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Sample records for gas exchange models

  1. Gas Exchange Models for a Flexible Insect Tracheal System.

    PubMed

    Simelane, S M; Abelman, S; Duncan, F D

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two models for movement of respiratory gases in the insect trachea are presented. One model considers the tracheal system as a single flexible compartment while the other model considers the trachea as a single flexible compartment with gas exchange. This work represents an extension of Ben-Tal's work on compartmental gas exchange in human lungs and is applied to the insect tracheal system. The purpose of the work is to study nonlinear phenomena seen in the insect respiratory system. It is assumed that the flow inside the trachea is laminar, and that the air inside the chamber behaves as an ideal gas. Further, with the isothermal assumption, the expressions for the tracheal partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, rate of volume change, and the rates of change of oxygen concentration and carbon dioxide concentration are derived. The effects of some flow parameters such as diffusion capacities, reaction rates and air concentrations on net flow are studied. Numerical simulations of the tracheal flow characteristics are performed. The models developed provide a mathematical framework to further investigate gas exchange in insects. PMID:27209375

  2. A Continuum Model for Metabolic Gas Exchange in Pear Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Q. Tri; Verboven, Pieter; Verlinden, Bert E.; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Vandewalle, Stefan; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2008-01-01

    Exchange of O2 and CO2 of plants with their environment is essential for metabolic processes such as photosynthesis and respiration. In some fruits such as pears, which are typically stored under a controlled atmosphere with reduced O2 and increased CO2 levels to extend their commercial storage life, anoxia may occur, eventually leading to physiological disorders. In this manuscript we have developed a mathematical model to predict the internal gas concentrations, including permeation, diffusion, and respiration and fermentation kinetics. Pear fruit has been selected as a case study. The model has been used to perform in silico experiments to evaluate the effect of, for example, fruit size or ambient gas concentration on internal O2 and CO2 levels. The model incorporates the actual shape of the fruit and was solved using fluid dynamics software. Environmental conditions such as temperature and gas composition have a large effect on the internal distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide in fruit. Also, the fruit size has a considerable effect on local metabolic gas concentrations; hence, depending on the size, local anaerobic conditions may result, which eventually may lead to physiological disorders. The model developed in this manuscript is to our knowledge the most comprehensive model to date to simulate gas exchange in plant tissue. It can be used to evaluate the effect of environmental stresses on fruit via in silico experiments and may lead to commercial applications involving long-term storage of fruit under controlled atmospheres. PMID:18369422

  3. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Woods, H Arthur; Smith, Jennifer N

    2010-05-01

    For terrestrial animals and plants, a fundamental cost of living is water vapor lost to the atmosphere during exchange of metabolic gases. Here, by bringing together previously developed models for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model of water loss. The model predicts that water loss scales to gas exchange with an exponent of 1 and that the amount of water lost per unit of gas exchanged depends on several factors: the surface temperature of the respiratory system near the outside of the organism, the gas consumed (oxygen or carbon dioxide), the steepness of the gradients for gas and vapor, and the transport mode (convective or diffusive). Model predictions were largely confirmed by data on 202 species in five taxa--insects, birds, bird eggs, mammals, and plants--spanning nine orders of magnitude in rate of gas exchange. Discrepancies between model predictions and data seemed to arise from biologically interesting violations of model assumptions, which emphasizes how poorly we understand gas exchange in some taxa. The universal model provides a unified conceptual framework for analyzing exchange-associated water losses across taxa with radically different metabolic and exchange systems.

  4. A simple, closed-form, mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Potkay, Joseph A

    2013-06-01

    Microfabrication techniques are attractive for constructing artificial lungs due to the ability to create features similar in size to those in the natural lung. However, a simple and intuitive mathematical model capable of accurately predicting the gas exchange performance of microchannel artificial lungs does not currently exist. Such a model is critical to understanding and optimizing these devices. Here, we describe a simple, closed-form mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs and qualify it through application to experimental data from several research groups. We utilize lumped parameters and several assumptions to obtain a closed-form set of equations that describe gas exchange. This work is intended to augment computational models by providing a more intuitive, albeit potentially less accurate, understanding of the operation and trade-offs inherent in microchannel artificial lung devices.

  5. Teaching Pulmonary Gas Exchange Physiology Using Computer Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapitan, Kent S.

    2008-01-01

    Students often have difficulty understanding the relationship of O[subscript 2] consumption, CO[subscript 2] production, cardiac output, and distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios in the lung to the final arterial blood gas composition. To overcome this difficulty, I have developed an interactive computer simulation of pulmonary gas exchange…

  6. A computational model of insect discontinuous gas exchange: A two-sensor, control systems approach.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, Beverley J; Terblanche, John S

    2015-06-01

    The insect gas exchange system is characterised by branching air-filled tubes (tracheae/tracheoles) and valve-like structures in their outer integument (spiracles) which allow for a periodic gas exchange pattern known as the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC). The DGC facilitates the temporal decoupling of whole animal gas exchange from cellular respiration rates and may confer several physiological benefits, which are nevertheless highly controversial (primarily reduction of cellular oxidative damage and/or respiratory water saving). The intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing DGCs are the focus of extensive ongoing research and little consensus has been reached on the evolutionary genesis or mechanistic costs and benefits of the pattern. Despite several hypotheses and much experimental and evolutionary biology research, a mechanistic physical model, which captures various key elements of the DGC pattern, is currently lacking. Here, we present a biologically realistic computational, two-sensor DGC model (pH/carbon dioxide and oxygen setpoints) for an Orthopteran gas exchange system, and show computationally for the first time that a control system of two interacting feedback loops is capable of generating a full DGC pattern with outputs which are physiologically realistic, quantitatively matching experimental results found in this taxonomic model elsewhere. A finite-element mathematical approach is employed and various trigger sets are considered. Parameter sensitivity analyses suggest that various aspects of insect DGC are adequately captured in this model. In particular, with physiologically relevant input parameters, the full DGC pattern is induced; and the phase durations, endotracheal carbon dioxide partial pressure ranges, and pH fluctuations which arise are physically realistic. The model results support the emergent property hypothesis for the existence of DGC, and indicate that asymmetric loading and off-loading (hysteresis) in one of the sensor

  7. A computational model of insect discontinuous gas exchange: A two-sensor, control systems approach.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, Beverley J; Terblanche, John S

    2015-06-01

    The insect gas exchange system is characterised by branching air-filled tubes (tracheae/tracheoles) and valve-like structures in their outer integument (spiracles) which allow for a periodic gas exchange pattern known as the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC). The DGC facilitates the temporal decoupling of whole animal gas exchange from cellular respiration rates and may confer several physiological benefits, which are nevertheless highly controversial (primarily reduction of cellular oxidative damage and/or respiratory water saving). The intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing DGCs are the focus of extensive ongoing research and little consensus has been reached on the evolutionary genesis or mechanistic costs and benefits of the pattern. Despite several hypotheses and much experimental and evolutionary biology research, a mechanistic physical model, which captures various key elements of the DGC pattern, is currently lacking. Here, we present a biologically realistic computational, two-sensor DGC model (pH/carbon dioxide and oxygen setpoints) for an Orthopteran gas exchange system, and show computationally for the first time that a control system of two interacting feedback loops is capable of generating a full DGC pattern with outputs which are physiologically realistic, quantitatively matching experimental results found in this taxonomic model elsewhere. A finite-element mathematical approach is employed and various trigger sets are considered. Parameter sensitivity analyses suggest that various aspects of insect DGC are adequately captured in this model. In particular, with physiologically relevant input parameters, the full DGC pattern is induced; and the phase durations, endotracheal carbon dioxide partial pressure ranges, and pH fluctuations which arise are physically realistic. The model results support the emergent property hypothesis for the existence of DGC, and indicate that asymmetric loading and off-loading (hysteresis) in one of the sensor

  8. A Comparative Data-Based Modeling Study on Respiratory CO2 Gas Exchange during Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Ansermino, J. Mark; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to derive a minimally complex but credible model of respiratory CO2 gas exchange that may be used in systematic design and pilot testing of closed-loop end-tidal CO2 controllers in mechanical ventilation. We first derived a candidate model that captures the essential mechanisms involved in the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process. Then, we simplified the candidate model to derive two lower-order candidate models. We compared these candidate models for predictive capability and reliability using experimental data collected from 25 pediatric subjects undergoing dynamically varying mechanical ventilation during surgical procedures. A two-compartment model equipped with transport delay to account for CO2 delivery between the lungs and the tissues showed modest but statistically significant improvement in predictive capability over the same model without transport delay. Aggregating the lungs and the tissues into a single compartment further degraded the predictive fidelity of the model. In addition, the model equipped with transport delay demonstrated superior reliability to the one without transport delay. Further, the respiratory parameters derived from the model equipped with transport delay, but not the one without transport delay, were physiologically plausible. The results suggest that gas transport between the lungs and the tissues must be taken into account to accurately reproduce the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process under conditions of wide-ranging and dynamically varying mechanical ventilation conditions. PMID:26870728

  9. Plantecophys--An R Package for Analysing and Modelling Leaf Gas Exchange Data.

    PubMed

    Duursma, Remko A

    2015-01-01

    Here I present the R package 'plantecophys', a toolkit to analyse and model leaf gas exchange data. Measurements of leaf photosynthesis and transpiration are routinely collected with portable gas exchange instruments, and analysed with a few key models. These models include the Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry (FvCB) model of leaf photosynthesis, the Ball-Berry models of stomatal conductance, and the coupled leaf gas exchange model which combines the supply and demand functions for CO2 in the leaf. The 'plantecophys' R package includes functions for fitting these models to measurements, as well as simulating from the fitted models to aid in interpreting experimental data. Here I describe the functionality and implementation of the new package, and give some examples of its use. I briefly describe functions for fitting the FvCB model of photosynthesis to measurements of photosynthesis-CO2 response curves ('A-Ci curves'), fitting Ball-Berry type models, modelling C3 photosynthesis with the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model, modelling C4 photosynthesis, numerical solution of optimal stomatal behaviour, and energy balance calculations using the Penman-Monteith equation. This open-source package makes technically challenging calculations easily accessible for many users and is freely available on CRAN. PMID:26581080

  10. Modeling gas exchange in a closed plant growth chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. D.; Hendrix, J. E.; Wheeler, R. M.; Ross, C. W.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid transport models for fluxes of water vapor and CO2 have been developed for one crop of wheat and three crops of soybean grown in a closed plant growth chamber. Correspondence among these fluxes is discussed. Maximum fluxes of gases are provided for engineering design requirements of fluid recycling equipment in growth chambers. Furthermore, to investigate the feasibility of generalized crop models, dimensionless representations of water vapor fluxes are presented. The feasibility of such generalized models and the need for additional data are discussed.

  11. Modeling Gas Exchange in a Closed Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. D.; Hendrix, J. E.; Wheeler, R. M.; Ross, C. W.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid transport models for fluxes of water vapor and CO2 have been developed for one crop of wheat and three crops of soybean grown in a closed plant a growth chamber. Correspondence among these fluxes is discussed. Maximum fluxes of gases are provided for engineering design requirements of fluid recycling equipment in growth chambers. Furthermore, to investigate the feasibility of generalized crop models, dimensionless representations of water vapor fluxes are presented. The feasibility of such generalized models and the need for additional data are discussed.

  12. A parameter model of gas exchange for the seasonal sea ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, B.; McGillis, W. R.; Perovich, D.; Zappa, C. J.; Schlosser, P.

    2013-07-01

    Carbon budgets for the polar oceans require better constraint on air-sea gas exchange in the sea ice zone (SIZ). Here, we utilize recent advances in the theory of turbulence, mixing and air-sea flux in the ice-ocean boundary layer (IOBL) to formulate a simple model for gas exchange when the surface ocean is partially covered by sea ice. The gas transfer velocity (k) is related to shear-driven and convection-driven turbulence in the aqueous mass boundary layer, and to the mean-squared wave slope at the air-sea interface. We use the model to estimate k along the drift track of Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITPs) in the Arctic. Individual estimates of daily-averaged k from ITP drifts ranged between 1.1 and 22 m d-1, and the fraction of open water (f) ranged from 0 to 0.83. Converted to area-weighted effective transfer velocities (keff), the minimum value of keff was 10-5 m d-1 near f = 0 with values exceeding keff = 5 m d-1 at f = 0.4. The largest values of k occurred during the periods when ice cover around the ITP was changing rapidly; either in advance or retreat. The model indicates that effects from shear and convection in the sea ice zone contribute an additional 40% to the magnitude of keff, beyond what would be predicted from an estimate of keff based solely upon a windspeed parameterization. Although the ultimate scaling relationship for gas exchange in the sea ice zone will require validation in laboratory and field studies, the basic parameter model described here demonstrates that it is feasible to formulate estimates of k based upon properties of the IOBL using data sources that presently exist.

  13. A parameter model of gas exchange for the seasonal sea ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, B.; McGillis, W. R.; Perovich, D.; Zappa, C. J.; Schlosser, P.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon budgets for the polar oceans require better constraint on air-sea gas exchange in the sea ice zone (SIZ). Here, we utilize advances in the theory of turbulence, mixing and air-sea flux in the ice-ocean boundary layer (IOBL) to formulate a simple model for gas exchange when the surface ocean is partially covered by sea ice. The gas transfer velocity (k) is related to shear-driven and convection-driven turbulence in the aqueous mass boundary layer, and to the mean-squared wave slope at the air-sea interface. We use the model to estimate k along the drift track of ice-tethered profilers (ITPs) in the Arctic. Individual estimates of daily-averaged k from ITP drifts ranged between 1.1 and 22 m d-1, and the fraction of open water (f) ranged from 0 to 0.83. Converted to area-weighted effective transfer velocities (keff), the minimum value of keff was 10-55 m d-1 near f = 0 with values exceeding keff = 5 m d-1 at f = 0.4. The model indicates that effects from shear and convection in the sea ice zone contribute an additional 40% to the magnitude of keff, beyond what would be predicted from an estimate of keff based solely upon a wind speed parameterization. Although the ultimate scaling relationship for gas exchange in the sea ice zone will require validation in laboratory and field studies, the basic parameter model described here demonstrates that it is feasible to formulate estimates of k based upon properties of the IOBL using data sources that presently exist.

  14. Liquid ventilation improves pulmonary function, gas exchange, and lung injury in a model of respiratory failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschl, R B; Parent, A; Tooley, R; McCracken, M; Johnson, K; Shaffer, T H; Wolfson, M R; Bartlett, R H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluated gas exchange, pulmonary function, and lung histology during perfluorocarbon liquid ventilation (LV) when compared with gas ventilation (GV) in the setting of severe respiratory failure. BACKGROUND: The efficacy of LV in the setting of respiratory failure has been evaluated in premature animals with surfactant deficiency. However, very little work has been performed in evaluating the efficacy of LV in older animal models of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: A stable model of lung injury was induced in 12 young sheep weighing 16.4 +/- 3.0 kg using right atrial injection of 0.07 mL/kg of oleic acid followed by saline pulmonary lavage and bijugular venovenous extracorporeal life support (ECLS). For the first 30 minutes on ECLS, all animals were ventilated with gas. Animals were then ventilated with either 15 mL/kg gas (GV, n = 6) or perflubron ([PFC], LV, n = 6) over the ensuing 2.5 hours. Subsequently, ECLS was discontinued in five of the GV animals and five of the LV animals, and GV or LV continued for 1 hour or until death. MAIN FINDINGS: Physiologic shunt (Qps/Qt) was significantly reduced in the LV animals when compared with the GV animals (LV = 31 +/- 10%; GV = 93 +/- 4%; p < 0.001) after 3 hours of ECLS. At the same time point, pulmonary compliance (CT) was significantly increased in the LV group when compared with the GV group (LV = 1.04 +/- 0.19 mL/cm H2O/kg; GV = 0.41 +/- 0.02 mL/cm H2O/kg; p < 0.001). In addition, the ECLS flow rate required to maintain the PaO2 in the 50- to 80-mm Hg range was substantially and significantly lower in the LV group when compared with that of the GV group (LV = 14 +/- 5 mL/kg/min; GV = 87 +/- 15 mL/kg/min; p < 0.001). All of the GV animals died after discontinuation of ECLS, whereas all the LV animals demonstrated effective gas exchange without extracorporeal support for 1 hour (p < 0.01). Lung biopsy light microscopy demonstrated a marked reduction in alveolar hemorrhage

  15. Alveolar ventilation to perfusion heterogeneity and diffusion impairment in a mathematical model of gas exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal Melo, M. F.; Loeppky, J. A.; Caprihan, A.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a two-compartment model of pulmonary gas exchange in which alveolar ventilation to perfusion (VA/Q) heterogeneity and impairment of pulmonary diffusing capacity (D) are simultaneously taken into account. The mathematical model uses as input data measurements usually obtained in the lung function laboratory. It consists of two compartments and an anatomical shunt. Each compartment receives fractions of alveolar ventilation and blood flow. Mass balance equations and integration of Fick's law of diffusion are used to compute alveolar and blood O2 and CO2 values compatible with input O2 uptake and CO2 elimination. Two applications are presented. The first is a method to partition O2 and CO2 alveolar-arterial gradients into VA/Q and D components. The technique is evaluated in data of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The second is a theoretical analysis of the effects of blood flow variation in alveolar and blood O2 partial pressures. The results show the importance of simultaneous consideration of D to estimate VA/Q heterogeneity in patients with diffusion impairment. This factor plays an increasing role in gas alveolar-arterial gradients as severity of COPD increases. Association of VA/Q heterogeneity and D may produce an increase of O2 arterial pressure with decreasing QT which would not be observed if only D were considered. We conclude that the presented computer model is a useful tool for description and interpretation of data from COPD patients and for performing theoretical analysis of variables involved in the gas exchange process.

  16. Kinetic model for the vibrational energy exchange in flowing molecular gas mixtures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offenhaeuser, F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a computational model for the description of the vibrational energy exchange in flowing gas mixtures, taking into account a given number of energy levels for each vibrational degree of freedom. It is possible to select an arbitrary number of energy levels. The presented model uses values in the range from 10 to approximately 40. The distribution of energy with respect to these levels can differ from the equilibrium distribution. The kinetic model developed can be employed for arbitrary gaseous mixtures with an arbitrary number of vibrational degrees of freedom for each type of gas. The application of the model to CO2-H2ON2-O2-He mixtures is discussed. The obtained relations can be utilized in a study of the suitability of radiation-related transitional processes, involving the CO2 molecule, for laser applications. It is found that the computational results provided by the model agree very well with experimental data obtained for a CO2 laser. Possibilities for the activation of a 16-micron and 14-micron laser are considered.

  17. A Test of the Optimality Approach to Modelling Canopy gas Exchange by Natural Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Sivapalan, M.; Roderick, M. L.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L. B.

    2005-12-01

    Natural vegetation has co-evolved with its environment over a long period of time and natural selection has led to a species composition that is most suited for the given conditions. Part of this adaptation is the vegetation's water use strategy, which determines the amount and timing of water extraction from the soil. Knowing that water extraction by vegetation often accounts for over 90% of the annual water balance in some places, we need to understand its controls if we want to properly model the hydrologic cycle. Water extraction by roots is driven by transpiration from the canopy, which in turn is an inevitable consequence of CO2 uptake for photosynthesis. Photosynthesis provides plants with their main building material, carbohydrates, and with the energy necessary to thrive and prosper in their environment. Therefore we expect that natural vegetation would have evolved an optimal water use strategy to maximise its `net carbon profit' (the difference between carbon acquired by photosynthesis and carbon spent on maintenance of the organs involved in its uptake). Based on this hypothesis and on an ecophysiological gas exchange and photosynthesis model (Cowan and Farquhar 1977; von Caemmerer 2000), we model the optimal vegetation for a site in Howard Springs (N.T., Australia) and compare the modelled fluxes with measurements by Beringer, Hutley et al. (2003). The comparison gives insights into theoretical and real controls on transpiration and photosynthesis and tests the optimality approach to modelling gas exchange of natural vegetation with unknown properties. The main advantage of the optimality approach is that no assumptions about the particular vegetation on a site are needed, which makes it very powerful for predicting vegetation response to long-term climate- or land use change. Literature: Beringer, J., L. B. Hutley, et al. (2003). "Fire impacts on surface heat, moisture and carbon fluxes from a tropical savanna in northern Australia." International

  18. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  19. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  20. Modelling non-steady-state isotope enrichment of leaf water in a gas-exchange cuvette environment.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Simonin, Kevin A; Loucos, Karen E; Barbour, Margaret M

    2015-12-01

    The combined use of a gas-exchange system and laser-based isotope measurement is a tool of growing interest in plant ecophysiological studies, owing to its relevance for assessing isotopic variability in leaf water and/or transpiration under non-steady-state (NSS) conditions. However, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model, originally developed for open-field scenarios, is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment where isotope composition of water vapour (δv ) is intrinsically linked to that of transpiration (δE ). Here, we modified the F&C model to make it directly compatible with the δv -δE dynamic characteristic of a typical cuvette setting. The resultant new model suggests a role of 'net-flux' (rather than 'gross-flux' as suggested by the original F&C model)-based leaf water turnover rate in controlling the time constant (τ) for the approach to steady sate. The validity of the new model was subsequently confirmed in a cuvette experiment involving cotton leaves, for which we demonstrated close agreement between τ values predicted from the model and those measured from NSS variations in isotope enrichment of transpiration. Hence, we recommend that our new model be incorporated into future isotope studies involving a cuvette condition where the transpiration flux directly influences δv . There is an increasing popularity among plant ecophysiologists to use a gas-exchange system coupled to laser-based isotope measurement for investigating non-steady state (NSS) isotopic variability in leaf water (and/or transpiration); however, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment due to its implicit assumption of isotope composition of water vapor (δv ) being constant and independent of that of transpiration (δE ). In the present study, we modified the F&C model to make it compatible with the dynamic relationship between δv and δE as is typically associated

  1. Quantifying the measurement errors in a LI-6400 gas exchange system and their effects on the parameterization of Farquhar et al. model for C3 leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The LI-6400 gas exchange system (Li-Cor, Inc, Lincoln, NE, USA) has been widely used for the measurement of net gas exchanges and calibration/parameterization of leaf models. Measurement errors due to diffusive leakages of water vapor and carbon dioxide between inside and outside of the leaf chamber...

  2. The Simulation of the Opposing Fluxes of Latent Heat and CO2 over Various Land-Use Types: Coupling a Gas Exchange Model to a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyers, Mark; Krüger, Andreas; Werner, Christiane; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Zacharias, Stefan; Kerschgens, Michael

    2011-04-01

    A mesoscale meteorological model (FOOT3DK) is coupled with a gas exchange model to simulate surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O under field conditions. The gas exchange model consists of a C3 single leaf photosynthesis sub-model and an extended big leaf (sun/shade) sub-model that divides the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions. Simulated CO2 fluxes of the stand-alone version of the gas exchange model correspond well to eddy-covariance measurements at a test site in a rural area in the west of Germany. The coupled FOOT3DK/gas exchange model is validated for the diurnal cycle at singular grid points, and delivers realistic fluxes with respect to their order of magnitude and to the general daily course. Compared to the Jarvis-based big leaf scheme, simulations of latent heat fluxes with a photosynthesis-based scheme for stomatal conductance are more realistic. As expected, flux averages are strongly influenced by the underlying land cover. While the simulated net ecosystem exchange is highly correlated with leaf area index, this correlation is much weaker for the latent heat flux. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake is associated with transpirational water loss via the stomata, and the resulting opposing surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O are reproduced with the model approach. Over vegetated surfaces it is shown that the coupling of a photosynthesis-based gas exchange model with the land-surface scheme of a mesoscale model results in more realistic simulated latent heat fluxes.

  3. Finite element modeling of 129Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Neil J.; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M.

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of 129Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on 129Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured 129Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the 129Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of 129Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data.

  4. Finite element modeling of (129)Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Neil J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of (129)Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on (129)Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured (129)Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the (129)Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of (129)Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data.

  5. Finite element modeling of (129)Xe diffusive gas exchange NMR in the human alveoli.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Neil J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2016-10-01

    Existing models of (129)Xe diffusive exchange for lung microstructural modeling with time-resolved MR spectroscopy data have considered analytical solutions to one-dimensional, homogeneous models of the lungs with specific assumptions about the alveolar geometry. In order to establish a model system for simulating the effects of physiologically-realistic changes in physical and microstructural parameters on (129)Xe exchange NMR, we have developed a 3D alveolar capillary model for finite element analysis. To account for the heterogeneity of the alveolar geometry across the lungs, we have derived realistic geometries for finite element analysis based on 2D histological samples and 3D micro-CT image volumes obtained from ex vivo biopsies of lung tissue from normal subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. The 3D alveolar capillary model permits investigation of the impact of alveolar geometrical parameters and diffusion and perfusion coefficients on the in vivo measured (129)Xe CSSR signal response. The heterogeneity of alveolar microstructure that is accounted for in image-based models resulted in considerable alterations to the shape of the (129)Xe diffusive uptake curve when compared to 1D models. Our findings have important implications for the future design and optimization of (129)Xe MR experiments and in the interpretation of lung microstructural changes from this data. PMID:27526397

  6. Gas exchange by intratracheal insufflation in a ventilatory failure dog model.

    PubMed Central

    Gavriely, N; Eckmann, D; Grotberg, J B

    1992-01-01

    Respiratory insufficiency patients who need only partial ventilatory support are, nevertheless, intubated and connected to a respirator. In search of a partial respiratory assistance method we evaluated the gas exchange, mechanisms, and hemodynamic effects of intratracheal insufflation (ITI) via a narrow (0.2-cm) catheter. The effects of flow rate (0.05-0.2 liter/min per kg), catheter tip position (carina, bronchus, and trachea), and superimposed chest vibration at 22 Hz were studied in seven anesthetized and partially paralyzed dogs. ITI in the carina induced CO2 removal (VCO2) of 48 +/- 16 ml/min in the periods between breaths, which was 39% of the control VCO2. CO2 removal rates between breaths with ITI in a bronchus and in the trachea were 63 and 28% of control, respectively (P < 0.05). ITI at 0.15-0.2 liter/min per kg augmented total VCO2 by > 50% over control (P < 0.05) and decreased PaCO2 by 10% (P < 0.05) despite a 28% fall in VE and 32% lower work of breathing (P < 0.05). Adding vibration to ITI at 0.15 liter/min per kg induced VCO2 of 162 +/- 34 ml/min, which was significantly greater than control, while PaCO2 fell from 69 +/- 24 to 47 +/- 6 mmHg (P < 0.05), despite complete cessation of spontaneous breathing. ITI with or without vibration did not cause any hemodynamic changes, except for a fall in the shunt fraction from 14.6 +/- 9.9% to 5.8 +/- 2.8% with vibration. Thus, ITI at low flow rates can support respiration with no hemodynamic side effects. Adding chest vibration further enhances gas exchange and can provide total ventilation. Images PMID:1469093

  7. Multiscale study of bacterial growth: Experiments and model to understand the impact of gas exchange on global growth.

    PubMed

    Lalanne-Aulet, David; Piacentini, Adalberto; Guillot, Pierre; Marchal, Philippe; Moreau, Gilles; Colin, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Using a millifluidics and macroscale setup, we study quantitatively the impact of gas exchange on bacterial growth. In millifluidic environments, the permeability of the incubator materials allows an unlimited oxygen supply by diffusion. Moreover, the efficiency of diffusion at small scales makes the supply instantaneous in comparison with the cell division time. In hermetic closed vials, the amount of available oxygen is low. The growth curve has the same trend but is quantitatively different from the millifluidic situation. The analysis of all the data allows us to write a quantitative modeling enabling us to capture the entire growth process.

  8. A two-dimensional microscale model of gas exchange during photosynthesis in maize (Zea mays L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Retta, Moges; Ho, Quang Tri; Yin, Xinyou; Verboven, Pieter; Berghuijs, Herman N C; Struik, Paul C; Nicolaï, Bart M

    2016-05-01

    CO2 exchange in leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) was examined using a microscale model of combined gas diffusion and C4 photosynthesis kinetics at the leaf tissue level. Based on a generalized scheme of photosynthesis in NADP-malic enzyme type C4 plants, the model accounted for CO2 diffusion in a leaf tissue, CO2 hydration and assimilation in mesophyll cells, CO2 release from decarboxylation of C4 acids, CO2 fixation in bundle sheath cells and CO2 retro-diffusion from bundle sheath cells. The transport equations were solved over a realistic 2-D geometry of the Kranz anatomy obtained from light microscopy images. The predicted responses of photosynthesis rate to changes in ambient CO2 and irradiance compared well with those obtained from gas exchange measurements. A sensitivity analysis showed that the CO2 permeability of the mesophyll-bundle sheath and airspace-mesophyll interfaces strongly affected the rate of photosynthesis and bundle sheath conductance. Carbonic anhydrase influenced the rate of photosynthesis, especially at low intercellular CO2 levels. In addition, the suberin layer at the exposed surface of the bundle sheath cells was found beneficial in reducing the retro-diffusion. The model may serve as a tool to investigate CO2 diffusion further in relation to the Kranz anatomy in C4 plants. PMID:26993234

  9. Parameterization of a coupled CO2 and H2O gas exchange model at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G. F.; Li, X.; Su, Y. H.; Huang, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    The following two models were combined to simultaneously predict CO2 and H2O gas exchange at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica: a Farquhar et al. type biochemical sub-model of photosynthesis (Farquhar et al., 1980) and a Ball et al. type stomatal conductance sub-model (Ball et al., 1987). The photosynthesis parameters [including maximum carboxylation rate allowed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylation rate (Vcmax), potential light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax), triose phosphate utilization (TPU) and day respiration (Rd)] were determined by using the genetic algorithm (GA) method based on A/Ci data. Values of Vcmax and Jmax standardized at 25 °C were 75.09±1.36 (mean ± standard error), 117.27±2.47, respectively. The stomatal conductance sub-model was calibrated independently. Prediction of net photosynthesis by the coupled model agreed well with the validation data, but the model tended to underestimate transpiration rates. Overall, the combined model generally captured the diurnal patterns of CO2 and H2O exchange resulting from variation in temperature and irradiation.

  10. Mathematical modeling of the "plant community -soil-like substrate -gas exchange with the human" closed ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhatov, Yuri; Gubanov, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Degermendzhy, Andrey G.

    A mathematical model of the "plant community -soil-like substrate -gas exchange with the human" experimental biological life support system (BLSS) has been constructed to predict its functioning and estimate feasibility of controlling it. The mathematical model consists of three compartments -two `phytotron' models (with wheat and radish) and the `mycotron' model (for mushrooms). The following components are included in the model: edible mushrooms (mushroom fruit bodies and mycelium); wheat; radish; straw (processed by mycelium); dead organic matter in the phytotron (separately for the wheat unit and for the radish unit); worms; worms' coprolites; vermicompost used as a soil-like substrate (SLS); bacterial microflora; min-eral nitrogen, phosphorus and iron; products of the system intended for humans (wheat grains, radish roots and mushroom fruit bodies); oxygen and carbon dioxide. Under continuous gas exchange, the mass exchange between the compartments occurs at the harvesting time. The conveyor character of the closed ecosystem functioning has been taken into account -the num-ber of culture age groups can be regulated (in experiments -4 and 8 age groups). The conveyor cycle duration can be regulated as well. The module is designed for the food and gas exchange requirements of 1/30 of a virtually present human. Aim of model analysis is determination of investigation direction in real experimental BLSS. The model allows doing dynamic calcu-lations of closure coefficient based on the main elements taken into account in the model and evaluating all dynamic components of the system under different conditions and modes of its operation, especially under the conditions that can hardly be created experimentally. One of the sustainability conditions can be long-duration functioning of the system under the light-ing that is far from the optimum. The mathematical model of the system can demonstrate variants of its sustainable functioning or ruin under various critical

  11. [Phylogeny of gas exchange systems].

    PubMed

    Jürgens, K D; Gros, G

    2002-04-01

    Several systems of gas transport have developed during evolution, all of which are able to sufficiently supply oxygen to the tissues and eliminate the CO2 produced by the metabolism, in spite of great distances between the environment and the individual cells of the tissues. Almost all these systems utilize a combination of convection and diffusion steps. Convection achieves an efficient transport of gas over large distances, but requires energy and cannot occur across tissue barriers. Diffusion, on the other hand, achieves gas transport across barriers, but requires optimization of diffusion paths and diffusion areas. When two convectional gas flows are linked via a diffusional barrier (gas/fluid in the case of the avian lung, fluid/fluid in the case of gills), the directions in which the respective convectional movements pass each other are important determinants of gas exchange efficiency (concurrent, countercurrent and cross-current systems). The tracheal respiration found in insects has the advantage of circumventing the convective gas transport step in the blood, thereby avoiding the high energy expenditure of circulatory systems. This is made possible by a system of tracheae, ending in tracheoles, that reaches from the body surface to every cell within the body. The last step of gas transfer in these animals occurs by diffusion from the tracheoles ("air capillaries") to the mitochondria of cells. The disadvantage is that the tracheal system occupies a substantial fraction of body volume and that, due to limited mechanical stability of tracheal walls, this system would not be able to operate under conditions of high hydrostatic pressures, i. e. in large animals. Respiration in an "open" system, i. e. direct exposure of the diffusional barrier to the environmental air, eliminates the problem of bringing the oxygen to the barrier by convection, as is necessary in the avian and mammalian lung, in the insects' tracheal system and in the gills. An open system is

  12. History of respiratory gas exchange.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2011-07-01

    As early as the 6th century B.C. the Greeks speculated on a substance pneuma that meant breath or soul, and they argued that this was essential for life. An important figure in the 2nd century A.D. was Galen whose school developed an elaborate cardiopulmonary system that influenced scientific thinking for 1400 years. A key concept was that blood was mixed with pneuma from the lung in the left ventricle thus forming vital spirit. It was also believed that blood flowed from the right to the left ventricle of the heart through pores in the interventricular septum but this view was challenged first by the Arab physician Ibn al-Nafis in the 13th century and later by Michael Servetus in the 16th century. The 17th century saw an enormous burgeoning of knowledge about the respiratory gases. First Torricelli explained the origin of atmospheric pressure, and then a group of physiologists in Oxford clarified the properties of inspired gas that were necessary for life. This culminated in the work of Lavoisier who first clearly elucidated the nature of the respiratory gases, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. At that time it was thought that oxygen was consumed in the lung itself, and the fact that the actual metabolism took place in peripheral tissues proved to be a very elusive concept. It was not until the late 19th century that the issue was finally settled by Pflüger. In the early 20th century there was a colorful controversy about whether oxygen was secreted by the lung. During and shortly after World War II, momentous strides were made on the understanding of pulmonary gas exchange, particularly the role of ventilation-perfusion inequality. A critical development in the 1960s was the introduction of blood gas electrodes, and these have transformed the management of patients with severe lung disease. PMID:23733651

  13. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory.

    PubMed

    Novick, Kimberly A; Miniat, Chelcy F; Vose, James M

    2016-03-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion-tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a 'demand limitation' driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) 'hydraulic limitation' of water movement from the roots to the leaves; and (3) 'non-stomatal' limitations imposed by declining leaf water status within the leaf. Model results suggest that species-specific 'economics' of stomatal behaviour may play an important role in differentiating species along the continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviour; specifically, we show that non-stomatal and demand limitations may reduce stomatal conductance and increase leaf water potential, promoting wide safety margins characteristic of isohydric species. We used model results to develop a diagnostic framework to identify the most likely limiting mechanism to stomatal functioning during drought and showed that many of those features were commonly observed in field observations of tree water use dynamics. Direct comparisons of modelled and measured stomatal conductance further indicated that non-stomatal and demand limitations reproduced observed patterns of tree water use well for an isohydric species but that a hydraulic limitation likely applies in the case of an anisohydric species.

  14. BOREAS TE-12 Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Yang, Litao

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-12 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the reflectance, transmittance, and gas exchange of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of leaf gas exchange conducted in the SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1995 using a portable gas exchange system. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Center (DAAC).

  15. A model for gas and nutrient exchange in the chorionic vasculature system of the mouse placenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbod, Parisa; Sled, John

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an analytical model for the oxygen and nutrient transport from the umbilical cord to the small villous capillaries. The nutrient and carbon dioxide removal from the fetal cotyledons in the mouse placental system has also been considered. This model describes the mass transfer between the fetal and the maternal red blood cells in the chorionic arterial vasculature system. The model reveals the detail fetal vasculature system and its geometry and the precise mechanisms of mass transfer through the placenta. The dimensions of the villous capillaries, the total length of the villous trees, the total villi surface area, and the total resistance to mass transport in the fetal villous trees has also been defined. This is the first effort to explain the reason why there are at least 7 lobules in the mouse placenta from the fluid dynamics point of view.

  16. Leaf-level gas exchange and scaling-up of forest understory carbon fixation rates with a ``patch-scale'' canopy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedler, M.; Geyer, R.; Heindl, B.; Hahn, S.; Tenhunen, J. D.

    1996-03-01

    During the Hartheim experiment (HartX) 1992, conducted in the Upper Rhine Valley, Germany, we estimated water vapor flux from the understory by several methods as reported in Wedler et al. (this issue). We also examined the photosynthetic gas exchange of the dominant understory species Brachypodium pinnatum, Carex alba, and Carex flacca at the leaf level with an CO2/H2O porometer. A mechanisticallybased leaf gas exchange model was parameterized for these understory species and validated via the measured diurnal courses of carbon dioxide exchange. Leaf CO2 gas exchange was scaled-up to patch- and then to stand-level utilizing the leaf gas exchange model as a component of the canopy light interception/energy balance model GAS-FLUX, and by further considering variation in vegetation “patch-type” distribution, patch-specific spatial structure, patch-type leaf area index, and microclimate beneath the tree canopy. At patch-level, C. alba exhibited the lowest net CO2 uptake of ca. 75 mmol m-2 d-1 due to a low leaf-level photosynthetic capacity, whereas net CO2 fixation of B. pinnatum- and C. flacca-patches was approx. 178 and 184 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively. Highest CO2 uptake was estimated for mixed patches where B. pinnatum grew together with the sedge species C. alba or C. flacca. Scaling-up of leaf gas exchange to stand level resulted in an estimated average rate of total CO2 fixation by the graminoid understory patches of approximately 93 mmol m-2 d-1 during the HartX period. The conservative gas exchange behavior of C. alba at Hartheim and its apparent success in space capture seems to affect overall functioning of this pine forest ecosystem by limiting understory CO2 uptake. The CO2 uptake by the understory is approximately 20% of stand total CO2 uptake. CO2 uptake fluxes mirror the relative differences in water loss from the understory and crown layer during the HartX period. Comparative measurements indicate that understory vegetation in spruce and pine

  17. Evaluating effects of wind-induced pressure fluctuations on soil-atmosphere gas exchange at a landfill using stochastic modelling.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Møldrup, Per

    2006-10-01

    The impact of wind turbulence-induced pressure fluctuations at the soil surface on landfill gas transport and emissions to the atmosphere at an old Danish landfill site was investigated using stochastic modelling combined with soil property and gas transport data measured at the site. The impacts of soil physical properties (including air permeability and volumetric water content) and wind-induced pressure fluctuation properties (amplitude and temporal correlation) on landfill gas emissions to the atmosphere were evaluated. Soil-air permeability and pressure fluctuation amplitude were found to be the most important parameters. Wind-induced gas emissions were further compared with gas emissions caused by diffusion and by long-term pressure variations (due to passing weather systems). Here diffusion and wind-induced gas transport were found to be equally important with wind-induced gas transport becoming the most important at lower soil-air contents.

  18. Parameterization of the coupling CO2 and H2O gas exchange model at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Li, X.; Su, Y.; Huang, C.

    2009-10-01

    The following two models were combined to predict simultaneously CO2 and H2O gas exchange at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica: a Farquhar et al. type biochemical sub-model of photosynthesis (Farquhar et al., 1980) and a Ball et al. type stomatal conductance sub-model (Ball et al., 1987). The photosynthesis parameters, Vcmax, Jmax, TPU, and Rd (maximum carboxylation rate allowed by ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), rate of phosynthetic electron transport, triose phosphate use, and day respiration) at the measurement temperature were determined by using the genetic algorithm (GA) method based on A/Ci data sets. The stomatal conductance sub-model was calibrated independently. Prediction of net photosynthesis by the coupled model agreed well with the validation data, but the model tended to underestimate rates of transpiration. Overall, the combined model generally captured the diurnal patterns of CO2and H2O exchange resulting from variation in temperature and irradiation.

  19. Modeling daily gas exchange of a Douglas-fir forest: comparison of three stomatal conductance models with and without a soil water stress function.

    PubMed

    Van Wijk, M. T.; Dekker, S. C.; Bouten, W.; Bosveld, F. C.; Kohsiek, W.; Kramer, K.; Mohren, G. M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Modeling stomatal conductance is a key element in predicting tree growth and water use at the stand scale. We compared three commonly used models of stomatal conductance, the Jarvis-Loustau, Ball-Berry and Leuning models, for their suitability for incorporating soil water stress into their formulation, and for their performance in modeling forest ecosystem fluxes. We optimized the parameters of each of the three models with sap flow and soil water content data. The optimized Ball-Berry model showed clear relationships with air temperature and soil water content, whereas the optimized Leuning and Jarvis-Loustau models only showed a relationship with soil water content. We conclude that use of relative humidity instead of vapor pressure deficit, as in the Ball-Berry model, is not suitable for modeling daily gas exchange in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Speulderbos forest near the village of Garderen, The Netherlands. Based on the calculated responses to soil water content, we linked a model of forest growth, FORGRO, with a model of soil water, SWIF, to obtain a forest water-balance model that satisfactorily simulated carbon and water (transpiration) fluxes and soil water contents in the Douglas-fir forest for 1995.

  20. Extremely low flow tracheal gas insufflation of helium-oxygen mixture improves gas exchange in a rabbit model of piston-type high-frequency oscillatory ventilation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to show the effects of the tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) technique on gas exchange using helium-oxygen mixtures during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). We hypothesized that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique (0.3 L/min) would enhance gas exchange during HFOV. Methods Three rabbits were prepared and ventilated by HFOV with carrier 70% helium/oxygen or 70% nitrogen/oxygen gas mixture with TGI in a crossover study. Changing the gas mixture from nitrogen70% to helium70% and back was performed three times per animal with constant ventilation parameters. Results Compared with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture, the helium-oxygen mixture of TGI reduced PaCO2 by 7.6 mmHg (p < 0.01) and improved PaO2 by 14 mmHg (p < 0.01). Amplitude during TGI was significantly lower with the helium-oxygen mixture than with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture (p < 0.01) and did not significantly affect mean airway pressure. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique would enhance CO2 elimination and improve oxygenation during HFOV. PMID:23566050

  1. Gas exchange under altered gravitational stress.

    PubMed

    Prisk, G Kim

    2011-01-01

    Efficient gas exchange in the lung depends on the matching of ventilation and perfusion. However, the human lung is a readily deformable structure and as a result gravitational stresses generate gradients in both ventilation and perfusion. Nevertheless, the lung is capable of withstanding considerable change in the applied gravitational load before pulmonary gas exchange becomes impaired. The postural changes that are part of the everyday existence for most bipedal species are well tolerated, as is the removal of gravity (weightlessness). Increases in the applied gravitational load result only in a large impairment in pulmonary gas exchange above approximately three times that on the ground, at which point the matching of ventilation to perfusion is so impaired that efficient gas exchange is no longer possible. Much of the tolerance of the lung to alterations in gravitation stress comes from the fact that ventilation and perfusion are inextricably coupled. Deformations in the lung that alter ventilation necessarily alter perfusion, thus maintaining a degree of matching and minimizing the disruption in ventilation to perfusion ratio and thus gas exchange.

  2. Gas exchange in the respiratory distress syndromes.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard K; Jobe, Alan

    2012-07-01

    This article describes the gas exchange abnormalities occurring in the acute respiratory distress syndrome seen in adults and children and in the respiratory distress syndrome that occurs in neonates. Evidence is presented indicating that the major gas exchange abnormality accounting for the hypoxemia in both conditions is shunt, and that approximately 50% of patients also have lungs regions in which low ventilation-to-perfusion ratios contribute to the venous admixture. The various mechanisms by which hypercarbia may develop and by which positive end-expiratory pressure improves gas exchange are reviewed, as are the effects of vascular tone and airway narrowing. The mechanisms by which surfactant abnormalities occur in the two conditions are described, as are the histological findings that have been associated with shunt and low ventilation-to-perfusion. PMID:23723019

  3. CO2 and O2 Gas Exchange in an Experimental Model of the Btlss with Plant Wastes and Human Wastes Included in the Mass Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Velichko, Vladimir; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Trifonov, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    Mass exchange processes in the new experimental model of the biotechnical life support system (BTLSS) constructed at the Institute of Biophysics SB RAS have a higher degree of closure than in the previous BTLSS, and, thus, the technologies employed in the new system are more complex. Therefore, before closing the loops of mass exchange processes for several months, the new model of the BTLSS was run to match the technologies employed to cultivate plants and the methods used to involve inedible plant parts and human wastes into the mass exchange with the CO2 absorption rate and the amount of the resulting O2. The plant compartment included vegetables grown on the soil-like substrate (SLS) (chufa, beet, carrot, radish, and lettuce), plants hydroponically grown on expanded clay aggregate (wheat, soybean, watercress), and plants grown in aquaculture (common glasswort and watercress). Nutrient solutions for hydroponically grown plants were prepared by using products of physicochemical mineralization of human wastes. Growing the plants in aquaculture enabled maintaining NaCl concentration in the irrigation solution for hydroponically grown plants at a level safe for the plants. Inedible plant biomass was added to the SLS. Three cycles of closing the system were run, which lasted 7, 7, and 10 days. The comparison of the amount of CO2 fed into the system over 24 h (simulating human respiration) and the amount of CO2 daily exhaled by a 70-kg middle-aged human showed that between 1% and 4% of the daily emissions of CO2 were assimilated in the system, and about 3% of the average human daily O2 requirement accumulated in the system. Plant productivity was between 4 and 4.7% of the human daily vegetable requirement, or between 3 and 3.5% of the total human daily food requirement. Thus, testing of the BTLSS showed a match between the technologies employed to arrange mass exchange processes. This study was supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation (Project No. 14-14-00599).

  4. Gas Transfer in Cellularized Collagen-Membrane Gas Exchange Devices

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Justin H.; Bassett, Erik K.; Penson, Elliot J. N.; Hoganson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lower respiratory disease is highly prevalent in the United States, and there remains a need for alternatives to lung transplant for patients who progress to end-stage lung disease. Portable or implantable gas oxygenators based on microfluidic technologies can address this need, provided they operate both efficiently and biocompatibly. Incorporating biomimetic materials into such devices can help replicate native gas exchange function and additionally support cellular components. In this work, we have developed microfluidic devices that enable blood gas exchange across ultra-thin collagen membranes (as thin as 2 μm). Endothelial, stromal, and parenchymal cells readily adhere to these membranes, and long-term culture with cellular components results in remodeling, reflected by reduced membrane thickness. Functionally, acellular collagen-membrane lung devices can mediate effective gas exchange up to ∼288 mL/min/m2 of oxygen and ∼685 mL/min/m2 of carbon dioxide, approaching the gas exchange efficiency noted in the native lung. Testing several configurations of lung devices to explore various physical parameters of the device design, we concluded that thinner membranes and longer gas exchange distances result in improved hemoglobin saturation and increases in pO2. However, in the design space tested, these effects are relatively small compared to the improvement in overall oxygen and carbon dioxide transfer by increasing the blood flow rate. Finally, devices cultured with endothelial and parenchymal cells achieved similar gas exchange rates compared with acellular devices. Biomimetic blood oxygenator design opens the possibility of creating portable or implantable microfluidic devices that achieve efficient gas transfer while also maintaining physiologic conditions. PMID:26020102

  5. BOREAS TE-5 Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. The leaf photosynthetic gas exchange data were collected in the BOREAS NSA and the SSA from 06-Jun- 1994 to 13-Sep- 1994 using a LI-COR 6200 portable photosynthesis system. The data were collected to compare the photosynthetic capacity, stomata] conductance, and leaf intercellular CO, concentrations among the major tree species at the BOREAS sites. The data are average values from diurnal measurements on the upper canopy foliage (sun leaves). The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Tracheal gas exchange: perfusion-related differences in inert gas elimination.

    PubMed

    Souders, J E; George, S C; Polissar, N L; Swenson, E R; Hlastala, M P

    1995-09-01

    Exchange of inert gases across the conducting airways has been demonstrated by using an isolated dog tracheal preparation and has been characterized by using a mathematical model (E. R. Swenson, H. T. Robertson, N. L. Polissar, M. E. Middaugh, and M. P. Hlastala, J. Appl. Physiol. 72: 1581-1588, 1992). Theory predicts that gas exchange is both diffusion and perfusion dependent, with gases with a higher blood-gas partition coefficient exchanging more efficiently. The present study evaluated the perfusion dependence of airway gas exchange in an in situ canine tracheal preparation. Eight dogs were studied under general anesthesia with the same isolated tracheal preparation. Tracheal perfusion (Q) was altered from control blood flow (Qo) by epinephrine or papaverine instilled into the trachea and was measured with fluorescent microspheres. Six inert gases of differing blood-gas partition coefficients were used to measure inert gas elimination. Gas exchange was quantified as excretion (E), equal to exhaled partial pressure divided by arterial partial pressure. Data were plotted as ln [E/(l-E)] vs. In (Q/Qo), and the slopes were determined by least squares. Excretion was a positive function of Q, and the magnitude of the response of each gas to changes in Q was similar and highly significant (P < or = 0.0002). These results confirm a substantial perfusion dependence of airway gas exchange.

  7. Comparison of measured reactive trace gas profiles with a multi-layer canopy chemical exchange model in an Amazonian rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Stefan; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Pöhlker, Christopher; de Abreu Sá, Leonardo Deane; Ocimar Manzi, Antonio; Souza, Rodrigo; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, an 80 m high walk up tower for atmospheric research was erected at the ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) site (02°08'38.8''S, 58°59'59.5''W) in the remote Amazonian rainforest. The nearly pristine environment allows biosphere-atmosphere studies within an ecosystem far away from large anthropogenic emission sources. Since April 2012 vertical mixing ratio profiles of H2O, CO2 and O3 were measured at 8 different heights between 0.05 m and 79.3 m. During five intensive campaigns (Oct-Dec 2012, Oct-Nov 2013, Mar 2014, Aug-Sep 2014, Oct-Dec 2015) nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were also measured. We applied the Multi-layer Canopy Chemical Exchange Model - MLC-CHEM to support the analysis of the observed profiles of NOx and O3. This includes inferring bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes as well as the role of the canopy interactions between the emissions, dry deposition, chemistry and turbulent transport of trace gases. During our investigation of diurnal and seasonal differences between model and measurements, we conducted a set of sensitivity studies to analyse the effects of changes in NOx-soil emissions, in-canopy turbulence and resistances for O3 and NO2 uptake on wet surfaces. These analyses suggest some modification in the representation of some of the poorly constrained canopy processes resulting in a significantly better comparison between the simulated and measured exchange fluxes and concentrations.

  8. A process-based model to estimate gas exchange and monoterpene emission rates in the mediterranean maquis - comparisons between modelled and measured fluxes at different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M.; Matteucci, G.; Fares, S.; Davison, B.

    2009-02-01

    This paper concerns the application of a process-based model (MOCA, Modelling of Carbon Assessment) as an useful tool for estimating gas exchange, and integrating the empirical algorithms for calculation of monoterpene fluxes, in a Mediterranean maquis of central Italy (Castelporziano, Rome). Simulations were carried out for a range of hypothetical but realistic canopies of the evergreen Quercus ilex (holm oak), Arbutus unedo (strawberry tree) and Phillyrea latifolia. More, the dependence on total leaf area and leaf distribution of monoterpene fluxes at the canopy scale has been considered in the algorithms. Simulation of the gas exchange rates showed higher values for P. latifolia and A. unedo (2.39±0.30 and 3.12±0.27 gC m-2 d-1, respectively) with respect to Q. ilex (1.67±0.08 gC m-2 d-1) in the measuring campaign (May-June). Comparisons of the average Gross Primary Production (GPP) values with those measured by eddy covariance were well in accordance (7.98±0.20 and 6.00±1.46 gC m-2 d-1, respectively, in May-June), although some differences (of about 30%) were evident in a point-to-point comparison. These differences could be explained by considering the non uniformity of the measuring site where diurnal winds blown S-SW direction affecting thus calculations of CO2 and water fluxes. The introduction of some structural parameters in the algorithms for monoterpene calculation allowed to simulate monoterpene emission rates and fluxes which were in accord to those measured (6.50±2.25 vs. 9.39±4.5μg g-1DW h-1 for Q. ilex, and 0.63±0.207μg g-1DW h-1 vs. 0.98±0.30μg g-1DW h-1 for P. latifolia). Some constraints of the MOCA model are discussed, but it is demonstrated to be an useful tool to simulate physiological processes and BVOC fluxes in a very complicated plant distributions and environmental conditions, and necessitating also of a low number of input data.

  9. Microscale mechanisms of gas exchange in fruit tissue.

    PubMed

    Ho, Q T; Verboven, P; Mebatsion, H K; Verlinden, B E; Vandewalle, S; Nicolaï, B M

    2009-01-01

    * Gas-filled intercellular spaces are considered the predominant pathways for gas transport through bulky plant organs such as fruit. Here, we introduce a methodology that combines a geometrical model of the tissue microstructure with mathematical equations to describe gas exchange mechanisms involved in fruit respiration. * Pear (Pyrus communis) was chosen as a model system. The two-dimensional microstructure of cortex tissue was modelled based on light microscopy images. The transport of O(2) and CO(2) in the intercellular space, cell wall network and cytoplasm was modelled using diffusion laws, irreversible thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. * In silico analysis showed that O(2) transport mainly occurred through intercellular spaces and less through the intracellular liquid, while CO(2) was transported at equal rates in both phases. Simulations indicated that biological variation of the apparent diffusivity appears to be caused by the random distribution of cells and intercellular spaces in tissue. Temperature does not affect modelled gas exchange properties; it rather acts on the respiration metabolism. * This modelling approach provides, for the first time, detailed information about gas exchange mechanisms at the microscopic scale in bulky plant organs, such as fruit, and can be used to study conditions of anoxia.

  10. BOREAS TE-10 Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Middleton, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-10 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the reflectance, transmittance, gas exchange, chlorophyll content, carbon content, hydrogen content, and nitrogen content of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of assimilation, stomatal conductance, transpiration, internal CO2 concentration, and water use efficiency conducted in the Southern Study Area (SSA) during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1996 using a portable gas exchange system. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  11. Artificial lung and extracorporeal gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Bensberg, R; Dembinski, R; Kopp, R; Kuhlen, R

    2005-03-01

    Over the last years, several observational studies have suggested that extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) may be an important contribution to clinical algorithms for the treatment of most severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Today ECLA is used only as a rescue therapy in life threatening gas exchange disorders if maximal conventional therapy fails to prevent from hypoxemia. With subsequent reduction of complications and improvement of biocompability, extracorporeal membrane oxygentation (ECMO) indications may be extendend to treat patients earlier and not only in rescue situations along the original idea to buy the lung some time to heal by avoiding further ventilator associated lung injury. Veno-venous ECMO therapy at present is an important therapeutic option in severe ARDS with persisiting life threatening gas exchange disorder as a rescue therapy. The development of smaller, less complex and more secure ECMO or pumpless veno-arterial ECLA systems has the potential to perform controlled studies of its use in ARDS and potentially expand indications.

  12. [Pathophysiology of gas exchange in ARDS].

    PubMed

    Fernández Fernández, R

    2006-11-01

    ARDS is produced in a pulmonary edema picture due to increased vascular patency. In this way, the initial alteration consists in an alveolar occupation due to protein rich edema. This occupation reduces the alveolar surface available for gas exchange, increasing the pulmonary areas with poor or null V/Q ratio. As ARDS progresses, vascular phenomena occur that affect the gas exchange differently, giving rise to heterogeneity in the V/Q ratio. This situation worsens due to the appearance of areas with null ventilation in relationship with the appearance of atelectasis in lung dependent zones. All these factors form the hypoxemia picture refractory to the increase of the inspired oxygen fraction characteristic of this clinical entity. In this article, we make a review of these physiological mechanisms and the effect on the oxygenation of different ventilatory and drug maneuvers.

  13. Relationship between wind speed and gas exchange over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik

    1992-01-01

    A quadratic dependence of gas exchange on wind speed is employed to analyze the relationship between gas transfer and wind speed with particular emphasizing variable and/or low wind speeds. The quadratic dependence is fit through gas-transfer velocities over the ocean determined by methods based on the natural C-14 disequilibrium and the bomb C-14 inventory. The variation in the CO2 levels is related to these mechanisms, but the results show that other causes play significant roles. A weaker dependence of gas transfer on wind is suggested for steady winds, and long-term averaged winds demonstrate a stronger dependence in the present model. The chemical enhancement of CO2 exchange is also shown to play a role by increasing CO2 fluxes at low wind speeds.

  14. Structure, function and evolution of the gas exchangers: comparative perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Maina, JN

    2002-01-01

    Over the evolutionary continuum, animals have faced similar fundamental challenges of acquiring molecular oxygen for aerobic metabolism. Under limitations and constraints imposed by factors such as phylogeny, behaviour, body size and environment, they have responded differently in founding optimal respiratory structures. A quintessence of the aphorism that ‘necessity is the mother of invention’, gas exchangers have been inaugurated through stiff cost–benefit analyses that have evoked transaction of trade-offs and compromises. Cogent structural–functional correlations occur in constructions of gas exchangers: within and between taxa, morphological complexity and respiratory efficiency increase with metabolic capacities and oxygen needs. Highly active, small endotherms have relatively better-refined gas exchangers compared with large, inactive ectotherms. Respiratory structures have developed from the plain cell membrane of the primeval prokaryotic unicells to complex multifunctional ones ofthe modern Metazoa. Regarding the respiratory medium used to extract oxygen from, animal life has had only two choices – water or air – within the biological range of temperature and pressure the only naturally occurring respirable fluids. In rarer cases, certain animalshave adapted to using both media. Gills (evaginated gas exchangers) are the primordial respiratory organs: they are the archetypal water breathing organs. Lungs (invaginated gas exchangers) are the model air breathing organs. Bimodal (transitional) breathers occupy the water–air interface. Presentation and exposure of external (water/air) and internal (haemolymph/blood) respiratory media, features determined by geometric arrangement of the conduits, are important features for gas exchange efficiency: counter-current, cross-current, uniform pool and infinite pool designs have variably developed. PMID:12430953

  15. Structure, function and evolution of the gas exchangers: comparative perspectives.

    PubMed

    Maina, J N

    2002-10-01

    Over the evolutionary continuum, animals have faced similar fundamental challenges of acquiring molecular oxygen for aerobic metabolism. Under limitations and constraints imposed by factors such as phylogeny, behaviour, body size and environment, they have responded differently in founding optimal respiratory structures. A quintessence of the aphorism that 'necessity is the mother of invention', gas exchangers have been inaugurated through stiff cost-benefit analyses that have evoked transaction of trade-offs and compromises. Cogent structural-functional correlations occur in constructions of gas exchangers: within and between taxa, morphological complexity and respiratory efficiency increase with metabolic capacities and oxygen needs. Highly active, small endotherms have relatively better-refined gas exchangers compared with large, inactive ectotherms. Respiratory structures have developed from the plain cell membrane of the primeval prokaryotic unicells to complex multifunctional ones of the modern Metazoa. Regarding the respiratory medium used to extract oxygen from, animal life has had only two choices--water or air--within the biological range of temperature and pressure the only naturally occurring respirable fluids. In rarer cases, certain animals have adapted to using both media. Gills (evaginated gas exchangers) are the primordial respiratory organs: they are the archetypal water breathing organs. Lungs (invaginated gas exchangers) are the model air breathing organs. Bimodal (transitional) breathers occupy the water-air interface. Presentation and exposure of external (water/air) and internal (haemolymph/blood) respiratory media, features determined by geometric arrangement of the conduits, are important features for gas exchange efficiency: counter-current, cross-current, uniform pool and infinite pool designs have variably developed. PMID:12430953

  16. Novel scalable and monolithically integrated extracorporeal gas exchange device.

    PubMed

    Rieper, Tina; Müller, Claas; Reinecke, Holger

    2015-10-01

    A novel extracorporeal gas exchange device (EGED) is developed, implemented and characterized. The aim hereby is to overcome drawbacks of state-of-the-art devices and of state-of-science approaches, like their labor intensive fabrication and their low volume density of the gas exchange area, respectively. As a consequence of the stacked setup of alternating layers of the blood compartment and the ventilation gas compartment, the developed EGED allows for double sided gas exchange. Furthermore, it enables an adaption to the diversity of medical requirements by scaling the amount of layers. The developed fabrication chain is used to fabricate leakage-free evaluation models and allows for a transition to automated fabrication. The EGED is completely fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and features diffusion membranes, which are separating the compartments, with a mean thickness of 90 μm. With the evaluation models and oxygen as ventilation gas an oxygen transfer of 60 ml/lblood (25 ml/(min m(2))) and a carbon dioxide transfer of 70 ml/lblood (30 ml/(min m(2))) are achieved. The linear scalability of the concept as well as the functionality of the EGED with air as ventilation gas is shown. PMID:26249794

  17. Closed system respirometry may underestimate tissue gas exchange and bias the respiratory exchange ratio (RER).

    PubMed

    Malte, Christian Lind; Nørgaard, Simon; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Closed respirometry is a commonly used method to measure gas exchange in animals due to its apparent simplicity. Typically, the rates of O2 uptake and CO2 excretion (VO2 and VCO2, respectively) are assumed to be in steady state, such that the measured rates of gas exchange equal those at tissue level. In other words, the respiratory gas exchange ratio (RER) is assumed to equal the respiratory quotient (RQ). However, because the gas concentrations change progressively during closure, the animal inspires air with a progressively increasing CO2 concentration and decreasing O2 concentration. These changes will eventually affect gas exchange causing the O2 and CO2 stores within the animal to change. Because of the higher solubility/capacitance of CO2 in the tissues of the body, VCO2 will be more affected than VO2, and we hypothesize therefore that RER will become progressively underestimated as closure time is prolonged. This hypothesis was addressed by a combination of experimental studies involving closed respirometry on ball pythons (Python regius) as well as mathematical models of gas exchange. We show that increased closed duration of the respirometer reduces RER by up to 13%, and these findings may explain previous reports of RER values being below 0.7. Our model reveals that the maximally possible reduction in RER is determined by the storage capacity of the body for CO2 (product of size and specific capacitance) relative to the respirometer storage capacity. Furthermore, modeling also shows that pronounced ventilatory and circulatory response to hypercapnia can alleviate the reduction in RER.

