit integrator generalized from the leap-frog approach. In the absence of drag force, it preserves the geometric properties of a particle orbit. We also present a fully implicit integrator that is unconditionally stable for all regimes of particle-gas coupling. Using our hybrid code, we study the numerical convergence of the nonlinear saturated state of the streaming instability. We find that gas flow properties are well converged with modest grid resolution (128 cells per pressure length {eta}r for dimensionless stopping time {tau} {sub s} = 0.1) and an equal number of particles and grid cells. On the other hand, particle clumping properties converge only at higher resolutions, and finer resolution leads to stronger clumping before convergence is reached. Finally, we find that the measurement of particle transport properties resulted from the streaming instability may be subject to error of about {+-}20%.

  9. Control method for mixed refrigerant based natural gas liquefier

    DOEpatents

    Kountz, Kenneth J.; Bishop, Patrick M.

    2003-01-01

    In a natural gas liquefaction system having a refrigerant storage circuit, a refrigerant circulation circuit in fluid communication with the refrigerant storage circuit, and a natural gas liquefaction circuit in thermal communication with the refrigerant circulation circuit, a method for liquefaction of natural gas in which pressure in the refrigerant circulation circuit is adjusted to below about 175 psig by exchange of refrigerant with the refrigerant storage circuit. A variable speed motor is started whereby operation of a compressor is initiated. The compressor is operated at full discharge capacity. Operation of an expansion valve is initiated whereby suction pressure at the suction pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 30 psig and discharge pressure at the discharge pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 350 psig. Refrigerant vapor is introduced from the refrigerant holding tank into the refrigerant circulation circuit until the suction pressure is reduced to below about 15 psig, after which flow of the refrigerant vapor from the refrigerant holding tank is terminated. Natural gas is then introduced into a natural gas liquefier, resulting in liquefaction of the natural gas.

  10. The growth of benzophenone crystals by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method and slow evaporation solution technique (SEST): A comparative investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Senthil Pandian, M.; Boopathi, K.; Ramasamy, P.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Benzophenone single crystal was grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method which has the sizes of 1060 mm length and 55 mm diameter for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conventional and SR-grown benzophenone crystals were characterized and compared using HRXRD, etching, laser damage threshold, microhardness, UV-transmittance, birefringence and dielectric analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SR-grown benzophenone crystal has higher LDT, microhardness, transparency, dielectric permittivity, birefringence and lower FWHM, EPD, dielectric loss than the crystal grown by conventional method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The probable reason for higher crystalline perfection in SR-grown crystal was discussed. -- Abstract: Longest unidirectional Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket benzophenone (BP) crystal having dimension of 1060 mm length and 55 mm diameter was grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method. The growth rate was measured by monitoring the elevation of the crystal-solution interface at different temperatures. The high resolution X-ray diffraction and etching measurements indicate that the unidirectional grown benzophenone crystal has good crystalline perfection and less density of defects. The optical damage threshold of SEST and SR grown BP crystals has been investigated and found that the SR grown benzophenone crystal has higher laser damage threshold value than the conventional method grown crystal. Microhardness measurement shows that crystals grown by SR method have a higher mechanical stability than the crystals grown by SEST method. Dielectric permittivity and birefringence are high in SR grown crystal compared to SEST grown BP crystal. The UV-vis-NIR results show that SR method grown crystal exhibits 7% higher transmittance as against crystals grown by conventional method.

  11. Rapid Evaporation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2008-11-01

    When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized rapidly. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a growing interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.

  12. Methods for improving the gas barrier properties of polymeric containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, G.J.

    1984-10-23

    Methods are disclosed for the treatment of food, beverage, and medicine containers and the like, which are made of organic polymeric resins, to greatly increase the gas barrier properties thereof. The containers are ion-plated with a very thin flexible layer of an inorganic oxide.

  13. Aircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Borguet, Sebastien; Leonard, Olivier; Zhang, Xiaodong (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed.

  14. Multi-spectral temperature measurement method for gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Feng, Chi; Wang, Lixin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    One of the basic methods to improve both the thermal efficiency and power output of a gas turbine is to increase the firing temperature. However, gas turbine blades are easily damaged in harsh high-temperature and high-pressure environments. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. There are unsolved problems in blade temperature measurement, relating to the emissivity of the blade surface, influences of the combustion gases, and reflections of radiant energy from the surroundings. In this study, the emissivity of blade surfaces has been measured, with errors reduced by a fitting method, influences of the combustion gases have been calculated for different operational conditions, and a reflection model has been built. An iterative computing method is proposed for calculating blade temperatures, and the experimental results show that this method has high precision.

  15. Method of making gas diffusion layers for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Frisk, Joseph William; Boand, Wayne Meredith; Larson, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for making a gas diffusion layer for an electrochemical cell comprising the steps of: a) combining carbon particles and one or more surfactants in a typically aqueous vehicle to make a preliminary composition, typically by high shear mixing; b) adding one or more highly fluorinated polymers to said preliminary composition by low shear mixing to make a coating composition; and c) applying the coating composition to an electrically conductive porous substrate, typically by a low shear coating method.

  16. State-of-the-art evaporation technology: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hasfurther, V.R.; Haass, M.J.

    1986-09-01

    This report discusses evaporation theory, measurement and estimation as well as the effects of water quality on evaporation. Emissions from waste effluents is also mentioned. The theory and equations to represent evaporation using energy balances, mass transport and the combination of these two methods of analysis are presented in detail. Evaporation meters and other techniques for measuring evaporation are reviewed. A discussion of ways to estimate areal evaporation is presented along with criteria which affects evaporation pond design. The effects of chemical monolayers and salinity on the rate of evaporation is cited and discussed to indicated problems associated with most industrial waste effluents. The problem of monitoring emissions resulting from evaporation ponds associated with industrial waste emissions is also presented.

  17. Sodium-limestone double alkali flue gas desulfurization method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.H.; Biolchini, R.J.; Legatski, L.K.

    1983-10-18

    A flue gas desulfurization method is disclosed for efficiently removing sulfur oxides from a gas stream with an aqueous sodium sulfite- and sodium bisulfite-containing absorption solution, in which absorber effluent solution at a pH of 5.8 to 6.6 and having an active sodium concentration of from 0.5 M to 0.9 M is regenerated with sufficient ground limestone to yield a treated solution with a higher pH of from 6.3 to 7.0 and whose bisulfite concentration is reduced by from 35 to 70%

  18. Structure and mechanism of the formation of core-shell nanoparticles obtained through a one-step gas-phase synthesis by electron beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Nomoev, Andrey V; Bardakhanov, Sergey P; Schreiber, Makoto; Bazarova, Dashima G; Romanov, Nikolai A; Baldanov, Boris B; Radnaev, Bair R; Syzrantsev, Viacheslav V

    2015-01-01

    The structure of core-shell Cu@silica and Ag@Si nanoparticles obtained in one-step through evaporation of elemental precursors by a high-powered electron beam are investigated. The structure of the core and shell of the particles are investigated in order to elucidate their mechanisms of formation and factors affecting the synthesis. It is proposed that the formation of Cu@silica particles is mainly driven by surface tension differences between Cu and Si while the formation of Ag@Si particles is mainly driven by differences in the vapour concentration of the two components.

  19. Evaporation of urea at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Andreas M; Czekaj, Izabela; Elsener, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander; Kröcher, Oliver

    2011-03-31

    Aqueous urea solution is widely used as reducing agent in the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) (SCR). Because reports of urea vapor at atmospheric pressure are rare, gaseous urea is usually neglected in computational models used for designing SCR systems. In this study, urea evaporation was investigated under flow reactor conditions, and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of gaseous urea was recorded at atmospheric pressure for the first time. The spectrum was compared to literature data under vacuum conditions and with theoretical spectra of monomolecular and dimeric urea in the gas phase calculated with the density functional theory (DFT) method. Comparison of the spectra indicates that urea vapor is in the monomolecular form at atmospheric pressure. The measured vapor pressure of urea agrees with the thermodynamic data obtained under vacuum reported in the literature. Our results indicate that considering gaseous urea will improve the computational modeling of urea SCR systems.

  20. Analysis of a resistance-energy balance method for estimating daily evaporation from wheat plots using one-time-of-day infrared temperature observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Idso, S. B.; Reginato, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate estimates of evaporation over field-scale or larger areas are needed in hydrologic studies, irrigation scheduling, and meteorology. Remotely sensed surface temperature might be used in a model to calculate evaporation. A resistance-energy balance model, which combines an energy balance equation, the Penman-Monteith (1981) evaporation equation, and van den Honert's (1948) equation for water extraction by plant roots, is analyzed for estimating daily evaporation from wheat using postnoon canopy temperature measurements. Additional data requirements are half-hourly averages of solar radiation, air and dew point temperatures, and wind speed, along with reasonable estimates of canopy emissivity, albedo, height, and leaf area index. Evaporation fluxes were measured in the field by precision weighing lysimeters for well-watered and water-stressed wheat. Errors in computed daily evaporation were generally less than 10 percent, while errors in cumulative evaporation for 10 clear sky days were less than 5 percent for both well-watered and water-stressed wheat. Some results from sensitivity analysis of the model are also given.

  1. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  2. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  3. Segmented inlet nozzle for gas turbine, and methods of installation

    DOEpatents

    Klompas, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle guide vane assembly is formed of individual arcuate nozzle segments. The arcuate nozzle segments are elastically joined to each other to form a complete ring, with edges abutted to prevent leakage. The resultant nozzle ring is included within the overall gas turbine stationary structure and secured by a mounting arrangement which permits relative radial movement at both the inner and outer mountings. A spline-type outer mounting provides circumferential retention. A complete rigid nozzle ring with freedom to "float" radially results. Specific structures are disclosed for the inner and outer mounting arrangements. A specific tie-rod structure is also disclosed for elastically joining the individual nozzle segments. Also disclosed is a method of assembling the nozzle ring subassembly-by-subassembly into a gas turbine employing temporary jacks.

  4. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  5. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, David W.; Haag, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants.

  6. New gas-liquid equilibration method: syringe tonometer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W D; Cutler, C A; Clark, J S

    1981-05-01

    This new apparatus for gas-liquid equilibration (tonometry) in a transportable vessel is designed for tonometry of blood or buffer solution in a specially designed syringe. Gas enters the syringe chamber through small holes in the tip of the syringe plunger and bubbles upward through the sample. The syringe plunger is a second chamber, which is used for warming and humidifying the gas before it enters the tonometer chamber. The entire syringe is housed in a transparent, temperature-controlled environment during equilibration. After equilibration, the sample is easily entered into a blood-gas analyzer. At most, gas-liquid O2/CO2 equilibration for 2.5 mL of buffer or blood requires less than 13 min. Comparisons with a standard thin-film tonometer show good agreement for pO2 and pCO2 over the range 0-93 kPa (0-700 mmHg) and 2-20 kPa (14-150 mmHg), respectively. The syringe tonometer eliminates contamination of the sample during transfer and transport to the analyzer, thus making tonometry more technique-independent. The apparatus is simple and easy to use, with definite advantages over existing methods of tonometry.

  7. Probing the Evaporation Dynamics of Ethanol/Gasoline Biofuel Blends Using Single Droplet Manipulation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Stella; Miles, Rachael E H; McDonald, Craig; Belotti, Yuri; Reid, Jonathan P; Kiefer, Johannes; McGloin, David

    2015-12-24

    Using blends of bioethanol and gasoline as automotive fuel leads to a net decrease in the production of harmful emission compared to the use of pure fossil fuel. However, fuel droplet evaporation dynamics change depending on the mixing ratio. Here we use single particle manipulation techniques to study the evaporation dynamics of ethanol/gasoline blend microdroplets. The use of an electrodynamic balance enables measurements of the evaporation of individual droplets in a controlled environment, while optical tweezers facilitate studies of the behavior of droplets inside a spray. Hence, the combination of both methods is perfectly suited to obtain a complete picture of the evaporation process. The influence of adding varied amounts of ethanol to gasoline is investigated, and we observe that droplets with a greater fraction of ethanol take longer to evaporate. Furthermore, we find that our methods are sensitive enough to observe the presence of trace amounts of water in the droplets. A theoretical model, predicting the evaporation of ethanol and gasoline droplets in dry nitrogen gas, is used to explain the experimental results. Also a theoretical estimation of the saturation of the environment, with other aerosols, in the tweezers is carried out. PMID:26633739

  8. Probing the Evaporation Dynamics of Ethanol/Gasoline Biofuel Blends Using Single Droplet Manipulation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Stella; Miles, Rachael E H; McDonald, Craig; Belotti, Yuri; Reid, Jonathan P; Kiefer, Johannes; McGloin, David

    2015-12-24

    Using blends of bioethanol and gasoline as automotive fuel leads to a net decrease in the production of harmful emission compared to the use of pure fossil fuel. However, fuel droplet evaporation dynamics change depending on the mixing ratio. Here we use single particle manipulation techniques to study the evaporation dynamics of ethanol/gasoline blend microdroplets. The use of an electrodynamic balance enables measurements of the evaporation of individual droplets in a controlled environment, while optical tweezers facilitate studies of the behavior of droplets inside a spray. Hence, the combination of both methods is perfectly suited to obtain a complete picture of the evaporation process. The influence of adding varied amounts of ethanol to gasoline is investigated, and we observe that droplets with a greater fraction of ethanol take longer to evaporate. Furthermore, we find that our methods are sensitive enough to observe the presence of trace amounts of water in the droplets. A theoretical model, predicting the evaporation of ethanol and gasoline droplets in dry nitrogen gas, is used to explain the experimental results. Also a theoretical estimation of the saturation of the environment, with other aerosols, in the tweezers is carried out.

  9. Bulk growth of ninhydrin single crystals by solvent evaporation method and its characterization for SHG and THG applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, N.; Philip, J.; Haranath, D.; Rathi, Brijesh; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Halder, S. K.; Roy, N.; Jayalakshmy, M. S.; Verma, Sunil

    2014-03-01

    Ninhydrin is a well-known compound generally used in amino acid synthesis and also for detecting the latent fingerprints on porous surfaces. Single crystals can be grown by dissolving the compound in double distilled water at ambient temperature, and can be used as a potential material for second and third harmonic generation applications. The grown specimen was subjected to different characterization techniques in order to find out its suitability for device fabrication. Its lattice dimensions have been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and its crystalline quality has been assessed by high resolution X-ray diffraction and X-ray topography methods. The presence of functional groups was identified from HETCOR analysis and confirmed the absence of impurities during crystallization. Its optical properties have been examined by photoluminescence and birefringence analyses. Its thermal parameters such as thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific capacity have been carried out by following photopyroelectric method. Third order nonlinear optical measurements have been carried out using Z-scan technique and its nonlinear optical absorption coefficient has been determined.

  10. Bulk growth of ninhydrin single crystals by solvent evaporation method and its characterization for SHG and THG applications.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, N; Philip, J; Haranath, D; Rathi, Brijesh; Bhagavannarayana, G; Halder, S K; Roy, N; Jayalakshmy, M S; Verma, Sunil

    2014-03-25

    Ninhydrin is a well-known compound generally used in amino acid synthesis and also for detecting the latent fingerprints on porous surfaces. Single crystals can be grown by dissolving the compound in double distilled water at ambient temperature, and can be used as a potential material for second and third harmonic generation applications. The grown specimen was subjected to different characterization techniques in order to find out its suitability for device fabrication. Its lattice dimensions have been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and its crystalline quality has been assessed by high resolution X-ray diffraction and X-ray topography methods. The presence of functional groups was identified from HETCOR analysis and confirmed the absence of impurities during crystallization. Its optical properties have been examined by photoluminescence and birefringence analyses. Its thermal parameters such as thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific capacity have been carried out by following photopyroelectric method. Third order nonlinear optical measurements have been carried out using Z-scan technique and its nonlinear optical absorption coefficient has been determined. PMID:24317258

  11. Bulk growth of ninhydrin single crystals by solvent evaporation method and its characterization for SHG and THG applications.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, N; Philip, J; Haranath, D; Rathi, Brijesh; Bhagavannarayana, G; Halder, S K; Roy, N; Jayalakshmy, M S; Verma, Sunil

    2014-03-25

    Ninhydrin is a well-known compound generally used in amino acid synthesis and also for detecting the latent fingerprints on porous surfaces. Single crystals can be grown by dissolving the compound in double distilled water at ambient temperature, and can be used as a potential material for second and third harmonic generation applications. The grown specimen was subjected to different characterization techniques in order to find out its suitability for device fabrication. Its lattice dimensions have been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and its crystalline quality has been assessed by high resolution X-ray diffraction and X-ray topography methods. The presence of functional groups was identified from HETCOR analysis and confirmed the absence of impurities during crystallization. Its optical properties have been examined by photoluminescence and birefringence analyses. Its thermal parameters such as thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific capacity have been carried out by following photopyroelectric method. Third order nonlinear optical measurements have been carried out using Z-scan technique and its nonlinear optical absorption coefficient has been determined.

  12. The effective encapsulation of a hydrophobic lipid-insoluble drug in solid lipid nanoparticles using a modified double emulsion solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Nabi-Meibodi, Mohsen; Vatanara, Alireza; Najafabadi, Abdolhossein Rouholamini; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Ramezani, Vahid; Gilani, Kambiz; Etemadzadeh, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2013-12-01

    Raloxifene HCl (RH), a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is indicated for the prophylaxis or treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. RH shows extremely poor bioavailability due to limited solubility and an extensive intestinal/hepatic first-pass metabolism. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are valuable carriers that can enhance drug bioavailability. However, in the case of RH, the encapsulation of the drug in SLNs remains a challenge because of its poor solubility in both water and lipids. In this study, a series of RH-containing SLNs (RH-SLNs) were generated using a modified double emulsion solvent evaporation (DESE) method. Briefly, RH with various drug/lipid ratios was solubilized in the inner core of a double emulsion using different water/organic solvent mixtures. Our best formulation was achieved with the formation of negatively charged nanoparticles, 180nm in diameter, with an encapsulation and loading efficiency of 85% and 4.5%, respectively. It also showed a Fickian mechanism of the drug release in the basic dissolution media. Thermal analysis revealed a distinct decrease in the crystallinity of lipids and RH in comparison with the unprocessed materials. The results of a cell viability assay also showed a better antiproliferative effect of the drug-loaded SLNs versus the free drug solution. Thus, these results indicated that the modified DESE method could be proposed for the effective encapsulation of RH in SLNs with appropriate physicochemical and biological properties. PMID:24036624

  13. Thermodynamic evaluation of the CdTe deposition by an elemental co-evaporation method under isothermal transport conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, M.C.R. . E-mail: mriccio@dcmm.puc-rio.br; Cruz, L.R.; Avillez, R.R. de

    2006-01-05

    Thermodynamic potential diagrams were used to predict the conditions for depositing cadmium telluride thin films from two independent elemental sources, Cd and Te, while keeping sources and substrate at the same temperature. The potential diagrams also allowed the evaluation of the influence of gaseous contaminants, such as oxygen, on the formed condensed phases. The method may be applied to the deposition of other compounds as long as their vapor pressures are much smaller than the vapor pressures of the constituent elements. The thermodynamic calculation suggested that the film may be deposited under total pressure of 10-4 mbar and at temperatures as low as 450 deg. C. This total pressure is easily achieved by a mechanical pump and the low temperature range allows the use of low cost glass substrates. The preliminary results showed that the films deposited under the conditions predicted by the thermodynamic calculations were uniform and crystalline, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  14. Evaporation and combustion of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    A description is provided of recent spray evaporation and combustion models, taking into account turbulent two- and three-dimensional spray processes found in furnaces, gas turbine combustors, and internal combustion engines. Within the class of spray models of interest, two major categories are distinguished, including locally homogeneous flow (LHF) models and separated flow (SF) models. SF models are of the greatest practical importance, but LHF models have distinct advantages in some cases. Attention is also given to recent progress on modeling interactions between drops and the flow in both dilute and dense sprays, involving sprays having low and high liquid volume fractions, respectively.

  15. Towards a robust evaporation-based disaggregation method of SMOS soil moisture by combining high-resolution shortwave/thermal and available meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiana Stefan, Vivien; Merlin, Olivier; José Escorihuela, Maria; AïtHssaine, Bouchra; Molero, Beatriz; Ezzahar, Jamal; Er-Raki, Salah; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Kerr, Yann

    2016-04-01

    The majority of hydrological and agricultural applications require high-resolution soil moisture (SM) information. To improve the spatial resolution of SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) SM, a downscaling algorithm is applied to the 40 km resolution SMOS level 3 product using 1 km resolution MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) shortwave and thermal data. The DISPATCH (DISaggregation based on a Physical and Theoretical Scale CHange) algorithm converts soil temperature data into SM data using a soil evaporative efficiency (SEE) model and a first order Taylor series expansion. The current version of DISPATCH is contextual, meaning that the MODIS-derived SEE is a function of temperature endmembers (Tends), which are determined from the image-based trapezoid method. However, limitations concerning the estimation of Tends arise when fully dry and fully wet conditions are not met within the scene at the observation resolution. Therefore, in order to improve DISPATCH's robustness in such conditions, the aim of this paper is to estimate Tends independently of shortwave/thermal data using an energy balance model forced by meteorological data. As a mean to evaluate the new algorithm, results are analyzed in terms of both disaggregated SM with respect to in situ 0-5 cm measurements and DISPATCH-derived SEE with respect to theoretical models. The approach is tested over a mixed irrigated and dry land area located in Catalunya, Spain, spanning 2011 and 2012. When comparing 40 km SMOS and 1 km disaggregated SM data with the in situ measurements, results indicate that DISPATCH improves the spatio-temporal correlation with in situ measurements. Moreover, disaggregation results are further improved by integrating the energy balance model in the methodology. The representation of SEE is also enhanced, proving that meteorological data foster the physical link between shortwave/thermal and SM data within the disaggregation method. The synergy between SEE modeling

  16. An evaporative and engine-cycle model for fuel octane sensitivity prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, D.P.; Taylor, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Motor Octane Number (MON) ranks fuels by their chemical resistance to knock. Evaporative cooling coupled with fuel chemistry determine Research Octane Number (RON) antiknock ratings. It is shown in this study that fuel Octane sensitivity (numerically RON minus MON) is liked to an important difference between the two test methods; the RON test allows each fuel`s evaporative cooling characteristics to affect gas temperature, while the MON test generally eliminates this effect by pre-evaporation. In order to establish RON test charge temperatures, a computer model of fuel evaporation was adapted to Octane Engine conditions, and simulations were compared with real Octane Test Engine measurements including droplet and gas temperatures. A novel gas temperature probe yielded data that corresponded well with model predictions. Tests spanned single component fuels and blends of isomers, n-paraffins, aromatics and alcohols. Commercially available automotive and aviation gasolines were also tested. A good correlation was observed between the computer predictions and measured temperature data across the range of pure fuels and blends. A numerical method to estimate the effect of precombustion temperature differences on Octane sensitivity was developed and applied to analyze these data, and was found to predict the widely disparate sensitivities of the tested fuels with accuracy. Data are presented showing mixture temperature histories of various tested fuels, and consequent sensitivity predictions. It is concluded that a fuel`s thermal-evaporative behavior gives rise to fuel Octane sensitivity as measured by differences between the RON and MON tests. This is demonstrated by the success, over a wide range of fuels, of the sensitivity predictor method describes. Evaporative cooling, must therefore be regarded as an important parameter affecting the general road performance of automobiles.

