Science.gov

Sample records for gas molecular ionization

  1. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  2. Outflowing OH+ in Markarian 231: The Ionization Rate of the Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Alfonso, E.; Fischer, J.; Bruderer, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Smith, H. A.; Veilleux, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Stewart, K. P.; Sturm, E.

    2018-04-01

    The oxygen-bearing molecular ions OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ are key species that probe the ionization rate of (partially) molecular gas that is ionized by X-rays and cosmic-rays permeating the interstellar medium. We report Herschel far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopic observations of OH+ in Mrk 231, showing both ground-state P-Cygni profiles, and excited line profiles with blueshifted absorption wings extending up to ≈1000 km s‑1. In addition, OH+ probes an excited component peaking at central velocities, likely arising from the torus probed by the OH centimeter-wave megamaser. Four lines of H2O+ are also detected at systemic velocities, but H3O+ is undetected. Based on our earlier OH studies, we estimate an abundance ratio of {OH}/{OH}}+∼ 5{--}10 for the outflowing components and ≈20 for the torus, and an OH+ abundance relative to H nuclei of ≳10‑7. We also find high OH+/H2O+ and OH+/H3O+ ratios; both are ≳4 in the torus and ≳10–20 in the outflowing gas components. Chemical models indicate that these high OH+ abundances relative to OH, H2O+, and H3O+ are characteristic of gas with a high ionization rate per unit density, \\zeta /{n}{{H}}∼ (1{--}5)× {10}-17 cm3 s‑1 and ∼(1–2) × 10‑16 cm3 s‑1 for the above components, respectively, an ionization rate of ζ ∼ (0.5–2) × 10‑12 s‑1, and a low molecular fraction, {f}{{{H}}2}∼ 0.25. X-rays appear to be unable to explain the inferred ionization rate, and thus we suggest that low-energy (10–400 MeV) cosmic-rays are primarily responsible for the ionization, with {\\dot{M}}CR}∼ 0.01 M ⊙ yr‑1 and {\\dot{E}}CR}∼ {10}44 erg s‑1 the latter corresponds to ∼1% of the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus and is similar to the energetics of the molecular outflow. We suggest that cosmic-rays accelerated in the forward shock associated with the molecular outflow are responsible for the ionization, as they diffuse through the outflowing molecular phase downstream.

  3. Ionized and Molecular Gas in IC 860: Evidence for an Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Carson; Alatalo, Katherine; Medling, Anne M.

    2018-01-01

    Galaxies at present-day fall predominantly in two distinct populations, as either blue, star-forming spirals or red, quiescent early-type galaxies. Blue galaxies appear to evolve onto the red sequence as star formation is quenched. The absence of a significant population falling in the intermediate ‘green valley’ implies that these transitions must occur rapidly. Identifying the initial properties of and pathways taken by these ‘dying galaxies’ is essential to building a complete understanding of galactic evolution. In this work, we investigate these phenomena in action within IC860 — a nearby, early-type spiral in the initial stages of undergoing a rapid transition in the presence of a powerful AGN-driven molecular outflow. As a shocked, post-starburst galaxy with an intermediate-age stellar population which lies on the blue end of the green valley, IC860 provides a window into the early stages of galaxy transition and AGN feedback. We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of IC860 showing a violent, dusty outflow originating from a compact core. We find that the mean velocity map of the CO(1-0) from CARMA suggests a dynamically excited bar funneling molecular gas into the galactic center. Finally, we present kinematic maps of ionized gas emission lines as well as sodium D absorption tracing neutral winds obtained by the Wide-Field Spectrograph.

  4. Probing Conditions at Ionized/Molecular Gas Interfaces With High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle Franklin

    2017-08-01

    Regions of star formation and star death in our Galaxy trace the cycle of gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas in dense molecular clouds collapses to form stars, and stars at the end of their lives return the gas that made up their outer layers back out into the Galaxy. Hot stars generate copious amounts of ultraviolet photons which interact with the surrounding medium and dominate the energetics, ionization state, and chemistry of the gas. The interface where molecular gas is being dissociated into neutral atomic gas by far-UV photons from a nearby hot source is called a photodissociation or photon-dominated region (PDR). PDRs are found primarily in star forming regions where O and B stars serve as the source of UV photons, and in planetary nebulae where the hot core of the dying star acts as the UV source. The main target of this dissertation is molecular hydrogen (H2), the most abundant molecule in the Universe, made from hydrogen formed during the Big Bang. H2 makes up the overwhelming majority of molecules found in the ISM and in PDRs. Far-UV radiation absorbed by H2 will excite an electron in the molecule. The molecule then either dissociates ( 10% of the time; Field et al. 1966) or decays into excited rotational and vibrational ("rovibrational") levels of the electronic ground state. These excited rovibrational levels then decay via a radiative cascade to the ground rovibrational state (v = 0, J = 0), giving rise to a large number of transitions observable in emission from the mid-IR to the optical (Black & van Dishoeck, 1987). These transitions provide an excellent probe of the excitation and conditions within the gas. These transitions are also observed in warm H2, such as in shocks, where collisions excite H2 to higher rovibrational levels. High resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, with its ability to see through dust, and avoid telluric absorption and emission, serves as an effective tool to detect emission from ions, atoms, and molecules

  5. The ATLAS3D project - X. On the origin of the molecular and ionized gas in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Alatalo, Katherine; Sarzi, Marc; Bureau, Martin; Young, Lisa M.; Blitz, Leo; Serra, Paolo; Crocker, Alison F.; Krajnović, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2011-10-01

    We make use of interferometric CO and H I observations, and optical integral-field spectroscopy from the ATLAS3D survey, to probe the origin of the molecular and ionized interstellar medium (ISM) in local early-type galaxies. We find that 36 ± 5 per cent of our sample of fast-rotating early-type galaxies have their ionized gas kinematically misaligned with respect to the stars, setting a strong lower limit on the importance of externally acquired gas (e.g. from mergers and cold accretion). Slow rotators have a flat distribution of misalignments, indicating that the dominant source of gas is external. The molecular, ionized and atomic gas in all the detected galaxies are always kinematically aligned, even when they are misaligned from the stars, suggesting that all these three phases of the ISM share a common origin. In addition, we find that the origin of the cold and warm gas in fast-rotating early-type galaxies is strongly affected by environment, despite the molecular gas detection rate and mass fractions being fairly independent of group/cluster membership. Galaxies in dense groups and the Virgo cluster nearly always have their molecular gas kinematically aligned with the stellar kinematics, consistent with a purely internal origin (presumably stellar mass loss). In the field, however, kinematic misalignments between the stellar and gaseous components indicate that at least 42 ± 5 per cent of local fast-rotating early-type galaxies have their gas supplied from external sources. When one also considers evidence of accretion present in the galaxies' atomic gas distributions, ≳46 per cent of fast-rotating field ETGs are likely to have acquired a detectable amount of ISM from accretion and mergers. We discuss several scenarios which could explain the environmental dichotomy, including preprocessing in galaxy groups/cluster outskirts and the morphological transformation of spiral galaxies, but we find it difficult to simultaneously explain the kinematic

  6. No Sign of Strong Molecular Gas Outflow in an Infrared-bright Dust-obscured Galaxy with Strong Ionized-gas Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Yoshiki; Komugi, Shinya; Nagao, Tohru; Yamashita, Takuji; Wang, Wei-Hao; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Sun, Ai-Lei

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery of an infrared (IR)-bright dust-obscured galaxy (DOG) that shows a strong ionized-gas outflow but no significant molecular gas outflow. Based on detailed analysis of their optical spectra, we found some peculiar IR-bright DOGs that show strong ionized-gas outflow ([O III] λ5007) from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). For one of these DOGs (WISE J102905.90+050132.4) at z spec = 0.493, we performed follow-up observations using ALMA to investigate their CO molecular gas properties. As a result, we successfully detected 12CO(J = 2–1) and 12CO(J = 4–3) lines and the continuum of this DOG. The intensity-weighted velocity map of both lines shows a gradient, and the line profile of those CO lines is well-fitted by a single narrow Gaussian, meaning that this DOG has no sign of strong molecular gas outflow. The IR luminosity of this object is log (L IR/L ⊙) = 12.40, which is classified as an ultraluminous IR galaxy (ULIRG). We found that (i) the stellar mass and star formation rate relation and (ii) the CO luminosity and far-IR luminosity relation are consistent with those of typical ULIRGs at similar redshifts. These results indicate that the molecular gas properties of this DOG are normal despite the fact that its optical spectrum shows a powerful AGN outflow. We conclude that a powerful ionized-gas outflow caused by the AGN does not necessarily affect the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at least for this DOG.

  7. A Desorbed Gas Molecular Ionization Mechanism for Arcing Onset in Solar Arrays Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.; Degroot, W.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have hypothesized that the onset of Solar Array Arc (SAA) initiation in low-density space plasmas is caused by a desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism. Indeed past investigations performed at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility tend to not only support the desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism, but have gone as far as identifying the crucial molecular species that must be present for molecular ion dominated process to occur. When electrical breakdown occurs at a triple junction site on a solar array panel, a quasi-neutral plasma cloud is ejected. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is due to water vapor, the fastest process available is due to HO molecules and OH(+) ions, or more succinctly, dissociative molecular-ion dominated recombination processes: H2O(+) + e(-) yields H* + OH*. Recently published spectroscopic observations of solar array arc spectra in ground tests have revealed the well-known molecular OH band (302 to 309nm), as well as the molecular SiH band (387nm peak), and the molecular CH band (432nm peak). Note that the OH band is observed in emission arcs where water vapor is present. Strong atomic lines were also observed for H(sub beta) at 486nm and H(sub alpha) at 656.3nm in prior ground testing. Independent supporting evidence of desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanisms also come from measurements of arc current pulse widths at different capacitances. We will revisit an earlier first order approximation demonstrating the dependence of arc current pulse widths on the square root of the capacitance. The simple arc current pulse width model will be then be used to estimate the temperature of the arc plasma (currently believed to be somewhere in the range of 3 to 5 eV). The current paper then seeks to extend the outlined work by including numerous vacuum chamber measurements obtained with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A small solar array was mounted inside the vacuum

  8. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from themore » Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.« less

  9. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Zeng Li, Jin; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  10. [Gas chromatography with a Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector for measurement of molecular hydrogen(H2) in the atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian; Fang, Shuang-xi; Zhou, Ling-xi; Wang, Hong-yang; Zhang, Gen

    2015-01-01

    A high precision GC system with a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector was set up based on the commercial Agilent 7890A gas chromatography. The gas is identified by retention time and the concentration is calculated through the peak height. Detection limit of the system is about 1 x 10(-9) (mole fraction, the same as below). The standard deviation of 140 continuous injections with a standard cylinder( concentration is roughly 600 x 10(-9)) is better than 0.3 x 10(-9). Between 409.30 x 10(-9) and 867.74 x 10(-9) molecular hydrogen mole fractions and peak height have good linear response. By using two standards to quantify the air sample, the precision meets the background molecular hydrogen compatibility goal within the World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) program. Atmospheric molecular hydrogen concentration at Guangzhou urban area was preliminarily measured by this method from January to November 2013. The results show that the atmospheric molecular hydrogen mole fraction varies from 450 x 10(-9) to 700 x 10(-9) during the observation period, with the lowest value at 14:00 (Beijing time, the same as below) and the peak value at 20:00. The seasonal variation of atmospheric hydrogen at Guangzhou area was similar with that of the same latitude stations in northern hemisphere.

  11. Study of the molecular and ionized gas in a possible precursor of an ultra-compact H II region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, M. E.; Paron, S.; Giacani, E.; Celis Peña, M.; Rubio, M.; Petriella, A.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We aim to study the molecular and the ionized gas in a possible precursor of an ultra-compact H II region to contribute to the understanding of how high-mass stars build-up their masses once they have reached the zero-age main sequence. Methods: We carried out molecular observations toward the position of the Red MSX source G052.9221-00.4892, using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE; Chile) in the 12CO J = 3-2, 13CO J = 3-2, C18O J = 3-2, and HCO+J = 4-3 lines with an angular resolution of about 22''. We also present radio continuum observations at 6 GHz carried out with the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA; USA) interferometer with a synthesized beam of 4.8 arcsec × 4.1 arcsec. The molecular data were used to study the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas, while the radio continuum data were used to characterize the ionized gas in the region. Combining these observations with public infrared data allowed us to inquire about the nature of the source. Results: The analysis of the molecular observations reveals the presence of a kinetic temperature and H2 column density gradients across the molecular clump in which the Red MSX source G052.9221-00.4892 is embedded, with the hotter and less dense gas in the inner region. The 12CO J = 3-2 emission shows evidence of misaligned massive molecular outflows, with the blue lobe in positional coincidence with a jet-like feature seen at 8 μm. The radio continuum emission shows a slightly elongated compact radio source, with a flux density of about 0.9 mJy, in positional coincidence with the Red MSX source. The polar-like morphology of this compact radio source perfectly matches the hourglass-like morphology exhibited by the source in the Ks band. Moreover, the axes of symmetry of the radio source and the near-infrared nebula are perfectly aligned. Thus, based on the presence of molecular outflows, the slightly elongated morphology of the compact radio source matching the hourglass

  12. Ionized and Molecular Gas Kinematics in a z = 1.4 Star-forming Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übler, H.; Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Neri, R.; Contursi, A.; Belli, S.; Nelson, E. J.; Lang, P.; Shimizu, T. T.; Davies, R.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Lutz, D.; Plewa, P. M.; Price, S. H.; Schuster, K.; Sternberg, A.; Tadaki, K.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, S.

    2018-02-01

    We present deep observations of a z = 1.4 massive, star-forming galaxy (SFG) in molecular and ionized gas at comparable spatial resolution (CO 3–2, NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA); Hα, Large Binocular Telescope (LBT)). The kinematic tracers agree well, indicating that both gas phases are subject to the same gravitational potential and physical processes affecting the gas dynamics. We combine the one-dimensional velocity and velocity dispersion profiles in CO and Hα to forward-model the galaxy in a Bayesian framework, combining a thick exponential disk, a bulge, and a dark matter halo. We determine the dynamical support due to baryons and dark matter, and find a dark matter fraction within one effective radius of {f}DM}(≤slant {R}e)={0.18}-0.04+0.06. Our result strengthens the evidence for strong baryon-dominance on galactic scales of massive z ∼ 1–3 SFGs recently found based on ionized gas kinematics alone. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Interferometer NOEMA. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). Based on observations carried out with the LBT. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, The Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona Board of Regents; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota and University of Virginia.

  13. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  14. Age, size, and position of H ii regions in the Galaxy. Expansion of ionized gas in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.; Anderson, L. D.; Didelon, P.; Raga, A. C.; Minier, V.; Ntormousi, E.; Pettitt, A.; Pinto, C.; Samal, M. R.; Schneider, N.; Zavagno, A.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: This work aims to improve the current understanding of the interaction between H ii regions and turbulent molecular clouds. We propose a new method to determine the age of a large sample of OB associations by investigating the development of their associated H ii regions in the surrounding turbulent medium. Methods: Using analytical solutions, one-dimensional (1D), and three-dimensional (3D) simulations, we constrained the expansion of the ionized bubble depending on the turbulence level of the parent molecular cloud. A grid of 1D simulations was then computed in order to build isochrone curves for H ii regions in a pressure-size diagram. This grid of models allowed us to date a large sample of OB associations that we obtained from the H ii Region Discovery Survey (HRDS). Results: Analytical solutions and numerical simulations showed that the expansion of H ii regions is slowed down by the turbulence up to the point where the pressure of the ionized gas is in a quasi-equilibrium with the turbulent ram pressure. Based on this result, we built a grid of 1D models of the expansion of H ii regions in a profile based on Larson's laws. We take the 3D turbulence into account with an effective 1D temperature profile. The ages estimated by the isochrones of this grid agree well with literature values of well known regions such as Rosette, RCW 36, RCW 79, and M 16. We thus propose that this method can be used to find ages of young OB associations through the Galaxy and also in nearby extra-galactic sources.

  15. Evidence for the interaction of the IRS 16 wind with the ionized and molecular gas at the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Wardle, Mark

    1993-01-01

    We present a number of high-resolution radio images showing evidence for the dynamical interaction of the outflow arising from the IRS 16 complex with the ionized gas associated with the Northern Arm of Sgr A West, and with the northwestern segment of the circumnuclear molecular disk which engulfs the inner few parsecs of the Galactic center. We suggest that the wind disturbs the dynamics of the Northern Arm within 0.1 pc of the center, is responsible for the waviness of the arm at larger distances, and is collimated by Sgr A West and the circumnuclear disk. The waviness is discussed in terms of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced by the ram pressure of the wind incident on the surface of the Northern Arm. Another consequence of this interaction is the strong mid-IR polarization of the Northern Arm in the vicinity of the IRS 16 complex which is explained as a result of the ram pressure of the wind compressing the gas and the magnetic field.

  16. Gemini Near Infrared Field Spectrograph Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy MRK 573: In Situ Acceleration of Ionized and Molecular Gas Off Fueling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Travis C.; Machuca, C.; Diniz, M. R.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Riffel, R. A.; Schmitt, H. R.; Baron, F.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Straughn, A. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical emission-line and stellar kinematics of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using the Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at Gemini North and Dual Imaging Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. By obtaining full kinematic maps of the infrared ionized and molecular gas and stellar kinematics in approximately 700 x 2100 pc(exp 2) circumnuclear region of Mrk 573, we find that kinematics within the Narrow-Line Region are largely due to a combination of both rotation and in situ acceleration of material originating in the host disk. Combining these observations with large-scale, optical long-slit spectroscopy that traces ionized gas emission out to several kpcs, we find that rotation kinematics dominate the majority of the gas. We find that outflowing gas extends to distances less than 1 kpc, suggesting that outflows in Seyfert galaxies may not be powerful enough to evacuate their entire bulges.

  17. Quantification of Triacylglycerol Molecular Species in Edible Fats and Oils by Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector Using Correction Factors.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Obi, Junji; Nagai, Toshiharu; Iioka, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the resolution parameters and correction factors (CFs) of triacylglycerol (TAG) standards were estimated by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) to achieve the precise quantification of the TAG composition in edible fats and oils. Forty seven TAG standards comprising capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and/or linolenic acid were analyzed, and the CFs of these TAGs were obtained against tripentadecanoyl glycerol as the internal standard. The capillary column was Ultra ALLOY + -65 (30 m × 0.25 mm i.d., 0.10 μm thickness) and the column temperature was programmed to rise from 250°C to 360°C at 4°C/min and then hold for 25 min. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of the TAG standards were > 0.10 mg and > 0.32 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively, except for LnLnLn, and the LOD and LOQ values of LnLnLn were 0.55 mg and 1.84 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively. The CFs of TAG standards decreased with increasing total acyl carbon number and degree of desaturation of TAG molecules. Also, there were no remarkable differences in the CFs between TAG positional isomers such as 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-stearoyl-rac-glycerol, 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, and 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, which cannot be separated by GC-FID. Furthermore, this method was able to predict the CFs of heterogeneous (AAB- and ABC-type) TAGs from the CFs of homogenous (AAA-, BBB-, and CCC-type) TAGs. In addition, the TAG composition in cocoa butter, palm oil, and canola oil was determined using CFs, and the results were found to be in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Therefore, the GC-FID method using CFs can be successfully used for the quantification of TAG molecular species in natural fats and oils.

  18. Weakly ionized cosmic gas: Ionization and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.; Chow, V. W.

    1994-01-01

    Since collective plasma behavior may determine important transport processes (e.g., plasma diffusion across a magnetic field) in certain cosmic environments, it is important to delineate the parameter space in which weakly ionized cosmic gases may be characterized as plasmas. In this short note, we do so. First, we use values for the ionization fraction given in the literature, wherein the ionization is generally assumed to be due primarily to ionization by cosmic rays. We also discuss an additional mechanism for ionization in such environments, namely, the photoelectric emission of electrons from cosmic dust grains in an interstellar Far Ultra Violet (FUV) radiation field. Simple estimates suggest that under certain conditions this mechanism may dominate cosmic ray ionization, and possibly also the photoionization of metal atoms by the interstellar FUV field, and thereby lead to an enhanced ionization level.