  18. X-ray CT imaging and image-based modelling study of gas exchange in the rice rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affholder, Marie-Cecile; Keyes, Samuel David; Roose, Tiina; Heppell, James; Kirk, Guy

    2016-04-01

    We used X-ray computer tomography and image-based modelling to investigate CO2 uptake by rice roots growing in submerged soil, and its consequences for the chemistry and biology of the rhizosphere. From previous work, three processes are known to greatly modify the rhizophere of rice and other wetland plants: (1) oxygenation of the submerged, anoxic soil by O2 transported through the root gas channels (aerenchyma); (2) oxidation of ferrous iron and resulting accumulation of ferric oxide; and (3) pH changes due to protons formed in iron oxidation and released from the roots to balance excess intake of cations over anions. A further process, so far not much investigated, is the possibility of CO2 uptake by the roots. Large amounts of CO2 accumulate in submerged soils because CO2 formed in soil respiration escapes only slowly by diffusion through the water-saturated soil pores. There is therefore a large CO2 gradient between the soil and the aerenchyma inside the root, and CO2 may be taken up by the roots and vented to the atmosphere. The extent of this and its consequences for rhizosphere chemistry and biology are poorly understood. We grew rice plants in a submerged, strongly-reduced, Philippine rice soil contained in 10-cm diameter, 20-cm deep Perspex pots. Four-week old rice seedlings, grown in nutrient culture, were transplanted into the pots at either 1 or 4 plants per pot, planted closely together. After 3 and 4 weeks, the pots were analysed with an X-ray CT scanner (Custom Nikon/Xtek Hutch; 80 mm by 56 mm field of view and 40 μm voxel size). Gas bubbles were extracted from the data by 3D median filtering and roots using a region-growth method. The images showed prominent and abundant gas bubbles in the soil bulk, but no or very few bubbles in the soil close to roots. There was a clear relation between the absence of gas bubbles and the presence of roots, as well as an increasing concentration of bubbles with depth through the soil. Analysis of the bubbles

  19. X-ray CT imaging and image-based modelling study of gas exchange in the rice rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affholder, Marie-Cecile; Keyes, Samuel David; Roose, Tiina; Heppell, James; Kirk, Guy

    2016-04-01

    We used X-ray computer tomography and image-based modelling to investigate CO2 uptake by rice roots growing in submerged soil, and its consequences for the chemistry and biology of the rhizosphere. From previous work, three processes are known to greatly modify the rhizophere of rice and other wetland plants: (1) oxygenation of the submerged, anoxic soil by O2 transported through the root gas channels (aerenchyma); (2) oxidation of ferrous iron and resulting accumulation of ferric oxide; and (3) pH changes due to protons formed in iron oxidation and released from the roots to balance excess intake of cations over anions. A further process, so far not much investigated, is the possibility of CO2 uptake by the roots. Large amounts of CO2 accumulate in submerged soils because CO2 formed in soil respiration escapes only slowly by diffusion through the water-saturated soil pores. There is therefore a large CO2 gradient between the soil and the aerenchyma inside the root, and CO2 may be taken up by the roots and vented to the atmosphere. The extent of this and its consequences for rhizosphere chemistry and biology are poorly understood. We grew rice plants in a submerged, strongly-reduced, Philippine rice soil contained in 10-cm diameter, 20-cm deep Perspex pots. Four-week old rice seedlings, grown in nutrient culture, were transplanted into the pots at either 1 or 4 plants per pot, planted closely together. After 3 and 4 weeks, the pots were analysed with an X-ray CT scanner (Custom Nikon/Xtek Hutch; 80 mm by 56 mm field of view and 40 μm voxel size). Gas bubbles were extracted from the data by 3D median filtering and roots using a region-growth method. The images showed prominent and abundant gas bubbles in the soil bulk, but no or very few bubbles in the soil close to roots. There was a clear relation between the absence of gas bubbles and the presence of roots, as well as an increasing concentration of bubbles with depth through the soil. Analysis of the bubbles

  20. Alcohol breath test: gas exchange issues.

    PubMed

    Hlastala, Michael P; Anderson, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    The alcohol breath test is reviewed with a focus on gas exchange factors affecting its accuracy. The basis of the alcohol breath test is the assumption that alveolar air reaches the mouth during exhalation with no change in alcohol concentration. Recent investigations have shown that alcohol concentration is altered during its transit to the mouth. The exhaled alcohol concentration is modified by interaction with the mucosa of the pulmonary airways. Exhaled alcohol concentration is not an accurate indicator of alveolar alcohol concentration. Measuring alcohol concentration in the breath is very different process than measuring a blood level from air equilibrated with a blood sample. Airway exchange of alcohol leads to a bias against certain individuals depending on the anatomic and physiologic characteristics. Methodological modifications are proposed to improve the accuracy of the alcohol breath test to become fair to all. PMID:27197859

  1. BOREAS TE-11 Leaf Gas Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Saugier, Bernard; Pontailler, J. Y.

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-11 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the sap flow, gas exchange, and lichen photosynthesis of boreal vegetation and meteorological data of the area studied. This data set contains measurements of assimilation and transpiration conducted at the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site during the growing seasons of 1993 and 1994. The data are stored in ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains single-leaf gas exchange data from the SSA-Fen site during 1994 and 1995. These leaf gas exchange properties were measured for the dominant vascular plants using portable gas exchange systems. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  3. High temperature heat exchanger studies for applications to gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, June Kee; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Ha, Man Yeong; Kim, Kui Soon

    2009-12-01

    Growing demand for environmentally friendly aero gas-turbine engines with lower emissions and improved specific fuel consumption can be met by incorporating heat exchangers into gas turbines. Relevant researches in such areas as the design of a heat exchanger matrix, materials selection, manufacturing technology, and optimization by a variety of researchers have been reviewed in this paper. Based on results reported in previous studies, potential heat exchanger designs for an aero gas turbine recuperator, intercooler, and cooling-air cooler are suggested.

  4. ASGAMAGE, the Air-Sea Gas Exchange/MAGE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oost, Wiebe; Jacobs, Cor; Kohsiek, Wim; Goossens, Guus; van der Horn, Jaap; Sprung, Detlev; Rapsomanikis, Spyros; Kenntner, Thomas; Reiner, Thomas; Bowyer, Peter; Larsen, Søren; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kunz, Gerard; Hall, Alan; Liss, Peter; Malin, Gill; Upstill-Goddard, Rob; Woolf, David; Graham, Angus; Nightingale, Phil; Fairall, Chris; Hare, Jeff; Dissly, Richard; Tans, Pieter; Anderson, Bob; Smith, Stu

    The ASGAMAGE project addressed the problem of the large discrepancy between the chemistry based and micrometeorological methods and aimed to determine any geophysical parameters apart from the wind speed that affect air-sea gas exchange in an effort to reduce the uncertainty in the global carbon balance. Experiments were performed in the spring and fall of 1996 at and near a research platform off the Dutch coast and two surface layer models were developed for the gas exchange process. The results gave a reduction of the difference between the two types of methods from an order of magnitude to a factor of two as well as indications for the causes of the remaining difference.

  5. Greenhouse gas exchange over grazed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Ammann, C.; Neftel, A.

    2012-04-01

    Grasslands act as sinks and sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) and are, in conjunction with livestock production systems, responsible for a large share of GHG emissions. Whereas ecosystem scale flux measurements (eddy covariance) are commonly used to investigate CO2 exchange (and is becoming state-of-the-art for other GHGs, too), GHG emissions from agricultural animals are usually investigated on the scale of individual animals. Therefore eddy covariance technique has to be tested for combined systems (i.e. grazed systems). Our project investigates the ability of field scale flux measurements to reliably quantify the contribution of grazing dairy cows to the net exchange of CO2 and CH4. To quantify the contribution of the animals to the net flux the position, movement, and grazing/rumination activity of each cow are recorded. In combination with a detailed footprint analysis of the eddy covariance fluxes, the animal related CO2 and CH4 emissions are derived and compared to standard emission values derived from respiration chambers. The aim of the project is to test the assumption whether field scale CO2 flux measurements adequately include the respiration of grazing cows and to identify potential errors in ecosystem Greenhouse gas budgets.

  6. Modeling Carbon Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Model results will be reviewed to assess different methods for bounding the terrestrial role in the global carbon cycle. It is proposed that a series of climate model runs could be scoped that would tighten the limits on the "missing sink" of terrestrial carbon and could also direct future satellite image analyses to search for its geographical location and understand its seasonal dynamics.

  7. Trace Gas Exchange of Biofuel Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Li, R.; Eller, A. S.; Gray, C.; Fierer, N.; Fall, R.; Harley, P. C.; Roberts, J. M.; Yuan, B.; Qian, Y.; Westra, P.; Fryrear, C.; Collins, M.; Whitman, K.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2010 leaf level gas exchange and VOC fluxes from switchgrass and corn grown at the CSU horticultural farm in Ft Collins (CO) were measured using a PTR-MS coupled to a modified Li6400 cuvette system. Both species are C4 plants with corn currently being the dominant biofuel crop in the USA whilst switchgrass being a promising candidate for cellulosic fuel ethanol production. Amongst the strongest VOC emissions from both plants were methanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, acetone and toluene. The switchgrass VOC emissions compare reasonably well with the only published data measured from potted plants in a whole plant enclosure (Eller et al. 2011). VOC emission studies on corn are almost as scarce as those of switchgrass. Considering the acreage of corn grown in the USA every year, VOC flux measurements of this plant species are largely under-represented in the literature. The emission rates that do exist in the literature do not compare well with the numbers found in this study (e.g. Das et al. 2003; 35μg methanol per hour per gram biomass). To investigate the biosphere atmosphere exchange of corn fields in more detail the field campaign BioCORN 2011 was initiated. In summer 2011 an eddy covariance system was set up in a corn field at ARDEC (CSU, Ft Collins, CO) to investigate the energy flux and the trace gas exchange of the US' dominant biofuel crop. Besides energy flux, evapotranspiration and CO2 flux a comprehensive suite of volatile organic compounds and inorganic species (O3, NO, NO2, CO) are measured for virtual disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) analysis and true eddy covariance (EC) fluxes, respectively. VOCs are monitored by PTR-MS and, for the first time, fluxes of formic acid are measured utilizing NI-CIMS data for vDEC analysis. Besides the EC approach leaf level flux measurements and soil flux measurements are performed using a GC-MS system (TACOH) coupled to a modified Li6400 system and to soil chambers, respectively. Ethanol and methanol are amongst the

  8. [The physiology of gas exchange in divers].

    PubMed

    Rieder, H U

    1989-04-01

    After a short reminder of Boyle's law and the physiology of oxygen and nitrogen, a mathematical model will be discussed (without formulas). Its limitations are shown in relation to the calculation of partial gas pressures in different human organs. Such models are already used in closed circuit anesthesia delivery systems and valuable insights can be obtained by this way, which enable us to calculate better nitrogen decompression tables. PMID:2727653

  9. Trace gas exchange in a high-Arctic valley: 3. Integrating and scaling CO2 fluxes from canopy to landscape using flux data, footprint modeling, and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soegaard, Henrik; Nordstroem, Claus; Friborg, Thomas; Hansen, Birger U.; Christensen, Torben R.; Bay, Christian

    2000-09-01

    Within the framework of the European Land Arctic Physical Processes project and as part of the Danish Research Council's Polar Program, a study on trace gas exchange in a high-arctic ecosystem was conducted in NE Greenland, May-August 1997. On the basis of carbon dioxide flux measurements from three dominant surface types, this paper reports on the upscaling of such measurements from canopy to landscape level. Over a three-week period starting in mid-July, the different surfaces revealed large differences in the CO2 flux with uptake rates ranging from 0.7 g C m-2 d-1 over the dwarf shrub heath to 3.0 g Cm-2 d-1 over denser parts of the fen, while willow snowbed revealed intermediate uptake rates. The carbon dioxide exchange could be simulated by a CO2 model, combining photosynthesis and soil respiration routines, for which the parametrization depended on the vegetation type. Results from the simulation were supported by a sensitivity analysis based on a three-dimensional footprint model where it was shown that the CO2 uptake was strongly related to the measured leaf area index. The CO2 model was used to calculate the spatial distribution in Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) on the basis of Landsat satellite data acquired at the peak of the growing season and stratified according to vegetation type. It was found that there was a reasonable agreement between the satellite-based flux estimate (-0.77 g C m-2 d-1) and the CO2 flux found by areal weighting of the eddy correlation measurements (-0.88 g C m-2 d-1) for the specific study day. Finally, the summer season NEE was calculated for the whole Zackenberg Valley bottom. In June, there was a valley-wide carbon loss of 8.4±2.6 g C m-2 month-1, whereas the valley system accumulated 18.8±6.7 g C m-2 season-1 during the growing season (July-August).

  10. Evolutionary responses of discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    PubMed Central

    White, Craig R.; Blackburn, Tim M.; Terblanche, John S.; Marais, Elrike; Gibernau, Marc; Chown, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    The discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGCs) observed in many quiescent insects have been a cause of debate for decades, but no consensus on their evolutionary origin or adaptive significance has been achieved. Nevertheless, three main adaptive hypotheses have emerged: (i) the hygric hypothesis suggests that DGCs reduce respiratory water loss; (ii) the chthonic hypothesis suggests that DGCs facilitate gas exchange during environmental hypoxia, hypercapnia, or both; and (iii) the oxidative-damage hypothesis suggests that DGCs minimize oxidative tissue damage. However, most work conducted to date has been based on single-species investigations or nonphylogenetic comparative analyses of few species, despite calls for a strong-inference, phylogenetic approach. Here, we adopt such an approach by using 76 measurements of 40 wild-caught species to examine macrophysiological variation in DGC duration in insects. Potential patterns of trait variation are first identified on the basis of the explicit a priori predictions of each hypothesis, and the best phylogenetic generalized least-squares fit of the candidate models to the data is selected on the basis of Akaike's information criterion. We find a significant positive relationship between DGC duration and habitat temperature and an important interaction between habitat temperature and precipitation. This result supports the hygric hypothesis. We conclude that the DGCs of insects reduce respiratory water loss while ensuring adequate gas exchange. PMID:17485672

  11. A comparison of three approaches to modeling leaf gas exchange in annually drought-stressed ponderosa pine forests.

    PubMed

    Misson, Laurent; Panek, Jeanne A; Goldstein, Allen H

    2004-05-01

    We tested, compared and modified three models of stomatal conductance at the leaf level in a forest ecosystem where drought stress is a major factor controlling forest productivity. The models were tested against 2 years (1999 and 2000) of leaf-level measurements on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) growing in the Mediterranean climate of California, USA. The Ball, Woodrow and Berry (1987) (BWB) model was modified to account for soil water stress. Among the models, results of the modified BWB model were in the closest agreement with observations (r2 = 0.71). The Jarvis (1976) model showed systematic simulation errors related to vapor pressure deficit (r2 = 0.65). Results of the Williams, Rastetter, Fernandes et al. (1996) (SPA) model showed the poorest correlation with empirical data, but this model has only one calibration parameter (r2 = 0.60). Sensitivity analyses showed that, in all three models, predictions of stomatal conductance were most responsive to photosynthetically active radiation and soil water content. Stomatal conductance showed little sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit in the Jarvis model, whereas in both the BWB and SPA models, vapor pressure deficit (or relative humidity) was the third most important variable. Parameterization of the SPA model was in accordance with the parameterization of the modified BWB model, although the two models differ greatly. Measured and modeled results indicate that stomatal behavior is not water conservative during spring; however, during summer, when soil water content is low and vapor pressure deficit is high, stomatal conductance decreases and, according to the models, intrinsic water- use efficiency increases.

  12. Pine needle holders for use in gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N T

    1989-12-01

    Simple holders for positioning pine needles in a gas exchange cuvette are described. The holders make it easy to enclose a standard length of needles in the cuvette in a single plane without mutual shading. The holders also make it possible, following gas exchange measurements, to harvest for further analysis just those needle portions that were enclosed in the leaf chamber. Field observations, which were made with a gas exchange cuvette incorporating the needle holders, on the relationship between carbon exchange rate and photon flux density in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) needles are reported.

  13. Could beaked whales get the bends? Effect of diving behaviour and physiology on modelled gas exchange for three species: Ziphius cavirostris, Mesoplodon densirostris and Hyperoodon ampullatus.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Sascha K; Baird, Robin W; Fahlman, Andreas

    2009-07-31

    A mathematical model, based on current knowledge of gas exchange and physiology of marine mammals, was used to predict blood and tissue tension N2 (P(N2)) using field data from three beaked whale species: northern bottlenose whales, Cuvier's beaked whales, and Blainville's beaked whales. The objective was to determine if physiology (body mass, diving lung volume, dive response) or dive behaviour (dive depth and duration, changes in ascent rate, diel behaviour) would lead to differences in P(N2) levels and thereby decompression sickness (DCS) risk between species. Diving lung volume and extent of the dive response had a large effect on end-dive P(N2). The dive profile had a larger influence on end-dive P(N2) than body mass differences between species. Despite diel changes in dive behaviour, P(N2) levels showed no consistent trend. Model output suggested that all three species live with tissue P(N2) levels that would cause a significant proportion of DCS cases in terrestrial mammals. Cuvier's beaked whale diving behaviour appears to put them at higher risk than the other species, which may explain their prevalence in strandings after the use of mid-frequency sonar.

  14. Primer on nuclear exchange models

    SciTech Connect

    Hafemeister, David

    2014-05-09

    Basic physics is applied to nuclear force exchange models between two nations. Ultimately, this scenario approach can be used to try and answer the age old question of 'how much is enough?' This work is based on Chapter 2 of Physics of Societal Issues: Calculations on National Security, Environment and Energy (Springer, 2007 and 2014)

  15. Mechanistic model coupling gas exchange dynamics and Listeria monocytogenes growth in modified atmosphere packaging of non respiring food.

    PubMed

    Chaix, E; Broyart, B; Couvert, O; Guillaume, C; Gontard, N; Guillard, V

    2015-10-01

    A mechanistic model coupling O2 and CO2 mass transfer (namely diffusion and solubilisation in the food itself and permeation through the packaging material) to microbial growth models was developed aiming at predicting the shelf life of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) systems. It was experimentally validated on a non-respiring food by investigating concomitantly the O2/CO2 partial pressure in packaging headspace and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (average microbial count) within the food sample. A sensitivity analysis has revealed that the reliability of the prediction by this "super-parametrized" model (no less than 47 parameters were required for running one simulation) was strongly dependent on the accuracy of the microbial input parameters. Once validated, this model was used to decipher the role of O2/CO2 mass transfer on microbial growth and as a MAP design tool: an example of MAP dimensioning was provided in this paper as a proof of concept.

  16. PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Pasha, MD Fayzul K; Stewart, Kevin M; Bender, Merlynn; Schneider, Michael L.

    2012-07-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and

  17. Observational Studies of Parameters Influencing Air-sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, U.; Frew, N. M.; Bock, E. J.; Hara, T.; Garbe, C. S.; Jaehne, B.

    A physically-based modeling of the air-sea gas transfer that can be used to predict the gas transfer rates with sufficient accuracy as a function of micrometeorological parameters is still lacking. State of the art are still simple gas transfer rate/wind speed relationships. Previous measurements from Coastal Ocean Experiment in the Atlantic revealed positive correlations between mean square slope, near surface turbulent dis- sipation, and wind stress. It also demonstrated a strong negative correlation between mean square slope and the fluorescence of surface-enriched colored dissolved organic matter. Using heat as a proxy tracer for gases the exchange process at the air/water interface and the micro turbulence at the water surface can be investigated. The anal- ysis of infrared image sequences allow the determination of the net heat flux at the ocean surface, the temperature gradient across the air/sea interface and thus the heat transfer velocity and gas transfer velocity respectively. Laboratory studies were carried out in the new Heidelberg wind-wave facility AELOTRON. Direct measurements of the Schmidt number exponent were done in conjunction with classical mass balance methods to estimate the transfer velocity. The laboratory results allowed to validate the basic assumptions of the so called controlled flux technique by applying differ- ent tracers for the gas exchange in a large Schmidt number regime. Thus a modeling of the Schmidt number exponent is able to fill the gap between laboratory and field measurements field. Both, the results from the laboratory and the field measurements should be able to give a further understanding of the mechanisms controlling the trans- port processes across the aqueous boundary layer and to relate the forcing functions to parameters measured by remote sensing.

  18. Kinetic models of immediate exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinsalu, Els; Patriarca, Marco

    2014-08-01

    We propose a novel kinetic exchange model differing from previous ones in two main aspects. First, the basic dynamics is modified in order to represent economies where immediate wealth exchanges are carried out, instead of reshufflings or uni-directional movements of wealth. Such dynamics produces wealth distributions that describe more faithfully real data at small values of wealth. Secondly, a general probabilistic trading criterion is introduced, so that two economic units can decide independently whether to trade or not depending on their profit. It is found that the type of the equilibrium wealth distribution is the same for a large class of trading criteria formulated in a symmetrical way with respect to the two interacting units. This establishes unexpected links between and provides a microscopic foundations of various kinetic exchange models in which the existence of a saving propensity is postulated. We also study the generalized heterogeneous version of the model in which units use different trading criteria and show that suitable sets of diversified parameter values with a moderate level of heterogeneity can reproduce realistic wealth distributions with a Pareto power law.

  19. Prototype Vent Gas Heat Exchanger for Exploration EVA - Performance and Manufacturing Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory J.; Strange, Jeremy; Jennings, Mallory

    2013-01-01

    NASA is developing new portable life support system (PLSS) technologies, which it is demonstrating in an unmanned ground based prototype unit called PLSS 2.0. One set of technologies within the PLSS provides suitable ventilation to an astronaut while on an EVA. A new component within the ventilation gas loop is a liquid-to-gas heat exchanger to transfer excess heat from the gas to the thermal control system s liquid coolant loop. A unique bench top prototype heat exchanger was built and tested for use in PLSS 2.0. The heat exchanger was designed as a counter-flow, compact plate fin type using stainless steel. Its design was based on previous compact heat exchangers manufactured by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS), but was half the size of any previous heat exchanger model and one third the size of previous liquid-to-gas heat exchangers. The prototype heat exchanger was less than 40 cubic inches and weighed 2.57 lb. Performance of the heat exchanger met the requirements and the model predictions. The water side and gas side pressure drops were less 0.8 psid and 0.5 inches of water, respectively, and an effectiveness of 94% was measured at the nominal air side pressure of 4.1 psia.

  20. Estimating Riverine Air-Water Gas Exchange and Metabolism from Long Oxygen Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. O., Jr.; Appling, A.; Yackulic, C. B.; Arroita, M.

    2015-12-01

    To accurately depict the role of streams and rivers in carbon cycling requires estimating air- water gas exchange, productivity, and respiration. It is possible to estimate gas exchange and metabolism (gross primary production and ecosystem respiration) simultaneously from oxygen data themselves, but estimates from any single day often contain a substantial (and unknown) amount of parameter error. Here we developed a statistical method to leverage the extra information in a long time series to better estimate daily rates of gas exchange and metabolism. Such time series are ubiquitous in water quality monitoring programs, and these data are readily available over broad spatial scales. We developed a hierarchical model that estimates gas exchange as a function of discharge for a year-long time series of dissolved oxygen data. Gas exchange, and therefore metabolism, had much lower temporal variability than if we estimated parameters on separate days. Rates of gas exchange were positively related with discharge, but the relationship was river specific and often nonlinear. Our approach provides a robust means to estimate gas exchange and metabolism from the many rivers that have oxygen time series collected as part of water quality monitoring.

  1. Quantifying air-sea gas exchange using noble gases in a coastal upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. C.; Stanley, R. H. R.; Nicholson, D. P.; Squibb, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    The diffusive and bubble-mediated components of air-sea gas exchange can be quantified separately using time-series measurements of a suite of dissolved inert gases. We have evaluated the performance of four published air-sea gas exchange parameterizations using a five-day time-series of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentration in Monterey Bay, CA. We constructed a vertical model including surface air-sea gas exchange and vertical diffusion. Diffusivity was measured throughout the cruise from profiles of turbulent microstructure. We corrected the mixed layer gas concentrations for an upwelling event that occurred partway through the cruise. All tested parameterizations gave similar results for Ar, Kr, and Xe; their air-sea fluxes were dominated by diffusive gas exchange during our study. For He and Ne, which are less soluble, and therefore more sensitive to differences in the treatment of bubble-mediated exchange, the parameterizations gave widely different results with respect to the net gas exchange flux and the bubble flux. This study demonstrates the value of using a suite of inert gases, especially the lower solubility ones, to parameterize air-sea gas exchange.

  2. Leaf gas exchange in the frankincense tree (Boswellia papyrifera) of African dry woodlands.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, Tefera; Sterck, Frank J; Fetene, Masresha; Tadesse, Wubalem; Bongers, Frans

    2011-07-01

    A conceptual model was tested for explaining environmental and physiological effects on leaf gas exchange in the deciduous dry tropical woodland tree Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst. For this species we aimed at (i) understanding diurnal patterns in leaf gas exchange, (ii) exploring cause-effect relationships among external environment, internal physiology and leaf gas exchange, and (iii) exploring site differences in leaf gas exchange in response to environmental variables. Diurnal courses in gas exchange, underlying physiological traits and environmental variables were measured for 90 trees on consecutive days at two contrasting areas, one at high and the other at low altitude. Assimilation was highest in the morning and slightly decreased during the day. In contrast, transpiration increased from early morning to midday, mainly in response to an increasing vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and gradual stomatal closure. The leaf water potential varied relatively little and did not influence gas exchange during the measurement period. Our results suggest that the same cause-effect relationships function at contrasting areas. However, leaves at the higher altitude had higher photosynthetic capacity, reflecting acclimation to higher light levels. Trees at both areas nevertheless achieved similar leaf assimilation rates since assimilation was down-regulated by stomatal closure due to the higher VPD at the higher altitude, while it became more light limited at the lower altitude. Gas exchange was thus limited by a high VPD or low light levels during the wet season, despite the ability of the species to acclimate to different conditions.

  3. FASTGAS: Fast Gas Sampling for palladium exchange tests

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.; VerBerkmoes, A.A.

    1991-06-01

    A mass spectrometric technique for measuring the composition of gas flows in rapid H/D exchange reactions in palladium compacts has been developed. This method, called FASTGAS (Fast Gas Sampling)'' has been used at atmospheric pressures and above with a time response of better than 100 ms. The current implementation of the FASTGAS technique is described in detail and examples of its application to palladium hydride exchange tests are given. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Reversible brain inactivation induces discontinuous gas exchange in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; White, Craig R

    2013-06-01

    Many insects at rest breathe discontinuously, alternating between brief bouts of gas exchange and extended periods of breath-holding. The association between discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) and inactivity has long been recognised, leading to speculation that DGCs lie at one end of a continuum of gas exchange patterns, from continuous to discontinuous, linked to metabolic rate (MR). However, the neural hypothesis posits that it is the downregulation of brain activity and a change in the neural control of gas exchange, rather than low MR per se, which is responsible for the emergence of DGCs during inactivity. To test this, Nauphoeta cinerea cockroaches had their brains inactivated by applying a Peltier-chilled cold probe to the head. Once brain temperature fell to 8°C, cockroaches switched from a continuous to a discontinuous breathing pattern. Re-warming the brain abolished the DGC and re-established a continuous breathing pattern. Chilling the brain did not significantly reduce the cockroaches' MR and there was no association between the gas exchange pattern displayed by the insect and its MR. This demonstrates that DGCs can arise due to a decrease in brain activity and a change in the underlying regulation of gas exchange, and are not necessarily a simple consequence of low respiratory demand.

  5. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  6. Air-water gas exchange by waving vegetation stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Martinez, M. R.; Variano, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    Exchange between wetland surface water and the atmosphere is driven by a variety of motions, ranging from rainfall impact to thermal convection and animal locomotion. Here we examine the effect of wind-driven vegetation movement. Wind causes the stems of emergent vegetation to wave back and forth, stirring the water column and facilitating air-water exchange. To understand the magnitude of this effect, a gas transfer velocity (k600 value) was measured via laboratory experiments. Vegetation waving was studied in isolation by mechanically forcing a model canopy to oscillate at a range of frequencies and amplitudes matching those found in the field. The results show that stirring due to vegetation waving produces k600 values from 0.55 cm/h to 1.60 cm/h. The dependence of k600 on waving amplitude and frequency are evident from the laboratory data. These results indicate that vegetation waving has a nonnegligible effect on gas transport; thus, it can contribute to a mechanistic understanding of the fluxes underpinning biogeochemical processes.

  7. Prototype Vent Gas Heat Exchanger for Exploration EVA - Performance and Manufacturing Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory; Quinn, Gregory; Strange, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    NASA is developing new portable life support system (PLSS) technologies, which it is demonstrating in an unmanned ground based prototype unit called PLSS 2.0. One set of technologies within the PLSS provides suitable ventilation to an astronaut while on an EVA. A new component within the ventilation gas loop is a liquid-to-gas heat exchanger to transfer excess heat from the gas to the thermal control system's liquid coolant loop. A unique bench top prototype heat exchanger was built and tested for use in PLSS 2.0. The heat exchanger was designed as a counter-flow, compact plate fin type using stainless steel. Its design was based on previous compact heat exchangers manufactured by United Technologies Aerospace Systems, but was half the size of any previous heat exchanger model and one third the size of previous liquid-to-gas heat exchangers. The prototype heat exchanger was less than 40 cubic inches and weighed 2.6 lb. The water side and gas side pressure drops were 0.8 psid and 0.5 inches of water, respectively. Performance of the heat exchanger at the nominal pressure of 4.1 psia was measured at 94%, while a gas inlet pressure of 25 psia resulted in an effectiveness of 84%. These results compared well with the model, which was scaled for the small size. Modeling of certain phenomena that affect performance, such as flow distribution in the headers was particularly difficult due to the small size of the heat exchanger. Data from the tests has confirmed the correction factors that were used in these parts of the model.

  8. Trace gas exchange in a high-Arctic valley: 2. Landscape CH4 fluxes measured and modeled using eddy correlation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friborg, T.; Christensen, T. R.; Hansen, B. U.; Nordstroem, C.; Soegaard, H.

    2000-09-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of methane exchange were conducted during a period of 43 days covering the summer season in high-arctic, NE Greenland. Measurements were carried out over a fen area and showed fluxes ranging from no exchange in the early part of the campaign to 120 mg m-2 d-1 during midsummer. The emission showed a clear variation related to soil temperatures and water table level in the late part of the summer, whereas the thickness of the active soil layer was a main controlling parameter in the thaw period, in the early part of the season. A model to assess methane emission dependency on physical parameters is found to give a realistic estimate for the seasonal variations in flux. The proportion of C returned to the atmosphere as CH4 relative to the total C cycling was around 2%, which is similar to ratios often reported in literature. On the basis of these findings, an estimate is given for the total summer season emission of CH4, in which a simple model including both physical parameters and net primary production (NPP) is adapted to reproduce CH4 exchange rates for periods when no measurements were undertaken. In this way the total emission of CH4 during the period June 1 to September 1 1997, is found to equal 3.7 ± 0.57 g m-2, which is a relatively high rate given the harsh climate in which the measurements were made.

  9. Sunlight supply and gas exchange systems in microalgal bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, K.; Ohya, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Furune, H.

    1987-01-01

    The bioreactor with sunlight supply system and gas exchange systems presented has proved feasible in ground tests and shows much promise for space use as a closed ecological life support system device. The chief conclusions concerning the specification of total system needed for a life support system for a man in a space station are the following: (1) Sunlight supply system - compactness and low electrical consumption; (2) Bioreactor system - high density and growth rate of chlorella; and (3) Gas exchange system - enough for O2 production and CO2 assimilation.

  10. Diffusion-limited gas exchange across amphibian skin.

    PubMed

    Gatz, R N

    1982-04-01

    Cutaneous gas exchange function of amphibians is conveniently analyzed in lungless salamanders in which all gas exchange is through the skin. Measurements in Desmognathus fuscus (Plethodontidae) have yielded the following results: 1) Cutaneous transfer of O2 and CO2 is limited predominantly by diffusion. 2) Accordingly, in environmental hypoxia, O2 uptake decreases. 3) Anaerobiosis contributes to energy balance during the first few hours of hypoxia only. Thereafter unknown biochemical adjustments take place that allow the animal to restore metabolite levels characteristic of normoxia regardless of the continued reduced oxygen uptake.

  11. Effect of Impeller Design and Spacing on Gas Exchange in a Percutaneous Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, R. Garrett; Frankowski, Brian J.; Burgreen, Greg W.; Federspiel, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Providing partial respiratory assistance by removing carbon dioxide (CO2) can improve clinical outcomes in patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. An intravenous respiratory assist device with a small (25 Fr) insertion diameter eliminates the complexity and potential complications associated with external blood circuitry and can be inserted by nonspecialized surgeons. The impeller percutaneous respiratory assist catheter (IPRAC) is a highly efficient CO2 removal device for percutaneous insertion to the vena cava via the right jugular or right femoral vein that utilizes an array of impellers rotating within a hollow-fiber membrane bundle to enhance gas exchange. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of new impeller designs and impeller spacing on gas exchange in the IPRAC using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and in vitro deionized water gas exchange testing. A CFD gas exchange and flow model was developed to guide a progressive impeller design process. Six impeller blade geometries were designed and tested in vitro in an IPRAC device with 2- or 10-mm axial spacing and varying numbers of blades (2–5). The maximum CO2 removal efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) achieved was 573 ± 8 mL/min/m2 (40.1 mL/min absolute). The gas exchange rate was found to be largely independent of blade design and number of blades for the impellers tested but increased significantly (5–10%) with reduced axial spacing allowing for additional shaft impellers (23 vs. 14). CFD gas exchange predictions were within 2–13% of experimental values and accurately predicted the relative improvement with impellers at 2- versus 10-mm axial spacing. The ability of CFD simulation to accurately forecast the effects of influential design parameters suggests it can be used to identify impeller traits that profoundly affect facilitated gas exchange. PMID:24749994

  12. World Natural Gas Model

    1994-12-01

    RAMSGAS, the Research and Development Analysis Modeling System World Natural Gas Model, was developed to support planning of unconventional gaseoues fuels research and development. The model is a scenario analysis tool that can simulate the penetration of unconventional gas into world markets for oil and gas. Given a set of parameter values, the model estimates the natural gas supply and demand for the world for the period from 1980 to 2030. RAMSGAS is based onmore » a supply/demand framwork and also accounts for the non-renewable nature of gas resources. The model has three fundamental components: a demand module, a wellhead production cost module, and a supply/demand interface module. The demand for gas is a product of total demand for oil and gas in each of 9 demand regions and the gas share. Demand for oil and gas is forecast from the base year of 1980 through 2030 for each demand region, based on energy growth rates and price-induced conservation. For each of 11 conventional and 19 unconventional gas supply regions, wellhead production costs are calculated. To these are added transportation and distribution costs estimates associated with moving gas from the supply region to each of the demand regions and any economic rents. Based on a weighted average of these costs and the world price of oil, fuel shares for gas and oil are computed for each demand region. The gas demand is the gas fuel share multiplied by the total demand for oil plus gas. This demand is then met from the available supply regions in inverse proportion to the cost of gas from each region. The user has almost complete control over the cost estimates for each unconventional gas source in each year and thus can compare contributions from unconventional resources under different cost/price/demand scenarios.« less

  13. Automated measurement of respiratory gas exchange by an inert gas dilution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A respiratory gas analyzer (RGA) has been developed wherein a mass spectrometer is the sole transducer required for measurement of respiratory gas exchange. The mass spectrometer maintains all signals in absolute phase relationships, precluding the need to synchronize flow and gas composition as required in other systems. The RGA system was evaluated by comparison with the Douglas bag technique. The RGA system established the feasibility of the inert gas dilution method for measuring breath-by-breath respiratory gas exchange. This breath-by-breath analytical capability permits detailed study of transient respiratory responses to exercise.

  14. In calm seas, precipitation drives air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-05-01

    In a series of experiments run in what resembles a heavily instrumented fish tank, Harrison et al. investigated the interwoven roles of wind and rain on air-sea gas exchange rates. Working with a 42-meterlong, 1-meter-wide, and 1.25-meter-tall experimental pool, the authors were able to control the wind speed, rainfall rate, water circulation speed, and other parameters, which they used to assess the effect of 24 different wind speed-rainfall rate combinations on the gas exchange rate of sulfur hexafuoride, a greenhouse gas. In trials that lasted up to 3 hours, the authors collected water samples from the tank at regular intervals, tracking the concentration of the dissolved gas.

  15. Lung Structure and the Intrinsic Challenges of Gas Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Connie C.W.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Weibel, Ewald R.

    2016-01-01

    Structural and functional complexities of the mammalian lung evolved to meet a unique set of challenges, namely, the provision of efficient delivery of inspired air to all lung units within a confined thoracic space, to build a large gas exchange surface associated with minimal barrier thickness and a microvascular network to accommodate the entire right ventricular cardiac output while withstanding cyclic mechanical stresses that increase several folds from rest to exercise. Intricate regulatory mechanisms at every level ensure that the dynamic capacities of ventilation, perfusion, diffusion, and chemical binding to hemoglobin are commensurate with usual metabolic demands and periodic extreme needs for activity and survival. This article reviews the structural design of mammalian and human lung, its functional challenges, limitations, and potential for adaptation. We discuss (i) the evolutionary origin of alveolar lungs and its advantages and compromises, (ii) structural determinants of alveolar gas exchange, including architecture of conducting bronchovascular trees that converge in gas exchange units, (iii) the challenges of matching ventilation, perfusion, and diffusion and tissue-erythrocyte and thoracopulmonary interactions. The notion of erythrocytes as an integral component of the gas exchanger is emphasized. We further discuss the signals, sources, and limits of structural plasticity of the lung in alveolar hypoxia and following a loss of lung units, and the promise and caveats of interventions aimed at augmenting endogenous adaptive responses. Our objective is to understand how individual components are matched at multiple levels to optimize organ function in the face of physiological demands or pathological constraints. PMID:27065169

  16. Phlebotomy improves pulmonary gas exchange in chronic mountain polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Cruz, J C; Diaz, C; Marticorena, E; Hilario, V

    1979-01-01

    There is not unanimous agreement in the literature regarding the effects of bleeding on pulmonary gas exchange in polycythemic patients. Spirometry, alveolar arterial O2 and CO2 tension differences, PaO2 breathing 100% oxygen and carbon monoxide-diffusing capacity were measured before and after 1 week of chronic phlebotomy in 4 chronic mountain polycythemic patients. Studies were carried out at 3,700 m above sea level (PB = 491 mm Hg). Before phlebotomy, 2 patients showed abnormal spirometry and gas exchange. Only 1 patient had high PaCO2 and all of them showed low values of PaO2 breathing oxygen. Phlebotomy improved both spirometry and gas exchange. Improvement in arterial oxygen saturation and PaO2 could not be attributed to changes in alveolar ventilation, but rather to better distribution of VA/Qc ratios since physiological dead space decreased. Our results are similar to those reported in polycythemia vera patients. A significant correlation between the changes in PaO2 with phlebotomy and the control PaO2 have been found from 45 polycythemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease collected from the literature. It is concluded that excessive polycythemia worsened hypoxemia and that phlebotomy improved gas exchange.

  17. Scaling leaf measurements to estimate cotton canopy gas exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diurnal leaf and canopy gas exchange of well watered field grown cotton were measured. Leaf measurements were made with a portable photosynthesis system and canopy measurements with open Canopy Evapo-Transpiration and Assimilation (CETA) systems. Leaf level measurements were arithmetically scaled to...

  18. Lung Structure and the Intrinsic Challenges of Gas Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W; Hyde, Dallas M; Weibel, Ewald R

    2016-03-15

    Structural and functional complexities of the mammalian lung evolved to meet a unique set of challenges, namely, the provision of efficient delivery of inspired air to all lung units within a confined thoracic space, to build a large gas exchange surface associated with minimal barrier thickness and a microvascular network to accommodate the entire right ventricular cardiac output while withstanding cyclic mechanical stresses that increase several folds from rest to exercise. Intricate regulatory mechanisms at every level ensure that the dynamic capacities of ventilation, perfusion, diffusion, and chemical binding to hemoglobin are commensurate with usual metabolic demands and periodic extreme needs for activity and survival. This article reviews the structural design of mammalian and human lung, its functional challenges, limitations, and potential for adaptation. We discuss (i) the evolutionary origin of alveolar lungs and its advantages and compromises, (ii) structural determinants of alveolar gas exchange, including architecture of conducting bronchovascular trees that converge in gas exchange units, (iii) the challenges of matching ventilation, perfusion, and diffusion and tissue-erythrocyte and thoracopulmonary interactions. The notion of erythrocytes as an integral component of the gas exchanger is emphasized. We further discuss the signals, sources, and limits of structural plasticity of the lung in alveolar hypoxia and following a loss of lung units, and the promise and caveats of interventions aimed at augmenting endogenous adaptive responses. Our objective is to understand how individual components are matched at multiple levels to optimize organ function in the face of physiological demands or pathological constraints.

  19. [External respiration, pulmonary gas exchange and energy expenditure in weightlessness].

    PubMed

    Kas'ian, I I; Makarov, G F

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes the data on external respiration and energy expenditures of men exposed to zero-g for 185 days and to 1/6 g on the lunar surface reported by Soviet and foreign authors. The paper also discusses factors that may be responsible for a higher level of gas exchange processes at reduced g. PMID:6392736

  20. Lung Structure and the Intrinsic Challenges of Gas Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W; Hyde, Dallas M; Weibel, Ewald R

    2016-04-01

    Structural and functional complexities of the mammalian lung evolved to meet a unique set of challenges, namely, the provision of efficient delivery of inspired air to all lung units within a confined thoracic space, to build a large gas exchange surface associated with minimal barrier thickness and a microvascular network to accommodate the entire right ventricular cardiac output while withstanding cyclic mechanical stresses that increase several folds from rest to exercise. Intricate regulatory mechanisms at every level ensure that the dynamic capacities of ventilation, perfusion, diffusion, and chemical binding to hemoglobin are commensurate with usual metabolic demands and periodic extreme needs for activity and survival. This article reviews the structural design of mammalian and human lung, its functional challenges, limitations, and potential for adaptation. We discuss (i) the evolutionary origin of alveolar lungs and its advantages and compromises, (ii) structural determinants of alveolar gas exchange, including architecture of conducting bronchovascular trees that converge in gas exchange units, (iii) the challenges of matching ventilation, perfusion, and diffusion and tissue-erythrocyte and thoracopulmonary interactions. The notion of erythrocytes as an integral component of the gas exchanger is emphasized. We further discuss the signals, sources, and limits of structural plasticity of the lung in alveolar hypoxia and following a loss of lung units, and the promise and caveats of interventions aimed at augmenting endogenous adaptive responses. Our objective is to understand how individual components are matched at multiple levels to optimize organ function in the face of physiological demands or pathological constraints. PMID:27065169

  1. BOREAS TE-4 Gas Exchange Data from Boreal Tree Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Collatz, G. James; Berry, Joseph A.; Gamon, John; Fredeen, Art; Fu, Wei

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-4 team collected steady-state gas exchange and reflectance data from several species in the BOREAS SSA during 1994 and in the NSA during 1996. Measurements of light, CO2, temperature, and humidity response curves were made by the BOREAS TE-4 team during the summers of 1994 and 1996 using intact attached leaves of boreal forest species located in the BOREAS SSA and NSA. These measurements were conducted to calibrate models used to predict photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf respiration. The 1994 and 1996 data can be used to construct plots of response functions or for parameterizing models. Parameter values are suitable for application in SiB2 (Sellers et al., 1996) or the leaf model of Collatz et al. (1991), and programs can be obtained from the investigators. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. Greenhouse Gas Exchange in Small Arctic Thaw Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurion, I.; Bégin, P. N.; Bouchard, F.; Preskienis, V.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic lakes and ponds can represent up to one quarter of the land surface in permafrost landscapes, particularly in lowland tundra landscapes characterized by ice wedge organic polygons. Thaw ponds can be defined as the aquatic ecosystems associated to thawing of organic soils, either resulting from active layer processes and located above low-center peat polygons (hereafter low-center polygonal or LCP ponds), or resulting from thermokarst slumping above melting ice wedges linked to the accelerated degradation of permafrost (hereafter ice-wedge trough or IWT ponds). These ponds can merge together forming larger water bodies, but with relatively stable shores (hereafter merged polygonal or MPG ponds), and with limnological characteristics similar to LCP ponds. These aquatic systems are very small and shallow, and present a different physical structure than the larger thermokarst lakes, generated after years of development and land subsidence. In a glacier valley on Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada, thermokarst and kettle lakes together represent 29% of the aquatic area, with a thermal profile resembling those of more standard arctic lakes (mixed epilimnion). The IWT ponds (44% of the area) are stratified for a large fraction of the summer despite their shallowness, while LCP and MPG ponds (27% of the area) show a more homogeneous water column. This will affect gas exchange in these diverse aquatic systems, in addition to their unique microbiota and organic carbon lability that control the production and consumption rates of greenhouse gases. The stratification in IWT ponds generates hypoxic conditions at the bottom, and together with the larger availability of organic carbon, stimulates methanogenesis and limits the mitigating action of methanotrophs. Overall, thaw ponds are largely supersaturated in methane, with IWT ponds dominating the emissions in this landscape (92% of total aquatic emissions estimated for the same valley), and they present large variations in

  3. Fundamental structural aspects and features in the bioengineering of the gas exchangers: comparative perspectives.

    PubMed

    Maina, J N

    2002-01-01

    generally those of reptiles, whereas a single capillary design commonly occurs in those of adult mammals. The capillary loading (the ratio of the volume of the capillary blood to the surface area across which blood is exposed to air) in lungs with a double capillary arrangement is high and manifests a poor design. On the other hand, the low capillary loading that characterizes the single capillary system indicates better exposure of blood to air and greater respiratory capacity. Fractal geometry features in the construction of the gas exchangers. The highly versatile design allows the gas exchangers to function optimally under different conditions and circumstances and to maintain congruent morphologies over a wide range of body size, shape and metabolic capacities. At the gas exchange level, sheet-flow design preponderates in the evolved gas exchangers; blood is efficiently exposed to the external respiratory medium. The respiratory capacity of a gas exchanger is comprehensively granted by refinements of structural features and functional processes. Modelling, mathematical integration of structural and functional parameters, provides a holistic view of the essence of the design of a gas exchanger.

  4. The effect of high temperatures on tropical forest gas exchange.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, C. E.; Goulden, M.; Miller, S.; Da Rocha, H.

    2006-12-01

    Further research is required to understand the sensitivity of tropical forest to climate warming. Previous research has shown that tropical forest photosynthesis decreases and respiration increases at high leaf temperatures and that tree growth is reduced in years with higher average air temperatures (Clark et al 2003). Models indicate that the climate related destruction of the Amazon forest will amplify global warming by 1.5¢ª C, resulting in a mean temperature increase of 5.5¢ª C, as compared with 4¢ª C without this carbon cycle feedback (Cox et al 2000). These studies demonstrate the importance of temperature on tropical forest gas exchange. At the LBA Tapajos km 83 site we determined what controls tropical leaf temperature and how temperature affects photosynthesis and respiration. Sunlit leaves were substantially warmer than air temperatures and this had a negative effect on photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. We used eddy flux data to compare intervals of 10 minute cloudy periods followed by 20 minute sunny periods to see if similar trends could be seen at both the leaf and canopy level. The longer the sunny interval the warmer the canopy became and canopy conductance and CO2 exchange declined correspondingly. As the canopy warmed u* increased which increased turbulence and kept the canopy temperature from rising more. Long light intervals can cause heat stress in tropical forests but due to the very cloudy nature of the tropics such intervals are rare. However, if the tropics become both warmer and less cloudy such heat stress will increase.

  5. Respiratory gas exchange using a triaxial alveolar gas diagram.

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, J. F.; Pages, T.; Palacios, L.

    1993-01-01

    A triaxial alveolar gas diagram to depict fractional concentration of oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen is described, in which the R = 1 line is always implicit. Although it is not claimed that this representation leads to new insights into respiratory physiology, a method of plotting on a triaxial coordinate system has been found to be well suited to many applications when a direct display of fractional nitrogen concentration is required. PMID:8303637

  6. Analysis of effect of the solubility on gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, W. E., Jr.; Evans, J. W.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison is made of the gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lung models and in homogeneous lung models with the same total blood flow and ventilation. It is shown that the ratio of the rate of gas transfer of the inhomogeneous lung model over the rate of gas transfer of the homogeneous lung model as a function of gas solubility always has the qualitative features for gases with linear dissociation curves. This ratio is 1 for a gas with zero solubility and decreases to a single minimum. It subsequently rises to approach 1 as the solubility tends to infinity. The early portion of the graph of this function is convex, then after a single inflection point it is concave.

  7. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.; Hetz, Stefan K.; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production. PMID:21865257

  8. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  9. Gas Diodes for Thermoacoustic Self-circulating Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Greg; Backhaus, Scott

    2006-05-01

    An asymmetrical constriction in a pipe functions as an imperfect gas diode for acoustic oscillations in the gas in the pipe. One or more gas diodes in a resonant loop of pipe create substantial steady flow, which can carry substantial heat between a remote heat exchanger and a thermoacoustic or Stirling engine or refrigerator; the flow is driven directly by the oscillations in the engine or refrigerator itself. This invention gives Stirling and thermoacoustic devices unprecedented flexibility, and may lead to Stirling engines of unprecedented power. We have built two of these resonant self-circulating heat exchangers, one as a fundamental test bed and the other as a demonstration of practical levels of heat transfer. Measurements of flow and heat transfer are in factor-of-two agreement with either of two simple calculation methods. One calculation method treats the oscillating and steady flows as independent and simply superimposed, except in the gas diodes. The other method accounts for the interaction between the oscillating and steady flow with the quasi-steady approximation. The mutual influence of superimposed turbulent oscillating and steady flows is a theoretical challenge.

  10. Hybrid heat exchange for the compression capture of CO2 from recirculated flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2004-01-01

    An approach proposed for removal of CO2 from flue gas cools and compresses a portion of a recirculated flue-gas stream, condensing its volatile materials for capture. Recirculating the flue gas concentrates SOx, H2O and CO2 while dramatically reducing N2 and NOx, enabling this approach, which uses readily available industrial components. A hybrid system of indirect and direct-contact heat exchange performs heat and mass transfer for pollutant removal and energy recovery. Computer modeling and experimentation combine to investigate the thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, chemistry and engineering design of this integrated pollutant removal (IPR) system.

  11. The role of bubbles during air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Steven; Bushinsky, Seth

    2016-06-01

    The potential for using the air-sea exchange rate of oxygen as a tracer for net community biological production in the ocean is greatly enhanced by recent accuracy improvements for in situ measurements of oxygen on unmanned platforms. A limiting factor for determining the exchange process is evaluating the air-sea flux contributed by bubble processes produced by breaking waves, particularly during winter months under high winds. Highly accurate measurements of noble gases (Ne, Ar & Kr) and nitrogen, N2, in seawater are tracers of the importance of bubble process in the surface mixed layer. We use measured distributions of these gases in the ventilated thermocline of the North Pacific and an annual time series of N2 in the surface ocean of the NE Subarctic Pacific to evaluate four different air-water exchange models chosen to represent the range of model interpretation of bubble processes. We find that models must have an explicit bubble mechanism to reproduce concentrations of insoluble atmospheric gases, but there are periods when they all depart from observations. The recent model of Liang et al. (2013) stems from a highly resolved model of bubble plumes and categorizes bubble mechanisms into those that are small enough to collapse and larger ones that exchange gases before they resurface, both of which are necessary to explain the data.

  12. Leaf gas exchange traits of domestic and exotic tree species in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Tateishi, M.; Kumagai, T.; Otsuki, K.

    2009-12-01

    In forests under the management by community villagers, exotic tree species with rapid growth rate are introduced in wide range of Cambodia. To evaluate the influence of the introduction on the forest gas exchange and water budget, we investigated the leaf gas exchange traits of two domestic (Dipterocarpus obtusifolius and Shorea roxburghii) and exotic tree species (Acasia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus camadilansis). We sampled shoots of each species and measured the leaf gas exchange traits (photosynthetic rates under different CO2 concentrations, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance) (6 leaves x 3 trees x 4 species). We carried out this measurement at 2 months intervals for a year from the beginning of rainy season and compared the obtained traits among species. Light saturated rate of net photosynthesis was higher in E. camadilansis but did not differ among other species both in rainy and dry seasons. Seasonal patter in photosynthetic traits was not obvious. Each species changed stomatal conductance in response to changes in environmental conditions. The response was more sensitive than reported values. In this presentation, we show details about the basic information about the leaf-level gas exchange traits, which are required to run soil- vegetation - atmosphere transfer model.

  13. A novel technique for highly accurate gas exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkenings, R. K.; Jähne, B. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Heidelberg Aeolotron is a circular wind-wave facility for investigating air-sea gas exchange. In this contribution a novel technique for measuring highly accurate transfer velocities k of mass transfer will be presented. Traditionally, in mass balance techniques the constant of decay for gas concentrations over time is measured. The major drawback of this concept is the long time constant. At low wind speeds and a water height greater than 1 m the period of observation has to be several days. In a gas-tight facility such as the Aeolotron, the transfer velocity k can be computed from the concentration in the water body and the change of concentration in the gas space. Owing to this fact, transfer velocities are gained while greatly reducing the measuring times to less than one hour. The transfer velocity k of a tracer can be parameterized as k=1/β \\cdot u_* \\cdot Sc^n, with the Schmidt Number Sc, shear velocity u_* and the dimensionless transfer resistance β. The Schmidt Number exponent n can be derived from simultaneous measurements of different tracers. Since these tracers are of different Schmidt number, the shear velocity is not needed. To allow for Schmidt numbers spanning a hole decade, in our experiments He, H_2, N_2O and F12 are used. The relative accuracy of measuring the transfer velocity was improved to less than 2%. In 9 consecutive experiments conducted at a wind speed of 6.2 m/s, the deviation of the Schmidt number exponent was found to be just under 0.02. This high accuracy will allow precisely determining the transition of the Schmidt number exponent from n=2/3 to n=0.5 from a flat to wavy water surface. In order to quantify gas exchange not only the wind speed is important. Surfactants have a pronounced effect on the wave field and lead to a drastic reduction in the transfer velocity. In the Aeolotron measurements were conducted with a variety of measuring devices, ranging from an imaging slope gauge (ISG) to thermal techniques with IR

  14. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  15. Atmosphere-ocean gas exchange based on radiocarbon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byalko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, the intensity of global atmospheric convection has accelerated faster than climate warming; it is possible to judge this process from indirect data. Increasing ocean salinity contrasts provide evidence that evaporation has intensified [1]; sea surface wind velocities and wave heights have increased [2]. The CO2 gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean must also simultaneously increase. Monthly measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration have been published since 1958 [3], but directly measuring its fluxes from the atmosphere to the ocean and back is hardly possible. We show they can be reconstructed from 14C isotope concentration data. In the past century, two processes influenced the atmospheric 14C concentration in opposite directions: burning fossil fuels and testing nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. We compare the gas exchange theory with measurements of radiocarbon content in the atmosphere [4—6], which allows assessing the gas exchange quantitatively for the ocean to atmosphere and atmosphere to ocean fluxes separately for period 1960—2010 [7]. References 1. Durack P. J. and Wijffels S. E., J. Climate 23, 4342 (2010). 2. Young I. R., Sieger S., and Babanin A.V., Science 332, 451 (2011). 3. NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Data: ftp://ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccg/co2/trends/co2_mm_mlo.txt. 4. Nydal R., Lövseth K. // J. Geophys. Res. 1983. V. 88. P. 3579. 5. Levin I., Kromer B. // Radiocarbon. 1997. V. 39. P. 205. 6. Miller J.B., Lehman S.J., Montzka S.A., et al. // J. Geophys. Res. 2012. V. 117. D08302. 7. Byalko A.V. Doklady Physics, 2013. V. 58, 267-271.

  16. Gas exchange theory and the lactic acidosis (anaerobic) threshold.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, K; Beaver, W L; Whipp, B J

    1990-01-01

    The physiological requirements of performing exercise above the anaerobic threshold are considerably more demanding than for lower work rates. Lactic acidosis develops at a metabolic rate that is specific to the individual and the task being performed. Although numerous pyruvate-dependent mechanisms can lead to an elevated blood lactate, the increase in lactate during muscular exercise is accompanied by an increase in lactate/pyruvate ratio (i.e., increased NADH/NAD ratio). This is typically caused by an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria. Thus, the anaerobic threshold can be considered to be an important assessment of the ability of the cardiovascular system to supply O2 at a rate adequate to prevent muscle anaerobiosis during exercise testing. In this paper, we demonstrate, with statistical justification, that the pattern of arterial lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio increase during exercise evidences threshold dynamics rather than the continuous exponential increase proposed by some investigators. The pattern of change in arterial bicarbonate (HCO3-) and pulmonary gas exchange supports this threshold concept. To estimate the anaerobic threshold by gas exchange methods, we measure CO2 output (VCO2) as a continuous function of O2 uptake (VO2) (V-slope analysis) as work rate is increased. The break-point in this plot reflects the obligate buffering of increasing lactic acid production by HCO3-. The anaerobic threshold measured by the V-slope analysis appears to be a sensitive index of the development of metabolic acidosis even in subjects in whom other gas exchange indexes are insensitive, owing to irregular breathing, reduced chemoreceptor sensitivity, impaired respiratory mechanics, or all of these occurrences.