  17. Method for minimizing recycling in an unsaturated gas plant

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.

    1986-08-12

    A method is described of operating an unsaturated gas plant, wherein the plant comprises first means for receiving a low pressure gas input and for providing a liquid output and a gaseous output, an absorber for receiving an unstabilized gasoline input and a hydrocarbon oil input, a stripper and a low temperature separator for providing an overhead output to the absorber and a bottoms output to the stripper. The method consists of: (a) mixing the liquid output from the first means, the gaseous output from the first means, bottoms product from the absorber and overhead products from the stripper; (b) separating the mixture provided in step (a) into a liquid hydrocarbon portion and a gaseous portion; (c) introducing the liquid hydrocarbon portion into an upper section of the stripper; and (d) introducing the gaseous portion into the low temperature separator.

  18. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  19. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Skorpik, James R.; Dodson, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

  20. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Skorpik, J.R.; Dodson, M.G.

    1999-05-25

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846. 8 figs.

  1. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  2. The high water solubility of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD prepared and characterized by the emulsion solvent evaporation and the freeze drying combination method.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yuangang; Wu, Weiwei; Zhao, Xiuhua; Li, Yong; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Yin

    2014-12-30

    This study selected γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) as the inclusion material and prepared inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD by the emulsion solvent evaporation and the freeze drying combination method to achieve the improvement of the solubility and oral bioavailability of taxifolin. We selected ethyl acetate as the oil phase, deionized water as the water phase. The taxifolin emulsion was prepared using adjustable speed homogenate machine in the process of this experiment, whose particle size was related to the concentration of taxifolin solution, the volume ratio of water phase to oil phase, the speed and time of homogenate. We knew through the single-factor test that, the optimum conditions were: the concentration of taxifolin solution was 40 mg/ml, the volume ratio of water phase to oil phase was 1.5, the speed of homogenate was 5,000 rpm, the homogenate time was 11 min. Taxifolin emulsion with a MPS of 142.5 nm was obtained under the optimum conditions, then the high-concentration taxifolin solution (3mg/ml) was obtained by the rotary evaporation process. Finally, the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD was prepared by vacuum freeze-dry. The characteristics of the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD were analyzed using SEM, FTIR, XRD, DSC, and TG. The FTIR results analyzed the interaction of taxifolin and γ-CD and determined the molecular structure of the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD. The analysis results of XRD, DSC and TG indicated that the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD was obtained and showed significantly different characteristics with taxifolin. In addition, dissolving capability test, antioxidant capacity test, solvent residue test were also carried out. The experimental datas showed that the solubility of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD at 25°C and 37°C were about 18.5 times and 19.8 times of raw taxifolin, the dissolution rate of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD were about 2.84 times of raw taxifolin, the bioavailability of

  3. Methods to produce calibration mixtures for anesthetic gas monitors and how to perform volumetric calculations on anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P L; Nielsen, J; Kann, T

    1992-10-01

    A simple procedure for making calibration mixtures of oxygen and the anesthetic gases isoflurane, enflurane, and halothane is described. One to ten grams of the anesthetic substance is evaporated in a closed, 11,361-cc glass bottle filled with oxygen gas at atmospheric pressure. The carefully mixed gas is used to calibrate anesthetic gas monitors. By comparison of calculated and measured volumetric results it is shown that at atmospheric conditions the volumetric behavior of anesthetic gas mixtures can be described with reasonable accuracy using the ideal gas law. A procedure is described for calculating the deviation from ideal gas behavior in cases in which this is needed. PMID:1453187

  4. Effect of selenium doping on structural and optical properties of SnS:Se thin films by electron beam evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Johnson; Mohanraj, Kannusamy; Kannan, Selvaraj; Barathan, Seshathri; Sivakumar, Ganesan

    2013-01-01

    SnS nanoparticle has been synthesized initially using SnCl2 · 2H2O and Na2S · XH2O, in the presence of TEA by precipitation method and XRD and FTIR techniques have been used for characterization of the sample. Powder X-ray diffraction studies revealed the particle size to be 48 nm and the pattern represents polycrystalline herzenbergite orthorhombic crystal structure of SnS. The FTIR result also confirmed the SnS at 2354 cm-1. Secondly SnS:Se thin films have been deposited on glass substrates by electron beam evaporation technique and the films were annealed at 100 °C and 200 °C for 1 h. The unannealed films are amorphous in nature and the annealed film shows that a sharp crystalline peak is due to SnS. Also a peak is shown at 2θ = 14.39°, which is due to characteristic peak of SnSe2, established by their XRD patterns. The band gap energy (Eg) was determined from transmission spectra and an optical band gap of Eg varies from 1.6 eV to 1.79 eV.

  5. Preparation and characterization of polylactic acid microspheres containing water-soluble dyes using a novel w/o/w emulsion solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Yoshida, K; Goto, S

    1996-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres containing soluble dyes as water-soluble model compounds were prepared using the water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation method. Addition of electrolytes such as NaCl or CaCl2 into the external aqueous phase significantly improved brilliant blue (BB) entrapment efficiency compared to the case of no additives. NaCl was the most effective for obtaining high entrapment efficiency (80-90% of theoretical BB content). The average diameter of the obtained microspheres was in the region of 10-20 microns in all cases. PLA microspheres containing 5 and 10% (w/w) BB exhibited the so-called burst release. The release rate decreased with decrease in the internal aqueous droplet volume in the preparation process. In particular, with PLA microspheres containing 5% (w/w) BB, those prepared with the smallest internal droplet volume (63 microliter), the initial burst release was reduced significantly, and 50% (w/w) of the loaded BB remained in the microspheres for 7 days. PMID:8999126

  6. Quality by design case study 1: Design of 5-fluorouracil loaded lipid nanoparticles by the W/O/W double emulsion - Solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Amasya, Gulin; Badilli, Ulya; Aksu, Buket; Tarimci, Nilufer

    2016-03-10

    With Quality by Design (QbD), a systematic approach involving design and development of all production processes to achieve the final product with a predetermined quality, you work within a design space that determines the critical formulation and process parameters. Verification of the quality of the final product is no longer necessary. In the current study, the QbD approach was used in the preparation of lipid nanoparticle formulations to improve skin penetration of 5-Fluorouracil, a widely-used compound for treating non-melanoma skin cancer. 5-Fluorouracil-loaded lipid nanoparticles were prepared by the W/O/W double emulsion - solvent evaporation method. Artificial neural network software was used to evaluate the data obtained from the lipid nanoparticle formulations, to establish the design space, and to optimize the formulations. Two different artificial neural network models were developed. The limit values of the design space of the inputs and outputs obtained by both models were found to be within the knowledge space. The optimal formulations recommended by the models were prepared and the critical quality attributes belonging to those formulations were assigned. The experimental results remained within the design space limit values. Consequently, optimal formulations with the critical quality attributes determined to achieve the Quality Target Product Profile were successfully obtained within the design space by following the QbD steps.

  7. Methods to optimize myxobacterial fermentations using off-gas analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The influence of carbon dioxide and oxygen on microbial secondary metabolite producers and the maintenance of these two parameters at optimal levels have been studied extensively. Nevertheless, most studies have focussed on their influence on specific product formation and condition optimization of established processes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the influence of reduced or elevated carbon dioxide and oxygen levels on the overall metabolite profiles of the investigated organisms. The synergistic action of both gases has garnered even less attention. Results We show that the composition of the gas phase is highly important for the production of different metabolites and present a simple approach that enables the maintenance of defined concentrations of both O2 and CO2 during bioprocesses over broad concentration ranges with a minimal instrumental setup by using endogenously produced CO2. The metabolite profiles of a myxobacterium belonging to the genus Chondromyces grown under various concentrations of CO2 and O2 showed considerable differences. Production of two unknown, highly cytotoxic compounds and one antimicrobial substance was found to increase depending on the gas composition. In addition, the observation of CO2 and O2 in the exhaust gas allowed optimization and control of production processes. Conclusions Myxobacteria are becoming increasingly important due to their potential for bioactive secondary metabolite production. Our studies show that the influence of different gas partial pressures should not be underestimated during screening processes for novel compounds and that our described method provides a simple tool to investigate this question. PMID:22571441

  8. Evaporation of a Non-Dilute, Multi-Component Liquid Mixture from a Porous Wick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyhaghi, Saman; Pillai, Krishna M.; Qadah, Diab T.; Dietz, Mark L.

    2010-05-01

    Modeling flow, evaporation and transport of multicomponent liquids remains one of the most challenging problems in porous media studies. Slow evaporation under isothermal conditions of a non-dilute multi-component liquid mixture from a cylindrical porous wick made of sintered polymer beads is studied in this paper. Since the rate of mass evaporation from wick top is much smaller than the rate of capillary-pressure-driven liquid imbibition, the wick is considered fully saturated while the evaporation from wick top is modeled as a boundary effect. A volume-averaged model based on the work by Quintard and Whitaker is employed for the nonlinear species-transport equation inside the fully-saturated porous medium. An implicit finite-difference method is employed to solve the governing equations in a one-dimensional domain representing the cylindrical wick. The Darcy velocity inside the wick is determined from the evaporation rate at the wick-top, which in turn is a function of mole-fractions of all components at the gas-liquid interface. A flux-balance condition, based on the overall mole-balance for each component, is employed to develop a mole-fraction boundary-condition at the wick-bottom interface with a liquid container. Results of this simulation are compared with experiments for a mixture of n-Decane, n-Dodecane and n-Hexadecane; reasonable agreement is observed for the evaporation rate at the wick top, and the component concentration distributions along the wick.

  9. An evaluation of models of bare soil evaporation formulated with different land surface boundary conditions and assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Kathleen M.; Ngo, Viet V.; Cihan, Abdullah; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2012-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance. However, there is no agreement on the best modeling methodology to determine evaporation under different atmospheric boundary conditions. Also, there is a lack of directly measured soil evaporation data for model validation to compare these methods to establish the validity of their mathematical formulations. Thus, a need exists to systematically compare evaporation estimates using existing methods to experimental observations. The goal of this work is to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations that are used to estimate evaporation from bare soils to critically investigate various formulations and surface boundary conditions. Such a comparison required the development of a numerical model that has the ability to incorporate these boundary conditions. For this model, we modified a previously developed theory that allows nonequilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and wind boundary conditions were generated, and results from numerical simulations were compared with experimental data. Results demonstrate that the approaches based on different boundary conditions varied in their ability to capture different stages of evaporation. All approaches have benefits and limitations, and no one approach can be deemed most appropriate for every scenario. Comparisons of different formulations of the surface boundary condition validate the need for further research on heat and vapor transport processes in soil for better modeling accuracy.

  10. Gravimetric methods for the preparation of standard gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Vargha, G. M.; Brown, A. S.

    2011-10-01

    The most widely used method for the preparation of primary standard gas mixtures involves weighing the individual components into a cylinder. We present a new mathematical description of the method and its uncertainties. We use this to demonstrate how strategies for serial dilution can be identified that minimize the uncertainty in the final mixture and show how they can be implemented practically. We review published reports of high accuracy gravimetry and give examples of relative uncertainties in the composition of standards approaching 1 part-per-million in the best cases and in the range of 100 to 1000 parts-per-million more typically.

  11. Statistical Methods Handbook for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Einerson

    2005-05-01

    Fuel materials such as kernels, coated particles, and compacts are being manufactured for experiments simulating service in the next generation of high temperature gas reactors. These must meet predefined acceptance specifications. Many tests are performed for quality assurance, and many of these correspond to criteria that must be met with specified confidence, based on random samples. This report describes the statistical methods to be used. The properties of the tests are discussed, including the risk of false acceptance, the risk of false rejection, and the assumption of normality. Methods for calculating sample sizes are also described.

  12. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient 'green technique', gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kg m(-2) h(-1)) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry. PMID:25819091

  13. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-03-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient `green technique', gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm-2h-1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry.

  14. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient ‘green technique’, gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm−2h−1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry. PMID:25819091

  15. CAPSULE REPORT: EVAPORATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaporation has been an established technology in the metal finishing industry for many years. In this process, wastewaters containing reusable materials, such as copper, nickel, or chromium compounds are heated, producing a water vapor that is continuously removed and condensed....

  16. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  17. Mixed feed evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Vakil, Himanshu B.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1982-01-01

    In the preparation of the gaseous reactant feed to undergo a chemical reaction requiring the presence of steam, the efficiency of overall power utilization is improved by premixing the gaseous reactant feed with water and then heating to evaporate the water in the presence of the gaseous reactant feed, the heating fluid utilized being at a temperature below the boiling point of water at the pressure in the volume where the evaporation occurs.

  18. Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deol, Pukhraj; Heitman, Josh; Amoozegar, Aziz; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Accurate quantification of energy and mass transfer during soil water evaporation is critical for improving understanding of the hydrologic cycle and for many environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. Drying of soil under radiation boundary conditions results in formation of a dry surface layer (DSL), which is accompanied by a shift in the position of the latent heat sink from the surface to the subsurface. Detailed investigation of evaporative dynamics within this active near-surface zone has mostly been limited to modeling, with few measurements available to test models. Soil column studies were conducted to quantify nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles using a sensible heat balance (SHB) approach. Eleven-needle heat pulse probes were used to measure soil temperature and thermal property distributions at the millimeter scale in the near-surface soil. Depth-integrated SHB evaporation rates were compared with mass balance evaporation estimates under controlled laboratory conditions. The results show that the SHB method effectively measured total subsurface evaporation rates with only 0.01-0.03 mm h-1difference from mass balance estimates. The SHB approach also quantified millimeter-scale nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles over a drying event, which has not been previously possible. Thickness of the DSL was also examined using measured soil thermal conductivity distributions near the drying surface. Estimates of the DSL thickness were consistent with observed evaporation profile distributions from SHB. Estimated thickness of the DSL was further used to compute diffusive vapor flux. The diffusive vapor flux also closely matched both mass balance evaporation rates and subsurface evaporation rates estimated from SHB.

  19. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  20. Selecting the optimal method to calculate daily global reference potential evaporation from CFSR reanalysis data for application in a hydrological model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperna Weiland, F. C.; Tisseuil, C.; Dürr, H. H.; Vrac, M.; van Beek, L. P. H.

    2012-03-01

    Potential evaporation (PET) is one of the main inputs of hydrological models. Yet, there is limited consensus on which PET equation is most applicable in hydrological climate impact assessments. In this study six different methods to derive global scale reference PET daily time series from Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data are compared: Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor and original and re-calibrated versions of the Hargreaves and Blaney-Criddle method. The calculated PET time series are (1) evaluated against global monthly Penman-Monteith PET time series calculated from CRU data and (2) tested on their usability for modeling of global discharge cycles. A major finding is that for part of the investigated basins the selection of a PET method may have only a minor influence on the resulting river flow. Within the hydrological model used in this study the bias related to the PET method tends to decrease while going from PET, AET and runoff to discharge calculations. However, the performance of individual PET methods appears to be spatially variable, which stresses the necessity to select the most accurate and spatially stable PET method. The lowest root mean squared differences and the least significant deviations (95% significance level) between monthly CFSR derived PET time series and CRU derived PET were obtained for a cell-specific re-calibrated Blaney-Criddle equation. However, results show that this re-calibrated form is likely to be unstable under changing climate conditions and less reliable for the calculation of daily time series. Although often recommended, the Penman-Monteith equation applied to the CFSR data did not outperform the other methods in a evaluation against PET derived with the Penman-Monteith equation from CRU data. In arid regions (e.g. Sahara, central Australia, US deserts), the equation resulted in relatively low PET values and, consequently, led to relatively high discharge values for dry basins (e.g. Orange, Murray and

  1. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McManus, G.J.; Motes, B.G.; Bird, S.K.; Kotter, D.K.

    1996-03-26

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, is composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method is described for obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant. 3 figs.

  2. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McManus, Gary J.; Motes, Billy G.; Bird, Susan K.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method of obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant.

  3. Development of NDE methods for hot gas filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Lee, H.; Spohnholtz, T.; Sun, J. G.

    1999-07-21

    Ceramic hot gas candle filters are currently under development for hot gas particulate cleanup in advanced coal-based power systems. The ceramic materials for these filters include nonoxide monolithic, nonoxide-fiber-reinforced composites, and nonoxide reticulated foam. A concern is the lack of reliable data on which to base decisions for reusing or replacing hot gas filters during plant shutdowns. The work in this project is aimed at developing nondestructive evaluation (FIDE) technology to allow detection, and determination of extent, of life-limiting characteristics such as thermal fatigue, oxidation, damage from ash bridging such as localized cracking, damage from local burning, and elongation at elevated temperature. Although in-situ NDE methods are desirable in order to avoid disassembly of the candle filter vessels, the current vessel designs, the presence of filter cakes and possible ash bridging, and the state of NDE technology prevent this. Candle filter producers use a variety of NDE methods to ensure as-produced quality. While impact acoustic resonance offers initial promise for examining new as-produced filters and for detecting damage in some monolithic filters when removed from service, it presents difficulties in data interpretation, it lacks localization capability, and its applicability to composites has yet to be demonstrated. Additional NDE technologies being developed and evaluated in this program and whose applicability to both monolithics and composites has been demonstrated include (a) full-scale thermal imaging for analyzing thermal property variations; (b) fret, high-spatial-resolution X-ray imaging for detecting density variations and dimensional changes; (c) air-coupled ultrasonic methods for determining through-thickness compositional variations; and (d) acoustic emission technology with mechanical loading for detecting localized bulk damage. New and exposed clay-bonded SiC filters and CVI-SiC composite filters have been tested with

  4. Usability of calcium carbide gas pressure method in hydrological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsoy, S.; Ozgur, M.; Keskin, E.; Yilmaz, C.

    2013-10-01

    Soil moisture is a key engineering variable with major influence on ecological and hydrological processes as well as in climate, weather, agricultural, civil and geotechnical applications. Methods for quantification of the soil moisture are classified into three main groups: (i) measurement with remote sensing, (ii) estimation via (soil water balance) simulation models, and (iii) measurement in the field (ground based). Remote sensing and simulation modeling require rapid ground truthing with one of the ground based methods. Calcium carbide gas pressure (CCGP) method is a rapid measurement procedure for obtaining soil moisture and relies on the chemical reaction of the calcium carbide reagent with the water in soil pores. However, the method is overlooked in hydrological science applications. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the usability of the CCGP method in comparison with standard oven-drying and dielectric methods in terms of accuracy, time efficiency, operational ease, cost effectiveness and safety for quantification of the soil moisture over a wide range of soil types. The research involved over 250 tests that were carried out on 15 different soil types. It was found that the accuracy of the method is mostly within ±1% of soil moisture deviation range in comparison to oven-drying, and that CCGP method has significant advantages over dielectric methods in terms of accuracy, cost, operational ease and time efficiency for the purpose of ground truthing.

  5. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for hot gas filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Sun, J. G.; Deemer, C.; Lee, H.; Spohnholtz, T.; Energy Technology

    1999-01-01

    Rigid ceramic hot gas candle filters are currently under development for high-temperature hot gas particulate cleanup in advanced coal-based power systems. The ceramic materials for these filters include monolithics (usually non-oxides), oxide and non-oxide fiber-reinforced composites, and recrystallized silicon carbide. A concern of end users in using these types of filters, where over 3000 may be used in a single installation, is the lack of a data base on which to base decisions for reusing, replacing or predicting remaining life during plant shutdowns. One method to improve confidence of usage is to develop nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology to provide surveillance methods for determination of the extent of damage or of life-limiting characteristics such as thermal fatigue, oxidation, damage from ash bridging such as localized cracking, damage from local burning, and elongation at elevated temperatures. Although in situ NDE methods would be desirable in order to avoid disassembly of the candle filter vessels, the possible presence of filter cakes and/or ash bridging, and the state of current NDE technology prevent this. Thus, off-line NDE methods, if demonstrated to be reliable, fast and cost effective, could be a significant step forward in developing confidence in utilization of rigid ceramic hot gas filters. Recently, NDE methods have been developed which show promise of providing information to build this confidence. Acousto-ultrasound, a totally nondestructive method, together with advanced digital signal processing, has been demonstrated to provide excellent correlation with remaining strength on new, as-produced filters, and for detecting damage in some monolithic filters when removed from service. Thermal imaging, with digital signal processing for determining through-wall thermal diffusivity, has also been demonstrated to correlate with remaining strength in both new (as-received) and in-service filters. Impact acoustic resonance using a

  6. The study on the interdependence of spray characteristics and evaporation history of fuel spray in high temperature air crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. Y.; Chin, J. S.

    1986-06-01

    A numerical calculation method is used to predict the variation of the characteristics of fuel spray moving in a high temperature air crossflow, mainly, Sauter mean diameter SMD, droplet size distribution index N of Rosin-Rammler distribution and evaporation percentage changing with downstream distance X from the nozzle. The effect of droplet heat-up period evaporation process and forced convection are taken into full account; thus, the calculation model is a very good approximation to the process of spray evaporation in a practical combustor, such as ramjet, aero-gas turbine, liquid propellant rocket, diesel and other liquid fuel-powered combustion devices. The changes of spray characteristics N, SMD and spray evaporation percentage with air velocity, pressure, temperature, fuel injection velocity, and the initial spray parameters are presented.

  7. Films of brookite TiO2 nanorods/nanoparticles deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation as NO2 gas-sensing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Buonsanti, R.; Catalano, M.; Cesaria, M.; Cozzoli, P. D.; Luches, A.; Manera, M. G.; Martino, M.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R.

    2011-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods in the brookite phase, with average dimensions of 3-4 nm × 20-50 nm, were synthesized by a wet-chemical aminolysis route and used as precursors for thin films that were deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique. A nanorod solution in toluene (0.016 wt% TiO2) was frozen at the liquid-nitrogen temperature and irradiated with a KrF excimer laser at a fluence of 350 mJ/cm2 and repetition rate of 10 Hz. Single-crystal Si wafers, silica slides, carbon-coated Cu grids and alumina interdigitated slabs were used as substrates to allow performing different characterizations. Films fabricated with 6000 laser pulses had an average thickness of ˜150 nm, and a complete coverage of the selected substrate as achieved. High-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations evidenced the formation of quite rough films incorporating individually distinguishable TiO2 nanorods and crystalline spherical nanoparticles with an average diameter of ˜13 nm. Spectrophotometric analysis showed high transparency through the UV-Vis spectral range. Promising resistive sensing responses to 1 ppm of NO2 mixed in dry air were obtained.