  19. Cross Sections for Ionization of Rare Gas Excimers by Electron Impact and Atomic and Molecular Processes in Excimer Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    6.1 Excimers and Exciplexes : Background 55 6.2 Rare Gas-Halide Lasers 58 6.3 Formation, Quenching and Absorption Processes for Rare Gas-Halides 60... exciplex such as KrF* and XeF* laser systems as well as in various types of gas discharges. They are also of fundamental significance in their own...collision processes contributing to the formation and quenching of the excited molecular states in exciplex (such as KrF ) and excimer (such as Xe2

  20. GEMINI NEAR INFRARED FIELD SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SEYFERT 2 GALAXY MRK 573: IN SITU ACCELERATION OF IONIZED AND MOLECULAR GAS OFF FUELING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Travis C.; Straughn, A. N.; Machuca, C.

    2017-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical emission-line and stellar kinematics of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using the Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at Gemini North and Dual Imaging Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. By obtaining full kinematic maps of the infrared ionized and molecular gas and stellar kinematics in a ∼700 × 2100 pc{sup 2} circumnuclear region of Mrk 573, we find that kinematics within the Narrow-Line Region are largely due to a combination of both rotation and in situ acceleration of material originating in the host disk. Combining these observations with large-scale, optical long-slit spectroscopy that traces ionized gas emission out tomore » several kpcs, we find that rotation kinematics dominate the majority of the gas. We find that outflowing gas extends to distances less than 1 kpc, suggesting that outflows in Seyfert galaxies may not be powerful enough to evacuate their entire bulges.« less

  1. The GBT Diffuse Ionized Gas Survey (GDIGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luisi, Matteo; Anderson, Loren Dean; Liu, Bin; Bania, Thomas; Balser, Dana; Wenger, Trey; Haffner, Lawrence Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Diffuse ionized gas in the Galactic mid-plane known as the "Warm Ionized Medium" (WIM) makes up ~20% of the gas mass of the Milky Way and >90% of its ionized gas. It is the last major component of the interstellar medium (ISM) that has not yet been studied at high spatial and spectral resolution, and therefore many of its fundamental properties remain unclear. The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) Diffuse Ionized Gas Survey (GDIGS) is a new large survey of the Milky Way disk at C-band (4-8 GHz). The main goals of GDIGS are to investigate the properties of the WIM and to determine the connection between the WIM and high-mass star formation over the Galactic longitude and latitude range of 32 deg > l > -5 deg, |b| < 0.5 deg. We use the new VEGAS spectrometer to simultaneously observe 22 Hn-alpha radio recombination lines, 25 Hn-beta lines, 8 Hn-gamma lines, and 9 molecular lines (namely CH3OH and H2CO), and also continuum at ~60 frequencies. We average the Hn-alpha lines to produce Nyquist-sampled maps on a spatial grid of 1 arcmin, a velocity resolution of 0.5 km/s and rms sensitivities of ~3 mJy per beam. GDIGS observations are currently underway and are expected to be completed by late 2018. These data will allow us to: 1) Study for the first time the inner-Galaxy WIM unaffected by confusion from discrete HII regions, 2) determine the distribution of the inner Galaxy WIM, 3) investigate the ionization state of the WIM, 4) explore the connection between the WIM and HII regions, and 5) analyze the effect of leaked photons from HII regions on ISM dust temperatures.

  2. Increasing Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Molecular Coverage during Fossil Oil Analysis by Combining Gas Chromatography and Atmospheric-Pressure Laser Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS)

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Paolo; DeBord, J. Daniel; Thompson, Christopher J.; Gardinali, Piero; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of chemically distinct compounds are encountered in fossil oil samples that require rapid screening and accurate identification. In the present paper, we show for the first time, the advantages of gas chromatography (GC) separation in combination with atmospheric-pressure laser ionization (APLI) and ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for the screening of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fossil oils. In particular, reference standards of organics in shale oil, petroleum crude oil, and heavy sweet crude oil were characterized by GC-APLI-FT-ICR MS and APLI-FT-ICR MS. Results showed that, while APLI increases the ionization efficiency of PAHs, when compared to other ionization sources, the complexity of the fossil oils reduces the probability of ionizing lower-concentration compounds during direct infusion. When gas chromatography precedes APLI-FT-ICR MS, an increase (more than 2-fold) in the ionization efficiency and an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of lower-concentration fractions are observed, giving better molecular coverage in the m/z 100–450 range. That is, the use of GC prior to APLI-FT-ICR MS resulted in higher molecular coverage, higher sensitivity, and the ability to separate and characterize molecular isomers, while maintaining the ultrahigh resolution and mass accuracy of the FT-ICR MS separation. PMID:27212790

  3. Ionization in MHD-Gas interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Diver, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    The study of partially ionized plasmas is important in a number of astrophysical situations and is vital for the study of laboratory plasmas. The interactions between a neutral gas and a plasma define a hybrid medium that has aspects of each, but does not only sustain the pure modes of the individual species. Previously we have shown that momentum coupling between the gas and the magnetized plasma alters the behaviour of both; as an extension of that simulation, we present results for the extension to the coupling in which the relative motion between the species provides enough kinetic energy in the flow to allow a measure of species exchange Alfvén ionization (AI) (also known as critical velocity ionization), allowing the ionization fraction to evolve as the dynamics evolve.

  4. Herschel Galactic plane survey of ionized gas traced by [NII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Umut; Goldsmith, Paul; Pineda, Jorge; Langer, William

    2015-01-01

    Far infrared and sub-/millimeter atomic & ionic fine structure and molecular rotational lines are powerful tracers of star formation on both Galactic and extragalactic scales. Although CO lines trace cool to moderately warm molecular gas, ionized carbon [CII] produces the strongest lines, which arise from almost all reasonably warm (T>50 K) parts of the ISM. However, [CII] alone cannot distinguish highly ionized gas from weakly ionized gas. [NII] plays a significant role in star formation as it is produced only in ionized regions; in [HII] regions as well as diffuse ionized gas. The ionization potential of nitrogen (14.5 eV) is greater than that of hydrogen (13.6 eV), therefore the ionized nitrogen [NII] lines reflect the effects of massive stars, with possible enhancement from X-ray and shock heating from the surroundings. Two far-infrared 122 um and 205 um [NII] fine structure spectral lines are targeted via Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) onboard Herschel Space Observatory. The sample consists of 149 line-of-sight (LOS) positions in the Galactic plane. These positions overlap with the [CII] 158 um observations obtained with the GOT C+ survey. With a reasonable assumption that the emission from both 122 um and 205 um lines originate in the same gas; [NII] 122/205 um line ratio indicates the a good measure of the electron density of each of the LOS positions. [NII] detections are mainly toward the Galactic center direction and the [NII] electron densities are found between 7-50 cm^-3, which is enhanced WIM (Warm Ionized Medium). WIM densities are expected to be much lower (~1 cm-3), therefore non-detections toward the opposite side of the Galactic Center shows abundant of this gas. The pixel to pixel variation of the emission within a single Herschel pointing is relatively small, which is interpreted as the [NII] emission comes from an extended gas. It is important to quantify what fraction of [CII] emission arises in the ionized gas. Thus, with

  5. The absorption of energetic electrons by molecular hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Victor, G. A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1975-01-01

    The processes by which energetic electrons lose energy in a weakly ionized gas of molecular hydrogen are analyzed, and calculations are carried out taking into account the discrete nature of the excitation processes. The excitation, ionization, and heating efficiencies are computed for electrons with energies up to 100 eV absorbed in a gas with fractional ionizations up to 0.01, and the mean energy per pair of neutral hydrogen atoms is calculated.

  6. Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Lignin Pyrolyzates with Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Molecular Structure Search with CSI:FingerID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Evan A.; Hutchinson, Carolyn P.; Lee, Young Jin

    2018-06-01

    Dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (dAPCI) is a soft ionization method rarely used for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The current study combines GC-dAPCI with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for analysis of a complex mixture such as lignin pyrolysis analysis. To identify the structures of volatile lignin pyrolysis products, collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (QTOFMS) and pseudo MS/MS through in-source collision-induced dissociation (ISCID) using a single stage TOFMS are utilized. To overcome the lack of MS/MS database, Compound Structure Identification (CSI):FingerID is used to interpret CID spectra and predict best matched structures from PubChem library. With this approach, a total of 59 compounds were positively identified in comparison to only 22 in NIST database search of GC-EI-MS dataset. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of GC-dAPCI-MS/MS to overcome the limitations of traditional GC-EI-MS analysis when EI-MS database is not sufficient. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.; Chevalier, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Brune, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  8. Molecular clumps photoevaporation in ionized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decataldo, D.; Ferrara, A.; Pallottini, A.; Gallerani, S.; Vallini, L.

    2017-11-01

    We study the photoevaporation of molecular clumps exposed to a UV radiation field including hydrogen-ionizing photons (hν > 13.6 eV) produced by massive stars or quasars. We follow the propagation and collision of shock waves inside clumps and take into account self-shielding effects, determining the evolution of clump size and density with time. The structure of the ionization-photodissociation region is obtained for different initial clump masses (M = 0.01-104 M⊙) and impinging fluxes (G0 = 102-105 in units of the Habing flux). The cases of molecular clumps engulfed in the H II region of an OB star and clumps carried within quasar outflows are treated separately. We find that the clump undergoes in both cases an initial shock-contraction phase and a following expansion phase, which lets the radiation penetrate in until the clump is completely evaporated. Typical evaporation time-scales are ≃0.01 Myr in the stellar case and 0.1 Myr in the quasar case, where the clump mass is 0.1 M⊙ and 103 M⊙, respectively. We find that clump lifetimes in quasar outflows are compatible with their observed extension, suggesting that photoevaporation is the main mechanism regulating the size of molecular outflows.

  9. Turbulence in the ionized gas of the Orion nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. J.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Henney, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    In order to study the nature, origin, and impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the ionized gas of the Orion nebula, we apply a variety of statistical techniques to observed velocity cubes. The cubes are derived from high resolving power (R ≈ 40 000) longslit spectroscopy of optical emission lines that span a range of ionizations. From velocity channel analysis (VCA), we find that the slope of the velocity power spectrum is consistent with predictions of Kolmogorov theory between scales of 8 and 22 arcsec (0.02 to 0.05 pc). The outer scale, which is the dominant scale of density fluctuations in the nebula, approximately coincides with the autocorrelation length of the velocity fluctuations that we determine from the second-order velocity structure function. We propose that this is the principal driving scale of the turbulence, which originates in the autocorrelation length of dense cores in the Orion molecular filament. By combining analysis of the non-thermal linewidths with the systematic trends of velocity centroid versus ionization, we find that the global champagne flow and smaller scale turbulence each contribute in equal measure to the total velocity dispersion, with respective root-mean-square widths of 4-5 km s-1. The turbulence is subsonic and can account for only one half of the derived variance in ionized density, with the remaining variance provided by density gradients in photoevaporation flows from globules and filaments. Intercomparison with results from simulations implies that the ionized gas is confined to a thick shell and does not fill the interior of the nebula.

  10. Characterization of low-molecular weight iodine-terminated polyethylenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the use of derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zaikin, Vladimir G; Borisov, Roman S; Polovkov, Nikolai Yu; Zhilyaev, Dmitry I; Vinogradov, Aleksei A; Ivanyuk, Aleksei V

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with various derivatization approaches, have been applied to structure determination of individual oligomers and molecular-mass distributions (MMD) in low-molecular mass polyethylene having an iodine terminus. Direct GC/MS analysis has shown that the samples under investigation composed of polyethyelene-iodides (major components) and n-alkanes. Exchange reaction with methanol in the presence of NaOH gave rise to methoxy-derivatives and n-alkenes. Electron ionization mass spectra have shown that the former contained terminal methoxy groups indicating the terminal position of the iodine atom in the initial oligomers. MMD parameters have been determined with the aid of MALDI mass spectrometry followed by preliminary derivatization-formation of covalently bonded charge through the reaction of iodides with triphenylphosphine, trialkylamines, pyridine or quinoline. The mass spectra revealed well-resolved peaks for cationic parts of derivatized oligomers allowing the determination of MMD. The latter values have been compared with those calculated from GC/MS data.

  11. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  12. MOLECULAR AND IONIZED HYDROGEN IN 30 DORADUS. I. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Seaquist, Ernest R.; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2015-07-10

    We present the first fully calibrated H{sub 2} 1–0 S(1) image of the entire 30 Doradus nebula. The observations were conducted using the NOAO Extremely Wide-field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) on the CTIO 4 m Blanco Telescope. Together with a NEWFIRM Brγ image of 30 Doradus, our data reveal the morphologies of the warm molecular gas and ionized gas in 30 Doradus. The brightest H{sub 2}-emitting area, which extends from the northeast to the southwest of R136, is a photodissociation region (PDR) viewed face-on, while many clumps and pillar features located at the outer shells of 30 Doradus are PDRs viewedmore » edge-on. Based on the morphologies of H{sub 2}, Brγ, CO, and 8 μm emission, the H{sub 2} to Brγ line ratio, and Cloudy models, we find that the H{sub 2} emission is formed inside the PDRs of 30 Doradus, 2–3 pc to the ionization front of the H ii region, in a relatively low-density environment <10{sup 4} cm{sup −3}. Comparisons with Brγ, 8 μm, and CO emission indicate that H{sub 2} emission is due to fluorescence, and provide no evidence for shock excited emission of this line.« less

  13. Kinematic Study of Ionized and Molecular Gases in Ultracompact HII Region in Monoceros R2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwihyun; Lacy, John H.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Monoceros R2 (Mon R2) is an UltraCompact HII region (UCHII) surrounded by several PhotoDissociation Regions (PDRs). It is an excellent example to investigate the chemistry and physics of early stage of massive star formation due to its proximity (830pc) and brightness. Previous studies suggest that the wind from the star holds the ionized gas up against the dense molecular core and the higher pressure at the head drives the ionized gas along the shell. In order for the model to work, there should be evidence for dense molecular gas along the shell walls, irradiated by the UCHII region and perhaps entrained into the flow along the walls.We obtained the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) spectra of Mon R2 to study the kinematic patterns in the areas where ionized and molecular gases interact. The position-velocity maps from the high resolution (R~45,000) H- and K-band (1.4-2.5μm) IGRINS spectra demonstrate that the ionized gases (Brackett and Pfund series, He and Fe emission lines; Δv ≈ 40km/s) flow along the walls of the surrounding clouds. This is consistent with the model by Zhu et al. (2008). In the PV maps of the H2 emission lines there is no obvious motion (Δv ≈ 10km/s) of the molecular hydrogen right at the ionization boundary. This implies that the molecular gas is not taking part in the flow as the ionized gas is moving along the cavity walls.This work used the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) that was developed under a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with the financial support of the US National Science Foundation (NSF; grant AST-1229522), of the University of Texas at Austin, and of the Korean GMTProject of KASI.

  14. Gas chromatography/chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis of anabolic steroids: ionization and collision-induced dissociation behavior.

    PubMed

    Polet, Michael; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2016-02-28

    The detection of new anabolic steroid metabolites and new designer steroids is a challenging task in doping analysis. Switching from electron ionization gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS/MS) to chemical ionization (CI) has proven to be an efficient way to increase the sensitivity of GC/MS/MS analyses and facilitate the detection of anabolic steroids. CI also extends the possibilities of GC/MS/MS analyses as the molecular ion is retained in its protonated form due to the softer ionization. In EI it can be difficult to find previously unknown but expected metabolites due to the low abundance or absence of the molecular ion and the extensive (and to a large extent unpredictable) fragmentation. The main aim of this work was to study the CI and collision-induced dissociation (CID) behavior of a large number of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) as their trimethylsilyl derivatives in order to determine correlations between structures and CID fragmentation. Clarification of these correlations is needed for the elucidation of structures of unknown steroids and new metabolites. The ionization and CID behavior of 65 AAS have been studied using GC/CI-MS/MS with ammonia as the reagent gas. Glucuronidated AAS reference standards were first hydrolyzed to obtain their free forms. Afterwards, all the standards were derivatized to their trimethylsilyl forms. Full scan and product ion scan analyses were used to examine the ionization and CID behavior. Full scan and product ion scan analyses revealed clear correlations between AAS structure and the obtained mass spectra. These correlations were confirmed by analysis of multiple hydroxylated, methylated, chlorinated and deuterated analogs. AAS have been divided into three groups according to their ionization behavior and into seven groups according to their CID behavior. Correlations between fragmentation and structure were revealed and fragmentation pathways were postulated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley

  15. ALMACAL - III. A combined ALMA and MUSE survey for neutral, molecular, and ionized gas in an H I-absorption-selected system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klitsch, A.; Péroux, C.; Zwaan, M. A.; Smail, I.; Oteo, I.; Biggs, A. D.; Popping, G.; Swinbank, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    Studying the flow of baryons into and out of galaxies is an important part of understanding the evolution of galaxies over time. We present a detailed case study of the environment around an intervening Ly α absorption line system at zabs = 0.633, seen towards the quasar J0423-0130 (zQSO = 0.915). We detect with ALMA the 12CO(2-1), 12CO(3-2), and 1.2 mm continuum emission from a galaxy at the redshift of the Ly α absorber at a projected distance of 135 kpc. From the ALMA detections, we infer interstellar medium conditions similar to those in low-redshift luminous infrared galaxies. Director's Discretionary Time (DDT) Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field unit observations reveal the optical counterpart of the 12CO emission line source and three additional emission line galaxies at the absorber redshift, which together form a galaxy group. The 12CO emission line detections originate from the most massive galaxy in this group. While we cannot exclude that we miss a fainter host, we reach a dust-uncorrected star formation rate (SFR) limit of >0.3 M⊙yr-1 within 100 kpc from the sightline to the background quasar. We measure the dust-corrected SFR (ranging from 3 to 50 M⊙ yr-1), the morpho-kinematics and the metallicities of the four group galaxies to understand the relation between the group and the neutral gas probed in absorption. We find that the Ly α absorber traces either an outflow from the most massive galaxy or intragroup gas. This case study illustrates the power of combining ALMA and MUSE to obtain a census of the cool baryons in a bounded structure at intermediate redshift.

  16. Shock-wave structure in a partially ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. S.; Huang, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a steady plane shock in a partially ionized gas has been investigated using the Boltzmann equation with a kinetic model as the governing equation and the discrete ordinate method as a tool. The effects of the electric field induced by the charge separation on the shock structure have also been studied. Although the three species of an ionized gas travel with approximately the same macroscopic velocity, the individual distribution functions are found to be very different. In a strong shock the atom distribution function may have double peaks, while the ion distribution function has only one peak. Electrons are heated up much earlier than ions and atoms in a partially ionized gas. Because the interactions of electrons with atoms and with ions are different, the ion temperature can be different from the atom temperature.