  17. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability.

  18. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability. PMID:24504355

  19. Steady-state canopy gas exchange: system design and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a commercial growth chamber for canopy photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration measurements. The system was designed to measure transpiration via water vapor fluxes, and the importance of this measurement is discussed. Procedures for continuous measurement of root-zone respiration are described, and new data is presented to dispel myths about sources of water vapor interference in photosynthesis and in the measurement of CO2 by infrared gas analysis. Mitchell (1992) has described the fundamentals of various approaches to measuring photosynthesis. Because our system evolved from experience with other types of single-leaf and canopy gas-exchange systems, it is useful to review advantages and disadvantages of different systems as they apply to various research objectives.

  20. Steady-state canopy gas exchange: system design and operation.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the use of a commercial growth chamber for canopy photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration measurements. The system was designed to measure transpiration via water vapor fluxes, and the importance of this measurement is discussed. Procedures for continuous measurement of root-zone respiration are described, and new data is presented to dispel myths about sources of water vapor interference in photosynthesis and in the measurement of CO2 by infrared gas analysis. Mitchell (1992) has described the fundamentals of various approaches to measuring photosynthesis. Because our system evolved from experience with other types of single-leaf and canopy gas-exchange systems, it is useful to review advantages and disadvantages of different systems as they apply to various research objectives.

  1. Results of mathematical modelling the kinetics of gaseous exchange through small channels in micro dischargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushin, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Results obtained using mathematical calculating models for physical processes of gaseous exchange through low-conductivity channels in the sealed envelopes of dischargers for various flow modes of indicative working gas are presented.

  2. Leaf gas exchange characteristics differ among Sonoran Desert riparian tree species.

    PubMed

    Horton, J L; Kolb, T E; Hart, S C

    2001-03-01

    We investigated leaf gas exchange responses to leaf temperature, leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and predawn and midday shoot water potential (psipd and psimd, respectively) of two native Sonoran Desert riparian tree species, Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii S. Wats.) and Goodding willow (Salix gooddingii Ball), and one exotic riparian tree species, saltcedar (Tamarix chinensis Lour. and related species). Measurements were made at two sites over 2 years that differed climatically. Because multiple linear regression models explained less than 29% of the variation in stomatal conductance (gs) and less than 48% of the variation in net photosynthetic rate (Pn) of all species, we used boundary-line analysis to compare gas exchange responses among species. Gas exchange rates were high in all species. The hyperbolic relationship between Pn and gs suggested that initial reductions in gs at high gs did not inhibit Pn. Reductions in gs of cottonwood and willow occurred at psimd values at or below previously reported xylem cavitation thresholds (-1.6 and -1.4 MPa, respectively), indicating tight stomatal regulation of water loss and a narrow cavitation safety margin. In contrast, reductions in gs of saltcedar occurred at psimd values well above the cavitation threshold (-7.0 MPa), but at much lower psimd values than in cottonwood and willow, suggesting a wider cavitation safety margin and less tight regulation of water loss in saltcedar. High VPD had a smaller effect on leaf gas exchange in willow than in cottonwood. In contrast, willow had a less negative psipd threshold for stomatal closure than cottonwood. Compared with cottonwood and willow, leaf gas exchange of saltcedar was more tolerant of high VPD and low psipd. These physiological characteristics of saltcedar explain its widespread success as an invader of riparian ecosystems containing native Fremont cottonwood and Goodding willow in the Sonoran Desert.

  3. Sulfur gas exchange in Sphagnum-dominated wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Demello, William Zamboni; Porter, Carolyn A.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S was investigated by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in trophic status. The effects of inorganic S input on the production and emission of gaseous S were also investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, fens within the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario, Canada and in freshwater and marine tundra. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods, and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed. Dissolved gases were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  4. Assimilate transport in phloem sets conditions for leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Nikinmaa, Eero; Hölttä, Teemu; Hari, Pertti; Kolari, Pasi; Mäkelä, Annikki; Sevanto, Sanna; Vesala, Timo

    2013-03-01

    Carbon uptake and transpiration in plant leaves occurs through stomata that open and close. Stomatal action is usually considered a response to environmental driving factors. Here we show that leaf gas exchange is more strongly related to whole tree level transport of assimilates than previously thought, and that transport of assimilates is a restriction of stomatal opening comparable with hydraulic limitation. Assimilate transport in the phloem requires that osmotic pressure at phloem loading sites in leaves exceeds the drop in hydrostatic pressure that is due to transpiration. Assimilate transport thus competes with transpiration for water. Excess sugar loading, however, may block the assimilate transport because of viscosity build-up in phloem sap. Therefore, for given conditions, there is a stomatal opening that maximizes phloem transport if we assume that sugar loading is proportional to photosynthetic rate. Here we show that such opening produces the observed behaviour of leaf gas exchange. Our approach connects stomatal regulation directly with sink activity, plant structure and soil water availability as they all influence assimilate transport. It produces similar behaviour as the optimal stomatal control approach, but does not require determination of marginal cost of water parameter. PMID:22934921

  5. Optimal allocation of leaf epidermal area for gas exchange.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Hugo J; Price, Charles A; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C; Franks, Peter J; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2016-06-01

    A long-standing research focus in phytology has been to understand how plants allocate leaf epidermal space to stomata in order to achieve an economic balance between the plant's carbon needs and water use. Here, we present a quantitative theoretical framework to predict allometric relationships between morphological stomatal traits in relation to leaf gas exchange and the required allocation of epidermal area to stomata. Our theoretical framework was derived from first principles of diffusion and geometry based on the hypothesis that selection for higher anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax ) involves a trade-off to minimize the fraction of the epidermis that is allocated to stomata. Predicted allometric relationships between stomatal traits were tested with a comprehensive compilation of published and unpublished data on 1057 species from all major clades. In support of our theoretical framework, stomatal traits of this phylogenetically diverse sample reflect spatially optimal allometry that minimizes investment in the allocation of epidermal area when plants evolve towards higher gsmax . Our results specifically highlight that the stomatal morphology of angiosperms evolved along spatially optimal allometric relationships. We propose that the resulting wide range of viable stomatal trait combinations equips angiosperms with developmental and evolutionary flexibility in leaf gas exchange unrivalled by gymnosperms and pteridophytes. PMID:26991124

  6. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    initially contained in the reservoir. This results deserves emphasis: whereas conventional guns apply a few percent of the reservoir pressure to a fast moving projectile, our design is paradoxically capable of applying nearly double the contained pressure. We later confirmed this experimental result analytically and related it to a type of direct energy exchange between unsteady fluid flows. This physical approach was the basis for the German V-1 ''buzz bomb'' of World War II; it has been applied to a limited number of commercial applications. (This work should not be confused with the German WWII distributed injection missile launchers.) Direct fluid-energy exchange has not previously been applied to any gas-launcher technology. As a result of these discoveries, we estimate that a practical, 15 km/s, high-velocity launcher could be built using our direct-energy-exchange, distributed-injection approach. However, the radical nature of the results, the lack of confirming or allied work being carried out anywhere else, and the fact that it would take extensive time and resources to demonstrate targeted performance precluded further development. We plan to submit the results to a refereed journal to ensure that the work will not be lost to the launcher community.

  7. Thermal Efficiency in a Direct Contact Heat Exchanger of Gas and Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Isamu; Tsuji, Katsuhiko

    Co-generation systems have many practical applications for energy-saving, utilization of various energy resources and energy recovery of waste gas. However, it is pointed out that heat exchangers of co-generation system involve some problems which are corrosion of heat surface, decrease of heat transfer rate due to accumulation of soot and NOx in waste gas. Then. the heat exchange which contacts waste gas with liquid are studied to solve the above problems. The contacting state of gas and liquid has not been researched on the direct contact heat exchanger of gas and liquid. For it is considered that the contacting state has direct effects on a thermal efficiency and gas absorption. Then, we try to investigate the contacting state of gas and liquid by experiments of heating and image processing on the direct contact heat exchanger. From the results, the contacting state of gas and liquid can be evaluate by a gas-liquid contacting area.

  8. Cryogenic Heat-Exchanger Design for Freeze-out Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Landfill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Chung, Myung Jin; Park, Seong Bum

    A cryogenic heat exchanger to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas (LFG) is proposed and designed for applications to LNG production in distributed-scale. Since the major components of LFG are methane and carbon dioxide, CO2 removal is a significant pre-process in the liquefaction systems. A new and simple approach is proposed to directly remove carbon dioxide as frost on the surface wall along the cooling passage in a liquefying heat exchanger and to install two identical heat exchangers in parallel for alternative switching. As a first step of feasibility study, combined heat and mass transfer analysis is performed on the freeze-out process of CO2 in a counterflow heat exchanger, where CH4-CO2 mixture is cooled below its frost temperature in thermal contact with cold refrigerant. Engineering correlations for the analogy of heat and mass transfer are incorporated into numerical heat exchanger analysis with detailed fluid properties. The developed analytical model is used to estimate the distribution of CO2 accumulation and the required heat exchanger size with latent thermal load for the cryogenic CO2 removal in various operating conditions.

  9. Experimental investigation of a reticulated porous alumina heat exchanger for high temperature gas heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Chandran, RB; Davidson, JH

    2015-01-22

    The present study presents an experimental study of a prototype counter-flow heat exchanger designed to recover sensible heat from inert and reactive gases flowing through a high temperature solar reactor for splitting CO2. The tube-in-tube heat exchanger is comprised of two concentric alumina tubes, each filled with reticulated porous alumina with a nominal porosity of 80% and pore density of 5 pores per inch (ppi). The RPC provides high heat transfer surface area per unit volume (917 m(-1)) with low pressure drop. Measurements include the permeability, inertial coefficient, overall heat transfer coefficient, effectiveness and pressure drop. For laminar flow and an inlet gas temperature of 1240 K, the overall heat transfer coefficients are 36-41 W m(-2) K-1. The measured performance is in good agreement with a prior CFD model of the heat exchanger. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimating gas exchange of CO2 and CH4 between headwater systems and the atmosphere in Southwest Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somlai, Celia; Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Bastviken, David; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the role of inland water systems in terms of carbon sinks and sources and their connection to the terrestrial ecosystems and landscapes is fundamental for improving the balance approach of regional and global carbon budgets. Recent research showed that freshwater bodies emit significant amounts of CO2 and CH4 into the atmosphere. The extent of the emissions from small streams and headwaters, however, remains uncertain due to a limited availability of data. Studies have shown that headwater systems receive most of the terrestrial organic carbon, have the highest dissolved CO2 concentration and the highest gas exchange velocities and cover the largest fractional surface area within fluvial networks. The gas exchange between inland waters and the atmosphere is controlled by two factors: the difference between the dissolved gas concentration and its atmospheric equilibrium concentration, and the gas exchange velocity. The direct measurement of the dissolved gas concentration of greenhouse gases can be measured straightforwardly, for example, by gas chromatography from headspace extraction of water sample. In contrast, direct measurement of gas exchange velocity is more complex and time consuming, as simultaneous measurements with a volatile and nonvolatile inert tracer gas are needed. Here we analyze measurements of gas exchange velocities, concentrations and fluxes of dissolved CO2 and CH4, as well as loads of total organic and inorganic carbon in 10 reaches in headwater streams in Southwest Sweden. We compare the gas exchange velocities measured directly through tracer injections with those estimated through various empirical approaches, which are based on modelled and measured current velocity, stream depth and slope. Furthermore, we estimate the resulting uncertainties of the flux estimates. We also present different time series of dissolved CO2, CH4 and O2 concentration, water temperature, barometric pressure, electro conductivity, and pH values

  11. Gas exchange of algae. IV. Reliability of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Ammann, E C; Fraser-Smith, A

    1968-05-01

    A single culture of Chlorella pyrenoidosa (700 ml) was grown continuously under uniform environmental conditions for a period of 11 months. During this time, the culture remained uncontaminated and its oxygen production, carbon dioxide consumption, and photosynthetic quotient (PQ = CO(2)/O(2)) were monitored on a 24-hr basis. The gas exchange characteristics of the alga were found to be extremely reliable; the average oxygen production was 1.21 +/- 0.03 ml per min, the carbon dioxide consumption was 1.09 +/- 0.03 ml per min, and the PQ was 0.90 +/- 0.01 when changes in both lamp intensity and instrument accuracy were taken into consideration. Such long-term dependability in the production of oxygen, consumption of carbon dioxide, and maintenance of a uniform PQ warrants the use of C. pyrenoidosa in a regenerative life support system for space travel.

  12. A Quantitative Tunneling/Desorption Model for the Exchange Current at the Porous Electrode/Beta - Alumina/Alkali Metal Gas Three Phase Zone at 700-1300K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; Saipetch, C.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    The exchange current observed at porous metal electrodes on sodium or potassium beta -alumina solid electrolytes in alkali metal vapor is quantitatively modeled with a multi-step process with good agreement with experimental results.

  13. Gas exchange dependency on diffusion coefficient: direct /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He comparisons in a small lake

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Mathieu, G.; Hesslein, R.H.; Broecker, W.S.

    1982-01-20

    A direct field comparison was conducted to determine the dependency of gas exchange coefficient (k/sub x/) on the diffusion coefficient (D/sub x/). The study also sought to confirm the enhanced vertical exchange properties of limnocorrals and similar enclosures. Gas exchange coefficients for /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He were determined in a small northern Ontario lake, using a /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H spike to gain the necessary precision. The results indicate that the gas exchange coefficient is functionally dependent on the diffusion coefficient raised to the 1.22/sub -35//sup + > 12/ power (k/sub x/ = f(D/sub x//sup 1.22)), clearly supporting the stagnant film model of gas exchange. Limnocorrals were found to have gas exchange rates up to 1.7 times higher than the whole lake in spite of the observation of more calm surface conditions in the corral than in the open lake. 33 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  14. A theory of exchange rate modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    The article examines exchange rate modeling for two cases: (a) when the trading partners have mutual interests and (b) when the trading partners have antogonistic interests. Exchange rates in world markets are determined by supply and demand for the currency of each state, and states may control the exchange rate of their currency by changing the interest rate, the volume of credit, and product prices in both domestic and export markets. Abstracting from issues of production and technology in different countries and also ignoring various trade, institutional, and other barriers, we consider in this article only the effect of export and import prices on the exchange rate, we propose a new criterion of external trade activity: each trading partner earns a profit which is proportional to the volume of benefits enjoyed by the other partner. We consider a trading cycle that consists of four stages: (a) purchase of goods in the domestic market with the object of selling them abroad; (b) sale of the goods in foreign markets; (c) purchase of goods abroad with the object of selling them in the domestic market; (d) sale of the goods domestically.

  15. Electrostatic enhancement of heat transfer in gas-to-gas heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohadi, M. M.

    1991-06-01

    Basic study of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) enhancement of heat transfer in heat exchangers was the subject of an investigation. The author's efforts over the three-year project time period can be categorized into three consecutive phases. In phase 1, EHD heat transfer enhancements and pressure drop characteristics for conventional pipe flows as a function of electric field potential, field polarity, number of electrodes (single or double configuration), and flow regime (Reynolds number ranging from fully laminar to fully turbulent conditions) were studied. Study of heat transfer enhancements and pressure drop characteristics in a shell-and-tube, gas-to-gas heat exchanger were performed in Phase 2 of the project. To address the applicability of the EHD technique under operating conditions of gas-fired equipment, the role of various working fluid properties were studied in Phase 3 of the project. Specifically, effects of working fluid humidity, temperature, pressure, and impurity level on the magnitude and nature of the EHD heat transfer enhancements were studied. A maximum of 322 percent heat transfer enhancement with only 112 percent increase in pressure drops was achieved under simultaneous excitation of the tube and shell sides of the heat exchanger in the study. With optimized electric and flow field parameters, much higher enhancements can be expected.

  16. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  17. Respiratory gas exchange of high altitude adapted chick embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wangensteen, O. D.; Rahn, H.; Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    Study of gas exchange by embryos from chickens acclimatized to an altitude of 3800 m. The oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure differences across the egg shell were measured and found to be less than the values previously reported for sea-level eggs by about a factor of two. Further measurements of embryonic oxygen consumption and shell conductivity to oxygen indicated that, compared to eggs at sea level, oxygen consumption was reduced by a factor of 0.58 while conductivity to oxygen was increased only by a factor of 1.07 in the high-altitude eggs. These independent measurements predict the change in oxygen partial pressure across the egg shell of the high-altitude eggs to be only 0.54 times that of sea-level eggs; the directly measured factor was 0.53. The authors conclude that at high altitude, a major adaptation of the chick embryo is a reduced metabolism which decreases the change in oxygen partial pressure across the egg shell since its gas conductivity remains essentially unchanged.

  18. BOREAS TE-9 In Situ Diurnal Gas Exchange of NAS Boreal Forest Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie; Dang, Qinglai

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. The purpose of the BOREAS TE-09 study was threefold: 1) to provide in situ gas exchange data that will be used to validate models of photosynthetic responses to light, temperature, and carbon dioxide (CO2); 2) to compare the photosynthetic responses of different tree crown levels (upper and lower); and 3) to characterize the diurnal water potential curves for these sites to get an indication of the extent to which soil moisture supply to leaves might be limiting photosynthesis. The gas exchange data of the BOREAS NSA were collected to characterize diurnal gas exchange and water potential of two canopy levels of five boreal canopy cover types: young jack pine, old jack pine, old aspen, lowland old black spruce, and upland black spruce. These data were collected between 27-May-1994 and 17-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. Gas exchange pattern transitions in the workers of the harvester termite.

    PubMed

    Inder, Isabelle M; Duncan, Frances D

    2015-04-01

    The evolutionary genesis and the current adaptive significance of the use of the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) for respiration by insects is the subject of intense debate. Years of research have resulted in several leading hypotheses, one of which is the emergent-property hypothesis. This hypothesis states that DGC is an emergent property or consequence of interactions between the O2 and CO2 set points that regulate spiracular function, i.e. opening and closing. Workers of the harvester termite, Hodotermes mossambicus were selected as a model to test this hypothesis. The respiratory patterns of major workers, investigated using flow-through respirometry, were obtained at 100% relative humidity (RH) under varying temperature to evaluate the assumptions of the emergent-property hypothesis. Metabolic rate, measured as VCO2 increased significantly after 15 °C. As VCO2 increased in response to increasing temperature and activity, the gas exchange pattern displayed by workers transitioned to a continuous gas exchange. A true DGC, defined as showing all three phases and a coefficient of variation value close to 2, was not expressed under the experimental conditions. The conclusion drawn from this study of termite workers is that changes in respiratory patterns are most likely an emergent property of the insects' nervous and respiratory system. PMID:25770978

  20. Gas exchange pattern transitions in the workers of the harvester termite.

    PubMed

    Inder, Isabelle M; Duncan, Frances D

    2015-04-01

    The evolutionary genesis and the current adaptive significance of the use of the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) for respiration by insects is the subject of intense debate. Years of research have resulted in several leading hypotheses, one of which is the emergent-property hypothesis. This hypothesis states that DGC is an emergent property or consequence of interactions between the O2 and CO2 set points that regulate spiracular function, i.e. opening and closing. Workers of the harvester termite, Hodotermes mossambicus were selected as a model to test this hypothesis. The respiratory patterns of major workers, investigated using flow-through respirometry, were obtained at 100% relative humidity (RH) under varying temperature to evaluate the assumptions of the emergent-property hypothesis. Metabolic rate, measured as VCO2 increased significantly after 15 °C. As VCO2 increased in response to increasing temperature and activity, the gas exchange pattern displayed by workers transitioned to a continuous gas exchange. A true DGC, defined as showing all three phases and a coefficient of variation value close to 2, was not expressed under the experimental conditions. The conclusion drawn from this study of termite workers is that changes in respiratory patterns are most likely an emergent property of the insects' nervous and respiratory system.

  1. Critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test: comparisons between exhaustion criteria, mathematical modeling, and correlation with gas exchange parameters.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, A; Miranda, M F; Gobatto, C A

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine and to compare the critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test (critical frequency - C F ) estimated from 5 mathematical models and using 2 different exhaustion criteria (voluntary and technical exhaustions). Also, it was an aim to assess the relationship between C F estimated from mathematical models and respiratory compensation point (RCP), peak oxygen uptake ( V˙O (2PEAK)) and minimal intensity at which V˙O (2PEAK) ( F V˙O (2PEAK)) appears. 9 male table tennis players [18(1) years; 62.3(4.4) kg] performed the maximal incremental test and 3-4 exhaustive exercise bouts to estimate C F s (balls · min (-1)). The exhaustion time and C F obtained were independent of the exhaustion criteria. The C F from 3-parameter model [45.2(7.0)-voluntary, 43.2(5.6)-technical] was lower than C F estimated by linear 2-parameter models, frequency-time (-1) [53.5(3.6)-voluntary, 53.5(3.5)-technical] and total ball thrown-time [52.2(3.5)-voluntary, 52.2(3.5)-technical] but significantly correlated. C F values from 2 linear models were significantly correlated with RCP [47.4(3.4) balls · min (-1)], and C F values of the linear and nonlinear models were correlated with F V˙O (2PEAK) [56.7(3.4) balls · min (-1)]. However, there were no significant correlations between C F values and V˙O (2PEAK) [49.8(1.1)ml · kg (-1) · min (-1)]. The results were not modified by exhaustion criteria. The 2 linear and non-linear 2-parameter models can be used to estimate aerobic endurance in specific table tennis tests. PMID:21563021

  2. Using a biochemical C4 photosynthesis model and combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements to estimate bundle-sheath conductance of maize leaves differing in age and nitrogen content.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinyou; Sun, Zhouping; Struik, Paul C; Van der Putten, Peter E L; Van Ieperen, Wim; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    Bundle-sheath conductance (g(bs) ) affects CO(2) leakiness, and, therefore, the efficiency of the CO(2) -concentrating mechanism (CCM) in C(4) photosynthesis. Whether and how g(bs) varies with leaf age and nitrogen status is virtually unknown. We used a C(4) -photosynthesis model to estimate g(bs) , based on combined measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence on fully expanded leaves of three different ages of maize (Zea mays L.) plants grown under two contrasting nitrogen levels. Nitrogen was replenished weekly to maintain leaf nitrogen content (LNC) at a similar level across the three leaf ages. The estimated g(bs) values on leaf-area basis ranged from 1.4 to 10.3 mmol m(-2) s(-1) and were affected more by LNC than by leaf age, although g(bs) tended to decrease as leaves became older. When converted to resistance (r(bs) = 1/g(bs)), r(bs) decreased monotonically with LNC. The correlation was presumably associated with nitrogen effects on leaf anatomy such as on wall thickness of bundle-sheath cells. Despite higher g(bs), meaning less efficient CCM, the calculated loss due to photorespiration was still low for high-nitrogen leaves. Under the condition of ambient CO(2) and saturating irradiance, photorespiratory loss accounted for 3-5% of fixed carbon for the high-nitrogen, versus 1-2% for the low-nitrogen, leaves. PMID:21883288

  3. Pulmonary and Cutaneous O[subscript 2] Gas Exchange: A Student Laboratory Exercise in the Frog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tattersall, Glenn J.; Currie, Suzanne; LeBlanc, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas exchange in animals is ultimately diffusion based, generally occurring across dedicated respiratory organs. In many aquatic amphibians, however, multiple modes of gas exchange exist, allowing for the partitioning of O[subscript 2] uptake and CO[subscript 2] excretion between respiratory organs with different efficiencies. For example, due to…

  4. Gas exchange in wetlands with emergent vegetation: The effects of wind and thermal convection at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Cristina M.; Variano, Evan A.

    2013-07-01

    Methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen are exchanged between wetlands and the atmosphere through multiple pathways. One of these pathways, the hydrodynamic transport of dissolved gas through the surface water, is often underestimated in importance. We constructed a model wetland in the laboratory with artificial emergent plants to investigate the mechanisms and magnitude of this transport. We measured gas transfer velocities, which characterize the near-surface stirring driving air-water gas transfer, while varying two stirring processes important to gas exchange in other aquatic environments: wind and thermal convection. To isolate the effects of thermal convection, we identified a semiempirical model for the gas transfer velocity as a function of surface heat loss. The laboratory results indicate that thermal convection will be the dominant mechanism of air-water gas exchange in marshes with emergent vegetation. Thermal convection yielded peak gas transfer velocities of 1 cm h-1. Because of the sheltering of the water surface by emergent vegetation, gas transfer velocities for wind-driven stirring alone are likely to exceed this value only in extreme cases.

  5. Polarized {sup 3}He gas compression system using metastability-exchange optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Hussey, D.S.; Rich, D.R.; Belov, A.S.; Tong, X.; Yang, H.; Bailey, C.; Keith, C.D.; Hartfield, J.; Hall, G.D.R.; Black, T.C.; Snow, W.M.; Gentile, T.R.; Chen, W.C.; Jones, G.L.; Wildman, E.

    2005-05-15

    Dense samples (10-100 bar cm) of nuclear spin polarized {sup 3}He are utilized in high energy physics, neutron scattering, atomic physics, and magnetic resonance imaging. Metastability exchange optical pumping can rapidly produce high {sup 3}He polarizations ({approx_equal}80%) at low pressures (few mbar). We describe a polarized {sup 3}He gas compressor system which accepts 0.26 bar l h{sup -1} of {sup 3}He gas polarized to 70% by a 4 W neodymium doped lanthanum magnesium hexaluminate (Nd:LMA) laser and compresses it into a 5 bar cm target with final polarization of 55%. The spin relaxation rates of the system's components have been measured using nuclear magnetic resonance and a model of the {sup 3}He polarization loss based on the measured relaxation rates and the gas flow is in agreement with a {sup 3}He polarization measurement using neutron transmission.

  6. Polarized 3He gas compression system using metastability-exchange optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, D. S.; Rich, D. R.; Belov, A. S.; Tong, X.; Yang, H.; Bailey, C.; Keith, C. D.; Hartfield, J.; Hall, G. D. R.; Black, T. C.; Snow, W. M.; Gentile, T. R.; Chen, W. C.; Jones, G. L.; Wildman, E.

    2005-05-01

    Dense samples (10-100barcm) of nuclear spin polarized He3 are utilized in high energy physics, neutron scattering, atomic physics, and magnetic resonance imaging. Metastability exchange optical pumping can rapidly produce high He3 polarizations (≈80%) at low pressures (few mbar). We describe a polarized He3 gas compressor system which accepts 0.26barlh-1 of He3 gas polarized to 70% by a 4W neodymium doped lanthanum magnesium hexaluminate (Nd:LMA) laser and compresses it into a 5barcm target with final polarization of 55%. The spin relaxation rates of the system's components have been measured using nuclear magnetic resonance and a model of the He3 polarization loss based on the measured relaxation rates and the gas flow is in agreement with a He3 polarization measurement using neutron transmission.

  7. Risk factors for transient dysfunction of gas exchange after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cristiane Delgado Alves; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; de Figueirêdo, Luciana Castilho; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras; Petrucci, Orlando; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective cohort study was preformed aiming to verify the presence of transient dysfunction of gas exchange in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and determine if this disorder is linked to cardiorespiratory events. Methods We included 942 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery and cardiac procedures who were referred to the Intensive Care Unit between June 2007 and November 2011. Results Fifteen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (2%), 199 (27.75%) had mild transient dysfunction of gas exchange, 402 (56.1%) had moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange, and 39 (5.4%) had severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange. Hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the emergence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange postoperatively (P=0.02 and P=0.019, respectively) and were risk factors for this dysfunction (P=0.0023 and P=0.0017, respectively). Diabetes mellitus was also a risk factor for transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.03). Pneumonia was present in 8.9% of cases and correlated with the presence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.001). Severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange was associated with patients who had renal replacement therapy (P=0.0005), hemotherapy (P=0.0001), enteral nutrition (P=0.0012), or cardiac arrhythmia (P=0.0451). Conclusion Preoperative hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the occurrence of postoperative transient dysfunction of gas exchange. The preoperative risk factors included hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and diabetes. Postoperatively, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, renal replacement therapy, hemotherapy, and cardiac arrhythmia were associated with the appearance of some degree of transient dysfunction of gas exchange, which was a risk factor for reintubation, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and cardiac

  8. Automatable Measurement of Gas Exchange Rate in Streams: Oxygen-Carbon Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, R.; Haggerty, R.; Argerich, A.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gas exchange rates between streams and the atmosphere are critically important to measurement of in-stream ecologic processes, as well as fate and transport of hazardous pollutants such as mercury and PCBs. Methods to estimate gas exchange rates include empirical relations to hydraulics, and direct injection of a tracer gas such as propane or SF6. Empirical relations are inconsistent and inaccurate, particularly for lower order, high-roughness streams. Gas injections are labor-intensive, and measured gas exchange rates are difficult to extrapolate in time since they change with discharge and stream geometry. We propose a novel method for calculation of gas exchange rates utilizing O2, pCO2, pH, and temperature data. Measurements, which can be automated using data loggers and probes, are made on the upstream and downstream end of the study reach. Gas exchange rates are then calculated from a solution to the transport equations for oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon. Field tests in steep, low order, high roughness streams of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest indicate the method to be viable along stream reaches with high downstream gas concentration gradients and high rates of gas transfer velocity. Automated and continuous collection of oxygen and carbonate chemistry data is increasingly common, thus the method may be used to estimate gas exchange rates through time, and is well suited for interactivity with databases.

  9. Cold ischemia with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion preserves gas exchange and mitochondrial homeostasis and curbs inflammation in an experimental model of donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Santelmo, Nicola; Noll, Eric; Charles, Anne-Laure; Benahmed, Malika; Canuet, Matthieu; Frossard, Nelly; Namer, Izzie J; Geny, Bernard; Massard, Gilbert; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional preservation of the lung graft with anterograde lung perfusion in a model of donation after cardiac death. Thirty minutes after cardiac arrest, in situ anterograde selective pulmonary cold perfusion was started in six swine. The alveolo-capillary membrane was challenged at 3, 6, and 8 h with measurements of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), the PaO2 /FiO2 ratio, the transpulmonary oxygen output (tpVO2 ), and the transpulmonary CO2 clearance (tpCO2 ). Mitochondrial homeostasis was investigated by measuring maximal oxidative capacity (Vmax ) and the coupling of phosphorylation to oxidation (ACR, acceptor control ratio) in lung biopsies. Inflammation and induction of primary immune response were assessed by measurement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Data were compared using repeated measures Anova. Pulmonary hemodynamics (mPAP: P = 0.69; PVR: P = 0.46), oxygenation (PaO2 /FiO2 : P = 0.56; tpVO2 : P = 0.46), CO2 diffusion (tpCO2 : P = 0.24), mitochondrial homeostasis (Vmax : P = 0.42; ACR: P = 0.8), and RAGE concentrations (P = 0.24) did not significantly change up to 8 h after cardiac arrest. TNFα and IL-6 were undetectable. Unaffected pulmonary hemodynamics, sustained oxygen and carbon dioxide diffusion, preserved mitochondrial homeostasis, and lack of inflammation suggest a long-lasting functional preservation of the graft with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion.

  10. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively.

  11. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively. PMID:27460608

  12. Double exchange model for magnetic hexaborides.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vitor M; Lopes dos Santos, J M B; Castro, Eduardo V; Neto, A H Castro

    2004-10-01

    A microscopic theory for rare-earth ferromagnetic hexaborides, such as Eu1-xCaxB6, is proposed on the basis of the double-exchange Hamiltonian. In these systems, the reduced carrier concentrations place the Fermi level near the mobility edge, introduced in the spectral density by the disordered spin background. We show that the transport properties such as the Hall effect, magnetoresistance, frequency dependent conductivity, and dc resistivity can be quantitatively described within the model. We also make specific predictions for the behavior of the Curie temperature T(C) as a function of the plasma frequency omega(p).

  13. Ethylene directly inhibits foliar gas exchange in Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, C.A.; Taylor, G.E. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Gas exchange of individual attached leaves of soybean, Glycine max (L,) Merr cv Davis, was monitored during exposure to exogenous ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) to test the hypothesis that the effects of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on net photosynthesis (P{sub n}) and stomatal conductance to H{sub 2}O{sub 4} vapor (g{sub s}) are direct and not mediated by changes in leaf orientation to light. Leaflets were held perpendicular to incident light in a temperature-controlled cuvette throughout a 5.5 hour exposure to 10 microliters per liter C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Declines in both P{sub N} and g{sub s} were evident within 2 hours and became more pronounced throughout the exposure period. In C{sub 2}H{sub 4} treated plants, P{sub N} and g{sub s} decreased to 80 and 62%, respectively, of the rates in control plants. Because epinastic movement of the leaflets was prohibited by the cuvette, the observed declines in P{sub N} and g{sub s} were a direct effect of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} rather than the result of reduced light interception caused by changing leaf angle.

  14. Gas circulation and mass exchange between animal and plant units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Hu, Enzhu

    To investigate the gas circulation and mass exchange relations among animal, plant and other biological units in the bioregenarative life support system, a closed cultivating system consisting of animal breeding chamber and plant growing chamber was established. This facility is 1.4 m high with the bottom area measuring 1.4 m X 0.8 m. In the animal chamber, silkworms in the multistage instars from the first instar to the third day in the fifth instar were bred; in the plant chamber, lettuce with sharp leaves were grown in a staggered manner. After transferring the silkworms in different instars hatched in the artificial climate box proportionally, utilizing mulberry leaves supplied from the outside of the closed cultivating system to feed the silkworms from the first instar to the third instar; fed the silkworms after the third instar to the third day in the fifth instar with the lettuce leaves grown in the closed facility, meanwhile, took out silkworms' excretion whose amount was in proportion to that of the mulberry leaves input into the facility. Furthermore, the silkworms on the third day in the fifth instar were took out to provide animal protein with high quality for astronauts at certain intervals and the next batch of the silkworms in the first instar were put into the animal chamber. In this cultivating process, the O2 cycle period and CO2 concentration change were investigated, moreover, the transfer and transforming ways of carbon and other elements were determined.

  15. Ethylene Directly Inhibits Foliar Gas Exchange in Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, C A; Taylor, G E

    1991-01-01

    Gas exchange of individual attached leaves of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr cv Davis, was monitored during exposure to exogenous ethylene (C(2)H(4)) to test the hypothesis that the effects of C(2)H(4) on net photosynthesis (P(N)) and stomatal conductance to H(2)O vapor (g(s)) are direct and not mediated by changes in leaf orientation to light. Leaflets were held perpendicular to incident light in a temperature-controlled cuvette throughout a 5.5 hour exposure to 10 microliters per liter C(2)H(4). Declines in both P(N) and g(s) were evident within 2 hours and became more pronounced throughout the exposure period. In C(2)H(4) treated plants, P(N) and g(s) decreased to 80 and 62%, respectively, of the rates in control plants. Because epinastic movement of the leaflets was prohibited by the cuvette, the observed declines in P(N) and g(s) were a direct effect of C(2)H(4) rather than the result of reduced light interception caused by changing leaf angle.

  16. Effects of Ozone on Gas Exchange in Invasive Forest Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, E. E.

    2006-12-01

    Evaluations of invasive plant biology have failed to investigate the relationship between leaf structure and effects of ozone among closely related native and non-native plants. When exposed to toxic pollutants plants with lower stomatal density and lower stomatal conductance might experience reduced exposure and consequently be more competitive. To test for systematic differences between invasive and native species, experiments assessed the stomatal density and stomatal conductance of nine non-native invasive species and thirteen native species. Field sites, used for forest surveys, centered on three urban areas including sites with differing ozone levels (low 0-60 ppb, medium 80-99 ppb, high 111-125+ ppb). Three sites were selected within each of the three urban areas, and surveys were taken at each of the nine sites determining the native and non-native plant composition. The low level sites had greater densities of native plants than the high ozone level sites. Leaf impressions revealed a significantly higher (t = 14.13, p < 0.0001) stomatal density for the natives, and a LI-COR 1600 showed significantly higher (Fndf,ddf = 12.88, p = 0.0004) stomatal conductance for native plants. Dissimilar gas-exchange capacities are likely to be linked to the observed differences in plant composition among study sites. The importance of addressing air and biotic pollution grows every year as human health, agriculture, and ecosystem function are negatively affected in new areas.

  17. Flight Simulation Model Exchange. Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center Review Board sponsored an assessment of the draft Standard, Flight Dynamics Model Exchange Standard, BSR/ANSI-S-119-201x (S-119) that was conducted by simulation and guidance, navigation, and control engineers from several NASA Centers. The assessment team reviewed the conventions and formats spelled out in the draft Standard and the actual implementation of two example aerodynamic models (a subsonic F-16 and the HL-20 lifting body) encoded in the Extensible Markup Language grammar. During the implementation, the team kept records of lessons learned and provided feedback to the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee representative. This document contains the appendices to the main report.

  18. Flight Simulation Model Exchange. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center Review Board sponsored an assessment of the draft Standard, Flight Dynamics Model Exchange Standard, BSR/ANSI-S-119-201x (S-119) that was conducted by simulation and guidance, navigation, and control engineers from several NASA Centers. The assessment team reviewed the conventions and formats spelled out in the draft Standard and the actual implementation of two example aerodynamic models (a subsonic F-16 and the HL-20 lifting body) encoded in the Extensible Markup Language grammar. During the implementation, the team kept records of lessons learned and provided feedback to the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee representative. This document contains the results of the assessment.

  19. Observations on gas exchange and element recycle within a gas-closed algal-mouse system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, D. T.; Wharton, R. A., Jr.; Averner, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Life support systems based on bioregeneration rely on the control and manipulation of organisms. Algae are potentially useful for a variety of Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) functions including the revitalization of atmospheres, production of food and for nitrogen fixation. The results of experiments conducted with a gas-closed algal-mouse system designed to investigate gas exchange phenomena under varying algal environmental conditions, and the ability of algae to utilize oxidized mouse solid waste are reported. Inherent instabilities exist between the uptake and release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) by the mouse and algae in a gas-closed system. Variations in light intensity and cell density alter the photosynthetic rate of the algae and enable short-term steady-state concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O2. Different nitrogen sources (urea and nitrate) result in different algal assimilatory quotients (AQ). Combinations of photosynthetic rate and AQ ratio manipulations were examined for their potential in stabilizing atmospheric gas concentrations in the gas-closed algal-mouse system.

  20. A mass balance method for non-intrusive measurements of surface-air trace gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denmead, O. T.; Harper, L. A.; Freney, J. R.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Leuning, R.; Sharpe, R. R.

    A mass balance method is described for calculating gas production from a surface or volume source in a small test plot from measurements of differences in the horizontal fluxes of the gas across upwind and downwind boundaries. It employs a square plot, 24 m×24 m, with measurements of gas concentration at four heights (up to 3.5 m) along each of the four boundaries. Gas concentrations are multiplied by the appropriate vector winds to yield the horizontal fluxes at each height on each boundary. The difference between these fluxes integrated over downwind and upwind boundaries represents production. Illustrations of the method, which involve exchanges of methane and carbon dioxide, are drawn from experiments with landfills, pastures and grazing animals. Tests included calculation of recovery rates from known gas releases and comparisons with a conventional micrometeorological approach and a backward dispersion model. The method performed satisfactorily in all cases. Its sensitivity for measuring exchanges of CO 2, CH 4 and N 2O in various scenarios was examined. As employed by us, the mass balance method can suffer from errors arising from the large number of gas analyses required for a flux determination, and becomes unreliable when there are light winds and variable wind directions. On the other hand, it is non-disturbing, has a simple theoretical basis, is independent of atmospheric stability or the shape of the wind profile, and is appropriate for flux measurement in situations where conventional micrometeorological methods can not be used, e.g. for small plots, elevated point sources, and heterogeneous surface sources.

  1. Surfactant control of gas transfer velocity along an offshore coastal transect: results from a laboratory gas exchange tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; Schneider-Zapp, K.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the physical and biogeochemical controls of air-sea gas exchange is necessary for establishing biogeochemical models for predicting regional- and global-scale trace gas fluxes and feedbacks. To this end we report the results of experiments designed to constrain the effect of surfactants in the sea surface microlayer (SML) on the gas transfer velocity (kw; cm h-1), seasonally (2012-2013) along a 20 km coastal transect (North East UK). We measured total surfactant activity (SA), chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and chlorophyll a (Chl a) in the SML and in sub-surface water (SSW) and we evaluated corresponding kw values using a custom-designed air-sea gas exchange tank. Temporal SA variability exceeded its spatial variability. Overall, SA varied 5-fold between all samples (0.08 to 0.38 mg L-1 T-X-100), being highest in the SML during summer. SML SA enrichment factors (EFs) relative to SSW were ˜ 1.0 to 1.9, except for two values (0.75; 0.89: February 2013). The range in corresponding k660 (kw for CO2 in seawater at 20 °C) was 6.8 to 22.0 cm h-1. The film factor R660 (the ratio of k660 for seawater to k660 for "clean", i.e. surfactant-free, laboratory water) was strongly correlated with SML SA (r ≥ 0.70, p ≤ 0.002, each n = 16). High SML SA typically corresponded to k660 suppressions ˜ 14 to 51 % relative to clean laboratory water, highlighting strong spatiotemporal gradients in gas exchange due to varying surfactant in these coastal waters. Such variability should be taken account of when evaluating marine trace gas sources and sinks. Total CDOM absorbance (250 to 450 nm), the CDOM spectral slope ratio (SR = S275 - 295/S350 - 400), the 250 : 365 nm CDOM absorption ratio (E2 : E3), and Chl a all indicated spatial and temporal signals in the quantity and composition of organic matter in the SML and SSW. This prompts us to hypothesise that spatiotemporal variation in R660 and its relationship with SA is a consequence of compositional

  2. The effect of wind and currents on gas exchange in an estuarine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Ledwell, J. R.; Bopp, R.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a non-volatile tracer to use in gas exchange experiments in laterally unconfined systems and to study applications of deliberate tracers in limnology and oceanography. Progress was made on both fronts but work on the development of the non-volatile tracer proved to be more difficult and labor intensive that anticipated so no field experiments using non-volatile tracers was performed as yet. In the search for a suitable non-volatile tracer for an ocean scale gas exchange experiment a tracer was discovered which does not have the required sensitivity for a large scale experiment, but is very easy to analyze and will be well suited for smaller experiments such as gas exchange determinations on rivers and streams. Sulfur hexafluoride, SF6, was used successfully as a volatile tracer along with tritium as a non-volatile tracer to study gas exchange rates from a primary stream. This is the first gas exchange experiment in which gas exchange rates were determined on a head water stream where significant groundwater input occurs along the reach. In conjunction with SF6, Radon-222 measurements were performed on the groundwater and in the stream. The feasibility of using a combination of SF6 and radon is being studied to determine groundwater inputs and gas exchange of rates in streams with significant groundwater input without using a non-volatile tracer.

  3. Models with inverse-square exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Z. N. C.; Haldane, F. D. M.

    1992-10-01

    A one-dimensional quantum N-body system of either fermions or bosons with SU(n) ``spins'' (or colors in particle physics language) interacting via inverse-square exchange is presented in this paper. A class of eigenstates of both the continuum and lattice version of the model Hamiltonians is constructed in terms of the Jastrow-product-type wave function. The class of states we construct in this paper corresponds to the ground state and the low-energy excitations of the model that can be described by the effective harmonic fluid Hamiltonian. By expanding the energy about the ground state we find the harmonic fluid parameters (i.e., the charge, spin velocities, etc.) explicitly. The correlation exponent and the compressibility are also found. As expected, the general harmonic relation [i.e., vS=(vNvJ)1/2] is satisfied among the charge and spin velocities.

  4. Gas exchange-wind speed relation measured with sulfur hexafluoride on a lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, R.; Broecker, W. S.; Ledwell, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-exchange processes control the uptake and release of various gases in natural systems such as oceans, rivers, and lakes. Not much is known about the effect of wind speed on gas exchange in such systems. In the experiment described here, sulfur hexafluoride was dissolved in lake water, and the rate of escape of the gas with wind speed (at wind speeds up to 6 meters per second) was determined over a 1-month period. A sharp change in the wind speed dependence of the gas-exchange coefficient was found at wind speeds of about 2.4 meters per second, in agreement with the results of wind-tunnel studies. However the gas-exchange coefficients at wind speeds above 3 meters per second were smaller than those observed in wind tunnels and are in agreement with earlier lake and ocean results.

  5. Effect of posture on regional gas exchange in pigs.

    PubMed

    Altemeier, William A; McKinney, Steve; Krueger, Melissa; Glenny, Robb W

    2004-12-01

    Although recent high-resolution studies demonstrate the importance of nongravitational determinants for both pulmonary blood flow and ventilation distributions, posture has a clear impact on whole lung gas exchange. Deterioration in arterial oxygenation with repositioning from prone to supine posture is caused by increased heterogeneity in the distribution of ventilation-to-perfusion ratios. This can result from increased heterogeneity in regional blood flow distribution, increased heterogeneity in regional ventilation distribution, decreased correlation between regional blood flow and ventilation, or some combination of the above (Wilson TA and Beck KC, J Appl Physiol 72: 2298-2304, 1992). We hypothesize that, although repositioning from prone to supine has relatively small effects on overall blood flow and ventilation distributions, regional changes are poorly correlated, resulting in regional ventilation-perfusion mismatch and reduction in alveolar oxygen tension. We report ventilation and perfusion distributions in seven anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs measured with aerosolized and injected microspheres. Total contributions of pulmonary structure and posture on ventilation and perfusion heterogeneities were quantified by using analysis of variance. Regional gradients of posture-mediated change in ventilation, perfusion, and calculated alveolar oxygen tension were examined in the caudocranial and ventrodorsal directions. We found that pulmonary structure was responsible for 74.0 +/- 4.7% of total ventilation heterogeneity and 63.3 +/- 4.2% of total blood flow heterogeneity. Posture-mediated redistribution was primarily oriented along the caudocranial axis for ventilation and along the ventrodorsal axis for blood flow. These mismatched changes reduced alveolar oxygen tension primarily in the dorsocaudal lung region. PMID:15298981

  6. Toxicodynamics of rigid polystyrene microparticles on pulmonary gas exchange in mice: Implications for microemboli-based drug delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, H.L.; Gao, D.; Li, S.; Massa, C.B.; Cervelli, J.; Deshmukh, M.; Joseph, L.B.; Laskin, D.L.; Sinko, P.J.

    2013-01-15

    The toxicodynamic relationship between the number and size of pulmonary microemboli resulting from uniformly sized, rigid polystyrene microparticles (MPs) administered intravenously and their potential effects on pulmonary gas exchange were investigated. CD-1 male mice (6–8 weeks) were intravenously administered 10, 25 and 45 μm diameter MPs. Oxygen hemoglobin saturation in the blood (SpO{sub 2}) was measured non-invasively using a pulse oximeter while varying inhaled oxygen concentration (F{sub I}O{sub 2}). The resulting data were fit to a physiologically based non-linear mathematical model that estimates 2 parameters: ventilation–perfusion ratio (V{sub A}/Q) and shunt (percentage of deoxygenated blood returning to systemic circulation). The number of MPs administered prior to a statistically significant reduction in normalized V{sub A}/Q was dependent on particle size. MP doses that resulted in a significant reduction in normalized V{sub A}/Q one day post-treatment were 4000, 40,000 and 550,000 MPs/g for 45, 25 and 10 μm MPs, respectively. The model estimated V{sub A}/Q and shunt returned to baseline levels 7 days post-treatment. Measuring SpO{sub 2} alone was not sufficient to observe changes in gas exchange; however, when combined with model-derived V{sub A}/Q and shunt early reversible toxicity from pulmonary microemboli was detected suggesting that the model and physical measurements are both required for assessing toxicity. Moreover, it appears that the MP load required to alter gas exchange in a mouse prior to lethality is significantly higher than the anticipated required MP dose for effective drug delivery. Overall, the current results indicate that the microemboli-based approach for targeted pulmonary drug delivery is potentially safe and should be further explored. -- Highlights: ► Murine pulmonary gas exchange after microembolization was non-invasively studied. ► A physiologically based model quantified impairment of pulmonary gas exchange.

  7. Effects of stomata clustering on leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-09-01

    A general theoretical framework for quantifying the stomatal clustering effects on leaf gaseous diffusive conductance was developed and tested. The theory accounts for stomatal spacing and interactions among 'gaseous concentration shells'. The theory was tested using the unique measurements of Dow et al. (2014) that have shown lower leaf diffusive conductance for a genotype of Arabidopsis thaliana with clustered stomata relative to uniformly distributed stomata of similar size and density. The model accounts for gaseous diffusion: through stomatal pores; via concentration shells forming at pore apertures that vary with stomata spacing and are thus altered by clustering; and across the adjacent air boundary layer. Analytical approximations were derived and validated using a numerical model for 3D diffusion equation. Stomata clustering increases the interactions among concentration shells resulting in larger diffusive resistance that may reduce fluxes by 5-15%. A similar reduction in conductance was found for clusters formed by networks of veins. The study resolves ambiguities found in the literature concerning stomata end-corrections and stomatal shape, and provides a new stomata density threshold for diffusive interactions of overlapping vapor shells. The predicted reduction in gaseous exchange due to clustering, suggests that guard cell function is impaired, limiting stomatal aperture opening.

  8. Long-term gas exchange characteristics as markers of deterioration in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aim In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) the architecture of the developing lungs and the ventilation of lung units are progressively affected, influencing intrapulmonary gas mixing and gas exchange. We examined the long-term course of blood gas measurements in relation to characteristics of lung function and the influence of different CFTR genotype upon this process. Methods Serial annual measurements of PaO2 and PaCO2 assessed in relation to lung function, providing functional residual capacity (FRCpleth), lung clearance index (LCI), trapped gas (VTG), airway resistance (sReff), and forced expiratory indices (FEV1, FEF50), were collected in 178 children (88 males; 90 females) with CF, over an age range of 5 to 18 years. Linear mixed model analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were used to define predominant lung function parameters influencing oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination. Results PaO2 decreased linearly from age 5 to 18 years, and was mainly associated with FRCpleth, (p < 0.0001), FEV1 (p < 0.001), FEF50 (p < 0.002), and LCI (p < 0.002), indicating that oxygenation was associated with the degree of pulmonary hyperinflation, ventilation inhomogeneities and impeded airway function. PaCO2 showed a transitory phase of low PaCO2 values, mainly during the age range of 5 to 12 years. Both PaO2 and PaCO2 presented with different progression slopes within specific CFTR genotypes. Conclusion In the long-term evaluation of gas exchange characteristics, an association with different lung function patterns was found and was closely related to specific genotypes. Early examination of blood gases may reveal hypocarbia, presumably reflecting compensatory mechanisms to improve oxygenation. PMID:19909502

  9. Nesting behaviour influences species-specific gas exchange across avian eggshells

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, Steven J.; Maurer, Golo; Thomas, Gavin H.; Hauber, Mark E.; Grim, Tomáš; Cassey, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Carefully controlled gas exchange across the eggshell is essential for the development of the avian embryo. Water vapour conductance (GH2O) across the shell, typically measured as mass loss during incubation, has been demonstrated to optimally ensure the healthy development of the embryo while avoiding desiccation. Accordingly, eggs exposed to sub-optimal gas exchange have reduced hatching success. We tested the association between eggshell GH2O and putative life-history correlates of adult birds, ecological nest parameters and physical characteristics of the egg itself to investigate how variation in GH2O has evolved to maintain optimal water loss across a diverse set of nest environments. We measured gas exchange through eggshell fragments in 151 British breeding bird species and fitted phylogenetically controlled, general linear models to test the relationship between GH2O and potential predictor parameters of each species. Of our 17 life-history traits, only two were retained in the final model: wet-incubating parent and nest type. Eggs of species where the parent habitually returned to the nest with wet plumage had significantly higher GH2O than those of parents that returned to the nest with dry plumage. Eggs of species nesting in ground burrows, cliffs and arboreal cups had significantly higher GH2O than those of species nesting on the ground in open nests or cups, in tree cavities and in shallow arboreal nests. Phylogenetic signal (measured as Pagel's λ) was intermediate in magnitude, suggesting that differences observed in the GH2O are dependent upon a combination of shared ancestry and species-specific life history and ecological traits. Although these data are correlational by nature, they are consistent with the hypothesis that parents constrained to return to the nest with wet plumage will increase the humidity of the nest environment, and the eggs of these species have evolved a higher GH2O to overcome this constraint and still achieve optimal water

  10. Pulmonary and cutaneous O₂gas exchange: a student laboratory exercise in the frog.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Glenn J; Currie, Suzanne; LeBlanc, Danielle M

    2013-03-01

    Gas exchange in animals is ultimately diffusion based, generally occurring across dedicated respiratory organs. In many aquatic amphibians, however, multiple modes of gas exchange exist, allowing for the partitioning of O2 uptake and CO2 excretion between respiratory organs with different efficiencies. For example, due to the physical properties of O2 being vastly different between air and water phases, the lung and skin play disproportionately important roles in O2 uptake. Many aquatic frogs are renowned for their cutaneous gas exchange capacity, where often the majority of CO2 is excreted across the skin. Furthermore, the roles of these gas exchange organs change with the animal's behavior. Under diving conditions, most of the frog's gas exchange needs must be met by the skin. In this article, we describe an interactive undergraduate laboratory that allows a class of students to share equipment while assessing pulmonary and cutaneous respiration in frogs provided with an air/water choice and under enforced dive conditions. Concepts explored in this laboratory exercise include animal energetics, diving reflex, pulmonary and cutaneous gas exchange processes, diffusion-based gas flux, and O2 debt.

  11. Operation of an ADR Using Helium Exchange Gas as a Substitute for a Failed Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  12. Operation of an ADR using helium exchange gas as a substitute for a failed heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 × 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  13. Effects of stomatal delays on the economics of leaf gas exchange under intermittent light regimes.

    PubMed

    Vico, Giulia; Manzoni, Stefano; Palmroth, Sari; Katul, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    • Understory plants are subjected to highly intermittent light availability and their leaf gas exchanges are mediated by delayed responses of stomata and leaf biochemistry to light fluctuations. In this article, the patterns in stomatal delays across biomes and plant functional types were studied and their effects on leaf carbon gains and water losses were quantified. • A database of more than 60 published datasets on stomatal responses to light fluctuations was assembled. To interpret these experimental observations, a leaf gas exchange model was developed and coupled to a novel formulation of stomatal movement energetics. The model was used to test whether stomatal delays optimize light capture for photosynthesis, whilst limiting transpiration and carbon costs for stomatal movement. • The data analysis showed that stomatal opening and closing delays occurred over a limited range of values and were strongly correlated. Plant functional type and climate were the most important drivers of stomatal delays, with faster responses in graminoids and species from dry climates. • Although perfectly tracking stomata would maximize photosynthesis and minimize transpiration at the expense of large opening costs, the observed combinations of opening and closure times appeared to be consistent with a near-optimal balance of carbon gain, water loss and movement costs. PMID:21851359

  14. Discontinuous gas exchange exhibition is a heritable trait in speckled cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, N G; Matthews, P G D; White, C R

    2013-07-01

    The regulation of insect respiratory gas exchange has long been an area of interest. In particular, the reason why insects from at least five orders exhibit patterns of gas exchange that include regular periods of spiracular closure has been the source of much controversy. Three adaptive hypotheses propose that these discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGCs) evolved to either limit water loss across respiratory surfaces, facilitate gas exchange in underground environments or to limit oxidative damage. It is possible that DGCs evolved independently multiple times and for different reasons, but for DGCs to be a plausible target for natural selection, they must be heritable and confer a fitness benefit. In a previous study of cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea, we demonstrated that DGCs are repeatable and extend survival under food and water restriction. Here, we show for the first time that DGCs are heritable, suggesting that they are a plausible target for natural selection.

  15. [Prone position: effect on gas exchange and functional capacity for exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bastidas-L, Andrea Carolina; Colina-Chourio, José A; Guevara, Jesnel M; Nunez, Alexis

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate gas exchange and cardiopulmonary functional behavior in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) before, during and after the change to a prone position. Thirty patients with PH and alterations in gas exchange were included in the study. Gas exchange measurements were performed in four stages: at the baseline supine position and after 30, 120 and 240 minutes in prone position. Also, the patients were evaluated by the six minutes walking test (6MWT) after 30 days in prone position during night's sleep. After four hours in prone position, all patients showed an increase of PaO2 and arterial saturation of oxygen (SaO2), with a decrease of intrapulmonary shunts, improving the gas exchange and therefore the physiological demand imposed by exercise in patients with PH. PMID:25920183

  16. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  17. Isotope exchange kinetics in metal hydrides I : TPLUG model.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Rich; James, Scott Carlton; Nilson, Robert H.

    2011-05-01

    A one-dimensional isobaric reactor model is used to simulate hydrogen isotope exchange processes taking place during flow through a powdered palladium bed. This simple model is designed to serve primarily as a platform for the initial development of detailed chemical mechanisms that can then be refined with the aid of more complex reactor descriptions. The one-dimensional model is based on the Sandia in-house code TPLUG, which solves a transient set of governing equations including an overall mass balance for the gas phase, material balances for all of the gas-phase and surface species, and an ideal gas equation of state. An energy equation can also be solved if thermodynamic properties for all of the species involved are known. The code is coupled with the Chemkin package to facilitate the incorporation of arbitrary multistep reaction mechanisms into the simulations. This capability is used here to test and optimize a basic mechanism describing the surface chemistry at or near the interface between the gas phase and a palladium particle. The mechanism includes reversible dissociative adsorptions of the three gas-phase species on the particle surface as well as atomic migrations between the surface and the bulk. The migration steps are more general than those used previously in that they do not require simultaneous movement of two atoms in opposite directions; this makes possible the creation and destruction of bulk vacancies and thus allows the model to account for variations in the bulk stoichiometry with isotopic composition. The optimization code APPSPACK is used to adjust the mass-action rate constants so as to achieve the best possible fit to a given set of experimental data, subject to a set of rigorous thermodynamic constraints. When data for nearly isothermal and isobaric deuterium-to-hydrogen (D {yields} H) and hydrogen-to-deuterium (H {yields} D) exchanges are fitted simultaneously, results for the former are excellent, while those for the latter show

  18. Percolation in a kinetic opinion exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Anjan Kumar

    2012-02-01

    We study the percolation transition of the geometrical clusters in the square-lattice LCCC model [a kinetic opinion exchange model introduced by Lallouache, Chakrabarti, Chakraborti, and Chakrabarti, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.82.056112 82, 056112 (2010)] with the change in conviction and influencing parameter. The cluster is comprised of the adjacent sites having an opinion value greater than or equal to a prefixed threshold value of opinion (Ω). The transition point is different from that obtained for the transition of the order parameter (average opinion value) found by Lallouache Although the transition point varies with the change in the threshold value of the opinion, the critical exponents for the percolation transition obtained from the data collapses of the maximum cluster size, the cluster size distribution, and the Binder cumulant remain the same. The exponents are also independent of the values of conviction and influencing parameters, indicating the robustness of this transition. The exponents do not match any other known percolation exponents (e.g., the static Ising, dynamic Ising, and standard percolation). This means that the LCCC model belongs to a separate universality class.

  19. A Quantitative Model for the Exchange Current of Porous Molybdenum Electrodes on Sodium Beta-Alumina in Sodium Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; LeDuc, H.; Cortez, R. H.; Saipetch, C.; Shields, V.; Manatt, K.; Homer, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the exchange current developed for porous molybdenum electrodes on sodium beta-alumina ceramics in low pressure sodium vapor, but which has general applicability to gas/porous metal electrodes on solid electrolytes.