  8. Method and apparatus for dispensing compressed natural gas and liquified natural gas to natural gas powered vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis A.; Clark, Michael L.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Palmer, Gary L.

    2005-05-31

    A fueling facility and method for dispensing liquid natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG) or both on-demand. The fueling facility may include a source of LNG, such as cryogenic storage vessel. A low volume high pressure pump is coupled to the source of LNG to produce a stream of pressurized LNG. The stream of pressurized LNG may be selectively directed through an LNG flow path or to a CNG flow path which includes a vaporizer configured to produce CNG from the pressurized LNG. A portion of the CNG may be drawn from the CNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of LNG flowing therethrough. Similarly, a portion of the LNG may be drawn from the LNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of CNG flowing therethrough.

  9. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios.

  10. Computation of Pressurized Gas Bearings Using CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cioc, Sorin; Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Fleming, David P.

    2003-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is extended to compute compressible viscous flows in pressurized thin fluid films. This numerical scheme has previously been used successfully to solve a wide variety of compressible flow problems, including flows with large and small discontinuities. In this paper, the method is applied to calculate the pressure distribution in a hybrid gas journal bearing. The formulation of the problem is presented, including the modeling of the feeding system. the numerical results obtained are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between the computed results and the test data were obtained, and thus validate the CE/SE method to solve such problems.

  11. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios. PMID:27265004

  12. Total introduction of microsamples in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry by high-temperature evaporation chamber with a sheathing gas stream.

    PubMed

    Grotti, Marco; Ardini, Francisco; Todolì, Josè Luis

    2013-03-12

    A systematic study on the high-temperature Torch Integrated Sample Introduction System (TISIS) for use in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been performed. The investigation included the optimization of the relevant parameters (chamber temperature, sheathing gas flow rate, nebulizer gas flow rate, sample uptake rate), the evaluation of its performance characteristics (sensitivity, limits of detection, stability, memory effects, use with the dynamic reaction cell) and representative applications to environmental, biological and clinical samples. Under the optimal conditions (T=150°C; nebulizer gas flow rate of 0.7Lmin(-1) along with sheathing gas flow rate of 0.35Lmin(-1) and a sample uptake rate of 20μLmin(-1)), the sensitivity was from 2 to 8 times higher than that measured using a conventional micronebulizer/mini-spray chamber system, due to the enhanced analyte mass transport toward the plasma and the solvent introduction in the vapour form. In addition, for several elements, TISIS provided lower limits of detection than the conventional system, even when the latter worked at 5-fold higher sample uptake rate. Short-term and long-term precision was better than 5%. Spectroscopic interferences arising from common matrices were efficiently removed by the dynamic reaction cell technique. The application of TISIS/ICP-MS to representative certified reference samples (spinach leaves, marine plankton, bone tissue, human blood) proved the suitability of this system for the accurate analysis of limited-size samples.

  13. Method For Enhanced Gas Monitoring In High Density Flow Streams

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Mulderink, Kenneth A.; Marin, Ovidiu

    2005-09-13

    A method for conducting laser absorption measurements in high temperature process streams having high levels of particulate matter is disclosed. An impinger is positioned substantially parallel to a laser beam propagation path and at upstream position relative to the laser beam. Beam shielding pipes shield the beam from the surrounding environment. Measurement is conducted only in the gap between the two shielding pipes where the beam propagates through the process gas. The impinger facilitates reduced particle presence in the measurement beam, resulting in improved SNR (signal-to-noise) and improved sensitivity and dynamic range of the measurement.

  14. Average wave function method for gas-surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harjinder; Dacol, Dalcio K.; Rabitz, Herschel

    1986-02-01

    The average wave function method (AWM) is applied to scattering of a gas off a solid surface. The formalism is developed for both periodic as well as disordered surfaces. For an ordered lattice an explicit relation is derived for the Bragg peaks along with a numerical illustration. Numerical results are presented for atomic clusters on a flat hard wall with a Gaussian-like potential at each atomic scattering site. The effect of relative lateral displacement of two clusters upon the scattering pattern is shown. The ability of AWM to accommodate disorder through statistical averaging over cluster configurations is illustrated. Enhanced uniform backscattering is observed with increasing roughness on the surface.

  15. New Methods for Gas Hydrate Energy and Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppel, C. D.; Pohlman, J.; Waite, W. F.; Hunt, A. G.; Stern, L. A.; Casso, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few years, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project has focused on advancements designed to enhance both energy resource and climate-hydrate interaction studies. On the energy side, the USGS now manages the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs), which includes the Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) that we have long maintained. These tools, originally built at Georgia Tech, are being used to analyze hydrate-bearing sediments recovered in pressure cores during gas hydrate drilling programs (e.g., Nankai 2012; India 2015). The USGS is now modifying the PCCTs for use on high-hydrate-saturation and sand-rich sediments and hopes to catalyze third-party tool development (e.g., visualization). The IPTC is also being used for experiments on sediments hosting synthetic methane hydrate, and our scanning electron microscope has recently been enhanced with a new cryo-stage for imaging hydrates. To support climate-hydrate interaction studies, the USGS has been re-assessing the amount of methane hydrate in permafrost-associated settings at high northern latitudes and examined the links between methane carbon emissions and gas hydrate dissociation. One approach relies on the noble gas signature of methane emissions. Hydrate dissociation uniquely releases noble gases partitioned by molecular weight, providing a potential fingerprint for hydrate-sourced methane emissions. In addition, we have linked a DOC analyzer with an IRMS at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, allowing rapid and precise measurement of DOC and DIC concentrations and carbon isotopic signatures. The USGS has also refined methods to measure real-time sea-air flux of methane and CO2 using cavity ring-down spectroscopy measurements coupled with other data. Acquiring ~8000 km of data on the Western Arctic, US Atlantic, and Svalbard margins, we have tested the Arctic methane catastrophe hypothesis and the link between seafloor methane emissions and sea-air methane flux.

  16. Waste tank ventilation rates measured with a tracer gas method

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mitroshkov, A.V.

    1998-08-01

    Passive ventilation with the atmosphere is used to prevent accumulation of waste gases and vapors in the headspaces of 132 of the 177 high-level radioactive waste Tanks at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. Measurements of the passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of two key safety issues associated with the rates of flammable gas production and accumulation and the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out. Direct measurement of passive ventilation rates using mass flow meters is not feasible because ventilation occurs va multiple pathways to the atmosphere (i.e., via the filtered breather riser and unsealed tank risers and pits), as well as via underground connections to other tanks, junction boxes, and inactive ventilation systems. The tracer gas method discussed in this report provides a direct measurement of the rate at which gases are removed by ventilation and an indirect measurement of the ventilation rate. The tracer gas behaves as a surrogate of the waste-generated gases, but it is only diminished via ventilation, whereas the waste gases are continuously released by the waste and may be subject to depletion mechanisms other than ventilation. The fiscal year 1998 tracer studies provide new evidence that significant exchange of air occurs between tanks via the underground cascade pipes. Most of the single-shell waste tanks are connected via 7.6-cm diameter cascade pipes to one or two adjacent tanks. Tracer gas studies of the Tank U-102/U-103 system indicated that the ventilation occurring via the cascade line could be a significant fraction of the total ventilation. In this two-tank cascade, air evidently flowed from Tank U-103 to Tank U-102 for a time and then was observed to flow from Tank U-102 to Tank U-103.

  17. Tank 26 Evaporator Feed Pump Transfer Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, David; Dimenna, Richard; Lee, Si

    2009-02-11

    The transfer of liquid salt solution from Tank 26 to an evaporator is to be accomplished by activating the evaporator feed pump, located approximately 72 inches above the sludge layer, while simultaneously turning on the downcomer. Previously, activation of the evaporator feed pump was an isolated event without any other components running at the same time. An analysis of the dissolved solution transfer has been performed using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the amount of entrained sludge solids pumped out of the tank to the evaporator with the downcomer turned on. The analysis results showed that, for the maximum and minimum supernate levels in Tank 26 (252.5 and 72 inches above the sludge layer, respectively), the evaporator feed pump will entrain between 0.03 and 0.1 wt% sludge undissolved solids weight fraction into the eductor, respectively, and therefore are an order of magnitude less than the 1.0 wt% undissolved solids loading criteria to feed the evaporator. Lower tank liquid levels, with respect to the sludge layer, result in higher amounts of sludge entrainment due to the increased velocity of the plunging jets from the downcomer and evaporator feed pump bypass as well as decreased dissipation depth. Revision 1 clarifies the analysis presented in Revision 0 and corrects a mathematical error in the calculations for Table 4.1 in Revision 0. However, the conclusions and recommendations of the analysis do not change for Revision 1.

  18. Estimating soil water evaporation using radar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, Ali M.; Scott, H. D.; Waite, W. P.; Asrar, G.

    1988-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to evaluate the application of radar reflectivity as compared with the shortwave reflectivity (albedo) used in the Idso-Jackson equation for the estimation of daily evaporation under overcast sky and subhumid climatic conditions. Soil water content, water potential, shortwave and radar reflectivity, and soil and air temperatures were monitored during three soil drying cycles. The data from each cycle were used to calculate daily evaporation from the Idso-Jackson equation and from two other standard methods, the modified Penman and plane of zero-flux. All three methods resulted in similar estimates of evaporation under clear sky conditions; however, under overcast sky conditions, evaporation fluxes computed from the Idso-Jackson equation were consistently lower than the other two methods. The shortwave albedo values in the Idso-Jackson equation were then replaced with radar reflectivities and a new set of total daily evaporation fluxes were calculated. This resulted in a significant improvement in computed soil evaporation fluxes from the Idso-Jackson equation, and a better agreement between the three methods under overcast sky conditions.

  19. Groundwater changes in evaporating basins using gypsum crystals' isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Bustos, D.; Allwood, A.; Coleman, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    While the dynamics of groundwater evaporation are well known, it is still challenging to reconstruct the water patterns in areas where water is not available anymore. We selected a specific location in White Sands National Monument (WSNM), New Mexico, to validate a method to extract information from hydrated minerals regarding past groundwater evaporation patterns in evaporitic basins. WSNM has gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) dunes and crystals precipitated from the evaporation of an ancient lake. Our approach aims to extract the water of crystallization of gypsum and measure its oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions, in order to reconstruct the groundwater history of the area. The idea is that as the mother brine evaporates its isotopic composition changes continuously, recorded as water of crystallization in successive growth zones of gypsum. To check if the isotopic composition of the salt could effectively differentiate between distinctive humidity conditions, the methodology was tested first on synthetic gypsum grown under controlled humidity and temperature conditions. T and RH% were maintained constant in a glove box and precipitated gypsum was harvested every 24 hours. d2H and d18O of water of crystallization from the synthetic gypsum was extracted using a specially developed technique on a TC/EA. The brine was measured using a Gas Bench II for d18O and an H-Device for d2H on a Thermo Finnigan MAT 253 mass spectrometer. With the method tested, we measured natural gypsum. In order to identify the growth zones we mapped the surface of the crystals using an experimental space flight XRF instrument. Crystals were then sampled for isotopic analyses. Preliminary results suggest that site-specific groundwater changes can be described by the isotopic variations. We will show that the methodology is a reliable and fast method to quantify hydrological changes in a targeted environment. The study is currently ongoing but the full dataset will be presented at the conference.

  20. Effects of the surroundings and conformerisation of n-dodecane molecules on evaporation/condensation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gun’ko, Vladimir M.; Nasiri, Rasoul; Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2015-01-21

    The evaporation/condensation coefficient (β) and the evaporation rate (γ) for n-dodecane vs. temperature, gas pressure, gas and liquid density, and solvation effects at a droplet surface are analysed using quantum chemical density functional theory calculations of several ensembles of conformers of n-dodecane molecules in the gas phase (hybrid functional ωB97X-D with the cc-pVTZ and cc-pVDZ basis sets) and in liquid phase (solvation method: SMD/ωB97X-D). It is shown that β depends more strongly on a number of neighbouring molecules interacting with an evaporating molecule at a droplet surface (this number is estimated through changes in the surface Gibbs free energy of solvation) than on pressure in the gas phase or conformerisation and cross-conformerisation of molecules in both phases. Thus, temperature and the surrounding effects at droplet surfaces are the dominant factors affecting the values of β for n-dodecane molecules. These values are shown to be similar (at reduced temperatures T/T{sub c} < 0.8) or slightly larger (at T/T{sub c} > 0.8) than the values of β calculated by the molecular dynamics force fields (MD FF) methods. This endorses the reliability of the previously developed classical approach to estimation of β by the MD FF methods, except at temperatures close to the critical temperature.

  1. Study on Turbulent Modeling in Gas Entrainment Evaluation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kei; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Nakamine, Yoshiaki; Imai, Yasutomo

    Suppression of gas entrainment (GE) phenomena caused by free surface vortices are very important to establish an economically superior design of the sodium-cooled fast reactor in Japan (JSFR). However, due to the non-linearity and/or locality of the GE phenomena, it is not easy to evaluate the occurrences of the GE phenomena accurately. In other words, the onset condition of the GE phenomena in the JSFR is not predicted easily based on scaled-model and/or partial-model experiments. Therefore, the authors are developing a CFD-based evaluation method in which the non-linearity and locality of the GE phenomena can be considered. In the evaluation method, macroscopic vortex parameters, e.g. circulation, are determined by three-dimensional CFD and then, GE-related parameters, e.g. gas core (GC) length, are calculated by using the Burgers vortex model. This procedure is efficient to evaluate the GE phenomena in the JSFR. However, it is well known that the Burgers vortex model tends to overestimate the GC length due to the lack of considerations on some physical mechanisms. Therefore, in this study, the authors develop a turbulent vortex model to evaluate the GE phenomena more accurately. Then, the improved GE evaluation method with the turbulent viscosity model is validated by analyzing the GC lengths observed in a simple experiment. The evaluation results show that the GC lengths analyzed by the improved method are shorter in comparison to the original method, and give better agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

    2013-03-05

    Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

  3. Optical methods for monitoring harmful gas in animal facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shirui; Dong, Daming; Zheng, Wengang; Wang, Jihua

    2014-06-01

    Animal facilities produce large amounts of harmful gases such as ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and methane, many of which have a pungent odor. The harmful gases produced by animal housing not only affect the health of people and livestock but also pollute the air. The detection of the harmful gases can effectively improve efficiency of livestock production and reduce environmental pollution. More and more optical detection methods are applied to the detection of the harmful gases produced by animal housing. This summarizes optical detection methods for monitoring the harmful gases in animal housing recently, including nondispersive infrared gas analyzer, ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The basic principle and the characteristics of these methods are illustrated and the applications on the detection of harmful gases in animal housing are described. Meanwhile, the research of harmful gases monitoring for livestock production based on these methods were listed. The current situation and future development of the detection methods for harmful gases generated by animal housing were summarized by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  4. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  5. How do drops evaporate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa; Kondic, Lou

    2007-11-01

    The problem of evaporating drops with non-pinned contact line, although seemingly trivial, so far lacks satisfactory theoretical description. In particular, there has been much discussion regarding appropriate evaporative mass flux model. We make an attempt to resolve this issue by comparing our experimental data with the results of several mathematical models for evaporating drops. After describing experimental procedure, we propose several models for mass flux and develop a governing equation for evolution of drop's thickness. Two-dimensional numerical results are then compared to the experimental results, and the most appropriate mass flux model is identified. Finally, we propose the governing equation for the full 3D system and present some new numerical results related to curious phenomena, where so-called ``octopus-shaped'' instabilities appear ahead of the contact line of volatile dropsootnotetextY. Gotkis, I. Ivanov, N. Murisic, L. Kondic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 186101 (2006)..

  6. Material point method modeling in oil and gas reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Vanderheyden, William Brian; Zhang, Duan

    2016-06-28

    A computer system and method of simulating the behavior of an oil and gas reservoir including changes in the margins of frangible solids. A system of equations including state equations such as momentum, and conservation laws such as mass conservation and volume fraction continuity, are defined and discretized for at least two phases in a modeled volume, one of which corresponds to frangible material. A material point model technique for numerically solving the system of discretized equations, to derive fluid flow at each of a plurality of mesh nodes in the modeled volume, and the velocity of at each of a plurality of particles representing the frangible material in the modeled volume. A time-splitting technique improves the computational efficiency of the simulation while maintaining accuracy on the deformation scale. The method can be applied to derive accurate upscaled model equations for larger volume scale simulations.

  7. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Black, Roger L.

    1981-01-01

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  8. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Vella, Dominic; Yeomans, Julia M

    2014-11-01

    We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. PMID:25186667

  9. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical channel in evaporating a heated falling glycols liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nait Alla, Abderrahman; Feddaoui, M'barek; Meftah, Hicham

    2015-12-01

    The interactive effects of heat and mass transfer in the evaporation of ethylene and propylene glycol flowing as falling films on vertical channel was investigated. The liquid film falls along a left plate which is externally subjected to a uniform heat flux while the right plate is the dry wall and is kept thermally insulated. The model solves the coupled governing equations in both phases together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by Tridiagonal Matrix Algorithm. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied glycols and water in the same conditions is made. The results indicate that water evaporates in more intense way in comparison to glycols and the increase of gas flow rate tends to improve slightly the evaporation.

  10. A novel method for rapid determination of total solid content in viscous liquids by multiple headspace extraction gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xin, Li-Ping; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Hu, Hui-Chao; Barnes, Donald G

    2014-09-01

    This work demonstrates a novel method for rapid determination of total solid content in viscous liquid (polymer-enriched) samples. The method is based multiple headspace extraction gas chromatography (MHE-GC) on a headspace vial at a temperature above boiling point of water. Thus, the trend of water loss from the tested liquid due to evaporation can be followed. With the limited MHE-GC testing (e.g., 5 extractions) and a one-point calibration procedure (i.e., recording the weight difference before and after analysis), the total amount of water in the sample can be determined, from which the total solid contents in the liquid can be calculated. A number of black liquors were analyzed by the new method which yielded results that closely matched those of the reference method; i.e., the results of these two methods differed by no more than 2.3%. Compared with the reference method, the MHE-GC method is much simpler and more practical. Therefore, it is suitable for the rapid determination of the solid content in many polymer-containing liquid samples.

  11. 78 FR 25392 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule: Revision to Best Available Monitoring Method Request Submission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    .... Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal Register GHG greenhouse gas GHGRP Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program CO... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 98 RIN 2060-AR74 Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule: Revision to Best Available Monitoring... Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule must submit requests for use of best available monitoring methods to...

  12. A novel method of atomization with potential gas turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Arthur H.

    1988-10-01

    In conventional airblast or air-assist nozzles the bulk liquid to be atomized is first transformed into a jet or sheet before being exposed to the atomizing air. In the method of atomization described in this paper, the air is introduced into the bulk liquid at some point upstream of the nozzle discharge orifice. This injected air forms bubbles which 'explode' downstream of the injection orifice thereby shattering the liquid into small drops. Experiments carried out on this atomizer, using water as the working fluid and nitrogen as the driving gas, show that good atomization can be achieved using only small amounts of atomizing gas at injection pressures as low as 173 kPa (25 psi). It is found that atomization quality is largely independent of the size of the nozzle discharge orifice. Thus, the system appears to have good potential for applications where small holes and passages cannot be employed due to the risk of blockage by contaminants in the fuel.

  13. Method for directly recovering fluorine from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Orlett, Michael J.; Saraceno, Anthony J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a process for the direct recovery of gaseous fluorine from waste-gas streams or the like. The process comprises passing the gas stream through a bed of anhydrous K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6 pellets to fluorinate the same to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.7 and subsequently desorbing the fluorine by heating the K.sub.3 NiF.sub.7 pellets to a temperature re-converting them to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6. The efficiency of the fluorine-absorption step is maximized by operating in a selected and conveniently low temperature. The desorbed fluorine is highly pure and is at a pressure of several atmospheres. Preferably, the K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6 pellets are prepared by a method including the steps of forming agglomerates of hydrated K.sub.3 NiF.sub.5, sintering the agglomerates to form K.sub.3 NiF.sub.5 pellets of enhanced reactivity with respect to fluorine, and fluorinating the sintered pellets to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6.

  14. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  15. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  16. Analytical resource assessment method for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations - The "ACCESS" Method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, Robert A.; revised by Charpentier, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) periodically assesses petroleum resources of areas within the United States and the world. The purpose of this report is to explain the development of an analytic probabilistic method and spreadsheet software system called Analytic Cell-Based Continuous Energy Spreadsheet System (ACCESS). The ACCESS method is based upon mathematical equations derived from probability theory. The ACCESS spreadsheet can be used to calculate estimates of the undeveloped oil, gas, and NGL (natural gas liquids) resources in a continuous-type assessment unit. An assessment unit is a mappable volume of rock in a total petroleum system. In this report, the geologic assessment model is defined first, the analytic probabilistic method is described second, and the spreadsheet ACCESS is described third. In this revised version of Open-File Report 00-044 , the text has been updated to reflect modifications that were made to the ACCESS program. Two versions of the program are added as appendixes.

  17. Evaporation from the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Mathers, William

    2004-03-01

    Evaporation from the ocular surface is dramatically reduced by the lipid layer which covers it. With this layer intact, evaporation represents a small loss of water for which the lacrimal gland easily compensates. When tear production is compromised evaporation becomes important, especially since evaporation in almost all ocular surface disease states and any surface perturbation, including contact lens wear, increases evaporation significantly. How the barrier function of the lipid layer accomplishes this reduction in evaporation is not understood and is probably quite complex as is the structure of the lipid layer. Improving this barrier function remains an important and elusive goal.

  18. Apparatus and method for gas turbine active combustion control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeh, Chukwueloka (Inventor); Kammer, Leonardo C. (Inventor); Shah, Minesh (Inventor); Fortin, Jeffrey B. (Inventor); Knobloch, Aaron (Inventor); Myers, William J. (Inventor); Mancini, Alfred Albert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An Active Combustion Control System and method provides for monitoring combustor pressure and modulating fuel to a gas turbine combustor to prevent combustion dynamics and/or flame extinguishments. The system includes an actuator, wherein the actuator periodically injects pulsed fuel into the combustor. The apparatus also includes a sensor connected to the combustion chamber down stream from an inlet, where the sensor generates a signal detecting the pressure oscillations in the combustor. The apparatus controls the actuator in response to the sensor. The apparatus prompts the actuator to periodically inject pulsed fuel into the combustor at a predetermined sympathetic frequency and magnitude, thereby controlling the amplitude of the pressure oscillations in the combustor by modulating the natural oscillations.