  17. The kinematics of the diffuse ionized gas in NGC 4666

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtländer, P.; Kamphuis, P.; Marcelin, M.; Bomans, D. J.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The global properties of the interstellar medium with processes such as infall and outflow of gas and a large scale circulation of matter and its consequences for star formation and chemical enrichment are important for the understanding of galaxy evolution. Aims: In this paper we studied the kinematics and morphology of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the disk and in the halo of the star forming spiral galaxy NGC 4666 to derive information about its kinematical properties. Especially, we searched for infalling and outflowing ionized gas. Methods: We determined surface brightness, radial velocity, and velocity dispersion of the warm ionized gas via high spectral resolution (R ≈ 9000) Fabry-Pérot interferometry. This allows the determination of the global velocity field and the detection of local deviations from this velocity field. We calculated models of the DIG distribution and its kinematics for comparison with the measured data. In this way we determined fundamental parameters such as the inclination and the scale height of NGC 4666, and established the need for an additional gas component to fit our observed data. Results: We found individual areas, especially along the minor axis, with gas components reaching into the halo which we interpret as an outflowing component of the DIG. As the main result of our study, we were able to determine that the vertical structure of the DIG distribution in NGC 4666 is best modeled with two components of ionized gas, a thick and a thin disk with 0.8 kpc and 0.2 kpc scale height, respectively. Therefore, the enhanced star formation in NGC 4666 drives an outflow and also maintains a thick ionized gas layer reminiscent of the Reynold's layer in the Milky Way.

  18. The Formation and Physical Origin of Highly Ionized Cooling Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Norman, Colin A.

    2017-10-01

    We present a simple model that explains the origin of warm, diffuse gas seen primarily as highly ionized absorption-line systems in the spectra of background sources. We predict the observed column densities of several highly ionized transitions such as O VI, O vii, Ne viii, N v, and Mg x, and we present a unified comparison of the model predictions with absorption lines seen in the Milky Way disk, Milky Way halo, starburst galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium at low and high redshifts. We show that diffuse gas seen in such diverse environments can be simultaneously explained by a simple model of radiatively cooling gas. We show that most such absorption-line systems are consistent with being collisionally ionized, and we estimate the maximum-likelihood temperature of the gas in each observation. This model satisfactorily explains why O VI is regularly observed around star-forming low-z L* galaxies, and why N v is rarely seen around the same galaxies. We further present some consequences of this model in quantifying the dynamics of the cooling gas around galaxies and predict the shock velocities associated with such flows. A unique strength of this model is that while it has only one free (but physically well-constrained) parameter, it nevertheless successfully reproduces the available data on O VI absorbers in the interstellar, circumgalactic, intragroup, and intergalactic media, as well as the available data on other absorption lines from highly ionized species.

  19. The Formation and Physical Origin of Highly Ionized Cooling Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    We present a simple model that explains the origin of warm, diffuse gas seen primarily as highly ionized absorption-line systems in the spectra of background sources. We predict the observed column densities of several highly ionized transitions such as O vi, O vii, Ne viii, N v, and Mg x, and we present a unified comparison of the model predictions with absorption lines seen in the Milky Way disk, Milky Way halo, starburst galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium at low and high redshifts. We show that diffuse gas seen in such diverse environments can be simultaneously explainedmore » by a simple model of radiatively cooling gas. We show that most such absorption-line systems are consistent with being collisionally ionized, and we estimate the maximum-likelihood temperature of the gas in each observation. This model satisfactorily explains why O vi is regularly observed around star-forming low- z L* galaxies, and why N v is rarely seen around the same galaxies. We further present some consequences of this model in quantifying the dynamics of the cooling gas around galaxies and predict the shock velocities associated with such flows. A unique strength of this model is that while it has only one free (but physically well-constrained) parameter, it nevertheless successfully reproduces the available data on O vi absorbers in the interstellar, circumgalactic, intragroup, and intergalactic media, as well as the available data on other absorption lines from highly ionized species.« less

  20. Coupled-cluster treatment of molecular strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.

    2018-05-01

    Ionization rates and Stark shifts of H2, CO, O2, H2O, and CH4 in static electric fields have been computed with coupled-cluster methods in a basis set of atom-centered Gaussian functions with a complex-scaled exponent. Consideration of electron correlation is found to be of great importance even for a qualitatively correct description of the dependence of ionization rates and Stark shifts on the strength and orientation of the external field. The analysis of the second moments of the molecular charge distribution suggests a simple criterion for distinguishing tunnel and barrier suppression ionization in polyatomic molecules.

  1. A Modified Kinematic Model of Neutral and Ionized Gas in Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnarao, Dhanesh; Benjamin, Robert A.; Haffner, L. Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Gas near the center of the Milky Way is very complex across all phases (cold, warm, neutral, ionized, atomic, molecular, etc.) and shows strong observational evidence for warping, lopsided orientations and strongly non-circular kinematics. Historically, the kinematic complexities were modeled with many discrete features involved with expulsive phenomena near Galactic Center. However, much of the observed emission can be explained with a single unified and smooth density structure when geometrical and perspective effects are accounted for. Here we present a new model for a tilted, elliptical disk of gas within the inner 2 kpc of Galactic center based on the series of models following Burton & Liszt (1978 - 1992, Papers I- V). Machine learning techniques such as the Histogram of Oriented Gradients image correlation statistic are used to optimize the geometry and kinematics of neutral and ionized gas in 3D observational space (position,position, velocity). The model successfully predicts emission from neutral gas as seen by HI (Hi4Pi) and explains anomalous ionized gas features in H-Alpha emission (Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper) and UV absorption lines (Hubble Space Telescope - Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph). The modeled distribution of this tilted gas disk along with its kinematics of elliptical x1 orbits can reveal new insight about the Galactic Bar, star formation, and high-velocity gas near Galactic Center and its relation with the Fermi Bubble.

  2. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  3. Amonia gas: an improved reagent for chemical ionization mass spectrometry of bile acid methyl ester acetates

    SciTech Connect

    DeMark, B.R.; Klein, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    The ammonia chemical ionization mass spectra of 28 methyl ester acetate derivatives of bile acids and related compounds have been determined by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Advantages of ammonia ionization over the previously studied isobutane ionization include a 130 to 270% enhancement in the sensitivity of base peak monitoring, and direct determination of molecular weight from the base peak (M + NH/sub 4//sup +/) in the mass spectrum of any of the derivatives. Minor ions in the ammonia spectra also allow selective detection of 3-keto compounds and can indicate unsaturation or double bond conjugation in the molecule. The significance of thesemore » studies for the detection and quantitation of bile acids is discussed. 2 tables.« less

  4. Low Ionization Absorbing Gas Kinematics Around Z ~ 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, C. W.; Steidel, C. C.; Vogt, S. S.

    1996-12-01

    Absorption profiles of the Mg II lambda lambda 2796,2803 doublet arising from gas associated with 48 ``normal'' intermediate redshift (0.4 < z < 1.7) galaxies have been resolved in QSO spectra at 6 km s(-1) resolution using HIRES on Keck I. We have found evidence for pronounced redshift evolution in the subcomponent velocity two--point correlation function, suggestive that the gas surrounding galaxies has settled over a 5--10 Gyr look--back time. Based upon a sub--sample of 15 galaxies at z<1, we found no evidence for correlations between the absorbing gas kinematics and the projected galactocentric distance of the gas, galaxy luminosities, or galaxy rest--frame colors (though trends between galaxy properties and absorption properties are apparent from a larger low resolution absorption line sample). The implication is that low ionization gas surrounding early epoch galaxies was not smoothly distributed either spatially or kinematically out to a galactocentric distance ~ 40 kpc. Directly from the profiles, we have measured the number of separate absorbing ``kinematic subsystems'' associated with each galaxy, and each subsystem's profile velocity width, asymmetry (skew), and integrated column density. The distribution in these subsystem properties with velocity is highly peaked at zero, and does not exhibit a bimodality. The lack of a bimodality is suggestive that the gas kinematics is not dominated by quasi--symmetric infall into galactic potential wells. In view of absorption line studies of local galaxies, it appears that extended regions of low ionization gas surrounding galaxies represent a dynamical and active epoch of ``normal'' galaxy evolution. The reservoirs of gas for these extended ``halos'' were probably residual infalling fragments (from earlier formation processes and on--going dynamical events) whose evolution first included a settling in velocity dispersion and then more recently a decline in number. The build up of thick and/or extended gaseous

  5. Radiative transfer calculations of the diffuse ionized gas in disc galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert; Wood, Kenneth; Girichidis, Philipp; Hill, Alex S.; Peters, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    The large vertical scale heights of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in disc galaxies are challenging to model, as hydrodynamical models including only thermal feedback seem to be unable to support gas at these heights. In this paper, we use a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transfer code to post-process disc simulations of the Simulating the Life-Cycle of Molecular Clouds project that include feedback by cosmic rays. We show that the more extended discs in simulations including cosmic ray feedback naturally lead to larger scale heights for the DIG which are more in line with observed scale heights. We also show that including a fiducial cosmic ray heating term in our model can help to increase the temperature as a function of disc scale height, but fails to reproduce observed DIG nitrogen and sulphur forbidden line intensities. We show that, to reproduce these line emissions, we require a heating mechanism that affects gas over a larger density range than is achieved by cosmic ray heating, which can be achieved by fine tuning the total luminosity of ionizing sources to get an appropriate ionizing spectrum as a function of scale height. This result sheds a new light on the relation between forbidden line emissions and temperature profiles for realistic DIG gas distributions.

  6. Ionization Gas Sensor using Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Array

    SciTech Connect

    Kermany, A. R.; Mohamed, N. M.; Singh, B. S. M.

    2011-05-25

    The challenge with current conventional gas sensors which are operating using semiconducting oxides is their size. After the introduction of nanotechnology and in order to reduce the dimension and consequently the power consumption and cost, new materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being introduced. From previous works and characterization results, it was proven that the CNTs based gas sensor has better sensitivity, selectivity and faster response time in compared with semiconducting oxides based gas sensors. As in this work, a fabrication and successful testing of an ionization-based gas sensor using aligned Multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) as sensing element is discussed,more » in which MWCNTs array and Al film are used as anode and cathode plates respectively with electrode separation ranging from 80 {mu}m to 140 {mu}m. Aligned MWCNTs array was incorporated into a sensor configuration in the gas chamber for testing of gases such as argon, air, and mixed gas of 2%H{sub 2} in air. Obtained results show that among the three gases, argon has the lowest breakdown voltage whilst air has the highest value and the breakdown voltage was found to decrease as the electrode spacing was reduced from 140 {mu}m to 80 {mu}m for all three gases.« less

  7. Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Disk of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Alexander; Howley, K.; Guhathakurta, P.; Dorman, C.; SPLASH Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the flattened rotating diffuse ionized gas (DIG) disk of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). For this we use spectra from 25 multislit masks obtained by the SPLASH collaboration using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck-II 10-meter telescope. Each mask contains 200 slits covering the region around M32 (S of the center of M31), the major axis of M31, and the SE minor axis. DIG emission was serendipitously detected in the background sky of these slits. By creating a normalized "sky spectrum” to remove various other sources of emission (such as night sky lines) in the background of these slits, we have examined the rotation of the DIG disk using individual line-of-sight velocity measurements of Hα, [NII] and [SII] emission. his emission is probably the result of newly formed stars ionizing the gas in the disk. The measured IG rotation will be compared to the rotation of M31's stellar disk and HI gas disk, as well as models of an infinitely thin rotating disk, to better understand the relationship between the components of the galactic disk and its differential rotation. We wish to acknowledge the NSF for funding on this project.

  8. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Detection of Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Erin; Gallagher, J. S., III; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2017-08-01

    We present the first kinematic study of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) in the nearby, face-on disk galaxy M83 using optical emission-line spectroscopy from the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to decompose the [N II]λ λ 6548, 6583, Hα, and [S II]λ λ 6717, 6731 emission lines into H II region and diffuse ionized gas emission. Extraplanar, diffuse gas is distinguished by its emission-line ratios ([N II]λ6583/Hα ≳ 1.0) and its rotational velocity lag with respect to the disk ({{Δ }}v=-24 km s-1 in projection). With interesting implications for isotropy, the velocity dispersion of the diffuse gas, σ =96 km s-1, is a factor of a few higher in M83 than in the Milky Way and nearby, edge-on disk galaxies. The turbulent pressure gradient is sufficient to support the eDIG layer in dynamical equilibrium at an electron scale height of {h}z=1 kpc. However, this dynamical equilibrium model must be finely tuned to reproduce the rotational velocity lag. There is evidence of local bulk flows near star-forming regions in the disk, suggesting that the dynamical state of the gas may be intermediate between a dynamical equilibrium and a galactic fountain flow. As one of the first efforts to study eDIG kinematics in a face-on galaxy, this study demonstrates the feasibility of characterizing the radial distribution, bulk velocities, and vertical velocity dispersions in low-inclination systems. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) under program 2015-2-SCI-004 (PI: E. Boettcher).

  10. Ionization impact on molecular clouds and star formation. Numerical simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.

    2012-11-01

    At all the scales of Astrophysics, the impact of the ionization from massive stars is a crucial issue. At the galactic scale, the ionization can regulate star formation by supporting molecular clouds against gravitational collapse and at the stellar scale, indications point toward a possible birth place of the Solar System close to massive stars. At the molecular cloud scale, it is clear that the hot ionized gas compresses the surrounding cold gas, leading to the formation of pillars, globules, and shells of dense gas in which some young stellar objects are observed. What are the formation mechanisms of these structures? Are the formation of these young stellar objects triggered or would have they formed anyway? Do massive stars have an impact on the distribution of the surrounding gas? Do they have an impact on the mass distribution of stars (the initial mass function, IMF)? This thesis aims at shedding some light on these questions, by focusing especially on the formation of the structures between the cold and the ionized gas. We present the state of the art of the theoretical and observational works on ionized regions (H ii regions) and we introduce the numerical tools that have been developed to model the ionization in the hydrodynamic simulations with turbulence performed with the HERACLES code. Thanks to the simulations, we present a new model for the formation of pillars based on the curvature and collapse of the dense shell on itself and a new model for the formations of cometary globules based on the turbulence of the cold gas. Several diagnostics have been developed to test these new models in the observations. If pillars are formed by the collapse of the dense shell on itself, the velocity spectrum of a nascent pillar presents a large spectra with a red-shifted and a blue-shifted components that are caused by the foreground and background parts of the shell that collapse along the line of sight. If cometary globules emerge because of the turbulence of

  11. Gas electron multiplier (GEM) enhanced ionization chamber for fluorescence detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, E. H.; Siddons, D. P.; Kuczewski, A.

    2007-11-01

    Detecting dilute elements in thin materials using extended X-ray absorption fluorescence spectroscopy (EXAFS) method requires a detector capable of high count rate and low noise. For detection of dilute elements, the fluorescence signal amplitude is often overcome by the presence of noise or background interference. In this paper we have used a gas ionization chamber enhanced by a gas electron multiplier (GEM) to amplify the primary ionized electrons due to the X-ray fluorescence of a dilute element. The GEM provides an essentially noise free electron amplification of the signal primary photoelectrons. It provides a larger output current prior to the electronic amplification, allowing a lower gain amplifier with lower electronic circuit noise contribution and hence improved S/ N ratio. In addition, since the signal is produced only by electrons, and not from ion motion, the detector is capable of recording rapidly changing signals. Iron in an arbitrary tree leaf was used as a test sample. This sample was measured using our detector SUBRSAB, and also with Lytle and passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detectors. An improvement in the signal amplitude by a factor of 20 and a factor of 2 are recorded for the proposed detector with respect to the Lytle and PIPS detectors, respectively. Although the gain in signal over the PIPS detector is small for this detector, its lack of sensitivity to light and its low and temperature-independent dark current are further advantages.

  12. Photoionized Mixing Layer Models of the Diffuse Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, Luc; Flores-Fajardo, Nahiely; Raga, Alejandro C.; Drissen, Laurent; Morisset, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    It is generally believed that O stars, confined near the galactic midplane, are somehow able to photoionize a significant fraction of what is termed the "diffuse ionized gas" (DIG) of spiral galaxies, which can extend up to 1-2 kpc above the galactic midplane. The heating of the DIG remains poorly understood, however, as simple photoionization models do not reproduce the observed line ratio correlations well or the DIG temperature. We present turbulent mixing layer (TML) models in which warm photoionized condensations are immersed in a hot supersonic wind. Turbulent dissipation and mixing generate an intermediate region where the gas is accelerated, heated, and mixed. The emission spectrum of such layers is compared with observations of Rand of the DIG in the edge-on spiral NGC 891. We generate two sequence of models that fit the line ratio correlations between [S II]/Hα, [O I]/Hα, [N II]/[S II], and [O III]/Hβ reasonably well. In one sequence of models, the hot wind velocity increases, while in the other, the ionization parameter and layer opacity increase. Despite the success of the mixing layer models, the overall efficiency in reprocessing the stellar UV is much too low, much less than 1%, which compels us to reject the TML model in its present form.

  13. Ionized gas clouds near the Sagittarius Arm tangent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Li-Gang; Dong, Jian; Gao, Xu-Yang; Han, Jin-Lin

    2017-04-01

    Radio recombination lines (RRLs) are the best tracers of ionized gas. Simultaneous observations of multi-transitions of RRLs can significantly improve survey sensitivity. We conducted pilot RRL observations near the Sagittarius Arm tangent by using the 65-m Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope (TMRT) equipped with broadband feeds and a digital backend. Six hydrogen RRLs (H96 α - H101α) at C band (6289 MHz-7319 MHz) were observed simultaneously toward a sky area of 2° × 1.2° by using on-the-fly mapping mode. These transitions were then stacked together for detection of ionized gas. Star forming complexes G48.6+0.1 and G49.5-0.3 were detected in the integrated intensity map. We found agreements between our measured centroid velocities and previous results for the 21 known HII regions in the mapped area. For more than 80 cataloged HII region candidates without previous RRL measurements, we obtained new RRL spectra at 30 targeted positions. In addition, we detected 25 new discrete RRL sources with spectral S/N > 5 σ, and they were not listed in the catalogs of previously known HII regions. The distances for 44 out of these 55 new RRL sources were estimated.

  14. The kinematics of the molecular gas in Centaurus A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quillen, A. C.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Phinney, E. S.; Phillips, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    The CO (2-1) emission along the inner dust lane of Centaurus A, observed with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, shows the molecular gas to be in a thin disk, with a velocity dispersion of only about 10 km/s. The observed line profiles are broadened considerably due to beam smearing of the gas velocity field. The profile shapes are inconsistent with planar circular and noncircular motion. However, a warped disk in a prolate potential provides a good fit to the profile shapes. The morphology and kinematics of the molecular gas is similar to that of the ionized material, seen in H-alpha. The best-fitting warped disk model not only matches the optical appearance of the dust lane but also agrees with the large-scale map of the CO emission and is consistent with H I measurements at larger radii.

  15. The 30 Doradus Nebula: An Imaging Study of Molecular and Ionized Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry; Seaquist, E. R.; Matzner, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present the very first, fully calibrated H2 1--0 S(1) image of the entire 30 Doradus nebula. The observations were carried out using the NOAO Extremely Wide Field Infrared Imager on the CTIO 4-meter telescope. Together with a Brγ image of 30 Dor taken by NEWFIRM, our images reveal the morphologies of the warm molecular gas and ionized gas in 30 Doradus. Based on the morphologies of H2 and Brγ, line ratio H2 to Brγ, and Cloudy models, we found that the H2 emission is formed inside the photodissociation regions of 30 Doradus, very close to the surface in association with the ionization front of the HII region. We also suggest that the bright H2-emitting area, which expands from the northeast to the southwest of R136, is a photodissociation region viewed face-on, while many clumps and elephant trunk features located at the outer shells of 30 Doradus are also photodissociation regions viewed edge-on. The characteristic radiation to gas pressure ratio is evaluated at selected regions in 30 Doradus, and we conclude that radiation pressure is not the dominating force at the current phase of 30 Doradus, while the pressurization of stellar winds and the injection of photoevaporative flows are likely the major feedback mechanisms acting to reduce the observed ionization parameter in 30 Doradus.

  16. Neutralization of space charge forces using ionized background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steski, D. B.; Zarcone, M. J.; Smith, K. S.; Thieberger, P.