  20. Exchange interaction and oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.; Al'pern, A. V.; Sal'nikov, N. V.

    2006-10-15

    The exchange energy of the electron gas on a cylindrical surface in a constant magnetic field has been calculated. Analytical formulas describing the contribution of the exchange interaction into oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder have been obtained. It is shown that the magnetic response of the system exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases.

  1. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Blayne; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainty of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of benthic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water interface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2–6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models.

  2. Noninvasive detection of gas exchange rate by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Mao, Zongzhen; Wang, Bangde

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the relationship among the oxygen concentration in skeletal muscle tissues and the heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during incremental running exercises on a treadmill, a near-infrared spectroscopy muscle oxygen monitor system is employed to measure the relative change in muscle oxygenation, with the heart rate, oxygen uptake, production of carbon dioxide (VCO2) and respiratory exchange ratio are recorded synchronously. The results indicate parameters mentioned above present regular changes during the incremental exercise. High correlations are discovered between relative change of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and heart rate, oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio at the significance level (P=0.01). This research might introduce a new measurement technology and/or a novel biological monitoring parameter to the evaluation of physical function status, control the training intensity, estimation of the effectiveness of exercise. Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy; muscle oxygen concentration; heart rate; oxygen uptake; respiratory exchange ratio.

  3. Lake-Atmosphere Greenhouse Gas Exchange in Relation to Atmospheric Forcing and Water Clarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, J. J.; Ojala, A.; Mammarella, I.; Vesala, T.

    2015-12-01

    Even though lakes cover only 2 % of the world's land surface, it has been estimated that lakes release about 10 % of the carbon fixed annually by the terrestrial ecosystems back to the atmosphere. A critical parameter in the gas exchange estimates is the gas transfer velocity (k), which is governed by turbulence. The aim of our study was to assess the current global CO2 evasion estimates from lakes to the atmosphere by comparing parameterizations for kand the significance of wind and heat flux to the gas transfer in small lakes. To improve future predictions of gas evasion from lakes, we focused on the changes in water clarity and how they affect water column physics and processes in the air-water interface. We studied a small boreal lake and used the eddy covariance (EC) method for the high precision data needed, and therefore also aimed to improve the EC methodology on lakes. The air-water gas transfer was related to both wind and heat loss during times of seasonal stratification, but only to wind during autumn overturn. When wind-induced thermocline tilting and resulting spatial variability in surface water CO2 concentrations was accounted for, average k derived from the measurements dropped from 6.0 cm h-1 to 5.2 cm h-1. This was still over twice the estimate (2.2 cm h-1) calculated with a widely used model for kin lakes suggesting that the global estimates of gas evasion from lakes might be underestimations. Water clarity was a significant parameter defining the thermal stratification of the lake: a change from clear to dark water would lead to shorter stratification period and lower water column temperatures in small lakes and therefore have significant impact on the lake-atmosphere exchange processes. Figure 1. The isotherms of Lake Kuivajärvi throughout the open-water period 2013. The top left are the measured temperatures and the others are modeled with LAKE model using fixed light extinction coefficient, Kd. The horizontal dashed black line represents

  4. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow around arrays of cylinders at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers has been studied numerically, analytically and experimentally. Early results demonstrated that at flow around randomly oriented cylinders exhibits reduced turbulent length scales and reduced diffusivity when compared to similarly forced, unimpeded flows (Nepf 1999). While horizontal dispersion in flows through cylinder arrays has received considerable research attention, the case of vertical dispersion of reactive constituents has not. This case is relevant to the vertical transfer of dissolved gases in wetlands with emergent vegetation. We present results showing that the presence of vegetation can significantly enhance vertical transport, including gas transfer across the air-water interface. Specifically, we study a wind-sheared air-water interface in which randomly arrayed cylinders represent emergent vegetation. Wind is one of several processes that may govern physical dispersion of dissolved gases in wetlands. Wind represents the dominant force for gas transfer across the air-water interface in the ocean. Empirical relationships between wind and the gas transfer coefficient, k, have been used to estimate spatial variability of CO2 exchange across the worlds’ oceans. Because wetlands with emergent vegetation are different from oceans, different model of wind effects is needed. We investigated the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen in a scaled wetland model built inside a laboratory tank equipped with an open-ended wind tunnel. Plastic tubing immersed in water to a depth of approximately 40 cm represented emergent vegetation of cylindrical form such as hard-stem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). After partially removing the oxygen from the tank water via reaction with sodium sulfite, we used an optical probe to measure dissolved oxygen at mid-depth as the tank water re-equilibrated with the air above. We used dissolved oxygen time-series for a range of mean wind speeds to estimate the

  5. Excretion-retention diagram to evaluate gas exchange properties of vertebrate respiratory systems.

    PubMed

    Zwart, A; Luijendijk, S C

    1982-09-01

    Excretion [E = (PE - PI)/(PV - PI)] and retention [R = (Pa - PI)/(PV -PI)]are completely model-free defined variables which describe the dual input-output black-box representation of vertebrate respiratory systems under steady-state conditions. In the excretion-retention diagram (E-R diagram), E is plotted as a function of R. The application of the principle of mass conservation confines the possible combinations of E and R for a gas with a blood-gas partition coefficient, lambda, in a respiratory system with an overall ventilation, VT, and an overall perfusion, QT, to E = (lambda QT/VT) (1 - R). In general, E can be described as a continuous function of R. The mathematical formulation of this function depends on the configuration of the respiratory system. Easily recognizable curvatures are obtained for counter-cross, and cocurrent systems with and without parallel inhomogeneities. Visual inspection of actual E and R data displayed in an E-R diagram therefore allows the correct choice of the configuration of the respiratory system to be eventually used for further parameter estimation schemes. The E-R diagram is also a powerful tutorial tool for visualizing the complex relationships between the gas exchange of agents with different physical properties and the consequences of changes in ventilation and perfusion distribution within the respiratory system on gas transport.

  6. Effect of Adding a Regenerator to Kornhauser's MIT "Two-Space" (Gas-Spring+Heat Exchanger) Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Gidugu, Praveen

    2008-01-01

    This study employed entropy-based second law post-processing analysis to characterize the various thermodynamic losses inside a 3-space solution domain (gas spring+heat exchanger+regenerator) operating under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating flow. The 3- space solution domain is adapted from the 2-space solution domain (gas spring+heat exchanger) in Kornhauser's MIT test rig by modifying the heat exchanger space to include a porous regenerator system. A thermal nonequilibrium model which assumes that the regenerator porous matrix and gas average temperatures can differ by several degrees at a given axial location and time during the cycle is employed. An important and primary objective of this study is the development and application of a thermodynamic loss post-processor to characterize the major thermodynamic losses inside the 3-space model. It is anticipated that the experience gained from thermodynamic loss analysis of the simple 3-space model can be extrapolated to more complex systems like the Stirling engine. It is hoped that successful development of loss post-processors will facilitate the improvement of the optimization capability of Stirling engine analysis codes through better understanding of the heat transfer and power losses. It is also anticipated that the incorporation of a successful thermal nonequilibrium model of the regenerator in Stirling engine CFD analysis codes, will improve our ability to accurately model Stirling regenerators relative to current multidimensional thermal-equilibrium porous media models.

  7. Hydraulically actuated gas exchange valve assembly and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Thomas S.; Taylor, Gregory O.

    2002-09-03

    An engine comprises a housing that defines a hollow piston cavity that is separated from a gas passage by a valve seat. The housing further defines a biasing hydraulic cavity and a control hydraulic cavity. A gas valve member is also included in the engine and is movable relative to the valve seat between an open position at which the hollow piston cavity is open to the gas passage and a closed position in which the hollow piston cavity is blocked from the gas passage. The gas valve member includes a ring mounted on a valve piece and a retainer positioned between the ring and the valve piece. A closing hydraulic surface is included on the gas valve member and is exposed to liquid pressure in the biasing hydraulic cavity.

  8. Respiratory dynamics of discontinuous gas exchange in the tracheal system of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Hetz, Stefan K; Chown, Steven L; Terblanche, John S

    2012-07-01

    Gas exchange dynamics in insects is of fundamental importance to understanding evolved variation in breathing patterns, such as discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). Most insects do not rely solely on diffusion for the exchange of respiratory gases but may also make use of respiratory movements (active ventilation) to supplement gas exchange at rest. However, their temporal dynamics have not been widely investigated. Here, intratracheal pressure, V(CO2) and body movements of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria were measured simultaneously during the DGC and revealed several important aspects of gas exchange dynamics. First, S. gregaria employs two different ventilatory strategies, one involving dorso-ventral contractions and the other longitudinal telescoping movements. Second, although a true spiracular closed (C)-phase of the DGC could be identified by means of subatmospheric intratracheal pressure recordings, some CO(2) continued to be released. Third, strong pumping actions do not necessarily lead to CO(2) release and could be used to ensure mixing of gases in the closed tracheal system, or enhance water vapour reabsorption into the haemolymph from fluid-filled tracheole tips by increasing the hydrostatic pressure or forcing fluid into the haemocoel. Finally, this work showed that the C-phase of the DGC can occur at any pressure. These results provide further insights into the mechanistic basis of insect gas exchange. PMID:22675191

  9. High effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high-effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for thermal management in space is described. Heat is transferred by direct contact between fine droplets (approx. 100 to 300 micron diameter) of a suitable low vapor pressure liquid and an inert working gas. Complete separation of the droplet and gas media in the zero-g environment is accomplished by configuring the LDHX as a vortex chamber. The large heat transfer area presented by the small droplets permits heat exchanger effectiveness of 0.9 to 0.95 in a compact, lightweight geometry which avoids many of the limitations of conventional plate and fin or tube and shell heat exchangers, such as their tendency toward single point failure. The application of the LDHX in a high temperature Bryaton cycle is discussed to illustrate the performance and operational characteristics of this heat exchanger concept.

  10. High effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high-effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for thermal management in space is described. Heat is transferred by direct contact between fine droplets (approximately 100-300 microns in diameter) of a suitable low vapor pressure liquid and an inert working gas. Complete separation of the droplet and gas media in the zero-g environment is accomplished by configuring the LDHX as a vortex chamber.The large heat transfer area presented by the small droplets permits heat exchanger effectiveness of 0.9-0.95 in a compact, lightweight geometry which avoids many of the limitations of conventional plate and fin or tube and shell heat exchangers, such as their tendency toward single point failure. The application of the LDHX in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate the performance and operational characteristics of this new heat exchanger concept.

  11. Radiation from Large Gas Volumes and Heat Exchange in Steam Boiler Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A. N.

    2015-09-15

    Radiation from large cylindrical gas volumes is studied as a means of simulating the flare in steam boiler furnaces. Calculations of heat exchange in a furnace by the zonal method and by simulation of the flare with cylindrical gas volumes are described. The latter method is more accurate and yields more reliable information on heat transfer processes taking place in furnaces.

  12. Multiphysics Model of Palladium Hydride Isotope Exchange Accounting for Higher Dimensionality

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Eliassi, Mehdi; Bon, Bradley Luis

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes computational model developm ent and simulations results for a series of isotope exchange dynamics experiments i ncluding long and thin isothermal beds similar to the Foltz and Melius beds and a lar ger non-isothermal experiment on the NENG7 test bed. The multiphysics 2D axi-symmetr ic model simulates the temperature and pressure dependent exchange reactio n kinetics, pressure and isotope dependent stoichiometry, heat generation from the r eaction, reacting gas flow through porous media, and non-uniformities in the bed perme ability. The new model is now able to replicate the curved reaction front and asy mmetry of the exit gas mass fractions over time. The improved understanding of the exchange process and its dependence on the non-uniform bed properties and te mperatures in these larger systems is critical to the future design of such sy stems.

  13. Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B.

    2008-07-01

    In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

  14. Modeling of temporal behavior of isotopic exchange between gaseous hydrogen and palladium hydride power

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C F; Foltz, G W

    1987-01-01

    A parametric rate-equation model is described which depicts the time dependent behavior of the isotopic exchange process occurring between the solid and gas phases in gaseous hydrogen (deuterium) flows through packed-powder palladium deuteride (hydride) beds. The exchange mechanism is assumed to be rate-limited by processes taking place on the surface of the powder. The fundamental kinetic parameter of the model is the isotopic exchange probability, p, which is the probability that an isotopic exchange event occurs during a collision of a gas phase atom with the surface. Isotope effects between the gas and solid phases are explicitly included in terms of the isotope separation factor, ..cap alpha... Results of the model are compared with recent experimental measurements of isotope exchange in the ..beta..-phase hydrogen/palladium system and, using a literature value of ..cap alpha.. = 2.4, a good description of the experimental data is obtained for p approx. 10/sup -7/. In view of the importance of the isotope effects in the hydrogen/palladium system and the range of ..cap alpha.. values reported for the ..beta..-phase in the literature, the sensitivity of the model results to a variation in the value of ..cap alpha.. is examined.

  15. A Scale Model of Cation Exchange for Classroom Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guertal, E. A.; Hattey, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a project that developed a scale model of cation exchange that can be used for a classroom demonstration. The model uses kaolinite clay, nails, plywood, and foam balls to enable students to gain a better understanding of the exchange complex of soil clays. (DDR)

  16. An Activity Model to Demonstrate Countercurrent Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the scant coverage in high school textbooks of countercurrent exchange for the efficient movement of molecules across biological membranes. Argues that this is one of the most intriguing of the physiological adaptive mechanisms. (DDR)

  17. Review of the findings of the Ignik Sikumi CO2-CH4 gas hydrate exchange field trial

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian J.; Boswell, Ray; Collett, Tim S.; Farrell, Helen; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; White, Mark D.

    2014-08-01

    The Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Exchange Field Trial was conducted by ConocoPhillips in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas, and Metals National Corporation, and the U.S. Geological Survey within the Prudhoe Bay Unit on the Alaska North Slope (ANS) during 2011 and 2012. The 2011 field program included drilling the vertical test well and performing extensive wireline logging through a thick section of gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs that provided substantial new insight into the nature of ANS gas hydrate occurrences. The 2012 field program involved an extended, scientific field trial conducted within a single vertical well (“huff-and-puff” design) through three primary operational phases: 1) injection of a gaseous phase mixture of CO2, N2, and chemical tracers; 2) flowback conducted at down-hole pressures above the stability threshold for native CH4-hydrate, and 3) extended (30-days) flowback at pressures below the stability threshold of native CH4-hydrate. Ignik Sikumi represents the first field investigation of gas hydrate response to chemical injection, and the longest-duration field reservoir response experiment yet conducted. Full descriptions of the operations and data collected have been fully reported by ConocoPhillips and are available to the science community. The 2011 field program indicated the presence of free water within the gas hydrate reservoir, a finding with significant implications to the design of the exchange trial – most notably the use of a mixed gas injectant. While this decision resulted in a complex chemical environment within the reservoir that greatly tests current experimental and modeling capabilities – without such a mixture, it is apparent that injection could not have been achieved. While interpretation of the field data are continuing, the primary scientific findings and implications of the program are: 1) gas hydrate destabilizing is self-limiting, dispelling any notion of the potential for

  18. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  19. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N2 bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N2 bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N2 sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, “semi-unfolded” ↔ “native” ↔ “globally unfolded” → “aggregated”. This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  20. More than just CO2: Multiple trace gas exchange measurements at a temperate mountain grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Bamberger, Ines; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Ecosystems exchange a large number of different trace gases to/from the atmosphere, however the vast majority of FLUXNET sites quantifies only the fluxes of carbon dioxide and when assessing the carbon or greenhouse gas balance neglect other carbon or greenhouse gas fluxes. This causes an overestimation of the role of carbon dioxid exchange for the ecosystem carbon and greenhouse gas balance, the magnitude of which is largely unconstrained Here we use the eddy covariance method (and variants thereof) with a large variety of analytical methods to quantify the exchange of multiple trace gases to/from a mountain grassland, partly for a time period of over a decade. The monitored trace gas fluxes cover: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide and several volatile organic compounds. The main result of our study is that carbon dioxide is the major contributor to the gaseous carbon and greenhouse gas budget at this temperate mountain grassland, which however may be significantly modulated by other trace gases may, at least during some years. Differences between source and sink periods for the different trace gases and the underlying drivers are discussed and annual budgets, for some compounds covering multiple years up to decades, are presented. We conclude that multiple trace gas flux measurements help to elucidate the importance of the exchange of carbon dioxide for the ecosystem carbon and greenhouse gas budget.

  1. Carbon gas exchange at a southern Rocky Mountain wetland, 1996-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickland, K.P.; Striegl, R.G.; Mast, M.A.; Clow, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) exchange between the atmosphere and a subalpine wetland located in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, at 3200 m elevation were measured during 1996-1998. Respiration, net CO2 flux, and CH4 flux were measured using the closed chamber method during snow-free periods and using gas diffusion calculations during snow-covered periods. The ranges of measured flux were 1.2-526 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 (respiration), -1056-100 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 (net CO2 exchange), and 0.1-36.8 mmol CH4 m-2 d-1 (a positive value represents efflux to the atmosphere). Respiration and CH4 emission were significantly correlated with 5 cm soil temperature. Annual respiration and CH4 emission were modeled by applying the flux-temperature relationships to a continuous soil temperature record during 1996-1998. Gross photosynthesis was modeled using a hyperbolic equation relating gross photosynthesis, photon flux density, and soil temperature. Modeled annual flux estimates indicate that the wetland was a net source of carbon gas to the atmosphere each of the three years: 8.9 mol C m-2 yr-1 in 1996, 9.5 mol C m-2 yr-1 in 1997, and 9.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 in 1998. This contrasts with the long-term carbon accumulation of ???0.7 mol m-2 yr-1 determined from 14C analyses of a peat core collected from the wetland.

  2. Discontinuous gas exchange, water loss, and metabolism in Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; White, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    Insects are at high risk of desiccation because of their small size, high surface-area-to-volume ratio, and air-filled tracheal system that ramifies throughout their bodies to transport O(2) and CO(2) to and from respiring cells. Although the tracheal system offers a high-conductance pathway for the movement of respiratory gases, it has the unintended consequence of allowing respiratory transpiration to the atmosphere. When resting, many species exchange respiratory gases discontinuously, and an early hypothesis for the origin of these discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) is that they serve to reduce respiratory water loss. In this study, we test this "hygric" hypothesis by comparing rates of CO(2) exchange and water loss among flower beetles Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae) breathing either continuously or discontinuously. We show that, consistent with the expectations of the hygric hypothesis, rates of total water loss are higher during continuous gas exchange than during discontinuous gas exchange and that the ratio of respiratory water loss to CO(2) exchange is lower during discontinuous gas exchange. This conclusion is in agreement with other studies of beetles and cockroaches that also support the hygric hypothesis. However, this result does not exclude other adaptive hypotheses supported by work on ants and moth pupae. This ambiguity may arise because there are multiple independent evolutionary origins of DGCs and no single adaptive function underlying their genesis. Alternatively, the observed reduction in water loss during DGCs may be a side effect of a nonadaptive gas exchange pattern that is elicited during periods of inactivity.

  3. Discontinuous gas exchange, water loss, and metabolism in Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; White, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    Insects are at high risk of desiccation because of their small size, high surface-area-to-volume ratio, and air-filled tracheal system that ramifies throughout their bodies to transport O(2) and CO(2) to and from respiring cells. Although the tracheal system offers a high-conductance pathway for the movement of respiratory gases, it has the unintended consequence of allowing respiratory transpiration to the atmosphere. When resting, many species exchange respiratory gases discontinuously, and an early hypothesis for the origin of these discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) is that they serve to reduce respiratory water loss. In this study, we test this "hygric" hypothesis by comparing rates of CO(2) exchange and water loss among flower beetles Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae) breathing either continuously or discontinuously. We show that, consistent with the expectations of the hygric hypothesis, rates of total water loss are higher during continuous gas exchange than during discontinuous gas exchange and that the ratio of respiratory water loss to CO(2) exchange is lower during discontinuous gas exchange. This conclusion is in agreement with other studies of beetles and cockroaches that also support the hygric hypothesis. However, this result does not exclude other adaptive hypotheses supported by work on ants and moth pupae. This ambiguity may arise because there are multiple independent evolutionary origins of DGCs and no single adaptive function underlying their genesis. Alternatively, the observed reduction in water loss during DGCs may be a side effect of a nonadaptive gas exchange pattern that is elicited during periods of inactivity. PMID:22418709

  4. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayo, W. S.; Urrutia, J. D.; Temple, J. M. F.; Sandoval, J. R. D.; Sanglay, J. E. A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a time series model of the Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index and its volatility using the finite mixture of ARIMA model with conditional variance equations such as ARCH, GARCH, EG ARCH, TARCH and PARCH models. Also, the study aimed to find out the reason behind the behaviorof PSEi, that is, which of the economic variables - Consumer Price Index, crude oil price, foreign exchange rate, gold price, interest rate, money supply, price-earnings ratio, Producers’ Price Index and terms of trade - can be used in projecting future values of PSEi and this was examined using Granger Causality Test. The findings showed that the best time series model for Philippine Stock Exchange Composite index is ARIMA(1,1,5) - ARCH(1). Also, Consumer Price Index, crude oil price and foreign exchange rate are factors concluded to Granger cause Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index.

  5. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought. PMID:26868055

  6. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought. PMID:26868055

  7. Evaluation of Fiber Bundle Rotation for Enhancing Gas Exchange in a Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Eash, Heide J.; Mihelc, Kevin M.; Frankowski, Brain J.; Hattler, Brack G.; Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal through an intravenous respiratory assist catheter can be used as a means of treating patients with acute respiratory failure. We are beginning development efforts toward a new respiratory assist catheter with an insertional size <25F, which can be inserted percutaneously. In this study, we evaluated fiber bundle rotation as an improved mechanism for active mixing and enhanced gas exchange in intravenous respiratory assist catheters. Using a simple test apparatus of a rotating densely packed bundle of hollow fiber membranes, water and blood gas exchange levels were evaluated at various rotation speeds in a mock vena cava. At 12,000 RPM, maximum CO2 gas exchange rates were 449 and 523 mL/min per m², water and blood, respectively, but the rate of increase with increasing rotation rate diminished beyond 7500 RPM. These levels of gas exchange efficiency are two‐ to threefold greater than achieved in our previous respiratory catheters using balloon pulsation for active mixing. In preliminary hemolysis tests, which monitored plasma‐free hemoglobin levels in vitro over a period of 6 hours, we established that the rotating fiber bundle per se did not cause significant blood hemolysis compared with an intra‐aortic balloon pump. Accordingly, fiber bundle rotation appears to be a potential mechanism for increasing gas exchange and reducing insertional size in respiratory catheters. PMID:17515731

  8. Characterization techniques for gas diffusion layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvay, A.; Yli-Rantala, E.; Liu, C.-H.; Peng, X.-H.; Koski, P.; Cindrella, L.; Kauranen, P.; Wilde, P. M.; Kannan, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is one of the functional components that provide a support structure for gas and water transport. The GDL plays a crucial role when the oxidant is air, especially when the fuel cell operates in the higher current density region. There has been an exponential growth in research and development because the PEMFC has the potential to become the future energy source for automotive applications. In order to serve in this capacity, the GDL requires due innovative analysis and characterization toward performance and durability. It is possible to achieve the optimum fuel cell performance only by understanding the characteristics of GDLs such as structure, pore size, porosity, gas permeability, wettability, thermal and electrical conductivities, surface morphology and water management. This review attempts to bring together the characterization techniques for the essential properties of the GDLs as handy tools for R&D institutions. Topics are categorized based on the ex-situ and in-situ characterization techniques of GDLs along with related modeling and simulation. Recently reported techniques used for accelerated durability evaluation of the GDLs are also consolidated within the ex-situ and in-situ methods.

  9. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  11. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  12. Nonlocal energy-optimized kernel: Recovering second-order exchange in the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jefferson E.; Laricchia, Savio; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    2016-01-01

    In order to remedy some of the shortcomings of the random phase approximation (RPA) within adiabatic connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) density functional theory, we introduce a short-ranged, exchange-like kernel that is one-electron self-correlation free and exact for two-electron systems in the high-density limit. By tuning a free parameter in our model to recover an exact limit of the homogeneous electron gas correlation energy, we obtain a nonlocal, energy-optimized kernel that reduces the errors of RPA for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous solids. Using wave-vector symmetrization for the kernel, we also implement RPA renormalized perturbation theory for extended systems, and demonstrate its capability to describe the dominant correlation effects with a low-order expansion in both metallic and nonmetallic systems. The comparison of ACFD structural properties with experiment is also shown to be limited by the choice of norm-conserving pseudopotential.

  13. Protein hydrogen exchange: Testing current models

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J; Lim, Woon K; Bédard, Sabrina; Black, Ben E; Englander, S Walter

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the determinants of protein hydrogen exchange (HX), HX rates of most of the backbone amide hydrogens of Staphylococcal nuclease were measured by NMR methods. A modified analysis was used to improve accuracy for the faster hydrogens. HX rates of both near surface and well buried hydrogens are spread over more than 7 orders of magnitude. These results were compared with previous hypotheses for HX rate determination. Contrary to a common assumption, proximity to the surface of the native protein does not usually produce fast exchange. The slow HX rates for unprotected surface hydrogens are not well explained by local electrostatic field. The ability of buried hydrogens to exchange is not explained by a solvent penetration mechanism. The exchange rates of structurally protected hydrogens are not well predicted by algorithms that depend only on local interactions or only on transient unfolding reactions. These observations identify some of the present difficulties of HX rate prediction and suggest the need for returning to a detailed hydrogen by hydrogen analysis to examine the bases of structure-rate relationships, as described in the companion paper (Skinner et al., Protein Sci 2012;21:996–1005). PMID:22544567

  14. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  15. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  16. Direct-contact heat exchanger for swirling countercurrent flow of hot gas and finely divided solids: A parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. J.; Arman, B.

    1991-06-01

    A vertically oriented solid-to-gas direct-contact heat exchanger (DCHX) has been proposed for heat recovery in high temperature plants that process finely divided solids. The flows are countercurrent, with the inlet gas flow entering on the centerline and swirling strongly. Swirling enhances heat transfer and centrifuges the solid particles from the center to the wall in order to minimize entrainment and permit gravity separation. A computer program was written to calculate particle trajectories and heat transfer rates (and, therefore, temperature profiles) for gas and solid phases. The flow model considers interactions between the particles and the flow field of the gas. The results of the computer program showed that the introduction of swirl significantly reduced the vertical distance required to achieve a given thermal efficiency. The countercurrent flow arrangement achieves high thermal efficiency in one contacting stage, unlike existing cocurrent suspension preheater systems, which require four or five stages. The practical application of this design to the cement industry appears unlikely, because very low gas velocities and correspondingly large areas of cross-sectional flow are required to prevent elutriation of the 74 micron particles required for the chemical reactions. The computer program can be modified for spray-dryer applications by the addition of mass transfer terms and a spray-formation model. In addition, the concept of a swirling flow heat exchanger may be applicable to other processes in which larger and heavier particles are used.

  17. Greenhouse gas exchange in tropical mountain ecosystems in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerschlauer, Friederike; Kikoti, Imani; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Tropical mountain ecosystems with their mostly immense biodiversity are important regions for natural resources but also for agricultural production. Their supportive ecosystem processes are particularly vulnerable to the combined impacts of global warming and the conversion of natural to human-modified landscapes. Data of impacts of climate and land use change on soil-atmosphere interactions due to GHG (CO2, CH4, and N2O) exchange from these ecosystems are still scarce, in particular for Africa. Tropical forest soils are underestimated as sinks for atmospheric CH4 with regard to worldwide GHG budgets (Werner et al. 2007, J GEOPHYS RES Vol. 112). Even though these soils are an important source for the atmospheric N2O budget, N2O emissions from tropical forest ecosystems are still poorly characterized (Castaldi et al. 2013, Biogeosciences 10). To obtain an insight of GHG balances of selected ecosystems soil-atmosphere exchange of N2O, CH4 and CO2 was investigated along the southern slope of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. We will present results for tropical forests in three different altitudes (lower montane, Ocotea, and Podocarpus forest), home garden (extensive agro-forestry), and coffee plantation (intensive agro-forestry). Therefore we used a combined approach consisting of a laboratory parameterization experiment (3 temperature and 2 moisture levels) and in situ static chamber measurements for GHG exchange. Field measurements were conducted during different hygric seasons throughout two years. Seasonal variation of temperature and especially of soil moisture across the different ecosystems resulted in distinct differences in GHG exchange. In addition environmental parameters like soil bulk density and substrate availability varying in space strongly influenced the GHG fluxes within sites. The results from parameterization experiments and in situ measurements show that natural forest ecosystems and extensive land use had higher uptakes of CH4. For the investigated

  18. Gamma radiation effect on gas production in anion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traboulsi, A.; Labed, V.; Dauvois, V.; Dupuy, N.; Rebufa, C.

    2013-10-01

    Radiation-induced decomposition of Amberlite IRA400 anion exchange resin in hydroxide form by gamma radiolysis has been studied at various doses in different atmospheres (anaerobic, anaerobic with liquid water, and aerobic). The effect of these parameters on the degradation of ion exchange resins is rarely investigated in the literature. We focused on the radiolysis gases produced by resin degradation. When the resin was irradiated under anaerobic conditions with liquid water, the liquid phase over the resin was also analyzed to identify any possible water-soluble products released by degradation of the resin. The main products released are trimethylamine (TMA), molecular hydrogen (H2g) and carbon dioxide (CO2g). TMA and H2g are produced in all the irradiation atmospheres. However, TMA was in gaseous form under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and in aqueous form in presence of liquid water. In the latter conditions, TMAaq was associated with aqueous dimethylamine (DMAaq), monomethylamine (MMAaq) and ammonia (NH). CO2g is formed in the presence of oxygen due to oxidation of organic compounds present in the system, in particular the degradation products such as TMAg.

  19. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed.

  20. Naphthenic acids inhibit root water transport, gas exchange and leaf growth in aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, M; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2002-12-01

    Effects of sodium naphthenates (NAs) on root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and gas exchange processes were examined in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) seedlings grown in solution culture. Exposure of roots to NAs for 3-5 weeks significantly decreased Lp and stomatal conductance. Root-absorbed NAs also decreased leaf chlorophyll concentration, net photosynthesis and leaf growth. Short-term (< or = 2 h) exposure of excised roots to NAs significantly decreased root water flow (Qv) with a concomitant decline in root respiration. We conclude that NAs metabolically inhibited Lp, likely by affecting water channel activity, and that this inhibition could be responsible for the observed reductions in gas exchange and leaf growth.

  1. Relationship between gas exchange, wind speed, and radar backscatter in a large wind-wave tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Richard H.; Bliven, L. F.

    1991-01-01

    The relationships between the gas exchange, wind speed, friction velocity, and radar backscatter from the water surface was investigated using data obtained in a large water tank in the Delft (Netherlands) wind-wave tunnel, filled with water supersaturated with SF6, N2O, and CH4. Results indicate that the gas-transfer velocities of these substances were related to the wind speed with a power law dependence. Microwave backscatter from water surface was found to be related to gas transfer velocities by a relationship in the form k(gas) = a 10 exp (b A0), where k is the gas transfer velocity for the particular gas, the values of a and b are obtained from a least squares fit of the average backscatter cross section and gas transfer at 80 m, and A0 is the directional (azimuthal) averaged return.

  2. Deriving C4 photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence using an Excel tool: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The higher photosynthetic potential of C4 plants has led to extensive research over the past 50 years, including C4 -dominated natural biomes, crops such as maize, or for evaluating the transfer of C4 traits into C3 lineages. Photosynthetic gas exchange can be measured in air or in a 2% Oxygen mixture using readily available commercial gas exchange and modulated PSII fluorescence systems. Interpretation of these data, however, requires an understanding (or the development) of various modelling approaches, which limit the use by non-specialists. In this paper we present an accessible summary of the theory behind the analysis and derivation of C4 photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel Fitting Tool (EFT), making rigorous C4 data analysis accessible to a broader audience. Outputs include those defining C4 photochemical and biochemical efficiency, the rate of photorespiration, bundle sheath conductance to CO2 diffusion and the in vivo biochemical constants for PEP carboxylase. The EFT compares several methodological variants proposed by different investigators, allowing users to choose the level of complexity required to interpret data. We provide a complete analysis of gas exchange data on maize (as a model C4 organism and key global crop) to illustrate the approaches, their analysis and interpretation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26286697

  3. Deriving C4 photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence using an Excel tool: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The higher photosynthetic potential of C4 plants has led to extensive research over the past 50 years, including C4 -dominated natural biomes, crops such as maize, or for evaluating the transfer of C4 traits into C3 lineages. Photosynthetic gas exchange can be measured in air or in a 2% Oxygen mixture using readily available commercial gas exchange and modulated PSII fluorescence systems. Interpretation of these data, however, requires an understanding (or the development) of various modelling approaches, which limit the use by non-specialists. In this paper we present an accessible summary of the theory behind the analysis and derivation of C4 photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel Fitting Tool (EFT), making rigorous C4 data analysis accessible to a broader audience. Outputs include those defining C4 photochemical and biochemical efficiency, the rate of photorespiration, bundle sheath conductance to CO2 diffusion and the in vivo biochemical constants for PEP carboxylase. The EFT compares several methodological variants proposed by different investigators, allowing users to choose the level of complexity required to interpret data. We provide a complete analysis of gas exchange data on maize (as a model C4 organism and key global crop) to illustrate the approaches, their analysis and interpretation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Ferrokinetics: a biologic model for plasma iron exchange in man

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. D.; Marsaglia, G.; Eschbach, J. W.; Funk, D. D.; Finch, C. A.

    1970-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating internal iron kinetics. An early reflux associated with extravascular exchange and a late reflux associated with erythropoiesis are described. A biologic model of iron exchange is proposed in which erythron iron turnover is divided into an effective portion (iron fixed in circulating red cells) and wastage iron of erythropoiesis (late reflux). Nonerythroid iron exchange also has a fixed portion (parenchymal uptake) and an early reflux (lymphatic circuit), both of which correlate in amount with the amount of plasma iron. Ferrokinetic measurements in normal subjects and in various pathologic states are presented to validate the model. PMID:5411779

  5. Common Data Model for Neuroscience Data and Data Model Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Daniel; Knuth, Kevin H.; Abato, Michael; Erde, Steven M.; White, Thomas; DeBellis, Robert; Gardner, Esther P.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Generalizing the data models underlying two prototype neurophysiology databases, the authors describe and propose the Common Data Model (CDM) as a framework for federating a broad spectrum of disparate neuroscience information resources. Design: Each component of the CDM derives from one of five superclasses—data, site, method, model, and reference—or from relations defined between them. A hierarchic attribute-value scheme for metadata enables interoperability with variable tree depth to serve specific intra- or broad inter-domain queries. To mediate data exchange between disparate systems, the authors propose a set of XML-derived schema for describing not only data sets but data models. These include biophysical description markup language (BDML), which mediates interoperability between data resources by providing a meta-description for the CDM. Results: The set of superclasses potentially spans data needs of contemporary neuroscience. Data elements abstracted from neurophysiology time series and histogram data represent data sets that differ in dimension and concordance. Site elements transcend neurons to describe subcellular compartments, circuits, regions, or slices; non-neuroanatomic sites include sequences to patients. Methods and models are highly domain-dependent. Conclusions: True federation of data resources requires explicit public description, in a metalanguage, of the contents, query methods, data formats, and data models of each data resource. Any data model that can be derived from the defined superclasses is potentially conformant and interoperability can be enabled by recognition of BDML-described compatibilities. Such metadescriptions can buffer technologic changes. PMID:11141510

  6. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  7. Optimization of heat and mass transfers in counterflow corrugated-plate liquid-gas exchangers used in a greenhouse dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentounes, N.; Jaffrin, A.

    1998-09-01

    Heat and mass transfers occuring in a counterflow direct contact liquid-gas exchanger determine the performance of a new greenhouse air dehumidifier designed at INRA. This prototype uses triethylene glycol (TEG) as the desiccant fluid which extracts water vapor from the air. The regeneration of the TEG desiccant fluid is then performed by direct contact with combustion gas from a high efficiency boiler equipped with a condensor. The heat and mass transfers between the thin film of diluted TEG and the hot gas were simulated by a model which uses correlation formula from the literature specifically relevant to the present cross-corrugated plates geometry. A simple set of analytical solutions is first derived, which explains why some possible processes can clearly be far from optimal. Then, more exact numerical calculations confirm that some undesirable water recondensations on the upper part of the exchanger were limiting the performance of this prototype. More suitable conditions were defined for the process, which lead to a new design of the apparatus. In this second prototype, a gas-gas exchanger provides dryer and cooler gas to the basis of the regenerators, while a warmer TEG is fed on the top. A whole range of operating conditions was experimented and measured parameters were compared with numerical simulations of this new configuration: recondensation did not occur any more. As a consequence, this second prototype was able to concentrate the desiccant fluid at the desired rate of 20 kg H_{2O}/hour, under temperature and humidity conditions which correspond to the dehumidification of a 1000 m2 greenhouse heated at night during the winter season.

  8. Stomatal encryption by epicuticular waxes as a plastic trait modifying gas exchange in a Mediterranean evergreen species (Quercus coccifera L.).

    PubMed

    Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Fernández, Victoria; Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2013-03-01

    The adaptive benefit of stomatal crypts remains a matter of controversy. This work studies the effect on gas exchange of cuticular rims that overarch the stomatal pore in the Mediterranean species Quercus coccifera L. growing under Mediterranean (lower relative humidities and high summer temperatures) or oceanic conditions (higher daily relative humidities and mild temperatures). After microscopic assessment of the leaf surfaces and stomatal architecture, the impact of the cuticular 'cup' on gas exchange was evaluated by employing three-dimensional finite element models. Here, we provide evidence for a high plasticity of the Q. coccifera cuticular cup, with much larger vents under oceanic conditions compared to small vents under Mediterranean conditions. This structure adds a substantial fixed resistance thereby strongly decreasing gas exchange under Mediterranean conditions. The cuticular cup, which also increases leaf internal humidity, might buffer the rapid changes in vapour pressure deficit (VPD) often observed under Mediterranean conditions. Since water loss of guard and adjacent epidermal cells regulates stomatal aperture, we suggest that this structure allows an efficient regulation of stomatal conductance and optimum use of resources under high VPD. This study provides evidence that plasticity of stomatal architecture can be an important structural component of hydraulic adaptation to different climate conditions. PMID:22897384

  9. An Excel tool for deriving key photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Combined photosynthetic gas exchange and modulated fluorometres are widely used to evaluate physiological characteristics associated with phenotypic and genotypic variation, whether in response to genetic manipulation or resource limitation in natural vegetation or crops. After describing relatively simple experimental procedures, we present the theoretical background to the derivation of photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel-based fitting tool (EFT) that will be of use to specialists and non-specialists alike. We use data acquired in concurrent variable fluorescence-gas exchange experiments, where A/Ci and light-response curves have been measured under ambient and low oxygen. From these data, the EFT derives light respiration, initial PSII (photosystem II) photochemical yield, initial quantum yield for CO2 fixation, fraction of incident light harvested by PSII, initial quantum yield for electron transport, electron transport rate, rate of photorespiration, stomatal limitation, Rubisco (ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) rate of carboxylation and oxygenation, Rubisco specificity factor, mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion, light and CO2 compensation point, Rubisco apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, and Rubisco CO2 -saturated carboxylation rate. As an example, a complete analysis of gas exchange data on tobacco plants is provided. We also discuss potential measurement problems and pitfalls, and suggest how such empirical data could subsequently be used to parameterize predictive photosynthetic models.

  10. Stomatal encryption by epicuticular waxes as a plastic trait modifying gas exchange in a Mediterranean evergreen species (Quercus coccifera L.).

    PubMed

    Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Fernández, Victoria; Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2013-03-01

    The adaptive benefit of stomatal crypts remains a matter of controversy. This work studies the effect on gas exchange of cuticular rims that overarch the stomatal pore in the Mediterranean species Quercus coccifera L. growing under Mediterranean (lower relative humidities and high summer temperatures) or oceanic conditions (higher daily relative humidities and mild temperatures). After microscopic assessment of the leaf surfaces and stomatal architecture, the impact of the cuticular 'cup' on gas exchange was evaluated by employing three-dimensional finite element models. Here, we provide evidence for a high plasticity of the Q. coccifera cuticular cup, with much larger vents under oceanic conditions compared to small vents under Mediterranean conditions. This structure adds a substantial fixed resistance thereby strongly decreasing gas exchange under Mediterranean conditions. The cuticular cup, which also increases leaf internal humidity, might buffer the rapid changes in vapour pressure deficit (VPD) often observed under Mediterranean conditions. Since water loss of guard and adjacent epidermal cells regulates stomatal aperture, we suggest that this structure allows an efficient regulation of stomatal conductance and optimum use of resources under high VPD. This study provides evidence that plasticity of stomatal architecture can be an important structural component of hydraulic adaptation to different climate conditions.

  11. Impaired gas exchange: accuracy of defining characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection1

    PubMed Central

    Pascoal, Lívia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange nursing diagnosis in children with acute respiratory infection. METHOD: open prospective cohort study conducted with 136 children monitored for a consecutive period of at least six days and not more than ten days. An instrument based on the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis and on literature addressing pulmonary assessment was used to collect data. The accuracy means of all the defining characteristics under study were computed. RESULTS: the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis was present in 42.6% of the children in the first assessment. Hypoxemia was the characteristic that presented the best measures of accuracy. Abnormal breathing presented high sensitivity, while restlessness, cyanosis, and abnormal skin color showed high specificity. All the characteristics presented negative predictive values of 70% and cyanosis stood out by its high positive predictive value. CONCLUSION: hypoxemia was the defining characteristic that presented the best predictive ability to determine Impaired gas exchange. Studies of this nature enable nurses to minimize variability in clinical situations presented by the patient and to identify more precisely the nursing diagnosis that represents the patient's true clinical condition. PMID:26155010

  12. Unsteady Conjugate Heat Exchange of Oil-Gas Pipe Line in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavljuchenko, A. M.; Papkov, A. N.

    2002-07-01

    The problem of conjugate beat exchange of main gas-oil pipe lines is of special importance for pipelines laying in the permafrost regions, because the energy saving reliability and ecology problems ought to be solved. In this work, this complex mathematical task without allowance for a movable thawing bound was numerically simulated.

  13. Carbon dioxide control in an open system that measures canopy gas exchanges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) effects both C3 net assimilation (A) as well as crop water use. Methods for measuring whole canopy gas exchange responses under [CO2] enrichment are needed for breeding programs aiming to develop crop cultivars resistant to stresses like drought in a...

  14. Carbon dioxide control in an open system that measures canopy gas exchanges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration affects both C3 carbon net assimilation as well as crop water use. Methods for measuring whole canopy gas exchange responses under carbon dioxide enrichment are needed for breeding programs aiming to develop crop cultivars resistant to stresses like drought i...

  15. Oxygen-induced plasticity in tracheal morphology and discontinuous gas exchange cycles in cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea.

    PubMed

    Bartrim, Hamish; Matthews, Philip G D; Lemon, Sussan; White, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    The function and mechanism underlying discontinuous gas exchange in terrestrial arthropods continues to be debated. Three adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolutionary origin or maintenance of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs), which may have evolved to reduce respiratory water loss, facilitate gas exchange in high CO2 and low O2 micro-environments, or to ameliorate potential damage as a result of oversupply of O2. None of these hypotheses have unequivocal support, and several non-adaptive hypotheses have also been proposed. In the present study, we reared cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea in selected levels of O2 throughout development, and examined how this affected growth rate, tracheal morphology and patterns of gas exchange. O2 level in the rearing environment caused significant changes in tracheal morphology and the exhibition of DGCs, but the direction of these effects was inconsistent with all three adaptive hypotheses: water loss was not associated with DGC length, cockroaches grew fastest in hyperoxia, and DGCs exhibited by cockroaches reared in normoxia were shorter than those exhibited by cockroaches reared in hypoxia or hyperoxia.

  16. Changes in gas exchange, tissue respiration and glycolysis in rats during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorya, L. V.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an experiment which studied changes in oxygen balance under conditions of hypokinesia in rats is presented. The effect of the stress during hypokinesia is expressed most clearly in the changes of general gas exchange, and in the intensity of liver and myocardial tissue respiration.

  17. Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics for the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; Lee, Won Suk

    2014-05-14

    A commercially viable technology for producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs remains elusive. Short-term depressurization field tests have demonstrated the potential for producing natural gas via dissociation of the clathrate structure, but the long-term performance of the depressurization technology ultimately requires a heat source to sustain the dissociation. A decade of laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have demonstrated the exchange of pure CO2 and N2-CO2 mixtures with CH4 in sI gas hydrates, yielding critical information about molecular mechanisms, recoveries, and exchange kinetics. Findings indicated the potential for producing natural gas with little to no production of water and rapid exchange kinetics, generating sufficient interest in the guest-molecule exchange technology for a field test. In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after an extensive quality check. These data included continuous temperature and pressure logs, injected and recovered fluid compositions and volumes. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This investigation is directed at using numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the collected data. A numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was recently completed that solves conservation equations for energy, water, mobile fluid guest molecules, and hydrate guest

  18. Seasonal differences in needle gas exchange between mature branches and seedlings of Pinus ponderosa

    SciTech Connect

    Houpis, J.L.J.; Anderson, P.D. )

    1991-05-01

    In 1990, an interactive study was initiated to understand the differing physiological and morphological response of mature tissue and seedling tissue to stress. The study was conducted at the Air Pollution and Climate Change Exposure Facility in a Pinus ponderosa seed production orchard at the US Forest Service Tree Improvement Center in Chico, CA. The orchard consists of clonal trees and the authors have planted half-sibling seedlings which correspond to the mature clones which were measured. Both the mature trees and seedlings were regularly irrigated and fertilized. The result is that they have minimized the genetic and environmental differences that might otherwise influence the physiological differences between mature and seedling tissue. One of the physiological parameters which was measured was seasonal and diurnal gas exchange using a LICOR 6200. They measured gas exchange in November 1989, March, July, and October 1990. They found that throughout the year, all gas exchange components (eg. photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance) were significantly greater for seedling tissue. Photosynthetic differences were greater during early October, with diurnal mean rates of 1.1 {mu}mol m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and 0.5 {mu}mol m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} for seedling and mature tissue, respectively. Transpiration differences were greater during early October, with diurnal mean rates of 2.2 mmol m{sup {minus}2}2{sup {minus}1} and 1.2 mmol m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} for seedling and mature tissue, respectively. Finally, gas exchange differences between seedling and mature tissue were greater for current needles than one-year old needles. The results of this study demonstrate that gas exchange differences between seedling and mature tissue observed in the field may be the result of inherent physiological differences, and not merely genetic and environmental differences.

  19. Kinetic exchange models: From molecular physics to social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, Marco; Chakraborti, Anirban

    2013-08-01

    We discuss several multi-agent models that have their origin in the kinetic exchange theory of statistical mechanics and have been recently applied to a variety of problems in the social sciences. This class of models can be easily adapted for simulations in areas other than physics, such as the modeling of income and wealth distributions in economics and opinion dynamics in sociology.

  20. Trace gas exchanges and transports over the Amazonian rain forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael; Greco, Steve; Scala, John; Harriss, Robert; Browell, Edward; Sachse, Glenn; Simpson, Joanne; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Torres, Arnold

    1986-01-01

    Early results are presented from a program to model deep convective transport of chemical species by means of in situ data collection and numerical models. Data were acquired during the NASA GTE Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment in July-August 1985. Airborne instrumentation, including a UV-DIAL system, collected data on the O3, CO, NO, temperature and water vapor profiles from the surface to 400 mb altitude, while GOES imagery tracked convective clouds over the study area. A two-dimensional cloud model with small amplitude random temperature fluctuations at low levels, which simulated thermals, was used to describe the movements of the chemical species sensed in the convective atmosphere. The data was useful for evaluating the accuracy of the cloud model, which in turn was effective in describing the circulation of the chemical species.

  1. Non-equilibrium stochastic model for stock exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yup; Kwon, Ikhyun; Yook, Soon-Hyung

    2013-12-01

    We study the effect of the topology of industrial relationship (IR) between the companies in a stock exchange market on the universal features in the market. For this we propose a stochastic model for stock exchange markets based on the behavior of technical traders. From the numerical simulations we measure the return distribution, P(R), and the autocorrelation function of the volatility, C(T), and find that the observed universal features in real financial markets are originated from the heterogeneity of IR network topology. Moreover, the heterogeneous IR topology can also explain Zipf-Pareto’s law for the distribution of market value of equity in the real stock exchange markets.

  2. Heat exchangers and thermal energy storage concepts for the off-gas heat of steelmaking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinparzer, T.; Haider, M.; Fleischanderl, A.; Hampel, A.; Enickl, G.; Zauner, F.

    2012-11-01

    The fluctuating thermal emissions of electric arc furnaces require energy storage systems to provide downstream consumers with a continuous amount of thermal energy or electricity. Heat recovery systems based on thermal energy storage are presented. A comparison of different thermal energy storage systems has been performed. For the purpose, suitable heat exchangers for the off-gas heat have been developed. Dynamic process simulations of the heat recovery plants were necessary to check the feasibility of the systems and consider the non-steady-state off-gas emissions of the steelmaking devices. The implementation of a pilot plant into an existing off-gas duct of an electric arc furnace was required to check the real behavior of the heat exchanger and determine suitable materials in view of corrosion issues. The pilot plant is presented in this paper.

  3. CFD analysis of the plate heat exchanger - Mathematical modelling of mass and heat transfer in serial connection with tubular heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojko, Marian; Kocich, Radim

    2016-06-01

    Application of numerical simulations based on the CFD calculation when the mass and heat transfer between the fluid flows is essential component of thermal calculation. In this article the mathematical model of the heat exchanger is defined, which is subsequently applied to the plate heat exchanger, which is connected in series with the other heat exchanger (tubular heat exchanger). The present contribution deals with the possibility to use the waste heat of the flue gas produced by small micro turbine. Inlet boundary conditions to the mathematical model of the plate heat exchanger are obtained from the results of numerical simulation of the tubular heat exchanger. Required parameters such for example inlet temperature was evaluated from temperature field, which was subsequently imported to the inlet boundary condition to the simulation of plate heat exchanger. From the results of 3D numerical simulations are evaluated basic flow variables including the evaluation of dimensionless parameters such as Colburn j-factor and friction ft factor. Numerical simulation is realized by software ANSYS Fluent15.0.

  4. Optimal diving behaviour and respiratory gas exchange in birds.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Lewis G; Butler, Patrick J

    2006-11-01

    This review discusses the advancements in our understanding of the physiology and behaviour of avian diving that have been underpinned by optimal foraging theory and the testing of optimal models. To maximise their foraging efficiency during foraging periods, diving birds must balance numerous factors that are directly or indirectly related to the replenishment of the oxygen stores and the removal of excess carbon dioxide. These include (1) the time spent underwater (which diminishes the oxygen supply, increases carbon dioxide levels and may even include a build up of lactate due to anaerobic metabolism), (2) the time spent at the surface recovering from the previous dive and preparing for the next (including reloading their oxygen supply, decreasing their carbon dioxide levels and possibly also metabolising lactate) and (3) the trade-off between maximising oxygen reserves for consumption underwater by taking in more air to the respiratory system, and minimising the energy costs of positive buoyancy caused by this air, to maximise the time available underwater to forage. Due to its importance in avian diving, replenishment of the oxygen stores has become integral to models of optimal diving, which predict the time budgeting of animals foraging underwater. While many of these models have been examined qualitatively, such tests of predictive trends appear fallible and only quantifiable support affords strong evidence of their predictive value. This review describes how the quantification of certain optimal diving models, using tufted ducks, indeed demonstrates some predictive success. This suggests that replenishment of the oxygen stores and removal of excess carbon dioxide have significant influences on the duration of the surface period between dives. Nevertheless, present models are too simplistic to be robust predictors of diving behaviour for individual animals and it is proposed that they require refinement through the incorporation of other variables that also

  5. Toxicodynamics of Rigid Polystyrene Microparticles on Pulmonary Gas Exchange in Mice: Implications for Microemboli-based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kutscher, HL.; Gao, D.; Li, S.; Massa, CB.; Cervelli, J.; Deshmukh, M.; Joseph, LB.; Laskin, DL.; Sinko, PJ.

    2013-01-01

    The toxicodynamic relationship between the number and size of pulmonary microemboli resulting from uniformly sized, rigid polystyrene microparticles (MPs) administered intravenously and their potential effects on pulmonary gas exchange was investigated. CD-1 male mice (6–8 wk) were intravenously administered 10, 25 and 45 μm diameter MPs. Oxygen hemoglobin saturation in the blood (SpO2) was measured non-invasively using a pulse oximeter while varying inhaled oxygen concentration (FIO2). Resulting data were fit to a physiologically based non-linear mathematical model that estimates 2 parameters: ventilation-perfusion ratio (VA/Q) and shunt (percentage of deoxygenated blood returning to systemic circulation). The number of MPs administered prior to a statistically significant reduction in normalized VA/Q was dependent on particle size. MP doses that resulted in a significant reduction in normalized VA/Q one day post-treatment were 4,000, 40,000 and 550,000 MPs/g for 45, 25 and 10 μm MPs, respectively. The model estimated VA/Q and shunt returned to baseline levels 7 days post-treatment. Measuring SpO2 alone was not sufficient to observe changes in gas exchange; however, when combined with model-derived VA/Q and shunt early reversible toxicity from pulmonary microemboli was detected suggesting that the model and physical measurements are both required for assessing toxicity. Moreover, it appears that the MP load required to alter gas exchange in a mouse prior to lethality is significantly higher than the anticipated required MP dose for effective drug delivery. Overall, the current results indicate that the microemboli-based approach for targeted pulmonary drug delivery is potentially safe and should be further explored. PMID:23142466

  6. Plant mineral nutrition, gas exchange and photosynthesis in space: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S. A.; Coelho, L. H.; Zabrodina, M.; Brinckmann, E.; Kittang, A.-I.

    2013-02-01

    Successful growth and development of higher plants in space rely on adequate availability and uptake of water and nutrients, and efficient energy distribution through photosynthesis and gas exchange. In the present review, literature has been reviewed to assemble the relevant knowledge within space plant research for future planetary missions. Focus has been on fractional gravity, space radiation, magnetic fields and ultimately a combined effect of these factors on gas exchange, photosynthesis and transport of water and solutes. Reduced gravity prevents buoyancy driven thermal convection in the physical environment around the plant and alters transport and exchange of gases and liquids between the plant and its surroundings. In space experiments, indications of root zone hypoxia have frequently been reported, but studies on the influences of the space environment on plant nutrition and water transport are limited or inconclusive. Some studies indicate that uptake of potassium is elevated when plants are grown under microgravity conditions. Based on the current knowledge, gas exchange, metabolism and photosynthesis seem to work properly in space when plants are provided with a well stirred atmosphere and grown at moderate light levels. Effects of space radiation on plant metabolism, however, have not been studied so far in orbit. Ground experiments indicated that shielding from the Earth's magnetic field alters plant gas exchange and metabolism, though more studies are required to understand the effects of magnetic fields on plant growth. It has been shown that plants can grow and reproduce in the space environment and adapt to space conditions. However, the influences of the space environment may result in a long term effect over multiple generations or have an impact on the plants' role as food and part of a regenerative life support system. Suggestions for future plant biology research in space are discussed.

  7. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics based on the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht Yonkofski, C. M.; Horner, J.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after a thorough quality check. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This study uses numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the CH4/CO2/N2 guest molecule exchange process that occurred at Ignik Sikumi #1. Simulations were further informed by experimental observations. The goal of the scoping experiments was to understand kinetic exchange rates and develop parameters for use in Iġnik Sikumi history match simulations. The experimental procedure involves two main stages: 1) the formation of CH4 hydrate in a consolidated sand column at 750 psi and 2°C and 2) flow-through of a 77.5/22.5 N2/CO2 molar ratio gas mixture across the column. Experiments were run both above and below the hydrate stability zone in order to observe exchange behavior across varying conditions. The numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was then used to match experimental results, specifically fitting kinetic behavior. Once this behavior is understood, it can be applied to field scale models based on Ignik Sikumi #1.

  9. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  10. Micromagnetic modeling of overlaid exchange-biased giant magnetoresistance head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuankai; You, Dan; Wu, Yihong

    2002-05-01

    Overlaid exchange-biased structures for giant magnetoresistance head have been proposed and investigated. A home-developed three-dimensional micromagnetic modeling tool has been used to simulate synthetic antiferromagnetic spin valves of this type of biased structure with dimensions of 100 nm in width and 80 nm in height. Simulation results showed that, with a properly chosen antiferromagnetic material and structure, the exchange-biasing field could be made sufficient to suppress the noise without severely reducing the sensitivity. The sensitivity of overlaid exchange-biased spin valves is 1.73 times that of the abutted hard biased ones. Microtrack profiles showed that side reading effect could be suppressed effectively with an effective exchange-biasing field over 600 Oe.

  11. Large N Model of Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Ke; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2010-03-01

    We construct the large N model of bose gas. Using an artificial parameter 1/N to do the perturbative analysis to study two models: U(N) bose gas and U(1) xO(N) bose gas. We find that for U(N) bose gas we get Bogoliubov spectrum and LHY thermal dynamical relations which is the same as the usual weak coupling bose gas models. For U(1) xO(N) bose gas model, however, we calculate the non-perturbative quantum correction to the depletion, chemical potential, free energy and dispersion relations.

  12. Flight Dynamic Model Exchange using XML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Hildreth, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    The AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee has worked for several years to develop a standard by which the information needed to develop physics-based models of aircraft can be specified. The purpose of this standard is to provide a well-defined set of information, definitions, data tables and axis systems so that cooperating organizations can transfer a model from one simulation facility to another with maximum efficiency. This paper proposes using an application of the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) to implement the AIAA simulation standard. The motivation and justification for using a standard such as XML is discussed. Necessary data elements to be supported are outlined. An example of an aerodynamic model as an XML file is given. This example includes definition of independent and dependent variables for function tables, definition of key variables used to define the model, and axis systems used. The final steps necessary for implementation of the standard are presented. Software to take an XML-defined model and import/export it to/from a given simulation facility is discussed, but not demonstrated. That would be the next step in final implementation of standards for physics-based aircraft dynamic models.

  13. Direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Sakurai, Hiromu; Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Günther, Detlef

    2015-09-01

    An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique was applied to the direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in ambient air. The ultra-trace semiconductor gases such as arsine (AsH3) and phosphine (PH3) were converted to particles by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonia (NH3) gases within a gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The converted particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS through a gas exchange device (GED), which could penetrate the particles as well as exchange to Ar from either non-reacted gases such as an air or remaining gases of O3 and NH3. The particle size distribution of converted particles was measured by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the results supported the elucidation of particle agglomeration between the particle converted from semiconductor gas and the particle of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which was produced as major particle in GPD. Stable time-resolved signals from AsH3 and PH3 in air were obtained by GPD-GED-ICPMS with continuous gas introduction; however, the slightly larger fluctuation, which could be due to the ionization fluctuation of particles in ICP, was observed compared to that of metal carbonyl gas in Ar introduced directly into ICPMS. The linear regression lines were obtained and the limits of detection (LODs) of 1.5 pL L(-1) and 2.4 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, were estimated. Since these LODs revealed sufficiently lower values than the measurement concentrations required from semiconductor industry such as 0.5 nL L(-1) and 30 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, the GPD-GED-ICPMS could be useful for direct and high sensitive analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in air.

  14. Mass exchange in an experimental new-generation LSS model based on biological regeneration of envirnment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, A.; Ushakova, S.; Gribovskaya, I.; Tirranen, L.; Manukovsky, N.; Zolotukhin, I.; Gros, J.; Lasseur, C.