  19. Development of impact design methods for ceramic gas turbine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, J.; Cuccio, J.; Kington, H.

    1990-01-01

    Impact damage prediction methods are being developed to aid in the design of ceramic gas turbine engine components with improved impact resistance. Two impact damage modes were characterized: local, near the impact site, and structural, usually fast fracture away from the impact site. Local damage to Si3N4 impacted by Si3N4 spherical projectiles consists of ring and/or radial cracks around the impact point. In a mechanistic model being developed, impact damage is characterized as microcrack nucleation and propagation. The extent of damage is measured as volume fraction of microcracks. Model capability is demonstrated by simulating late impact tests. Structural failure is caused by tensile stress during impact exceeding material strength. The EPIC3 code was successfully used to predict blade structural failures in different size particle impacts on radial and axial blades.

  20. Gas-liquid separator and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Whitt, David Brandon

    2009-07-14

    A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a first gas therein and a second compartment having the liquid carrier including a second gas therein. The system also includes a gas-liquid separator fluidically coupled to the first and second compartments for separating the liquid carrier from the first and second gases.

  1. Method for removing particulate matter from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1984-01-01

    Particulate matter is removed from a stream of pressurized gas by directing the stream of gas upwardly through a bed of porous material, the porous bed being held in an open ended container and at least partially submerged in liquid. The passage of the gas through the porous bed sets up a circulation in the liquid which cleans the particulate matter from the bed.

  2. Measuring the Nonuniform Evaporation Dynamics of Sprayed Sessile Microdroplets with Quantitative Phase Imaging.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Chris; Arbabi, Amir; Bhaduri, Basanta; Wang, Xiaozhen; Ganti, Raman; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L

    2015-10-13

    We demonstrate real-time quantitative phase imaging as a new optical approach for measuring the evaporation dynamics of sessile microdroplets. Quantitative phase images of various droplets were captured during evaporation. The images enabled us to generate time-resolved three-dimensional topographic profiles of droplet shape with nanometer accuracy and, without any assumptions about droplet geometry, to directly measure important physical parameters that characterize surface wetting processes. Specifically, the time-dependent variation of the droplet height, volume, contact radius, contact angle distribution along the droplet's perimeter, and mass flux density for two different surface preparations are reported. The studies clearly demonstrate three phases of evaporation reported previously: pinned, depinned, and drying modes; the studies also reveal instances of partial pinning. Finally, the apparatus is employed to investigate the cooperative evaporation of the sprayed droplets. We observe and explain the neighbor-induced reduction in evaporation rate, that is, as compared to predictions for isolated droplets. In the future, the new experimental methods should stimulate the exploration of colloidal particle dynamics on the gas-liquid-solid interface.

  3. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) chemistry and analytical methods handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Noblett, J.G.; Burke, J.M.

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide a comprehensive guide to sampling, analytical, and physical test methods essential to the operation, maintenance, and understanding of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system chemistry. EPRI sponsored the first edition of this three-volume report in response to the needs of electric utility personnel responsible for establishing and operating commercial FGD analytical laboratories. The second, revised editions of Volumes 1 and 2 were prompted by the results of research into various non-standard aspects of FGD system chemistry. Volume 1 of the handbook explains FGD system chemistry in the detail necessary to understand how the processes operate and how process performance indicators can be used to optimize system operation. Volume 2 includes 63 physical-testing and chemical-analysis methods for reagents, slurries, and solids, and information on the applicability of individual methods to specific FGD systems. Volume 3 contains instructions for FGD solution chemistry computer program designated by EPRI as FGDLIQEQ. Executable on IBM-compatible personal computers, this program calculates the concentrations (activities) of chemical species (ions) in scrubber liquor and can calculate driving forces for important chemical reactions such as S0{sub 2} absorption and calcium sulfite and sulfate precipitation. This program and selected chemical analyses will help an FGD system operator optimize system performance, prevent many potential process problems, and define solutions to existing problems. 22 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

    2013-06-11

    A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

  5. IMPACT OF EVAPORATION ON AQUEOUS TEAR LOSS

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, James P.; Uchiyama, Eduardo; Aronowicz, Joel D.; Butovich, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of evaporation on preocular aqueous tear (AT) loss in normal subjects (controls) and patients with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Methods Eighteen patients (32 eyes) with KCS with or without associated meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and 11 sex-matched controls had AT evaporation determined between relative humidity (RH) of 20% and 45% using an evaporometer. AT volume, flow, and turnover were determined with a fluorophotometer. Results Evaporative rates increased significantly when the RH was changed from 40%–45% to 20%–25% (P < .001). This change was similar in all groups and on average accounted for a 99.43% increase. There were no statistically significant differences in evaporative rate between controls, the KCS alone group, and the KCS/MGD group. Dry eye patients exhibited a decreased tear turnover when compared to controls. Evaporative contribution to tear loss at 40%–45% RH was 23.47% for controls, 30.99% for “classic” KCS patients, and 25.44% for KCS/MGD patients. At 20%–25% RH, the evaporative contribution was 41.66% for controls, 57.67% for classic KCS patients, and 50.28% for KCS/MGD patients. Conclusions RH significantly impacts evaporation regardless of the presence of dry eye disease and probably accounts for the increased dry eye symptoms in people (controls and dry eye patients) in conditions of low RH (eg, deserts, airplane cabins, cold dry seasons). Contribution of evaporation to tear loss tends to be higher than previously described. The percent contribution is dependent on environmental conditions such as RH. There was a trend toward increased contribution to AT loss in dry eye patients vs controls, but statistical significance was not reached. PMID:17471332

  6. Waste Feed Evaporation Physical Properties Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W.E.

    2003-08-25

    This document describes the waste feed evaporator modeling work done in the Waste Feed Evaporation and Physical Properties Modeling test specification and in support of the Hanford River Protection Project (RPP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) project. A private database (ZEOLITE) was developed and used in this work in order to include the behavior of aluminosilicates such a NAS-gel in the OLI/ESP simulations, in addition to the development of the mathematical models. Mathematical models were developed that describe certain physical properties in the Hanford RPP-WTP waste feed evaporator process (FEP). In particular, models were developed for the feed stream to the first ultra-filtration step characterizing its heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and viscosity, as well as the density of the evaporator contents. The scope of the task was expanded to include the volume reduction factor across the waste feed evaporator (total evaporator feed volume/evaporator bottoms volume). All the physical properties were modeled as functions of the waste feed composition, temperature, and the high level waste recycle volumetric flow rate relative to that of the waste feed. The goal for the mathematical models was to predict the physical property to predicted simulation value. The simulation model approximating the FEP process used to develop the correlations was relatively complex, and not possible to duplicate within the scope of the bench scale evaporation experiments. Therefore, simulants were made of 13 design points (a subset of the points used in the model fits) using the compositions of the ultra-filtration feed streams as predicted by the simulation model. The chemistry and physical properties of the supernate (the modeled stream) as predicted by the simulation were compared with the analytical results of experimental simulant work as a method of validating the simulation software.

  7. TANK 26 EVAPORATOR FEED PUMP TRANSFER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, D; Si Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2008-09-30

    The transfer of liquid salt solution from Tank 26 to an evaporator is to be accomplished by activating the evaporator feed pump, located approximately 72 inches above the sludge layer, while simultaneously turning on the downcomer. Previously, activation of the evaporator feed pump was an isolated event without any other components running at the same time. An analysis of the dissolved solution transfer has been performed using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the amount of entrained sludge solids pumped out of the tank to the evaporator with the downcomer turned on. The analysis results showed that, for the maximum and minimum supernate levels in Tank 26 (252.5 and 72 inches above the sludge layer, respectively), the evaporator feed pump will entrain between 0.05 and 0.1 wt% sludge solids weight fraction into the eductor, respectively. Lower tank liquid levels, with respect to the sludge layer, result in higher amounts of sludge entrainment due to the increased velocity of the plunging jets from the downcomer and evaporator feed pump bypass as well as decreased dissipation depth.

  8. TANK 32 EVAPORATOR FEED PUMP TRANSFER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, D; Richard Dimenna, R; Si Lee, S

    2009-01-27

    The transfer of liquid salt solution from Tank 32 to an evaporator is to be accomplished by activating the evaporator feed pump, with the supernate surface at a minimum height of approximately 74.4 inches above the sludge layer, while simultaneously turning on the downcomer with a flow rate of 110 gpm. Previously, activation of the evaporator feed pump was an isolated event without any other components running at the same time. An analysis of the dissolved solution transfer has been performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to determine the amount of entrained sludge solids pumped out of the tank toward the evaporator with the downcomer turned on. The analysis results shows that, for the minimum tank liquid level of 105 inches above the tank bottom (which corresponds to a liquid depth of 74.4 inches above the sludge layer), the evaporator feed pump will contain less than 0.1 wt% sludge solids in the discharge stream, which is an order of magnitude less than the 1.0 wt% undissolved solids (UDS) loading criteria to feed the evaporator. Lower liquid levels with respect to the sludge layer will result in higher amounts of sludge entrainment due to the increased plunging jet velocity from the downcomer disturbing the sludge layer.

  9. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Hyatt, David E.; Bustard, Cynthia Jean; Sjostrom, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  10. MOVES2014: Evaporative Emissions Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle evaporative emissions are now modeled in EPA’s MOVES according to physical processes, permeation, tank vapor venting, liquid leaks, and refueling emissions. With this update, the following improvements are being incorporated into MOVES evaporative emissions methodology, a...

  11. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  12. Facile and Scalable Fabrication of Highly Efficient Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin-Film Solar Cells in Air Using Gas Pump Method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Liang, Lusheng; Chu, Qianqian; Song, Xiaoxuan; Li, Yan; Yang, Guanjun; Fan, Bin; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Chengxin; Li, Changjiu

    2016-08-10

    Control of the perovskite film formation process to produce high-quality organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite thin films with uniform morphology, high surface coverage, and minimum pinholes is of great importance to highly efficient solar cells. Herein, we report on large-area light-absorbing perovskite films fabrication with a new facile and scalable gas pump method. By decreasing the total pressure in the evaporation environment, the gas pump method can significantly enhance the solvent evaporation rate by 8 times faster and thereby produce an extremely dense, uniform, and full-coverage perovskite thin film. The resulting planar perovskite solar cells can achieve an impressive power conversion efficiency up to 19.00% with an average efficiency of 17.38 ± 0.70% for 32 devices with an area of 5 × 2 mm, 13.91% for devices with a large area up to 1.13 cm(2). The perovskite films can be easily fabricated in air conditions with a relative humidity of 45-55%, which definitely has a promising prospect in industrial application of large-area perovskite solar panels.

  13. Facile and Scalable Fabrication of Highly Efficient Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin-Film Solar Cells in Air Using Gas Pump Method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Liang, Lusheng; Chu, Qianqian; Song, Xiaoxuan; Li, Yan; Yang, Guanjun; Fan, Bin; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Chengxin; Li, Changjiu

    2016-08-10

    Control of the perovskite film formation process to produce high-quality organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite thin films with uniform morphology, high surface coverage, and minimum pinholes is of great importance to highly efficient solar cells. Herein, we report on large-area light-absorbing perovskite films fabrication with a new facile and scalable gas pump method. By decreasing the total pressure in the evaporation environment, the gas pump method can significantly enhance the solvent evaporation rate by 8 times faster and thereby produce an extremely dense, uniform, and full-coverage perovskite thin film. The resulting planar perovskite solar cells can achieve an impressive power conversion efficiency up to 19.00% with an average efficiency of 17.38 ± 0.70% for 32 devices with an area of 5 × 2 mm, 13.91% for devices with a large area up to 1.13 cm(2). The perovskite films can be easily fabricated in air conditions with a relative humidity of 45-55%, which definitely has a promising prospect in industrial application of large-area perovskite solar panels. PMID:27428311

  14. A predictive method for volatile organic compounds emission from soil: Evaporation and diffusion behavior investigation of a representative component of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijing; Fischer, Thomas; Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Möller, Detlev

    2015-10-15

    Pipelines are convenient, economical and widely used mode of transportation of crude oil. However, the inevitable or otherwise accidents during such transport of crude oil lead to large scale oil spills, which consequently result in both soil and air pollution. When such pollution occurs, crude oil VOC concentrations in air, soil pollution evaluation and VOC propagation in soil provide important evidence for airborne detection of oils spills. Therefore, several issues, including determination method for VOC, isotherm parameters of VOC sorption on soil surfaces, and VOC diffusion flux simulation, are significant. In our previous study, n-butane and n-pentane were proved to be the maximum VOCs in studied crude oils. Therefore, a predictive method using n-pentane as a representative component is proposed in this paper. Firstly, a headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) method was developed for determination of n-pentane in non-equilibrium mass transfer conditions. Secondly, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis with liquid nitrogen was carried out to predict isotherm parameters for n-pentane. Finally, two models were used to predict the emission process. Probably influenced by gas vapor density below and above the soil layer, the experimental data amounted to 74% of the deduced value from the simplified analytical model. However, the free diffusion model fitted well with the experimental results.

  15. A predictive method for volatile organic compounds emission from soil: Evaporation and diffusion behavior investigation of a representative component of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijing; Fischer, Thomas; Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Möller, Detlev

    2015-10-15

    Pipelines are convenient, economical and widely used mode of transportation of crude oil. However, the inevitable or otherwise accidents during such transport of crude oil lead to large scale oil spills, which consequently result in both soil and air pollution. When such pollution occurs, crude oil VOC concentrations in air, soil pollution evaluation and VOC propagation in soil provide important evidence for airborne detection of oils spills. Therefore, several issues, including determination method for VOC, isotherm parameters of VOC sorption on soil surfaces, and VOC diffusion flux simulation, are significant. In our previous study, n-butane and n-pentane were proved to be the maximum VOCs in studied crude oils. Therefore, a predictive method using n-pentane as a representative component is proposed in this paper. Firstly, a headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) method was developed for determination of n-pentane in non-equilibrium mass transfer conditions. Secondly, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis with liquid nitrogen was carried out to predict isotherm parameters for n-pentane. Finally, two models were used to predict the emission process. Probably influenced by gas vapor density below and above the soil layer, the experimental data amounted to 74% of the deduced value from the simplified analytical model. However, the free diffusion model fitted well with the experimental results. PMID:26026407

  16. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA. PMID:21619278

  17. Putting the "vap" into evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    In the spirit of the Special Issue of HESS to which it contributes, this paper documents the origin and development of the science of natural evaporation from land surfaces over the last 30-35 years, since the symposium A View from the Watershed was held to commemorate the opening of the new Institute of Hydrology (IH) building in 1973. Important subsequent technical progress includes the ability to measure routinely the diurnal cycle of near-surface meteorological variables using automatic weather stations, and of surface energy and momentum exchanges using automated implementations of the Bowen Ratio/Energy Budget technique and the Eddy Correlation technique, along with the capability to estimate the "fetch" for which these measurements apply. These improvements have been complemented by new methods to measure the separate components of evaporation, including: the interception process using randomly relocated below-canopy gauges, transpiration fluxes from individual leaves/shoots using porometers and from plants/plant components using stem-flow gauges and soil evaporation using micro-lysimeters and soil moisture depletion methods. In recent years progress has been made in making theory-based area-average estimates of evaporation using scintillometers, and model-based area-average estimates by assembling many streams of relevant data into Land Data Assimilation Systems. Theoretical progress has been made in extending near-surface turbulence theory to accommodate the effect of the "excess" boundary layer resistance to leaf-to-air transfer of energy and mass fluxes relative to that for momentum, and to allow for observed shortcoming in stability factors in the transition layer immediately above vegetation. Controversy regarding the relative merits of multi-layer model and "big leaf" representations of whole-canopy exchanges has been resolved in favour of the latter approach. Important gaps in the theory of canopy-atmosphere interactions have been filled, including

  18. Multiphysics methods development for high temperature gas reactor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, Volkan

    Multiphysics computational methods were developed to perform design and safety analysis of the next generation Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors. A suite of code modules was developed to solve the coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics field equations. The thermal-hydraulics module is based on the three dimensional solution of the mass, momentum and energy equations in cylindrical coordinates within the framework of the porous media method. The neutronics module is a part of the PARCS (Purdue Advanced Reactor Core Simulator) code and provides a fine mesh finite difference solution of the neutron diffusion equation in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates. Coupling of the two modules was performed by mapping the solution variables from one module to the other. Mapping is performed automatically in the code system by the use of a common material mesh in both modules. The standalone validation of the thermal-hydraulics module was performed with several cases of the SANA experiment and the standalone thermal-hydraulics exercise of the PBMR-400 benchmark problem. The standalone neutronics module was validated by performing the relevant exercises of the PBMR-268 and PBMR-400 benchmark problems. Additionally, the validation of the coupled code system was performed by analyzing several steady state and transient cases of the OECD/NEA PBMR-400 benchmark problem.

  19. Miniscale Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with Full Evaporation Dynamic Headspace Extraction for the Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with 4000-to-14 000-fold Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Liew, Christina Shu Min; Li, Xiao; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-09-20

    A new sample preparation approach of combining a miniscale version of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), termed miniscale-LLE (msLLE), with automated full evaporation dynamic headspace extraction (FEDHS) was developed. Its applicability was demonstrated in the extraction of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene) from aqueous samples. In the first step, msLLE was conducted with 1.75 mL of n-hexane, and all of the extract was vaporized through a Tenax TA sorbent tube via a nitrogen gas flow, in the FEDHS step. Due to the stronger π-π interaction between the Tenax TA polymer and PAHs, only the latter, and not n-hexane, was adsorbed by the sorbent. This selectivity by the Tenax TA polymer allowed an effective concentration of PAHs while eliminating n-hexane by the FEDHS process. After that, thermal desorption was applied to the PAHs to channel them into a gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) system for analysis. Experimental parameters affecting msLLE (solvent volume and mixing duration) and FEDHS (temperature and duration) were optimized. The obtained results achieved low limits of detection (1.85-3.63 ng/L) with good linearity (r(2) > 0.9989) and high enrichment factors ranging from 4200 to 14 100. The optimized settings were applied to the analysis of canal water sampled from an industrial area and tap water, and this methodology was compared to stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). This innovative combined extraction-concentration approach proved to be fast, effective, and efficient in determining low concentrations of PAHs in aqueous samples.

  20. Miniscale Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with Full Evaporation Dynamic Headspace Extraction for the Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with 4000-to-14 000-fold Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Liew, Christina Shu Min; Li, Xiao; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-09-20

    A new sample preparation approach of combining a miniscale version of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), termed miniscale-LLE (msLLE), with automated full evaporation dynamic headspace extraction (FEDHS) was developed. Its applicability was demonstrated in the extraction of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene) from aqueous samples. In the first step, msLLE was conducted with 1.75 mL of n-hexane, and all of the extract was vaporized through a Tenax TA sorbent tube via a nitrogen gas flow, in the FEDHS step. Due to the stronger π-π interaction between the Tenax TA polymer and PAHs, only the latter, and not n-hexane, was adsorbed by the sorbent. This selectivity by the Tenax TA polymer allowed an effective concentration of PAHs while eliminating n-hexane by the FEDHS process. After that, thermal desorption was applied to the PAHs to channel them into a gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) system for analysis. Experimental parameters affecting msLLE (solvent volume and mixing duration) and FEDHS (temperature and duration) were optimized. The obtained results achieved low limits of detection (1.85-3.63 ng/L) with good linearity (r(2) > 0.9989) and high enrichment factors ranging from 4200 to 14 100. The optimized settings were applied to the analysis of canal water sampled from an industrial area and tap water, and this methodology was compared to stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). This innovative combined extraction-concentration approach proved to be fast, effective, and efficient in determining low concentrations of PAHs in aqueous samples. PMID:27535573

  1. Method and apparatus for producing natural gas from tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresie, D. A.; Burns, J. M.; Fowler, D. W.

    1984-10-30

    Natural gas wells in a tight formation area are drilled and completed with piping, the piping being capped with a Christmas tree. The piping is then utilized as a reservoir to collect natural gas from the tight formation over a prolonged time period. Mobile pressure vessel units are employed periodically to recover the collected natural gas, on a schedule designed for maximum economic efficiency. In the preferred embodiment, the reservoir is formed between the inner production tubing and the outer casing tubing, and conduits are connected to direct the natural gas from the production tubing into the reservoir. Liquid/gas separators and dehydrator units are employed on wells as necessary, so that the natural gas stored in the reservoir is ready for transport.

  2. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  3. Apparatus for the liquefaction of a gas and methods relating to same

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-29

    Apparatuses and methods are provided for producing liquefied gas, such as liquefied natural gas. In one embodiment, a liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream may be sequentially pass through a compressor and an expander. The process stream may also pass through a compressor. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas may be used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line.

  4. Method and apparatus for processing filling gas from a coke oven battery

    SciTech Connect

    Polenz, J.; Wagner, H.

    1981-08-11

    An improved coke oven battery and an improved method for production of coke and byproducts are provided. The filling gas escaping during the filling of the oven chambers with coal is initially rendered inert by admixing flue gas. Then the resulting gas mixture of filling gas and flue gas is withdrawn via a conduit fed with flushing liquor from the coke oven gas off-take main and is added to the raw coke oven gas after the coke oven gas off-take main. The tar and coal containing flushing liquor coming from the filling gas conduit is fed back to the coke oven gas off-take main after removal of the tar.

  5. Simulations of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    A paper presents additional information on the subject matter of Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops (NPO-30505), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 55. To recapitulate: A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The model is used to perform direct numerical simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behaviors of sprays of liquid petroleum fuels in furnaces, industrial combustors, and engines. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and drops, respectively, and incorporates a concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described by use of a distribution function. In this investigation, the distribution function depends solely on the species molar weight. The present paper reiterates the description of the model and discusses further in-depth analysis of the previous results as well as results of additional numerical simulations assessing the effect of the mass loading. The paper reiterates the conclusions reported in the cited previous article, and states some new conclusions. Some new conclusions are: 1. The slower evaporation and the evaporation/ condensation process for multicomponent-fuel drops resulted in a reduced drop-size polydispersity compared to their single-component counterpart. 2. The inhomogeneity in the spatial distribution of the species in the layer increases with the initial mass loading. 3. As evaporation becomes faster, the assumed invariant form of the molecular- weight distribution during evaporation becomes inaccurate.

  6. The effect of carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature on low pressure organic vapor phase deposition simulation by direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Takao; Ueda, Noriaki

    2013-04-01

    The process of low pressure organic vapor phase deposition (LP-OVPD) controls the growth of amorphous organic thin films, where the source gases (Alq3 molecule, etc.) are introduced into a hot wall reactor via an injection barrel using an inert carrier gas (N2 molecule). It is possible to control well the following substrate properties such as dopant concentration, deposition rate, and thickness uniformity of the thin film. In this paper, we present LP-OVPD simulation results using direct simulation Monte Carlo-Neutrals (Particle-PLUS neutral module) which is commercial software adopting direct simulation Monte Carlo method. By estimating properly the evaporation rate with experimental vaporization enthalpies, the calculated deposition rates on the substrate agree well with the experimental results that depend on carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature.