    1996-03-01

    The Tandem Van de Graaff at Brookhaven National Laboratory has delivered pulsed gold beam to the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and AGS Booster since 1992 for relativistic heavy ion physics. There is an ongoing effort to improve the quality and intensity of the negative ion beam delivered to the Tandem from the present Cs sputter sources. Because the beam energy is low (approximately 30 keV) and the current high, there are significant losses due to space charge forces. One of the ways being explored to overcome these losses is to neutralize the space charge forces with ionized background gas. On an ion source test bench, using three different gases (Ar, N2, and Xe), the percentage of current transported from the source to a downstream Faraday cup was increased from 10% to 40% by bleeding in gas. Bleeding in Xe resulted in the best transmission. The time dependence of the neutralization as a function of gas pressure was also observed. This system is presently being transferred to the Negative Ion Injector of the Tandem for use in upcoming heavy ion experiments.

  17. Use of a microwave diagnostics technique to measure the temperature of an axisymmetric ionized gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsel'Sov, Iu. G.; Kondrat'ev, A. S.

    1990-12-01

    A method is developed for determining the temperature of an ionized gas on the basis of electron-density sounding. This technique is used to measure the cross-sectional temperature distribution of an axisymmetric ionized gas flow using microwave diagnostics.

  18. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin, E-mail: sawada.tsuyoshi@nao.ac.jp

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by highermore » BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.« less

  19. The Impact of Diffuse Ionized Gas on Emission-line Ratios and Gas Metallicity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of galaxies observed by MaNGA, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impact the measurements of emission line ratios, hence the gas-phase metallicity measurements and the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams. We demonstrate that emission line surface brightness (SB) is a reasonably good proxy to separate HII regions from regions dominated by diffuse ionized gas. For spatially-adjacent regions or regions at the same radius, many line ratios change systematically with emission line surface brightness, reflecting a gradual increase of dominance by DIG towards low SB. DIG could significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradient. Because DIG tend to have a higher temperature than HII regions, at fixed metallicity DIG displays lower [NII]/[OII] ratios. DIG also show lower [OIII]/[OII] ratios than HII regions, due to extended partially-ionized regions that enhance all low-ionization lines ([NII], [SII], [OII], [OI]). The contamination by DIG is responsible for a substantial portion of the scatter in metallicity measurements. At different surface brightness, line ratios and line ratio gradients can differ systematically. As DIG fraction could change with radius, it can affect the metallicity gradient measurements in systematic ways. The three commonly used strong-line metallicity indicators, R23, [NII]/[OII], O3N2, are all affected in different ways. To make robust metallicity gradient measurements, one has to properly isolate HII regions and correct for DIG contamination. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves HII regions towards composite or LINER-like regions.

  20. Background studies in gas ionizing x ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Hudson B.

    1989-01-01

    The background response of a gas ionizing proportional x ray detector is estimated by solving the one dimensional photon transport equation for two regions using Monte Carlo techniques. The solution was effected using the SSL VAX 780 and the CRAY XMP computers at Marshall Space Flight Center. The isotropic photon energy spectrum encompassing the range from 1 to 1000 KeV incident onto the first region, the shield, is taken so as to represent the measured spectrum at an altitude of 3 mb over Palastine, Texas. The differential energy spectrum deposited in the gas region, xenon, over the range of 0 to 100 KeV is written to an output file. In addition, the photon flux emerging from the shield region, tin, over the range of 1 to 1000 KeV is also tabulated and written to a separate file. Published tabular cross sections for photoelectric, elastic and inelastic Compton scattering as well as the total absorption coefficient are used. Histories of each incident photon as well as secondary photons from Compton and photoelectric interactions are followed until the photon either is absorbed or exits from the regions under consideration. The effect of shielding thickness upon the energy spectrum deposited in the xenon region for this background spectrum incident upon the tin shield was studied.

  1. Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Milky Way Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luisi, Matteo; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M.

    2017-11-01

    We analyze the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the first Galactic quadrant from {\\ell }=18^\\circ to 40° using radio recombination line (RRL) data from the Green Bank Telescope. These data allow us to distinguish DIG emission from H II region emission and thus study the diffuse gas essentially unaffected by confusion from discrete sources. We find that the DIG has two dominant velocity components, one centered around 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1 associated with the luminous H II region W43, and the other centered around 45 {km} {{{s}}}-1 not associated with any large H II region. Our analysis suggests that the two velocity components near W43 may be caused by noncircular streaming motions originating near the end of the Galactic bar. At lower Galactic longitudes, the two velocities may instead arise from gas at two distinct distances from the Sun, with the most likely distances being ˜6 kpc for the 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1 component and ˜12 kpc for the 45 {km} {{{s}}}-1 component. We show that the intensity of diffuse Spitzer GLIMPSE 8.0 μm emission caused by excitation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is correlated with both the locations of discrete H II regions and the intensity of the RRL emission from the DIG. This implies that the soft ultraviolet photons responsible for creating the infrared emission have a similar origin as the harder ultraviolet photons required for the RRL emission. The 8.0 μm emission increases with RRL intensity but flattens out for directions with the most intense RRL emission, suggesting that PAHs are partially destroyed by the energetic radiation field at these locations.

  2. Discovery of Ionized Gas Associated with the Tilted Inner Disk of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.; Krishnarao, Dhanesh

    2018-01-01

    The complex distribution and motion of gas within the central few kiloparsecs of our Galaxy does not follow the more regular patterns seen throughout the rest of its gaseous disk. Sensitive observations of the neutral and molecular gas over the past 40 years reveal emission intensities and velocities that are far from symmetric about the Galactic equator and the line at zero longitude. Burton and Liszt (1978-1992) show that much of the anomalous behavior is well explained by an elliptical disk, tilted with respect to the Galactic plane and our line of sight.Using the Wisconsin Hα Mapper (WHAM), we report the discovery of ionized gas near the Galactic center (l = 0° - 14° b = -8° to +4°) with a distribution and velocities also explained by this creative model. Emission from distant regions near the Galactic plane is typically blocked by a thick band of interstellar dust. However, a portion of the tilted disk is behind Baade's Window, a hole in the thick dust near the Galactic center. Combined with the unparalleled sensitivity of the WHAM Sky Survey (IHα ~ 0.1 R; EM ~ 0.2 pc cm-6), we are able to trace the distribution and kinematics of the ionized phase of this structure for the first time. The relationship between this multi-phase inner disk, outflow from the Galactic center, and the Fermi bubbles is not yet clear.In several directions around the disk, WHAM captures emission from Hα, Hβ, and several ions (N, S, and O) to explore the state and source of the ionized gas. [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [S II]/[N II] line ratios are much different than classical H II regions and diffuse gas near the plane but are similar to those seen at high-|z| (> 1.5 kpc) in the Perseus arm. We will also compare this emission to multi-phase absorption components revealed in a recent UV absorption-line study through the low halo (z ~ -1 kpc) in this direction (Savage et al. 2017) and to emission seen near nuclear regions of other spiral galaxies, where high low-ionization

  3. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  4. IC 5181: An S0 Galaxy with Ionized Gas on Polar Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, A.; Morelli, L.; Corsini, E. M.; Dalla Bontá, E.; Cesetti, M.

    2014-05-01

    The nearby S0 galaxy IC 5181 is studied to address the origin of the ionized gas component that orbits the galaxy on polar orbit. We perform detailed photometric and spectroscopic observations measuring the surface brightness distribution of the stars (I band), ionized gas of IC 5181 (Hα narrow band), the ionized-gas and stellar kinematics along both the major and minor axis, and the corresponding line strengths of the Lick indices. We conclude that the galaxy hosts a geometrically and kinematically decoupled component of ionized gas. It is elongated along the galaxy minor axis and in orthogonal rotation with respect to the galaxy disk. The result is suggesting that the gas component is not related to the stars having an external origin. The gas was accreted by IC 5181 on polar orbits from the surrounding environment.

  5. Plasma channel created by ionization of gas by a surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, V. N.; Kuz’min, G. P.; Minaev, I. M., E-mail: minaev1945@mail.ru

    2015-09-15

    Conditions for gas ionization in the field of a slow surface wave excited by a microwave source are considered. The gas ionization rate and the plasma density distribution over the radius of the discharge tube were studied by the optical method. The experiments were conducted in a dielectric tube with a radius much smaller than the tube length, the gas pressure being ∼1–3 Torr. It is shown that the stationary distribution of the plasma density is determined by diffusion processes.

  6. Supernova remnants and diffuse ionized gas in M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walterbos, Rene; Braun, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Researchers have compiled an initial list of radio/optical supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31, by searching for radio identifications of emission-line sources with a high (SII)/H alpha ratio (greater than 0.60). The (SII) filter included both sulfur lines and the H alpha filter did not include (NII). This search revealed 11 SNRs, of which only two were known. In addition, researchers detected radio emission from 3 SNRs that were identified in previous optical surveys (D'Odorico et al., 1980), but that were outside the charge coupled device (CCD) fields. The 14 objects only include the most obvious candidates, but a full search is in progress and the researchers expect to find several more SNRs. Also not all optical SNRs show detectable radio emission and a pure optical list of SNR candidates based only on the ratio of (SII)/H alpha emission contains many more objects. Two conclusions are apparent. First, the radio properties of the SNRs in M31 are quite similar to those of Galactic SNRs as is illustrated. The brightnesses are not systematically lower as has been suggested in the past (Dickel and D'Odorico, 1984). Second, the slope of the relation is close to -2; this slope is expected from the intrinsic dependence between surface brightness and diameter. The radio luminosity of the SNRs does not seem to depend strongly on diameter, or age, contrary to model predictions. Selection effects, however, play an important role in these plots. The CCD images show widespread diffuse ionized gas with a ratio of (SII)/H alpha that is higher than that of discrete HII regions. Discrete HII regions typically show ratios between 0.2 to 0.3, while the diffuse gas in the arms consistently shows ratios of 0.5. Researchers can trace this gas across the spiral arms to emission measures below 5 pc cm (-6). Its properties seem to be similar to that of the diffuse gas in the solar neighborhood.

  7. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-07-04

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological macromolecules. Owing to its unique features of structure specificity; predictability; recognition and universal application; there has been exploration of the possible application of MIPs in the field of highly selective gas sensors. In this present study; we outline the recent advances in gas sensors based on MIT; classify and introduce the existing molecularly imprinted gas sensors; summarize their advantages and disadvantages; and analyze further research directions.

  8. Analysis of the diffuse ionized gas database: DIGEDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Morisset, C.; Binette, L.

    2009-10-01

    Studies of the Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) have progressed without providing so far any strict criterion to distinguish DIGs from H II regions. In this work, we compile the emission line measurements of 29 galaxies that are available in the scientific literature, thereby setting up the first DIG database (DIGEDA). Making use of this database, we proceed to analyze the global properties of the DIG using the [NII]λ6583/Hα, [O I]λ6300/Hα, [O III]λ5007/Hβ and [SII]λ6716/Hα lines ratios, including the H α emission measure. This analysis leads us to conclude that the [N II]/Hα ratio provides an objective criterion for distinguishing whether an emission region is a DIG or an H II region, while the EM(Hα) is a useful quantity only when the galaxies are considered individually. Finally, we find that the emission regions of Irr galaxies classified as DIG in the literature appear in fact to be much more similar to H II regions than to the DIGs of spiral galaxies.

  9. Three-Dimensional View of Ionized Gas Conditions in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stephanie; NOAO Data Lab

    2018-06-01

    We present a 3D version of common emission line diagnostic diagrams used to identify the source of ionization in galaxies, and highlight interesting features in this new 3D space, which are associated with global galaxy properties. Namely, we combine the BPT and Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagrams, and apply it to a set of >300,000 galaxies from the SDSS survey. Among other features, we show that the usual “branch” of star-forming galaxies becomes a curved surface in the new 3D space. Understanding the underlying reasons can shed light on the nearby galaxy population but also aid our interpretation of high-redshift surveys, which indicate a strong evolution of emission line ratios. Despite efforts to explain the origin of this strong evolution, a consensus has not yet been reached. Yet, the implications are crucial to our understanding of galaxy growth across cosmic time, and in particular to assess how star forming regions differed at earlier times (gas properties? stellar properties? a combination?). We perform this analysis within the framework of the NOAO Data Lab (datalab.noao.edu) jointly with public visualization tools. The final workflow will be released publicly.

  10. Fundamental Studies of Molecular Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Ionization Probability Measured With Femtosecond, Infrared Laser Post-Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popczun, Nicholas James

    The work presented in this dissertation is focused on increasing the fundamental understanding of molecular secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ionization probability by measuring neutral molecule behavior with femtosecond, mid-infrared laser post-ionization (LPI). To accomplish this, a model system was designed with a homogeneous organic film comprised of coronene, a polycyclic hydrocarbon which provides substantial LPI signal. Careful consideration was given to signal lost to photofragmentation and undersampling of the sputtered plume that is contained within the extraction volume of the mass spectrometer. This study provided the first ionization probability for an organic compound measured directly by the relative secondary ions and sputtered neutral molecules using a strong-field ionization (SFI) ionization method. The measured value of ˜10-3 is near the upper limit of previous estimations of ionization probability for organic molecules. The measurement method was refined, and then applied to a homogeneous guanine film, which produces protonated secondary ions. This measurement found the probability of protonation to occur to be on the order of 10-3, although with less uncertainty than that of the coronene. Finally, molecular depth profiles were obtained for SIMS and LPI signals as a function of primary ion fluence to determine the effect of ionization probability on the depth resolution of chemical interfaces. The interfaces chosen were organic/inorganic interfaces to limit chemical mixing. It is shown that approaching the inorganic chemical interface can enhance or suppress the ionization probability for the organic molecule, which can lead to artificially sharpened or broadened depths, respectively. Overall, the research described in this dissertation provides new methods for measuring ionization efficiency in SIMS in both absolute and relative terms, and will inform both innovation in the technique, as well as increase understanding of depth

  11. PHOTOCHEMICAL HEATING OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Glassgold, A. E.; Najita, J. R.

    2015-09-10

    Photochemical heating is analyzed with an emphasis on the heating generated by chemical reactions initiated by the products of photodissociation and photoionization. The immediate products are slowed down by collisions with the ambient gas and then heat the gas. In addition to this direct process, heating is also produced by the subsequent chemical reactions initiated by these products. Some of this chemical heating comes from the kinetic energy of the reaction products and the rest from collisional de-excitation of the product atoms and molecules. In considering dense gas dominated by molecular hydrogen, we find that the chemical heating is sometimesmore » as large, if not much larger than, the direct heating. In very dense gas, the total photochemical heating approaches 10 eV per photodissociation (or photoionization), competitive with other ways of heating molecular gas.« less

  12. Electron impact ionization of the gas-phase sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, Irina; Markush, Pavlo; Zavilopulo, Anatoly; Shpenik, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Ionization and dissociative ionization of the sorbitol molecule by electron impact have been studied using two different experimental methods. In the mass range of m/ z = 10-190, the mass spectra of sorbitol were recorded at the ionizing electron energies of 70 and 30 eV. The ion yield curves for the fragment ions have been analyzed and the appearance energies of these ions have been determined. The relative total ionization cross section of the sorbitol molecule was measured using monoenergetic electron beam. Possible fragmentation pathways for the sorbitol molecule were proposed.

  13. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics ofmore » waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.« less

  14. Microplume model of spatial-yield spectra. [applying to electron gas degradation in molecular nitrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Singhal, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic representation for the spatial (radial and longitudinal) yield spectra is developed in terms of a model containing three simple 'microplumes'. The model is applied to electron energy degradation in molecular nitrogen gas for 0.1 to 5 keV incident electrons. From the nature of the cross section input to this model it is expected that the scaled spatial yield spectra for other gases will be quite similar. The model indicates that each excitation, ionization, etc. plume should have its individual spatial and energy dependence. Extensions and aeronomical and radiological applications of the model are discussed.

  15. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  16. Distribution and Kinematics of Ionized Gas in the central 500pc of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Ella; Hicks, Erin K. S.; Kade, Kiana

    2018-06-01

    We have characterized the spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized hydrogen gas in a sample of 40 Seyfert galaxies as part of the KONA (Keck OSIRIS Nearby AGN) survey. An analysis of the narrow Brackett Gamma emission (2.16 microns) in the central 500 pc of these local AGN will be presented. Measurements include the azimuthal averages of the flux distribution, velocity dispersion, and emission line equivalent width. In addition, the excitation of the Brackett Gamma emission is considered using the ratio of its flux with that of molecular hydrogen (2.12 microns) as a diagnostic. A comparison of the circumnuclear narrow Brackett Gamma emission characteristics in the Seyfert type 1 and type 2 subsamples will also be presented.

  17. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of ionized corannulene in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Alvaro Galué, Héctor; Rice, Corey A; Steill, Jeffrey D; Oomens, Jos

    2011-02-07

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of radical cationic and protonated corannulene were recorded by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy using the IR free electron laser for infrared experiments. Electrospray ionization was used to generate protonated corannulene and an IRMPD spectrum was recorded in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer monitoring H-loss as a function of IR frequency. The radical cation was produced by 193-nm UV photoionization of the vapor of corannulene in a 3D quadrupole trap and IR irradiation produces H, H(2), and C(2)H(x) losses. Summing the spectral response of the three fragmentation channels yields the IRMPD spectrum of the radical cation. The spectra were analyzed with the aid of quantum-chemical calculations carried out at various levels of theory. The good agreement of theoretical and experimental spectra for protonated corannulene indicates that protonation occurs on one of the peripheral C-atoms, forming an sp(3) hybridized carbon. The spectrum of the radical cation was examined taking into account distortions of the C(5v) geometry induced by the Jahn-Teller effect as a consequence of the degenerate (2)E(1) ground electronic state. As indicated by the calculations, the five equivalent C(s) minima are separated by marginal barriers, giving rise to a dynamically distorted system. Although in general the character of the various computed vibrational bands appears to be in order, only a qualitative match to the experimental spectrum is found. Along with a general redshift of the calculated frequencies, the IR intensities of modes in the 1000-1250 cm(-1) region show the largest discrepancy with the harmonic predictions. In addition to CH "in-plane" bending vibrations, these modes also exhibit substantial deformation of the pentagonal inner ring, which may relate directly to the vibronic interaction in the radical cation.

  19. Preparation of a pure molecular quantum gas.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Jens; Kraemer, Tobias; Mark, Michael; Weber, Tino; Chin, Cheng; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph; Grimm, Rudolf

    2003-09-12

    An ultracold molecular quantum gas is created by application of a magnetic field sweep across a Feshbach resonance to a Bose-Einstein condensate of cesium atoms. The ability to separate the molecules from the atoms permits direct imaging of the pure molecular sample. Magnetic levitation enables study of the dynamics of the ensemble on extended time scales. We measured ultralow expansion energies in the range of a few nanokelvin for a sample of 3000 molecules. Our observations are consistent with the presence of a macroscopic molecular matter wave.

  20. Influence of ionization on ultrafast gas-based nonlinear fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Nazarkin, A; Travers, J C; Nold, J; Hölzer, P; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2011-10-10

    We numerically investigate the effect of ionization on ultrashort high-energy pulses propagating in gas-filled kagomé-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers by solving an established uni-directional field equation. We consider the dynamics of two distinct regimes: ionization induced blue-shift and resonant dispersive wave emission in the deep-UV. We illustrate how the system evolves between these regimes and the changing influence of ionization. Finally, we consider the effect of higher ionization stages.