    Experimental model of a biological life support system (LSS) was used to evaluate qualitative and quantitative parameters of inner mass exchange. The photosynthesizing block was the higher plants component (wheat, 3 radish), the heterotroph block consisted of the soil-like substrate (SLS) California worms, mushrooms and microbial microflora. In terms of gas composition the mass exchange process involved emission of oxygen by the photosynthesiz ing component and its uptake by the heterotroph component along with formation and maintaining the SLS structure, growth of mushrooms, California worms, human respiration and several other processes. Human presence in the system had the form of a "part of virtual human" that at regular intervals took part in the respiration gas exchange to get engaged in the respiration gas exchange in the course of calculated period of time. Experimental data demonstrated good agreement of ? 2 /? ? 2 balance which, in these gas components, was close to complete. Basic component in the water mass exchange were transpiration water and aqueous watering solution with mineral elements. Human consumption of the harvest biomass of plants (seeds and roots) was simulated by processing hese production by a genuine physical - chemicalt method of oxidizing to inorganic mineral compounds that were returned into the system and fully assimilated by the plants. Such an oxidation was achieved by "wet incineration" of organic biomass using hydrogen peroxide by a special process where high temperature and pressure are not needed, and hydrogen peroxide is produced from the water inside the system. The turnover was estimated in terms of individual biogenous elements. Specifically, experiments showed that in terms of sulfur, carbon and several other elements the closedness was almost 100%. Applications opportunities of the experimental biological system considered are under discussion.

  15. Gas exchange characteristics of wheat stands grown in a closed, controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Corey, K A; Sager, J C; Knott, W M

    1993-01-01

    Information on gas exchange of crop stands grown in controlled environments is limited, but is vital for assessing the use of crops for human life-support in closed habitats envisioned for space. Two studies were conducted to measure gas exchange of wheat stands (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) grown from planting to maturity in a large (20 m2 canopy area), closed growth chamber. Daily rates of dark-period respiration and net photosynthesis of the stand were calculated from rates of CO2 build-up during dark cycles and subsequent CO2 drawdown in the light (i.e., a closed-system approach). Lighting was provided as a 20-h photoperiod by high-pressure sodium lamps, with canopy-level photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) ranging from 500 to 800 micromoles m-2 s-1 as canopy height increased. Net photosynthesis rates peaked near 27 micromoles CO2 m-2 s-1 at 25 d after planting, which corresponded closely with stand closure, and then declined slowly with age. Similarly, dark-period respiration rates peaked near 14 micromoles CO2 m-2 s-1 at 25 d and then gradually declined with age. Responses to short-term changes in irradiance after canopy closure indicated the stand light compensation point for photosynthesis to be near 200 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPFD. Tests in which CO2 concentration was raised to approximately 2000 micromoles mol-1 and then allowed to draw down to a compensation point showed that net photosynthesis was nearly saturated at > 1000 micromoles mol-1; below approximately 500 micromoles mol-1, net photosynthesis rates dropped sharply with decreasing CO2. The CO2 compensation point for photosynthesis occurred near 50 micromoles mol-1. Short-term (24 h) temperature tests showed net photosynthesis at 20 degrees C > or = 16 degrees C > 24 degrees C, while dark-period respiration at 24 degrees C > 20 degrees C > 16 degrees C. Rates of stand evapotranspiration peaked near Day 25 and remained relatively constant until about Day 75, after which rates declined

  16. Heavy gas dispersion: integral models and shallow layer models.

    PubMed

    Hankin, Robin K S

    2003-10-01

    Integral models for heavy gas dispersion approximate a dispersing cloud in terms of a small number of variables; each of these is ultimately a function of an independent variable which is usually time (instantaneous releases) or downwind distance (continuous releases). This type of model is used almost exclusively in risk assessment [HSE's risk assessment tool, RISKAT, in: Major Hazards: Onshore and Offshore, October 1992, pp. 607-638; Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech. 21 (1989) 317], but many distinct integral models exist. The code comparison exercise of Mercer et al. [CEA/AEA exchange agreement on external event. Comparison of heavy gas dispersion models for instantaneous releases: final report, Technical Report IR/L/HA/91/6, Health and Safety Laboratory, Sheffield, June 1991; J. Hazard. Mater. 36 (1994) 193] presented the results from a number of integral models in a common format; Mercer found that the range of predictions for some scenarios exceeded three orders of magnitude. Here, the TWODEE shallow layer model [J. Hazard. Mater. 66 (3) (1999) 211; J. Hazard. Mater. 66 (3) (1999) 227; J. Hazard. Mater. 66 (3) (1999) 239] is added to Mercer's code comparison exercise. The physical assumptions used in shallow layer models differ profoundly from those used in integral models and the implications of these differences for risk assessment are discussed. TWODEE was used to simulate four representative cases considered by Mercer. In terms of cloud averaged concentration (CAC) vs. centroid position, the present model gave predictions that were consistent with the integral models used by Mercer. As the model neglects horizontal diffusion for passive clouds, overprediction at large downwind distances was expected, but not generally observed.

  17. Operation of an experimental algal gas exchanger for use in a CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, David T.; Wharton, Robert A., Jr.; Averner, Maurice M.

    1987-01-01

    Concepts of a CELSS anticipate the use of photosynthetic organisms for air revitalization. The rates of production and uptake of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the crew and the photosynthetic organisms are mismatched. An algal system used for gas exchange only will have the difficulty of an accumulation or depletion of these gases beyond physiologically tolerable limits. The results of a study designed to test the feasibility of using environmental manipulations to maintain physiologically appropriate atmospheres for algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) and mice (Mus musculus strain DW/J) in a gas-closed system is reported. Specifically, the atmosphere behavior of this system with Chlorella grown on nitrate or urea and at different light intensities and optical densities is considered. Manipulation of both the photosynthetic rate and the assimilatory quotient of the alga has been found to reduce the mismatch of gas requirements and allow operation of the system in a gas-stable manner.

  18. Gas exchange and hatchability of chicken eggs incubated at simulated high altitude.

    PubMed

    Visschedijk, A H

    1985-02-01

    Chicken eggs laid at sea level were incubated at sea level (control conditions), at a simulated altitude of 5.5 km without any further measures (natural conditions), and at a simulated altitude of 5.7 km at optimal incubator gas composition (optimal conditions). Under optimal conditions the incubator relative humidity was 70% throughout incubation, the gas mixture supplied to the incubator contained 45% O2-55% N2, and the ventilation rate was reduced to 6% of control in order to maintain the normal air-space gas tensions and to compensate for the increased eggshell conductance at altitude. The embryos that developed under control conditions showed a normal CO2 production with 94% hatchability of fertile eggs. Under natural conditions at altitude all embryos died within a few days. Optimal conditions resulted in an almost normal gas exchange and in an improvement of hatchability from 0 to 81% of fertile eggs.

  19. Characterizing the drivers of seedling leaf gas exchange responses to warming and altered precipitation: indirect and direct effects

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Pold, Grace; Goranson, Carol; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic forces are projected to lead to warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns globally. The impact of these climatic changes on the uptake of carbon by the land surface will, in part, determine the rate and magnitude of these changes. However, there is a great deal of uncertainty in how terrestrial ecosystems will respond to climate in the future. Here, we used a fully factorial warming (four levels) by precipitation (three levels) manipulation experiment in an old-field ecosystem in the northeastern USA to examine the impact of climatic changes on leaf carbon exchange in five species of deciduous tree seedlings. We found that photosynthesis generally increased in response to increasing precipitation and decreased in response to warming. Respiration was less sensitive to the treatments. The net result was greater leaf carbon uptake in wetter and cooler conditions across all species. Structural equation modelling revealed the primary pathway through which climate impacted leaf carbon exchange. Net photosynthesis increased with increasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic enzyme capacity (Vcmax), and decreased with increasing respiration of leaves. Soil moisture and leaf temperature at the time of measurement most heavily influenced these primary drivers of net photosynthesis. Leaf respiration increased with increasing soil moisture, leaf temperature, and photosynthetic supply of substrates. Counter to the soil moisture response, respiration decreased with increasing precipitation amount, indicating that the response to short- (i.e. soil moisture) versus long-term (i.e. precipitation amount) water stress differed, possibly as a result of changes in the relative amounts of growth and maintenance demand for respiration over time. These data (>500 paired measurements of light and dark leaf gas exchange), now publicly available, detail the pathways by which climate can impact leaf gas exchange and could be useful for testing assumptions in

  20. The effect of nebulized epinephrine on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange in bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Numa, A H; Williams, G D; Dakin, C J

    2001-07-01

    Nebulized epinephrine has been advocated as a treatment for airway obstruction in infants with bronchiolitis; however, its effect on respiratory mechanics and gas exchange has been poorly documented to date. We performed a preinterventional and postinterventional study with primary outcome measures of mechanics (measured by single-breath occlusion passive deflation) and oxygenation and ventilation indices in order to measure the effects of nebulized epinephrine in infants requiring mechanical ventilation for RSV-positive bronchiolitis. A two-compartment model was used to describe respiratory mechanics in patients with nonlinear flow-volume curves. Nebulized epinephrine (0.5 mg/kg) was administered to 15 patients (median age, 0.19 yr; weight, 4.4 kg). Resistance decreased significantly in slow and fast compartments in 87 and 70% of patients, respectively. Median resistance in the slow compartment decreased from 0.427 to 0.198 cm H2O/ml/s (p = 0.0015) and in the fast compartment from 0.167 to 0.116 cm H2O/ ml/s (p = 0.018). Compliance, oxygenation index, and ventilation index were not significantly changed after administration of epinephrine. We conclude that nebulized epinephrine substantially improves respiratory system resistance but not oxygenation or ventilation indices. This may be because of the effects of epinephrine on oxygen consumption or ventilation-perfusion matching.

  1. Direct effects of nitroprusside do not alter gas exchange in canine oleic acid edema.

    PubMed

    Angle, M; Ducas, J; Schick, U; Girling, L; Prewitt, R M

    1984-11-01

    The authors investigated why intrapulmonary shunt (QS/QT) increases with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in canine oleic acid pulmonary edema. To determine the effects of flow alone on QS/QT, a peripheral arteriovenous fistula with a variable resistor was employed to increase cardiac output (Q) 26 and 52% above base line in a stepwise fashion (P less than 0.01). To examine the direct effects of SNP, distinct from changes in flow, the drug was given to produce matched increments in Q in each dog (P less than 0.01). To control for time, base-line measurements were obtained before and after each intervention, the sequence of which was alternated. At each increment in Q, SNP and the arteriovenous fistula increased QS/QT a similar amount. The mixed venous O2 tension (P-vO2) followed Q similarly in each group. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) fell more (P less than 0.01) with SNP than with the arteriovenous fistula at identical Q and P-vO2. The authors conclude that, in this model, a direct pharmacological effect of SNP does not contribute to the deterioration in QS/QT. In fact, SNP exerts a pulmonary vasoactive effect that does not adversely affect gas exchange. PMID:6520043

  2. Gas exchange in NASA's biomass production chamber: a preprototype closed human life support system.

    PubMed

    Corey, K A; Wheeler, R M

    1992-01-01

    An important aspect of environmental control in a life-support system is the monitoring and regulation of atmospheric gases (Sager et al. 1988) at concentrations required for the maintenance of all life forms. It will be necessary to know the rates of CO2 use, oxygen evolution, and water flux through evapotranspiration by a crop stand under various environmental conditions, so that appropriate designs and control systems for maintaining mass balances of those gases can be achieved for a full range of environmental regimes. Mass budgets of gases will also enable evaluation of crop health by monitoring directly the rates of gas exchange and indirectly the rate of accumulation of dry matter, based on rates of carbon dioxide use. This article focuses on the unique capabilities of the NASA biomass production chamber for monitoring and evaluating gas exchange rates, with special emphasis on results with wheat and soybean, two candidate species identified by NASA for CELSS.

  3. Conversion of deuterium gas to heavy water by catalytic isotopic exchange using wetproof catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Quaiattini, R.J.; McGauley, M.P.; Burns, D.L.; Tichler, P.R.

    1987-06-01

    The invention at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of a simple method of wetproofing platinum catalysts allows them to retain their activity in liquid water. High performance catalysts for the hydrogen-water isotope exchange reaction that remain active for years can now be routinely produced. The first commercial application using the ordered-bed-type wetproofed isotope exchange catalyst developed and patented by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. has been successfully completed. Approximately 9100 m/sup 3/ of deuterium gas stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory was converted to high grade heavy water. Conversion efficiency exceeded 99.8%. The product D/sub 2/O concentration was 6.7 percentage points higher than the feed D/sub 2/ gas.

  4. Involvement of plant growth substances in the alteration of leaf gas exchange of flooded tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Bradford, K J

    1983-10-01

    Ethylene, abscisic acid, and cytokinins were tested for their ability to either induce or prevent the changes which occur in gas exchange characteristics of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Rheinlands Ruhm) leaves during short-term soil flooding. Ethylene, which increases in the shoots of flooded plants, had no effect on stomatal conductance or photosynthetic capacity of drained plants. Abscisic acid, which also accumulates in the shoots of flooded plants, could reproduce the stomatal behavior of flooded plants when sprayed on the leaves of drained plants. However, photosynthetic capacity of drained plants was unaffected by abscisic acid sprays. Cytokinin export from the roots to the shoots declines in flooded plants. Spray applications of benzyladenine increased stomatal conductance in both flooded and drained plants. In addition, the decline in photosynthetic capacity during flooding was largely prevented by supplementary cytokinin applications. The possible involvement of these growth substances in modifying leaf gas exchange during flooding is discussed.

  5. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  6. Impaired Gas Exchange at Birth and Risk of Intellectual Disability and Autism: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Mollon, Josephine; Boffetta, Paolo; Reichenberg, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    We conducted meta-analyses of 67 studies on the association between neonatal proxies of impaired gas exchange and intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Neonatal acidosis was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.23-5.49] for ID and an OR of 1.10 (95% CI 0.91-1.31) for ASD.…

  7. Surviving submerged--Setal tracheal gills for gas exchange in adult rheophilic diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Siegfried; Dettner, Konrad

    2009-11-01

    The gas exchange in adult diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) relies on a subelytral air store, which has to be renewed in regular intervals at the water surface. The dive duration varies from a few minutes to 24 h depending on the species, activity, and temperature. However, some species remain submerged for several weeks. Stygobiont species do not ascend to the surface and gas exchange of these species remains unclear, but it is assumed that they require air filled voids for respiration or they use cutaneous respiration. In this study, we investigate the gas exchange in the running water diving beetle Deronectes aubei, which survive submerged for over 6 weeks. The diffusion distance through the cuticle is too great for cutaneous respiration. Therefore, the dissolved oxygen uptake of submerged beetles was determined and an oxygen uptake via the rich tracheated elytra was observed. Fine structure analyses (SEM and TEM) of the beetles showed tracheated setae mainly on the elytral surface, which acts as tracheal gills. Prevention of the air bubble formation at the tip of the abdomen, which normally act as physical gill in Dytiscidae, resulted in no effect in oxygen uptake in D. aubei, but this was the sole way for a submerged Hydroporus palustris to get oxygen. The setal gas exchange technique explains the restriction of D. aubei to rivers and brooks with high oxygen concentration and it may also be used by subterran living diving beetles, which lack access to atmospheric oxygen. The existence of setal tracheal gills in species in running water which are often found in the hyporheic zone and in stygobiont species supports the known evolution of stygobiont Dytiscidae from species of the hyporheic zone. For species in running water, setal tracheal gills could be seen as an adaptation to avoid drifting downstream by the current.

  8. Leaf gas exchange characteristics of three neotropical mangrove species in response to varying hydroperiod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Twilley, Robert R.; Doyle, Thomas W.; Gardiner, Emile S.

    2006-01-01

    We determined how different hydroperiods affected leaf gas exchange characteristics of greenhouse-grown seedlings (2002) and saplings (2003) of the mangrove species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn., Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f., and Rhizophora mangle L. Hydroperiod treatments included no flooding (unflooded), intermittent flooding (intermittent), and permanent flooding (flooded). Plants in the intermittent treatment were measured under both flooded and drained states and compared separately. In the greenhouse study, plants of all species maintained different leaf areas in the contrasting hydroperiods during both years. Assimilation–light response curves indicated that the different hydroperiods had little effect on leaf gas exchange characteristics in either seedlings or saplings. However, short-term intermittent flooding for between 6 and 22 days caused a 20% reduction in maximum leaf-level carbon assimilation rate, a 51% lower light requirement to attain 50% of maximum assimilation, and a 38% higher demand from dark respiration. Although interspecific differences were evident for nearly all measured parameters in both years, there was little consistency in ranking of the interspecific responses. Species by hydroperiod interactions were significant only for sapling leaf area. In a field study, R. mangle saplings along the Shark River in the Everglades National Park either demonstrated no significant effect or slight enhancement of carbon assimilation and water-use efficiency while flooded. We obtained little evidence that contrasting hydroperiods affect leaf gas exchange characteristics of mangrove seedlings or saplings over long time intervals; however, intermittent flooding may cause short-term depressions in leaf gas exchange. The resilience of mangrove systems to flooding, as demonstrated in the permanently flooded treatments, will likely promote photosynthetic and morphological adjustment to slight hydroperiod shifts in many settings..

  9. Leaf gas exchange characteristics of three neotropical mangrove species in response to varying hydroperiod.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ken W; Twilley, Robert R; Doyle, Thomas W; Gardiner, Emile S

    2006-07-01

    We determined how different hydroperiods affected leaf gas exchange characteristics of greenhouse-grown seedlings (2002) and saplings (2003) of the mangrove species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn., Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f., and Rhizophora mangle L. Hydroperiod treatments included no flooding (unflooded), intermittent flooding (intermittent), and permanent flooding (flooded). Plants in the intermittent treatment were measured under both flooded and drained states and compared separately. In the greenhouse study, plants of all species maintained different leaf areas in the contrasting hydroperiods during both years. Assimilation-light response curves indicated that the different hydroperiods had little effect on leaf gas exchange characteristics in either seedlings or saplings. However, short-term intermittent flooding for between 6 and 22 days caused a 20% reduction in maximum leaf-level carbon assimilation rate, a 51% lower light requirement to attain 50% of maximum assimilation, and a 38% higher demand from dark respiration. Although interspecific differences were evident for nearly all measured parameters in both years, there was little consistency in ranking of the interspecific responses. Species by hydroperiod interactions were significant only for sapling leaf area. In a field study, R. mangle saplings along the Shark River in the Everglades National Park either demonstrated no significant effect or slight enhancement of carbon assimilation and water-use efficiency while flooded. We obtained little evidence that contrasting hydroperiods affect leaf gas exchange characteristics of mangrove seedlings or saplings over long time intervals; however, intermittent flooding may cause short-term depressions in leaf gas exchange. The resilience of mangrove systems to flooding, as demonstrated in the permanently flooded treatments, will likely promote photosynthetic and morphological adjustment to slight hydroperiod shifts in many settings. PMID:16585041

  10. Kinetics of response of foliar gas exchange to exogenously applied ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Gunderson, C.A.

    1987-04-01

    While the sensitivity of foliar gas exchange to ethylene in some species is documented, the kinetics of response, including reaction rates, effective concentrations, and mode of action, are not well characterized. The responses of carbon dioxide assimilation and stomatal conductance were investigated in Glycine max grown in a controlled environment and exposed to a range of exogenously applied ethylene concentrations. The gas-exchange responses exhibited first-order kinetics at low concentrations (less than 20 ..mu..moles per cubic meter) but zero-order kinetics at all higher concentrations. In the region of first-order kinetics, the rate of inhibition per unit change is ethylene concentration was twice as great for stomatal conductance as for carbon dioxide assimilation. The ethylene concentrations resulting in one-half maximal inhibition of stomatal conductance and carbon dioxide assimilation were 7.4 and 15.6 ..mu..moles per cubic meter, respectively. The ethylene influence on foliar gas exchange exhibited features of capacity-limited or saturation kinetics.

  11. Host suitability and gas exchange response of grapevines to potato leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Lamp, William O; Miranda, Daniel; Culler, Lauren E; Alexander, Laurie C

    2011-08-01

    Although potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is highly polyphagous, classic host studies do not recognize grapevines (Vitis spp.), as suitable hosts. Recently, injury has been reported and reproduction documented within grape vineyards, suggesting a host expansion for the leafhopper. To document this apparent expansion in host use, we determined whether grape plants were suitable hosts for potato leafhopper reproduction, measured the consequence of feeding injury on gas exchange rates of grape leaves, and compared the susceptibility to feeding injury among cultivars. We found that potato leafhopper adults survived equally well on grape (Vitis vinifera L.), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and fava bean (Vicia faba L.). The total number of offspring was greater on fava bean but did not differ between alfalfa and grape. Injury to grapevines was assessed by measuring gas exchange responses of leaves in field cages and in greenhouse tests. We found marginally significant declines in photosynthesis and transpiration rates in the field (9.6 and 13.2%, respectively), and much stronger effects in greenhouse tests (ranging between 22 and 52%). Our results verify that Vitis is a suitable host, and that potato leafhopper is capable of injuring its gas exchange physiology. We discuss possible explanations for the host expansion, and its potential to damage commercial grapevines.

  12. The effects of oxygen induced pulmonary vasoconstriction on bedside measurement of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Ulla M; Thomsen, Lars P; Rees, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2016-04-01

    In patients with respiratory failure measurements of pulmonary gas exchange are of importance. The bedside automatic lung parameter estimator (ALPE) of pulmonary gas exchange is based on changes in inspired oxygen (FiO2) assuming that these changes do not affect pulmonary circulation. This assumption is investigated in this study. Forty-two out of 65 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had measurements of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), cardiac output and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure thus enabling the calculation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at each FiO2 level. The research version of ALPE was used and FiO2 was step-wise reduced a median of 0.20 and ultimately returned towards baseline values, allowing 6-8 min' steady state period at each of 4-6 levels before recording the oxygen saturation (SpO2). FiO2 reduction led to median decrease in SpO2 from 99 to 92 %, an increase in MPAP of 4 mmHg and an increase in PVR of 36 dyn s cm(-5). Changes were immediately reversed on returning FiO2 towards baseline. In this study changes in MPAP and PVR are small and immediately reversible consistent with small changes in pulmonary gas exchange. This indicates that mild deoxygenation induced pulmonary vasoconstriction does not have significant influences on the ALPE parameters in patients after CABG.

  13. Host suitability and gas exchange response of grapevines to potato leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Lamp, William O; Miranda, Daniel; Culler, Lauren E; Alexander, Laurie C

    2011-08-01

    Although potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is highly polyphagous, classic host studies do not recognize grapevines (Vitis spp.), as suitable hosts. Recently, injury has been reported and reproduction documented within grape vineyards, suggesting a host expansion for the leafhopper. To document this apparent expansion in host use, we determined whether grape plants were suitable hosts for potato leafhopper reproduction, measured the consequence of feeding injury on gas exchange rates of grape leaves, and compared the susceptibility to feeding injury among cultivars. We found that potato leafhopper adults survived equally well on grape (Vitis vinifera L.), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and fava bean (Vicia faba L.). The total number of offspring was greater on fava bean but did not differ between alfalfa and grape. Injury to grapevines was assessed by measuring gas exchange responses of leaves in field cages and in greenhouse tests. We found marginally significant declines in photosynthesis and transpiration rates in the field (9.6 and 13.2%, respectively), and much stronger effects in greenhouse tests (ranging between 22 and 52%). Our results verify that Vitis is a suitable host, and that potato leafhopper is capable of injuring its gas exchange physiology. We discuss possible explanations for the host expansion, and its potential to damage commercial grapevines. PMID:21882698

  14. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs to the bloodstream, and the elimination of carbon dioxide from the bloodstream to the lungs. It occurs ... membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory system and the ...

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Oxygen Gas Release from Basaltic Minerals Exposed to UV- Radiation: Implications for the Viking Gas Exchange Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; Yen, A. S.

    2007-12-01

    The biology experiments onboard the Viking Landers determined that the Martian soils at Chryse and Utopia Planitia contain an unknown chemical compound of a highly oxidizing nature. The Gas Exchange Experiments (GEx) demonstrated that the humidification of a 1-cc Martian soil sample resulted in the production of as much as 790 nanomoles of oxygen gas. Yen et al. (2000) have provided experimental evidence that superoxide radicals can be generated on plagioclase feldspar (labradorite) grain surfaces by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light in the presence of oxygen gas. Adsorbed superoxide radicals are thought to react readily with water vapor, and produce oxygen gas in quantities sufficient to explain the Viking GEx results. Direct evidence for the formation of oxygen gas, however, was not provided in the experiments of Yen et al (2000). Accordingly, the motivation of this study is to determine whether superoxide radicals adsorbed on labradorite surfaces are capable of producing oxygen gas upon exposure to water vapor. We have constructed an experimental apparatus that is capable of monitoring oxygen gas release from basaltic mineral powders that have been exposed to UV-radiation under Martian atmospheric pressure conditions. The apparatus consists of a stainless-steel vacuum chamber with a UV- transparent window where sample radiation exposures are performed. The vacuum chamber has multiple valved ports for injection of gases and water vapor. The vacuum chamber is connected via a precision leak valve to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, which measures changes in the composition of the headspace gases over our mineral samples. We will report on the results of our experiments, which are aimed at detecting and quantifying oxygen gas release from UV-exposed basaltic mineral samples using this new experimental facility. These results will further constrain whether superoxide ions adsorbed on mineral surfaces provide a viable explanation for the Viking GEx results, which have

  16. Atmosphere behavior in gas-closed mouse-algal systems - An experimental and modelling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, M. M.; Moore, B., III; Bartholomew, I.; Wharton, R.

    1984-01-01

    A NASA-sponsored research program initiated using mathematical modelling and laboratory experimentation aimed at examining the gas-exchange characteristics of artificial animal/plant systems closed to the ambient atmosphere is studied. The development of control techniques and management strategies for maintaining the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen at physiological levels is considered. A mathematical model simulating the behavior of a gas-closed mouse-algal system under varying environmental conditions is described. To verify and validate the model simulations, an analytical system with which algal growth and gas exchange characteristics can be manipulated and measured is designed, fabricated, and tested. The preliminary results are presented.

  17. Exergy destruction analysis of a vortices generator in a gas liquid finned tube heat exchanger: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazikhani, M.; Khazaee, I.; Monazzam, S. M. S.; Takdehghan, H.

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the effect of using different shapes of vortices generator (VG) on a gas liquid finned heat exchanger is investigated experimentally with irreversibility analysis. In this project the ambient air with mass flow rates of 0.047-0.072 kg/s is forced across the finned tube heat exchanger. Hot water with constant flow rate of 240 L/h is circulated inside heat exchanger tubes with inlet temperature range of 45-73 °C. The tests are carried out on the flat finned heat exchanger and then repeated on the VG finned heat exchanger. The results show that using the vortex generator can decrease the ratio of air side irreversibility to heat transfer (ASIHR) of the heat exchanger. Also the results show that the IASIHR is >1.05 for all air mass flow rates, which means that ASIHR for the initial heat exchanger is higher than 5 % greater than that of improved heat exchanger.

  18. Exergy destruction analysis of a vortices generator in a gas liquid finned tube heat exchanger: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazikhani, M.; Khazaee, I.; Monazzam, S. M. S.; Takdehghan, H.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of using different shapes of vortices generator (VG) on a gas liquid finned heat exchanger is investigated experimentally with irreversibility analysis. In this project the ambient air with mass flow rates of 0.047-0.072 kg/s is forced across the finned tube heat exchanger. Hot water with constant flow rate of 240 L/h is circulated inside heat exchanger tubes with inlet temperature range of 45-73 °C. The tests are carried out on the flat finned heat exchanger and then repeated on the VG finned heat exchanger. The results show that using the vortex generator can decrease the ratio of air side irreversibility to heat transfer (ASIHR) of the heat exchanger. Also the results show that the IASIHR is >1.05 for all air mass flow rates, which means that ASIHR for the initial heat exchanger is higher than 5 % greater than that of improved heat exchanger.

  19. The shell model for the exchange-correlation hole in the strong-correlation limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmann, Hilke; Zhou, Yongxi; Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present a model for the exchange-correlation hole and the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation (SC) limit of density functional theory. The SC limit is useful in the construction of exchange-correlation functionals through interpolation of the adiabatic connection. The new approximation (referred to as shell model) is an improvement of the non-local radius (NLR) model recently proposed by Wagner and Gori-Giorgi [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052512 (2014)]. The NLR model does not correctly reproduce the limit of the strongly correlated homogeneous electron gas and this shortcoming is remedied by the shell model. As in the case of the NLR model, the spherically averaged electron density ρ ( r , u ) = ∫ /d Ω u 4 π ρ ( r + u ) is the starting point for the construction of the shell model and it is also its computational bottleneck. We show how ρ(r, u), the NLR, and the shell model can be implemented efficiently. For this purpose, analytical integrals for the normalization and the energy density of the underlying holes are provided. Employing the shell model, we illustrate how improved adiabatic connection interpolations can be constructed.

  20. Microeconomics of the ideal gas like market models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a framework based on microeconomic theory from which the ideal gas like market models can be addressed. A kinetic exchange model based on that framework is proposed and its distributional features have been studied by considering its moments. Next, we derive the moments of the CC model (Eur. Phys. J. B 17 (2000) 167) as well. Some precise solutions are obtained which conform with the solutions obtained earlier. Finally, an output market is introduced with global price determination in the model with some necessary modifications.

  1. A review on the performance and modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucetta, A.; Ghodbane, H.; Ayad, M. Y.; Bahri, M.

    2016-07-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional energy conversion for various applications in stationary power plants, portable power device and transportation. PEM fuel cells provide low operating temperature and high-energy efficiency with near zero emission. A PEM fuel cell is a multiple distinct parts device and a series of mass, energy, transport through gas channels, electric current transport through membrane electrode assembly and electrochemical reactions at the triple-phase boundaries. These processes play a decisive role in determining the performance of the Fuel cell, so that studies on the phenomena of gas flows and the performance modelling are made deeply. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the state of the art on the Study of the phenomena of gas flow and performance modelling of PEMFC.

  2. Effect of gas composition and gas utilisation on the dynamic response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weydahl, Helge; Møller-Holst, Steffen; Børresen, Børre

    The transient response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was measured for various cathode gas compositions and gas utilisations (fraction of supplied reactant gas which is consumed in the fuel cell reaction). For a PEMFC operated on pure hydrogen and oxygen, the cell voltage response to current steps was fast, with response times in the range 0.01-1 s, depending on the applied current. For a PEMFC supplied with air as cathode gas, an additional relaxation process related to oxygen transport caused a slower response (approximately 0.1-2 s depending on the applied current). Response curves up to approximately 0.01 s were apparently unaffected by gas composition and utilisation and were most likely dominated by capacitive discharge of the double layer and reaction with surplus oxygen residing in the cathode. The utilisation of hydrogen had only a minor effect on the response curves, while the utilisation of air severely influenced the PEMFC dynamics. Results suggested that air flow rates should be high to obtain rapid PEMFC response.

  3. Gas transfer model to design a ventilator for neonatal total liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Mirko; Cammi, Antonio; Bagnoli, Paola

    2015-12-01

    The study was aimed to optimize the gas transfer in an innovative ventilator for neonatal Total Liquid Ventilation (TLV) that integrates the pumping and oxygenation functions in a non-volumetric pulsatile device made of parallel flat silicone membranes. A computational approach was adopted to evaluate oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges between the liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) and the oxygenating gas, as a function of the geometrical parameter of the device. A 2D semi-empirical model was implemented to this purpose using Comsol Multiphysics to study both the fluid dynamics and the gas exchange in the ventilator. Experimental gas exchanges measured with a preliminary prototype were compared to the simulation outcomes to prove the model reliability. Different device configurations were modeled to identify the optimal design able to guarantee the desired gas transfer. Good agreement between experimental and simulation outcomes was obtained, validating the model. The optimal configuration, able to achieve the desired gas exchange (ΔpCO2 = 16.5 mmHg and ΔpO2 = 69 mmHg), is a device comprising 40 modules, 300 mm in length (total exchange area = 2.28 m(2)). With this configuration gas transfer performance is satisfactory for all the simulated settings, proving good adaptability of the device.

  4. Gas transfer model to design a ventilator for neonatal total liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Mirko; Cammi, Antonio; Bagnoli, Paola

    2015-12-01

    The study was aimed to optimize the gas transfer in an innovative ventilator for neonatal Total Liquid Ventilation (TLV) that integrates the pumping and oxygenation functions in a non-volumetric pulsatile device made of parallel flat silicone membranes. A computational approach was adopted to evaluate oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges between the liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) and the oxygenating gas, as a function of the geometrical parameter of the device. A 2D semi-empirical model was implemented to this purpose using Comsol Multiphysics to study both the fluid dynamics and the gas exchange in the ventilator. Experimental gas exchanges measured with a preliminary prototype were compared to the simulation outcomes to prove the model reliability. Different device configurations were modeled to identify the optimal design able to guarantee the desired gas transfer. Good agreement between experimental and simulation outcomes was obtained, validating the model. The optimal configuration, able to achieve the desired gas exchange (ΔpCO2 = 16.5 mmHg and ΔpO2 = 69 mmHg), is a device comprising 40 modules, 300 mm in length (total exchange area = 2.28 m(2)). With this configuration gas transfer performance is satisfactory for all the simulated settings, proving good adaptability of the device. PMID:26475493

  5. Effects of air current speed on gas exchange in plant leaves and plant canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Tsuruyama, J.; Shibuya, T.; Yoshida, M.; Kiyota, M.

    To obtain basic data on adequate air circulation to enhance plant growth in a closed plant culture system in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS), an investigation was made of the effects of the air current speed ranging from 0.01 to 1.0 m s-1 on photosynthesis and transpiration in sweetpotato leaves and photosynthesis in tomato seedlings canopies. The gas exchange rates in leaves and canopies were determined by using a chamber method with an infrared gas analyzer. The net photosynthetic rate and the transpiration rate increased significantly as the air current speeds increased from 0.01 to 0.2 m s-1. The transpiration rate increased gradually at air current speeds ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 m s-1 while the net photosynthetic rate was almost constant at air current speeds ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 m s-1. The increase in the net photosynthetic and transpiration rates were strongly dependent on decreased boundary-layer resistances against gas diffusion. The net photosynthetic rate of the plant canopy was doubled by an increased air current speed from 0.1 to 1.0 m s-1 above the plant canopy. The results demonstrate the importance of air movement around plants for enhancing the gas exchange in the leaf, especially in plant canopies in the CELSS.

  6. Canopy photosynthesis and transpiration in microgravity: gas exchange measurements aboard Mir.

    PubMed

    Monje, O; Bingham, G E; Carman, J G; Campbell, W F; Salisbury, F B; Eames, B K; Sytchev, V; Levinskikh, M A; Podolsky, I

    2000-01-01

    The SVET Greenhouse on-board the Orbital Station Mir was used to measure canopy photosynthesis and transpiration rates for the first time in space. During the Greenhouse IIB experiment on Mir (June-January 1997), carbon and water vapor fluxes from two wheat (cv. Superdwarf) canopies were measured using the US developed Gas Exchange Measurement System (GEMS). Gas analyzers capable of resolving CO2 concentration differences of 5 micromoles mol-1 against a background of 0.9% CO2, are necessary to measure photosynthetic and respiratory rates on Mir. The ability of the GEMS gas analyzers to measure these CO2 concentration differences was determined during extensive ground calibrations. Similarly, the sensitivity of the analyzers to water vapor was sufficient to accurately measure canopy evapotranspiration. Evapotranspiration, which accounted for over 90% of the water added to the root zone, was estimated using gas exchange and used to estimate substrate moisture content. This paper presents canopy photosynthesis and transpiration data during the peak vegetative phase of development in microgravity.

  7. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H]4+ ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 446 Å2; the [M + 3H]3+ ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å2 and 367 Å2. Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H]3+ ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H]4+ ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H]4+ ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  8. Modeling exact exchange potential in spherically confined atoms.

    PubMed

    Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2015-10-15

    In this work, local exchange potentials corresponding to the Hartree-Fock (HF) electron density have been obtained using the Zhao-Morrison-Parr method for a number of closed-shell confined atoms and ions. The exchange potentials obtained and the resulting density were compared with those given by the Becke-Johnson (BJ) model potential. It is demonstrated that introducing a scaling factor to the BJ potential allows improving the quality of the resulting density. The optimum scaling factor increases with decreasing confinement radius. The performance of Karasiev and Ludeña's SCα-LDA method as well as of the Becke-88 exchange potential for reproducing the HF electron densities in confined atoms has been also examined.

  9. Effects of perturbative exchanges in a QCD-string model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Weda; J. Tjon

    2004-03-01

    The QCD-string model for baryons derived by Simonov and used for the calculation of baryon magnetic moments in a previous paper is extended to include also perturbative gluon and meson exchanges. The mass spectrum of the baryon multiplet is studied. For the meson interaction either the pseudoscalar or pseudovector coupling is used. Predictions are compared with the experimental data. Besides these exchanges the influence of excited quark orbitals on the baryon ground state are considered by performing a multichannel calculation. The nucleon-Delta splitting increases due to the mixing of higher quark states while the baryon magnetic momenta decrease. The multichannel calculation with perturbative exchanges is shown to yield reasonable magnetic moments while the mass spectrum is close to experiment.

  10. A conceptual model of Verbal Exchange Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kathleen F.; Valerio, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To address a gap in understanding of verbal exchange (oral and aural) health literacy by describing the systematic development of a verbal exchange health literacy (VEHL) definition and model which hypothesizes the role of VEHL in health outcomes. Methods Current health literacy and communication literature was systematically reviewed and combined with qualitative patient and provider data that were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results Analyses of current literature and formative data indicated the importance of verbal exchange in the clinical setting and revealed various factors associated with the patient-provider relationship and their characteristics that influence decision making and health behaviors. VEHL is defined as the ability to speak and listen that facilitates exchanging, understanding, and interpreting of health information for health-decision making, disease management and navigation of the healthcare system. A model depiction of mediating and influenced factors is presented. Conclusion A definition and model of VEHL is a step towards addressing a gap in health literacy knowledge and provides a foundation for examining the influence of VEHL on health outcomes. Practice Implications VEHL is an extension of current descriptions of health literacy and has implications for patient-provider communication and health decision making. PMID:24291145

  11. Dynamics of Exchange at Gas-Zeolite Interfaces 1: Pure Component n-Butane and Isobutane

    SciTech Connect

    CHANDROSS,MICHAEL E.; WEBB III,EDMUND B.; GREST,GARY S.; MARTIN,MARCUS G.; THOMPSON,AIDAN P.; ROTH,M.W.

    2000-07-13

    The authors present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of n-butane and isobutane in silicalite. They begin with a comparison of the bulk adsorption and diffusion properties for two different parameterizations of the interaction potential between the hydrocarbon species, both of which have been shown to reproduce experimental gas-liquid coexistence curves. They examine diffusion as a function of the loading of the zeolite, as well as the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant at loading and for infinite dilution. They continue with simulations in which interfaces are formed between single component gases and the zeolite. After reaching equilibrium, they examine the dynamics of exchange between the bulk gas and the zeolite. Finally, they calculate the permeability of the zeolite for n-butane and isobutane as a function of pressure. Their simulations are performed for a number of different gas temperatures and pressures, covering a wide range of state points.

  12. The Viking gas exchange experiment results from Chryse and Utopia surface samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Berdahl, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Immediate gas changes occurred when untreated Martian surface samples were humidified and/or wet by an aqueous nutrient medium in the Viking lander gas exchange experiment. The evolutions of N2, CO2, and Ar are mainly associated with soil surface desorption caused by water vapor, while O2 evolution is primarily associated with decomposition of superoxides inferred to be present on Mars. On recharges with fresh nutrient and test gas, only CO2 was given off, and its rate of evolution decreased with each recharge. This CO2 evolution is thought to come from the oxidation of organics present in the nutrient by gamma Fe2O3 in the surface samples. Atmospheric analyses were also performed at both sites. The mean atmospheric composition from four analyses is N2, 2.3%; O2, not greater than 0.15%; Ar, 1.5% and CO2, 96.2%.

  13. Development of models for exchange of electronic documents

    SciTech Connect

    Glavev, Victor

    2014-11-18

    The report presents a model for exchange of electronic documents between different government administrations. It defines electronic messages that are transmitted between them and the way that messages should be processed by software systems. The proposed approach is sufficiently general and allows use of the best applicable information technologies such as data presentation structures and communication protocols. Within the study, a simple implementation of the model is implemented and deployed in various government administrations in Republic of Bulgaria.

  14. Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange across contrasting biogeochemical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Ryan; Schneider-Zapp, Klaus; Upstill-Goddard, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Air-sea gas exchange is important to the global partitioning of CO2.Exchange fluxes are products of an air-sea gas concentration difference, ΔC, and a gas transfer velocity, kw. The latter is controlled by the rate of turbulent diffusion at the air-sea interface but it cannot be directly measured and has a high uncertainty that is now considered one of the greatest challenges to quantifying net global air-sea CO2 exchange ...(Takahashi et al., 2009). One important control on kw is exerted by sea surface surfactants that arise both naturally from biological processes and through anthropogenic activity. They influence gas exchange in two fundamental ways: as a monolayer physical barrier and through modifying sea surface hydrodynamics and hence turbulent energy transfer. These effects have been demonstrated in the laboratory with artificial surfactants ...(Bock et al., 1999; Goldman et al., 1988) and through purposeful surfactant releases in coastal waters .(.).........().(Brockmann et al., 1982) and in the open ocean (Salter et al., 2011). Suppression of kwin these field experiments was ~5-55%. While changes in both total surfactant concentration and the composition of the natural surfactant pool might be expected to impact kw, the required in-situ studies are lacking. New data collected from the coastal North Sea in 2012-2013 shows significant spatio-temporal variability in the surfactant activity of organic matter within the sea surface microlayer that ranges from 0.07-0.94 mg/L T-X-100 (AC voltammetry). The surfactant activities show a strong winter/summer seasonal bias and general decrease in concentration with increasing distance from the coastline possibly associated with changing terrestrial vs. phytoplankton sources. Gas exchange experiments of this seawater using a novel laboratory tank and gas tracers (CH4 and SF6) demonstrate a 12-45% reduction in kw compared to surfactant-free water. Seasonally there is higher gas exchange suppression in the summer

  15. Poisson-Fermi Modeling of the Ion Exchange Mechanism of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Hsieh, Hann-Jeng; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-03-17

    The ion exchange mechanism of the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) crystallized by Liao et al. in 2012 is studied using the Poisson-Fermi theory developed by Liu and Eisenberg in 2014. A cycle of binding and unbinding is proposed to account for the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange function of the NCX molecule. Outputs of the theory include electric and steric fields of ions with different sizes, correlations of ions of different charges, and polarization of water, along with number densities of ions, water molecules, and interstitial voids. We calculate the electrostatic and steric potentials of the four binding sites in NCX, i.e., three Na(+) binding sites and one Ca(2+) binding site, with protein charges provided by the software PDB2PQR. The energy profiles of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions along their respective Na(+) and Ca(2+) pathways in experimental conditions enable us to explain the fundamental mechanism of NCX that extrudes intracellular Ca(2+) across the cell membrane against its chemical gradient by using the downhill gradient of Na(+). Atomic and numerical details of the binding sites are given to illustrate the 3 Na(+):1 Ca(2+) stoichiometry of NCX. The protein NCX is a catalyst. It does not provide (free) energy for transport. All energy for transport in our model comes from the ions in surrounding baths. PMID:26906748

  16. Gas-Surface Chemical Exchange in the Near-surface Atmosphere of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    The very tenuous O2 atmosphere of Europa is a near-surface (or surface-bounded) atmosphere [1]. It is produced by the radiolysis of Europa's surface due to exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic magnetospheric plasma ions and electrons. Earlier we developed a collisional Monte Carlo model of Europa's atmosphere [2] accounting for adsorption, thermalization and re-emission of condensed O2, a stable decomposition product of H2O radiolysis. Dissociation and ionization by magnetospheric electron and solar UV-photon impact, and collisional ejection from the atmosphere by the low energy plasma were also taken into account. It was found that to account for the production of oxygen emission observed by HST [3] larger surface fluxes of O2 are required than those assumed in earlier work from measured fluxes of magnetospheric particles [4]. This has since been shown to be due to the fact that radiolysis is occurring in a regolith and not on a laboratory surface [5]. In this report we present the results of an expanded Monte Carlo model of Europa's atmosphere. In this model the sublimation and sputtering sources of H2O molecules and their molecular fragments are also included. Therefore, we account for water and oxygen photochemistry in the near surface atmospheric region and for adsorption-desorption of radiolytic water products onto the satellite surface. This expanded model allowed us to emphasize the important role of chemical exchange in the atmosphere-surface interface of Europa. The numerical modeling of chemical composition in both the near-surface gas-phase boundary region and the satellite surface provides a more complete accounting of the chemical pathways occurring in the icy satellite surface material following decomposition by the solar ultraviolet radiation and the energetic magnetospheric plasma. The model will eventually be expanded to include the effect of the release of trace amounts of SO2 and CO2 that are trapped in the surface ice. [1

  17. Effect of a patent foramen ovale on pulmonary gas exchange efficiency at rest and during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Andrew T.; Stickland, Michael K.; Amann, Markus; O'Brien, Matthew J.; Hokanson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is ∼30%, and this source of right-to-left shunt could result in greater pulmonary gas exchange impairment at rest and during exercise. The aim of this work was to determine if individuals with an asymptomatic PFO (PFO+) have greater pulmonary gas exchange inefficiency at rest and during exercise than subjects without a PFO (PFO−). Separated by 1 h of rest, 8 PFO+ and 8 PFO− subjects performed two incremental cycle ergometer exercise tests to voluntary exhaustion while breathing either room air or hypoxic gas [fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) = 0.12]. Using echocardiography, we detected small, intermittent boluses of saline contrast bubbles entering directly into the left atrium within 3 heart beats at rest and during both exercise conditions in PFO+. These findings suggest a qualitatively small intracardiac shunt at rest and during exercise in PFO+. The alveolar-to-arterial oxygen difference (AaDo2) was significantly (P < 0.05) different between PFO+ and PFO− in normoxia (5.9 ± 5.1 vs. 0.5 ± 3.5 mmHg) and hypoxia (10.1 ± 5.9 vs. 4.1 ± 3.1 mmHg) at rest, but not during exercise. However, arterial oxygen saturation was significantly different between PFO+ and PFO− at peak exercise in normoxia (94.3 ± 0.9 vs. 95.8 ± 1.0%) as a result of a significant difference in esophageal temperature (38.4 ± 0.3 vs. 38.0 ± 0.3°C). An asymptomatic PFO contributes to pulmonary gas exchange inefficiency at rest but not during exercise in healthy humans and therefore does not explain intersubject variability in the AaDo2 at maximal exercise. PMID:21372097

  18. An Experimental Investigation of an Exhaust-gas-to-air Heat Exchanger for Use on Jet-stack-equipped Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Spies, Ray J , Jr

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the loss in exhaust-jet thrust and engine power resulting from the insertion of an exhaust-gas-to-air heat exchanger in a jet-type exhaust stack of an aircraft engine. The thermal performance of the heat exchanger was also determined.

  19. Process-Scale Modeling of Atmosphere-Snowpack Exchange of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. A.; Doskey, P. V.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2013-12-01

    Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. Previous studies indicate nitrogen oxides (NOx) are generated in snowpack interstitial air through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-). Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate exchange of NOx with snowpack, which affects the Arctic ozone budget and climate. To better understand the dynamics of cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx in the Arctic, we collected 2 years of meteorological and chemical data in and above the snowpack at Summit, Greenland. The comprehensive dataset indicates NOx emissions are episodic, with NOx enhancements in snowpack in early spring during high wind speed events (10-20 mph), which elevate NOx levels to ~500 pptv at depths of 2.5 m. Analysis of the observations will be based upon application of a 1-D process-scale model of atmosphere-snowpack exchange of NOx. The model will include representations of the snowpack chemistry in gas and aqueous phases, mass transfer of chemical species between phases, and physical transport by diffusion and wind pumping. The model will calculate the chemical and physical tendencies in three dimensions: depth, time, and intensity. Analysis of the tendencies will allow us to perform model sensitivity tests of pertinent snowpack physical and chemical processes. The end-goal of the project is to simplify the major tendencies into a parameterized model add-on for use in global models to determine the importance of properly representing snowpack in global model simulations.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Gas-Side Performance of a Compact Finned-Tube Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, Louis

    1959-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure-drop data were obtained experimentally for the gas side of a liquid-metal to air, compact finned-tube heat exchanger. The heat exchanger was fabricated from 0.185-inch Inconel tubing in an inline array. The fins were made of 310 stainless-steel- clad copper with a total thickness of 0.010 inch, and the fin pitch was 15.3 fins per inch. The liquid used as the heating medium was sodium. The heat-exchanger inlet gas temperature was varied from 5100 to 1260 R by burning JP fuel for airflow rates of 0.4 to 10.5 pounds per second corresponding to an approximate Reynolds number range of 300 to 9000. The sodium inlet temperature was held at 1400 R with the exception of a few runs taken at 1700 and 1960 R. The maximum ratio of surface temperature to air bulk temperature was 1.45. Friction-factor data with heat transfer were best represented by a single line when the density and viscosity of Reynolds number were evaluated at the average film temperature. At the lower Reynolds numbers reported, the friction data with heat transfer plotted slightly above the friction data without heat transfer. The density of the friction factor was calculated at the average bulk temperature. Heat-transfer results of this investigation were correlated by evaluating the physical properties of air (specific heat, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) at the film temperature.

  1. The impact of lower sea-ice extent on Arctic greenhouse-gas exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Christensen, Torben R.; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Rysgaard, Søren; McGuire, A. David; Miller, Paul A.; Walker, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    In September 2012, Arctic sea-ice extent plummeted to a new record low: two times lower than the 1979–2000 average. Often, record lows in sea-ice cover are hailed as an example of climate change impacts in the Arctic. Less apparent, however, are the implications of reduced sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean for marine–atmosphere CO2 exchange. Sea-ice decline has been connected to increasing air temperatures at high latitudes. Temperature is a key controlling factor in the terrestrial exchange of CO2 and methane, and therefore the greenhouse-gas balance of the Arctic. Despite the large potential for feedbacks, many studies do not connect the diminishing sea-ice extent with changes in the interaction of the marine and terrestrial Arctic with the atmosphere. In this Review, we assess how current understanding of the Arctic Ocean and high-latitude ecosystems can be used to predict the impact of a lower sea-ice cover on Arctic greenhouse-gas exchange.

  2. Modeling tidal exchange and dispersion in Boston Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Butman, Bradford

    1992-01-01

    Tidal dispersion and the horizontal exchange of water between Boston Harbor and the surrounding ocean are examined with a high-resolution (200 m) depth-averaged numerical model. The strongly varying bathymetry and coastline geometry of the harbor generate complex spatial patterns in the modeled tidal currents which are verified by shipboard acoustic Doppler surveys. Lagrangian exchange experiments demonstrate that tidal currents rapidly exchange and mix material near the inlets of the harbor due to asymmetry in the ebb/flood response. This tidal mixing zone extends roughly a tidal excursion from the inlets and plays an important role in the overall flushing of the harbor. Because the tides can only efficiently mix material in this limited region, however, harbor flushing must be considered a two step process: rapid exchange in the tidal mixing zone, followed by flushing of the tidal mixing zone by nontidal residual currents. Estimates of embayment flushing based on tidal calculations alone therefore can significantly overestimate the flushing time that would be expected under typical environmental conditions. Particle-release simulations from point sources also demonstrate that while the tides efficiently exchange material in the vicinity of the inlets, the exact nature of dispersion from point sources is extremely sensitive to the timing and location of the release, and the distribution of particles is streaky and patchlike. This suggests that high-resolution modeling of dispersion from point sources in these regions must be performed explicitly and cannot be parameterized as a plume with Gaussian-spreading in a larger scale flow field.

  3. Effect of multi-stream heat exchanger on performance of natural gas liquefaction with mixed refrigerant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Lim, Hye Su; Choe, Kun Hyung

    2012-12-01

    A thermodynamic study is carried out to investigate the effect of multi-stream heat exchanger on the performance of natural gas (NG) liquefaction with mixed refrigerant (MR). A cold stream (low-pressure MR) is in thermal contact with opposite flow of two hot streams (high-pressure MR and NG feed) at the same time. In typical process simulation with commercial software (such as Aspen HYSYS®), the liquefaction performance is estimated with a method of minimum temperature approach, simply assuming that two hot streams have the same temperature. In this study, local energy balance equations are rigorously solved with temperature-dependent properties of MR and NG feed, and are linked to the thermodynamic cycle analysis. The figure of merit (FOM) is quantitatively examined in terms of UA (the product of overall heat transfer coefficient and heat exchange area) between respective streams. In a single-stage MR process, it is concluded that the temperature profile from HYSYS is difficult to realize in practice, and the FOM value from HYSYS is an over-estimate, but can be closely achieved with a proper heat-exchanger design. It is also demonstrated that there exists a unique optimal ratio in three UA's, and no direct heat exchanger between hot streams is recommended.

  4. Hypoxia and hypercarbia in endophagous insects: Larval position in the plant gas exchange network is key.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Casas, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Gas composition is an important component of any micro-environment. Insects, as the vast majority of living organisms, depend on O2 and CO2 concentrations in the air they breathe. Low O2 (hypoxia), and high CO2 (hypercarbia) levels can have a dramatic effect. For phytophagous insects that live within plant tissues (endophagous lifestyle), gas is exchanged between ambient air and the atmosphere within the insect habitat. The insect larva contributes to the modification of this environment by expiring CO2. Yet, knowledge on the gas exchange network in endophagous insects remains sparse. Our study identified mechanisms that modulate gas composition in the habitat of endophagous insects. Our aim was to show that the mere position of the insect larva within plant tissues could be used as a proxy for estimating risk of occurrence of hypoxia and hypercarbia, despite the widely diverse life history traits of these organisms. We developed a conceptual framework for a gas diffusion network determining gas composition in endophagous insect habitats. We applied this framework to mines, galls and insect tunnels (borers) by integrating the numerous obstacles along O2 and CO2 pathways. The nature and the direction of gas transfers depended on the physical structure of the insect habitat, the photosynthesis activity as well as stomatal behavior in plant tissues. We identified the insect larva position within the gas diffusion network as a predictor of risk exposure to hypoxia and hypercarbia. We ranked endophagous insect habitats in terms of risk of exposure to hypoxia and/or hypercarbia, from the more to the less risky as cambium mines>borer tunnels≫galls>bark mines>mines in aquatic plants>upper and lower surface mines. Furthermore, we showed that the photosynthetically active tissues likely assimilate larval CO2 produced. In addition, temperature of the microhabitat and atmospheric CO2 alter gas composition in the insect habitat. We predict that (i) hypoxia indirectly favors

  5. Hypoxia and hypercarbia in endophagous insects: Larval position in the plant gas exchange network is key.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Casas, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Gas composition is an important component of any micro-environment. Insects, as the vast majority of living organisms, depend on O2 and CO2 concentrations in the air they breathe. Low O2 (hypoxia), and high CO2 (hypercarbia) levels can have a dramatic effect. For phytophagous insects that live within plant tissues (endophagous lifestyle), gas is exchanged between ambient air and the atmosphere within the insect habitat. The insect larva contributes to the modification of this environment by expiring CO2. Yet, knowledge on the gas exchange network in endophagous insects remains sparse. Our study identified mechanisms that modulate gas composition in the habitat of endophagous insects. Our aim was to show that the mere position of the insect larva within plant tissues could be used as a proxy for estimating risk of occurrence of hypoxia and hypercarbia, despite the widely diverse life history traits of these organisms. We developed a conceptual framework for a gas diffusion network determining gas composition in endophagous insect habitats. We applied this framework to mines, galls and insect tunnels (borers) by integrating the numerous obstacles along O2 and CO2 pathways. The nature and the direction of gas transfers depended on the physical structure of the insect habitat, the photosynthesis activity as well as stomatal behavior in plant tissues. We identified the insect larva position within the gas diffusion network as a predictor of risk exposure to hypoxia and hypercarbia. We ranked endophagous insect habitats in terms of risk of exposure to hypoxia and/or hypercarbia, from the more to the less risky as cambium mines>borer tunnels≫galls>bark mines>mines in aquatic plants>upper and lower surface mines. Furthermore, we showed that the photosynthetically active tissues likely assimilate larval CO2 produced. In addition, temperature of the microhabitat and atmospheric CO2 alter gas composition in the insect habitat. We predict that (i) hypoxia indirectly favors

  6. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  7. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, K.E.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of these materials to a simulated coal combustion environment for relatively short periods of time (10-50 hours). Heat exchanger tubes from DuPont Lanxide Composite Inc. were cut and infiltrated with Cr by heating in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed. This resulted in continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. The Cr-free and the Cr-infiltrated specimens were reacted with the molten Illinois No. 6 slag for 2 and 20 h at 1260{degrees}C, and the reaction layers examined with SEM and EDX. In the Cr-free specimens, the segregation of Fe and the precipitation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were detected near the liquid/gas interface, but no evidence of corrosion was present. In the Cr-infiltrate specimens, corrosion was evident, since a rearrangement and segregation of the Cr-rich grains occurred toward the surface of the molten slag. In addition, evidence of the diffusion of major quantities of Fe was observed from the liquid slag into the Cr-rich layer formed by infiltration.

  8. Oxygen isotope exchange between refractory inclusion in Allende and solar nebula gas.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, H; Ito, M; Nagasawa, H

    1998-12-01

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite was analyzed and found to contain melilite crystals with extreme oxygen-isotope composition (approximately 5 percent oxygen-16 enrichment relative to terrestrial oxygen-16). Some of the melilite is also anomalously enriched in oxygen-16 compared with oxygen isotopes measured in other CAIs. The oxygen isotopic variation measured among the minerals (melilite, spinel, and fassaite) indicates that crystallization of the CAI started from oxygen-16-rich materials that were probably liquid droplets in the solar nebula, and oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding oxygen-16-poor nebular gas progressed through the crystallization of the CAI. Additional oxygen isotope exchange also occurred during subsequent reheating events in the solar nebula.

  9. Oxygen isotope exchange between refractory inclusion in allende and solar nebula Gas

    PubMed

    Yurimoto; Ito; Nagasawa

    1998-12-01

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite was analyzed and found to contain melilite crystals with extreme oxygen-isotope compositions ( approximately 5 percent oxygen-16 enrichment relative to terrestrial oxygen-16). Some of the melilite is also anomalously enriched in oxygen-16 compared with oxygen isotopes measured in other CAIs. The oxygen isotopic variation measured among the minerals (melilite, spinel, and fassaite) indicates that crystallization of the CAI started from oxygen-16-rich materials that were probably liquid droplets in the solar nebula, and oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding oxygen-16-poor nebular gas progressed through the crystallization of the CAI. Additional oxygen isotope exchange also occurred during subsequent reheating events in the solar nebula.

  10. Optical Pumping Spin Exchange 3He Gas Cells for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Jung, Y.; Woo, S.; Yurov, M.; Jang, J.

    2009-08-01

    We present a device for spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of polarized noble gases for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A method and design of apparatus for pumping the polarization of noble gases is described. The method and apparatus enable production, storage and usage of hyperpolarized noble gases for different purposes, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human and animal subjects. Magnetic imaging agents breathed into lungs can be observed by the radio waves of the MRI scanner and report back physical and functional information about lung's health and desease. The technique known as spin exchange optical pumping is used. Nuclear magnetic resonance is implemented to measure the polarization of hyperpolarized gas. The cells prepared and sealed under high vacuum after handling Alkali metals into the cell and filling with the 3He-N2 mixture. The cells could be refilled. The 3He reaches around 50% polarization in 5-15 hours.

  11. Heat transfer in a compact tubular heat exchanger with helium gas at 3.5 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Douglas A.; Glover, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of circular tubes in parallel brazed to a grooved base plate. This tube specimen heat exchanger was tested in an apparatus which radiatively heated the specimen on one side at a heat flux of up to 54 W/sq cm, and cooled the specimen with helium gas at 3.5 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 3000 to 35,000. The measured friction factor of the tube specimen was lower than that of a circular tube with fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to entrance and exit losses. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in circular tubes.