  7. Methods For Delivering Liquified Gas To An Engine

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; O'Brien, James E.; Siahpush, Ali S.; Brown, Kevin B.

    2003-09-16

    A liquified gas delivery system for a motorized platform includes a holding tank configured to receive liquified gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the tank to a valve device. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the tank to the valve device. Fluid coupled to the valve device is a vaporizer which is in communication with an engine. The valve device selectively withdraws either liquified gas or liquified gas vapor from the tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the tank. Various configurations of the delivery system can be utilized for pressurizing the tank during operation.

  8. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  9. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Shielded Cells Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.; Herman, D. T.; Stone, M.E

    2005-07-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of evaporation of actual Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle material. Samples of the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) were transferred from DWPF to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Shielded Cells and blended with De-Ionized (DI) water and a small amount of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product. A total of 3000 mL of this feed was concentrated to approximately 90 mL during a semi-batch evaporation test of approximately 17 hours. One interruption occurred during the run when the feed tube developed a split and was replaced. Samples of the resulting condensate and concentrate were collected and analyzed. The resulting analysis of the condensate was compared to the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits for the F/H Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). Results from the test were compared to previous testing using simulants and OLI modeling. Conclusions from this work included the following: (1) The evaporation of DWPF recycle to achieve a 30X concentration factor was successfully demonstrated. The feed blend of OGCT and SMECT material was concentrated from 3000 mL to approximately 90 mL during testing, a concentration of approximately 33X. (2) Foaming was observed during the run. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam was added seven times throughout the run at 100 parts per million (ppm) per addition. The addition of this antifoam was very effective in reducing the foam level, but the impact diminished over time and additional antifoam was required every 2 to 3 hours during the run. (3) No scale or solids formed on the evaporator vessel, but splatter was observed in the headspace of the evaporator vessel. No scaling formed on the stainless steel thermocouple. (4) The majority of the analytes met the F/H ETP WAC. However, the detection limits for selected species (Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-240, Am-243, and Cm-244) exceeded the ETP WAC limits. (5) I

  10. Crystallization of proteins by dynamic control of evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. G.; Bray, T. L.; Suddath, F. L.

    1991-03-01

    It is expected that the kinetics of supersaturation, which is directly related to the evaporation of solvent from a crystallization solution, will greatly affect both nucleation and crystal growth processes. Therefore, a novel device has been developed which allows computer regulation of the flow of N 2(g) over a hanging drop to dynamically control the evaporation of solvent. A thermal conductivity detector is used to monitor the amount of water vapor transferred from the drop to the gas stream and provides closed loop control of the evaporation process. Data acquisition and control are accomplished using a custom program written with LabVIEW software (National Instruments) on a Macintosh II microcomputer. Quantitation of several evaporation protocols has been accomplished using both the thermal conductivity detector and a novel conductance cell that allows continuous measurement of solution analyte concentrations. Crystals of hen egg white lysozyme have been grown at different evaporation rates and analyzed according to size and number of single crystals.

  11. A Simpler Way to Tame Multiple-Effect Evaporators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joye, Donald D.; Koko, F. William Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a new method to teach the subject of evaporators which is both simple enough to use in the classroom and accurate and flexible enough to be used as a design tool in practice. Gives an example using a triple evaporator series. Analyzes the effect of this method. (CW)

  12. Condensation and Evaporation of Solar System Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. M.; Richter, F. M.

    2003-12-01

    absence of isotopic fractionation in a volatile element-depleted condensed phase is more a measure of the degree to which the system maintained thermodynamic equilibrium than a diagnostic of whether the path involved condensation or evaporation.The pervasive volatile element depletion of inner solar system planets and the asteroidal parent bodies of most meteorites is a major, but by no means the only reason to consider evaporation and condensation processes in the early history of the solar system. Chondrules appear to have been rapidly heated and then cooled over a period of minutes to hours (see Chapter 1.07). If this occurred in a gas of solar composition under nonequilibrium conditions, chondrules should have partially evaporated and an isotopic fractionation record should remain. The absence of such effects can be used to chonstrain the conditions of chondrule formation (e.g., Alexander et al., 2000; Alexander and Wang, 2001). There is good petrologic, chemical, and isotopic evidence suggesting that certain solar system materials such as the coarse-grained CAIs are likely evaporation residues. For example, the type B CAIs are often found to have correlated enrichments in the heavy isotopes of silicon and magnesium ( Figure 1), and these isotopic fractionations are very much like those of evaporation residues produced in laboratory experiments. Condensation also appears to be a major control of elemental zoning patterns in metal grains in CH chondrites (Meibom et al., 1999, 2001; Campbell et al., 2001; Petaev et al., 2001; Campbell et al., 2002). A more contemporary example is the isotopic and chemical compositions of deep-sea spherules that have been significantly affected by evaporative loss during atmospheric entry ( Davis et al., 1991a; Davis and Brownlee, 1993; Herzog et al., 1994, 1999; Xue et al., 1995; Alexander et al., 2002). (7K)Figure 1. Isotopic mass fractionation effects in CAIs. Most coarse-grained CAIs have enrichments of a few ‰ amu-1 in magnesium

  13. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Hyatt, D.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Sjostrom, S.

    1998-11-10

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 11 figs.

  14. Catastrophic evaporation of rocky planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    Short-period exoplanets can have dayside surface temperatures surpassing 2000 K, hot enough to vaporize rock and drive a thermal wind. Small enough planets evaporate completely. We construct a radiative hydrodynamic model of atmospheric escape from strongly irradiated, low-mass rocky planets, accounting for dust-gas energy exchange in the wind. Rocky planets with masses ≲ 0.1 M⊕ (less than twice the mass of Mercury) and surface temperatures ≳2000 K are found to disintegrate entirely in ≲10 Gyr. When our model is applied to Kepler planet candidate KIC 12557548b - which is believed to be a rocky body evaporating at a rate of dot{M} gtrsim 0.1 M_{{{oplus }}} Gyr-1 - our model yields a present-day planet mass of ≲ 0.02 M⊕ or less than about twice the mass of the Moon. Mass-loss rates depend so strongly on planet mass that bodies can reside on close-in orbits for Gyr with initial masses comparable to or less than that of Mercury, before entering a final short-lived phase of catastrophic mass-loss (which KIC 12557548b has entered). Because this catastrophic stage lasts only up to a few per cent of the planet's life, we estimate that for every object like KIC 12557548b, there should be 10-100 close-in quiescent progenitors with sub-day periods whose hard-surface transits may be detectable by Kepler - if the progenitors are as large as their maximal, Mercury-like sizes (alternatively, the progenitors could be smaller and more numerous). According to our calculations, KIC 12557548b may have lost ˜70 per cent of its formation mass; today we may be observing its naked iron core.

  15. Development of comprehensive numerical schemes for predicting evaporating gas-droplets flow processes of a liquid-fueled combustor. Semiannual report, 15 June 1988-30 November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics code for simulating complex turbulent flows inside a liquid rocket combustion chamber was validated and further developed. The Advanced Rocket Injector/Combustor Code (ARICC) is simplified and validated against benchmark flow situations for laminar and turbulent flows. The numerical method used in ARICC Code is re-examined for incompressible flow calculations. For turbulent flows, both the subgrid and the two equation k-epsilon turbulence models are studied. Cases tested include idealized Burger's equation in complex geometries and boundaries, a laminar pipe flow, a high Reynolds number turbulent flow, and a confined coaxial jet with recirculations. The accuracy of the algorithm is examined by comparing the numerical results with the analytical solutions as well as experimented data with different grid sizes.

  16. EVAPORATION OF ICY PLANETESIMALS DUE TO BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Miura, Hitoshi; Nagasawa, Makiko; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-02-20

    We present the novel concept of evaporation of planetesimals as a result of bow shocks associated with planetesimals orbiting with supersonic velocities relative to the gas in a protoplanetary disk. We evaluate the evaporation rates of the planetesimals based on a simple model describing planetesimal heating and evaporation by the bow shock. We find that icy planetesimals with radius {approx}>100 km evaporate efficiently even outside the snow line in the stage of planetary oligarchic growth, where strong bow shocks are produced by gravitational perturbations from protoplanets. The obtained results suggest that the formation of gas giant planets is suppressed owing to insufficient accretion of icy planetesimals onto the protoplanet within the {approx}<5 AU disk region.

  17. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  18. Evaporation control research, 1955-58

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruse, Robert R.; Harbeck, Guy Earl

    1960-01-01

    One hundred fifty-two compounds and compositions of matter were screened as potential evaporation retardants. The homologous straight-chain fatty alkanols are considered the best materials for retardants. Several methods of application of the alkanols to the reservoir surface were investigated. Although wick-type drippers for the application of liquids and cage rafts for the application of solids appear to be the most promising methods from an economic standpoint, both methods have serious disadvantages. Considerable study was given to reducing biochemical oxidation of the evaporation retardants. Copper in several forms was found adequate as a bacteriostatic agent but posed a potential hazard because of its toxicity. Many other bactericides that were tested were also toxic. Two sets of large-scale field tests have been completed and several others are still in progress. On the larger reservoirs, the reduction of evaporation was not more than 20 percent under the prevailing conditions and the application procedure used. Three major practical problems remain; namely, the effects and action of wind on the monofilm, the effects of biochemical oxidation, and the most effective method of application. Fundamental problems remaining include the effects of various impurities, and the composition of the best evaporation retardant; the long-range effects of monofilms on the limnology of a reservoir, including the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide; toxicological aspects of all components of any evaporation-retardant composition, plus toxicology of any composition chosen for large-scale use; and further studies of the calorimetry and thermodynamics involved in the mechanism of evaporation and its reduction by a monofilm.

  19. 78 FR 11619 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule: Revision to Best Available Monitoring Method Request Submission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Method Request Submission Deadline for Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems Source Category AGENCY... deadline by which owners or operators of facilities subject to the petroleum and natural gas systems source... facilities subject to the petroleum and natural gas systems source category, subpart W, of the Greenhouse...

  20. A method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1997-12-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  1. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  2. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.

    1999-05-04

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents. 7 figs.

  3. 40 CFR 86.1821-01 - Evaporative/refueling family determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evaporative/refueling family... family determination. (a) The gasoline-, methanol-, liquefied petroleum gas-, and natural gas-fueled... emission characteristics shall be defined as a separate evaporative/refueling family. Manufacturers...

  4. 40 CFR 86.1821-01 - Evaporative/refueling family determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaporative/refueling family... family determination. (a) The gasoline-, methanol-, liquefied petroleum gas-, and natural gas-fueled... emission characteristics shall be defined as a separate evaporative/refueling family. Manufacturers...

  5. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.

    2009-09-22

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates a vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas is used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line or recirculation within the system for further processing.

  6. Method of cooling gas only nozzle fuel tip

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, William Theodore; Fitts, David Orus; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  7. Evaporation rate and vapor pressure of selected polymeric lubricating oils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardos, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    A recently developed ultrahigh-vacuum quartz spring mass sorption microbalance has been utilized to measure the evaporation rates of several low-volatility polymeric lubricating oils at various temperatures. The evaporation rates are used to calculate the vapor pressures by the Langmuir equation. A method is presented to accurately estimate extended temperature range evaporation rate and vapor pressure data for polymeric oils, incorporating appropriate corrections for the increases in molecular weight and the change in volatility of the progressively evaporating polymer fractions. The logarithms of the calculated data appear to follow linear relationships within the test temperature ranges, when plotted versus 1000/T. These functions and the observed effusion characteristics of the fluids on progressive volatilization are useful in estimating evaporation rate and vapor pressure changes on evaporative depletion.

  8. Methods of Si based ceramic components volatilization control in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John; Dion Ouellet, Noemie

    2016-09-06

    A method of controlling volatilization of silicon based components in a gas turbine engine includes measuring, estimating and/or predicting a variable related to operation of the gas turbine engine; correlating the variable to determine an amount of silicon to control volatilization of the silicon based components in the gas turbine engine; and injecting silicon into the gas turbine engine to control volatilization of the silicon based components. A gas turbine with a compressor, combustion system, turbine section and silicon injection system may be controlled by a controller that implements the control method.

  9. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses.

  10. Method of manufacturing aluminum sulfate from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, H.

    1981-10-20

    A continuous process for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gas is described. Sodium aluminate solution is reacted with sulfur dioxide to form sodium sulfite and aluminum hydroxy sulfite. These are separated and the aluminum hydroxy sulfite oxidized to aluminum sulfate.

  11. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGES

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device for producing an energetic gas arc discharge employing the use of gas-fed hollow cathode and anode electrodes is reported. The rate of feed of the gas to the electrodes is regulated to cause complete space charge neutralization to occur within the electrodes. The arc discharge is closely fitted within at least one of the electrodes so tint the gas fed to this electrode is substantially completely ionized before it is emitted into the vacuum chamber. It is this electrode design and the axial potential gradient that exists in the arc which permits the arc to be operated in low pressures and at volthges and currents that permit the arc to be energetic. The use of the large number of energetic ions that are accelerated toward the cathode as a propulsion device for a space vehicle is set forth.

  12. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Tonkyn, Russell G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes.

  13. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Tonkyn, R.G.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes. 12 figs.

  14. Method and means for refinery gas plant operation

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a process for operating an unsaturated gas plant of a catalytic hydrocarbon conversion process. It comprises: contacting acidic hydrocarbon feedstreams to a gas plant absorption zone comprising a least one liquid absorber bed and one vapor absorber bed upstream of the separator zone, the feedstreams comprising unstabilized liquid gasoline and liquid and vapor output streams from liquid vapor separator for inter-stage liquids and compressor effluents from the conversion process main fractionator, whereby the feedstreams are deacidified.

  15. Surface tension of evaporating nanofluid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruey-Hung; Phuoc, Tran X.; Martello, Donald

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of nanofluid surface tension were made using the pendant droplet method. Three different types of nanoparticles were used - laponite, silver and Fe2O3 - with de-ionized water (DW) as the base fluid. The reported results focus on the following categories; (1) because some nanoparticles require surfactants to form stable colloids, the individual effects of the surfactant and the particles were investigated; (2) due to evaporation of the pendant droplet, the particle concentration increases, affecting the apparent surface tension; (3) because of the evaporation process, a hysteresis was found where the evaporating droplet can only achieve lower values of surface tension than that of nanofluids at the same prepared concentrations: and (4) the Stefan equation relating the apparent surface tension and heat of evaporation was found to be inapplicable for nanofluids investigated. Comparisons with findings for sessile droplets are also discussed, pointing to additional effects of nanoparticles other than the non-equilibrium evaporation process.

  16. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-03-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers. PMID:24804069

  17. Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1994-09-19

    This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy.

  18. Catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires on ITO seed/glass by thermal evaporation method: Effects of ITO seed layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsultany, Forat H.; Hassan, Z.; Ahmed, Naser M.

    2016-07-01

    A seed/catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires (ZnO-NWs) on a glass substrate were successfully fabricated using thermal evaporation technique. These nanowires were grown on ITO seed layers of different thicknesses of 25 and 75 nm, which were deposited on glass substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. Prior to synthesized ITO nanowires, the sputtered ITO seeds were annealed using the continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser at 450 °C in air for 15 min. The effect of seed layer thickness on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of ZnO-NWs were systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and UV-Vis spectrophotometer.

  19. Assessment of water droplet evaporation mechanisms on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenhai; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-12-23

    Evaporation rates are predicted and important transport mechanisms identified for evaporation of water droplets on hydrophobic (contact angle ~110°) and superhydrophobic (contact angle ~160°) substrates. Analytical models for droplet evaporation in the literature are usually simplified to include only vapor diffusion in the gas domain, and the system is assumed to be isothermal. In the comprehensive model developed in this study, evaporative cooling of the interface is accounted for, and vapor concentration is coupled to local temperature at the interface. Conjugate heat and mass transfer are solved in the solid substrate, liquid droplet, and surrounding gas. Buoyancy-driven convective flows in the droplet and vapor domains are also simulated. The influences of evaporative cooling and convection on the evaporation characteristics are determined quantitatively. The liquid-vapor interface temperature drop induced by evaporative cooling suppresses evaporation, while gas-phase natural convection acts to enhance evaporation. While the effects of these competing transport mechanisms are observed to counterbalance for evaporation on a hydrophobic surface, the stronger influence of evaporative cooling on a superhydrophobic surface accounts for an overprediction of experimental evaporation rates by ~20% with vapor diffusion-based models. The local evaporation fluxes along the liquid-vapor interface for both hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates are investigated. The highest local evaporation flux occurs at the three-phase contact line region due to proximity to the higher temperature substrate, rather than at the relatively colder droplet top; vapor diffusion-based models predict the opposite. The numerically calculated evaporation rates agree with experimental results to within 2% for superhydrophobic substrates and 3% for hydrophobic substrates. The large deviations between past analytical models and the experimental data are therefore reconciled with the

  20. Experimental analysis and semicontinuous simulation of low-temperature droplet evaporation of multicomponent fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, S.; Lorenz, S.; Rivard, E.; Brüggemann, D.

    2015-01-01

    Low-pollutant and efficient combustion not only in internal combustion engines requires a balanced gaseous mixture of fuel and oxidizer. As fuels may contain several hundred different chemical species with different physicochemical properties as well as defined amounts of biogenic additives, e.g., ethanol, a thorough understanding of liquid fuel droplet evaporation processes is necessary to allow further engine optimization. We have studied the evaporation of fuel droplets at low ambient temperature. A non-uniform temperature distribution inside the droplet was already considered by including a finite thermal conductivity in a one-dimensional radial evaporation model (Rivard and Brüggemann in Chem Eng Sci 65(18):5137-5145, 2010). For a detailed analysis of droplet evaporation, two non-laser-based experimental setups have been developed. They allow a fast and relatively simple but yet precise measurement of diameter decrease and composition change. The first method is based on collecting droplets in a diameter range from 70 to 150 µm by a high-precision scale. A simultaneous evaluation of mass increase is employed for an accurate average diameter value determination. Subsequently, a gas chromatographic analysis of the collected droplets was conducted. In the second experiment, evaporation of even smaller droplets was optically analyzed by a high-speed shadowgraphy/schlieren microscope setup. A detailed analysis of evaporating E85 (ethanol/gasoline in a mass ratio of 85 %/15 %) and surrogate fuel droplets over a wide range of initial droplet diameters and ambient temperatures was conducted. The comparison of experimental and numerical results shows the applicability of the developed model over a large range of diameters and temperatures.

  1. High-temperature gas stream filter and method

    SciTech Connect

    Notestein, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to the removal of solid particulate material from high-temperature gas streams, and more particularly the removal of such particulate material by employing a barrier filter formed of a carbon-carbon composite provided by a porous carbon fiber substrate with open interstitial regions between adjacently disposed carbon fibers selectively restricted by carbon integrally attached to the carbon fibers of the substrate. In a typical utilization of a particulate-bearing hot gas stream, the particulate loading of the gas stream after cleaning is normally less than about 50 ppm and with essentially no particulates larger than about 10 microns. This carbon-carbon filter for removing particulate material of a particle size larger than a preselected particle size from a gas stream at a temperature greater than about 800 F, is produced by the steps which comprise: providing a substrate of carbonaceous fibers with pore-forming open interstitial regions between adjacently disposed fibers; and, sufficiently filling these open interstitial regions with carbon integrally attached to and supported by the fibers for providing the interstitial regions with throughgoing passage-ways of a pore size sufficient to provide for the passage of the gas stream while preventing the passage of particulate material larger than a preselected particle size.

  2. Installing and maintaining evaporative coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Otterbein, R.

    1996-05-01

    In the spring, many people in the western United States will be starting up or replacing evaporative coolers, or buying them for the first time. Proper installation and maintenance of these systems is very important, and recent improvements in the technology change how to best handle these tasks. Topics covered in this article include the following: evaporative cooler types; cooler maintenance; sizing evaporative coolers; A/C Add-on; Blower Orientation and cooler location; increasing air flow. 5 figs.

  3. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  4. A transient method for measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow using acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dehua; Wang, Xiuming; Che, Chengxuan; Cong, Jiansheng; Xu, Delong; Wang, Xiaomin

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow by using an acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) method in a transient way is studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the effects of sizes and locations of a single air bubble in a cylindrical cavity with two open ends on resonant frequencies are investigated numerically. Then, a transient measurement system for ARS is established, and the trends of the resonant frequencies (RFs) and resonant amplitudes (RAs) in the cylindrical cavity with gas flux inside are investigated experimentally. The measurement results by the proposed transient method are compared with those by steady-state ones and numerical ones. The numerical results show that the RFs of the cavity are highly sensitive to the volume of the single air bubble. A tiny bubble volume perturbation may cause a prominent RF shift even though the volume of the air bubble is smaller than 0.1% of that of the cavity. When the small air bubble moves, the RF shift will change and reach its maximum value as it is located at the middle of the cavity. As the gas volume fraction of the two-phase flow is low, both the RFs and RAs from the measurement results decrease dramatically with the increasing gas volume, and this decreasing trend gradually becomes even as the gas volume fraction increases further. These experimental results agree with the theoretical ones qualitatively. In addition, the transient method for ARS is more suitable for measuring the gas volume fraction with randomness and instantaneity than the steady-state one, because the latter could not reflect the random and instant characteristics of the mixed fluid due to the time consumption for frequency sweeping. This study will play a very important role in the quantitative measurement of the gas volume fraction of multiphase flows.

  5. Thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation water recovery technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Winkler, H. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    The recently developed Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) offers a highly competitive approach to water recovery from waste fluids for future on-orbit stations such as the Space Operations Center. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than pumps and an accumulator, thus solving problems inherent in other reclamation subsystem designs. In an extensive test program, over 850 hours of operation were accumulated during which time high quality product water was recovered from both urine and wash water at an average steady state production rate of 2.2 pounds per hour.

  6. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  7. Gas chromatographic method for measuring nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacetyl nitrate in air without compressed gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Maniga, N.I.; Stedman, D.H.; Paur, R.J.

    1988-04-15

    A gas chromatographic technique that measures atmospheric concentrations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO/sub 2/ has been developed that uses luminol-based chemiluminescence for detection. The carrier gas is air that has been scrubbed by passing it over FeSO/sub 4/, which eliminates the need for any compressed gas cylinders. A novel gas sampling system and time enable variable sample volumes of contaminated air to be injected. Ambient PAN and NO/sub 2/ measurements can be made every 40 s with detection limits of 0.12 ppb for PAN and 0.2 ppb for NO/sub 2/. Seven other atmospheric species, including ozone, gave no interference. Linear response was observed for NO/sub 2/ from 0.2 to 170 ppb and for PAN from 1 to 70 ppb.