  1. Air ionization as a control technology for off-gas emissions of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Szulejko, Jan E; Kumar, Pawan; Kwon, Eilhann E; Adelodun, Adedeji A; Reddy, Police Anil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    High energy electron-impact ionizers have found applications mainly in industry to reduce off-gas emissions from waste gas streams at low cost and high efficiency because of their ability to oxidize many airborne organic pollutants (e.g., volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) to CO 2 and H 2 O. Applications of air ionizers in indoor air quality management are limited due to poor removal efficiency and production of noxious side products, e.g., ozone (O 3 ). In this paper, we provide a critical evaluation of the pollutant removal performance of air ionizing system through comprehensive review of the literature. In particular, we focus on removal of VOCs and odorants. We also discuss the generation of unwanted air ionization byproducts such as O 3 , NOx, and VOC oxidation intermediates that limit the use of air-ionizers in indoor air quality management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Ionization heating in rare-gas clusters under intense XUV laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas

    The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses ({lambda}=32 nm, I=10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with small rare-gas clusters (Ar{sub 147}) is studied by quasiclassical molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis supports a very general picture of the charging and heating dynamics in finite samples under short-wavelength radiation that is of relevance for several applications of free-electron lasers. First, up to a certain photon flux, ionization proceeds as a series of direct photoemission events producing a jellium-like cluster potential and a characteristic plateau in the photoelectron spectrum as observed in Bostedt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133401 (2008)]. Second,more » beyond the onset of photoelectron trapping, nanoplasma formation leads to evaporative electron emission with a characteristic thermal tail in the electron spectrum. A detailed analysis of this transition is presented. Third, in contrast to the behavior in the infrared or low vacuum ultraviolet range, the nanoplasma energy capture proceeds via ionization heating, i.e., inner photoionization of localized electrons, whereas collisional heating of conduction electrons is negligible up to high laser intensities. A direct consequence of the latter is a surprising evolution of the mean energy of emitted electrons as function of laser intensity.« less

  3. Observations of extended and counterrotating disks of ionized gas in S0 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Jullien-Dettmar, Marlies; Barteldrees, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    While many E/S0 galaxies have been found to show emission line spectra in their nuclear regions, the question of the presence and nature of extended disks of ionized gas in these galaxies has been addressed only in recent years. Typically the ionized gas is detected in the inner region on a scale of approx. 1 kpc (e.g., Phillips et al. 1986, Caldwell 1984). Here researchers present evidence that the disks of ionized gas of at least some S0 galaxies are much more extended than previously believed. In addition, with the detection of the counterrotation of gas and stars in NGC 7007 they strengthen the basis for arguments that the source of gas in S0 galaxies is external

  4. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  5. Hot interstellar gas and ionization of embedded clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, K.-P.; Bruhweiler, F.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers present detailed photoionization calculations for the instellar cloud in which the Sun is embedded. They consider the EUV radiation field with contribution from discrete stellar sources and from a thermal bremsstrahlung-radiative recombination spectrum emitted from the surrounding 10 to the 6th power k coronal substrate. They establish lower limits to the fractional ionization of hydrogen and helium of 0.17 and 0.29 respectively. The high He ionization fraction results primarily from very strong line emission below 500 A originating in the surrounding coronal substrate while the H ionization is dominated by the EUV radiation from the discrete stellar sources. The dual effects of thermal conduction and the EUV spectrum of the 10 to the 6th k plasma on ionization in the cloud skin are explored. The EUV radiation field and Auger ionization have insignificant effects on the resulting ionic column densities of Si IV, C IV, N V and O VI through the cloud skin. Calculations show that the abundances of these species are dominated by collisional ionization in the thermal conduction front. Because of a low charge exchange rate with hydrogen, the ionic column density ratios of N (CIII)/N (CII) and N (NII)/N (NI) are dominated by the EUV radiation field in the local interstellar medium. These ratios should be important diagnostics for the EUV radiation field and serve as surrogate indicators of the interstellar He and H ionization fraction respectively. Spacecraft such as Lyman which is designed to obtain high resolution spectral data down to the Lyman limit at 912 A could sample interstellar lines of these ions.

  6. [Determination of acetanilide herbicide residues in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques].

    PubMed

    Shen, Weijian; Xu, Jinzhong; Yang, Wenquan; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Ding, Tao; Wu, Bin

    2007-09-01

    An analytical method of solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques was established for simultaneous determination of 12 acetanilide herbicide residues in tea-leaves. Herbicides were extracted from tea-leaf samples with ethyl acetate. The extract was cleaned-up on an active carbon SPE column connected to a Florisil SPE column. Analytical screening was determined by the technique of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with either electron impact ionization (EI) or negative chemical ionization (NCI). It is reliable and stable that the recoveries of all herbicides were in the range from 50% to 110% at three spiked levels, 10 microg/kg, 20 microg/kg and 40 microg/kg, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were no more than 10.9%. The two different ionization techniques are complementary as more ion fragmentation information can be obtained from the EI mode while more molecular ion information from the NCI mode. By comparison of the two techniques, the selectivity of NCI-SIM was much better than that of EI-SIM method. The sensitivities of the both techniques were high, the limit of quantitative (LOQ) for each herbicide was no more than 2.0 microg/kg, and the limit of detection (LOD) with NCI-SIM technique was much lower than that of EI-SIM when analyzing herbicides with several halogen atoms in the molecule.

  7. APEX Detection of Molecular Gas in Ram-Pressure Stripped Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Alessia

    2017-11-01

    I will report on our recent study aimed at detecting molecular gas in the main body and in the tails of a sample of 5 jellyfish galaxies that have been observed within our ongoing MUSE Large Program (GASP). The analyzed sample is constituted by the most extreme jellyfish galaxies, for which the analysis of the ionized gas has already demonstrated that the mechanism at play in regulating 5the gas outflow is the ram pressure stripping. The detection of molecular gas in the tails and the broad characterization that we have been able to extract with APEX data is one of the key ingredients to understand if and how the molecular gas is subject to the same physical process.

  8. Mass spectrometric behavior of anabolic androgenic steroids using gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. Part I: ionization.

    PubMed

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Sancho, J V; Pitarch, E; Hernández, F; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Gómez, C; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2014-06-01

    The detection of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is one of the most important topics in doping control analysis. Gas chromatography coupled to (tandem) mass spectrometry (GC-MS(/MS)) with electron ionization and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry have been traditionally applied for this purpose. However, both approaches still have important limitations, and, therefore, detection of all AAS is currently afforded by the combination of these strategies. Alternative ionization techniques can minimize these drawbacks and help in the implementation of a single method for the detection of AAS. In the present work, a new atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source commercialized for gas chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer has been tested to evaluate the ionization of 60 model AAS. Underivatized and trimethylsylil (TMS)-derivatized compounds have been investigated. The use of GC-APCI-MS allowed for the ionization of all AAS assayed irrespective of their structure. The presence of water in the source as modifier promoted the formation of protonated molecules ([M+H](+)), becoming the base peak of the spectrum for the majority of studied compounds. Under these conditions, [M+H](+), [M+H-H2O](+) and [M+H-2·H2O](+) for underivatized AAS and [M+H](+), [M+H-TMSOH](+) and [M+H-2·TMSOH](+) for TMS-derivatized AAS were observed as main ions in the spectra. The formed ions preserve the intact steroid skeleton, and, therefore, they might be used as specific precursors in MS/MS-based methods. Additionally, a relationship between the relative abundance of these ions and the AAS structure has been established. This relationship might be useful in the structural elucidation of unknown metabolites. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Gauging Metallicity of Diffuse Gas under an Uncertain Ionizing Radiation Field

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Zahedy, Fakhri S.; Johnson, Sean D.

    Gas metallicity is a key quantity used to determine the physical conditions of gaseous clouds in a wide range of astronomical environments, including interstellar and intergalactic space. In particular, considerable effort in circumgalactic medium (CGM) studies focuses on metallicity measurements because gas metallicity serves as a critical discriminator for whether the observed heavy ions in the CGM originate in chemically enriched outflows or in more chemically pristine gas accreted from the intergalactic medium. However, because the gas is ionized, a necessary first step in determining CGM metallicity is to constrain the ionization state of the gas which, in addition tomore » gas density, depends on the ultraviolet background radiation field (UVB). While it is generally acknowledged that both the intensity and spectral slope of the UVB are uncertain, the impact of an uncertain spectral slope has not been properly addressed in the literature. This Letter shows that adopting a different spectral slope can result in an order of magnitude difference in the inferred CGM metallicity. Specifically, a harder UVB spectrum leads to a higher estimated gas metallicity for a given set of observed ionic column densities. Therefore, such systematic uncertainties must be folded into the error budget for metallicity estimates of ionized gas. An initial study shows that empirical diagnostics are available for discriminating between hard and soft ionizing spectra. Applying these diagnostics helps reduce the systematic uncertainties in CGM metallicity estimates.« less

  10. Gauging Metallicity of Diffuse Gas under an Uncertain Ionizing Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Johnson, Sean D.; Zahedy, Fakhri S.; Rauch, Michael; Mulchaey, John S.

    2017-06-01

    Gas metallicity is a key quantity used to determine the physical conditions of gaseous clouds in a wide range of astronomical environments, including interstellar and intergalactic space. In particular, considerable effort in circumgalactic medium (CGM) studies focuses on metallicity measurements because gas metallicity serves as a critical discriminator for whether the observed heavy ions in the CGM originate in chemically enriched outflows or in more chemically pristine gas accreted from the intergalactic medium. However, because the gas is ionized, a necessary first step in determining CGM metallicity is to constrain the ionization state of the gas which, in addition to gas density, depends on the ultraviolet background radiation field (UVB). While it is generally acknowledged that both the intensity and spectral slope of the UVB are uncertain, the impact of an uncertain spectral slope has not been properly addressed in the literature. This Letter shows that adopting a different spectral slope can result in an order of magnitude difference in the inferred CGM metallicity. Specifically, a harder UVB spectrum leads to a higher estimated gas metallicity for a given set of observed ionic column densities. Therefore, such systematic uncertainties must be folded into the error budget for metallicity estimates of ionized gas. An initial study shows that empirical diagnostics are available for discriminating between hard and soft ionizing spectra. Applying these diagnostics helps reduce the systematic uncertainties in CGM metallicity estimates.

  11. A rapid novel derivatization of amphetamine and methamphetamine using 2,2,2-trichloroethyl chloroformate for gas chromatography electron ionization and chemical ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, A; Spies, J

    1998-05-01

    Amphetamine and methamphetamine are commonly abused central nervous system stimulants. We describe a rapid new derivatization of amphetamine and methamphetamine using 2,2,2-trichloroethyl chloroformate for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. Amphetamine and methamphetamine, along with N-propyl amphetamine (internal standard), were extracted from urine using 1-chlorobutane. The derivatization with 2,2,2-trichloroethyl chloroformate can be achieved at room temperature in 10 minutes. The electron ionization mass spectrum of amphetamine 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate showed two weak molecular ions at m/z 309 and 311, but showed diagnostic strong peaks at m/z 218, 220, and 222. In contrast, chemical ionization of the mass spectrum of amphetamine 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate showed strong (M + 1) ions at m/z 310 and 312 and other strong diagnostic peaks at m/z 274 and 276. The major advantages of this derivative are the presence of a diagnostic cluster of peaks due to the isotopic effect of three chlorine atoms (isotopes 35 and 37) in the derivatized molecule and the relative ease of its preparation. We also observed strong molecular ions for derivatized methamphetamine in the chemical ionization mass spectrum, but the molecular ions were very weak in the electron ionization mass spectrum. We used the scan mode of mass spectrometry in all analyses. When using a urine standard containing 1,000 ng/mL of amphetamine (a 7.4-micromol/L concentration) and methamphetamine (a 6.7-micromol/L concentration), the within-run precisions were 4.8% for amphetamine and 3.6% for methamphetamine. The corresponding between-run precisions were 5.3% for amphetamine and 6.7% for methamphetamine. The assay was linear for amphetamine and methamphetamine concentrations of 250 to 5,000 ng/mL (amphetamine, 1.9-37.0 micromol/L; methamphetamine, 1.7-33.6 micromol/L). The detection limit was 100 ng/mL (amphetamine, 0.74 micromol/L; methamphetamine, 0.67 micromol/L) using the scan mode

  12. Molecular gas associated with IRAS 10361-5830

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Rubio, M.; Romero, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas and dust in the molecular clump linked to IRAS 10361-5830, located in the environs of the bubble-shaped Hii region Gum 31 in the Carina region, with the aim of determining the main parameters of the associated material and of investigating the evolutionary state of the young stellar objects identified there. Methods: Using the APEX telescope, we mapped the molecular emission in the J = 3-2 transition of three CO isotopologues, 12CO, 13CO and C18O, over a 1.´5 × 1.´5 region around the IRAS position. We also observed the high-density tracers CS and HCO+ toward the source. The cold- dust distribution was analyzed using submillimeter continuum data at 870 μm obtained with the APEX telescope. Complementary IR and radio data at different wavelengths were used to complete the study of the interstellar medium. Results: The molecular gas distribution reveals a cavity and a shell-like structure of ~0.32 pc in radius centered at the position of the IRAS source, with some young stellar objects projected onto the cavity. The total molecular mass in the shell and the mean H2volume density are ~40 M⊙ and ~(1-2) × 103 cm-3. The cold-dust counterpart of the molecular shell has been detected in the far-IR at 870 μm and in Herschel data at 350 μm. Weak extended emission at 24 μm from warm dust is projected onto the cavity, as well as weak radio continuum emission. Conclusions: A comparison of the distribution of cold and warm dust, and molecular and ionized gas allows us to conclude that a compact Hii region has developed in the molecular clump, indicating that this is an area of recent massive star formation. Probable exciting sources capable of creating the compact Hii region are investigated. The 2MASS source 10380461-5846233 (MSX G286.3773-00.2563) seems to be responsible for the formation of the Hii region. FITS files with datacubes corresponding to 12CO, 13CO, C180 maps are only available at the CDS via anonymous

  13. OH+ and H2O+: Probes of the Molecular Hydrogen Fraction and Cosmic-Ray Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A.; Gerin, M.; PRISMAS; WISH

    2014-01-01

    The fast ion-molecule chemistry that occurs in the interstellar medium (ISM) is initiated by cosmic-ray ionization of both atomic and molecular hydrogen. Species that are near the beginning of the network of interstellar chemistry such as the oxygen-bearing ions OH+ and H2O+ can be useful probes of the cosmic-ray ionization rate. This parameter is of particular interest as, to some extent, it controls the abundances of several molecules. Using observations of OH+ and H2O+ made with HIFI on board Herschel, we have inferred the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen in multiple distinct clouds along 12 Galactic sight lines. These two molecules also allow us to determine the molecular hydrogen fraction (amount of hydrogen nuclei in H2 versus H) as OH+ and H2O+ abundances are dependent on the competition between dissociative recombination with electrons and hydrogen abstraction reactions involving H2. Our observations of OH+ and H2O+ indicate environments where H2 accounts for less than 10% of the available hydrogen nuclei, suggesting that these species primarily reside in the diffuse, atomic ISM. Average ionization rates in this gas are on the order of a few times 10-16 s-1, with most values in specific clouds above or below this average by a factor of 3 or so. This result is in good agreement with the most up-to-date determination of the distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates in diffuse molecular clouds as inferred from observations of H3+.

  14. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  15. The Massive Stellar Population in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    1995-01-01

    We compare Far-UV, H alpha, and optical broadband images of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, to investigate the massive stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas. The H-alpha/FUV ratio is higher in HII regions than in the DIG, possibly indicating that an older population ionizes the DIG. The broad-band colors support this conclusion. The HII region population is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG colors resemble an older population with constant star formation. Our results indicate that there may be enough massive field stars to ionize the DIG, without the need for photon leakage from HII regions.

  16. Determination of photoionization cross-sections of different organic molecules using gas chromatography coupled to single-photon ionization (SPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) with an electron-beam-pumped rare gas excimer light source (EBEL): influence of molecular structure and analytical implications.

    PubMed

    Eschner, Markus S; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2011-07-01

    This work describes a fast and reliable method for determination of photoionization cross-sections (PICS) by means of gas chromatography (GC) coupled to single-photon ionization mass spectrometry (SPI-MS). Photoionization efficiency (PIE) data for 69 substances was obtained at a photon energy of 9.8 ± 0.4 eV using an innovative electron-beam-pumped rare gas excimer light source (EBEL) filled with argon. The investigated analytes comprise 12 alkylbenzenes as well as 11 other substituted benzenes, 23 n-alkanes, ten polyaromatic hydrocarbons, seven aromatic heterocycles, and six polyaromatic heterocycles. Absolute PICS for each substance at 9.8 eV are calculated from the relative photoionization efficiencies of the compounds with respect to benzene, whose photoionization cross-section data is well known. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the type of benzene substituents and their absolute PICS is presented and discussed in depth. Finally, comparison of previously measured photoionization cross-sections for 20 substances shows good agreement with the data of the present work.

  17. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  18. Lyman-continuum leakage as dominant source of diffuse ionized gas in the Antennae galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilbacher, Peter M.; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Verhamme, Anne; Sandin, Christer; Steinmetz, Matthias; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Krajnović, Davor; Kamann, Sebastian; Roth, Martin M.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Maseda, Michael V.; Wendt, Martin; Bacon, Roland; Dreizler, Stefan; Richard, Johan; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2018-04-01

    The Antennae galaxy (NGC 4038/39) is the closest major interacting galaxy system and is therefore often studied as a merger prototype. We present the first comprehensive integral field spectroscopic dataset of this system, observed with the MUSE instrument at the ESO VLT. We cover the two regions in this system which exhibit recent star formation: the central galaxy interaction and a region near the tip of the southern tidal tail. In these fields, we detect HII regions and diffuse ionized gas to unprecedented depth. About 15% of the ionized gas was undetected by previous observing campaigns. This newly detected faint ionized gas is visible everywhere around the central merger, and shows filamentary structure. We estimate diffuse gas fractions of about 60% in the central field and 10% in the southern region. We are able to show that the southern region contains a significantly different population of HII regions, showing fainter luminosities. By comparing HII region luminosities with the HST catalog of young star clusters in the central field, we estimate that there is enough Lyman-continuum leakage in the merger to explain the amount of diffuse ionized gas that we detect. We compare the Lyman-continuum escape fraction of each HII region against emission line ratios that are sensitive to the ionization parameter. While we find no systematic trend between these properties, the most extreme line ratios seem to be strong indicators of density bounded ionization. Extrapolating the Lyman-continuum escape fractions to the southern region, we conclude that simply from the comparison of the young stellar populations to the ionized gas there is no need to invoke other ionization mechanisms than Lyman-continuum leaking HII regions for the diffuse ionized gas in the Antennae. FITS images and Table of HII regions are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A95 and at http://muse-vlt.eu/science/antennae/

  19. The Gaia-ESO Survey: dynamics of ionized and neutral gas in the Lagoon nebula (M 8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Bonito, R.; Prisinzano, L.; Zwitter, T.; Bayo, A.; Kalari, V.; Jiménez-Esteban, F. M.; Costado, M. T.; Jofré, P.; Randich, S.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lardo, C.; Morbidelli, L.; Zaggia, S.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: We present a spectroscopic study of the dynamics of the ionized and neutral gas throughout the Lagoon nebula (M 8), using VLT-FLAMES data from the Gaia-ESO Survey. The new data permit exploration of the physical connections between the nebular gas and the stellar population of the associated star cluster NGC 6530. Methods: We characterized through spectral fitting emission lines of Hα, [N II] and [S II] doublets, [O III], and absorption lines of sodium D doublet, using data from the FLAMES-Giraffe and UVES spectrographs, on more than 1000 sightlines toward the entire face of the Lagoon nebula. Gas temperatures are derived from line-width comparisons, densities from the [S II] doublet ratio, and ionization parameter from Hα/[N II] ratio. Although doubly-peaked emission profiles are rarely found, line asymmetries often imply multiple velocity components along the same line of sight. This is especially true for the sodium absorption, and for the [O III] lines. Results: Spatial maps for density and ionization are derived, and compared to other known properties of the nebula and of its massive stars 9 Sgr, Herschel 36 and HD 165052 which are confirmed to provide most of the ionizing flux. The detailed velocity fields across the nebula show several expanding shells, related to the cluster NGC 6530, the O stars 9 Sgr and Herschel 36, and the massive protostar M 8East-IR. The origins of kinematical expansion and ionization of the NGC 6530 shell appear to be different. We are able to put constrains on the line-of-sight (relative or absolute) distances between some of these objects and the molecular cloud. The data show that the large obscuring band running through the middle of the nebula is being compressed by both sides, which might explain its enhanced density. We also find an unexplained large-scale velocity gradient across the entire nebula. At larger distances, the transition from ionized to neutral gas is studied using the sodium lines. Based on observations

  20. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    PubMed

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-03

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Radiative Cooling of Warm Molecular Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Kaufman, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the radiative cooling of warm (T >= 100 K), fully molecular astrophysical gas by rotational and vibrational transitions of the molecules H2O, CO, and H2. Using an escape probability method to solve for the molecular level populations, we have obtained the cooling rate for each molecule as a function of temperature, density, and an optical depth parameter. A four-parameter expression proves useful in fitting the run of cooling rate with density for any fixed values of the temperature and optical depth parameter. We identify the various cooling mechanisms which are dominant in different regions of the astrophysically relevant parameter space. Given the assumption that water is very abundant in warm regions of the interstellar medium, H2O rotational transitions are found to dominate the cooling of warm interstellar gas over a wide portion of the parameter space considered. While chemical models for the interstellar medium make the strong prediction that water will be produced copiously at temperatures above a few hundred degrees, our assumption of a high water abundance has yet to be tested observationally. The Infrared Space Observatory and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite will prove ideal instruments for testing whether water is indeed an important coolant of interstellar and circumstellar gas.