  12. A modified photo- and magnetoacoustic multigas analyzer applied in gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Clemensen, P; Christensen, P; Norsk, P; Grønlund, J

    1994-06-01

    The feasibility of replacing a conventional mass spectrometer (MS) with a specially modified multicomponent (O2, CO2, Freon 22, and SF6) acoustic infrared and paramagnetic (IR/PM) gas analyzer in inert gas-rebreathing and metabolic gas exchange measurements has been investigated. Rebreathing variables were determined simultaneously with the MS and IR/PM analyzers in duplicate measurements at rest and during submaximal exercise in 10 subjects. The differences (means +/- SD, IR/PM - MS) were 0.028 +/- 0.048 liters [functional residual capacity (FRC)], 0.18 +/- 0.38 l/min [cardiac output (Qc)], -0.006 +/- 0.030 l/min [O2 consumption (VO2)], and -33 +/- 108 ml [combined lung tissue and capillary blood volume (Vti,c)]. The coefficients of variation on repeated estimates were 5.8% (FRC), 5.4% (Qc), 6.2% (VO2), and 17% (Vti,c) with the IR/PM analyzer and 5.9% (FRC), 4.2% (Qc), 5.0% (VO2), and 9.8% (Vti,c) with the MS. The differences (IR/PM - MS) obtained in mixed-expirate measurements were -0.006 +/- 0.020 l/min (VO2) and 0.020 +/- 0.021 l/min (CO2 production). Breath-by-breath estimates of VO2 and CO2 production with the IR/PM analyzer were, on average, 2.4 and 4.4% higher than the MS estimates, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the IR/PM gas analyzer, when appropriately modified, can substitute for a complex MS in a variety of noninvasive pulmonary gas exchange measurements.

  13. Performance analysis of a medical record exchanges model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Liou, Der-Ming

    2007-03-01

    Electronic medical record exchange among hospitals can provide more information for physician diagnosis and reduce costs from duplicate examinations. In this paper, we proposed and implemented a medical record exchange model. According to our study, exchange interface servers (EISs) are designed for hospitals to manage the information communication through the intra and interhospital networks linked with a medical records database. An index service center can be given responsibility for managing the EIS and publishing the addresses and public keys. The prototype system has been implemented to generate, parse, and transfer the health level seven query messages. Moreover, the system can encrypt and decrypt a message using the public-key encryption algorithm. The queuing theory is applied to evaluate the performance of our proposed model. We estimated the service time for each queue of the CPU, database, and network, and measured the response time and possible bottlenecks of the model. The capacity of the model is estimated to process the medical records of about 4000 patients/h in the 1-MB network backbone environments, which comprises about the 4% of the total outpatients in Taiwan.

  14. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  15. Gas exchange in Quercus rubra (northern red oak) during a drought: analysis of relations among photosynthesis, transpiration, and leaf conductance.

    PubMed

    Weber, J. A.; Gates, D. M.

    1990-12-01

    Development of water stress in leaves of mature Quercus rubra L. caused a marked midday depression in photosynthesis (A) and transpiration (E). At external CO(2) partial pressures of 100-110 Pa, a constant temperature of 30 degrees C and a constant photosynthetic photon flux density of about 1000 micromol m(-2) s(-1), A was 8 micromol m(-2) at low leaf water potentials (-1.5 to -2.0 MPa), whereas it was 20 micromol m(-2) s(-1) in non-stressed leaves (-1.0 MPa). At lower external CO(2) partial pressures, the effect of low leaf water potential on A was less. The midday depression in gas exchange was relieved by an overnight rain of 2.5 cm. No difference in carboxylation efficiency or CO(2) compensation point was found between leaves before and after rain, The relationship between A and E was linear for a given external CO(2) partial pressure, but the slope varied with CO(2) concentration. Modification of the model of stomatal response proposed by Ball et al. (1987) produced a linear relationship between leaf conductance and a factor incorporating A, relative humidity, and CO(2). The data indicate that gas exchange in leaves of mature northern red oak respond rapidly to relief of drought with no indication of long-term photoinhibition. PMID:14972919

  16. The North American Electric Grid as an Exchange Network: An Approach for Evaluating Energy Resource Composition and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation.

    PubMed

    Kodra, Evan; Sheldon, Seth; Dolen, Ryan; Zik, Ory

    2015-11-17

    Using a complex network framework, the North American electric grid is modeled as a dynamic, equilibrium-based supply chain of more than 100 interconnected power control areas (PCAs) in the contiguous United States, Canada, and Northern Mexico. Monthly generation and yearly inter-PCA exchange data reported by PCAs are used to estimate a directed network topology. Variables including electricity, as well as primary fuels, technologies, and greenhouse gas emissions associated with power generation can be traced through the network, providing energy source composition statistics for power consumers at a given location. Results show opportunities for more precise measurement by consumers of emissions occurring on their behalf at power plants. Specifically, we show a larger range of possible factors (∼0 to 1.3 kgCO2/kWh) as compared to the range provided by the EPA's eGRID analysis (∼0.4 to 1 kgCO2/kWh). We also show that 66-73% of the variance in PCA-level estimated emissions savings is the result of PCA-to-PCA differences that are not captured by the larger eGRID subregions. The increased precision could bolster development of effective greenhouse gas reporting and mitigation policies. This study also highlights the need for improvements in the consistency and spatiotemporal resolution of PCA-level generation and exchange data reporting.

  17. Analysis of cutaneous and internal gill gas exchange morphology in early larval amphibians, Pseudophryne bibronii and Crinia georgiana.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-08-01

    This study uses stereological techniques to examine body, internal gill and cardiovascular morphology of two larval amphibians, Pseudophryne bibronii and Crinia georgiana, to evaluate the roles of diffusive and convective gas exchange. Gosner stage 27 specimens were prepared for light microscopy and six parallel sections of equal distance taken through the body as well as a further six through the heart and internal gills. Body, internal gill and heart volume as well as body and internal gill surface areas were determined. The harmonic mean distance across the internal gills was also measured and used to estimate oxygen diffusive conductance, DO₂. The species were of similar body size and surface area, but the heart and internal gills were larger in P. bibronii, which may represent precursors for greater growth of the species beyond stage 27. The much larger surface area of the skin compared to the internal gills in both species suggests it is the main site for gas exchange, with the gills supplementing oxygen uptake. The sparse cutaneous capillary network suggests diffusion is the main oxygen transport mechanism across the skin and directly into deeper tissues. A numerical model that simplifies larval shape, and has an internal (axial vessels) and external oxygen source, confirms that diffusion is able to maintain tissue oxygen with limited convective input.

  18. Simultaneous Measurement of Acetylene Reduction and Respiratory Gas Exchange of Attached Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Lawrence J.; Tjepkema, John D.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of acetylene reduction, carbon dioxide evolution and oxygen uptake by individual root nodules of intact nitrogen-fixing plants (Alnus rubra Bong.). The nodules were enclosed in a temperature-controlled leak-tight cuvette. Assay gas mixtures were passed through the cuvette at a constant, known flow rate and gas exchange was measured by the difference between inlet and outlet gas compositions. Gas concentrations were assayed by a combination of an automated gas chromatograph and a programmable electronic integrator. Carbon dioxide and ethylene evolution were determined with a coefficient of variation which was less than 2%, whereas the coefficient of variation for oxygen uptake measurements was less than 5%. Nodules subjected to repeated removal from and reinsertion into the cuvette and to long exposures of 10% v/v acetylene showed no irreversible decline in respiration or acetylene reduction. This system offers long-term stability and freedom from disturbance artifacts plus the ability to monitor continuously, rapidly and specifically the changes in root nodule activity caused by environmental perturbation. PMID:16662496

  19. Using Riverboat-Mounted Eddy Covariance for Direct Measurements of Air-water Gas Exchange in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Freitas, H.; Read, E.; Goulden, M. L.; Rocha, H.

    2007-12-01

    Gas evasion from Amazonian rivers and lakes to the atmosphere has been estimated to play an important role in the regional budget of carbon dioxide (Richey et al., 2002) and the global budget of methane (Melack et al., 2004). These flux estimates were calculated by combining remote sensing estimates of inundation area with water-side concentration gradients and gas transfer rates (piston velocities) estimated primarily from floating chamber measurements (footprint ~1 m2). The uncertainty in these fluxes was large, attributed primarily to uncertainty in the gas exchange parameterization. Direct measurements of the gas exchange coefficient are needed to improve the parameterizations in these environments, and therefore reduce the uncertainty in fluxes. The micrometeorological technique of eddy covariance is attractive since it is a direct measurement of gas exchange that samples over a much larger area than floating chambers, and is amenable to use from a moving platform. We present eddy covariance carbon dioxide exchange measurements made using a small riverboat in rivers and lakes in the central Amazon near Santarem, Para, Brazil. Water-side carbon dioxide concentration was measured in situ, and the gas exchange coefficient was calculated. We found the piston velocity at a site on the Amazon River to be similar to existing ocean-based parameterizations, whereas the piston velocity at a site on the Tapajos River was roughly a factor 5 higher. We hypothesize that the enhanced gas exchange at the Tapajos site was due to a shallow upwind fetch. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of boat-based eddy covariance on these rivers, and also the utility of a mobile platform to investigate spatial variability of gas exchange.

  20. Pion double charge exchange in a composite-meson model

    SciTech Connect

    Kezerashvili, R. Ya.; Boyko, V. S.

    2007-01-15

    The pion double charge exchange amplitude is evaluated in a composite-meson model based on the four-quark interaction. The model assumes that the mesons are two-quark systems and can interact with each other only through quark loops. To evaluate the meson exchange current contribution, the form factors of the two-pion decay modes of the {rho},{sigma}, and f{sub 0} mesons have been used in the calculations. The contribution of the four-quark box diagram has been taken into account as well as a contact diagram. The contributions of the {rho},{sigma}, and f{sub 0} mesons increase the forward scattering cross section, which depends weakly on the energy.

  1. Measuring and Modeling Component and Whole-System Carbon Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Bolstad

    2006-11-01

    We measured ecosystem/atmospheric carbon exchange through a range of methods covering a range of scales. We measured carbon (C) pool and flux for a number of previously poorly quantified ecosystems, developed measurement and modeling methods, and applied these to substantially increase the accuracy and reduce uncertainty in ecosystem/atmospheric C exchange at a range of scales. It appears most upland forests are weak to strong carbon sinks, and status depends largely on disturbance history and age. Net flux from wetland ecosystems appears to be from weak sinks to moderate sources of C to the atmosphere. We found limited evidence for a positive feedback of warming/drying to increased ecosystem C emissions. We further developed multi-source integration and modeling methods, including multiple towers, to scale estimates to landscapes and larger regions.

  2. Generalized Bogoliubov Polariton Model: An Application to Stock Exchange Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Anh, Chu; Anh, Truong Thi Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    A generalized Bogoliubov method for investigation non-simple and complex systems was developed. We take two branch polariton Hamiltonian model in second quantization representation and replace the energies of quasi-particles by two distribution functions of research objects. Application to stock exchange market was taken as an example, where the changing the form of return distribution functions from Boltzmann-like to Gaussian-like was studied.

  3. Tritium labelled nucleotides: Heterogeneous metal catalyzed exchange labelling of ATP with tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K. ); Morimoto, H.; Williams, P.G.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1991-09-01

    Adenosine 5{prime} triphosphate (ATP) in aqueous solution has been labeled by exchange with tritium gas in the presence of palladium oxide catalyst. Comparison with our experiments using Pd/BaSO{sub 4} as the catalyst shows that we have obtained product with higher specific activity and improved chemical purity. {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy of the tritiated ATP shows labelling in both the C-8 and C-2 positions, and the integral ratio of these positions was found to vary from 3:1 to 1:1 under different reaction conditions. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Hierarchy carbon paper for the gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chunyu; Wang, Baorong; Cheng, Xinqun

    This communication described the fabrication of a hierarchy carbon paper, and its application to the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The carbon paper was fabricated by growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers via covalently assembling metal nanocatalysts. Surface morphology observation revealed a highly uniform distribution of hydrophobic materials within the carbon paper. The contact angle to water of this carbon paper was not only very large but also particularly even. Polarization measurements verified that the hierarchy carbon paper facilitated the self-humidifying of PEM fuel cells, which could be mainly attributed to its higher hydrophobic property as diagnosed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  5. Numerical simulation of gas dynamics and heat exchange tasks in fuel assemblies of the nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuchenko, S. V.

    2014-11-12

    This report presents a PC-based program for solution gas dynamics and heat exchange mathematical tasks in fuel assemblies of the fast-neutron nuclear reactors. A fuel assembly consisting of bulk heat-generating elements, which are integrated together by the system of supply and pressure manifolds, is examined. Spherical heat-generating microelements, which contain nuclear fuel, are pulled into the heat-generating elements. Gaseous coolant proceed from supply manifolds to heat-generating elements, where it withdraws the nuclear reaction heat and assembles in pressure manifolds.

  6. Gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Gunther, Detlef; Ohata, Masaki

    2014-10-21

    A novel gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for the direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was proposed and demonstrated in the present study. The technique is based on a transfer of gas into particle, which can be directly analyzed by ICPMS. Particles from metal carbonyl gases such as Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6 are formed by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonium (NH3) gases within a newly developed gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The reaction mechanism of the gas to particle conversion is based on either oxidation of metal carbonyl gas by O3 or agglomeration of metal oxide with ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which is generated by the reaction of O3 and NH3. To separate the reaction gases (remaining O3 and NH3) from the formed particles, a previously reported gas exchange device (GED) was used and the in argon stabilized analyte particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS. This new technique provided limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 pL L(-1) (0.32 ng m(-3)), 0.02 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)), and 0.01 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)) for Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6, respectively, which were 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than those conventional applied for detecting these gases, e.g., gas chromatography with electron captured detector (GC-ECD) as well as Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The achieved LODs were also similar or slightly better than those for ICPMS coupled to GC. Since the gas to particle conversion technique can achieve the direct measurement of metal carbonyl gases as well as the removal of reaction and ambient gases from metal carbonyl gases, the technique is considered to be well suited to monitor gas quality in semiconductor industry, engine exhaust gases, and or waste incineration products.

  7. Gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Gunther, Detlef; Ohata, Masaki

    2014-10-21

    A novel gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for the direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was proposed and demonstrated in the present study. The technique is based on a transfer of gas into particle, which can be directly analyzed by ICPMS. Particles from metal carbonyl gases such as Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6 are formed by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonium (NH3) gases within a newly developed gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The reaction mechanism of the gas to particle conversion is based on either oxidation of metal carbonyl gas by O3 or agglomeration of metal oxide with ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which is generated by the reaction of O3 and NH3. To separate the reaction gases (remaining O3 and NH3) from the formed particles, a previously reported gas exchange device (GED) was used and the in argon stabilized analyte particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS. This new technique provided limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 pL L(-1) (0.32 ng m(-3)), 0.02 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)), and 0.01 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)) for Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6, respectively, which were 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than those conventional applied for detecting these gases, e.g., gas chromatography with electron captured detector (GC-ECD) as well as Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The achieved LODs were also similar or slightly better than those for ICPMS coupled to GC. Since the gas to particle conversion technique can achieve the direct measurement of metal carbonyl gases as well as the removal of reaction and ambient gases from metal carbonyl gases, the technique is considered to be well suited to monitor gas quality in semiconductor industry, engine exhaust gases, and or waste incineration products. PMID:25247610

  8. Exchange bias phenomenology and models of core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amílcar; Batlle, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    Some of the main experimental observations related to the occurrence of exchange bias in magnetic systems are reviewed, focusing the attention on the peculiar phenomenology associated to nanoparticles with core/shell structure as compared to thin film bilayers. The main open questions posed by the experimental observations are presented and contrasted to existing theories and models for exchange bias formulated up to date. We also present results of simulations based on a simple model of a core/shell nanoparticle in which the values of microscopic parameters such as anisotropy and exchange constants can be tuned in the core, shell and at the interfacial regions, offering new insight on the microscopic origin of the experimental phenomenology. A detailed study of the magnetic order of the interfacial spins shows compelling evidence that most of the experimentally observed effects can be qualitatively accounted within the context of this model and allows also to quantify the magnitude of the loop shifts in striking agreement with the macroscopic observed values.

  9. Flue gas carbon dioxide sequestration during water softening with ion-exchange fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Greenleaf, J.E.; SenGupta, A.K.

    2009-06-15

    This study examines the use of ion-exchange fibers (IX fibers) to permanently sequester carbon dioxide present in flue gas into an aqueous phase as calcium or magnesium alkalinity while concurrently softening hard water. The only process inputs besides carbon dioxide (or flue gas) are snowmelt (or rainwater); no other chemicals are required for the regeneration of the IX fibers. Importantly, the process is not energy intensive and carbon dioxide does not need to be compressed to excessive pressures (>150 psi) for efficient use. Sources of carbon dioxide do not require concentration and, therefore, the use of raw flue gas (similar to 17% CO{sub 2}) is feasible with the rate of sequestration governed only by the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. While valid for flue gas obtained from any combustion process (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.), emissions from oil or gas combustion may be more appropriate for use in the described process due to the absence of mercury and particulates. It should also be noted that the presence of sulfur dioxide in flue gas would not adversely affect the process and may even enhance regeneration efficiency. The only product of the proposed process is an environmentally benign regenerant stream containing calcium and/or magnesium alkalinity. The unique property of IX fibers that makes the proposed process both environmentally sustainable and economically feasible is amenability to efficient regeneration with carbon dioxide and harvested snowmelt. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason why IX fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration using snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide; 95% calcium recovery was attained at a CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 6.8 atm. The energy balance for a typical electric utility shows that up to 1% of carbon dioxide emitted during combustion would be sequestered in the softening process.

  10. Measuring gas exchange with step changes in inspired oxygen: an analysis of the assumption of oxygen steady state in patients suffering from COPD.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Lars P; Weinreich, Ulla M; Karbing, Dan S; Wagner, Peter D; Rees, Stephen E

    2014-12-01

    Bedside estimation of pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be possible from step changes in FIO2 and subsequent measurement of arterial oxygenation at steady state conditions. However, a steady state may not be achieved quickly after a change in FIO2, especially in patients with lung disease such as COPD, rendering this approach cumbersome. This paper investigates whether breath by breath measurement of respiratory gas and arterial oxygen levels as FIO2 is changed can be used as a much more rapid alternative to collecting data from steady state conditions for measuring pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. Fourteen patients with COPD were studied using 4-5 step changes in FIO2 in the range of 0.15-0.35. Values of expired respiratory gas and arterial oxygenation were used to calculate and compare the parameters of a mathematical model of pulmonary gas exchange in two cases: from data at steady state; and from breath by breath data prior to achievement of a steady state. For each patient, the breath by breath data were corrected for the delay in arterial oxygen saturation changes following each change in FIO2. Calculated model parameters were shown to be similar for the two data sets, with Bland-Altman bias and limits of agreement of -0.4 and -3.0 to 2.2 % for calculation of pulmonary shunt and 0.17 and -0.47 to 0.81 kPa for alveolar to end-capillary PO2, a measure of oxygen abnormality due to shunting plus regions of low [Formula: see text] A/[Formula: see text] ratio. This study shows that steady state oxygen levels may not be necessary when estimating pulmonary gas exchange using changes in FIO2. As such this technique may be applicable in patients with lung disease such as COPD.

  11. A symbiotic gas exchange between bioreactors enhances microalgal biomass and lipid productivities: taking advantage of complementary nutritional modes.

    PubMed

    Santos, C A; Ferreira, M E; da Silva, T Lopes; Gouveia, L; Novais, J M; Reis, A

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the association of two bioreactors: one photoautotrophic and the other heterotrophic, connected by the gas phase and allowing an exchange of O(2) and CO(2) gases between them, benefiting from a symbiotic effect. The association of two bioreactors was proposed with the aim of improving the microalgae oil productivity for biodiesel production. The outlet gas flow from the autotrophic (O(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the heterotrophic bioreactor. In parallel, the outlet gas flow from another heterotrophic (CO(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the autotrophic bioreactor. Aside from using the air supplied from the auto- and hetero-trophic bioreactors as controls, one mixotrophic bioreactor was also studied and used as a model, for its claimed advantage of CO(2) and organic carbon being simultaneously assimilated. The microalga Chlorella protothecoides was chosen as a model due to its ability to grow under different nutritional modes (auto, hetero, and mixotrophic), and its ability to attain a high biomass productivity and lipid content, suitable for biodiesel production. The comparison between heterotrophic, autotrophic, and mixotrophic Chlorella protothecoides growth for lipid production revealed that heterotrophic growth achieved the highest biomass productivity and lipid content (>22%), and furthermore showed that these lipids had the most suitable fatty acid profile in order to produce high quality biodiesel. Both associations showed a higher biomass productivity (10-20%), when comparing the two separately operated bioreactors (controls) which occurred on the fourth day. A more remarkable result would have been seen if in actuality the two bioreactors had been inter-connected in a closed loop. The biomass productivity gain would have been 30% and the lipid productivity gain would have been 100%, as seen by comparing the productivities of the symbiotic assemblage with the sum of the two

  12. Water removal characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells using a dry gas purging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Uk; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyun; Oh, In-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ae; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Ko, Jaejun; Lim, Tae-Won; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lim, Tae-Hoon

    Water removal from proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is of great importance to improve start-up ability and mitigate cell degradation when the fuel cell operates at subfreezing temperatures. In this study, we report water removal characteristics under various shut down conditions including a dry gas-purging step. In order to estimate the dehydration level of the electrolyte membrane, the high frequency resistance of the fuel cell stack was observed. Also, a novel method for measuring the amount of residual water in the fuel cell was developed to determine the amount of water removal. The method used the phase change of liquid water and was successfully applied to examine the water removal characteristics. Based on these works, the effects of several parameters such as purging time, flow rate of purging gas, operation current, and stack temperature on the amount of residual water were investigated.

  13. Bayesian Models of Graphs, Arrays and Other Exchangeable Random Structures.

    PubMed

    Orbanz, Peter; Roy, Daniel M

    2015-02-01

    The natural habitat of most Bayesian methods is data represented by exchangeable sequences of observations, for which de Finetti's theorem provides the theoretical foundation. Dirichlet process clustering, Gaussian process regression, and many other parametric and nonparametric Bayesian models fall within the remit of this framework; many problems arising in modern data analysis do not. This article provides an introduction to Bayesian models of graphs, matrices, and other data that can be modeled by random structures. We describe results in probability theory that generalize de Finetti's theorem to such data and discuss their relevance to nonparametric Bayesian modeling. With the basic ideas in place, we survey example models available in the literature; applications of such models include collaborative filtering, link prediction, and graph and network analysis. We also highlight connections to recent developments in graph theory and probability, and sketch the more general mathematical foundation of Bayesian methods for other types of data beyond sequences and arrays. PMID:26353253

  14. Wealth distribution of simple exchange models coupled with extremal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatella-Flores, N.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Punctuated Equilibrium (PE) states that after long periods of evolutionary quiescence, species evolution can take place in short time intervals, where sudden differentiation makes new species emerge and some species extinct. In this paper, we introduce and study the effect of punctuated equilibrium on two different asset exchange models: the yard sale model (YS, winner gets a random fraction of a poorer player's wealth) and the theft and fraud model (TF, winner gets a random fraction of the loser's wealth). The resulting wealth distribution is characterized using the Gini index. In order to do this, we consider PE as a perturbation with probability ρ of being applied. We compare the resulting values of the Gini index at different increasing values of ρ in both models. We found that in the case of the TF model, the Gini index reduces as the perturbation ρ increases, not showing dependence with the agents number. While for YS we observe a phase transition which happens around ρc = 0.79. For perturbations ρ <ρc the Gini index reaches the value of one as time increases (an extreme wealth condensation state), whereas for perturbations greater than or equal to ρc the Gini index becomes different to one, avoiding the system reaches this extreme state. We show that both simple exchange models coupled with PE dynamics give more realistic results. In particular for YS, we observe a power low decay of wealth distribution.

  15. Krypton charge exchange cross sections for Hall effect thruster models

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2013-04-28

    Following discharge from a Hall effect thruster, charge exchange occurs between ions and un-ionized propellant atoms. The low-energy cations produced can disturb operation of onboard instrumentation or the thruster itself. Charge-exchange cross sections for both singly and doubly charged propellant atoms are required to model these interactions. While xenon is the most common propellant currently used in Hall effect thrusters, other propellants are being considered, in particular, krypton. We present here guided-ion beam measurements and comparisons to semiclassical calculations for Kr{sup +} + Kr and Kr{sup 2+} + Kr cross sections. The measurements of symmetric Kr{sup +} + Kr charge exchange are in good agreement with both the calculations including spin-orbit effects and previous measurements. For the symmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr reaction, we present cross section measurements for center-of-mass energies between 1 eV and 300 eV, which spans energies not previously examined experimentally. These cross section measurements compare well with a simple one-electron transfer model. Finally, cross sections for the asymmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr {yields} Kr{sup +} + Kr{sup +} reaction show an onset near 12 eV, reaching cross sections near constant value of 1.6 A{sup 2} with an exception near 70-80 eV.

  16. Operation of an experimental algal gas exchanger for use in a CELSS.

    PubMed

    Smernoff, D T; Wharton, R A; Averner, M M

    1987-01-01

    Concepts of a CELSS anticipate the use of photosynthetic organisms (higher plants and algae) for air revitalization. The rates of production and uptake of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the crew and the photosynthetic organisms are mismatched. An algal [correction of aglal] system used for gas exchange only will have the difficulty of an accumulation or depletion of these gases beyond physiologically tolerable limits (in a materially closed system the mismatch between assimilatory quotient (AQ) and respiratory quotient (RQ) will be balanced by the operation of the waste processor). We report the results of a study designed to test the feasibility of using environmental manipulations to maintain physiologically appropriate atmospheres for algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) and mice (Mus musculus strain DW/J) in a gas-closed system. Specifically, we consider the atmosphere behavior of this system with Chlorella grown on nitrate or urea and at different light intensities and optical densities. Manipulation of both the photosynthetic rate and AQ of the alga has been found to reduce the mismatch of gas requirements and allow operation of the system in a gas-stable manner. Operation of such a system in a CELSS may be useful for reduction of buffer sizes, as a backup system for higher plant air revitalization and to supply extra oxygen to the waste processor or during crew changes. In addition, mass balance for components of the system (mouse, algae and a waste processor) are presented.

  17. Stomata size and spatial pattern effects on leaf gas exchange - a quantitative assessment of plant evolutionary choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Assouline, Shmuel; Aminzadeh, Milad; Haghighi, Erfan; Schymanski, Stan; Lehmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Land plants developed a dynamically gas-permeable layer at their leaf surfaces to allow CO2 uptake for photosynthesis while controlling water vapor loss through numerous adjustable openings (stomata) in the impervious leaf epidermis. Details of stomata structure, density and function may vary greatly among different plant families and respond to local environmental conditions, yet they share basic traits in dynamically controlling gaseous exchange rates by varying stomata apertures. We implement a pore scale gas diffusion model to quantitatively interpret the functionality of different combinations of stomata size and pattern on leaf gas exchange and thermal management based on data from fossil records and contemporary data sets. Considering all available data we draw several general conclusions concerning stomata design considerations: (1) the sizes and densities of stomata in the available fossil record leaves were designed to evaporate at rates in the range 0.75≤e/e0 ≤0.99 (relative to free water evaporation); (2) examination of evaporation curves show that for a given stomata size, the density (jointly defining the leaf evaporating area when fully open) was chosen to enable a high sensitivity in reducing evaporation rate with incremental stomatal closure, nevertheless, results show the design includes safety margins to account for different wind conditions (boundary layer thickness); (3) scaled for mean vapor flux, the size of stomata plays a minor role in the uniformity of leaf thermal field for a given stomata density. These principles enable rationale assessment of plant response to raising CO2, and provide a physical framework for considering the consequences of different stomata patterns (patchy) on leaf gas exchange (and thermal regime). In contrast with present quantitative description of traits and functionality of these dynamic covers in terms of gaseous diffusion resistance (or conductance), where stomata size, density and spatial pattern are

  18. Pulmonary gas exchange during dialysis in patients with obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, W D; Diamond, S M; Henrich, W L

    1989-11-01

    Hypoxemia occurs during routine hemodialysis and may contribute to morbidity, but its cause is not well understood. We reasoned that patients with COPD would be more vulnerable to abnormalities in gas exchange with dialysis. Thus, to investigate the cause of dialysis-related hypoxemia, we measured gas exchange in a group of stable dialysis patients with normal pulmonary function (n = 6) and a group of dialysis patients with COPD (n = 6). Measurements were made predialysis, at 1 h, and postdialysis with both acetate and bicarbonate dialysates. Acetate dialysis decreased PaO2 in normal and COPD patients at 1 h and postdialysis. Acetate-induced hypoxemia was associated with reduced respiratory CO2 excretion and hypoventilation but PaCO2 did not change. This decrease in CO2 excretion resulted from CO2 fixation during acetate metabolism and modest CO2 loss across the dialyzer. Hypoxemia occurred only postdialysis with bicarbonate dialysate in normal and COPD patients. An increased P(A-a)O2 occurred postdialysis with both dialysates, and was most consistently observed in the COPD patients. In summary, at least two mechanisms contribute to dialysis hypoxemia. With acetate dialysate, alveolar hypoventilation from CO2 unloading occurs at 1 h and postdialysis due to acetate metabolism. However, abnormalities in ventilation/perfusion contribute to postdialysis hypoxemia observed with both dialysates. In addition, the decrement in PaO2 associated with dialysis is similar in normal and COPD patients, although preexisting COPD makes postdialysis changes more apparent. PMID:2805844

  19. Functional differences between the arteries perfusing gas exchange and nutritional membranes in the late chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Riazudin; Cavallaro, Giacomo; Kessels, Carolina G A; Villamor, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The chicken extraembryonic arterial system comprises the allantoic arteries, which irrigate the gas exchange organ (the chorioallantoic membrane, CAM) and the yolk sac (YS) artery, which irrigates the nutritional organ (the YS membrane). We compared, using wire myography, the reactivity of allantoic and YS arteries from 19-day chicken embryos (total incubation 21 days). The contractions induced by KCl, the adrenergic agonists norepinephrine (NE, nonselective), phenylephrine (α1), and oxymetazoline (α2), electric field stimulation (EFS), serotonin, U46619 (TP receptor agonist), and endothelin (ET)-1 and the relaxations induced by acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor), forskolin (adenylate cyclase activator), and isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist) were investigated. Extraembryonic allantoic arteries did not show α-adrenergic-mediated contraction (either elicited by exogenous agonists or EFS) or ACh-induced (endothelium-dependent) relaxation, whereas these responses were present in YS arteries. Interestingly, the intraembryonic segment of the allantoic artery showed EFS- and α-adrenergic-induced contraction and ACh-mediated relaxation. Moreover, glyoxylic acid staining showed the presence of catecholamine-containing nerves in the YS and the intraembryonic allantoic artery, but not in the extraembryonic allantoic artery. Isoproterenol- and forskolin-induced relaxation and ET-1-induced contraction were higher in YS than in allantoic arteries, whereas serotonin- and U46619-induced contraction and SNP-induced relaxation did not significantly differ between the two arteries. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a different pattern of reactivity in the arteries perfusing the gas exchange and the nutritional membranes of the chicken embryo.

  20. Ozone affects gas exchange, growth and reproductive development in Brassica campestris (Wisconsin fast plants).

    PubMed

    Black, V J; Stewart, C A; Roberts, J A; Black, C R

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O(3)) may affect vegetative and reproductive development, although the consequences for yield depend on the effectiveness of the compensatory processes induced. This study examined the impact on reproductive development of exposing Brassica campestris (Wisconsin Fast Plants) to ozone during vegetative growth. Plants were exposed to 70 ppb ozone for 2 d during late vegetative growth or 10 d spanning most of the vegetative phase. Effects on gas exchange, vegetative growth, reproductive development and seed yield were determined. Impacts on gas exchange and foliar injury were related to pre-exposure stomatal conductance. Exposure for 2 d had no effect on growth or reproductive characteristics, whereas 10-d exposure reduced vegetative growth and reproductive site number on the terminal raceme. Mature seed number and weight per pod and per plant were unaffected because seed abortion was reduced. The observation that mature seed yield per plant was unaffected by exposure during the vegetative phase, despite adverse effects on physiological, vegetative and reproductive processes, shows that indeterminate species such as B. campestris possess sufficient compensatory flexibility to avoid reductions in seed production. PMID:17803646

  1. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot-gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, M.F.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of the 3M material to a combustion environment for as little as 25 hours at 800{degrees}C. The study of heat exchanger materials has focused on enhancing the corrosion resistance of DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} composite tubes by adding chromium to its surfaces by (1) heat treatments in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed, or (2) infiltrating surface porosity with molten chromium nitrate. Each process is followed by a surface homogenization at 1500{degrees}C. The powder bed method has been most successful, producing continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. As-received and Cr-modified DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} samples will be reacted with commonly encountered coal-ash slags to determine the Cr effects on corrosion resistance.

  2. Atmospheric dust accumulation on native and non-native species: effects on gas exchange parameters.

    PubMed

    González, Juan A; Prado, Fernando E; Piacentini, Ruben D

    2014-05-01

    Plants are continuously exposed to atmospheric particulate matter (dust), and their leaves are the main receptors of deposited dust. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dust deposition on leaf gas exchange parameters of 17 native and non-native tree and shrub species growing in Gran San Miguel de Tucumán in northwestern Argentina. Maximum assimilation rate (), stomatal conductance (), transpiration rate (), internal CO concentration (), and instantaneous water-use efficiency (WUE) were measured in cleaned leaves (CL) and dusted leaves (DL) of different species on November 2010, July 2011, and September 2011. In almost all studied species, gas exchange parameters were significantly affected by dust deposition. Values for , , and of DL were significantly reduced in 11, 12, and 14 species compared with CL. Morphological leaf traits seem to be related to reduction. Indeed, L. and (Mart. ex DC.) Standl. species with pubescent leaves and thick ribs showed the highest reduction percentages. Contrarily, and WUE were increased in DL but were less responsive to dust deposition than other parameters. Increases of and WUE were significant in 5 and 11 species, respectively. Correlation analyses between /, /, and / pairs showed significant positive linear correlations in CL and DL of many studied species, including small and tall plants. These results suggest that leaf stomatal factors and shade-induced effect by accumulated dust are primarily responsible for the observed reductions in photosynthesis rate of DL.

  3. Cyclic gas exchange in the giant burrowing cockroach, Macropanesthia rhinoceros: effect of oxygen tension and temperature.

    PubMed

    Woodman, James D; Cooper, Paul D; Haritos, Victoria S

    2007-05-01

    The giant burrowing cockroach, Macropanesthia rhinoceros, is endemic to north-eastern Australia and excavates a permanent burrow up to 1m deep into soil. Using flow-through respirometry, we investigated gas exchange and water loss at three different oxygen tensions (21%, 10% and 2% at 20 degrees C) and temperatures (10, 20 and 30 degrees C at 21% oxygen). M. rhinoceros employ cyclic gas exchange (CGE) making the species by far the largest insect known to engage in discontinuous ventilation. CGE featured rhythmic bursts of CO(2) dispersed among inter-burst periods of reduced output. CGE was most commonly observed at 20 degrees C and degraded at <10% oxygen. Mild hypoxia (10% oxygen) resulted in a lengthening of the burst period by approximately two-fold; this result is complementary to oxygen consumption data that suggests that the burst period is important in oxygen uptake. When exposed to severe hypoxia (2% oxygen), CGE was degraded to a more erratic continuous pattern. Also, during severe hypoxia, total water loss increased significantly, although CO(2) release was maintained at the same level as in 21% oxygen. During CGE, an increase in temperature from 10 to 20 degrees C caused both water loss and CO(2) output to double; from 20 to 30 degrees C, CO(2) output again doubled but water loss increased by only 31%.

  4. Dry deposition and soil-air gas exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an industrial area.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayse; Odabasi, Mustafa; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2008-12-01

    Ambient air and dry deposition, and soil samples were collected at the Aliaga industrial site in Izmir, Turkey. Atmospheric total (particle+gas) Sigma(41)-PCB concentrations were higher in summer (3370+/-1617 pg m(-3), average+SD) than in winter (1164+/-618 pg m(-3)), probably due to increased volatilization with temperature. Average particulate Sigma(41)-PCBs dry deposition fluxes were 349+/-183 and 469+/-328 ng m(-2) day(-1) in summer and winter, respectively. Overall average particulate deposition velocity was 5.5+/-3.5 cm s(-1). The spatial distribution of Sigma(41)-PCB soil concentrations (n=48) showed that the iron-steel plants, ship dismantling facilities, refinery and petrochemicals complex are the major sources in the area. Calculated air-soil exchange fluxes indicated that the contaminated soil is a secondary source to the atmosphere for lighter PCBs and as a sink for heavier ones. Comparable magnitude of gas exchange and dry particle deposition fluxes indicated that both mechanisms are equally important for PCB movement between air and soil in Aliaga.

  5. Red spruce gas exchange in response to light, temperature, CO sub 2 and water stress

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.; Seiler, J. )

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the gas exchange responses of native red spruce seedlings to light, temperature and CO{sub 2} in combination with water stress to determine how red spruce physiologically responds to water stress. Gas exchange responses were examined under well-watered conditions and at an average leaf water potential of {minus}1.6 MPa. Net photosynthesis (Pnet) and leaf conductance (gl) were on average 35% and 53% lower, respectively, during water stress. The nature of the response of Pnet and gl to temperature and CO{sub 2} was similar to the well-watered response. Pnet was lower with water stress at high irradiances only. Water use efficiency was greater during water stress at 15C but not at 25 and 35C. No change in osmotic potential during water stress was observed. The response of red spruce physiology to varying light, temperature and CO{sub 2} does not appear to be greatly modified by water stress.

  6. Canopy gas exchange of white spruce in contrasting habitats near the Arctic treeline in northwest Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, P.; Mcnown, R. W.; Sveinbjornsson, B.

    2011-12-01

    Recent work near the Arctic treeline has revealed that an increasing number of white spruce are showing negative growth responses to rising air temperatures. Researchers have speculated that these negative responders are experiencing warm temperature-induced drought stress. Measurements of white spruce needle gas exchange near the Arctic treeline are rare and, to our knowledge, measurements of whole canopy gas exchange have not been made. In this study, we measured sap flow to estimate whole canopy transpiration at hourly intervals for the entire growing seasons of 2010 and 2011 in white spruce growing on a riverside terrace, in a hillslope forest and at the treeline. We used weekly measurements of needle-scale photosynthesis, transpiration and needle δ13C to estimate water use efficiency at each site. We then applied these estimates of water use efficiency to our sap flow data in order to estimate hourly whole canopy photosynthesis at each site for the two growing seasons. Our results show evidence of stomatal control when the atmospheric vapor pressure deficit exceeds approximately 1.0 kPa, but no evidence of complete stomatal closure. Trees growing on the riverside terrace, where soils are relatively warm and dry, are more efficient in their water use, have greater leaf area and assimilate more carbon per unit basal diameter than trees in the forest and at the treeline. We found that the month of September, after growth has almost completely ceased, can be an important time for carbon uptake in white spruce near the Arctic treeline.

  7. Novel shell device for gas exchange in an operculate land snail.

    PubMed

    Páll-Gergely, Barna; Naggs, Fred; Asami, Takahiro

    2016-07-01

    The operculum of terrestrial snails tightly seals the shell aperture providing protection from predators and body-water loss. To allow respiration with a closed operculum, operculate land snails repeatedly evolved shell devices such as tubes or channels that open to the air. In all Asian members of the Alycaeidae, an externally closed tube lies along the suture behind the aperture that possesses a small internal opening into the last whorl at the tube's anterior end. However, this structure presents a paradox: how is gas exchanged through an externally closed tube? Here we show that many microtunnels open into the tube and run beneath radial ribs along the growth line of the last whorl in Alycaeus conformis These tunnels open to the outside of the shell surface near the umbilicus. Examination under high magnification revealed that the outermost shell layer forms these tunnels only in the whorl range beneath the sutural tube. Each tunnel (ca 16 µm diameter) is far narrower than any known metazoan parasite. These findings support our hypothesis that the externally closed sutural tube functions with microtunnels as a specialized apparatus for predator-free gas exchange with minimal water loss when the operculum seals the aperture. PMID:27405378

  8. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade on ventilation and gas exchange during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Dodd, S; Powers, S; O'Malley, N; Brooks, E; Sommers, H

    1988-08-01

    Controversy exists concerning the effects of acute beta-adrenergic blockade on ventilation during exercise. Hence, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute beta blockade on ventilation and gas exchange during incremental exercise. Nine male subjects underwent incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer (30 W.min-1) to exhaustion, with one trial being performed 60 min after the subject ingested propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal 1 mg.kg-1 BW) while the second test served as control. The treatment order was counterbalanced to preclude any ordering effect on the results, and 1 week separated the tests. Ventilation and gas exchange were monitored by open circuit techniques. No difference (p greater than 0.05) existed in VE, % Hb sat, VCO2, ventilatory threshold, and VE/VCO2 between treatments at the same exercise stage. VO2max was lowered from 3.82 to 3.26 l.min-1 (p less than 0.05) and HRmax was reduced from 190 to 150 bpm (p less than 0.05) as a result of beta blockade. These data suggested that acute beta blockade had no effect on exercise ventilation, but decreased HRmax at comparable work rates. In addition, VO2max and exercise time to exhaustion were hindered, probably due to beta blockade limitation of HRmax, and, thus, oxygen transport. PMID:3178619

  9. Vasomotor tone does not affect perfusion heterogeneity and gas exchange in normal primate lungs during normoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenny, R. W.; Robertson, H. T.; Hlastala, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether vasoregulation is an important cause of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity, we measured regional blood flow and gas exchange before and after giving prostacyclin (PGI(2)) to baboons. Four animals were anesthetized with ketamine and mechanically ventilated. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mark regional perfusion before and after PGI(2) infusion. The lungs were subsequently excised, dried inflated, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces (n = 1,208-1,629 per animal) with the spatial coordinates recorded for each piece. Blood flow to each piece was determined for each condition from the fluorescent signals. Blood flow heterogeneity did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Two other measures of spatial blood flow distribution, the fractal dimension and the spatial correlation, did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Alveolar-arterial O(2) differences did not change with PGI(2) infusion. We conclude that, in normal primate lungs during normoxia, vasomotor tone is not a significant cause of perfusion heterogeneity. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of blood flow, active regulation of regional perfusion is not required for efficient gas exchange.

  10. Gas-dynamics characteristics of wave energy exchanger as high-temperature preheater-compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Zubatov, N.

    1983-12-01

    In the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion and high-temperature steel production technological processes the air preheater is an essential component. It preheats the air used in fuel combustion, so that the flame temperature can reach the high levels required by the process. Many studies have indicated that air preheat temperature significantly affects MHD plant efficiency and blast-furnace performance. Combustion air preheating can be accomplished by either of two methods. One method (MHD power plant) utilizes the heat energy of the MHD generator exhaust gas directly. In this case, the preheater, classified as directly-fired, is located in the MHD generator exhaust gas stream as part of the bottoming plant. The alternate method of preheating the combustion air (blast-furnace systems) utilizes a separate heat source and fires the preheater with a clean fuel. This type of preheater is classified as indirectly-fired. The regenerative heat exchangers are used for both methods to achieve the high air preheat temperature required for combustion. Such heat exchangers operate on the principle of transferring heat through a separating medium that is heated for a time by a hot fluid, then cooled by a fluid of lower temperature. The preheater system requires several regenerators, arranged in parallel and with switchover valves, in order to deliver a continuous flow of preheated air.

  11. Ozone affects gas exchange, growth and reproductive development in Brassica campestris (Wisconsin fast plants).

    PubMed

    Black, V J; Stewart, C A; Roberts, J A; Black, C R

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O(3)) may affect vegetative and reproductive development, although the consequences for yield depend on the effectiveness of the compensatory processes induced. This study examined the impact on reproductive development of exposing Brassica campestris (Wisconsin Fast Plants) to ozone during vegetative growth. Plants were exposed to 70 ppb ozone for 2 d during late vegetative growth or 10 d spanning most of the vegetative phase. Effects on gas exchange, vegetative growth, reproductive development and seed yield were determined. Impacts on gas exchange and foliar injury were related to pre-exposure stomatal conductance. Exposure for 2 d had no effect on growth or reproductive characteristics, whereas 10-d exposure reduced vegetative growth and reproductive site number on the terminal raceme. Mature seed number and weight per pod and per plant were unaffected because seed abortion was reduced. The observation that mature seed yield per plant was unaffected by exposure during the vegetative phase, despite adverse effects on physiological, vegetative and reproductive processes, shows that indeterminate species such as B. campestris possess sufficient compensatory flexibility to avoid reductions in seed production.

  12. Modeling inflation rates and exchange rates in Ghana: application of multivariate GARCH models.

    PubMed

    Nortey, Ezekiel Nn; Ngoh, Delali D; Doku-Amponsah, Kwabena; Ofori-Boateng, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed at investigating the volatility and conditional relationship among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates as well as to construct a model using multivariate GARCH DCC and BEKK models using Ghana data from January 1990 to December 2013. The study revealed that the cumulative depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar from 1990 to 2013 is 7,010.2% and the yearly weighted depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar for the period is 20.4%. There was evidence that, the fact that inflation rate was stable, does not mean that exchange rates and interest rates are expected to be stable. Rather, when the cedi performs well on the forex, inflation rates and interest rates react positively and become stable in the long run. The BEKK model is robust to modelling and forecasting volatility of inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The DCC model is robust to model the conditional and unconditional correlation among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The BEKK model, which forecasted high exchange rate volatility for the year 2014, is very robust for modelling the exchange rates in Ghana. The mean equation of the DCC model is also robust to forecast inflation rates in Ghana. PMID:25741459

  13. Modeling inflation rates and exchange rates in Ghana: application of multivariate GARCH models.

    PubMed

    Nortey, Ezekiel Nn; Ngoh, Delali D; Doku-Amponsah, Kwabena; Ofori-Boateng, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed at investigating the volatility and conditional relationship among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates as well as to construct a model using multivariate GARCH DCC and BEKK models using Ghana data from January 1990 to December 2013. The study revealed that the cumulative depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar from 1990 to 2013 is 7,010.2% and the yearly weighted depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar for the period is 20.4%. There was evidence that, the fact that inflation rate was stable, does not mean that exchange rates and interest rates are expected to be stable. Rather, when the cedi performs well on the forex, inflation rates and interest rates react positively and become stable in the long run. The BEKK model is robust to modelling and forecasting volatility of inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The DCC model is robust to model the conditional and unconditional correlation among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The BEKK model, which forecasted high exchange rate volatility for the year 2014, is very robust for modelling the exchange rates in Ghana. The mean equation of the DCC model is also robust to forecast inflation rates in Ghana.

  14. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  15. The structural design of the bat wing web and its possible role in gas exchange

    PubMed Central

    Makanya, Andrew N; Mortola, Jacopo P

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the skin in the epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus wahlbergi) wing and body trunk was studied with a view to understanding possible adaptations for gas metabolism and thermoregulation. In addition, gas exchange measurements were performed using a respirometer designed for the purpose. The body skin had an epidermis, a dermis with hair follicles and sweat glands and a fat-laden hypodermis. In contrast, the wing web skin was made up of a thin bilayered epidermis separated by a connective tissue core with collagen and elastic fibres and was devoid of hair follicles and sweat glands. The wings spanned 18–24 cm each, with about 753 cm2 of surface exposed to air. The body skin epidermis was thick (61 ± 3 µm, SEM), the stratum corneum alone taking a third of it (21 ± 3 µm). In contrast, the wing web skin epidermis was thinner at 9.8 ± 0.7 µm, with a stratum corneum measuring 4.1 ± 0.3 µm (41%). The wing capillaries in the wing web skin ran in the middle of the connective tissue core, with a resultant surface-capillary diffusion distance of 26.8 ± 3.2 µm. The rate of oxygen consumption (V˙O2) of the wings alone and of the whole animal measured under light anaesthesia at ambient temperatures of 24 ºC and 33 ºC, averaged 6% and 10% of the total, respectively. Rate of carbon dioxide production had similar values. The membrane diffusing capacity for the wing web was estimated to be 0.019 ml O2 min−1 mmHg−1. We conclude that in Epomophorus wahlbergi, the wing web has structural modifications that permit a substantial contribution to the total gas exchange. PMID:17971117

  16. The structural design of the bat wing web and its possible role in gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Makanya, Andrew N; Mortola, Jacopo P

    2007-12-01

    The structure of the skin in the epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus wahlbergi) wing and body trunk was studied with a view to understanding possible adaptations for gas metabolism and thermoregulation. In addition, gas exchange measurements were performed using a respirometer designed for the purpose. The body skin had an epidermis, a dermis with hair follicles and sweat glands and a fat-laden hypodermis. In contrast, the wing web skin was made up of a thin bilayered epidermis separated by a connective tissue core with collagen and elastic fibres and was devoid of hair follicles and sweat glands. The wings spanned 18-24 cm each, with about 753 cm2 of surface exposed to air. The body skin epidermis was thick (61 +/- 3 microm, SEM), the stratum corneum alone taking a third of it (21 +/- 3 microm). In contrast, the wing web skin epidermis was thinner at 9.8 +/- 0.7 microm, with a stratum corneum measuring 4.1 +/- 0.3 microm (41%). The wing capillaries in the wing web skin ran in the middle of the connective tissue core, with a resultant surface-capillary diffusion distance of 26.8 +/- 3.2 microm. The rate of oxygen consumption (VO2) of the wings alone and of the whole animal measured under light anaesthesia at ambient temperatures of 24 masculineC and 33 masculineC, averaged 6% and 10% of the total, respectively. Rate of carbon dioxide production had similar values. The membrane diffusing capacity for the wing web was estimated to be 0.019 ml O2 min(-1) mmHg(-1). We conclude that in Epomophorus wahlbergi, the wing web has structural modifications that permit a substantial contribution to the total gas exchange.

  17. The effects of dobutamine and dopamine on intrapulmonary shunt and gas exchange in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Tracey L.; van Diepen, Sean; Bhutani, Mohit; Shanks, Miriam; Welsh, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of intrapulmonary shunts with increased cardiac output during exercise in healthy humans has been reported in several recent studies, but mechanisms governing their recruitment remain unclear. Dobutamine and dopamine are inotropes commonly used to augment cardiac output; however, both can increase venous admixture/shunt fraction (Qs/Qt). It is possible that, as with exercise, intrapulmonary shunts are recruited with increased cardiac output during dobutamine and/or dopamine infusion that may contribute to the observed increase in Qs/Qt. The purpose of this study was to examine how dobutamine and dopamine affect intrapulmonary shunt and gas exchange. Nine resting healthy subjects received serial infusions of dobutamine and dopamine at incremental doses under normoxic and hyperoxic (inspired O2 fraction = 1.0) conditions. At each step, alveolar-to-arterial Po2 difference (A-aDo2) and Qs/Qt were calculated from arterial blood gas samples, intrapulmonary shunt was evaluated using contrast echocardiography, and cardiac output was calculated by Doppler echocardiography. Both dobutamine and dopamine increased cardiac output and Qs/Qt. Intrapulmonary shunt developed in most subjects with both drugs and paralleled the increase in Qs/Qt. A-aDo2 was unchanged due to a concurrent rise in mixed venous oxygen content. Hyperoxia consistently eliminated intrapulmonary shunt. These findings contribute to our present understanding of the mechanisms governing recruitment of these intrapulmonary shunts as well as their impact on gas exchange. In addition, given the deleterious effect on Qs/Qt and the risk of neurological complications with intrapulmonary shunts, these findings could have important implications for use of dobutamine and dopamine in the clinical setting. PMID:22700799

  18. On the Limiting Markov Process of Energy Exchanges in a Rarely Interacting Ball-Piston Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálint, Péter; Gilbert, Thomas; Nándori, Péter; Szász, Domokos; Tóth, Imre Péter

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the process of energy exchanges generated by the elastic collisions between a point-particle, confined to a two-dimensional cell with convex boundaries, and a `piston', i.e. a line-segment, which moves back and forth along a one-dimensional interval partially intersecting the cell. This model can be considered as the elementary building block of a spatially extended high-dimensional billiard modeling heat transport in a class of hybrid materials exhibiting the kinetics of gases and spatial structure of solids. Using heuristic arguments and numerical analysis, we argue that, in a regime of rare interactions, the billiard process converges to a Markov jump process for the energy exchanges and obtain the expression of its generator.

  19. Modeling Inflation Using a Non-Equilibrium Equation of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Inflation is a change in the prices of goods that takes place without changes in the actual values of those goods. The Equation of Exchange, formulated clearly in a seminal paper by Irving Fisher in 1911, establishes an equilibrium relationship between the price index P (also known as "inflation"), the economy's aggregate output Q (also known as "the real gross domestic product"), the amount of money available for spending M (also known as "the money supply"), and the rate at which money is reused V (also known as "the velocity of circulation of money"). This paper offers first a qualitative discussion of what can cause these factors to change and how those causes might be controlled, then develops a quantitative model of inflation based on a non-equilibrium version of the Equation of Exchange. Causal relationships are different from equations in that the effects of changes in the causal variables take time to play out-often significant amounts of time. In the model described here, wages track prices, but only after a distributed lag. Prices change whenever the money supply, aggregate output, or the velocity of circulation of money change, but only after a distributed lag. Similarly, the money supply depends on the supplies of domestic and foreign money, which depend on the monetary base and a variety of foreign transactions, respectively. The spreading of delays mitigates the shocks of sudden changes to important inputs, but the most important aspect of this model is that delays, which often have dramatic consequences in dynamic systems, are explicitly incorporated.macroeconomics, inflation, equation of exchange, non-equilibrium, Athena Project

  20. Extreme value modelling of Ghana stock exchange index.

    PubMed

    Nortey, Ezekiel N N; Asare, Kwabena; Mettle, Felix Okoe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of extreme events has always been of interest in fields such as hydrology and meteorology. However, after the recent global financial crises, appropriate models for modelling of such rare events leading to these crises have become quite essential in the finance and risk management fields. This paper models the extreme values of the Ghana stock exchange all-shares index (2000-2010) by applying the extreme value theory (EVT) to fit a model to the tails of the daily stock returns data. A conditional approach of the EVT was preferred and hence an ARMA-GARCH model was fitted to the data to correct for the effects of autocorrelation and conditional heteroscedastic terms present in the returns series, before the EVT method was applied. The Peak Over Threshold approach of the EVT, which fits a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) model to excesses above a certain selected threshold, was employed. Maximum likelihood estimates of the model parameters were obtained and the model's goodness of fit was assessed graphically using Q-Q, P-P and density plots. The findings indicate that the GPD provides an adequate fit to the data of excesses. The size of the extreme daily Ghanaian stock market movements were then computed using the value at risk and expected shortfall risk measures at some high quantiles, based on the fitted GPD model. PMID:26587364

  1. Modeling surfzone to inner-shelf tracer exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hally-Rosendahl, Kai; Feddersen, Falk

    2016-06-01

    A near-shoreline, continuous dye release at an approximately alongshore-uniform beach (IB09 experiment) is simulated with the wave-resolving Boussinesq model funwaveC. The model generates surfzone eddies and transient rip currents but does not resolve inner-shelf vertical variation or stratification. The funwaveC model reproduces well the observed surfzone and inner-shelf dye observations over roughly 350 m cross-shore and 2 km alongshore. Dye is advected alongshore by wave- and wind-driven currents similarly in the observations and model. Near-shoreline mean dye concentration decays downstream as a power law with similar observed (-0.33) and modeled (-0.38) exponents. Observed and modeled cross-shore mean dye profiles are similar, though modeled inner-shelf dye is somewhat elevated. Observed and modeled alongshore dye transports agree, though with compensating surfzone and inner-shelf errors later in the release. For times <3.5 h (before observed and modeled dye advects beyond the model alongshore domain), observed and modeled dye budgets are similar to each other and close to within 10%, and half the observed and modeled dye is exported to the inner-shelf. Later in the release, surfzone and inner-shelf dye masses are under and overpredicted, respectively. Model-data differences may be due to the model's lack of vertical variation, stratification, or tide. The good overall model-data agreement indicates that nearshore tracer transport and dispersion are realistically simulated over 5 h and 2 km alongshore, and that the model transient rip currents accurately induce cross-shore exchange between the surfzone and inner-shelf.

  2. Gas Exchange Rates for a First-Order Stream Determined With Deliberate and Natural Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninkhof, R.; Mulholland, P. J.; Elwood, J. W.

    1990-07-01

    Gas transfer velocities have been determined for a first-order stream by performing a 3-hour release of the volatile tracer sulfur hexafluoride, SF6, and the nonvolatile tracer tritiated water, 3H2O. The average gas transfer velocity for the 292-m reach was 29 cm/h which corresponds to a reaeration coefficient for oxygen at 25°C of 134 day-1. Groundwater inflow along the stream was corrected for by measuring the downstream dilution of the 3H2O spike. Downstream discharge increased from 0.5 L/s, 2 m downstream of the point of tracer release, to 19.3 L/s at a point 292 m downstream. As an alternative to using (radioactive) 3H2O, we investigated the possibility of using natural radon, 222Rn, as a groundwater tag and using the variation of SF6 and 222Rn along the stream to determine gas exchange rates and groundwater inflow. The method yielded an average transfer velocity of 21 cm/h and underestimated the groundwater inflow by a factor of 3. This large discrepancy is attributed to a doubling of stream discharge between the time the stream was sampled for radon and the tracer experiment and the limited number of radon samples.

  3. Gas cells for 3He hyperpolarized via spin-exchange optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Tan, J. A.; Woo, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a device for the production of hyperpolarized 3He, which is widely used in spinrelated nuclear physics research. Spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) is employed to polarize 3He enclosed in a circular borosilicate glass cell suitable not only for the production of polarized gas but also for its storage. The portable glass cell can, thus, be transported to any other research facility. The glass cell can be refilled several times. Special attention is given to the preparation and the filling of the cell to minimize the impurities on its walls and in the gas. We employ glass tubes with shorter lengths and larger diameters in the gas-filling system to achieve the improvement in the air flow necessary to obtain purer polarized 3He samples. The cell is prepared, and after it has been filled with rubidium (Rb) and 3He-N2 mixture, it is sealed under high vacuum conditions. The cell containing the mixture is exposed to circularly-polarized laser light with a wavelength of 795 nm at temperatures of 180 - 220 °C for SEOP. The polarization of 3He is measured via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We obtained 40% polarized 3He in less than 15 hours and 50% in about 25 hours. The longitudinal relaxation time T 1 of the polarized 3He we measured was about 58 hours.

  4. Operation of an experimental algal gas exchanger for use in a CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, David T.; Wharton, Robert A., Jr.; Averner, Maurice M.

    1987-01-01

    Concepts of a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) anticipate the use of photosynthetic organisms (higher plants and algae) for air revitalization. The rates of production and uptake of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the crew and the photosynthetic organisms are mismatched. An algal system used for gas exchange only will have the difficulty of an accumulation or depletion of these gases beyond physiologically tolerable limits (in a closed system the mismatch between assimilatory quotient (AQ) and respiratory quotient (RQ) is balanced by the operation of the waste processor). The results are given of a study designed to test the feasibility of using environmental manipulations to maintain physiologically appropriate atmospheres for algae and mice in a gas closed system. Specifically, the atmosphere behavior of this system is considered with algae grown on nitrate or urea and at different light intensities and optical densities. Manipulation of both allow operation of the system in a gas stable manner. Operation of such a system in a CELSS may be useful for reduction of buffer sizes, as a backup system for higher plant air revitalization and to supply extra oxygen to the waste processor or during crew changes.