  8. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Rosen, M S; Wang, R; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-12-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. PMID:12807139

  9. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Fluidized bed and method and system for gas component capture

    DOEpatents

    Krutka, Holly; Wilson, Cody; Starns, Travis

    2016-05-31

    The present disclosure is directed to a process that allows dry sorbents to remove a target constituent, such as carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from a gas stream. A staged fluidized bed separator enables gas and sorbent to move in opposite directions. The sorbent is loaded with target constituent in the separator. It is then transferred to a regenerator where the target constituent is stripped. The temperature of the separator and regenerator are controlled. After it is removed from the regenerator, the sorbent is then transferred back to the separator.

  11. Integration of Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Methods for Differentiating Ricin Preparation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Melville, Angela M.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Colburn, Heather A.; Victry, Kristin D.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-05-17

    The investigation of crimes involving chemical or biological agents is infrequent, but presents unique analytical challenges. The protein toxin ricin is encountered more frequently than other agents and is found in the seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis. Typically, the toxin is extracted from castor seeds utilizing a variety of different recipes that result in varying purity of the toxin. Moreover, these various purification steps can also leave or differentially remove a variety of exogenous and endogenous residual components with the toxin that may indicate the type and number of purification steps involved. We have applied three gas chromatographic - mass spectrometric (GC-MS) based analytical methods to measure the variation in seed carbohydrates and castor oil ricinoleic acid as well as the presence of solvents used for purification. These methods were applied to the same samples prepared using four previously identified toxin preparation methods starting from four varieties of castor seeds. The individual data sets for seed carbohydrate profiles, ricinoleic acid or acetone amount each provided information capable of differentiating different types of toxin preparations across seed types. However, the integration of the data sets using multivariate factor analysis provided a clear distinction of all samples based on the preparation method and independent of the seed source. In particular the abundance of mannose, arabinose, fucose, ricinoleic acid and acetone were shown to be important differentiating factors. These complementary tools provide a more confident determination of the method of toxin preparation.

  12. Method for combined removal of mercury and nitrogen oxides from off-gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Livengood, C. David

    2006-10-10

    A method for removing elemental Hg and nitric oxide simultaneously from a gas stream is provided whereby the gas stream is reacted with gaseous chlorinated compound to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds and the nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide. The method works to remove either mercury or nitrogen oxide in the absence or presence of each other.

  13. Automatable Measurement of Gas Exchange Rate in Streams: Oxygen-Carbon Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, R.; Haggerty, R.; Argerich, A.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gas exchange rates between streams and the atmosphere are critically important to measurement of in-stream ecologic processes, as well as fate and transport of hazardous pollutants such as mercury and PCBs. Methods to estimate gas exchange rates include empirical relations to hydraulics, and direct injection of a tracer gas such as propane or SF6. Empirical relations are inconsistent and inaccurate, particularly for lower order, high-roughness streams. Gas injections are labor-intensive, and measured gas exchange rates are difficult to extrapolate in time since they change with discharge and stream geometry. We propose a novel method for calculation of gas exchange rates utilizing O2, pCO2, pH, and temperature data. Measurements, which can be automated using data loggers and probes, are made on the upstream and downstream end of the study reach. Gas exchange rates are then calculated from a solution to the transport equations for oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon. Field tests in steep, low order, high roughness streams of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest indicate the method to be viable along stream reaches with high downstream gas concentration gradients and high rates of gas transfer velocity. Automated and continuous collection of oxygen and carbonate chemistry data is increasingly common, thus the method may be used to estimate gas exchange rates through time, and is well suited for interactivity with databases.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring the gas permeability of a solid sample

    DOEpatents

    Carstens, D.H.W.

    1984-01-27

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the permeability of a gas in a sample. The gas is allowed to reach a steady flow rate through the sample. A measurable amount of the gas is collected during a given time period and then delivered to a sensitive quadrupole. The quadrupole signal, adjusted for background, is proportional to the amount of gas collected during the time period. The quadrupole can be calibrated with a standard helium leak. The gas can be deuterium and the sample can be polyvinyl alcohol.

  15. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

  16. A method for observing gas evolution during plastic laminate cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, A. H.

    1969-01-01

    Polyimide, phenolic, and other resins which develop volatiles during laminating or molding cure are studied using optimum cure cycles. The specimen is placed on a platen and sealed in a plastic bag, then heated and observed for gas evolution using a binocular microscope. A cover plate is added to sumulate an autoclave.

  17. Evaporation Dynamics of Moss and Bare Soil in Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, S.; Young, J. M.; Barron, C. G.; Bolton, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation dynamics of mosses is a critical process in boreal and arctic systems and represents a key uncertainty in hydrology and climate models. At this point, moss evaporation is not well quantified at the plot or landscape scale. Relative to bare soil or litter evaporation, moss evaporation can be challenging to predict because the water flux is not isolated to the moss surface. Evaporation can originate from nearly 10 cm below the surface. Some mosses can wick moisture from even deeper than 10 cm, which subsequently evaporates. The goal of this study was to use field measurements to quantify the moss evaporation dynamics in a coniferous forest relative to bare ground or litter evaporation dynamics in a deciduous forest in Interior Alaska. Measurements were made in two ecosystem types within the boreal forest of Interior Alaska: a deciduous forest devoid of moss and a coniferous forest with a thick moss layer. A small clear chamber was attached to a LiCor 840 infrared gas analyzer in a closed loop system with a low flow rate. Water fluxes were measured for ~ 90 seconds on each plot in dry and wet soil and moss conditions. Additional measurements included: soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, barometric pressure, dew point, relative humidity, and wind speed. Thermal infrared images were also captured in congruence with water flux measurements to determine skin temperature. We found that the moss evaporation rate was over 100% greater than the soil evaporation rate (0.057 g/min vs. 0.024 g/min), and evaporation rates in both systems were most strongly driven by relative humidity and surface temperature. Surface temperature was lower at the birch site than the black spruce site because trees shade the surface beneath the birch. High fluxes associated with high water content were sustained for a longer period of time over the mosses compared to the bare soil. The thermal IR data showed that skin temperature lagged the evaporation flux, such that the

  18. Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  19. Experimental Investigations of the Internal Energy of Molecules Evaporated via Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption into a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (LIAD/FT-ICR)

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Ji-ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR), was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity (GB) values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kcal/mol. Chemical ionization with a series of proton transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, val-pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have less internal energy than those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  20. Using the gradient method to measure soil gas fluxes: limitations and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer

    2015-04-01

    The gradient method (De Jong & Schappert,1974) can be used to determine gas efflux from the soil, representing an alternative to the widely used chamber methods. In addition, valuable information about the vertical distribution of the sources/sinks of gas (e.g. CO2, CH4) in the soil can be derived. Although the method seems to be simple, care must be taken whether all assumption and simplifications are made: (1) Diffusion only: Gas transport can be described by Fick's law. (2) 1D vertical gas diffusion: No horizontal concentration gradients. (3) Gas diffusion in the soil is at steady-state: Changes are negligible. If the preconditions are not met, the gradient method may yield unreliable results. We tried to address some of these and further issues in different studies. We identified the method used to interpolate the gas concentration profile between the measurement locations as an issue affecting substantially the calculated efflux and vertical partitioning. Another critical issue is deriving the correct soil gas diffusivity. The assumption of steady-state diffusion is not always justified, especially after rain, and may lead to substantial misinterpretation if ignored. We also observed that soil gas transport can be affected by turbulence-driven pressure-pumping, so that the effect of non-diffusive gas transport must be considered. The Temporal and spatial resolution must match the research question and gas species. The gradient method is a valuable tool , that, Ideally, the GM should be used on well aerated, horizontally homogeneous soils where gas exchange is entirely driven by diffusion. Here the gradient method promises to yield reliable results when soil respiration and methane consumption is studied. Substantial discrepancy in these conditions could lead to increasing uncertainty in the flux estimates

  1. EVAPORATION OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

    PubMed Central

    Cruess, W. V.

    1921-01-01

    More and more the world is utilizing dried fruits and vegetables, the war having given impetus to the preparation of the latter. Here are plain statements of processes and values deduced from scientific institution investigations. Evaporation is in its infancy while sun drying is very ancient. Evaporated products are better looking but more costly. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:18010426

  2. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOEpatents

    Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G [Idaho Falls, ID; Turner, Terry D [Ammon, ID; Carney, Francis H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-29

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream.

  3. Benchmarking Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: A Public Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Bird, Jeff; Davison, Craig; Volponi, Al; Iverson, R. Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of engine health management (EHM) technology. The need is two-fold: technology developers require relevant data and problems to design and validate new algorithms and techniques while engine system integrators and operators need practical tools to direct development and then evaluate the effectiveness of proposed solutions. This paper presents a publicly available gas path diagnostic benchmark problem that has been developed by the Propulsion and Power Systems Panel of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to help address these needs. The problem is coded in MATLAB (The MathWorks, Inc.) and coupled with a non-linear turbofan engine simulation to produce "snap-shot" measurements, with relevant noise levels, as if collected from a fleet of engines over their lifetime of use. Each engine within the fleet will experience unique operating and deterioration profiles, and may encounter randomly occurring relevant gas path faults including sensor, actuator and component faults. The challenge to the EHM community is to develop gas path diagnostic algorithms to reliably perform fault detection and isolation. An example solution to the benchmark problem is provided along with associated evaluation metrics. A plan is presented to disseminate this benchmark problem to the engine health management technical community and invite technology solutions.

  4. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Two Methods to Estimate Natural Gas Production in Texas

    EIA Publications

    2003-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in August 2003 of two methods that estimate natural gas production in Texas. The first method (parametric method) was used by EIA from February through August 2003 and the second method (multinomial method) replaced it starting in September 2003, based on the results of this evaluation.

  6. Assessment of alternative disposal methods to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste in India.

    PubMed

    Yedla, Sudhakar; Sindhu, N T

    2016-06-01

    Open dumping, the most commonly practiced method of solid waste disposal in Indian cities, creates serious environment and economic challenges, and also contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. The present article attempts to analyse and identify economically effective ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste. The article looks at the selection of appropriate methods for the control of methane emissions. Multivariate functional models are presented, based on theoretical considerations as well as the field measurements to forecast the greenhouse gas mitigation potential for all the methodologies under consideration. Economic feasibility is tested by calculating the unit cost of waste disposal for the respective disposal process. The purpose-built landfill system proposed by Yedla and Parikh has shown promise in controlling greenhouse gas and saving land. However, these studies show that aerobic composting offers the optimal method, both in terms of controlling greenhouse gas emissions and reducing costs, mainly by requiring less land than other methods. PMID:27118738

  7. Assessment of alternative disposal methods to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste in India.

    PubMed

    Yedla, Sudhakar; Sindhu, N T

    2016-06-01

    Open dumping, the most commonly practiced method of solid waste disposal in Indian cities, creates serious environment and economic challenges, and also contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. The present article attempts to analyse and identify economically effective ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste. The article looks at the selection of appropriate methods for the control of methane emissions. Multivariate functional models are presented, based on theoretical considerations as well as the field measurements to forecast the greenhouse gas mitigation potential for all the methodologies under consideration. Economic feasibility is tested by calculating the unit cost of waste disposal for the respective disposal process. The purpose-built landfill system proposed by Yedla and Parikh has shown promise in controlling greenhouse gas and saving land. However, these studies show that aerobic composting offers the optimal method, both in terms of controlling greenhouse gas emissions and reducing costs, mainly by requiring less land than other methods.

  8. Iridium single atom tips fabricated by field assisted reactive gas etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John A.; Urban, Radovan; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a simple, reliable method to fabricate Ir single atom tips (SATs) from polycrystalline wire. An electrochemical etch in CaCl2 solution is followed by a field assisted reactive gas etch in vacuum at room temperature using oxygen as an etching gas and neon as an imaging gas. Once formed, SATs are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures and their underlying structure is examined through evaporation of the apex atoms. Furthermore, a method is developed to repair Ir SATs at liquid nitrogen temperatures when apex atoms evaporate. This method may be used to fabricate Ir SAT ion sources.

  9. Modeling Treated LAW Feed Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    DANIEL, WE

    2004-07-08

    This task examines the potential of the treated waste feed blends to form sodium-aluminum silicate precipitates when evaporated using the zeolite database. To investigate the behavior of the blended pretreated waste feed, an OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI ESP) model of the treated low activity waste (LAW) evaporator was built. A range of waste feed compositions representative of Envelope A, B, and C were then fed into the OLI model to predict various physical and chemical properties of the evaporator concentrates. Additional runs with treated LAW evaporator were performed to compare chemical and physical property model predictions and experimental results for small-scale radioactive tests of the treated feed evaporation process.

  10. System and method to determine thermophysical properties of a multi-component gas

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2003-08-05

    A system and method to characterize natural gas hydrocarbons using a single inferential property, such as standard sound speed, when the concentrations of the diluent gases (e.g., carbon dioxide and nitrogen) are known. The system to determine a thermophysical property of a gas having a first plurality of components comprises a sound velocity measurement device, a concentration measurement device, and a processor to determine a thermophysical property as a function of a correlation between the thermophysical property, the speed of sound, and the concentration measurements, wherein the number of concentration measurements is less than the number of components in the gas. The method includes the steps of determining the speed of sound in the gas, determining a plurality of gas component concentrations in the gas, and determining the thermophysical property as a function of a correlation between the thermophysical property, the speed of sound, and the plurality of concentrations.

  11. An in situ method for real-time monitoring of soil gas diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biogeochemistry of soils. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and by this way fluxes can be calculated using by Fick's Law. The soil gas diffusion coefficient DS represents the proportional factor between the gas flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One common way to determine DS is taking core samples in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious and it can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence, uncertainty about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale, i.e. the real aeration status remains. We developed a method to measure and monitor DS in situ. The set-up consists of a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has seven sampling depths (from 0 to -43 cm of depth) and can be easily installed into vertical holes drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the DS depth distribution of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas-sampling-device/soil system the program COMSOL was used. We tested our new method both in the lab and in a field study and compared the results with a reference lab method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. Soil gas profiles could be measured with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. During the field study, there was an important rain event and we could monitor the decrease in soil gas diffusivity in the top soil due to water infiltration. The effect

  12. Evaporation from heterogeneous soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

    2009-04-01

    Evaporation rate is a key process of water exchange between soil surfaces and atmosphere and is controlled by both atmospheric demand and soil hydraulic properties. Initially high evaporation rates are sustained by capillary-induced water flow from receding drying front to evaporating surface. In heterogeneous soils air invades preferentially coarse-textured regions whereas fine textured surface regions remain water saturated. We investigated experimentally and numerically effects of hydraulic coupling on drying rate of heterogeneous porous media. Laboratory experiments with vertical contrasts between fine (0.1-0.5 mm) and coarse sand (0.3-0.9 mm) showed that the period of high drying rate was extended compared to evaporation from homogeneous materials. Water flow from coarse material to supply water evaporated from fine textured surface was monitored by neutron radiography imaging. Due to the high hydraulic conductivity of the coarse material the viscous head loss could be neglected for flow distances analyzed in the experiments (< 600 mm). We proposed a model to explore effects of hydraulic coupling on evaporation for a wide range of soil textural classes at plot scale. When the drying front in the coarse reaches a certain characteristic depth (defined by the pore size distribution) no water evaporates from the coarse surface, yet, subsurface flow from coarse to the fine textured inclusion persists and feeds enhanced evaporation rate. Assuming energy input was not limiting, evaporation from the fine textured inclusion may increase to compensate reduction of evaporating surface. For loam or silt as inclusion in sandy material, water was extracted from regions with more than 10 m in distance before flow was limited by viscous effects. In case of clay inclusions the radius of water extraction was smaller due to enhanced viscous resistance. The findings of the numerical study can be applied as well to assess the effect of shrubs or compacted trafficked zones on the

  13. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Darab, John G.; Gross, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer.

  14. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Darab, J.G.; Gross, M.E.

    1999-05-11

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer. 3 figs.

  15. Apparatus and method to inject a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream

    DOEpatents

    Viola, Michael B.

    2009-09-22

    An exhaust aftertreatment system for an internal combustion engine is provided including an apparatus and method to inject a reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream. Included is a fuel metering device adapted to inject reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream and a controllable pressure regulating device. A control module is operatively connected to the reductant metering device and the controllable pressure regulating device, and, adapted to effect flow of reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream over a controllable flow range.

  16. CHEMISTRY IN EVAPORATING ICES-UNEXPLORED TERRITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Rawlings, Jonathan M. C.; Viti, Serena; Williams, David A. E-mail: jcr@star.ucl.ac.u E-mail: daw@star.ucl.ac.u

    2010-12-20

    We suggest that three-body chemistry may occur in warm high-density gas evaporating in transient co-desorption events on interstellar ices. Using a highly idealized computational model we explore the chemical conversion from simple species of the ice to more complex species containing several heavy atoms, as a function of density and of adopted three-body rate coefficients. We predict that there is a wide range of densities and rate coefficients in which a significant chemical conversion may occur. We discuss the implications of this idea for the astrochemistry of hot cores.

  17. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  18. Evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Katsuhiro; Hiramatsu, Muneyuki; Hino, Tomonori; Otake, Takuma; Okamoto, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroki; Honma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Norimichi

    2015-04-28

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, production of gasoline blended with ethyl tert-buthyl ether (ETBE) is increasing annually. The flash point of ETBE is higher than that of gasoline, and blending ETBE into gasoline will change the flash point and the vapor pressure. Therefore, it is expected that the fire hazard caused by ETBE-blended gasoline would differ from that caused by normal gasoline. The aim of this study was to acquire the knowledge required for estimating the fire hazard of ETBE-blended gasoline. Supposing that ETBE-blended gasoline was a two-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE, we developed a prediction model that describes the vapor pressure and flash point of ETBE-blended gasoline in an arbitrary ETBE blending ratio. We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the relation between molar mass of gasoline and mass loss fraction. We measured the changes in the vapor pressure and flash point of gasoline by blending ETBE and evaporation, and compared the predicted values with the measured values in order to verify the prediction model. The calculated values of vapor pressures and flash points corresponded well to the measured values. Thus, we confirmed that the change in the evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation could be predicted by the proposed model. Furthermore, the vapor pressure constants of ETBE-blended gasoline were obtained by the model, and then the distillation curves were developed.

  19. Evaporation of tiny water aggregation on solid surfaces with different wetting properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen; Tu, Yusong; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2012-11-29

    The evaporation of a tiny amount of water on the solid surface with different wettabilities has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. From nonequilibrium MD simulations, we found that, as the surface changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the evaporation speed did not show a monotonic decrease as intuitively expected, but increased first, and then decreased after it reached a maximum value. The analysis of the simulation trajectory and calculation of the surface water interaction illustrate that the competition between the number of water molecules on the water-gas surface from where the water molecules can evaporate and the potential barrier to prevent those water molecules from evaporating results in the unexpected behavior of the evaporation. This finding is helpful in understanding the evaporation on biological surfaces, designing artificial surfaces of ultrafast water evaporating, or preserving water in soil. PMID:23051060

  20. Comparison of different evaporation estimates over the African continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambauer, P.; Dutra, E.; Maskey, S.; Werner, M.; Pappenberger, F.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2014-01-01

    Evaporation is a key process in the water cycle with implications ranging, inter alia, from water management to weather forecast and climate change assessments. The estimation of continental evaporation fluxes is complex and typically relies on continental-scale hydrological models or land-surface models. However, it appears that most global or continental-scale hydrological models underestimate evaporative fluxes in some regions of Africa, and as a result overestimate stream flow. Other studies suggest that land-surface models may overestimate evaporative fluxes. In this study, we computed actual evaporation for the African continent using a continental version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB, which is based on a water balance approach. Results are compared with other independently computed evaporation products: the evaporation results from the ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim and ERA-Land (both based on the energy balance approach), the MOD16 evaporation product, and the GLEAM product. Three other alternative versions of the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological model were also considered. This resulted in eight products of actual evaporation, which were compared in distinct regions of the African continent spanning different climatic regimes. Annual totals, spatial patterns and seasonality were studied and compared through visual inspection and statistical methods. The comparison shows that the representation of irrigation areas has an insignificant contribution to the actual evaporation at a continental scale with a 0.5° spatial resolution when averaged over the defined regions. The choice of meteorological forcing data has a larger effect on the evaporation results, especially in the case of the precipitation input as different precipitation input resulted in significantly different evaporation in some of the studied regions. ERA-Interim evaporation is generally the highest of the selected products followed by ERA-Land evaporation. In some regions, the satellite

  1. Comparison of different evaporation estimates over the African continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambauer, P.; Dutra, E.; Maskey, S.; Werner, M.; Pappenberger, F.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-07-01

    Evaporation is a key process in the water cycle, with implications ranging from water management, to weather forecast and climate change assessments. The estimation of continental evaporation fluxes is complex and typically relies on continental-scale hydrological or land-surface models. However, it appears that most global or continental-scale hydrological models underestimate evaporative fluxes in some regions of Africa, and as a result overestimate stream flow. Other studies suggest that land-surface models may overestimate evaporative fluxes. In this study, we computed actual evaporation for the African continent using a continental version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB, which is based on a water balance approach. Results are compared with other independently computed evaporation products: the evaporation results from the ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim and ERA-Land (both based on the energy balance approach), the MOD16 evaporation product, and the GLEAM product. Three other alternative versions of the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological model were also considered. This resulted in eight products of actual evaporation, which were compared in distinct regions of the African continent spanning different climatic regimes. Annual totals, spatial patterns and seasonality were studied and compared through visual inspection and statistical methods. The comparison shows that the representation of irrigation areas has an insignificant contribution to the actual evaporation at a continental scale with a 0.5° spatial resolution. The choice of meteorological forcing data has a larger effect on the evaporation results, especially in the case of the precipitation input as different precipitation input resulted in significantly different evaporation in some of the studied regions. ERA-Interim evaporation is generally the highest of the selected products followed by ERA-Land evaporation. The satellite based products (GLEAM and MOD16) do not show regular behaviour when compared

  2. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Michael A.; Sirinakis, George

    2011-01-04

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  3. Development and application of a method for analysis of phthalates in ham sausages by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Wang, Sui; Wei, Danyi; Wang, Meili; Zhang, Huina; Gai, Panpan; Duan, Jing

    2010-03-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay was developed and successfully applied for the determination of phthalates in ham sausage migrated from packaging film. The phthalates studied were dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP), with dibutyl adipate (DBA) as internal standard. The sample pre-treatments included extraction with n-hexane, solvent evaporation and reconstitution with acetonitrile before and after solid-phase extraction (SPE). The extraction and cleaning up procedure was carried out with cartridges containing dimethyl butylamine groups, which showed extraction efficiencies over 87.3%. The calibration curves obtained were linear with correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. The method proved to be accurate and precise for the six phthalates used. It was successfully applied to a study on the migration of phthalates from packaging PVC film into ham sausage.