  2. Delivering Transmembrane Peptide Complexes to the Gas Phase Using Nanodiscs and Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2017-10-01

    The gas-phase conformations of dimers of the channel-forming membrane peptide gramicidin A (GA), produced from isobutanol or aqueous solutions of GA-containing nanodiscs (NDs), are investigated using electrospray ionization-ion mobility separation-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The IMS arrival times measured for (2GA + 2Na)2+ ions from isobutanol reveal three different conformations, with collision cross-sections (Ω) of 683 Å2 (conformation 1, C1), 708 Å2 (C2), and 737 Å2 (C3). The addition of NH4CH3CO2 produced (2GA + 2Na)2+ and (2GA + H + Na)2+ ions, with Ω similar to those of C1, C2, and C3, as well as (2GA + 2H)2+, (2GA + 2NH4)2+, and (2GA + H + NH4)2+ ions, which adopt a single conformation with a Ω similar to that of C2. These results suggest that the nature of the charging agents, imparted by the ESI process, can influence dimer conformation in the gas phase. Notably, the POPC NDs produced exclusively (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions; the DMPC NDs produced both (2GA + 2H)2+ and (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions. While the Ω of (2GA + 2H)2+ is similar to that of C2, the (2GA + 2NH4)2+ ions from NDs adopt a more compact structure, with a Ω of 656 Å2. It is proposed that this compact structure corresponds to the ion conducting single stranded head-to-head helical GA dimer. These findings highlight the potential of NDs, combined with ESI, for transferring transmembrane peptide complexes directly from lipid bilayers to the gas phase. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Interstellar matter in Shapley-Ames elliptical galaxies. II. The distribution of dust and ionized gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, P.; Hansen, L.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.

    1994-06-01

    We present results of deep optical CCD imaging for a complete, optical magnitude-limited sample of 56 elliptical galaxies from the RSA catalog. For each galaxy we have obtained broad-band images (in B, V, and I) and narrow-band images using interference filters isolating the Hα+[NII] emission lines to derive the amount and morphology of dust and ionized gas. Detailed consideration of systematic errors due to effects of sky background subtraction and removal of stellar continuum light from the narrow-band images is described. The flux calibration of the narrow-band images is performed by deconvolving actually measured spectral energy distributions with the filter transmission curves. We also present optical long-slit spectroscopy to determine the [NII]/Hα intensity ratio of the ionized gas. Dust lanes and/or patches have been detected in 23 galaxies (41%) from this sample using both colour-index images and division by purely elliptical model images. We achieved a detection limit for dust absorption of A_B_~0.02. Accounting for selection effects, the true fraction of elliptical galaxies containing dust is estimated to be of order 80%. This detection rate is comparable to that of the IRAS satellite, and significantly larger than results of previous optical studies. Ionized gas has been detected in 32 galaxies (57%). The spectroscopic data confirm the presence and distribution of ionized gas as seen in the direct imaging. All elliptical galaxies in our sample in which a number of emission lines is detected show very similar emission-line intensity ratios, which are typical of LINER nuclei. The amounts of detectable dust and ionized gas are generally small--of order 10^4^-10^5^Msun_ of dust and 10^3^-10^4^Msun_ of ionized gas. The dust and ionized gas show a wide variety of distributions-extended along either the apparent major axis, or the minor axis, or a skewed axis, indicating that triaxiality is in general required as a galaxy figure. In some cases (NGC 1275, NGC

  4. The highly ionized, high-velocity gas in NGC 6231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Derck

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that clusters of massive stars are influenced by the presence of strong winds, that they are sources of diffuse X-rays from shocked gas, and that this gas can be vented into the surrounding region or the halo through the champagne effect. However, the details of how these different environments interact and evolve are far from complete. This paper attributes the broad C IVλλ1500 absorption features (extending to -1900 km s-1) that are seen in the spectra of main sequence B stars in NGC 6231 to gas in the cluster environment and not the B stars themselves. It is shown that the presence of a WC star, WR 79, in the cluster makes this gas detectable because its wind enriches the cluster gas with carbon. Given the available data, it is not clear whether the absorbing gas is simply the far wind of WR 79 or a collective cluster wind enriched by carbon from the wind of WR 79. If it is simply due to the wind, then this wind must flow, unimpeded for more than 2 pc, suggesting that the inner region of the cluster is nearly devoid of obstructing material. If it is actually a collective wind from the cluster, then we could be witnessing an important stage of galactic feedback. In either case, the observations provide a unique and significant piece to the puzzle of how massive, open clusters evolve.

  5. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  6. Ablation from High Velocity Clouds: A Source for Low Velocity Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.; Henley, D. B.; Kwak, K.

    2012-05-01

    High velocity clouds shed material as they move through the Galaxy. This material mixes with the Galactic interstellar medium, resulting in plasma whose temperature and ionization levels are intermediate between those of the cloud and those of the Galaxy. As time passes, the mixed material slows to the velocity of the ambient gas. This raises the possibility that initially warm (T 10^3 K), poorly ionized clouds moving through hot (T 10^6 K), very highly ionized ambient gas could lead to mixed gas that harbors significant numbers of high ions (O+5, N+4, and C+3) and thus helps to explain the large numbers of low-velocity high ions seen on high latitude lines of sight through the Galactic halo. We have used a series of detailed FLASH simulations in order to track the hydrodynamics of warm clouds embedded in hot Galactic halo gas. These simulations tracked the ablated material as it mixed and slowed to low velocities. By following the ionization levels of the gas in a time-dependent fashion, we determined that the mixed material is rich in O+5, N+4, and C+3 ions and continues to contain these ions for some time after slowing to low velocities. Combining our simulational results with estimates of the high velocity cloud infall rate leads to the finding that the mixed gas can account for 1/3 of the normal-velocity O+5 column density found on high latitude lines of sight. It accounts for lesser fractions of the N+4 and C+3 column densities. We will discuss our high velocity cloud results as part of a composite halo model that also includes cooling Galactic fountain gas, isolated supernova remnants, and ionizing photons.

  7. Hot Molecular Gas in the Circumnuclear Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Togi, Aditya; Kaufman, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We present an analysis of archival Infrared Space Observatory observations of H2 for three 14\\prime\\prime × 20\\prime\\prime pointings in the central 3 pc of the Galaxy: toward the southwest region and northeast region of the Galactic center circumnuclear disk (CND), and toward the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. We detect pure rotational lines from 0-0 S(0) to S(13), as well as a number of rovibrationally excited transitions. Using the pure rotational lines, we perform both fits to a discrete temperature distribution (measuring up to three temperature components with T = 500-600 K, T = 1250-1350 K, and T > 2600 K) and fits to a continuous temperature distribution, assuming a power-law distribution of temperatures. We measure power-law indices of n = 3.22 for the northeast region and n = 2.83 for the southwest region. These indices are lower than those measured for other galaxies or other Galactic center clouds, indicating a larger fraction of gas at high temperatures. We also test whether extrapolating this temperature distribution can yield a reasonable estimate of the total molecular mass, as has been recently done for H2 observations in other galaxies. Extrapolating to a cutoff temperature of 50 K in the southwest (northeast) region, we would measure 32% (140%) of the total molecular gas mass inferred from the dust emission, and 26% (125%) of the total molecular gas mass inferred from the CO emission. Ultimately, the inconsistency of the masses inferred in this way suggests that a simple application of this method cannot yield a reliable estimate of the mass of the CND.

  8. Molecular gas in the central parsec of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurlo, Anna

    2015-08-01

    In the central parsec of the Galaxy the environment of the black hole presents two different gas structures: the neutral Circumnuclear Disc (CND) and the ionized Minispiral. In order to study the transition between the two structures we have investigated the presence of neutral gas in the inner part of the CND, where the ionized Minispiral lies. Such study is carried out through spectro-imaging data of the central cavity observed with VLT/SPIFFI. Such data cover several H2 lines and the Brγ line. In order to preserve the spatial resolution and avoid edge effects we applied a new line fitting method, which consists on a regularized three- dimensional fit. Thank to the new method we present the highest resolution maps of the H2 emission in the Central parsec, together with velocity and width maps. The analysis of the H2 1-0 S(1) line leads to the detection of three components of the emission: one in the background of the Minispiral, one in the CND, and one in the Minispiral northern arm. This finding is confirmed by others ortho lines 1-0 S(3) and Q(3). Some para lines are detectable, but no complete map can be achieved. However some portion of the field have been studied for all detectable lines and in particular a strong emission at the entrance of the Minicavity is detected. Lines fluxes allow to trace excitation diagrams which lead to excitation temperature of 1200 K in the CND and T>1500 K in the central cavity. The clear higher temperature of the gas in the central cavity is related to the higher density of UV photons and cosmic rays and this means that H2 molecules have thus a shorter mean life during which thermalization cannot fully occur, it is possible for molecular hydrogen to be formed in a state where peculiar state are favoured. The hypothesis is that we are observing not all the H2 but just the one which is situated at the border of the clouds, a mince shell of gas, heated by the UV central field, which gives a new and interesting picture not only of

  9. The ratio of molecular to atomic gas in spiral galaxies as a function of morphological type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezek, Patricia M.; Young, Judith S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to gain an understanding of the global processes which influence cloud and star formation in disk galaxies, it is necessary to determine the relative amounts of atomic, molecular, and ionized gas both as a function of position in galaxies and from galaxy to galaxy. With observations of the CO distributions in over 200 galaxies now completed as part of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) Extragalactic CO Survey (Young et al. 1989), researchers are finally in a position to determine the type dependence of the molecular content of spiral galaxies, along with the ratio of molecular to atomic gas as a function of type. Do late type spirals really have more gas than early types when the molecular gas content is included. Researchers conclude that there is more than an order of magnitude decrease in the ratio of molecular to atomic gas mass as a function of morphological type from Sa-Sd; an average Sa galaxy has more molecular than atomic gas, and an average Sc has less. Therefore, the total interstellar gas mass to blue luminosity ratio, M sub gas/L sub B, increases by less than a factor of two as a function of type from Sa-Sd. The dominant effect found is that the phase of the gas in the cool interstellar medium (ISM) varies along the Hubble sequence. Researchers suggest that the more massive and centrally concentrated galaxies are able to achieve a molecular-dominated ISM through the collection of more gas in the potential. That gas may then form molecular clouds when a critical density is exceeded. The picture which these observations support is one in which the conversion of atomic gas to molecular gas is a global process which depends on large scale dynamics (cf Wyse 1986). Among interacting and merging systems, researchers find considerable scatter in the M(H2)/M(HI) ratio, with the mean ratio similar to that in the early type galaxies. The high global ratio of molecular to atomic gas could result from the removal of HI gas, the enhanced

  10. Penning Ionization: Measurement of Ion and Molecular Lifetimes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    State of CH", James Carozza and Richard Anderson, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 67, 118 (1977). "Spin & Coherence Transfer in Penning Ionization", L.D. Schearer...Lamp , F. Rev. Sei. Instru. 48, 92 (1977). _^^ ^rtjri ’’Radiative Lifetime of the PrÄ State of CH , James Carroza and Richard ’ Anderson, J. Opt...lr.h .--.- •’••• —•;••.: — - ----- Radiative lifetime of the A2A state of CHr James Carozza and Richard Anderson Drparimem 0/ Physics

  11. Investigation of Plasma Focus in Coaxial Accelerator with Pre-Ionization of Gas,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    appears that when the accelerating current beyond the end of the central electrodes has sufficiently high levels a plasma focus is formed which is...obtained from an investigation of the main properties of the plasma focus in a system with a pre-ionized gas, achieved by means of an inductive electrical field.

  12. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements...

  15. Properties of the highly ionized disk and halo gas toward two distant high-latitude stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) intermediate -resolution observations of S III, Si III, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption along the sight lines to HD 18100 (l = 217.9 deg, b = -62.7, d = 3.1 kpc, z = -2.8 kpc) and HD 100340 (l = 258.9 deg, b = +61.2 deg, d = 5.3 kpc, z = 4.6 kpc) are presented. These small science aperture spectra have resolutions ranging from 11 to 20 km/s full width at half maximum (FWHM) and S/N from 30 to 65 per diode substep. Strong absorption by moderately and highly ionized gas is seen in each direction. The absorption in the direction of the south Galactic polar region (HD 18100) is kinematically simple, while the absorption in the direction of north Galactic polar region (HD 100304) is kinematically complex. In each case the absorption by the highly ionized gas lies within the velocity range of absorption by neutral and weakly ionized gas. Along each sight line, the velocity dispersion determined from the unsaturated absorption lines increases with the energy required to create each ion. The logarithmic column densities for Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V are log N(atoms/sq cm = 12.71, 13.10, 13.58, and 12.75 toward HD 18100 and log N = 12.88, 13.31, 13.83, and 13.04 toward HD 100340. Average ionic ratios among these species are very similar along the two sight lines. Differences in profile shape between the absorption for AL II, Si IV, C IV, and N V provide additional support for the claim of Savage, Sembach, & Cardelli (1994) that there exists two types of highly ionized gas in the interstellar medium. One type of highly ionized gas is responsible for the structured Si IV absorption and part of the C IV absorption. In this gas N(C IV)/N(Si IV) approximately 3.0 and N(C IV)/N(N V) greater than 6. The absorption by this gas seems to be associated with some type of self-regulating interface or mixing layer between the warm and hot interstellar medium. The other type of highly ionized gas is responsible for most of the N V

  16. Ionization compression impact on dense gas distribution and star formation. Probability density functions around H II regions as seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.; Schneider, N.; Minier, V.; Didelon, P.; Hill, T.; Anderson, L. D.; Motte, F.; Zavagno, A.; André, Ph.; Arzoumanian, D.; Audit, E.; Benedettini, M.; Bontemps, S.; Csengeri, T.; Di Francesco, J.; Giannini, T.; Hennemann, M.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Marston, A. P.; Peretto, N.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Russeil, D.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: Ionization feedback should impact the probability distribution function (PDF) of the column density of cold dust around the ionized gas. We aim to quantify this effect and discuss its potential link to the core and initial mass function (CMF/IMF). Methods: We used Herschel column density maps of several regions observed within the HOBYS key program in a systematic way: M 16, the Rosette and Vela C molecular clouds, and the RCW 120 H ii region. We computed the PDFs in concentric disks around the main ionizing sources, determined their properties, and discuss the effect of ionization pressure on the distribution of the column density. Results: We fitted the column density PDFs of all clouds with two lognormal distributions, since they present a "double-peak" or an enlarged shape in the PDF. Our interpretation is that the lowest part of the column density distribution describes the turbulent molecular gas, while the second peak corresponds to a compression zone induced by the expansion of the ionized gas into the turbulent molecular cloud. Such a double peak is not visible for all clouds associated with ionization fronts, but it depends on the relative importance of ionization pressure and turbulent ram pressure. A power-law tail is present for higher column densities, which are generally ascribed to the effect of gravity. The condensations at the edge of the ionized gas have a steep compressed radial profile, sometimes recognizable in the flattening of the power-law tail. This could lead to an unambiguous criterion that is able to disentangle triggered star formation from pre-existing star formation. Conclusions: In the context of the gravo-turbulent scenario for the origin of the CMF/IMF, the double-peaked or enlarged shape of the PDF may affect the formation of objects at both the low-mass and the high-mass ends of the CMF/IMF. In particular, a broader PDF is required by the gravo-turbulent scenario to fit the IMF properly with a reasonable initial Mach

  17. Dust and ionized gas in active radio elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, D. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present broad and narrow bandwidth imaging of three southern elliptical galaxies which have flat-spectrum active radio cores (NGC 1052, IC 1459 and NGC 6958). All three contain dust and extended low excitation optical line emission, particularly extensive in the case of NGC 1052 which has a large H alpha + (NII) luminosity. Both NGC 1052 and IC 1459 have a spiral morphology in emission-line images. All three display independent strong evidence that a merger or infall event has recently occurred, i.e., extensive and infalling HI gas in NGC 1052, a counter-rotating core in IC 1459 and Malin-Carter shells in NGC 6958. This infall event is the most likely origin for the emission-line gas and dust, and the authors are currently investigating possible excitation mechanisms (Sparks et al. 1990).

  18. Ionized Gas Motions and the Structure of Feedback near a Forming Globular Cluster in NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Daniel P.; Turner, Jean L.; Consiglio, S. Michelle; Martin, Emily C.; Beck, Sara C.

    2018-06-01

    We observed Brackett α 4.05 μm emission toward the supernebula in NGC 5253 with NIRSPEC on Keck II in adaptive optics mode, NIRSPAO, to probe feedback from its exciting embedded super star cluster (SSC). NIRSPEC's Slit-viewing Camera was simultaneously used to image the K-band continuum at ∼0.″1 resolution. We register the IR continuum with HST imaging, and find that the visible clusters are offset from the K-band peak, which coincides with the Brα peak of the supernebula and its associated molecular cloud. The spectra of the supernebula exhibit Brα emission with a strong, narrow core. The linewidths are 65–76 km s‑1, FWHM, comparable to those around individual ultra-compact H II regions within our Galaxy. A weak, broad (FWHM ≃ 150–175 km s‑1) component is detected on the base of the line, which could trace a population of sources with high-velocity winds. The core velocity of Brα emission shifts by +13 km s‑1 from NE to SW across the supernebula, possibly indicating a bipolar outflow from an embedded object or a link to a foreground redshifted gas filament. The results can be explained if the supernebula comprises thousands of ionized wind regions around individual massive stars, stalled in their expansion due to critical radiative cooling and unable to merge to drive a coherent cluster wind. Based on the absence of an outflow with large mass loss, we conclude that feedback is currently ineffective at dispersing gas, and the SSC retains enriched material out of which it may continue to form stars.