  5. Interruption to cutaneous gas exchange is not a likely mechanism of WNS-associated death in bats.

    PubMed

    Carey, Charleve S; Boyles, Justin G

    2015-07-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative fungal agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), an emerging fungal-borne epizootic. WNS is responsible for a catastrophic decline of hibernating bats in North America, yet we have limited understanding of the physiological interactions between pathogen and host. Pseudogymnoascus destructans severely damages wings and tail membranes, by causing dryness that leads to whole sections crumbling off. Four possible mechanisms have been proposed by which infection could lead to dehydration; in this study, we tested one: P. destructans infection could cause disruption to passive gas-exchange pathways across the wing membranes, thereby causing a compensatory increase in water-intensive pulmonary respiration. We hypothesized that total evaporative water loss would be greater when passive gas exchange was inhibited. We found that bats did not lose more water when passive pathways were blocked. This study provides evidence against the proposed proximal mechanism that disruption to passive gas exchange causes dehydration and death to WNS-infected bats.

  6. Discontinuous gas exchange and the significance of respiratory water loss in Scarabaeine beetles.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Davis, Adrian L V

    2003-10-01

    Respiratory water loss in insects is a controversial topic. Whilst earlier studies considered respiratory transpiration a significant component of overall water loss, to the extent that it was thought to be responsible not only for the evolution of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) but also for variation in DGC patterns, later work repeatedly questioned its importance. In particular, investigations of the proportional contribution of respiratory transpiration to total water loss in species showing DGCs suggested that respiratory transpiration was unlikely to be important in these species. In turn, these studies have been criticized on analytical grounds. In this study we investigated variation in cuticular and respiratory water loss rates in five Scarabaeus dung beetle species, all of which show discontinuous gas exchange cycles, to ascertain the significance of respiratory water loss using modern analytical techniques. In particular, we determined whether there is variation in water loss rates amongst these beetles, whether both respiratory and cuticular water loss rates contribute significantly to variation in the former, and whether metabolic rate variation and variation in the duration of the DGC periods contribute significantly to variation in respiratory water loss rate. Total water loss rate varied such that species from arid areas had the lowest rates of water loss, and both cuticular and spiracular transpiration contributed significantly to variation in overall water loss rate. Moreover, variation in metabolic rate and in the duration of the DGC periods contributed significantly to variation in respiratory water loss rate. By contrast, examination of proportional water loss revealed little other than that it varies between 6.5% and 21%, depending on the species and the temperature at which it was examined. Cuticular water loss scaled as mass(0.721), but did not differ from that expected from geometric considerations alone. By contrast, respiratory

  7. Feasibility study for an advanced coal fired heat exchanger/gas turbine topping cycle for a high efficiency power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Zhao, Y.; Pines, D.; Buggeln, R.C.; Shamroth, S.J.

    1993-11-01

    Significant improvements in efficiency for the conversion of coal into electricity can be achieved by cycles which employ a high temperature gas turbine topping cycle. The objective of this project is the development of an externally fired gas turbine system. The project computationally tested a new concept for a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) and high temperature heat exchanger with a proprietary design to reduce the problems associated with the harsh coal environment. The program addressed two key technology issues: (1) the HITAF/heat exchanger heat transfer through a 2-D computer analysis of the HITAF configuration; (2) 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model application to simulate the exclusion of particles and corrosive gases from the heat exchanger surface. The basic concept of this new combustor design was verified through the 2D and 3D modeling. It demonstrated that the corrosion and erosion of the exchanger material caused by coal and ash particles can be largely reduced by employing a specially designed firing scheme. It also suggested that a proper combustion geometry design is necessary to maximize the cleaning effect.

  8. Atmosphere Behavior in Gas-Closed Mouse-Algal Systems: An Experimental and Modelling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, M. M.; Moore, B., III; Bartholomew, I.; Wharton, R.

    1985-01-01

    A dual approach of mathematical modelling and laboratory experimentation aimed at examining the gas exchange characteristics of artificial animal/plant systems closed to the ambient atmosphere was initiated. The development of control techniques and management strategies for maintaining the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen at physiological levels is examined. A mathematical model simulating the atmospheric behavior in these systems was developed and an experimental gas closed system was constructed. These systems are described and preliminary results are presented.

  9. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  10. Radon 222 tracing of soil and forest canopy trace gas exchange in an open canopy boreal forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ussler, William, III; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    A set of continuous, high-resolution atmospheric radon (Rn-222) concentration time series and radon soil flux measurements were acquired during the summer of 1990 at a micrometeorological tower site 13 km northwest of Schefferville, Quebec, Canada. The tower was located in a dry upland, open-canopy lichen-spruce woodland. For the period July 23 to August 1, 1990, the mean radon soil flux was 41.1 +/- 4.8 Bq m(exp -2)/h. Radon surface flux from the two end-member forest floor cover types (lichen mat and bare soil) were 38.8 +/- 5.1 and 61.8 +/- 15.6 Bq m(exp -2)/h, respectively. Average total forest canopy resistances computed using a simple 'flux box' model for radon exchange between the forest canopy and the overlying atmosphere range from 0.47 +/- 0.24 s cm(exp -1) to 2.65 +/- 1.61 cm(exp -1) for daytime hours (0900-1700 LT) and from 3.44 +/- 0.91 s cm(exp -1) to 10.55 +/- 7.16 s cm(exp -1) for nighttime hours (2000-0600) for the period July 23 to August 6, 1990. Continuous radon profiling of canopy atmospheres is a suitable approach for determining rates of biosphere/atmosphere trace gas exchange for remote field sites where daily equipment maintenance is not possible. where daily equipment maintenance is not possible.

  11. Adsorption of iodine on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite: Experiments and modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nan, Yue; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; DePaoli, David W.

    2016-08-03

    The adsorption process of iodine, a major volatile radionuclide in the off-gas streams of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) was studied at the micro-scale. The gas-solid mass transfer and reaction involved in the adsorption process were investigated and evaluated with appropriate models. Optimal conditions for reducing the silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) in a hydrogen stream were determined. Kinetic and equilibrium data of iodine adsorption on Ag0Z were obtained by performing single-layer adsorption experiments with experimental systems of high precision at 373–473 K over various iodine concentrations. Results indicate approximately 91% to 97% of the iodine adsorption wasmore » through the silver-iodine reaction. The effect of temperature on the iodine loading capacity of Ag0Z was discussed. In conclusion, the Shrinking Core model describes the data well, and the primary rate controlling mechanisms were macro-pore diffusion and silver-iodine reaction. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2016« less

  12. Modeling Urban Surface-Atmosphere Sensible Heat Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S. M.; Oke, T.; Lemonsu, A.; Grimmond, C.; Jackson, P.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the nature of energy partitioning at the surface of cities is prerequisite to gaining proper insight and ability to model their climatic environment and impacts. Of particular relevance in the urban setting is the surface-atmosphere exchange of sensible heat. The combined conductive-convective exchange of turbulent sensible heat flux (QH) and net storage heat flux (Δ QS) has been shown to account for over 90% of the daytime net radiation at highly urbanized sites. This relation depends on surface structure, materials and the degree of surface-atmosphere coupling and its understanding is required in many applications; for example, to assess building climates, and to model evapo-transpiration, the urban heat island, and boundary layer growth. Observational studies, while allowing for general awareness of urban surface-atmosphere energetic interactions, are often limited in their applicability to other urban sites and/or processes. To overcome this, numerical models which aim to simulate urban climates have been developed. The Town Energy Balance (TEB) model of Masson (2000) couples the micro- and meso- scales and accurately represents the urban energy budget in meso-scale atmospheric models. TEB uses local canyon geometry together with surface and substrate radiative, thermal, moisture and roughness properties to simulate the effects produced by the presence of buildings. The urban system is simulated by calculating individual energy balances for walls, roads, and roofs, which are then integrated to resolve the local-scale surface energy balance. The model has been independently evaluated using measured fluxes from three dry sites - central Mexico City, a light industrial site in Vancouver (Masson et al., 2002) and the city center of Marseille, France (Lemonsu et al., 2003). At these sites, TEB simulated net radiation to within less than 10 W m-2 and its partitioning into turbulent and storage heat fluxes to within a few tens of W -2. TEB's good

  13. Greenhouse gas exchange of rewetted bog peat extraction sites and a Sphagnum cultivation site in northwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, C.; Höper, H.

    2015-04-01

    During the last decades an increasing area of drained peatlands has been rewetted. Especially in Germany, rewetting is the principal treatment on cutover sites when peat extraction is finished. The objectives are bog restoration and the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The first sites were rewetted in the 1980s. Thus, there is a good opportunity to study long-term effects of rewetting on greenhouse gas exchange, which has not been done so far on temperate cutover peatlands. Moreover, Sphagnum cultivating may become a new way to use cutover peatlands and agriculturally used peatlands as it permits the economical use of bogs under wet conditions. The climate impact of such measures has not been studied yet. We conducted a field study on the exchange of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide at three rewetted sites with a gradient from dry to wet conditions and at a Sphagnum cultivation site in NW Germany over the course of more than 2 years. Gas fluxes were measured using transparent and opaque closed chambers. The ecosystem respiration (CO2) and the net ecosystem exchange (CO2) were modelled at a high temporal resolution. Measured and modelled values fit very well together. Annually cumulated gas flux rates, net ecosystem carbon balances (NECB) and global warming potential (GWP) balances were determined. The annual net ecosystem exchange (CO2) varied strongly at the rewetted sites (from -201.7 ± 126.8 to 29.7± 112.7g CO2-C m-2 a-1) due to differing weather conditions, water levels and vegetation. The Sphagnum cultivation site was a sink of CO2 (-118.8 ± 48.1 and -78.6 ± 39.8 g CO2-C m-2 a-1). The annual CH4 balances ranged between 16.2 ± 2.2 and 24.2 ± 5.0g CH4-C m-2 a-1 at two inundated sites, while one rewetted site with a comparatively low water level and the Sphagnum farming site show CH4 fluxes close to 0. The net N2O fluxes were low and not significantly different between the four sites. The annual NECB was between -185.5 ± 126.9 and 49

  14. Developmental Changes in Photosynthetic Gas Exchange in the Polyol-Synthesizing Species, Apium graveolens L. (Celery).

    PubMed

    Fox, T C; Kennedy, R A; Loescher, W H

    1986-09-01

    Developmental changes in photosynthetic gas exchange were investigated in the mannitol synthesizing plant celery (Apium graveolens L. ;Giant Pascal'). Greenhouse-grown plants had unusually high photosynthetic rates for a C(3) plant, but consistent with field productivity data reported elsewhere for this plant. In most respects, celery exhibited typical C(3) photosynthetic characteristics; light saturation occurred at 600 micromoles photons per square meter per second, with a broad temperature optimum, peaking at 26 degrees C. At 2% O(2), photosynthesis was enhanced 15 to 25% compared to rates at 21% O(2). However, celery had low CO(2) compensation points, averaging 7 to 20 microliters per liter throughout the canopy. Conventional mechanisms for concentrating CO(2) were not detectable.

  15. Differential leaf gas exchange responses to salinity and drought in the mangrove tree Avicecennia germinans (Avicenniaceae).

    PubMed

    Sobrado, M A

    2006-06-01

    Leaf gas exchange was assessed in Avicennia germinans L. grown under different NaCl concentrations (0-40 per thousand), after salt-relief, and then during drought. Stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) decreased with increasing NaCl concentration, and intrinsic water use efficiency (Pn / gs) increased. Under desalinization Pn / gs declined. Thus, gs did not change in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10 per thousand), but increased up to 30-32% at higher NaCl concentration (20-40 per thousand). However, Pn was only slightly enhanced (10-15%). Under drought, Pn decreased by as much as 46% in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10 per thousand) and by 22% at high NaCl concentration (40 per thousand). Thus, Pn / gs decreased and water use efficiency was lower during drought compared to estimates prior to salt-relief.

  16. Effects of elevated CO 2 on gas exchange characteristics of alpine grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemer, M.

    The ecosystem-level gas exchange characteristics of an alpine grassland treated with a combination of elevated CO 2 and moderate additions of NPK fertilizer during the third season of experimental treatments are described. Mid-season maximum daytime net ecosystem CO 2 flux (NEC max) increased significantly under elevated CO 2 (+45%), whereas nighttime NEC was unaffected by the CO 2 treatment. Since daytimke NEC under elevated CO 2 underwent a seasonal decline, only moderate carbon surpluses accumulated under elevated CO 2. The observed seasonal decline in daytime NEC may be due to reduced sink strength once maximum aboveground biomass is attained and appears to be a regulatory mechanism of ecosystem carbon accumulation. Moderate additions of NPK fertilizer stimulated both day-(+39%) and nighttime NEC (+29%) due to increased plant biomass, independent of CO 2 treatment. Yet there is no indication that enhanced mineral nutrient status will increase ecosystem responsiveness to elevated CO 2.

  17. Gas exchange: large surface and thin barrier determine pulmonary diffusing capacity.

    PubMed

    Weibel, E R

    1999-06-01

    The lung is characterized by its diffusing capacity for oxygen, DLO2, which is estimated from morphometric information as a theoretical capacity. It is determined by the large gas exchange surface, the thin tissue barrier, and the amount of capillary blood. The question is asked whether DLO2 could be a limiting factor for O2 uptake in heavy exercise, particularly in athletes with their 50% higher O2 demand. This is answered by studying the relation between DLO2 and maximal O2 consumption in different sedentary and athletic mammals, comparing horse and cow, dog and goat, and, finally, the most athletic mammal, the pronghorn antelope of the Rocky Mountains. It is concluded that in athletic species the lung is just sufficient to satisfy the O2 needs and can therefore be a limiting factor for aerobic work. PMID:10394805

  18. The closed spiracle phase of discontinuous gas exchange predicts diving duration in the grasshopper Paracinema tricolor.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, Agnieszka; Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S

    2016-08-15

    The discontinuous gas exchange (DGE) pattern of respiration shown by many arthropods includes periods of spiracle closure (C-phase) and is largely thought to serve as a physiological adaptation to restrict water loss in terrestrial environments. One major challenge to this hypothesis is to explain the presence of DGE in insects in moist environments. Here, we show a novel ecological correlate of the C-phase, namely, diving behaviour in mesic Paracinema tricolor grasshoppers. Notably, maximal dive duration is positively correlated with C-phase length, even after accounting for mass scaling and absolute metabolic rate. Here, we propose that an additional advantage of DGE may be conferred by allowing the tracheal system to act as a sealed underwater oxygen reservoir. Spiracle closure may facilitate underwater submersion, which, in turn, may contribute to predator avoidance, the survival of accidental immersion or periodic flooding and the exploitation of underwater resources. PMID:27296045

  19. The relationship between leaf water status, gas exchange, and spectral reflectance in cotton leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of leaf spectral reflectance, the components of water potential, and leaf gas exchanges as a function of leaf water content were made to evaluate the use of NIR reflectance as an indicator of plant water status. Significant correlations were determined between spectral reflectance at 810 nm, 1665 nm, and 2210 nm and leaf relative water content, total water potential, and turgor pressure. However, the slopes of these relationships were relatively shallow and, when evaluated over the range of leaf water contents in which physiological activity occurs (e.g., photosynthesis), had lower r-squared values, and some relationships were not statistically significant. NIR reflectance varied primarily as a function of leaf water content, and not independently as a function of turgor pressure, which is a sensitive indicator of leaf water status. The limitations of this approach to measuring plant water stress are discussed.

  20. Differential leaf gas exchange responses to salinity and drought in the mangrove tree Avicecennia germinans (Avicenniaceae).

    PubMed

    Sobrado, M A

    2006-06-01

    Leaf gas exchange was assessed in Avicennia germinans L. grown under different NaCl concentrations (0-40 per thousand), after salt-relief, and then during drought. Stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) decreased with increasing NaCl concentration, and intrinsic water use efficiency (Pn / gs) increased. Under desalinization Pn / gs declined. Thus, gs did not change in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10 per thousand), but increased up to 30-32% at higher NaCl concentration (20-40 per thousand). However, Pn was only slightly enhanced (10-15%). Under drought, Pn decreased by as much as 46% in plants grown at low NaCl concentration (10 per thousand) and by 22% at high NaCl concentration (40 per thousand). Thus, Pn / gs decreased and water use efficiency was lower during drought compared to estimates prior to salt-relief. PMID:18494307

  1. Modelling magmatic gas scrubbing in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, Rossella; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Valenza, Mariano; Bergsson, Baldur; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Rakel Guðjónsdóttir, Sylvía

    2015-04-01

    In volcano-hosted hydrothermal systems, the chemistry of deeply rising magmatic gases is extensively modified by gas-water-rock interactions taking place within the hydrothermal reservoir, and/or at shallow groundwaters conditions. These reactions can scrub reactive, water-soluble species (S, halogens) from the magmatic gas phase, so that their quantitative assessment is central to understanding the chemistry of surface gas manifestations, and brings profound implications to the interpretation of volcanic-hydrothermal unrests. Here, we present the results of numerical simulations of magmatic gas scrubbing, in which the reaction path modelling approach (Helgeson, 1968) is used to reproduce hydrothermal gas-water-rock interactions at both shallow (temperature up to 109°C; low-T model runs) and deep reservoir (temperature range: 150-250 °C; high-T model runs) conditions. The model was built based upon the EQ3/6 software package (Wolery and Daveler, 1992), and consisted into a step by step addition of a high-temperature magmatic gas to an initial meteoric water, in the presence of a dissolving aquifer rock. The model outputted, at each step of gas addition, the chemical composition of a new aqueous solution formed after gas-water-rock interactions; which, upon reaching gas over-pressuring (PgasTOT > Psat(H2O) at run T), is degassed (by single-step degassing) to separate a scrubbed gas phase. As an application of the model results, the model compositions of the separated gases are finally compared with compositions of natural gas emissions from Hekla volcano (T< 100°C) and from Krisuvik geothermal system (T> 100°C), resulting into an excellent agreement. The compositions of the model solutions are also in fair agreement with compositions of natural thermal water samples. We conclude that our EQ3/6-based reaction path simulations offer a realistic representation of gas-water-rock interaction processes occurring underneath active magmatic-hydrothermal systems

  2. Modelling world gold prices and USD foreign exchange relationship using multivariate GARCH model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Pung Yean; Ahmad, Maizah Hura Binti

    2014-12-01

    World gold price is a popular investment commodity. The series have often been modeled using univariate models. The objective of this paper is to show that there is a co-movement between gold price and USD foreign exchange rate. Using the effect of the USD foreign exchange rate on the gold price, a model that can be used to forecast future gold prices is developed. For this purpose, the current paper proposes a multivariate GARCH (Bivariate GARCH) model. Using daily prices of both series from 01.01.2000 to 05.05.2014, a causal relation between the two series understudied are found and a bivariate GARCH model is produced.

  3. Mechanisms of worsening gas exchange during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, J A; Roca, J; Ferrer, A; Félez, M A; Díaz, O; Roger, N; Rodriguez-Roisin, R

    1997-06-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms that determine abnormal gas exchange during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Thirteen COPD patients, hospitalized because of an exacerbation, were studied after admission and 38+/-10 (+/-SD) days after discharge, once they were clinically stable. Measurements included forced spirometry, arterial blood gas values, minute ventilation (V'E), cardiac output (Q'), oxygen consumption (V'O2), and ventilation/perfusion (V'A/Q') relationships, assessed by the inert gas technique. Exacerbations were characterized by very severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 0.74+/-0.17 vs 0.91+/-0.19 L, during exacerbation and stable conditions, respectively; p=0.01), severe hypoxaemia (ratio between arterial oxygen tension and inspired oxygen fraction (Pa,O2/FI,O2) 32.7+/-7.7 vs 37.6+/-6.9 kPa (245+/-58 vs 282+/-52 mmHg); p=0.01) and hypercapnia (arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) 6.8+/-1.6 vs 5.9+/-0.8 kPa (51+/-12 vs 44+/-6 mmHg); p=0.04). V'A/Q' inequality increased during exacerbation (log SD Q', 1.10+/-0.29 vs 0.96+/-0.27; normal < or = 0.6; p=0.04) as a result of greater perfusion in poorly-ventilated alveoli. Shunt was almost negligible on both measurements. V'E remained essentially unchanged during exacerbation (10.5+/-2.2 vs 9.2+/-1.8 L x min(-1); p=0.1), whereas both Q' (6.1+/-2.4 vs 5.1+/-1.7 L x min(-1); p=0.05) and V'O2 (300+/-49 vs 248+/-59 mL x min(-1); p=0.03) increased significantly. Worsening of hypoxaemia was explained mainly by the increase both in V'A/Q' inequality and V'O2, whereas the increase in Q' partially counterbalanced the effect of greater V'O2 on mixed venous oxygen tension (PV,O2). We conclude that worsening of gas exchange during exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is primarily produced by increased ventilation/perfusion inequality, and that this effect is amplified by the decrease of mixed venous oxygen

  4. Gas exchange and intrapulmonary distribution of ventilation during continuous-flow ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Vettermann, J.; Brusasco, V.; Rehder, K.

    1988-05-01

    In 12 anesthetized paralyzed dogs, pulmonary gas exchange and intrapulmonary inspired gas distribution were compared between continuous-flow ventilation (CFV) and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV). Nine dogs were studied while they were lying supine, and three dogs were studied while they were lying prone. A single-lumen catheter for tracheal insufflation and a double-lumen catheter for bilateral endobronchial insufflation (inspired O2 fraction = 0.4; inspired minute ventilation = 1.7 +/- 0.3 (SD) 1.kg-1.min-1) were evaluated. Intrapulmonary gas distribution was assessed from regional 133Xe clearances. In dogs lying supine, CO2 elimination was more efficient with endobronchial insufflation than with tracheal insufflation, but the alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference was larger during CFV than during CMV, regardless of the type of insufflation. By contrast, endobronchial insufflation maintained both arterial PCO2 and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference at significantly lower levels in dogs lying prone than in dogs lying supine. In dogs lying supine, the dependent lung was preferentially ventilated during CMV but not during CFV. In dogs lying prone, gas distribution was uniform with both modes of ventilation. The alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference during CFV in dogs lying supine was negatively correlated with the reduced ventilation of the dependent lung, which suggests that increased ventilation-perfusion mismatching was responsible for the increase in alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference. The more efficient oxygenation during CFV in dogs lying prone suggests a more efficient matching of ventilation to perfusion, presumably because the distribution of blood flow is also nearly uniform.

  5. Computational modeling of intraocular gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noohi, P.; Abdekhodaie, M. J.; Cheng, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computational model to simulate the dynamics of intraocular gas behavior in pneumatic retinopexy (PR) procedure. The presented model predicted intraocular gas volume at any time and determined the tolerance angle within which a patient can maneuver and still gas completely covers the tear(s). Computational fluid dynamics calculations were conducted to describe PR procedure. The geometrical model was constructed based on the rabbit and human eye dimensions. SF6 in the form of pure and diluted with air was considered as the injected gas. The presented results indicated that the composition of the injected gas affected the gas absorption rate and gas volume. After injection of pure SF6, the bubble expanded to 2.3 times of its initial volume during the first 23 h, but when diluted SF6 was used, no significant expansion was observed. Also, head positioning for the treatment of retinal tear influenced the rate of gas absorption. Moreover, the determined tolerance angle depended on the bubble and tear size. More bubble expansion and smaller retinal tear caused greater tolerance angle. For example, after 23 h, for the tear size of 2 mm the tolerance angle of using pure SF6 is 1.4 times more than that of using diluted SF6 with 80% air. Composition of the injected gas and conditions of the tear in PR may dramatically affect the gas absorption rate and gas volume. Quantifying these effects helps to predict the tolerance angle and improve treatment efficiency.

  6. Computational modeling of intraocular gas dynamics.

    PubMed

    Noohi, P; Abdekhodaie, M J; Cheng, Y L

    2015-12-18

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computational model to simulate the dynamics of intraocular gas behavior in pneumatic retinopexy (PR) procedure. The presented model predicted intraocular gas volume at any time and determined the tolerance angle within which a patient can maneuver and still gas completely covers the tear(s). Computational fluid dynamics calculations were conducted to describe PR procedure. The geometrical model was constructed based on the rabbit and human eye dimensions. SF6 in the form of pure and diluted with air was considered as the injected gas. The presented results indicated that the composition of the injected gas affected the gas absorption rate and gas volume. After injection of pure SF6, the bubble expanded to 2.3 times of its initial volume during the first 23 h, but when diluted SF6 was used, no significant expansion was observed. Also, head positioning for the treatment of retinal tear influenced the rate of gas absorption. Moreover, the determined tolerance angle depended on the bubble and tear size. More bubble expansion and smaller retinal tear caused greater tolerance angle. For example, after 23 h, for the tear size of 2 mm the tolerance angle of using pure SF6 is 1.4 times more than that of using diluted SF6 with 80% air. Composition of the injected gas and conditions of the tear in PR may dramatically affect the gas absorption rate and gas volume. Quantifying these effects helps to predict the tolerance angle and improve treatment efficiency.

  7. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  8. [Pulmonary and alveolar ventilation, gas exchanges and arterial blood gases during ramp exercise].

    PubMed

    Péronnet, F; Aguilaniu, B

    2012-10-01

    In response to ramp exercise, changes in ventilation, gas exchange and arterial blood gases, which are closely interrelated, reflect the two roles of ventilation: 1) providing O(2) and eliminating metabolic CO(2) (from rest to maximal exercise); and 2) contributing to acid-base balance by eliminating non metabolic CO(2) from the alkaline reserve (from the first ventilatory threshold [VT(1)] to maximal exercise). Hyperpnea before VT(1) increases gas exchanges as needed for aerobic metabolism without large changes in ventilatory equivalent of O(2) and CO(2) (VE/V(O2) or VE/V(CO2)), in P(O2) and P(CO2) in alveoli or arterial blood (except for a small widening of alveolo-arterial P(O2) gradient), and in bicarbonate concentration. In contrast, above VT(1), CO(2) is washed-out from the alkaline reserve due to the combined effect of the fall in PA(CO2) (because of hyperventilation) and in pH, and this helps maintaining acid-base balance. Pa(CO2) and bicarbonate concentration decrease while PA(O2) and VE/V(O2) increase, and V(CO2), which follows VE, becomes higher than V(O2). In healthy young subjects, but very seldom in patients, the end of exercise can occur after a second ventilatory threshold (VT(2)), which is the zone where the increase in V(CO2) fails to follow that in VE in spite of hyperventilation and acidosis because of the progressive depletion of the alkaline reserve.

  9. Stem and leaf gas exchange and their responses to fire in a north Australian tropical savanna.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Hutley, Lindsay B; Beringer, Jason; Tapper, Nigel J

    2006-04-01

    We measured stem CO2 efflux and leaf gas exchange in a tropical savanna ecosystem in northern Australia, and assessed the impact of fire on these processes. Gas exchange of mature leaves that flushed after a fire showed only slight differences from that of mature leaves on unburned trees. Expanding leaves typically showed net losses of CO2 to the atmosphere in both burned and unburned trees, even under saturating irradiance. Fire caused stem CO2 efflux to decline in overstory trees, when measured 8 weeks post-fire. This decline was thought to have resulted from reduced availability of C substrate for respiration, due to reduced canopy photosynthesis caused by leaf scorching, and to priority allocation of fixed C towards reconstruction of a new canopy. At the ecosystem scale, we estimated the annual above-ground woody-tissue CO2 efflux to be 275 g C m(-2) ground area year(-1) in a non-fire year, or approximately 13% of the annual gross primary production. We contrasted the canopy physiology of two co-dominant overstory tree species, one of which has a smooth bark on its branches capable of photosynthetic re-fixation (Eucalyptus miniata), and the other of which has a thick, rough bark incapable of re-fixation (Eucalyptus tetrodonta). Eucalyptus miniata supported a larger branch sapwood cross-sectional area in the crown per unit subtending leaf area, and had higher leaf stomatal conductance and photosynthesis than E. tetrodonta. Re-fixation by photosynthetic bark reduces the C cost of delivering water to evaporative sites in leaves, because it reduces the net C cost of constructing and maintaining sapwood. We suggest that re-fixation allowed leaves of E. miniata to photosynthesize at higher rates than those of E. tetrodonta, while the two invested similar amounts of C in the maintenance of branch sapwood.

  10. Peach Water Relations, Gas Exchange, Growth and Shoot Mortality under Water Deficit in Semi-Arid Weather Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Mitra; Davarynejad, Gholam Hossein; Génard, Michel; Bannayan, Mohammad; Azizi, Majid; Vercambre, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In this study the sensitivity of peach tree (Prunus persica L.) to three water stress levels from mid-pit hardening until harvest was assessed. Seasonal patterns of shoot and fruit growth, gas exchange (leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration) as well as carbon (C) storage/mobilization were evaluated in relation to plant water status. A simple C balance model was also developed to investigate sink-source relationship in relation to plant water status at the tree level. The C source was estimated through the leaf area dynamics and leaf photosynthesis rate along the season. The C sink was estimated for maintenance respiration and growth of shoots and fruits. Water stress significantly reduced gas exchange, and fruit, and shoot growth, but increased fruit dry matter concentration. Growth was more affected by water deficit than photosynthesis, and shoot growth was more sensitive to water deficit than fruit growth. Reduction of shoot growth was associated with a decrease of shoot elongation, emergence, and high shoot mortality. Water scarcity affected tree C assimilation due to two interacting factors: (i) reduction in leaf photosynthesis (-23% and -50% under moderate (MS) and severe (SS) water stress compared to low (LS) stress during growth season) and (ii) reduction in total leaf area (-57% and -79% under MS and SS compared to LS at harvest). Our field data analysis suggested a Ψstem threshold of -1.5 MPa below which daily net C gain became negative, i.e. C assimilation became lower than C needed for respiration and growth. Negative C balance under MS and SS associated with decline of trunk carbohydrate reserves – may have led to drought-induced vegetative mortality. PMID:25830350

  11. Peach water relations, gas exchange, growth and shoot mortality under water deficit in semi-arid weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Mitra; Davarynejad, Gholam Hossein; Génard, Michel; Bannayan, Mohammad; Azizi, Majid; Vercambre, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In this study the sensitivity of peach tree (Prunus persica L.) to three water stress levels from mid-pit hardening until harvest was assessed. Seasonal patterns of shoot and fruit growth, gas exchange (leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration) as well as carbon (C) storage/mobilization were evaluated in relation to plant water status. A simple C balance model was also developed to investigate sink-source relationship in relation to plant water status at the tree level. The C source was estimated through the leaf area dynamics and leaf photosynthesis rate along the season. The C sink was estimated for maintenance respiration and growth of shoots and fruits. Water stress significantly reduced gas exchange, and fruit, and shoot growth, but increased fruit dry matter concentration. Growth was more affected by water deficit than photosynthesis, and shoot growth was more sensitive to water deficit than fruit growth. Reduction of shoot growth was associated with a decrease of shoot elongation, emergence, and high shoot mortality. Water scarcity affected tree C assimilation due to two interacting factors: (i) reduction in leaf photosynthesis (-23% and -50% under moderate (MS) and severe (SS) water stress compared to low (LS) stress during growth season) and (ii) reduction in total leaf area (-57% and -79% under MS and SS compared to LS at harvest). Our field data analysis suggested a Ψstem threshold of -1.5 MPa below which daily net C gain became negative, i.e. C assimilation became lower than C needed for respiration and growth. Negative C balance under MS and SS associated with decline of trunk carbohydrate reserves--may have led to drought-induced vegetative mortality.

  12. Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-03-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  13. Meson exchange current (MEC) models in neutrino interaction generators

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    Understanding of the so-called 2 particle-2 hole (2p-2h) effect is an urgent program in neutrino interaction physics for current and future oscillation experiments. Such processes are believed to be responsible for the event excesses observed by recent neutrino experiments. The 2p-2h effect is dominated by the meson exchange current (MEC), and is accompanied by a 2-nucleon emission from the primary vertex, instead of a single nucleon emission from the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interaction. Current and future high resolution experiments can potentially nail down this effect. For this reason, there are world wide efforts to model and implement this process in neutrino interaction simulations. In these proceedings, I would like to describe how this channel is modeled in neutrino interaction generators.

  14. Estimation of Instantaneous Gas Exchange in Flow-Through Respirometry Systems: A Modern Revision of Bartholomew's Z-Transform Method

    PubMed Central

    Pendar, Hodjat; Socha, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Flow-through respirometry systems provide accurate measurement of gas exchange over long periods of time. However, these systems have limitations in tracking rapid changes. When an animal infuses a metabolic gas into the respirometry chamber in a short burst, diffusion and airflow in the chamber gradually alter the original signal before it arrives at the gas analyzer. For single or multiple bursts, the recorded signal is smeared or mixed, which may result in dramatically altered recordings compared to the emitted signal. Recovering the original metabolic signal is a difficult task because of the inherent ill conditioning problem. Here, we present two new methods to recover the fast dynamics of metabolic patterns from recorded data. We first re-derive the equations of the well-known Z-transform method (ZT method) to show the source of imprecision in this method. Then, we develop a new model of analysis for respirometry systems based on the experimentally determined impulse response, which is the response of the system to a very short unit input. As a result, we present a major modification of the ZT method (dubbed the ‘EZT method’) by using a new model for the impulse response, enhancing its precision to recover the true metabolic signals. The second method, the generalized Z-transform (GZT) method, was then developed by generalizing the EZT method; it can be applied to any flow-through respirometry system with any arbitrary impulse response. Experiments verified that the accuracy of recovering the true metabolic signals is significantly improved by the new methods. These new methods can be used more broadly for input estimation in variety of physiological systems. PMID:26466361

  15. Estimation of Instantaneous Gas Exchange in Flow-Through Respirometry Systems: A Modern Revision of Bartholomew's Z-Transform Method.

    PubMed

    Pendar, Hodjat; Socha, John J

    2015-01-01

    Flow-through respirometry systems provide accurate measurement of gas exchange over long periods of time. However, these systems have limitations in tracking rapid changes. When an animal infuses a metabolic gas into the respirometry chamber in a short burst, diffusion and airflow in the chamber gradually alter the original signal before it arrives at the gas analyzer. For single or multiple bursts, the recorded signal is smeared or mixed, which may result in dramatically altered recordings compared to the emitted signal. Recovering the original metabolic signal is a difficult task because of the inherent ill conditioning problem. Here, we present two new methods to recover the fast dynamics of metabolic patterns from recorded data. We first re-derive the equations of the well-known Z-transform method (ZT method) to show the source of imprecision in this method. Then, we develop a new model of analysis for respirometry systems based on the experimentally determined impulse response, which is the response of the system to a very short unit input. As a result, we present a major modification of the ZT method (dubbed the 'EZT method') by using a new model for the impulse response, enhancing its precision to recover the true metabolic signals. The second method, the generalized Z-transform (GZT) method, was then developed by generalizing the EZT method; it can be applied to any flow-through respirometry system with any arbitrary impulse response. Experiments verified that the accuracy of recovering the true metabolic signals is significantly improved by the new methods. These new methods can be used more broadly for input estimation in variety of physiological systems. PMID:26466361

  16. The single-process biochemical reaction of Rubisco: a unified theory and model with the effects of irradiance, CO₂ and rate-limiting step on the kinetics of C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis from gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Farazdaghi, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the origin of oxygenic life on the planet, and its models are the core of all models of plant biology, agriculture, environmental quality and global climate change. A theory is presented here, based on single process biochemical reactions of Rubisco, recognizing that: In the light, Rubisco activase helps separate Rubisco from the stored ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), activates Rubisco with carbamylation and addition of Mg²(+), and then produces two products, in two steps: (Step 1) Reaction of Rubisco with RuBP produces a Rubisco-enediol complex, which is the carboxylase-oxygenase enzyme (Enco) and (Step 2) Enco captures CO₂ and/or O₂ and produces intermediate products leading to production and release of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) and Rubisco. PGA interactively controls (1) the carboxylation-oxygenation, (2) electron transport, and (3) triosephosphate pathway of the Calvin-Benson cycle that leads to the release of glucose and regeneration of RuBP. Initially, the total enzyme participates in the two steps of the reaction transitionally and its rate follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. But, for a continuous steady state, Rubisco must be divided into two concurrently active segments for the two steps. This causes a deviation of the steady state from the transitional rate. Kinetic models are developed that integrate the transitional and the steady state reactions. They are tested and successfully validated with verifiable experimental data. The single-process theory is compared to the widely used two-process theory of Farquhar et al. (1980. Planta 149, 78-90), which assumes that the carboxylation rate is either Rubisco-limited at low CO₂ levels such as CO₂ compensation point, or RuBP regeneration-limited at high CO₂. Since the photosynthesis rate cannot increase beyond the two-process theory's Rubisco limit at the CO₂ compensation point, net photosynthesis cannot increase above zero in daylight, and since there is always respiration at

  17. Superhydrophobic PAN nanofibers for gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Hwang, Gisuk; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered to be the promising alternatives of natural resources for generating electricity and power. An optimal water management in the gas diffusion layers (GDL) is critical to high fuel cell performance. Its basic functions include transportation of the reactant gas from flow channels to catalyst effectively, draining out the liquid water from catalyst layer to flow channels, and conducting electrons with low humidity. In this study, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in a solvent and electrospun at various conditions to produce PAN nanofibers prior to the stabilization at 280 °C for 1 hour in the atmospheric pressure and carbonization at 850 °C for 1 hour. The surface hydrophobicity values of the carbonized PAN nanofibers were adjusted using superhydrophobic and hydrophilic agents. The thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of the new GDLs depicted much better results compared to the conventionally used ones. The water condensation tests on the surfaces (superhydrophobic and hydrophilic) of the GDL showed a crucial step towards improved water managements in the fuel cell. This study may open up new possibilities for developing high- performing GDL materials for future PEM fuel cell applications.

  18. Mechanisms of gas exchange abnormality in patients with chronic obliterative pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dantzker, D R; Bower, J S

    1979-01-01

    We have examined the mechanisms of abnormal gas exchange in seven patients with chronic obliteration of the pulmonary vascular bed secondary to recurrent pulmonary emboli or idiopathic pulmonary hypertension. All of the patients had a widened alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient and four were significantly hypoxemic with arterial partial presssures of oxygen less than 80 torr. Using the technique of multiple inert gas elimination, we found that ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) relationships were only minimally abnormal with a mean of 10% (range, 2--19%) of cardiac output perfusing abnormal units. These units consisted of shunt and units with VA/Q ratios less than 0.1. In addition, the dead space was found to be normal in each patient. There was no evidence for diffusion impairment, and the widened alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient was completely explained by VA/ inequality. Significant hypoxemia occurred only when VA/Q inequality was combined with a low mixed venous oxygen content. PMID:479367

  19. Effects of hypobaria on parabronchial gas exchange in normoxic and hypoxic ducks.

    PubMed

    Shams, H; Scheid, P

    1993-03-01

    Cardio-respiratory parameters and air sac and blood gases were measured in the unrestrained, unanesthetized duck during exposure to normobaric (PB = 746 Torr) or hypobaric (PB = 253 Torr) normoxia (PIO2 = 143 Torr) and hypoxia (PIO2 = 41.5 Torr). Compared with normobaria at the same PIO2, hypobaria caused a statistically significant increase in ventilation during both normoxia and hypoxia, resulting in elevated PO2 and diminished PCO2 in the caudal thoracic and clavicular air sac, and in increased PaO2 and decreased PaCO2. Similarly, lactic acid production was elevated in hypobaria, and the resulting decrease in arterial pH may be responsible for the increase in ventilation. Despite these changes, there was no evidence for altered gas exchange efficiency during hypobaria. This suggests that no significant diffusion limitation is present in the air capillary gas phase in normobaria, that could have been diminished with hypobaria. It also suggests that the aerodynamic valving efficiency, present during inspiration at the level of the medioventral bronchi, is not affected by hypobaria. Although the mechanisms underlying the increased lactic acid production and ventilation are not understood, they may exert an advantageous effect on high altitude tolerance of the bird.

  20. Effect of stratified inequality of blood flow on gas exchange in liquid-filled lungs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Maloney, J. E.; Castle, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation set out to answer two questions: (1) are the distal alveoli in the terminal lung units less well perfused than the proximal alveoli, i.e., is there stratification of blood flow; and (2) if so, does this enhance gas exchange in the presence of stratified inequality of ventilation. Excised dog lungs were ventilated with saline and perfused with blood. Following single inspirations of xenon 133 in saline and various periods of breath holding, the expired xenon concentration against volume was measured and it confirmed marked stratified inequality of ventilation under these conditions. By measuring the rate of depletion of xenon from alveoli during a period of blood flow, we showed that the alveoli which emptied at the end of expiration had 16% less blood flow than those exhaling earlier. However, by measuring the xenon concentration in pulmonary venous blood, we found that about 10% less tracer was transferred from the alveoli into the blood when the inspired xenon was stratified within the respiratory zone. Thus while stratification of blood flow was confirmed, it was shown to impair rather than enhance the efficiency of gas transfer.

  1. Bubble Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Enhances Lung Volume and Gas Exchange in Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Pillow, J. Jane; Hillman, Noah; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Polglase, Graeme; Bold, Geoff; Beaumont, Chris; Ikegami, Machiko; Jobe, Alan H.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: The technique used to provide continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the newborn may influence lung function and breathing efficiency. Objectives: To compare differences in gas exchange physiology and lung injury resulting from treatment of respiratory distress with either bubble or constant pressure CPAP and to determine if the applied flow influences short-term outcomes. Methods: Lambs (133 d gestation; term is 150 d) born via cesarean section were weighed, intubated, and treated with CPAP for 3 hours. Two groups were treated with 8 L/minute applied flow using the bubble (n = 12) or the constant pressure (n = 12) technique. A third group (n = 10) received the bubble method with 12 L/minute bias flow. Measurements at study completion included arterial blood gases, oxygraphy, capnography, tidal flow, multiple breath washout, lung mechanics, static pressure–volume curves, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein. Measurements and Main Results: Birth weight and arterial gas variables at 15 minutes were comparable. Flow (8 or 12 L/min) did not influence the 3-hour outcomes in the bubble group. Bubble technique was associated with a higher pH, PaO2, oxygen uptake, and area under the flow–volume curve, and a decreased alveolar protein, respiratory quotient, PaCO2, and ventilation inhomogeneity compared with the constant pressure group. Conclusions: Compared with constant pressure technique, bubble CPAP promotes enhanced airway patency during treatment of acute postnatal respiratory disease in preterm lambs and may offer protection against lung injury. PMID:17431223

  2. DOGEE-SOLAS: The Role of Surfactants in Air-Sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.; Nightingale, P.

    2008-12-01

    One of the major aims of DOGEE-SOLAS was to improve our understanding of the role of surfactants in air- sea gas exchange. With this in mind we carried out a number of artificial surfactant releases on a research cruise in the North Atlantic (D320), during June-July of 2007. We used oleyl alcohol, a surrogate for natural surfactants which is relatively cheap and easy to obtain (it is used in the manufacture of cosmetics). The main release overlaid a dual tracer "patch" of SF6 and 3He; our aim was to directly compare values of the gas transfer velocity, kw, estimated within the surfactant covered patch with those estimated quasi- simultaneously in a second, surfactant-free patch about 20km away. A second release in conjunction with colleagues from the University of Hawaii had the aim of measuring DMS fluxes by eddy correlation both inside and outside a surfactant slick, and a third was undertaken in the path of one of two 14m ASIS (Air-Sea Interaction Spar) buoys operated by the University of Miami for direct comparison of surfactant effects on the fluxes of CO2, H2O, heat and momentum (eddy correlation) etc. We present here some preliminary findings from the work.

  3. Modelling the soil-atmosphere exchange of POPs: Long-term steady state and diurnal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Z.; Beckingham, B.; Maier, U.; Haberer, C.; Grathwohl, P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange is an important transport process influencing environmental fate and transport of many persistent organic pollutants (POPs). This study focuses on modelling the gaseous exchange of a semi-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (phenanthrene) between soil and the atmosphere using the multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P. MIN3P is typically applied to simulate aqueous and vapor phase subsurface transport and reaction processes. We extended the code to also include an atmospheric boundary layer where eddy diffusion and photodegradation take place. The relevant processes and parameters affecting soil-atmosphere exchange were investigated in several scenarios and at various time scales. We found that phenanthrene is well-mixed in the atmospheric boundary layer under neutral or stable atmospheric conditions due to fast eddy diffusion. Uptake of airborne phenanthrene to soils is limited by the soil properties and initially depends on diffusion in soil gas and sorption to the solids. On the long term seepage water dominates transport into deeper soil layers; biodegradation finally leads to steady-state concentration profiles in the subsurface typically achieved after a few centuries. If concentrations in the atmosphere decrease, e.g. due to environmental legislation, then soils become sources for the POPs for the first two months and function as sinks again for the POPs until new steady state concentrations are reached (after decades to centuries). MIN3P was also used to simulate diurnal soil-atmosphere exchanges of airborne pollutants due to temperature changes and photodegradation, both which cause fluctuations in atmospheric concentrations and therefore affect mass transfer between soil and the atmosphere. The model can further be applied to estimate the environmental fate of other POPs between soil and the atmosphere under different environmental pollution and climate change scenarios.

  4. Modeling the Hydrogen-Proton Charge-Exchange Process in Global Heliospheric Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, A.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2015-12-01

    The environment surrounding our Solar System has a vast and dynamic structure. As the Sun rounds the Milky Way galaxy, interstellar dust and gas interact with the Sun's outflow of solar wind. A bubble of hot plasma forms around the Sun due to this interaction, called the heliosphere. In order to understand the structure of the heliosphere, observations and simulations must work in tandem. Within the past decade or so, 3D models of the heliosphere have been developed exhibiting non- symmmetric as well as predicting structures such as the hydrogen wall and the IBEX ribbon. In this poster we explore new ways to compute charge-exchange source terms. The charge-exchange process is the coupling mechanism between the MHD and kinetic theories. The understanding of this process is crucial in order to make valuable predictions. Energy dependant cross section terms will aid in settling non-linear affects coupling the intestellar and solar particles. Through these new ways of computing source terms, resolving fine structures in the plasma in the heliopause may be possible. In addition, other non-trivial situations, such as charge-exchange mediated shocks, may be addressed.

  5. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  6. International Natural Gas Model 2011, Model Documentation Report

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the International Natural Gas Model (INGM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  7. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Natural Gas Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Natural Gas Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  8. Effect of prolonged, heavy exercise on pulmonary gas exchange in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, S R; Gavin, T P; Siafakas, N M; Haseler, L J; Olfert, I M; Wagner, H; Wagner, P D

    1998-10-01

    During maximal exercise, ventilation-perfusion inequality increases, especially in athletes. The mechanism remains speculative. We hypothesized that, if interstitial pulmonary edema is involved, prolonged exercise would result in increasing ventilation-perfusion inequality over time by exposing the pulmonary vascular bed to high pressures for a long duration. The response to short-term exercise was first characterized in six male athletes [maximal O2 uptake (V(O2)max) = 63 ml x kg-1 x min-1] by using 5 min of cycling exercise at 30, 65, and 90% V(O2) max. Multiple inert-gas, blood-gas, hemodynamic, metabolic rate, and ventilatory data were obtained. Resting log SD of the perfusion distribution (log SDQ) was normal [0.50 +/- 0.03 (SE)] and increased with exercise (log SDQ = 0.65 +/- 0.04, P < 0.005), alveolar-arterial O2 difference increased (to 24 +/- 3 Torr), and end-capillary pulmonary diffusion limitation occurred at 90% V(O2)max. The subjects recovered for 30 min, then, after resting measurements were taken, exercised for 60 min at approximately 65% V(O2)max. O2 uptake, ventilation, cardiac output, and alveolar-arterial O2 difference were unchanged after the first 5 min of this test, but log SDQ increased from 0.59 +/- 0.03 at 5 min to 0. 66 +/- 0.05 at 60 min (P < 0.05), without pulmonary diffusion limitation. Log SDQ was negatively related to total lung capacity normalized for body surface area (r = -0.97, P < 0.005 at 60 min). These data are compatible with interstitial edema as a mechanism and suggest that lung size is an important determinant of the efficiency of gas exchange during exercise.

  9. Pulmonary gas exchange is not impaired 24 h after extravehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Prisk, G Kim; Fine, Janelle M; Cooper, Trevor K; West, John B

    2005-12-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) during spaceflight involves a significant decompression stress. Previous studies have shown an increase in the inhomogeneity of ventilation-perfusion ratio (VA/Q) after some underwater dives, presumably through the embolic effects of venous gas microemboli in the lung. Ground-based chamber studies simulating EVA have shown that venous gas microemboli occur in a large percentage of the subjects undergoing decompression, despite the use of prebreathe protocols to reduce dissolved N(2) in the tissues. We studied eight crewmembers (7 male, 1 female) of the International Space Station who performed 15 EVAs (initial cabin pressure 748 mmHg, final suit pressure either approximately 295 or approximately 220 mmHg depending on the suit used) and who followed the denitrogenation procedures approved for EVA from the International Space Station. The intrabreath VA/Q slope was calculated from the alveolar Po(2) and Pco(2) in a prolonged exhalation maneuver on the day after EVA and compared with measurements made in microgravity on days well separated from the EVA. There were no significant changes in intrabreath VA/Q slope as a result of EVA, although there was a slight increase in metabolic rate and ventilation (approximately 9%) on the day after EVA. Vital capacity and other measures of pulmonary function were largely unaltered by EVA. Because measurements could only be performed on the day after EVA because of logistical constraints, we were unable to determine an acute effect of EVA on VA/Q inequality. The results suggest that current denitrogenation protocols do not result in any major lasting alteration to gas exchange in the lung.

  10. Weak coordination among petiole, leaf, vein, and gas-exchange traits across 41 Australian angiosperm species and its possible implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims Close coordination between leaf gas exchange and maximal hydraulic supply has been reported across diverse plant life-forms. However, recent reports suggest that this relationship may become weak or break down completely within the angiosperms. Methods To examine this possi...

  11. Asymmetrical effects of mesophyll conductance on fundamental photosynthetic parameters and their relationships estimated from leaf gas exchange measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most previous analyses of leaf gas exchange measurements assumed an infinite value of mesophyll conductance (gm) and thus equaled CO2 partial pressures in the substomatal cavity and chloroplast. Yet an increasing number of studies have recognized that gm is finite and there is a drawdown of CO2 part...

  12. High Frequency Nasal Ventilation for 21 Days Maintains Gas Exchange with Lower Respiratory Pressures and Promotes Alveolarization in Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Null, Donald M.; Alvord, Jeremy; Leavitt, Wendy; Wint, Albert; Dahl, Mar Janna; Presson, Angela P.; Lane, Robert H.; DiGeronimo, Robert J.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Short-term high-frequency nasal ventilation (HFNV) of preterm neonates provides acceptable gas exchange compared to endotracheal intubation and intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV). Whether long-term HFNV will provide acceptable gas exchange is unknown. We hypothesized that HFNV for up to 21d would lead to acceptable gas exchange at lower inspired oxygen (O2) levels and airway pressures compared to intubation and IMV. Methods Preterm lambs were exposed to antenatal steroids, and treated with perinatal surfactant and postnatal caffeine. Lambs were intubated and resuscitated by IMV. At ~3h of age, half of the lambs were switched to non-invasive HFNV. Support was for 3d or 21d. By design, PaO2 and PaCO2 were not different between groups. Results At 3d (n=5) and 21d (n=4) of HFNV, fractional inspired O2 (FiO2), peak inspiratory pressure, mean airway, intra-tracheal, and positive end-expiratory pressures, oxygenation index, and Alveolar-arterial gradient were significantly lower than matched periods of intubation and IMV. PaO2/FiO2 ratio was significantly higher at 3d and 21d of HFNV compared to matched intubation and IMV. HFNV led to better alveolarization at 3d and 21d. Conclusion Long-term HFNV provides acceptable gas exchange at lower inspired O2 levels and respiratory pressures compared to intubation and IMV. PMID:24378898

  13. Enterprise Networks for Competences Exchange: A Simulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remondino, Marco; Pironti, Marco; Pisano, Paola

    A business process is a set of logically related tasks performed to achieve a defined business and related to improving organizational processes. Process innovation can happen at various levels: incrementally, redesign of existing processes, new processes. The knowledge behind process innovation can be shared, acquired, changed and increased by the enterprises inside a network. An enterprise can decide to exploit innovative processes it owns, thus potentially gaining competitive advantage, but risking, in turn, that other players could reach the same technological levels. Or it could decide to share it, in exchange for other competencies or money. These activities could be the basis for a network formation and/or impact the topology of an existing network. In this work an agent based model is introduced (E3), aiming to explore how a process innovation can facilitate network formation, affect its topology, induce new players to enter the market and spread onto the network by being shared or developed by new players.

  14. Comet Gas and Dust Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul A.; Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    This software models the gas and dust dynamics of comet coma (the head region of a comet) in order to support the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO) project. MIRO will study the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's coma system. The instrument will measure surface temperature, gas-production rates and relative abundances, and velocity and excitation temperatures of each species along with their spatial temporal variability. This software will use these measurements to improve the understanding of coma dynamics. The modeling tool solves the equation of motion of a dust particle, the energy balance equation of the dust particle, the continuity equation for the dust and gas flow, and the dust and gas mixture energy equation. By solving these equations numerically, the software calculates the temperature and velocity of gas and dust as a function of time for a given initial gas and dust production rate, and a dust characteristic parameter that measures the ability of a dust particle to adjust its velocity to the local gas velocity. The software is written in a modular manner, thereby allowing the addition of more dynamics equations as needed. All of the numerical algorithms are added in-house and no third-party libraries are used.

  15. A Laboratory Exercise Using a Physical Model for Demonstrating Countercurrent Heat Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, Catherine; Davis-Berg, Elizabeth C.; Botz, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    A physical model was used in a laboratory exercise to teach students about countercurrent exchange mechanisms. Countercurrent exchange is the transport of heat or chemicals between fluids moving in opposite directions separated by a permeable barrier (such as blood within adjacent blood vessels flowing in opposite directions). Greater exchange of…

  16. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

  17. A heat transfer model of a horizontal ground heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, R. E.; Shtern, Yu. I.; Shtern, M. Yu.; Rogachev, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Ground-source heat pumps are gaining popularity in Eastern Europe, especially those which are using the horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX). Due to the difficulty of accessing GHX after the installation, materials and the quality of the installation must satisfy the very high requirements. An inaccurate calculation of GHX can be the reason of a scarcity of heat power in a crucial moment. So far, there isn't any appropriate mathematical description of the horizontal GHX which takes into account the mutual influence of GHX pipes on each other. To solve this problem we used the temperature wave approach. As a result, a mathematical model which describes the dependence of the heat transfer rate per unit length of the horizontal GHX pipe on the thermal properties of soil, operating time of GHX and the distance between pipes was obtained. Using this model, heat transfer rates per unit length of a horizontal GHX were plotted as functions of the distance between pipes and operating time. The modeling shows that heat transfer rates decreases rapidly with the distance between pipes lower then 2 meters. After the launch of heat pump, heat power of GHX is reduced during the first 20 - 30 days and get steady after that. The obtained results correlate with experimental data. Therefore the proposed mathematical model can be used to design a horizontal GHX with the optimal characteristics, and predict its capability during operation.

  18. Mathematical modeling of heat exchange between mine air and rock mass during fire

    SciTech Connect

    A.E. Krasnoshtein; B.P. Kazakov; A.V. Shalimov

    2006-05-15

    Solution of problems on heat exchange between ventilating air and rock mass and on gas admixture propagation in mine workings serve as a base for considering changes in heat-gas-air state at a mine after inflammation. The presented mathematical relations allow calculation of a varied velocity and movement direction of air flows, their temperatures and smoking conditions during fire.

  19. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is to help develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Combustion modeling, including emission characteristics, has been identified as a needed, high-priority technology by key professionals in the gas turbine industry.

  20. Technical/market assessment of heat exchanger technology for users of natural gas. Final report, April 1, 1990-May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, L.S.; Andrews, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the report is to assess those heat exchanger technologies most relevant to gas-fired applications, including a literature review of existing heat transfer enhancement technology, an assessment of heat exchanger use in industry, and an evaluation of the enhancement technologies sponsored by the Gas Research Institute.

  1. Emission-dominated gas exchange of elemental mercury vapor over natural surfaces in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xun; Lin, Che-Jen; Yuan, Wei; Sommar, Jonas; Zhu, Wei; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) emission from natural surfaces plays an important role in global Hg cycling. The present estimate of global natural emission has large uncertainty and remains unverified against field data, particularly for terrestrial surfaces. In this study, a mechanistic model is developed for estimating the emission of elemental mercury vapor (Hg0) from natural surfaces in China. The development implements recent advancements in the understanding of air-soil and air-foliage exchange of Hg0 and redox chemistry in soil and on surfaces, incorporates the effects of soil characteristics and land use changes by agricultural activities, and is examined through a systematic set of sensitivity simulations. Using the model, the net exchange of Hg0 between the atmosphere and natural surfaces of mainland China is estimated to be 465.1 Mg yr-1, including 565.5 Mg yr-1 from soil surfaces, 9.0 Mg yr-1 from water bodies, and -100.4 Mg yr-1 from vegetation. The air-surface exchange is strongly dependent on the land use and meteorology, with 9 % of net emission from forest ecosystems; 50 % from shrubland, savanna, and grassland; 33 % from cropland; and 8 % from other land uses. Given the large agricultural land area in China, farming activities play an important role on the air-surface exchange over farmland. Particularly, rice field shift from a net sink (3.3 Mg uptake) during April-October (rice planting) to a net source when the farmland is not flooded (November-March). Summing up the emission from each land use, more than half of the total emission occurs in summer (51 %), followed by spring (28 %), autumn (13 %), and winter (8 %). Model verification is accomplished using observational data of air-soil/air-water fluxes and Hg deposition through litterfall for forest ecosystems in China and Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast to the earlier estimate by Shetty et al. (2008) that reported large emission from vegetative surfaces using an evapotranspiration approach, the estimate in

  2. Investigating onychophoran gas exchange and water balance as a means to inform current controversies in arthropod physiology.

    PubMed

    Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Chown, Steven L

    2008-10-01

    Several controversies currently dominate the fields of arthropod metabolic rate, gas exchange and water balance, including the extent to which modulation of gas exchange reduces water loss, the origins of discontinuous gas exchange, the relationship between metabolic rate and life-history strategies, and the causes of Palaeozoic gigantism. In all of these areas, repeated calls have been made for the investigation of groups that might most inform the debates, especially of taxa in key phylogenetic positions. Here we respond to this call by investigating metabolic rate, respiratory water loss and critical oxygen partial pressure (Pc) in the onychophoran Peripatopsis capensis, a member of a group basal to the arthropods, and by synthesizing the available data on the Onychophora. The rate of carbon dioxide release (VCO2) at 20 degrees C in P. capensis is 0.043 ml CO2 h(-1), in keeping with other onychophoran species; suggesting that low metabolic rates in some arthropod groups are derived. Continuous gas exchange suggests that more complex gas exchange patterns are also derived. Total water loss in P. capensis is 57 mg H2O h(-1) at 20 degrees C, similar to modern estimates for another onychophoran species. High relative respiratory water loss rates ( approximately 34%; estimated using a regression technique) suggest that the basal condition in arthropods may be a high respiratory water loss rate. Relatively high Pc values (5-10% O2) suggest that substantial safety margins in insects are also a derived condition. Curling behaviour in P. capensis appears to be a strategy to lower energetic costs when resting, and the concomitant depression of water loss is a proximate consequence of this behaviour.

  3. Investigating onychophoran gas exchange and water balance as a means to inform current controversies in arthropod physiology.