  4. Method of fabricating an integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1988-03-22

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  5. Integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-03-19

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  6. Long term measurement of lake evaporation using a pontoon mounted Eddy Covariance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, H. A.; McGloin, R.; McJannet, D.; Burn, S.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate quantification of evaporation from water storages is essential for design of water management and allocation policy that aims to balance demands for water without compromising the sustainability of future water resources, particularly during periods of prolonged and severe drought. Precise measurement of evaporation from lakes and dams however, presents significant research challenges. These include design and installation of measurement platforms that can withstand a range of wind and wave conditions; accurate determination of the evaporation measurement footprint and the influence of changing water levels. In this paper we present results from a two year long deployment of a pontoon mounted Eddy Covariance (EC) system on a 17.2ha irrigation reservoir in southeast Queensland, Australia. The EC unit included a CSAT-3 sonic anemometer (Campbell Scientific, Utah, United States) and a Li-Cor CS7500 open-path H2O/CO2 infrared gas analyzer (LiCor, Nebraska, United States) at a height of 2.2m, a net radiometer (CNR1, Kipp & Zonen, Netherlands) at a height of 1.2m and a humidity and temperature probe (HMP45C,Vaisala, Finland) at 2.3m. The EC unit was controlled by a Campbell Scientific CR3000 data logger with flux measurements made at 10 Hz and block averaged values logged every 15 minutes. Power to the EC system was from mounted solar panels that charged deep cycle lead-acid batteries while communication was via a cellphone data link. The pontoon was fitted with a weighted central beam and gimbal ring system that allowed self-levelling of the instrumentation and minimized dynamic influences on measurements (McGowan et al 2010; Wiebe et al 2011). EC measurements were corrected for tilt errors using the double rotation method for coordinate rotation described by Wilczak et al. (2001). High and low frequency attenuation of the measured co-spectrum was corrected using Massman's (2000) method for estimating frequency response corrections, while measurements were

  7. Method for removal of mercury from various gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2003-06-10

    The invention provides for a method for removing elemental mercury from a fluid, the method comprising irradiating the mercury with light having a wavelength of approximately 254 nm. The method is implemented in situ at various fuel combustion locations such as power plants and municipal incinerators.

  8. Small Scale Evaporation Kinetics of a Binary Fluid Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdeo, Carl; Ye, Dezhuang; Kalonia, Devendra; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Mechanical Engineering Team; Pharmaceutical Sciences Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Evaporation induces a concentrating effect in liquid mixtures. The transient process has significant influence on the dynamic behaviors of a complex fluid. To simultaneously investigate the fluid properties and small-scale evaporation kinetics during the transient process, the quartz crystal microbalance is applied to a binary mixture droplet of light alcohols including both a single volatile component (a fast evaporation followed by a slow evaporation) and a mixture of two volatile components with comparable evaporation rates. The density and viscosity stratification are evaluated by the shear wave, and the evaporation kinetics is measured by the resonant signature of the acoustic p-wave. The evaporation flux can be precisely determined by the resonant frequency spikes and the complex impedance. To predict the concentration field, the moving interface, and the precision evaporation kinetics of the mixture, a multiphase model is developed to interpret the complex impedance signals based on the underlying mass and momentum transport phenomena. The experimental method and theoretical model are developed for better characterizing and understanding of the drying process involving liquid mixtures of protein pharmaceuticals.

  9. Good odorant practices ensure safer operations. [Natural gas odorant detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Oudman, P. )

    1993-12-01

    Regulations in Canada and the US require that combustible gas used as a fuel be odorized at such a level that a concentration in air of one-fifth the lower explosive limit the gas can be readily detected and recognized by a person with a normal sense of smell. These regulations do not specify how the odorant level should be determined. However, since the requirement is related to smell, the level should be determined by an olfactory method. There are two odorant monitoring methods commonly used by gas companies, the olfactory (odorometer) and the instrumentation (gas chromatograph) methods. The instrument method provides only quantitative results, which somehow must be related to an olfactory response. This paper discusses these methods.

  10. Hot Jupiters: how rapidly are they evaporating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Munoz, A.; McConnell, J. C.; Caldwell, J. J.

    2005-08-01

    The detection of an extended atmosphere on the exoplanet HD 209458 b containing H, C and O and reaching as far out as 3-4 planetary radii (Vidal-Madjar et al. 2004, Astrophys. J. 604, L69-L72 ) constitutes a unique case in the study of so-called hot Jupiters. At 0.045 AU from its host star, stellar EUV radiation supplies HD 209458 b with sufficient energy so as to heat up its upper atmosphere and, presumably, power its evaporation. The goal of this work is two-fold: estimate the evaporation rate from the atmosphere of hot Jupiters, of importance for the understanding of their evolution, and predict the composition of their thermosphere, giving support to future observations. For this purpose we have built an idealized one-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the thermosphere of hot Jupiters, of particular relevance for HD 209458 b. Concentrations of H-, C- and O-bearing constituents, as well as density, velocity and temperature of the whole plasma, are solved self-consistently. The evaporation rate is fluid-dynamically constrained by the occurrence of a sonic point in the expansion of the atmospheric gas. Rapid adiabatic cooling may place an additional constraint on the thermal structure near the transition between the lower and upper atmospheres of these planets. Evaporation rates and profiles of constituents will be given for various planet-star distances, appropriate to very hot Jupiters ( ˜ 0.02 AU), hot Jupiters ( ˜ 0.05 AU) and more temperate conditions (> 0.1 AU).

  11. Evaporation flows driven by early B stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Els

    2013-10-01

    Young massive OB stars significantly influence their environment as their far-UV photons (6 eV < E < 13.6 eV) dominate the physics and chemistry of the surrounding gas, creating PhotoDissociation Regions (PDRs). The incident FUV field heats and photo-dissociates the PDR and may create evaporation flows of the PDR surfaces. These photo-evaporated flows are fundamental to understanding proplyds, pillars, and the evolution of molecular clouds and hence may greatly influence the star and planet formation process. As the far-UV luminosity of the galaxy is dominated by later type B stars rather than O stars, understanding the interaction of B stars with nearby molecular clouds is key. However, for the majority of the PDRs -- those associated with lower mass B stars -- the photo-evaporation process and its relation with star formation are not well studied. Here, we propose a velocity-resolved study of the [CII] line at 158 micron with the GREAT spectrometer on board of SOFIA to study the dynamical interaction of the B2V star HD 39703 and the B0.5IVe star gamma Cas with the molecular cloud they illuminate. These regions are well-studied over a wide-wavelength range and have been observed by Spitzer/IRS in spectral mapping and Herschel/PACS in both photometry and line-mapping (cooling lines, CO). The goal of this combined SOFIA/Herschel/Spitzer study is to address the kinematic characteristics of the interaction of these two stars with the molecular cloud, determine the mass loss rate, and assess their role in triggering star formation in the PDR. In this way, we can assess the role of evaporation flows driven by early B stars in the evolution of molecular clouds.

  12. Modeling of Bulk Evaporation and Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, S.; Ding, Z.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the modeling and mathematical formulation of the bulk evaporation and condensation involved in liquid-vapor phase change processes. An internal energy formulation, for these phase change processes that occur under the constraint of constant volume, was studied. Compared to the enthalpy formulation, the internal energy formulation has a more concise and compact form. The velocity and time scales of the interface movement were obtained through scaling analysis and verified by performing detailed numerical experiments. The convection effect induced by the density change was analyzed and found to be negligible compared to the conduction effect. Two iterative methods for updating the value of the vapor phase fraction, the energy based (E-based) and temperature based (T-based) methods, were investigated. Numerical experiments revealed that for the evaporation and condensation problems the E-based method is superior to the T-based method in terms of computational efficiency. The internal energy formulation and the E-based method were used to compute the bulk evaporation and condensation processes under different conditions. The evolution of the phase change processes was investigated. This work provided a basis for the modeling of thermal performance of multi-phase nuclear fuel elements under variable gravity conditions, in which the buoyancy convection due to gravity effects and internal heating are involved.

  13. Trace gas retrieval for limb DOAS under changing atmospheric conditions: The X-gas scaling method vs optimal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueneke, Tilman; Grossmann, Katja; Knecht, Matthias; Raecke, Rasmus; Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Changing atmospheric conditions during DOAS measurements from fast moving aircraft platforms pose a challenge for trace gas retrievals. Traditional inversion techniques to retrieve trace gas concentrations from limb scattered UV/vis spectroscopy, like optimal estimation, require a-priori information on Mie extinction (e.g., aerosol concentration and cloud cover) and albedo, which determine the atmospheric radiative transfer. In contrast to satellite applications, cloud filters can not be applied because they would strongly reduce the usable amount of expensively gathered measurement data. In contrast to ground-based MAX-DOAS applications, an aerosol retrieval based on O4 is not able to constrain the radiative transfer in air-borne applications due to the rapidly decreasing amount of O4 with altitude. Furthermore, the assumption of a constant cloud cover is not valid for fast moving aircrafts, thus requiring 2D or even 3D treatment of the radiative transfer. Therefore, traditional techniques are not applicable for most of the data gathered by fast moving aircraft platforms. In order to circumvent these limitations, we have been developing the so-called X-gas scaling method. By utilising a proxy gas X (e.g. O3, O4, …), whose concentration is either a priori known or simultaneously in-situ measured as well as remotely measured, an effective absorption length for the target gas is inferred. In this presentation, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the novel approach along with some sample cases. A particular strength of the X-gas scaling method is its insensitivity towards the aerosol abundance and cloud cover as well as wavelength dependent effects, whereas its sensitivity towards the profiles of both gases requires a priori information on their shapes.

  14. Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

  15. Method of fabricating an abradable gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of a ceramic layer is improved. The invention is particularly directed to an improved abradable lining that is deposited on shroud forming a gas path in turbomachinery. Improved thermal shock resistance of a shroud is effected through the deliberate introduction of benign cracks. These are microcracks which will not propagate appreciably upon exposure to the thermal shock environment in which a turbine seal must function. Laser surface fusion treatment is used to introduce these microcracks. The ceramic surface is laser scanned to form a continuous dense layer. As this layer cools and solidifies, shrinkage results in the formation of a very fine crack network. The presence of this deliberately introduced fine crack network precludes the formation of a catastrophic crack during thermal shock exposure.

  16. Stochastic method for modeling of the rarefied gas transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya; Lezhnev, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for computation of the transport coefficients of rarefied gas, which is based on stochastic modeling of phase trajectories considered molecular system. The hard spheres potential is used. The number of operations is proportional to the number of used molecules. Naturally in this algorithm the conservation laws are performed. The efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated by the calculation of the viscosity and diffusion coefficients of several noble gases (argon, neon, xenon, krypton). It was shown that the algorithm accuracy of the order of 1-2% can be obtained by using a relatively small number of molecules. The accuracy dependence on the number of used molecules, statistics (number of the used phase trajectories) and calculation time was analyzed.

  17. Gas turbine nozzle vane insert and methods of installation

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William John; Predmore, Daniel Ross; Placko, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A pair of hollow elongated insert bodies are disposed in one or more of the nozzle vane cavities of a nozzle stage of a gas turbine. Each insert body has an outer wall portion with apertures for impingement-cooling of nozzle wall portions in registration with the outer wall portion. The insert bodies are installed into the cavity separately and spreaders flex the bodies toward and to engage standoffs against wall portions of the nozzle whereby the designed impingement gap between the outer wall portions of the insert bodies and the nozzle wall portions is achieved. The spreaders are secured to the inner wall portions of the insert bodies and the bodies are secured to one another and to the nozzle vane by welding or brazing.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Evaporation Behavior of Polonium and Rare-Earth Elements in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Shuji Ohno; Shinya Miyahara; Yuji Kurata; Ryoei Katsura; Shigeru Yoshida

    2006-07-01

    Equilibrium evaporation behavior was experimentally investigated for polonium ({sup 210}Po) in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and for rare-earth elements gadolinium (Gd) and europium (Eu) in LBE to understand and clarify the transfer behavior of toxic impurities from LBE coolant to a gas phase. The experiments utilized the 'transpiration method' in which saturated vapor in an isothermal evaporation pot was transported by inert carrier gas and collected outside of the pot. While the previous paper ICONE12-49111 has already reported the evaporation behavior of LBE and of tellurium in LBE, this paper summarizes the outlines and the results of experiments for important impurity materials {sup 210}Po and rare-earth elements which are accumulated in liquid LBE as activation products and spallation products. In the experiments for rare-earth elements, non-radioactive isotope was used. The LBE pool is about 330-670 g in weight and has a surface area of 4 cm x 14 cm. {sup 210}Po experiments were carried out with a smaller test apparatus and radioactive {sup 210}Po produced through neutron irradiation of LBE in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). We obtained fundamental and instructive evaporation data such as vapor concentration, partial vapor pressure of {sup 210}Po in the gas phase, and gas-liquid equilibrium partition coefficients of the impurities in LBE under the temperature condition between 450 and 750 deg. C. The {sup 210}Po test revealed that Po had characteristics to be retained in LBE but was still more volatile than LBE solvent. A part of Eu tests implied high volatility of rare-earth elements comparable to that of Po. This tendency is possibly related to the local enrichment of the solute near the pool surface and needs to be investigated more. These results are useful and indispensable for the evaluation of radioactive materials transfer to the gas phase in LBE-cooled nuclear systems. (authors)

  19. Novel method for online monitoring of dissolved N2O concentrations through a gas stripping device.

    PubMed

    Mampaey, Kris E; van Dongen, Udo G J M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment plants are currently measured by online gas phase analysis or grab sampling from the liquid phase. In this study, a novel method is presented to monitor the liquid phase N2O concentration for aerated as well as non-aerated conditions/reactors, following variations both in time and in space. The monitoring method consists of a gas stripping device, of which the measurement principle is based on a continuous flow of reactor liquid through a stripping flask and subsequent analysis of the N2O concentration in the stripped gas phase. The method was theoretically and experimentally evaluated for its fit for use in the wastewater treatment context. Besides, the influence of design and operating variables on the performance of the gas stripping device was addressed. This method can easily be integrated with online off-gas measurements and allows to better investigate the origin of the gas emissions from the treatment plant. Liquid phase measurements of N2O are of use in mitigation of these emissions. The method can also be applied to measure other dissolved gasses, such as methane, being another important greenhouse gas.

  20. Novel method for online monitoring of dissolved N2O concentrations through a gas stripping device.

    PubMed

    Mampaey, Kris E; van Dongen, Udo G J M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment plants are currently measured by online gas phase analysis or grab sampling from the liquid phase. In this study, a novel method is presented to monitor the liquid phase N2O concentration for aerated as well as non-aerated conditions/reactors, following variations both in time and in space. The monitoring method consists of a gas stripping device, of which the measurement principle is based on a continuous flow of reactor liquid through a stripping flask and subsequent analysis of the N2O concentration in the stripped gas phase. The method was theoretically and experimentally evaluated for its fit for use in the wastewater treatment context. Besides, the influence of design and operating variables on the performance of the gas stripping device was addressed. This method can easily be integrated with online off-gas measurements and allows to better investigate the origin of the gas emissions from the treatment plant. Liquid phase measurements of N2O are of use in mitigation of these emissions. The method can also be applied to measure other dissolved gasses, such as methane, being another important greenhouse gas. PMID:25573615

  1. A new in-situ method to determine the apparent gas diffusion coefficient of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Paulus, Sinikka; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biological activity in the soil and soil respiration. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by diffusion and Fick's Law is used to describe the fluxes in the soil. The "apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient" represents the proportional factor between the flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gases through the soil. One common way to determine this coefficient is to take core samples in the field and determine it in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and needs laborious field work and can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence insecurity about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale must remain. We developed a new in-situ method using new gas sampling device, tracer gas and inverse soil gas modelling. The gas sampling device contains several sampling depths and can be easily installed into vertical holes of an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. At the lower end of the device inert tracer gas is injected continuously. The tracer gas diffuses into the surrounding soil. The resulting distribution of the tracer gas concentrations is used to deduce the diffusivity profile of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas sampling device/soil system the program COMSOL is used. We will present the results of a field campaign comparing the new in-situ method with lab measurements on soil cores. The new sampling pole has several interesting advantages: it can be used in-situ and over a long time; so it allows following modifications of diffusion coefficients in interaction with rain but also vegetation cycle and wind.

  2. Comparison study on qualitative and quantitative risk assessment methods for urban natural gas pipeline network.

    PubMed

    Han, Z Y; Weng, W G

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, a qualitative and a quantitative risk assessment methods for urban natural gas pipeline network are proposed. The qualitative method is comprised of an index system, which includes a causation index, an inherent risk index, a consequence index and their corresponding weights. The quantitative method consists of a probability assessment, a consequences analysis and a risk evaluation. The outcome of the qualitative method is a qualitative risk value, and for quantitative method the outcomes are individual risk and social risk. In comparison with previous research, the qualitative method proposed in this paper is particularly suitable for urban natural gas pipeline network, and the quantitative method takes different consequences of accidents into consideration, such as toxic gas diffusion, jet flame, fire ball combustion and UVCE. Two sample urban natural gas pipeline networks are used to demonstrate these two methods. It is indicated that both of the two methods can be applied to practical application, and the choice of the methods depends on the actual basic data of the gas pipelines and the precision requirements of risk assessment.

  3. Software system for numerical simulation of minor gas constituents lidar sensing by the differential absorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkovskii, D. A.; Matvienko, G. G.; Romanovskii, O. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports the development of LIDAS (LIdar Differential Absorption Sensing) program-algorithmic system for laser remote sensing of minor gas constituents (MGCs) of the atmosphere by the differential absorption method (DIAL). The system includes modules for the search of wavelengths informative for laser gas analysis by the differential absorption method, for numerical simulation of lidar sensing of atmospheric MGCs, and for calculation of errors of methodical, atmospheric, spectral, and instrumental origin. Lidar sensing of gas constituents by the differential absorption method as applied to problems of sensing of atmospheric MGCs is simulated numerically. Results of experiments on remote sensing of gas constituents of the atmosphere with the use of RO laser are presented.

  4. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2000-07-01

    This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

  5. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed.

  6. Hollow-Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Mitchell, Keith; Settles, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The hollow-fiber spacesuit water membrane evaporator (HoFi SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits and spacecraft to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust, heat-rejection device that is less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. After recent contamination tests, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) micro porous hollow-fiber membrane was selected for prototype development as the most suitable candidate among commercial hollow-fiber evaporator alternatives. An innovative design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was developed into a full-scale prototype for the spacesuit application. Vacuum chamber testing has been performed to characterize heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor back-pressure, and to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the wastewater reclamation distillation processes. Other tests showed tolerance to freezing and suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment. In summary, HoFi SWME is a lightweight, compact evaporator for heat rejection in the spacesuit that is robust, contamination- insensitive, freeze-tolerant, and able to reject the required heat of spacewalks in microgravity, lunar, and Martian environments. The HoFi is packaged to reject 810 W of heat through 800 hours of use in a vacuum environment, and 370 W in a Mars environment. The device also eliminates free gas and dissolved gas from the coolant loop.

  7. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  8. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1994-01-04

    An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

  9. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Rawlinson, K. Scott

    1994-01-01

    An improved evaporator section for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes.

  10. Horst Meyer and Quantum Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balibar, S.

    2016-11-01

    With their 1963 article in Cryogenics Horst Meyer and his collaborators triggered intense research activity on the evaporation of superfluid helium. Discussing this subject with him in 1975 was enlightening. Fifty years later, the analogy between the photoelectric effect and the evaporation of superfluid helium in the low temperature limit is not yet clear, although remarkable progress has been made in its observation and its understanding. This special issue of the Journal of Low Temperature Physics is an opportunity to recall the history of quantum evaporation, and to express my gratitude to Horst Meyer. It describes quickly most of the experimental and theoretical works which have been published on quantum evaporation during the last 50 years, but it is not a comprehensive review of this fascinating subject.

  11. Horst Meyer and Quantum Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balibar, S.

    2016-06-01

    With their 1963 article in Cryogenics Horst Meyer and his collaborators triggered intense research activity on the evaporation of superfluid helium. Discussing this subject with him in 1975 was enlightening. Fifty years later, the analogy between the photoelectric effect and the evaporation of superfluid helium in the low temperature limit is not yet clear, although remarkable progress has been made in its observation and its understanding. This special issue of the Journal of Low Temperature Physics is an opportunity to recall the history of quantum evaporation, and to express my gratitude to Horst Meyer. It describes quickly most of the experimental and theoretical works which have been published on quantum evaporation during the last 50 years, but it is not a comprehensive review of this fascinating subject.

  12. Evaporation Tower With Prill Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tower more efficient than conventional evaporation equipment. Liquids such as milk and fruit juice concentrated by passing them through tiny nozzle to form droplets, then allowing droplets to fall through evacuated tower with cooled walls.

  13. Classical fields method for a relativistic interacting Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska, Emilia; Zin, Pawel; Gajda, Mariusz

    2009-01-15

    We formulate a classical fields method for the description of relativistic interacting bosonic particles at nonzero temperatures. The method relies on the assumption that at low temperatures the Bose field can be described by a c-number function. We discuss a very important role of the cutoff momentum which divides the field into a dominant classical part and a small quantum correction. We illustrate the method by studying the thermodynamics of a relativistic Bose field which is governed by the Klein-Gordon equation with a {lambda}{psi}{sup 4} term responsible for the interactions.

  14. Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Daryl Haefner

    2007-02-01

    A literature survey was conducted to collect information and summarize the methods available to capture iodine from fuel reprocessing off-gases. Techniques were categorized as either wet scrubbing or solid adsorbent methods, and each method was generally described as it might be used under reprocessing conditions. Decontamination factors are quoted only to give a rough indication of the effectiveness of the method. No attempt is made to identify a preferred capture method at this time, although activities are proposed that would provide a consistent baseline that would aid in evaluating technologies.

  15. Evaporation waves in superheated dodecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões-Moreira, J. R.; Shepherd, J. E.

    1999-03-01

    We have observed propagating adiabatic evaporation waves in superheated liquid dodecane, C12H26. Experiments were performed with a rapid decompression apparatus at initial temperatures of 180 300°C. Saturated dodecane in a tube was suddenly depressurized by rupturing a diaphragm. Motion pictures and still photographic images, and pressure and temperature data were obtained during the evaporation event that followed depressurization. Usually, a front or wave of evaporation started at the liquid free surface and propagated into the undisturbed regions of the metastable liquid. The evaporation wave front moved with a steady mean velocity but the front itself was unstable and fluctuating in character. At low superheats, no waves were observed until a threshold superheat was exceeded. At moderate superheats, subsonic downstream states were observed. At higher superheats, the downstream flow was choked, corresponding to a Chapman Jouguet condition. At the most extreme superheat tested, a vapour content of over 90% was estimated from the measured data, indicating a nearly complete evaporation wave. Our results are interpreted by modelling the evaporation wave as a discontinuity, or jump, between a superheated liquid state and a two-phase liquid vapour downstream state. Reasonable agreement is found between the model and observations; however, there is a fundamental indeterminacy that prevents the prediction of the observed wave speeds.