  19. Determination of Pesticides by Gas Chromatography Combined with Mass Spectrometry Using Femtosecond Lasers Emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the Ionization Source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xixiang; Imasaka, Tomoko; Imasaka, Totaro

    2018-04-03

    A standard sample mixture containing 51 pesticides was separated by gas chromatography (GC), and the constituents were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) using femtosecond lasers emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the ionization source. A two-dimensional display of the GC/MS was successfully used for the determination of these compounds. A molecular ion was observed for 38 of the compounds at 267 nm and for 30 of the compounds at 800 nm, in contrast to 27 among 50 compounds when electron ionization was used. These results suggest that the ultraviolet laser is superior to the near-infrared laser for molecular weight determinations and for a more reliable analysis of these compounds. In order to study the conditions for optimal ionization, the experimental data were examined using the spectral properties (i.e., the excitation and ionization energies and absorption spectra for the neutral and ionized species) obtained by quantum chemical calculations. A few molecules remained unexplained by the currently reported rules, requiring additional rules for developing a full understanding of the femtosecond ionization process. The pesticides in the homogenized matrix obtained from kabosu ( citrus sphaerocarpa) were measured using lasers emitting at 267 and 800 nm. The pesticides were clearly separated and measured on the two-dimensional display, especially for the data measured at 267 nm, suggesting that this technique would have potential for use in the practical trace analysis of the pesticides in the environment.

  20. Molecular orbital imaging via above-threshold ionization with circularly polarized pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Lu, Peixiang; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-07-18

    Above-threshold ionization (ATI) for aligned or orientated linear molecules by circularly polarized laser pulsed is investigated. It is found that the all-round structural information of the molecular orbital is extracted with only one shot by the circularly polarized probe pulse rather than with multi-shot detections in a linearly polarized case. The obtained photoelectron momentum spectrum directly depicts the symmetry and electron distribution of the occupied molecular orbital, which results from the strong sensitivity of the ionization probability to these structural features. Our investigation indicates that the circularly polarized probe scheme would present a simple method to study the angle-dependent ionization and image the occupied electronic orbital.

  1. IONIZED GAS IN THE FIRST 10 kpc OF THE INTERSTELLAR GALACTIC HALO: METAL ION FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Howk, J. Christopher; Consiglio, S. Michelle, E-mail: jhowk@nd.edu, E-mail: smconsiglio@ucla.edu

    2012-11-10

    We present direct measures of the ionization fractions of several sulfur ions in the Galactic warm ionized medium (WIM). We obtained high-resolution ultraviolet absorption-line spectroscopy of post-asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular clusters Messier 3 [(l, b) = (42.{sup 0}2, +78.{sup 0}7), d = 10.2 kpc, and z = 10.0 kpc] and Messier 5 [(l, b) = (3.{sup 0}9, +46.{sup 0}8), d = 7.5 kpc, and z = +5.3 kpc] with the Hubble Space Telescope and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer to measure, or place limits on, the column densities of S I, S II, S III, S IV, Smore » VI, and H I. These clusters also house millisecond pulsars, whose dispersion measures give an electron column density from which we infer the H II column in these directions. We find fractions of S{sup +2} in the WIM for the M 3 and M 5 sight lines x(S{sup +2}) {identical_to} N(S{sup +2})/N(S) = 0.33 {+-} 0.07 and 0.47 {+-} 0.09, respectively, with variations perhaps related to location. With negligible quantities of the higher ionization states, we conclude that S{sup +} and S{sup +2} account for all of the S in the WIM. We extend the methodology to study the ion fractions in the warm and hot ionized gas of the Milky Way, including the high ions Si{sup +3}, C{sup +3}, N{sup +4}, and O{sup +5}. The vast majority of the Galactic ionized gas is warm (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K) and photoionized (the WIM) or very hot (T > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) and collisionally ionized. The common tracer of ionized gas beyond the Milky Way, O{sup +5}, traces <1% of the total ionized gas mass of the Milky Way.« less

  2. An Experimental Study of the Ionization of Low-Density Gas Flows by Induced Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.; Brooks, J. D.; Beasley, W. D.

    1960-01-01

    Induced discharges are advantageous for ionizing low-density flows in that they introduce no electrode contamination into the flow and they provide a relatively high degree of ionization with good coupling of power into the gas. In this investigation a 40-megacycle oscillator was used to produce and maintain induced discharges in argon and mercury-vapor flows. Methods for preventing blowout of the discharge were determined, and power measurements were made with an in-line wattmeter. Some results with damped oscillations pulsed at 1,000 pulses per second are also presented.

  3. Relating polarizability to volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, moments of momentum, and other molecular properties

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, Shamus A.; Thakkar, Ajit J., E-mail: ajit@unb.ca

    2014-08-21

    Semiquantitative relationships between the mean static dipole polarizability and other molecular properties such as the volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, and moments of momentum are explored. The relationships are tested using density functional theory computations on the 1641 neutral, ground-state, organic molecules in the TABS database. The best polarizability approximations have median errors under 5%.

  4. Relating polarizability to volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, moments of momentum, and other molecular properties.

    PubMed

    Blair, Shamus A; Thakkar, Ajit J

    2014-08-21

    Semiquantitative relationships between the mean static dipole polarizability and other molecular properties such as the volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, and moments of momentum are explored. The relationships are tested using density functional theory computations on the 1641 neutral, ground-state, organic molecules in the TABS database. The best polarizability approximations have median errors under 5%.

  5. Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E

    2007-02-26

    With the advent of coupled chemical/hydrodynamic reactive flow models for high explosives, understanding detonation chemistry is of increasing importance to DNT. The accuracy of first principles detonation codes, such as CHEETAH, are dependent on an accurate representation of the species present under detonation conditions. Ionic species and non-molecular phases are not currently included coupled chemistry/hydrodynamic simulations. This LDRD will determine the prevalence of such species during high explosive detonations, by carrying out experimental and computational investigation of common detonation products under extreme conditions. We are studying the phase diagram of detonation products such as H{sub 2}O, or NH{sub 3} andmore » mixtures under conditions of extreme pressure (P > 1 GPa) and temperature (T > 1000K). Under these conditions, the neutral molecular form of matter transforms to a phase dominated by ions. The phase boundaries of such a region are unknown.« less

  6. In-gas-cell laser ionization studies of plutonium isotopes at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjalainen, I.; Moore, I. D.; Kron, T.; Raeder, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Tomita, H.; Trautmann, N.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    In-gas-cell resonance laser ionization has been performed on long-lived isotopes of Pu at the IGISOL facility, Jyväskylä. This initiates a new programme of research towards high-resolution optical spectroscopy of heavy actinide elements which can be produced in sufficient quantities at research reactors and transported to facilities elsewhere. In this work a new gas cell has been constructed for fast extraction of laser-ionized elements. Samples of 238-240,242Pu and 244Pu have been evaporated from Ta filaments, laser ionized, mass separated and delivered to the collinear laser spectroscopy station. Here we report on the performance of the gas cell through studies of the mass spectra obtained in helium and argon, before and after the radiofrequency quadrupole cooler-buncher. This provides valuable insight into the gas phase chemistry exhibited by Pu, which has been additionally supported by measurements of ion time profiles. The resulting monoatomic yields are sufficient for collinear laser spectroscopy. A gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis of the Pu samples shows a good agreement with the assay provided by the Mainz Nuclear Chemistry department.

  7. Study on the Characteristics of Gas Molecular Mean Free Path in Nanopores by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qixin; Cai, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents studies on the characteristics of gas molecular mean free path in nanopores by molecular dynamics simulation. Our study results indicate that the mean free path of all molecules in nanopores depend on both the radius of the nanopore and the gas-solid interaction strength. Besides mean free path of all molecules in the nanopore, this paper highlights the gas molecular mean free path at different positions of the nanopore and the anisotropy of the gas molecular mean free path at nanopores. The molecular mean free path varies with the molecule’s distance from the center of the nanopore. The least value of the mean free path occurs at the wall surface of the nanopore. The present paper found that the gas molecular mean free path is anisotropic when gas is confined in nanopores. The radial gas molecular mean free path is much smaller than the mean free path including all molecular collisions occuring in three directions. Our study results also indicate that when gas is confined in nanopores the gas molecule number density does not affect the gas molecular mean free path in the same way as it does for the gas in unbounded space. These study results may bring new insights into understanding the gas flow’s characteristic at nanoscale. PMID:25046745

  8. The Independence of Neutral and Ionized Gas Outflows in Low-z Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2018-02-01

    Using a large sample of emission line galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we investigate the kinematics of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) based on the Na I λλ5890,5896 (Na D) doublet absorption line. By removing the Na D contribution from stellar atmospheres, we isolate the line profile of the Na D excess, which represents the neutral gas in the ISM. The kinematics traced by the Na D excess show high velocity and velocity dispersion for a fraction of galaxies, indicating the presence of neutral gas outflows. We find that the kinematics measured from the Na D excess are similar between AGNs and star-forming galaxies. Moreover, by comparing the kinematics traced by the Na D excess and those by the [O III] λ5007 line taken from Woo et al., which traces ionized outflows driven by AGNs, we find no correlation between them. These results demonstrate that the neutral gas in the ISM traced by the Na D excess and the ionized gas traced by [O III] are kinematically independent, and AGNs have no impact on the neutral gas outflows. In contrast to [O III], we find that the measured line-of-sight velocity shift and velocity dispersion of the Na D excess increase for more face-on galaxies due to the projection effect, supporting that Na D outflows are radially driven (i.e., perpendicular to the major axis of galaxies), presumably due to star formation.

  9. Survival of molecular gas in Virgo's hot intracluster medium: CO near M 86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasyra, K. M.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Braine, J.

    2012-04-01

    We carried out 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations of 21 different regions in the vicinity of M 86, NGC 4438, and along the 120 kpc-long, Hα-emitting filamentary trail that connects them, aiming to test whether molecular gas can survive to be transferred from a spiral to an elliptical galaxy in Virgo's 107 K intracluster medium (ICM). We targeted Hα-emitting regions that could be associated with the interface between cold molecular clouds and the hot ionized ICM. The data, obtained with the 30 m telescope of the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, led to the detection of molecular gas close to M 86. CO gas with a recession velocity that is similar to that of the stars, -265 km s-1, and with a corresponding H2 mass of 2 × 107 M⊙, was detected ~10 kpc southeast of the nucleus of M 86, near the peak of its H i emission. We argue that it is possible for this molecular gas either to have formed in situ from H i, or to have been stripped from NGC 4438 directly in molecular form. In situ formation is nonetheless negligible for the 7 × 106 M⊙ of gas detected at 12:26:15.9+12:58:49, at ~10 kpc northeast of M 86, where no (strong) H i emission is present. This detection provides evidence for the survival of molecular gas in filaments for timescales of ~100 Myr. An amount equivalent to 5 × 107 M⊙ of H2 gas that could be lost to the ICM or to neighboring galaxies was also discovered in the tidal tail northwest of NGC 4438. A scenario in which gas was alternatively brought to M 86 from NGC 4388 was also examined but it was considered unlikely because of the non-detection of CO below or at the H I stream velocities, 2000-2700 km s-1.

  10. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-06-09

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)-CO-N2-noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system.

  11. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)−CO−N2−noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system. PMID:26039983

  12. Optimized cell geometry for buffer-gas-cooled molecular-beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Samanta, Amit K.; Roth, Nils; Gusa, Daniel; Ossenbrüggen, Tim; Rubinsky, Igor; Horke, Daniel A.; Küpper, Jochen

    2018-03-01

    We have designed, constructed, and commissioned a cryogenic helium buffer-gas source for producing a cryogenically cooled molecular beam and evaluated the effect of different cell geometries on the intensity of the produced molecular beam, using ammonia as a test molecule. Planar and conical entrance and exit geometries are tested. We observe a threefold enhancement in the NH3 signal for a cell with planar entrance and conical-exit geometry, compared to that for a typically used "boxlike" geometry with planar entrance and exit. These observations are rationalized by flow field simulations for the different buffer-gas cell geometries. The full thermalization of molecules with the helium buffer gas is confirmed through rotationally resolved resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra yielding a rotational temperature of 5 K.

  13. An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jong, Edmund C; Macek, Paul V; Perera, Inoka E; Luxbacher, Kray D; McNair, Harold M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely used as a tracer gas because of its detectability at low concentrations. This attribute of SF6 allows the quantification of both small-scale flows, such as leakage, and large-scale flows, such as atmospheric currents. SF6's high detection sensitivity also facilitates greater usage efficiency and lower operating cost for tracer deployments by reducing quantity requirements. The detectability of SF6 is produced by its high molecular electronegativity. This property provides a high potential for negative ion formation through electron capture thus naturally translating to selective detection using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS). This paper investigates the potential of using gas chromatography (GC) with NCI-MS for the detection of SF6. The experimental parameters for an ultra-trace SF6 detection method utilizing minimal customizations of the analytical instrument are detailed. A method for the detection of parts per trillion (ppt) level concentrations of SF6 for the purpose of underground ventilation tracer gas analysis was successfully developed in this study. The method utilized a Shimadzu gas chromatography with negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry system equipped with an Agilent J&W HP-porous layer open tubular column coated with an alumina oxide (Al2O3) S column. The method detection limit (MDL) analysis as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency of the tracer data showed the method MDL to be 5.2 ppt. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Ultraviolet absorption by highly ionized halo gas near the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.; Massa, D.

    1985-01-01

    Initial results are presented for a program to survey highly ionized gas in the Milky Way disk and halo. High-resolution IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) far-UV spectra were obtained for 12 stars at galactocentric distances less than 6 kpc. The stars are 0.7-2.2 kpc away from the plane. Most of the spectra contain exceedingly strong and broad interstellar absorption lines of weakly and highly ionized atoms. In addition to the normally strong lines of Si IV and C IV, strong interstellar NV lines have been detected in the spectra of eight stars. The detection of NV absorption (amounting to more than 10 times the predicted NV) provides an important new constraint on models for the origin of Galactic halo gas. A Galactic fountain operating in the presence of known UV and EUV radiation might explain the observations.

  15. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Diffuse ionized gas in the Antennae galaxy (Weilbacher+, 2018)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilbacher, P. M.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Verhamme, A.; Sandin, C.; Steinmetz, M.; Kollatschny, W.; Krajnovic, D.; Kamann, S.; Roth, M. M.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Marino, R. A.; Maseda, M. V.; Wendt, M.; Bacon, R.; Dreizler, S.; Richard, J.; Wisotzki, L.

    2017-11-01

    We provide two-dimensional maps of two different ways to measure the diffuse ionized gas as traced by the Halpha emission line in the Antennae Galaxy, both for the central field and the field at the end of the southern tidal tail. We provide a velocity map derived from the Halpha emission line, binned to a S/N~30. Finally, we provide line measurements and derived properties for all HII regions discussed in the paper. (4 data files).

  17. A Pre-ionization System to Limit Neutral Gas in a Compact Toroid Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allfrey, Ian; Roche, Thomas; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Garate, Eusebio; Gota, Hiroshi; Asai, Tomohiko; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Fusion plasmas require long lifetimes and high temperatures, both of which are limited by particle loss, among other factors. Therefore, refueling a long-lived advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in C-2U is necessary, and injecting a supersonic compact toroid (CT) is an effective means of introducing particles into the FRC core. However, neutral gas that trails the CT into the target chamber cools the FRC. Pre-ionization (PI) system assists the break down between electrodes of the CT injector (CTI), so the amount of introduced gas can be lowered by up to a factor of two, effectively increasing the ionization fraction; thus, reducing the amount of neutral gas in the system. Additionally, the PI decreases the delay in CTI breakdown so a highly reproducible operation is achievable. The PI system consists of a fast, high voltage, pulse discharge circuit coupled to a Teflon insulated semi-rigid coaxial cable inserted into the CTI. System details and experimental data will be presented, in addition to issues such as the introduction of impurities and pre-ionizer lifetime.

  18. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  19. Fluctuations in microwave background radiation due to secondary ionization of the intergalactic gas in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunyayev, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary heating and ionization of the intergalactic gas at redshifts z approximately 10-30 could lead to the large optical depth of the Universe for Thomson scattering and could smooth the primordial fluctuations formed at z approximately 1500. It is shown that the gas motions connected with the large scale density perturbations at z approximately 10-15 must lead to the generation of secondary fluctuations of microwave background. The contribution of the rich clusters of galaxies and young galaxies to the fluctuations of microwave background is also estimated.

  20. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  1. The effect of extreme ionization rates during the initial collapse of a molecular cloud core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R.; Price, Daniel J.

    2018-05-01

    What cosmic ray ionization rate is required such that a non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of a collapsing molecular cloud will follow the same evolutionary path as an ideal MHD simulation or as a purely hydrodynamics simulation? To investigate this question, we perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal MHD simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating, one solar mass, magnetized molecular cloud cores, which include Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. We assume a uniform grain size of ag = 0.1 μm, and our free parameter is the cosmic ray ionization rate, ζcr. We evolve our models, where possible, until they have produced a first hydrostatic core. Models with ζcr ≳ 10-13 s-1 are indistinguishable from ideal MHD models, and the evolution of the model with ζcr = 10-14 s-1 matches the evolution of the ideal MHD model within 1 per cent when considering maximum density, magnetic energy, and maximum magnetic field strength as a function of time; these results are independent of ag. Models with very low ionization rates (ζcr ≲ 10-24 s-1) are required to approach hydrodynamical collapse, and even lower ionization rates may be required for larger ag. Thus, it is possible to reproduce ideal MHD and purely hydrodynamical collapses using non-ideal MHD given an appropriate cosmic ray ionization rate. However, realistic cosmic ray ionization rates approach neither limit; thus, non-ideal MHD cannot be neglected in star formation simulations.

  2. Natural gas treating with molecular sieves. Pt. 2. Regeneration, economics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.B.

    1972-08-01

    Regeneration considerations are often the key to successful and economical application of molecular sieves for natural gas sweetening. In effect, molecular sieves remove the sulfur compounds from the feed stream and concentrate them into a smaller regeneration gas stream. Because a molecular sieve natural gas sweetener concentrates the hydrogen sulfide from the feed stream in a smaller regeneration gas stream, the sulfur-rich gas must be subsequently treated or disposed of. Molecular sieve sweeteners afford a high degree of flexibility in operating rates. They have a very high turndown ratio limited only by the use of product gas for regeneration, whichmore » can be utilized to full advantage with a control system that provides variable cycle times. Tabular data provide a range of designed conditions for existing molecular sieve natural gas sweeteners. Actual operating experience has shown that, in most cases, the following economical advantages can be realized: (1) investment cost is competitive to alternate forms of gas treating; (2) operating cost of molecular sieve units are generally lower (3) the value of carbon dioxide left in natural gas can lead to a considerable operating credit; and (4) the incremental costs of expansion to an existing plant are normally much less. (24 refs.)« less

  3. INTEGRAL-FIELD STELLAR AND IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS OF PECULIAR VIRGO CLUSTER SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cortés, Juan R.; Hardy, Eduardo; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P., E-mail: jcortes@alma.cl, E-mail: ehardy@nrao.cl, E-mail: jeff.kenney@yale.edu

    2015-01-01

    We present the stellar and ionized gas kinematics of 13 bright peculiar Virgo cluster galaxies observed with the DensePak Integral Field Unit at the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in order to look for kinematic evidence that these galaxies have experienced gravitational interactions or gas stripping. Two-dimensional maps of the stellar velocity V, stellar velocity dispersion σ, and the ionized gas velocity (Hβ and/or [O III]) are presented for the galaxies in the sample. The stellar rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles are determined for 13 galaxies, and the ionized gas rotation curves are determined for 6 galaxies. Misalignments between themore » optical and kinematical major axes are found in several galaxies. While in some cases this is due to a bar, in other cases it seems to be associated with gravitational interaction or ongoing ram pressure stripping. Non-circular gas motions are found in nine galaxies, with various causes including bars, nuclear outflows, or gravitational disturbances. Several galaxies have signatures of kinematically distinct stellar components, which are likely signatures of accretion or mergers. For all of our galaxies, we compute the angular momentum parameter λ {sub R}. An evaluation of the galaxies in the λ {sub R} ellipticity plane shows that all but two of the galaxies have significant support from random stellar motions, and have likely experienced gravitational interactions. This includes some galaxies with very small bulges and truncated/compact Hα morphologies, indicating that such galaxies cannot be fully explained by simple ram pressure stripping, but must have had significant gravitational encounters. Most of the sample galaxies show evidence for ICM-ISM stripping as well as gravitational interactions, indicating that the evolution of a significant fraction of cluster galaxies is likely strongly impacted by both effects.« less

  4. Dense clumps of ionized gas near Pi Scorpii, as revealed by the fine-structure excitation of N II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1992-01-01

    The column density and the emission of the ionized gas along the line of sight toward the B1 V + B2 V binary star Pi Sco are measured on the basis of the fine-structure absorption lines of the ground state N II. It is found that the bulk of this ionized gas must be clumped on a length scale of 0.025 pc, which is far smaller than the observed size of the diffuse H II region surrounding Pi Sco of about 6 pc. The observed column density of S III toward Pi Sco yields an upper limit on the distance of the absorbing, clumped gas from the star of less than about 0.02 pc, assuming that both the N II and S III absorption arise from the same gas. The possibility that the ionized gas originates from a photoevaporating circumstellar disk directly surrounding Pi Sco is excluded, since such a disk would have an unusual size of order 0.025 pc and would have had to survive for the estimated age of Pi Sco of 5-8 Myr. The derived mean density of the clumped gas is of order 40/cu cm, so that the gas is at a pressure that far exceeds the mean pressure in the H II region. It is concluded that the ionized gas could originate from evaporation flows off a cluster of compact neutral objects that evaporate due to the ionizing radiation of Pi Sco.