    PubMed

    Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Chown, Steven L

    2008-10-01

    Several controversies currently dominate the fields of arthropod metabolic rate, gas exchange and water balance, including the extent to which modulation of gas exchange reduces water loss, the origins of discontinuous gas exchange, the relationship between metabolic rate and life-history strategies, and the causes of Palaeozoic gigantism. In all of these areas, repeated calls have been made for the investigation of groups that might most inform the debates, especially of taxa in key phylogenetic positions. Here we respond to this call by investigating metabolic rate, respiratory water loss and critical oxygen partial pressure (Pc) in the onychophoran Peripatopsis capensis, a member of a group basal to the arthropods, and by synthesizing the available data on the Onychophora. The rate of carbon dioxide release (VCO2) at 20 degrees C in P. capensis is 0.043 ml CO2 h(-1), in keeping with other onychophoran species; suggesting that low metabolic rates in some arthropod groups are derived. Continuous gas exchange suggests that more complex gas exchange patterns are also derived. Total water loss in P. capensis is 57 mg H2O h(-1) at 20 degrees C, similar to modern estimates for another onychophoran species. High relative respiratory water loss rates ( approximately 34%; estimated using a regression technique) suggest that the basal condition in arthropods may be a high respiratory water loss rate. Relatively high Pc values (5-10% O2) suggest that substantial safety margins in insects are also a derived condition. Curling behaviour in P. capensis appears to be a strategy to lower energetic costs when resting, and the concomitant depression of water loss is a proximate consequence of this behaviour. PMID:18805813

  4. Using stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen for the determination of gas exchange in the Grand River, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Terra S; Schiff, Sherry L; Taylor, William D

    2013-02-01

    Gas exchange can be a key component of the dissolved oxygen (DO) mass balance in aquatic ecosystems. Quantification of gas transfer rates is essential for the estimation of DO production and consumption rates, and determination of assimilation capacities of systems receiving organic inputs. Currently, the accurate determination of gas transfer rate is a topic of debate in DO modeling, and there are a wide variety of approaches that have been proposed in the literature. The current study investigates the use of repeated measures of stable isotopes of O₂ and DO and a dynamic dual mass-balance model to quantify gas transfer coefficients (k) in the Grand River, Ontario, Canada. Measurements were conducted over a longitudinal gradient that reflected watershed changes from agricultural to urban. Values of k in the Grand River ranged from 3.6 to 8.6 day⁻¹, over discharges ranging from 5.6 to 22.4 m³ s⁻¹, with one high-flow event of 73.1 m³ s⁻¹. The k values were relatively constant over the range of discharge conditions studied. The range in discharge observed in this study is generally representative of non-storm and summer low-flow events; a greater range in k might be observed under a wider range of hydrologic conditions. Overall, k values obtained with the dual model for the Grand River were found to be lower than predicted by the traditional approaches evaluated, highlighting the importance of determining site-specific values of k. The dual mass balance approach provides a more constrained estimate of k than using DO only, and is applicable to large rivers where other approaches would be difficult to use. The addition of an isotopic mass balance provides for a corroboration of the input parameter estimates between the two balances. Constraining the range of potential input values allows for a direct estimate of k in large, productive systems where other k-estimation approaches may be uncertain or logistically infeasible.

  5. Mathematical model of diffusion-limited gas bubble dynamics in unstirred tissue with finite volume.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, R Srini; Gerth, Wayne A; Powell, Michael R

    2002-02-01

    Models of gas bubble dynamics for studying decompression sickness have been developed by considering the bubble to be immersed in an extravascular tissue with diffusion-limited gas exchange between the bubble and the surrounding unstirred tissue. In previous versions of this two-region model, the tissue volume must be theoretically infinite, which renders the model inapplicable to analysis of bubble growth in a finite-sized tissue. We herein present a new two-region model that is applicable to problems involving finite tissue volumes. By introducing radial deviations to gas tension in the diffusion region surrounding the bubble, the concentration gradient can be zero at a finite distance from the bubble, thus limiting the tissue volume that participates in bubble-tissue gas exchange. It is shown that these deviations account for the effects of heterogeneous perfusion on gas bubble dynamics, and are required for the tissue volume to be finite. The bubble growth results from a difference between the bubble gas pressure and an average gas tension in the surrounding diffusion region that explicitly depends on gas uptake and release by the bubble. For any given decompression, the diffusion region volume must stay above a certain minimum in order to sustain bubble growth.

  6. Mathematical model of diffusion-limited gas bubble dynamics in unstirred tissue with finite volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Models of gas bubble dynamics for studying decompression sickness have been developed by considering the bubble to be immersed in an extravascular tissue with diffusion-limited gas exchange between the bubble and the surrounding unstirred tissue. In previous versions of this two-region model, the tissue volume must be theoretically infinite, which renders the model inapplicable to analysis of bubble growth in a finite-sized tissue. We herein present a new two-region model that is applicable to problems involving finite tissue volumes. By introducing radial deviations to gas tension in the diffusion region surrounding the bubble, the concentration gradient can be zero at a finite distance from the bubble, thus limiting the tissue volume that participates in bubble-tissue gas exchange. It is shown that these deviations account for the effects of heterogeneous perfusion on gas bubble dynamics, and are required for the tissue volume to be finite. The bubble growth results from a difference between the bubble gas pressure and an average gas tension in the surrounding diffusion region that explicitly depends on gas uptake and release by the bubble. For any given decompression, the diffusion region volume must stay above a certain minimum in order to sustain bubble growth.

  7. Growing season ecosystem and leaf-level gas exchange of an exotic and native semiarid bunchgrass.

    PubMed

    Hamerlynck, Erik P; Scott, Russell L; Moran, M Susan; Keefer, Timothy O; Huxman, Travis E

    2010-07-01

    The South African grass, Lehmann lovegrass (Eragrostis lehmanniana), may alter ecosystem processes across extensive semiarid grasslands and savannahs of western North America. We compared volumetric soil moisture (theta), total and green tissue leaf area index (LAI), ecosystem (i.e. whole-plant and soil), and leaf-level gas exchange of Lehmann lovegrass and the native bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri) over the 2008 monsoon season in a semiarid savanna in southern Arizona, USA, to see if these were consistent with high productivity associated with lovegrass invasive success. theta across 0-5 and 0-25 cm was higher while evapotranspiration (ET) was similar between lovegrass and bush muhly plots, except shortly after rainfall, when ET was 32-81% higher in lovegrass plots. Lehmann lovegrass had lower, quickly developing LAI with greater leaf proportions than bush muhly. When early season theta was high, net ecosystem CO(2) exchange (NEE) was similar, but as storm frequency and theta declined, NEE was more negative in lovegrass (-0.69 to -3.00 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) than bush muhly (+1.75 to -1.55 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Ecosystem respiration (R (eco)) responded quickly to monsoon onset and late-season rains, and was lower in lovegrass (2.44-3.74 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) than bush muhly (3.60-5.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) across the season. Gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) was greater in Lehmann lovegrass, concurrent with higher leaf-level photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. We conclude that canopy structure facilitates higher theta under Lehmann lovegrass, reducing phenological constraints and stomatal limitations to whole-plant carbon uptake through the short summer monsoon growing season.

  8. Antipersistent dynamics in kinetic models of wealth exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Sanchari; Chatterjee, Arnab; Sen, Parongama

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the detailed dynamics of gains and losses made by agents in some kinetic models of wealth exchange. An earlier work suggested that a walk in an abstract gain-loss space can be conceived for the agents. For models in which agents do not save, or save with uniform saving propensity, the walk has diffusive behavior. For the case in which the saving propensity λ is distributed randomly (0≤λ<1), the resultant walk showed a ballistic nature (except at a particular value of λ*≈0.47). Here we consider several other features of the walk with random λ. While some macroscopic properties of this walk are comparable to a biased random walk, at microscopic level, there are gross differences. The difference turns out to be due to an antipersistent tendency toward making a gain (loss) immediately after making a loss (gain). This correlation is in fact present in kinetic models without saving or with uniform saving as well, such that the corresponding walks are not identical to ordinary random walks. In the distributed saving case, antipersistence occurs with a simultaneous overall bias.

  9. Greenhouse gas exchange in grasslands: impacts of climate, intensity of management and other factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. A.

    2003-04-01

    Grasslands occupy some 40% of the terrestrial land surface. They are generally categorised as natural (occurring mainly in those regions where the rainfall is too low to support forest ecosystems), semi-natural (where management, mainly by grazing, has changed the vegetation composition), and artificial (where forests have been cleared to create new pasture land). The soils of the natural and semi-natural grasslands constitute a large reservoir of carbon, and make a substantial contribution to the soil sink for atmospheric CH_4. The conversion of much of the natural temperate grassland to arable agriculture, e.g. in North America and Europe, resulted in a considerable decrease in soil organic carbon, and its release to the atmosphere as CO_2 has made a substantial contribution to the total atmospheric concentration of this gas. The associated increase in cycling of soil N (released from the organic matter) will have contributed to N_2O emissions, and land disturbance and fertilisation has resulted in a depletion of the soil CH_4 sink. Conversion of tropical forests to pastures has also been a major source of CO_2, and these pastures show elevated emissions of N_2O for some years after conversion. Seasonally flooded tropical grasslands are a significant source of CH_4 emissions. Consideration of grassland ecosystems in their entirety, in relation to GHG exchange, necessitates the inclusion of CH_4 production by fauna - domesticated livestock and wild herbivores, as well as some species of termites - in the overall assessment. Stocking rates on pasture land have increased, and the total CH_4 emissions likewise. The relationship between animal production and CH_4 emissions is dependent on the nutritional quality of the vegetation, as well as on animal numbers. In both temperate and tropical regions, increased N inputs as synthetic fertilisers and manures (and increased N deposition) are producing possibly a more-than-linear response in terms of emissions of N_2O. In

  10. Quantifying near-surface water exchange to assess hydrometeorological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Annie-Claude; Anctil, François; Morais, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Modelling water exchange from the lower atmosphere, crop and soil system using hydrometeorological models allows processing an actual evapotranspiration (ETa) which is a complex but critical value for numerous hydrological purposes e.g. hydrological modelling and crop irrigation. This poster presents a summary of the hydrometeorological research activity conducted by our research group. The first purpose of this research is to quantify ETa and drainage of a rainfed potato crop located in South-Eastern Canada. Then, the outputs of the hydrometeorological models under study are compared with the observed turbulent fluxes. Afterwards, the sensibility of the hydrometeorological models to different inputs is assessed for an environment under a changing climate. ETa was measured from micrometeorological instrumentation (CSAT3, Campbell SCI Inc.; Li7500, LiCor Inc.), and the eddy covariance techniques. Near surface soil heat flux and soil water content at different layers from 10 cm to 100 cm were also measured. Other parameters required by the hydrometeorological models were observed using meteorological standard instrumentation: shortwave and longwave solar radiation, wind speed, air temperature, atmospheric pressure and precipitation. The cumulative ETa during the growth season (123 days) was 331.5 mm, with a daily maximum of 6.5 mm at full coverage; precipitation was 350.6 mm which is rather small compared with the historical mean (563.3 mm). This experimentation allowed calculating crop coefficients that vary among the growth season for a rainfed potato crop. Land surface schemes as CLASS (Canadian Land Surface Scheme) and c-ISBA (a Canadian version of the model Interaction Sol-Biosphère-Atmosphère) are 1-D physical hydrometeorological models that produce turbulent fluxes (including ETa) for a given crop. The schemes performances were assessed for both energy and water balance, based on the resulting turbulent fluxes and the given observations. CLASS showed

  11. Reactive transport modeling of multicomponent cation exchange at the laboratory and field scale

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl I.

    2004-04-01

    Multicomponent ion exchange models have been successful in describing the chromatographic separation of cations in both laboratory and field settings. Their chief advantage lies in their ability to capture the competitive effects of other cations that may be present. By incorporating exchanger activity coefficients calculated on the basis of the Gibbs-Duhem equation applied to the exchanger phase, it is possible to correct for the non-ideality of exchange. The use of multiple exchange sites can also substantially improve the ability of the cation exchange models to describe adsorption and retardation. All of these benefits are associated with relatively little additional computational burden. Even where the cost of the multicomponent cation exchange calculations are considered too high, the models are useful in calculating distribution coefficients for the environmental conditions of interest.

  12. The Impact of a Lower Sea Ice Extent on Arctic Greenhouse Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Christensen, Torben R.; Lotte Sørensen, Lise; Rysgaard, Søren; McGuire, A. David; Miller, Paul A.; Walker, Donald A.

    2013-04-01

    Arctic sea ice extent hit a new record low in September 2012, when it fell to a level about two times lower than the 1979-2000 average. Record low sea ice extents such as these are often hailed as an obvious example of the impact of climate change on the Arctic. Less obvious, however, are the further implications of a lower sea ice extent on Arctic greenhouse gas exchange. For example, a reduction in sea ice, in consort with a lower snow cover, has been connected to higher surface temperatures in the terrestrial part of the Arctic (Screen et al., 2012). These higher temperatures and longer growing seasons have the potential to alter the CO2 balance of Arctic tundra through enhanced photosynthesis and respiration, as well as the magnitude of methane emissions. In fact, large changes are already observed in terrestrial ecosystems (Post et al., 2009), and concerns have been raised of large releases of carbon through permafrost thaw (Schuur et al., 2011). While these changes in the greenhouse gas balance of the terrestrial Arctic are described in numerous studies, a connection with a decline in sea ice extent is nonetheless seldom made. In addition to these changes on land, a lower sea ice extent also has a direct effect on the exchange of greenhouse gases between the ocean and the atmosphere. For example, due to sea ice retreat, more ocean surface remains in contact with the atmosphere, and this has been suggested to increase the oceanic uptake of CO2 (Bates et al., 2006). However, the sustainability of this increased uptake is uncertain (Cai et al., 2010), and carbon fluxes related directly to the sea ice itself add much uncertainty to the oceanic uptake of CO2 (Nomura et al., 2006; Rysgaard et al., 2007). Furthermore, significant emissions of methane from the Arctic Ocean have been observed (Kort et al., 2012; Shakhova et al., 2010), but the consequence of a lower sea ice extent thereon is still unclear. Overall, the decline in sea ice that has been seen in recent

  13. Modeling snow season controls on northern net ecosystem exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, K. A.; Lin, J. C.; Kelly, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent field studies have indicated that the timing of snow melt and snow fall, the quantity of snow, and soil temperature are important controls on snow season net ecosystem exchange (NEE). The low thermal conductivity of snow reduces soil heat loss, thereby enabling a greater rate of subnivean respiration under deeper snowpacks, whereas snow melt and snow fall alter the seasonal timing of photosynthetic uptake. Although a substantial portion of annual NEE in northern regions occurs during the snow season, model estimates have not previously included representations of snow season controls on NEE. The objective of this study was therefore to 1) incorporate remotely sensed estimates of snow water equivalent, soil temperature, and the timing of initial snow fall and final snow melt into model estimates of northern NEE; and 2) examine whether incorporating representations of key snow season variables reduces model uncertainty. NEE was estimated using the Vegetation Photosynthesis Respiration Model (VPRM), a simple diagnostic biosphere model that relies on a remote sensing based approach. Findings indicate that a potential exists to improve northern estimates of NEE by incorporating information on snow season controls from remote sensing observations. Soil respiration can be better assessed using soil temperature rather than surface air temperature. The influence of changes in snow water equivalent on soil temperature dynamics can be assessed using remotely sensed estimates of snow water equivalent. Incorporating remotely sensed estimates of snow cover area can improve the timing of seasonal changes in photosynthetic uptake. Furthermore, including snow season controls on northern NEE can enable experiments to be run analyzing the influence of changes in snowpack dynamics, the frequency of extreme winter warming events, and the timing of the snow season on northern NEE.

  14. Bayesian Analysis for Exponential Random Graph Models Using the Adaptive Exchange Sampler*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ick Hoon; Yuan, Ying; Liang, Faming

    2014-01-01

    Exponential random graph models have been widely used in social network analysis. However, these models are extremely difficult to handle from a statistical viewpoint, because of the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy. In this paper, we consider a fully Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler, which solves the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy issues encountered in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. The adaptive exchange sampler can be viewed as a MCMC extension of the exchange algorithm, and it generates auxiliary networks via an importance sampling procedure from an auxiliary Markov chain running in parallel. The convergence of this algorithm is established under mild conditions. The adaptive exchange sampler is illustrated using a few social networks, including the Florentine business network, molecule synthetic network, and dolphins network. The results indicate that the adaptive exchange algorithm can produce more accurate estimates than approximate exchange algorithms, while maintaining the same computational efficiency. PMID:24653788

  15. Pulmonary gas exchange and breathing pattern during and after exercise in highly trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Caillaud, C; Anselme, F; Mercier, J; Préfaut, C

    1993-01-01

    Highly trained athletes (HT) have been found to show arterial hypoxaemia during strenuous exercise. A lack of compensatory hyperpnoea and/or a limitation of pulmonary diffusion by pulmonary interstitial oedema have been suggested as causes, but the exact role of each is not clear. It is known, however, that interstitial pulmonary oedema may result in rapid shallow breathing (RSB). The purpose of this study was therefore twofold: firstly, to determine the exact role of a lack of compensatory hyperpnoea versus a widened in ideal alveolar minus arterial oxygen partial pressure difference [PA(i)-aO2] in the decrease in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2) and, secondly, to detect RSB during recovery in HT. Untrained subjects (UT) and HT performed exhausting incremental exercise. During rest, exercise testing, and recovery, breathing pattern, respiratory gas exchange, and arterial blood gases were measured. The PA(i)-aO2 and the difference in tidal volume (VT) between exercise and recovery for the same level of ventilation, normalized to vital capacity of the subject [delta VT(%VC)], were then calculated. A large positive delta VT(%VC) was considered to be the sign of RSB. HT showed a marked hypoxaemia (F = 11.6, P < 0.0001), higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (F = 3.51, P < 0.05), and lower ideal partial pressure of oxygen in alveolar gas (P < 0.001). The relationship between PA(i)-aO2 and oxygen consumption was the same for the two groups. The widening PA(i)-aO2 persisted throughout recovery for both HT and UT. The RSB was observed in HT during recovery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Lung function, breathing pattern, and gas exchange in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, S; Sicilian, L

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the relation between the severity of abnormalities in ventilatory function tests and tidal breathing pattern and gas exchange indices in interstitial lung disease. METHODS: Pulmonary function, ventilation, carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption, arterial blood gas tensions, and pH were measured during resting steady state conditions in 60 patients with proved interstitial lung disease. Patients were categorised by forced vital capacity (FVC) (percentage of predicted values) as having a mild, moderate, or severe restrictive defect with means (SD) of 71% (4%), 57% (4%), and 41% (7%) of predicted values, respectively. RESULTS: FVC varied from 29% to 79% of predicted values and from 0.99 l to 4.32 l. The two measurements of FVC correlated strongly with most static lung volumes and with transfer factor for carbon monoxide. Mean respiratory rates (per minute) and tidal volumes (ml) were 17 (4) and 484 (131), 20 (4) and 460 (139), and 23 (5) and 377 (109) in mild, moderate, and severe restrictive defects, respectively. FVC correlated negatively with respiratory rate and positively with tidal volume. Arterial carbon dioxide tension ranged from 30 to 49 mm Hg; only two patients were hypercapnic. Mean arterial oxygen tensions were not significantly different among the three groups, and there were no significant correlations between forced expiratory volume in one second or FVC and arterial carbon dioxide tension or carbon dioxide production. CONCLUSION: Low values of FVC were associated with increased respiratory rate and decreased tidal volume; this pattern of breathing mimics external elastic loading, suggesting that mechanoreceptors may contribute to the rapid and shallow pattern of breathing in interstitial lung disease. Hypercapnia seems to be rare in interstitial lung disease even when functional impairment is severe and tidal volume is small. The increased respiratory rate is important in maintaining adequate

  17. Developing Sustainable International Library Exchange Programs: The CUNY-Shanghai Library Faculty Exchange Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Sheau-yueh J.; Evans, Beth; Phillips, Ryan; Polger, Mark Aaron; Posner, Beth; Sexton, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the City University of New York (CUNY)-Shanghai Librarian Faculty Exchange Program. By observing and working in academic library services at CUNY, Shanghai University (SU), and Shanghai Normal University (SNU), participants were able to teach and learn from their colleagues, bringing their experiences back to further share…

  18. THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2009-12-30

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below

  19. Biology and air-sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R. M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air-sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease) δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer) water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air-sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air-sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air-sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by

  20. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/ (kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  1. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/(kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  2. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    PubMed

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur.

  3. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    PubMed

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur. PMID:26239103

  4. Scaling of stomatal size and density optimizes allocation of leaf epidermal space for gas exchange in angiosperms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Hugo Jan; Price, Charles A.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C.; Franks, Peter J.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2015-04-01

    Stomata on plant leaves are key traits in the regulation of terrestrial fluxes of water and carbon. The basic morphology of stomata consists of a diffusion pore and two guard cells that regulate the exchange of CO2 and water vapour between the leaf interior and the atmosphere. This morphology is common to nearly all land plants, yet stomatal size (defined as the area of the guard cell pair) and stomatal density (the number of stomata per unit area) range over three orders of magnitude across species. Evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is driven by selection pressure on the anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax), which determines the operational range of leaf gas exchange. Despite the importance of stomata traits for regulating leaf gas exchange, a quantitative understanding of the relation between adaptation of gsmax and the underlying co-evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is still lacking. Here we develop a theoretical framework for a scaling relationship between stomatal sizes and densities within the constraints set by the allocation of epidermal space and stomatal gas exchange. Our theory predicts an optimal scaling relationship that maximizes gsmax and minimizes epidermal space allocation to stomata. We test whether stomatal sizes and densities reflect this optimal scaling with a global compilation of stomatal trait data on 923 species reflecting most major clades. Our results show optimal scaling between stomatal sizes and densities across all species in the compiled data set. Our results also show optimal stomatal scaling across angiosperm species, but not across gymnosperm and fern species. We propose that the evolutionary flexibility of angiosperms to adjust stomatal sizes underlies their optimal allocation of leaf epidermal space to gas exchange.

  5. Gas Exchange and Phytoluminography of Single Red Kidney Bean Leaves during Periods of Induced Stomatal Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ellenson, James L.; Raba, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    This report examines the capabilities of a new approach to the study of gas exchange and electron transport properties of single, intact leaves. The method combines conventional aspects of analysis with an image intensification system that records the spatial distribution of delayed light emission (DLE) over single leaf surfaces. The combined system was used to investigate physiological perturbations induced by exposure of single leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris cv `California Light Red' to a combination of SO2 (0.5 microliters per liter) and ozone (0.1 microliters per liter). Exposure of one-half of a leaf to this combination induced DLE and stomatal oscillations, but only in the half of the leaf exposed to the combined gases. Examination of phytoluminographs taken during these oscillations revealed distinct leaf patches where the greatest changes in DLE intensity occurred. This phenomenon is interpreted to be evidence that control of stomatal activity of intact plant leaves occurs within discrete leaf areas defined within the vascular network. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16662989

  6. Decline of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Arctic atmosphere and reversal of air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidleman, T. F.; Jantunen, L. M.; Falconer, R. L.; Barrie, L. A.; Fellin, P.

    1995-02-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are the most abundant organochlorine pesticides in the arctic atmosphere and ocean surface water. A compilation of measurements made between 1979-93 from stations in the Canadian and Norwegian Arctic and from cruises in the Bering and Chukchi seas indicates that atmospheric concentrations of α-HCH have declined significantly (p < 0.01), with a time for 50% decrease of about 4 y in summer-fall and 6 y in winter-spring. The 1992-93 levels of about 100 pg m-3 are 2-4 fold lower than values in the mid-1980s. The trend in γ-HCH is less pronounced, but a decrease is also suggested from measurements in the Canadian Arctic and the Bering-Chukchi seas. HCHs in ocean surface water have remained relatively constant since the early 1980s. The decline in atmospheric α-HCH has reversed the net direction of air-sea gas exchange to the point where some northern waters are now sources of the pesticide to the atmosphere instead of sinks.

  7. High-frequency animal ventilator using a loudspeaker and its gas exchange characteristics.

    PubMed

    Suwa, K; Tagami, M

    1981-01-01

    A high-frequency ventilator was designed using a loudspeaker as a piston, driven by a power-amplifier. A sine-wave signal was introduced into the amplifier from an electronic oscillator. The mechanical and gas exchange characteristics of the ventilator were studied in vitro and in dogs. The volume output per stroke, when open to air, was between 100 and 200 ml up to 7 Hz, then gradually decreased as the frequency increased. A Wright respirometer appeared to measure the volume flow fairly accurately up to 14 Hz. The pressure output against a closed volume of 1.1 liters achieved a maximum of 29 mmHg at 7 Hz. It gradually decreased as the frequency was changed from 7 Hz. The loudspeaker worked in such a way that the volume output decreased considerably when it was forced to move against a closed space to generate pressure. Adequate ventilation was achieved in all dogs from 1.4 to 10 Hz. At 14 Hz, the results were variable, and at 20 Hz and above, gross hypoventilation always resulted. The PaO2 values were always over 440 mmHg when 0.8 liter/(kg . min) of oxygen was supplied into the respiratory circuit. A speaker ventilator has the advantage of easy assembly and the possibility of applying various flows by electrical control. Its disadvantages are a lack of power and the difficulty in establishing ventilatory volumes without actual measurement.

  8. Gas exchange in Paulownia species growing under different soil moisture conditions in the field.

    PubMed

    Llano-Sotelo, J M; Alcaraz-Melendez, L; Castellanos Villegas, A E

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate their responses to drought, we determined the photosynthetic activity water potential, stomatal conductance, transpiration, water use efficiency photosynthetic photon flux density and leaf temperature of Paulownia imperialis, P. fortunei and P. elongata in three different soil moisture conditions in the field. Our results showed that P. imperialis had greater photosynthesis (8.86 micromol CO2 m(-2) s(-1)) and instantaneous water use efficiency (0.79 micromol CO2 mmol H2O(-1)) than either P. elongata (8.20 micromol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) and 0.71 micromol CO2 mmol H2O(-1)) or P. fortunei (3.26 micromol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) and 0.07 micromol CO2 mmol H2O(-1)). The rapid growth of Paulownia did not appear to be correlated with photosynthetic rates. Paulownia fortunei showed more transpiration (48.78 mmol H2O m(-2) s(-1)) and stomatal conductance (840 mmol m(-2) s(-1)) than P. imperialis (20 mmol H2O m(-2) s(-1) and 540 mmol m(-2) s(-1)) and P. elongata (20 mmol H2O m(-2) s(-1) and 410 mmol m(-2) s(-1)), which allowed these two Paulownia species to increase their tolerance to low soil moisture, and maintain higher water use efficiency under these conditions. According to our physiological gas exchange field tests, Paulownia imperialis does appear to be capable of successful growth in semiarid zones. PMID:21186726

  9. Effects of elastic loading and exercise on pulmonary gas exchange in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chonan, T; Hida, W; Kikuchi, Y; Shindoh, C; Taguchi, O; Miki, H; Takishima, T

    1991-06-01

    We assessed the effects of negative intrathoracic pressure induced by inspiratory elastic loading on pulmonary, gas exchange with and without electrically induced hindlimb exercise in 8 normal, anesthetized dogs. Two elastic loads (EL) were used; one of 81 and one of 140 cmH2O/liter. These are equivalent to doubling and tripling the normal elastance of the dog's respiratory system, respectively. Elastic loading decreased ventilation and caused hypoxemia and hypercapnia, but it did not affect systemic arterial pressure or heart rate. During exercise, increase in ventilation was limited, whereas increase in cardiac output was not affected by elastic loading. Alveolar-arterial O2 tension difference (A-aDO2) was not changed significantly by exercise alone. However, elastic loading accompanied by exercise increased A-aDO2. Although comparable end-inspiratory pleural pressure was achieved with large EL (-29 +/- 2 cmH2O, mean +/- SE) and small EL with exercise (-30 +/- 2 cmH2O), the latter increased A-aDO2 whereas the former did not. Large negative intrapleural pressure combined with increased cardiac output may have caused transient interstitial edema.

  10. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two "sun-leaf-like" surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature. PMID:27377989

  11. Accurate Exchange-Correlation Energies for the Warm Dense Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Brown, Ethan W; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C; Shepherd, James J

    2016-09-01

    The density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) method is used to sample exact-on-average N-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10^{124} matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the k-space configuration path-integral formalism disagree by up to ∼10% at certain reduced temperatures T/T_{F}≤0.5 and densities r_{s}≤1. Our calculations confirm the accuracy of the configuration path-integral Monte Carlo results available at high density and bridge the gap to lower densities, providing trustworthy data in the regime typical of planetary interiors and solids subject to laser irradiation. We demonstrate that the DMQMC method can calculate free energies directly and present exact free energies for T/T_{F}≥1 and r_{s}≤2.

  12. Accurate Exchange-Correlation Energies for the Warm Dense Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Fionn D.; Blunt, N. S.; Brown, Ethan W.; Lee, D. K. K.; Spencer, J. S.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Shepherd, James J.

    2016-09-01

    The density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) method is used to sample exact-on-average N -body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10124 matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the k -space configuration path-integral formalism disagree by up to ˜10 % at certain reduced temperatures T /TF≤0.5 and densities rs≤1 . Our calculations confirm the accuracy of the configuration path-integral Monte Carlo results available at high density and bridge the gap to lower densities, providing trustworthy data in the regime typical of planetary interiors and solids subject to laser irradiation. We demonstrate that the DMQMC method can calculate free energies directly and present exact free energies for T /TF≥1 and rs≤2 .

  13. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-07-05

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two "sun-leaf-like" surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature.

  14. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m−2 s−1. Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two “sun-leaf-like” surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature. PMID:27377989

  15. Gasotransmitters are emerging as new guard cell signaling molecules and regulators of leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    Specialized guard cells modulate plant gas exchange through the regulation of stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is a direct function of the volume of the guard cells. The transport of solutes across channels in plasma membrane is a crucial process in the maintenance of guard cell water status. The fine tuned regulation of that transport requires an integrated convergence of multiple endogenous and exogenous signals perceived at both the cellular and the whole plant level. Gasotransmitters are novel signaling molecules with key functions in guard cell physiology. Three gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) are involved in guard cell regulatory processes. These molecules are endogenously produced by plant cells and are part of the guard cells responses to drought stress conditions through ABA-dependent pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gasotransmitters as versatile molecules interacting with different components of guard cell signaling network and propose them as players in new paradigms to study ABA-independent guard cell responses to water deficit.

  16. A test of the oxidative damage hypothesis for discontinuous gas exchange in the locust Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Philip G. D.; Snelling, Edward P.; Seymour, Roger S.; White, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    The discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) is a breathing pattern displayed by many insects, characterized by periodic breath-holding and intermittently low tracheal O2 levels. It has been hypothesized that the adaptive value of DGCs is to reduce oxidative damage, with low tracheal O2 partial pressures (PO2 ∼2–5 kPa) occurring to reduce the production of oxygen free radicals. If this is so, insects displaying DGCs should continue to actively defend a low tracheal PO2 even when breathing higher than atmospheric levels of oxygen (hyperoxia). This behaviour has been observed in moth pupae exposed to ambient PO2 up to 50 kPa. To test this observation in adult insects, we implanted fibre-optic oxygen optodes within the tracheal systems of adult migratory locusts Locusta migratoria exposed to normoxia, hypoxia and hyperoxia. In normoxic and hypoxic atmospheres, the minimum tracheal PO2 that occurred during DGCs varied between 3.4 and 1.2 kPa. In hyperoxia up to 40.5 kPa, the minimum tracheal PO2 achieved during a DGC exceeded 30 kPa, increasing with ambient levels. These results are consistent with a respiratory control mechanism that functions to satisfy O2 requirements by maintaining PO2 above a critical level, not defend against high levels of O2. PMID:22491761

  17. Leaf gas exchange performance and the lethal water potential of five European species during drought.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Feifel, Marion; Karimi, Zohreh; Schuldt, Bernhard; Choat, Brendan; Jansen, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Establishing physiological thresholds to drought-induced mortality in a range of plant species is crucial in understanding how plants respond to severe drought. Here, five common European tree species were selected (Acer campestre L., Acer pseudoplatanus L., Carpinus betulus L., Corylus avellana L. and Fraxinus excelsior L.) to study their hydraulic thresholds to mortality. Photosynthetic parameters during desiccation and the recovery of leaf gas exchange after rewatering were measured. Stem vulnerability curves and leaf pressure-volume curves were investigated to understand the hydraulic coordination of stem and leaf tissue traits. Stem and root samples from well-watered and severely drought-stressed plants of two species were observed using transmission electron microscopy to visualize mortality of cambial cells. The lethal water potential (ψlethal) correlated with stem P99 (i.e., the xylem water potential at 99% loss of hydraulic conductivity, PLC). However, several plants that were stressed beyond the water potential at 100% PLC showed complete recovery during the next spring, which suggests that the ψlethal values were underestimated. Moreover, we observed a 1 : 1 relationship between the xylem water potential at the onset of embolism and stomatal closure, confirming hydraulic coordination between leaf and stem tissues. Finally, ultrastructural changes in the cytoplasm of cambium tissue and mortality of cambial cells are proposed to provide an alternative approach to investigate the point of no return associated with plant death.

  18. Heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger containing rectangular channels and using helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which will fly at hypersonic speeds, require novel cooling techniques to manage the anticipated high heat fluxes on various components. A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of 12 parallel, rectangular channels in a flat piece of commercially pure nickel. The channel specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes of up to 77 W/sq cm, insulated on the back side, and cooled with helium gas flowing in the channels at 3.5 to 7.0 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 1400 to 28,000. The measured friction factor was lower than that of the accepted correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to uncertainty in the channel height and a high ratio of dynamic pressure to pressure drop. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in channels. Flow nonuniformity from channel-to-channel was as high as 12 pct above and 19 pct below the mean flow.

  19. Leaf gas exchange and solute accumulation in the halophyte Salvadora persica grown at moderate salinity.

    PubMed

    Maggio; Reddy; Joly

    2000-08-01

    The domestication of halophytes has been proposed as a strategy to expand cultivation onto unfavorable land. However, halophytes mainly have been considered for their performance in extremely saline environments, and only a few species have been characterized in terms of their tolerance and physiological responses to moderately high levels of salinity. Salvadora persica is an evergreen perennial halophyte capable of growing under extreme conditions, from very dry environments to highly saline soils. It possesses high potential economic value as a source of oil and medicinal compounds. To quantify its response to salinity, S. persica seedlings were exposed to 200 mM NaCl for 3 weeks, and growth, leaf gas exchange and solute accumulation were measured. The presence of NaCl induced a 100% increase in fresh weight and a 30% increase in dry weight, relative to non-salinized controls. Increases in fresh weight and dry weight were not associated with higher rates of net CO(2) assimilation, however. Analysis of ion accumulation revealed that S. persica leaves accumulated Na(+) as a primary osmoticum. The concentration of Na(+) in leaves of salinized plants was approximately 40-fold greater than that measured in non-salinized controls, and this was associated with significant reductions in leaf K(+) and Ca(2+) concentrations. In addition, a significant accumulation of proline, probably associated with osmotic adjustment and protection of membrane stability, occurred in roots of salinized plants.

  20. Effect of Salinity on Leaf Gas Exchange in Two Populations of a C4 Nonhalophyte 1

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange measurements were made on plants from two natural populations differing in salt tolerance of Andropogon glomeratus, a C4 nonhalophyte, to examine the effect of salinity on components responsible for differences in photosynthetic capacity. Net CO2 uptake and stomatal conductance decreased with increasing salinity in both populations, but to a greater extent in the inland (nontolerant) population. The intercellular CO2 concentrations increased with increasing salinity in the inland population, but decreased in the marsh (tolerant) population. Water use efficiency decreased as salinity increased in the inland population, and remained unchanged in the marsh population. Carboxylation efficiency decreased and CO2 compensation points increased with increasing salinity in both populations, but to a lesser extent in the marsh population. Carboxylation efficiencies were higher with 2% relative to 21% atmospheric O2 in salt stressed plants, suggesting that a decrease in the carboxylation:oxygenation ratio of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was partly responsible for the decrease in photosynthetic capacity. Populational differences in photosynthetic capacity were the result of greater salinity-induced changes in carboxylation efficiency in the inland population, and not due to differences in the stomatal limitation to CO2 diffusion. PMID:16665802

  1. Leaf Gas Exchange and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Imaging of Rice Leaves Infected with Monographella albescens.

    PubMed

    Tatagiba, Sandro Dan; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-02-01

    This study was intended to analyze the photosynthetic performance of rice leaf blades infected with Monographella albescens by combining chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence images with gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment pools. The net CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, total Chl and carotenoid pools, and Chl a/b ratio all decreased but the internal CO2 concentration increased in the inoculated plants compared with their noninoculated counterparts. The first detectable changes in the images of Chl a fluorescence from the leaves of inoculated plants were already evident at 24 h after inoculation (hai) and increased dramatically as the leaf scald lesions expanded. However, these changes were negligible for the photosystem II photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) at 24 hai, in contrast to other Chl fluorescence traits such as the photochemical quenching coefficient, yield of photochemistry, and yield for dissipation by downregulation; which, therefore, were much more sensitive than the Fv/Fm ratio in assessing the early stages of fungal infection. It was also demonstrated that M. albescens was able to impair the photosynthetic process in both symptomatic and asymptomatic leaf areas. Overall, it was proven that Chl a fluorescence imaging is an excellent tool to describe the loss of functionality of the photosynthetic apparatus occurring in rice leaves upon infection by M. albescens.

  2. Accurate Exchange-Correlation Energies for the Warm Dense Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Brown, Ethan W; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C; Shepherd, James J

    2016-09-01

    The density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) method is used to sample exact-on-average N-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10^{124} matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the k-space configuration path-integral formalism disagree by up to ∼10% at certain reduced temperatures T/T_{F}≤0.5 and densities r_{s}≤1. Our calculations confirm the accuracy of the configuration path-integral Monte Carlo results available at high density and bridge the gap to lower densities, providing trustworthy data in the regime typical of planetary interiors and solids subject to laser irradiation. We demonstrate that the DMQMC method can calculate free energies directly and present exact free energies for T/T_{F}≥1 and r_{s}≤2. PMID:27661699

  3. Leaf gas exchange performance and the lethal water potential of five European species during drought.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Feifel, Marion; Karimi, Zohreh; Schuldt, Bernhard; Choat, Brendan; Jansen, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Establishing physiological thresholds to drought-induced mortality in a range of plant species is crucial in understanding how plants respond to severe drought. Here, five common European tree species were selected (Acer campestre L., Acer pseudoplatanus L., Carpinus betulus L., Corylus avellana L. and Fraxinus excelsior L.) to study their hydraulic thresholds to mortality. Photosynthetic parameters during desiccation and the recovery of leaf gas exchange after rewatering were measured. Stem vulnerability curves and leaf pressure-volume curves were investigated to understand the hydraulic coordination of stem and leaf tissue traits. Stem and root samples from well-watered and severely drought-stressed plants of two species were observed using transmission electron microscopy to visualize mortality of cambial cells. The lethal water potential (ψlethal) correlated with stem P99 (i.e., the xylem water potential at 99% loss of hydraulic conductivity, PLC). However, several plants that were stressed beyond the water potential at 100% PLC showed complete recovery during the next spring, which suggests that the ψlethal values were underestimated. Moreover, we observed a 1 : 1 relationship between the xylem water potential at the onset of embolism and stomatal closure, confirming hydraulic coordination between leaf and stem tissues. Finally, ultrastructural changes in the cytoplasm of cambium tissue and mortality of cambial cells are proposed to provide an alternative approach to investigate the point of no return associated with plant death. PMID:26614785

  4. Proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells on 3D porous silicon gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouassi, S.; Gautier, G.; Thery, J.; Desplobain, S.; Borella, M.; Ventura, L.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Since the 90's, porous silicon has been studied and implemented in many devices, especially in MEMS technology. In this article, we present a new approach to build miniaturized proton exchange membrane micro-fuel cells using porous silicon as a hydrogen diffusion layer. In particular, we propose an innovative process to build micro fuel cells from a “corrugated iron like” 3D structured porous silicon substrates. This structure is able to increase up to 40% the cell area keeping a constant footprint on the silicon wafer. We propose here a process route to perform electrochemically 3D porous gas diffusion layers and to deposit fuel cell active layers on such substrates. The prototype peak power performance was measured to be 90 mW cm-2 in a “breathing configuration” at room temperature. These performances are less than expected if we compare with a reference 2D micro fuel cell. Actually, the active layer deposition processes are not fully optimized but this prototype demonstrates the feasibility of these 3D devices.

  5. Gas exchange and leaf anatomy of a C3–CAM hybrid, Yucca gloriosa (Asparagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Heyduk, Karolina; Burrell, Nia; Lalani, Falak; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2016-01-01

    While the majority of plants use the typical C3 carbon metabolic pathway, ~6% of angiosperms have adapted to carbon limitation as a result of water stress by employing a modified form of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM plants concentrate carbon in the cells by temporally separating atmospheric carbon acquisition from fixation into carbohydrates. CAM has been studied for decades, but the evolutionary progression from C3 to CAM remains obscure. In order to better understand the morphological and physiological characteristics associated with CAM photosynthesis, phenotypic variation was assessed in Yucca aloifolia, a CAM species, Yucca filamentosa, a C3 species, and Yucca gloriosa, a hybrid species derived from these two yuccas exhibiting intermediate C3–CAM characteristics. Gas exchange, titratable leaf acidity, and leaf anatomical traits of all three species were assayed in a common garden under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions. Yucca gloriosa showed intermediate phenotypes for nearly all traits measured, including the ability to acquire carbon at night. Using the variation found among individuals of all three species, correlations between traits were assessed to better understand how leaf anatomy and CAM physiology are related. Yucca gloriosa may be constrained by a number of traits which prevent it from using CAM to as high a degree as Y. aloifolia. The intermediate nature of Y. gloriosa makes it a promising system in which to study the evolution of CAM. PMID:26717954

  6. Dynamics of ventilation, heart rate, and gas exchange: sinusoidal and impulse work loads in man.

    PubMed

    Bakker, H K; Struikenkamp, R S; De Vries, G A

    1980-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of ventilation, heart rate, and gas exchange in response to sinusoidally varying work loads were analyzed in four male subjects, exercising in the upright position on a bicycle ergometer. Mean work-load and sinusoidal amplitude were about 1.5 and 0.9 W/kg, fat-free mass), respectively. Seven different frequencies were used, the periods ranging from 12 to 0.75 min. To further investigate the linearity of the variables under study, 10-s impulse loads were also applied to three of the four subjects. Harmonic analysis of the sine-wave data and comparison of the sine-wave fundamental responses with the impulse frequency responses showed that only O2 uptake behaves in a linear fashion. Ventilation and CO2 production showed quasi- to nonlinear behaviors, whereas the responses of heart rate and alveolar partial pressures were clearly dependent on the type of forcing used. By means of mathematical parameter identification techniques, it was found that the individual frequency responses of O2 uptake could be almost completely described by a four-parameter transfer function with parameter values showing second-order underdamped to critically damped dynamics.

  7. A test of the oxidative damage hypothesis for discontinuous gas exchange in the locust Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; Snelling, Edward P; Seymour, Roger S; White, Craig R

    2012-08-23

    The discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) is a breathing pattern displayed by many insects, characterized by periodic breath-holding and intermittently low tracheal O(2) levels. It has been hypothesized that the adaptive value of DGCs is to reduce oxidative damage, with low tracheal O(2) partial pressures (PO(2) ≈ 2-5 kPa) occurring to reduce the production of oxygen free radicals. If this is so, insects displaying DGCs should continue to actively defend a low tracheal PO(2) even when breathing higher than atmospheric levels of oxygen (hyperoxia). This behaviour has been observed in moth pupae exposed to ambient PO(2) up to 50 kPa. To test this observation in adult insects, we implanted fibre-optic oxygen optodes within the tracheal systems of adult migratory locusts Locusta migratoria exposed to normoxia, hypoxia and hyperoxia. In normoxic and hypoxic atmospheres, the minimum tracheal PO(2) that occurred during DGCs varied between 3.4 and 1.2 kPa. In hyperoxia up to 40.5 kPa, the minimum tracheal PO(2) achieved during a DGC exceeded 30 kPa, increasing with ambient levels. These results are consistent with a respiratory control mechanism that functions to satisfy O(2) requirements by maintaining PO(2) above a critical level, not defend against high levels of O(2). PMID:22491761

  8. Can Heart Rate Variability be used to Estimate Gas Exchange Threshold in Obese Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, F; Seabra, A; Montenegro, R; Cunha, F; Bouskela, E; Farinatti, P

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the agreement and reliability of oxygen uptake (V̇O2), V̇O2 reserve (V̇O2 R), heart rate (HR) and power output at intensities corresponding to the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in obese and eutrophic adolescents. A further aim was to establish whether the HRVT was able to detect changes in cardio-respiratory fitness in obese adolescents after 3 months of recreational soccer practice. First, 25 obese and 10 eutrophic adolescents (ages 12-17) visited the laboratory twice to perform cycling CPET to test the reliability of CPET outcomes at GET and HRVT. Furthermore, the level of agreement between GET and HRVT was determined for a subgroup of 10 obese adolescents after performing a 3-month recreational soccer program. No significant difference was found for V̇O2, %V̇O2 R, HR and power output at the GET and HRVT (P>0.05), which were equally able to detect improvements in aerobic fitness after the soccer intervention. Correlations between GET and HRVT for V̇O2 and %V̇O2 R ranged from 0.89 to 0.95 (P<0.001) and test-retest reliability ranged from 0.59 to 0.82 (P<0.006). Overall, HRVT seems to be a reliable alternative for prescribing aerobic exercise intensity in obese adolescents.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Circulation and Exchange through Singapore Straits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Xu, M.; Chua, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The circulation in the Singapore coastal region is complicated and influenced by the combination of tidal forcing of the surrounding seas, complex bathymetry, irregular coastlines, and seasonal monsoon and local winds. An unstructured-grid SUNTANS (Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier-Stokes Simulator) model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of flow in Singapore coastal waters. The unstructured-grid has an average resolution of 50 - 100 m around Singapore and in areas close to the shoreline, while a coarse grid resolution is employed in the open waters. The model is tidally forced at the three open boundaries, located to the west, south and east of Singapore, using the 8 main tidal constituents as derived from the OSU Tidal Prediction Software (OTPS). A detailed calibration is performed, and the model-predicted water levels and currents compare well with observed data throughout the model domain. We examine the individual and combined effects of tidal and wind forcing by performing simulations with (1) tides only, (2) winds only and (3) both tides and wind. The exchange through Singapore Strait is investigated by computing volume fluxes and transport pathways at four transects, namely the Malacca Strait, Java Sea, South China Sea and Singapore transects. The transport pathways are computed by releasing particles on each side of the transects, and identifying the spatial distribution of the particles over one tidal cycle. Our results show that tidal forcing is predominant in Singapore Strait, and wind forcing is an important mechanism during the monsoon season. The residual effects, attributed to nonlinear interactions between tidal and wind forcing, is dominant during the inter-monsoon season.

  10. Multidimensional separations of ubiquitin conformers in the gas phase: relating ion cross sections to H/D exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Errol W; Williams, Evan R

    2005-09-01

    Investigating gas-phase structures of protein ions can lead to an improved understanding of intramolecular forces that play an important role in protein folding. Both hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and ion mobility spectrometry provide insight into the structures and stabilities of different gas-phase conformers, but how best to relate the results from these two methods has been hotly debated. Here, high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is combined with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT/ICR MS) and is used to directly relate ubiquitin ion cross sections and H/D exchange extents. Multiple conformers can be identified using both methods. For the 9+ charge state of ubiquitin, two conformers (or unresolved populations of conformers) that have cross sections differing by 10% are resolved by FAIMS, but only one conformer is apparent using H/D exchange at short times. For the 12+ charge state, two conformers (or conformer populations) have cross sections differing by <1%, yet H/D exchange of these conformers differ significantly (6 versus 25 exchanges). These and other results show that ubiquitin ion collisional cross sections and H/D exchange distributions are not strongly correlated and that factors other than surface accessibility appear to play a significant role in determining rates and extents of H/D exchange. Conformers that are not resolved by one method could be resolved by the other, indicating that these two methods are highly complementary and that more conformations can be resolved with this combination of methods than by either method alone.

  11. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  12. 75 FR 53371 - Liquefied Natural Gas Facilities: Obtaining Approval of Alternative Vapor-Gas Dispersion Models

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Liquefied Natural Gas Facilities: Obtaining Approval of Alternative Vapor-Gas Dispersion Models AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... provides guidance on the requirements for obtaining approval of alternative vapor-gas dispersion...

  13. Blood lactate concentrations are mildly affected by mobile gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, F; Wochatz, M; Otto, C; Cassel, M; Mayer, F; Scharhag, J

    2014-06-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of wearing a mobile respiratory gas analysis system during a treadmill test on blood lactate (bLa) concentrations and commonly applied bLa thresholds. A total of 16 recreational athletes (31±3 years, VO2max: 58±6 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)) performed one multistage treadmill test with and one without gas exchange measurements (GEM and noGEM). The whole bLa curve, the lactate threshold (LT), the individual anaerobic thresholds according to Stegmann (IATSt) and Dickhuth (IATDi), and a fixed bLa concentration of 4 mmol ∙ l(-1) (OBLA) were evaluated. The bLa curve was shifted slightly leftward in GEM compared to noGEM (P<0.05), whereas the heart rate response was not different between conditions (P=0.89). There was no difference between GEM and noGEM for LT (2.61±0.34 vs. 2.64±0.39 m · s(-1), P=0.49) and IATSt (3.47±0.42 vs. 3.55±0.47 m · s(-1), P=0.12). However, IATDi (3.57±0.39 vs. 3.66±0.44 m · s(-1), P<0.01) and OBLA (3.85±0.46 vs. 3.96±0.47 m · s(-1), P<0.01) occurred at slower running velocities in GEM. The bLa response to treadmill tests is mildly affected by wearing a mobile gas analysis system. This also applies to bLa thresholds located at higher exercise intensities. While the magnitude of the effects is of little importance for recreational athletes, it might be relevant for elite athletes and scientific studies.

  14. ESTIMATING GASEOUS EXCHANGES BETWEEN THE ATMOSPHERE AND PLANTS USING A COUPLED BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study gaseous exchanges between the soil, biosphere and atmosphere, a biochemical model was coupled with the latest version of Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model. The biochemical model describes photosynthesis and respiration and their coupling with stomatal resistance for...

  15. Low GWP Refrigerants Modelling Study for a Room Air Conditioner Having Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Bhandari, Mahabir S

    2016-01-01

    Microchannel heat exchangers (MHX) have found great successes in residential and commercial air conditioning applications, being compact heat exchangers, to reduce refrigerant charge and material cost. This investigation aims to extend the application of MHXs in split, room air conditioners (RAC), per fundamental heat exchanger and system modelling. For this paper, microchannel condenser and evaporator models were developed, using a segment-to-segment modelling approach. The microchannel heat exchanger models were integrated to a system design model. The system model is able to predict the performance indices, such as cooling capacity, efficiency, sensible heat ratio, etc. Using the calibrated system and heat exchanger models, we evaluated numerous low GWP (global warming potential) refrigerants. The predicted system performance indices, e.g. cooling efficiency, compressor discharge temperature, and required compressor displacement volume etc., are compared. Suitable replacements for R22 and R-410A for the room air conditioner application are recommended.

  16. The contrast model method for the thermodynamical calculation of air-air wet heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiugan; Mei, Fang

    1989-02-01

    The 'contrast model' method thermodynamic calculation of air-air crossflow wet heat exchangers with initial air condensation is presented. Contrast-model equations are derived from the actual heat exchanger equations as well as imaginary ones; it is then possible to proceed to a proof that the enthalpy efficiency of the contrast model equations is similar to the temperature efficiency of the dry heat exchanger. Conditions are noted under which it becomes possible to unify thermodynamic calculations for wet and dry heat exchangers.

  17. DETAILED LOOP MODEL (DLM) ANALYSIS OF LIQUID SOLAR THERMOSIPHONS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mertol, A.; Place, W.; Webster, T.; Greif, R.

    1981-06-01

    An analytical Detailed Loop Model (DLM) has been developed to analyze the performance of solar thermosiphon water heaters with heat exchangers in storage tanks. The model has been used to study the performance of thermosiphons as a function of heat exchanger characteristics, heat transfer fluids, flow resistances, tank stratification, and tank elevation relative to the collector. The results indicate that good performance can be attained with these systems compared to thermosiphons without heat exchangers.

  18. A lattice gas model for thermohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Doolen, G.D.; Gutman, S.; Lee, M.

    1990-05-03

    The FHP lattice gas model is extended to include a temperature variable in order to study thermohydrodynamics. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are derived using a Chapman-Enskog expansion. Heat conduction and convention problems are investigated, including Benard convention. It is shown that the usual FHP rescaling procedure can be avoided by controlling the temperature. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Application of crop gas exchange and transpiration data obtained with CEEF to global change problem.

    PubMed

    Tako, Y; Arai, R; Otsubo, K; Nitta, K

    2001-01-01

    In order to predict carbon sequestration of vegetation with the future rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration, [CO2] and temperature, long term effects of high [CO2] and high temperature on responses of both photosynthesis and transpiration of plants as a whole community to environmental parameters need to be elucidated. Especially in the last decade, many studies on photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO2] at gene, cell, tissue or leaf level for only vegetative growth phase (i.e. before formation of reproductive organs) have been conducted all over the world. However, CO2 acclimation studies at population or community level for a whole growing season are thus far very rare. Data obtained from repeatable experiments at population or community level for a whole growing season are necessary for modeling carbon sequestration of a plant community. On the other hand, in order to stabilize material circulation in the artificial ecological system of Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF), it is necessary to predict material exchange rates in the biological systems. In particular, the material exchange rate in higher plant systems is highly variable during growth periods and there is a strong dependence on environmental conditions. For this reason, dependencies of both CO2 exchange rate and transpiration rate of three rice populations grown from seed under differing conditions of [CO2] and day/night air temperature (350 microL CO2 L-1, 24/17 degrees C (population A); 700 microL CO2 L-1, 24/17 degrees C (population B) and 700 microL CO2 L-1, 26/19 degrees C (population C)) upon PPFD, leaf temperature and [CO2] were investigated every two weeks during whole growing season. Growth of leaf lamina, leaf sheath, panicle and root was also compared. From this experiment, it was elucidated that acclimation of instantaneous photosynthetic response of rice population to [CO2] occurs in vegetative phase through changes in ratio of leaf area to whole plant dry weight, LAR. But

  20. Application of crop gas exchange and transpiration data obtained with CEEF to global change problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tako, Y.; Arai, R.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    In order to predict carbon sequestration of vegetation with the future rise in atmospheric CO 2 concentration, [CO 2] and temperature, long term effects of high [CO 2] and high temperature on responses of both photosynthesis and transpiration of plants as a whole community to environmental parameters need to be elucidated. Especially in the last decade, many studies on photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO 2] at gene, cell, tissue or leaf level for only vegetative growth phase ( i.e. before formation of reproductive organs) have been conducted all over the world. However, CO 2 acclimation studies at population or community level for a whole growing season are thus far very rare. Data obtained from repeatable experiments at population or community level for a whole growing season are necessary for modeling carbon sequestration of a plant community. On the other hand, in order to stabilize material circulation in the artificial ecological system of Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF), it is necessary to predict material exchange rates in the biological systems. In particular, the material exchange rate in higher plant systems is highly variable during growth periods and there is a strong dependence on environmental conditions. For this reason, dependencies of both CO 2 exchange rate and transpiration rate of three rice populations grown from seed under differing conditions of [CO 2] and day/night air temperature (350 μL CO 2 L -1, 24/17°C (population A); 700 μL CO 2 L -1, 24/17°C (population B) and 700 μL CO 2 L -1, 26/19°C (population C)) upon PPFD, leaf temperature and [CO 2] were investigated every two weeks during whole growing season. Growth of leaf lamina, leaf sheath, panicle and root was also compared. From this experiment, it was elucidated that acclimation of instantaneous photosynthetic response of rice population to [CO 2] occurs in vegetative phase through changes in ratio of leaf area to whole plant dry weight, LAR. But, in

  1. Simulating Replica Exchange: Markov State Models, Proposal Schemes, and the Infinite Swapping Limit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin W; Dai, Wei; Gallicchio, Emilio; He, Peng; Xia, Junchao; Tan, Zhiqiang; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-08-25

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics is a multicanonical simulation technique commonly used to enhance the sampling of solvated biomolecules on rugged free energy landscapes. While replica exchange is relatively easy to implement, there are many unanswered questions about how to use this technique most efficiently, especially because it is frequently the case in practice that replica exchange simulations are not fully converged. A replica exchange cycle consists of a series of molecular dynamics steps of a set of replicas moving under different Hamiltonians or at different thermodynamic states followed by one or more replica exchange attempts to swap replicas among the different states. How the replica exchange cycle is constructed affects how rapidly the system equilibrates. We have constructed a Markov state model of replica exchange (MSMRE) using long molecular dynamics simulations of a host-guest binding system as an example, in order to study how different implementations of the replica exchange cycle can affect the sampling efficiency. We analyze how the number of replica exchange attempts per cycle, the number of MD steps per cycle, and the interaction between the two parameters affects the largest implied time scale of the MSMRE simulation. The infinite swapping limit is an important concept in replica exchange. We show how to estimate the infinite swapping limit from the diagonal elements of the exchange transition matrix constructed from MSMRE "simulations of simulations" as well as from relatively short runs of the actual replica exchange simulations.

  2. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  3. Effect of wind and currents on gas exchange in an estuarine system. Final technical report, 1 August 1986-31 July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Ledwell, J.R.; Bopp, R.

    1987-11-01

    The objectives were to develop a non-volatile tracer to use in gas exchange experiments in laterally unconfined systems and to study applications of deliberate tracers in limnology and oceanography. Progress was made on both fronts but work on the development of the non-volatile tracer proved to be more difficult and labor intensive that anticipated so no field experiments using non-volatile tracers was performed as yet. In the search for a suitable non-volatile tracer for an ocean scale gas exchange experiment a tracer was discovered which does not have the required sensitivity for a large scale experiment, but is very easy to analyze and will be well suited for smaller experiments such as gas exchange determinations on rivers and streams. Sulfur hexafluoride, SF/sub 6/, was used successfully as a volatile tracer along with tritium as a non-volatile tracer to study gas exchange rates from a primary stream. This is the first gas exchange experiment in which gas exchange rates were determined on a head water stream where significant groundwater input occurs along the reach. In conjunction with SF/sub 6/, Radon-222 measurements were performed on the groundwater and in the stream. The feasibility of using a combination of SF/sub 6/ and radon is being studied to determine groundwater inputs and gas exchange of rates in streams with significant groundwater input without using a non-volatile tracer.

  4. Regulation and acclimation of leaf gas exchange in a piñon-juniper woodland exposed to three different precipitation regimes.

    PubMed

    Limousin, Jean-Marc; Bickford, Christopher P; Dickman, Lee T; Pangle, Robert E; Hudson, Patrick J; Boutz, Amanda L; Gehres, Nathan; Osuna, Jessica L; Pockman, William T; McDowell, Nate G

    2013-10-01

    Leaf gas-exchange regulation plays a central role in the ability of trees to survive drought, but forecasting the future response of gas exchange to prolonged drought is hampered by our lack of knowledge regarding potential acclimation. To investigate whether leaf gas-exchange rates and sensitivity to drought acclimate to precipitation regimes, we measured the seasonal variations of leaf gas exchange in a mature piñon-juniper Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma woodland after 3 years of precipitation manipulation. We compared trees receiving ambient precipitation with those in an irrigated treatment (+30% of ambient precipitation) and a partial rainfall exclusion (-45%). Treatments significantly affected leaf water potential, stomatal conductance and photosynthesis for both isohydric piñon and anisohydric juniper. Leaf gas exchange acclimated to the precipitation regimes in both species. Maximum gas-exchange rates under well-watered conditions, leaf-specific hydraulic conductance and leaf water potential at zero photosynthetic assimilation all decreased with decreasing precipitation. Despite their distinct drought resistance and stomatal regulation strategies, both species experienced hydraulic limitation on leaf gas exchange when precipitation decreased, leading to an intraspecific trade-off between maximum photosynthetic assimilation and resistance of photosynthesis to drought. This response will be most detrimental to the carbon balance of piñon under predicted increases in aridity in the southwestern USA.

  5. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.