  16. Sensitivity of Spacebased Microwave Radiometer Observations to Ocean Surface Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Timothy W.; Li, Li

    2000-01-01

    Ocean surface evaporation and the latent heat it carries are the major components of the hydrologic and thermal forcing on the global oceans. However, there is practically no direct in situ measurements. Evaporation estimated from bulk parameterization methods depends on the quality and distribution of volunteer-ship reports which are far less than satisfactory. The only way to monitor evaporation with sufficient temporal and spatial resolutions to study global environment changes is by spaceborne sensors. The estimation of seasonal-to-interannual variation of ocean evaporation, using spacebased measurements of wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST), and integrated water vapor, through bulk parameterization method,s was achieved with reasonable success over most of the global ocean, in the past decade. Because all the three geophysical parameters can be retrieved from the radiance at the frequencies measured by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus-7, the feasibility of retrieving evaporation directly from the measured radiance was suggested and demonstrated using coincident brightness temperatures observed by SMMR and latent heat flux computed from ship data, in the monthly time scale. However, the operational microwave radiometers that followed SMMR, the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), lack the low frequency channels which are sensitive to SST. This low frequency channels are again included in the microwave imager (TMI) of the recently launched Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM). The radiance at the frequencies observed by both TMI and SSM/I were simulated through an atmospheric radiative transfer model using ocean surface parameters and atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles produced by the reanalysis of the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). From the same ECMWF data set, coincident evaporation is computed using a surface layer turbulent transfer model. The sensitivity of the radiance to

  17. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to

  18. Numerical simulation of dip-coating in the evaporative regime.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mohar; Doumenc, Frédéric; Guerrier, Béatrice

    2016-02-01

    A hydrodynamic model is used for numerical simulations of a polymer solution in a dip-coating-like experiment. We focus on the regime of small capillary numbers where the liquid flow is driven by evaporation, in contrast to the well-known Landau-Levich regime dominated by viscous forces. Lubrication approximation is used to describe the flow in the liquid phase. Evaporation in stagnant air is considered (diffusion-limited evaporation), which results in a coupling between liquid and gas phases. Self-patterning due to the solutal Marangoni effect is observed for some ranges of the control parameters. We first investigate the effect of evaporation rate on the deposit morphology. Then the role of the spatial variations in the evaporative flux on the wavelength and mean thickness of the dried deposit is ascertained, by comparing the 2D and 1D diffusion models for the gas phase. Finally, for the very low substrate velocities, we discuss the relative importance of diffusive and advective components of the polymer flux, and consequences on the choice of the boundary conditions. PMID:26920522

  19. Metal-ion Absorption in Conductively Evaporating Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnat, Orly; Sternberg, Amiel; McKee, Christopher F.

    2010-08-01

    We present computations of the ionization structure and metal-absorption properties of thermally conductive interface layers that surround evaporating warm spherical clouds embedded in a hot medium. We rely on the analytical steady-state formalism of Dalton and Balbus to calculate the temperature profile in the evaporating gas, and we explicitly solve the time-dependent ionization equations for H, He, C, N, O, Si, and S in the conductive interface. We include photoionization by an external field. We estimate how departures from equilibrium ionization affect the resonance-line cooling efficiencies in the evaporating gas, and determine the conditions for which radiative losses may be neglected in the solution for the evaporation dynamics and temperature profile. Our results indicate that nonequilibrium cooling significantly increases the value of the saturation parameter σ0 at which radiative losses begin to affect the flow dynamics. As applications, we calculate the ion fractions and projected column densities arising in the evaporating layers surrounding dwarf-galaxy-scale objects that are also photoionized by metagalactic radiation. We compare our results to the UV metal-absorption column densities observed in local highly ionized metal absorbers, located in the Galactic corona or intergalactic medium. Conductive interfaces significantly enhance the formation of high ions such as C3+, N4+, and O5+ relative to purely photoionized clouds, especially for clouds embedded in a high-pressure corona. However, the enhanced columns are still too low to account for the O VI columns (~1014 cm-2) observed in the local high-velocity metal-ion absorbers. We find that column densities larger than ~1013 cm-2 cannot be produced in evaporating clouds. Our results do support the conclusion of Savage and Lehner that absorption due to evaporating O VI likely occurs in the local interstellar medium, with characteristic columns of ~1013 cm-2.

  20. Mechanisms of solvent evaporation encapsulation processes: prediction of solvent evaporation rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Schwendeman, S P

    1999-10-01

    The mechanism of organic solvent evaporation during microencapsulation and its role during microsphere hardening has been investigated. Evaporation and encapsulation studies were carried out in a jacketed beaker, filled with aqueous hardening solution, which was maintained at constant temperature and constant stirring rate in the turbulent regime. Evaporation of dissolved methylene chloride (MC), ethyl acetate (EA), and acetonitrile (ACN) was examined by the decline in organic solvent concentration in the hardening bath, which was monitored by gas chromatography. The evaporation from the bath followed first-order kinetics under dilute conditions (e.g., MC < 3 mg/mL), yielding an overall permeability coefficient, P. The value of P was theoretically related to the Kolmogorov length-scale of turbulence under conditions that favor liquid-side transport control. According to theory, factors that favored liquid-phase control (as opposed to gas-phase control) were those that favored a high Henry's law constant [i.e., elevated temperature near the normal boiling point (bp) of the organic solvent] and properties of the dissolved organic solvent (i.e., low normal bp and low aqueous solubility). These theoretical hypotheses were confirmed by (1) correlating the experimentally determined P with process variables raised to the appropriate power according to theory, r(2) = 0.95 (i.e., P approximately rotational speed, omega(3/4), impeller diameter, d (5/4), volume of hardening bath, V(-1/4), and the product of kinematic viscosity and diffusion coefficient, nu(-5/12)D (2/3)), and (2) illustrating that at constant temperature, the tendency of the evaporation system to obey liquid-side transport control follows the same order of increasing Henry's law constant (i.e., MC > EA > ACN). To establish the relationship of evaporation with microsphere hardening, the decline in MC concentration was determined in both the continuous and dispersed polymer phases during microencapsulation. By

  1. Impact design methods for ceramic components in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, J.; Cuccio, J.; Kington, H.

    1991-01-01

    Methods currently under development to design ceramic turbine components with improved impact resistance are presented. Two different modes of impact damage are identified and characterized, i.e., structural damage and local damage. The entire computation is incorporated into the EPIC computer code. Model capability is demonstrated by simulating instrumented plate impact and particle impact tests.

  2. [The Study about Spectrum Characteristic Analysis Method in the Induction Period of Gas Explosion Flame].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Xiao-bin; Zheng, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Through analyzing the spectroscopic data of gas explosion flame whose volume fraction is 10% under a small scale experimental condition based on the target emission spectrum analysis methods; presents the gas explosion flame spectrum characteristic analysis methods about frequency domain feature parameters which include spectral density, band radiation light intensity, band average deviation, the time domain characteristic parameter which include band radiation energy, time average and deviation and the characteristic parameters which include skewness, kurtosis and half width; obtain the results that in the vicinity of somewhere, the spectral density converts between positive and negative in the range of 1 nm that the light intensity of gas explosion flame changes dramatically; the definite integral of gas explosion flame spectral waveband is strongest in the 550~900 nm; with the wavelength increases the detected time grow, the gas explosion flame spectral signal strength attenuation trends on the whole and after the peak interval appeared in the process of decay have weaken the strength of the enhanced; results show tha the target emission spectrum analysis methods can be applied to do the semi-quantitative analysis of dynamic process of gas explosion, the analysis spectral characteristics can be taken as a standard to detecting gas explosion flame.

  3. Method for converting noxious pollutants from flue gas into merchantable by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.F.

    1993-07-27

    A method is described for removing pollutants from boiler plant flue gases comprising the steps of: (a) exchanging heat between a flue gas which contains SO[sub 2], SO[sub 3] and NO pollutants and a first fluid to cool the flue gas down to a first temperature whereat substantially all SO[sub 3] in the flue gas is combined with H[sub 2]O; (b) condensing the SO[sub 3] and H[sub 2]O from the flue gas as a first condensate; (c) adding a solution containing an ammoniacal substance and a detergent to said flue gas to produce soapsuds and sulfates including ammonium bisulfate; (d) collecting the soap suds and ammonium bisulfate produced after said adding step and the first condensate as a first solution; and (e) separating ammonium bisulfate from said first solution.

  4. Method and apparatus for filtering gas with a moving granular filter bed

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C.; Wistrom, Corey; Smeenk, Jerod L.

    2007-12-18

    A method and apparatus for filtering gas (58) with a moving granular filter bed (48) involves moving a mass of particulate filter material (48) downwardly through a filter compartment (35); tangentially introducing gas into the compartment (54) to move in a cyclonic path downwardly around the moving filter material (48); diverting the cyclonic path (58) to a vertical path (62) to cause the gas to directly interface with the particulate filter material (48); thence causing the gas to move upwardly through the filter material (48) through a screened partition (24, 32) into a static upper compartment (22) of a filter compartment for exodus (56) of the gas which has passed through the particulate filter material (48).

  5. Apparatus and method for a gas turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Intile, John Charles; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2013-02-05

    A nozzle includes an inlet, an outlet, and an axial centerline. A shroud surrounding the axial centerline extends from the inlet to the outlet and defines a circumference. The circumference proximate the inlet is greater than the circumference at a first point downstream of the inlet, and the circumference at the first point downstream of the inlet is less than the circumference at a second point downstream of the first point. A method for supplying a fuel through a nozzle directs a first airflow along a first path and a second airflow along a second path separate from the first path. The method further includes injecting the fuel into at least one of the first path or the second path and accelerating at least one of the first airflow or the second airflow.

  6. Linear nozzle with tailored gas plumes and method

    DOEpatents

    Leon, David D.; Kozarek, Robert L.; Mansour, Adel; Chigier, Norman

    1999-01-01

    There is claimed a method for depositing fluid material from a linear nozzle in a substantially uniform manner across and along a surface. The method includes directing gaseous medium through said nozzle to provide a gaseous stream at the nozzle exit that entrains fluid material supplied to the nozzle, said gaseous stream being provided with a velocity profile across the nozzle width that compensates for the gaseous medium's tendency to assume an axisymmetric configuration after leaving the nozzle and before reaching the surface. There is also claimed a nozzle divided into respective side-by-side zones, or preferably chambers, through which a gaseous stream can be delivered in various velocity profiles across the width of said nozzle to compensate for the tendency of this gaseous medium to assume an axisymmetric configuration.

  7. Control method for turbocharged diesel engines having exhaust gas recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Jankovic, Mrdjan J; Jankovic, Miroslava

    2000-03-14

    A method of controlling the airflow into a compression ignition engine having an EGR and a VGT. The control strategy includes the steps of generating desired EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates as a function of the desired and measured compressor mass airflow values and exhaust manifold pressure values. The desired compressor mass airflow and exhaust manifold pressure values are generated as a function of the operator-requested fueling rate and engine speed. The EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates are then inverted to corresponding EGR and VGT actuator positions to achieve the desired compressor mass airflow rate and exhaust manifold pressure. The control strategy also includes a method of estimating the intake manifold pressure used in generating the EGR valve and VGT turbine positions.

  8. Preparation and Properties of Nonionic Vesicles Prepared with Polyglycerol Fatty Acid Esters Using the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reverse Phase Evaporation Method.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Kimura, Zen; Misono, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Koji; Sakai, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiko; Sakai, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported a new preparation method for liposomes and niosomes (nonionic vesicles) using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as the solvent (scRPE method). In this study, niosomes were prepared from polyglycerol fatty acid ester (PG ester)-type nonionic surfactants. These surfactants are made from naturally derived materials and are neither harmful to the human body nor to the environment. Niosomes were prepared using the scRPE method with ethanol as the co-solvent. Through this method, decaglycerol distearate (DG2S) and decaglycerol diisostearate (DG2IS) formed niosomes. On the other hand, decaglycerol monostearate (DG1S), which has a high hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) value, yielded a solution of spherical micelles, and decaglycerol tristearate (DG3S), which has a low HLB value, yielded a gel-like solution. Niosomes of DG2IS had higher trapping efficiencies and dispersion stabilities than those of DG2S because the membrane fluidity of the DG2IS niosomes was greater than that of the DG2S niosomes. The niosomes obtained in the present study are candidates for cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications because they are formed from nonionic surfactants derived from natural sources, and prepared using the scRPE method, which avoids the use of harmful organic solvents.

  9. Preparation and Properties of Nonionic Vesicles Prepared with Polyglycerol Fatty Acid Esters Using the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reverse Phase Evaporation Method.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Kimura, Zen; Misono, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Koji; Sakai, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiko; Sakai, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported a new preparation method for liposomes and niosomes (nonionic vesicles) using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as the solvent (scRPE method). In this study, niosomes were prepared from polyglycerol fatty acid ester (PG ester)-type nonionic surfactants. These surfactants are made from naturally derived materials and are neither harmful to the human body nor to the environment. Niosomes were prepared using the scRPE method with ethanol as the co-solvent. Through this method, decaglycerol distearate (DG2S) and decaglycerol diisostearate (DG2IS) formed niosomes. On the other hand, decaglycerol monostearate (DG1S), which has a high hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) value, yielded a solution of spherical micelles, and decaglycerol tristearate (DG3S), which has a low HLB value, yielded a gel-like solution. Niosomes of DG2IS had higher trapping efficiencies and dispersion stabilities than those of DG2S because the membrane fluidity of the DG2IS niosomes was greater than that of the DG2S niosomes. The niosomes obtained in the present study are candidates for cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications because they are formed from nonionic surfactants derived from natural sources, and prepared using the scRPE method, which avoids the use of harmful organic solvents. PMID:26876680

  10. Thermodynamic Modeling of Savannah River Evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.

    2001-08-02

    A thermodynamic model based on the code SOLGASMIX is developed to calculate phase equilibrium in evaporators and related tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This model uses the Pitzer method to calculate activity coefficients, and many of the required Pitzer parameters have been determined in the course of this work. Principal chemical species in standard SRS simulant solutions are included, and the temperature range for most parameters has been extended above 100 C. The SOLGASMIX model and calculations using the code Geochemists Workbench are compared to actual solubility data including silicate, aluminate, and aluminosilicate solutions. In addition, SOLGASMIX model calculations are also compared to transient solubility data involving SRS simulant solutions. These comparisons indicate that the SOLGASMIX predictions closely match reliable data over the range of temperature and solution composition expected in the SRS evaporator and related tanks. Predictions using the Geochemists Workbench may be unreliable, due primarily to the use of an inaccurate activity coefficient model.

  11. Digitally Programmable Micro Evaporation Source for Nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Del Corro, Pablo; Stark, Thomas; Lally, Richard; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cris; Bishop, David

    2015-03-01

    There is a significant world-wide effort to develop nano-manufacturing methods that can extend into the deep nanoscale region, below 20 nm. Techniques include photolithography, nano-imprint and direct write methods such as dip-pen lithography and atomic calligraphy. A central component of any fabrication setup is the deposition control of the materials to be used. Here we present a MEMS based, multi-material evaporation source array with each source element consisting of a polysilicon plate suspended by two electrical constriction leads. When resistively heating the plate, the pre-loaded material is thermally evaporated off of the plate. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, digitally programmable evaporation source. Pulsing the source with precisely controlled peak voltage and timing can emit atom fluxes with an unprecedented level of control in terms of what, when and how many atoms get deposited. By varying their dimensions and arrangement, the source array can provide controllable atom fluxes ranging over ten orders of magnitude. Such a material source can provide precise control and flexibility when conducting nanopatterning and nanolithography.

  12. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  13. Radiation-transport method to simulate noncontinuum gas flows for MEMS devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2004-01-01

    A Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) typically consists of micron-scale parts that move through a gas at atmospheric or reduced pressure. In this situation, the gas-molecule mean free path is comparable to the geometric features of the microsystem, so the gas flow is noncontinuum. When mean-free-path effects cannot be neglected, the Boltzmann equation must be used to describe the gas flow. Solution of the Boltzmann equation is difficult even for the simplest case because of its sevenfold dimensionality (one temporal dimension, three spatial dimensions, and three velocity dimensions) and because of the integral nature of the collision term. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the method of choice to simulate high-speed noncontinuum flows. However, since DSMC uses computational molecules to represent the gas, the inherent statistical noise must be minimized by sampling large numbers of molecules. Since typical microsystem velocities are low (< 1 m/s) compared to molecular velocities ({approx}400 m/s), the number of molecular samples required to achieve 1% precision can exceed 1010 per cell. The Discrete Velocity Gas (DVG) method, an approach motivated by radiation transport, provides another way to simulate noncontinuum gas flows. Unlike DSMC, the DVG method restricts molecular velocities to have only certain discrete values. The transport of the number density of a velocity state is governed by a discrete Boltzmann equation that has one temporal dimension and three spatial dimensions and a polynomial collision term. Specification and implementation of DVG models are discussed, and DVG models are applied to Couette flow and to Fourier flow. While the DVG results for these benchmark problems are qualitatively correct, the errors in the shear stress and the heat flux can be order-unity even for DVG models with 88 velocity states. It is concluded that the DVG method, as described herein, is not sufficiently accurate to simulate the low-speed gas flows

  14. System and method for laser-based, non-evaporative repair of damage sites in the surfaces of fused silica optics

    DOEpatents

    Adams, John J.; Bolourchi, Masoud; Bude, Jeffrey D.; Guss, Gabriel M.; Jarboe, Jeffery A.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Nostrand, Michael C; Wegner, Paul J.

    2016-09-06

    A method for repairing a damage site on a surface of an optical material is disclosed. The method may involve focusing an Infrared (IR) laser beam having a predetermined wavelength, with a predetermined beam power, to a predetermined full width ("F/W") 1/e.sup.2 diameter spot on the damage site. The focused IR laser beam is maintained on the damage site for a predetermined exposure period corresponding to a predetermined acceptable level of downstream intensification. The focused IR laser beam heats the damage site to a predetermined peak temperature, which melts and reflows material at the damage site of the optical material to create a mitigated site.

  15. From evaporating pans to transpiring plants (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The name of the original inventor of irrigated agriculture is lost to antiquity. Nevertheless, one can perhaps imagine an inquisitive desert inhabitant noting the greener vegetation along a watercourse and putting two and two together. Once water was being supplied and food was being produced it would be natural to ask a further question: how much water can we put on? No doubt much experience was gained down through the ages, but again, one can readily imagine someone inverting a rain gauge, filling it with water and measuring how fast the water evaporated. The inverted rain gauge measures the demand for water by the atmosphere. We call it the evaporative demand. I do not know if this is what actually happened but it sure makes an interesting start to a talk. Evaporation pans are basically inverted rain gauges. The rain gauge and evaporation pan measure the supply and demand respectively and these instruments are the workhorses of agricultural meteorology. Rain gauges are well known. Evaporation pans are lesser known but are in widespread use and are a key part of several national standardized meteorological networks. Many more pans are used for things like scheduling irrigation on farms or estimating evaporation from lakes. Analysis of the long records now available from standardized networks has revealed an interesting phenomenon, i.e., pan evaporation has increased in some places and decreased in other but when averaged over large numbers of pans there has been a steady decline. These independent reports from, for example, the US, Russia, China, India, Thailand, are replicated in the southern hemisphere in, for example, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. One often hears the statement that because the earth is expected to warm with increasing greenhouse gas emissions then it follows that water will evaporate faster. The pan evaporation observations show that this widely held expectation is wrong. When expectations disagree with observations, it is the

  16. Modeling monthly pan evaporations using fuzzy genetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kişi, Özgür; Tombul, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    SummaryThis study investigates the ability of fuzzy genetic (FG) approach in estimation of monthly pan evaporations. Various monthly climatic data, that are, solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed from two stations, Antalya and Mersin, in Mediterranean Region of Turkey, were used as inputs to the FG technique so as to estimate monthly pan evaporations. In the first part of the study, FG models were compared with neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS), artificial neural networks (ANNs) and Stephens-Stewart (SS) methods in estimating pan evaporations of Antalya and Mersin stations, separately. Comparison of the models revealed that the FG models generally performed better than the ANFIS, ANN and SS models. In the second part of the study, models were compared to each other in two different applications. In the first application the input data of Antalya Station were used as inputs to the models to estimate pan evaporation data of Mersin Station. The pan evaporation data of Mersin Station were estimated using the input data of Antalya and Mersin stations in the second application. Comparison results indicated that the FG models performed better than the ANFIS and ANN models. Comparison of the accuracy of the applied models in estimating total pan evaporations showed that the FG model provided the closest estimate. It was concluded that monthly pan evaporations could be successfully estimated by the FG approach.

  17. The desorptivity model of bulk soil-water evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Available models of bulk evaporation from a bare-surfaced soil are difficult to apply to field conditions where evaporation is complicated by two main factors: rate-limiting climatic conditions and redistribution of soil moisture following infiltration. Both factors are included in the "desorptivity model', wherein the evaporation rate during the second stage (the soil-limiting stage) of evaporation is related to the desorptivity parameter, A. Analytical approximations for A are presented. The approximations are independent of the surface soil moisture. However, calculations using the approximations indicate that both soil texture and soil moisture content at depth significantly affect A. Because the moisture content at depth decreases in time during redistribution, it follows that the A parameter also changes with time. Consequently, a method to calculate a representative value of A was developed. When applied to field data, the desorptivity model estimated cumulative evaporation well. The model is easy to calculate, but its usefulness is limited because it requires an independent estimate of the time of transition between the first and second stages of evaporation. The model shows that bulk evaporation after the transition to the second stage is largely independent of climatic conditions.

  18. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  19. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of gas hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.; Bockrath, Bradley C.

    2001-01-01

    A method for converting methane hydrates to methanol, as well as hydrogen, through exposure to light. The process includes conversion of methane hydrates by light where a radical initiator has been added, and may be modified to include the conversion of methane hydrates with light where a photocatalyst doped by a suitable metal and an electron transfer agent to produce methanol and hydrogen. The present invention operates at temperatures below 0.degree. C., and allows for the direct conversion of methane contained within the hydrate in situ.

  20. Magnesium, Silicon, and Oxygen Isotopic Consequences of CAI Evaporation and Inversion for Primordial Melt Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.; Shahar, A.

    2012-03-01

    We show how realistic activity-composition relationships in CMAS melts can be used to invert silicon- and magnesium-isotope ratios for evaporation histories of CAIs. Results suggest igneous CAIs were indeed condensates from a solar gas.