  5. Lighting the dark molecular gas and a Bok globule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya G.

    Stars are the building blocks of galaxies. The gas present in galaxies is the primary fuel for star formation. Galaxy evolution depends on the amount of gas present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Stars are born mainly from molecular gas in the GMCs. Robust knowledge of the molecular hydrogen H2 gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. Since H2 is not readily observable in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), the molecular gas content has traditionally been inferred using indirect tracers like carbon-monoxide (CO), dust emission, gamma ray interactions, and star formation efficiency. Physical processes resulting in enhancement and reduction of these indirect tracers can result in misleading estimates of molecular gas masses. My dissertation work is based on devising a new temperature power law distribution model for H2, a direct tracer, to calculate the total molecular gas mass in galaxies. The model parameters are estimated using mid infrared (MIR) H2 rotational line fluxes obtained from IRS-Spitzer (Infrared Spectrograph-Spitzer) instrument and the model is extrapolated to a suitable lower temperature to recover the total molecular gas mass. The power law model is able to recover the dark molecular gas, undetected by CO, in galaxies at metallicity as low as one-tenth of our Milky Way value. I have applied the power law model in U/LIRGs and shocks of Stephan's Quintet to understand molecular gas properties, where shocks play an important role in exciting H2. Comparing the molecular gas content derived through our power law model can be useful in studying the application of our model in mergers. The parameters derived by our model is useful in understanding variation in molecular gas properties in shock regions of Stephan's Quintet. Low mass stars are formed in small isolated dense cores known as Bok globules. Multiple star formation events are seen in a Bok globule. In my thesis I also studied a Bok globule, B207, and determined the

  6. The interaction of intense, ultra-short microwave beams with the plasma generated by gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafir, G.; Cao, Y.; Bliokh, Y.; Leopold, J. G.; Levko, D.; Rostov, V.; Gad, R.; Fisher, A.; Bernshtam, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2018-03-01

    Results of the non-linear interaction of an extremely short (0.6 ns) high power (˜500 MW) X-band focused microwave beam with the plasma generated by gas ionization are presented. Within certain gas pressure ranges, specific to the gas type, the plasma density is considerably lower around the microwave beam axis than at its periphery, thus forming guiding channel through which the beam self-focuses. Outside these pressure ranges, either diffuse or streamer-like plasma is observed. We also observe high energy electrons (˜15 keV), accelerated by the very high-power microwaves. A simplified analytical model of this complicated dynamical system and particle-in-cell numerical simulations confirm the experimental results.

  7. Imaging spectrophotometry of ionized gas in NGC 1068. I - Kinematics of the narrow-line region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Gerald; Bland, Jonathan; Tully, R. Brent

    1990-01-01

    The kinematics of collisionally excited forbidden N II 6548, 6583 across the inner 1 arcmin diameter of the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 is mapped using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer and low-noise CCD. The stack of monochromatic images, which spatially resolved the high-velocity gas, was analyzed for kinematic and photometric content. Profiles agree well with previous long-slit work, and their complete spatial coverage makes it possible to constrain the gas volume distribution. It is found that the narrow-line region is distributed in a thick center-darkened, line-emitting cylinder that envelopes the collimated radio jet. Three distinct kinematic subsystems, of which the cylinder is composed, are discussed in detail. Detailed behavior of the emission-line profiles, at the few points in the NE quadrant with simple kinematics, argues that the ionized gas develops a significant component of motion perpendicular to the jet axis.

  8. Molecular resolution and fragmentation of fulvic acid by electrospray ionization/multistage tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Gates, Paul M.; Furlong, E.T.; Ferrer, I.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular weight distributions of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, were investigated by electrospray ionization/quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI/QMS), and fragmentation pathways of specific fulvic acid masses were investigated by electrospray ionization/ion trap multistage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MST/MS). ESI/QMS studies of the free acid form of low molecular weight poly(carboxylic acid) standards in 75% methanol/25% water mobile phase found that negative ion detection gave the optimum generation of parent ions that can be used for molecular weight determinations. However, experiments with poly(acrylic acid) mixtures and specific high molecular weight standards found multiply charged negative ions that gave a low bias to molecular mass distributions. The number of negative charges on a molecule is dependent on the distance between charges. ESI/MST/MS of model compounds found characteristic water loss from alcohol dehydration and anhydride formation, as well as CO2 loss from decarboxylation, and CO loss from ester structures. Application of these fragmentation pathways to specific masses of fulvic acid isolated and fragmented by ESI/MST/MS is indicative of specific structures that can serve as a basis for future structural confirmation after these hypothesized structures are synthesized.

  9. Radiation sterilization of medical devices. Effects of ionizing radiation on ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, R.; Schüttler, C.; Bögl, K. W.

    1995-02-01

    Sterilization by ionizing radiation has become, next to ethylene oxide treament, the most important "cold" sterilization process for medical devices made from plastics. The effects of ionizing radiation on the most important polymer for medical devices, ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene, are briefly described in this review.

  10. Adaptation of the Black Yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to Ionizing Radiation: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly L.; Mostaghim, Anahita; Cuomo, Christina A.; Soto, Carissa M.; Lebedev, Nikolai; Bailey, Robert F.; Wang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual genes

  11. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J-C; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency. PMID:28224987

  12. The spatially resolved stellar population and ionized gas properties in the merger LIRG NGC 2623

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez, S. F.; Cid Fernandes, R.; de Amorim, A. L.; Di Matteo, P.; García-Benito, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; López Fernández, R.; Tadhunter, C.; Villar-Martín, M.; Roth, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    We report on a detailed study of the stellar populations and ionized gas properties in the merger LIRG NGC 2623, analyzing optical integral field spectroscopy from the CALIFA survey and PMAS LArr, multiwavelength HST imaging, and OSIRIS narrow band Hα and [NII]λ6584 imaging. The spectra were processed with the starlight full spectral fitting code, and the results are compared with those for two early-stage merger LIRGs (IC 1623 W and NGC 6090), together with CALIFA Sbc/Sc galaxies. We find that NGC 2623 went through two periods of increased star formation (SF), a first and widespread episode, traced by intermediate-age stellar populations ISP (140 Myr-1.4 Gyr), and a second one, traced by young stellar populations YSP (<140 Myr), which is concentrated in the central regions (<1.4 kpc). Our results are in agreement with the epochs of the first peri-center passage ( 200 Myr ago) and coalescence (<100 Myr ago) predicted by dynamical models, and with high-resolution merger simulations in the literature, consistent with NGC 2623 representing an evolved version of the early-stage mergers. Most ionized gas is concentrated within <2.8 kpc, where LINER-like ionization and high-velocity dispersion ( 220 km s-1) are found, consistent with the previously reported outflow. As revealed by the highest-resolution OSIRIS and HST data, a collection of HII regions is also present in the plane of the galaxy, which explains the mixture of ionization mechanisms in this system. It is unlikely that the outflow in NGC 2623 will escape from the galaxy, given the low SFR intensity ( 0.5 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2), the fact that the outflow rate is three times lower than the current SFR, and the escape velocity in the central areas is higher than the outflow velocity.

  13. Development of a resonant laser ionization gas cell for high-energy, short-lived nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Tomita, H.; Sakamoto, C.; Takatsuka, T.; Furukawa, T.; Iimura, H.; Ito, Y.; Kubo, T.; Matsuo, Y.; Mita, H.; Naimi, S.; Nakamura, S.; Noto, T.; Schury, P.; Shinozuka, T.; Wakui, T.; Miyatake, H.; Jeong, S.; Ishiyama, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Hirayama, Y.; Okada, K.; Takamine, A.

    2013-01-01

    A new laser ion source configuration based on resonant photoionization in a gas cell has been developed at RIBF RIKEN. This system is intended for the future PArasitic RI-beam production by Laser Ion-Source (PALIS) project which will be installed at RIKEN's fragment separator, BigRIPS. A novel implementation of differential pumping, in combination with a sextupole ion beam guide (SPIG), has been developed. A few small scroll pumps create a pressure difference from 1000 hPa-10-3 Pa within a geometry drastically miniaturized compared to conventional systems. This system can utilize a large exit hole for fast evacuation times, minimizing the decay loss for short-lived nuclei during extraction from a buffer gas cell, while sufficient gas cell pressure is maintained for stopping high energy RI-beams. In spite of the motion in a dense pressure gradient, the photo-ionized ions inside the gas cell are ejected with an assisting force gas jet and successfully transported to a high-vacuum region via SPIG followed by a quadrupole mass separator. Observed behaviors agree with the results of gas flow and Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. [in model for cooling of hot Galactic corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Bruna, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  15. Ionized gas outflow in the isolated S0 galaxy NGC 4460

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexei; Karachentsev, Igor; Kaisin, Serafim

    2010-04-01

    We used integral-field and long-slit spectroscopy to study a bright extended nebulosity recently discovered in the isolated lenticular galaxy NGC 4460 during an Hα survey of nearby galaxies. An analysis of archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX and Hubble Space Telescope images indicates that current star formation is entirely concentrated in the central kiloparsec of the galaxy disc. The observed ionized gas parameters (morphology, kinematics and ionization state) can be explained by a gas outflow above the plane of the galaxy, caused by star formation in the circumnuclear region. Galactic wind parameters in NGC 4460 (outflow velocity, total kinetic energy) are several times smaller, compared with the known galactic wind in NGC 253, which is explained by the substantially lower total star formation rate. We discuss the cause of the star formation processes in NGC 4460 and in two other known isolated lenticular (S0) and elliptical (E) galaxies of the Local Volume: NGC 404 and 855. We provide evidence suggesting that the feeding of isolated galaxies by intergalactic gas on a cosmological time-scale is a steady process without significant variations. Based on observations collected with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is operated under the financial support of the Science Department of Russia (registration number 01-43). E-mail: moisav@gmail.com

  16. Preparation of the spacer for narrow electrode gap configuration in ionization-based gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2012-09-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have started to be developed as the sensing element for ionization-based gas sensors due to the demand for improved sensitivity, selectivity, stability and other sensing properties beyond what can be offered by the conventional ones. Although these limitations have been overcome, the problems still remain with the conventional ionization-based gas sensors in that they are bulky and operating with large breakdown voltage and high temperature. Recent studies have shown that the breakdown voltage can be reduced by using nanostructured electrodes and narrow electrode gap. Nanostructured electrode in the form of aligned CNTs array with evenly distributed nanotipsmore » can enhance the linear electric field significantly. The later is attributed to the shorter conductivity path through narrow electrode gap. The paper presents the study on the design consideration in order to realize ionization based gas sensor using aligned carbon nanotubes array in an optimum sensor configuration with narrow electrode gap. Several deposition techniques were studied to deposit the spacer, the key component that can control the electrode gap. Plasma spray deposition, electron beam deposition and dry oxidation method were employed to obtain minimum film thickness around 32 {mu}m. For plasma spray method, sand blasting process is required in order to produce rough surface for strong bonding of the deposited film onto the surface. Film thickness, typically about 39 {mu}m can be obtained. For the electron beam deposition and dry oxidation, the film thickness is in the range of nanometers and thus unsuitable to produce the spacer. The deposited multilayer film consisting of copper, alumina and ferum on which CNTs array will be grown was found to be removed during the etching process. This is attributed to the high etching rate on the thin film which can be prevented by reducing the rate and having a thicker conductive copper film.« less

  17. Can the Lyman Continuum Leaked Out of H II Regions Explain Diffuse Ionized Gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2009-09-01

    We present an attempt to explain the diffuse Hα emission of a face-on galaxy M 51 with the "standard" photoionization model, in which the Lyman continuum (Lyc) escaping from H II regions propagates large distances into the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). The diffuse Hα emission of M 51 is analyzed using thin slab models and exponential disk models in the context of the "on-the-spot" approximation. The scale height of the ionized gas needed to explain the diffuse Hα emission with the scenario is found to be of the order of ~1-2 kpc, consistent with those of our Galaxy and edge-on galaxies. The model also provides a vertical profile, when the galaxy is viewed edge-on, consisting of two-exponential components. However, it is found that an incredibly low absorption coefficient of κ0 ≈ 0.4-0.8 kpc-1 at the galactic plane, or, equivalently, an effective cross section as low as σeff ~ 10-5 of the photoionization cross section at 912 Å is required to allow the stellar Lyc photons to travel through the H I disk. Such a low absorption coefficient is out of accord with the properties of the ISM. Furthermore, we found that even the model that has the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) phase only and no H I gas phase shows highly concentrated Hα emissions around H II regions, and can account for only lsim26% of the Hα luminosity of the DIG. This result places a strong constraint on the ionizing source of the DIG. We also report that the Hα intensity distribution functions not only of the DIG, but also of H II regions in M 51, appear to be lognormal.

  18. Discovery of a Vast Ionized Gas Cloud in the M51 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Aaron E.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Bershady, Matthew; Harding, Paul

    2018-05-01

    We present the discovery of a vast cloud of ionized gas (hereafter, the Cloud) 13‧ (32 kpc) north of the interacting system M51. We detected this cloud via deep narrowband imaging with the Burrell Schmidt Telescope, where it appears as an extended, diffuse Hα-emitting feature with no embedded compact regions. The Cloud spans ∼10‧ × 3‧ (25 × 7.5 kpc) in size and has no stellar counterpart; comparisons with our previous deep broadband imaging show no detected continuum light to a limit of μ lim,B ∼ 30 mag arcsec‑2. WIYN SparsePak observations confirm the Cloud’s kinematic association with M51, and the high [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [O I]/Hα line ratios that we measure imply a hard ionization source such as active galactic nuclei (AGN) photoionization or shock heating rather than photoionization due to young stars. Given the strong [N II] emission, we infer roughly solar metallicity for the Cloud, ruling out an origin due to infall of primordial gas. Instead, we favor models where the gas has been expelled from the inner regions of the M51 system due to tidal stripping or starburst/AGN winds and has been subsequently ionized either by shocks or a fading AGN. This latter scenario raises the intriguing possibility that M51 may be the nearest example of an AGN fossil nebula or light echo, akin to the famous “Hanny’s Voorwerp” in the IC 2497 system.

  19. Ionized Gas Outflows in Infrared-bright Dust-obscured Galaxies Selected with WISE and SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Yoshiki; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Nagao, Tohru; Woo, Jong-Hak; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Sun, Ai-Lei; Chang, Yu-Yen

    2017-12-01

    We present the ionized gas properties of infrared (IR)-bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) that show an extreme optical/IR color, {(i-[22])}{AB}> 7.0, selected with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). For 36 IR-bright DOGs that show [O III]λ5007 emission in the SDSS spectra, we performed a detailed spectral analysis to investigate their ionized gas properties. In particular, we measured the velocity offset (the velocity with respect to the systemic velocity measured from the stellar absorption lines) and the velocity dispersion of the [O III] line. We found that the derived velocity offset and dispersion of most IR-bright DOGs are larger than those of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s) at z< 0.3, meaning that the IR-bright DOGs show relatively strong outflows compared to Sy2s. This can be explained by the difference in IR luminosity contributed from active galactic nuclei, {L}{IR} (AGN), because we found that (i) {L}{IR} (AGN) correlates with the velocity offset and dispersion of [O III] and (ii) our IR-bright DOG sample has larger {L}{IR} (AGN) than Sy2s. Nevertheless, the fact that about 75% IR-bright DOGs have a large (>300 km s-1) velocity dispersion, which is a larger fraction compared to other AGN populations, suggests that IR-bright DOGs are good laboratories to investigate AGN feedback. The velocity offset and dispersion of [O III] and [Ne III]λ3869 are larger than those of [O II]λ3727, which indicates that the highly ionized gas tends to show stronger outflows.

  20. Warm and Diffuse Gas and High Ionization Rate Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Morong, C. P.; Geballe, T. R.; Indriolo, N.; McCall, B. J.; Goto, M.; Usuda, T.

    2011-06-01

    Using 12 newly found bright dust-embedded stars distributed from 140 pc West to 120 pc East of Sgr A*, we have observed spectra of H_3^+ and CO in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic center. Sightlines toward the 12 stars have been observed at the Gemini South Observatory on Cerro Pachon, Chile, and those for 2 of the stars at the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea Hawaii. This has extended our previous longitudinal coverage by a factor of 7. Although complete coverage of various transitions have yet to be made for some stars, almost all sightlines showed high total column densities of H_3^+ and highly populated (J, K) = (3, 3) metastable level, demonstrating the prevalence of the warm and diffuse gas previously observed from the center to 30 pc East and high ionization rate in the environment. A few sightlines did not show strong H_3^+ absorptions. It remains to be seen whether this is due to the radial and transverse location of the stars or lack of H_3^+. While the velocity profiles of H_3^+ toward stars from the center to 30 pc East are similar apart from subtle variations, the velocity profiles of the wider regions vary greatly ^a. A remarkable similarity has been noted between the velocity profile of H_3^+ toward a star nicknamed Iota and those of H_2O^+ and 13CH^+ observed toward Sgr B2 by the HIFI instrument of the Herschel Space Observatory. Although all these ions exist in diffuse environment, this is surprising since H_3^+ favors environments with high H_2 fraction f(H_2) while H_2O^+ and CH^+ favors low f(H_2). Also the peak of Sgr B2 and Iota are separated by 17 pc. Possible interpretations of this will be discussed. T. R. Geballe and T. Oka, ApJ, 709, L70 (2010). M. Goto, T. Usuda, T. R. Geballe, N. Indriolo, B. J. McCall, Th. Henning, and T. Oka, PASJ (2011) in press. P. Schilke, et al., A&A, 521, L11 (2010). E. Falgarone, private communication

  1. Molecular Gas in Obscured and Extremely Red Quasars at z ˜ 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Zakamska, Nadia; Hamann, Fred; Greene, Jenny; Rahman, Mubdi

    2018-01-01

    Quasar feedback is a key element of modern galaxy evolution theory. During powerful episodes of feedback, quasar-driven winds are suspected of removing large amounts of molecular gas from the host galaxy, thus limiting supplies for star formation and ultimately curtailing the maximum mass of galaxies. Here we present Karl A. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the CO(1-0) transition in 11 powerful obscured and extremely red quasars (ERQs) at z~2.5. Previous observations have shown that several of these targets display signatures of powerful quasar-driven winds in their ionized gas. Molecular emission is not detected in a single object, whether kinematically disturbed due to a quasar wind or in equilibrium with the host galaxy and neither is molecular gas detected in a combined stack of all objects (equivalent to an exposure time of over 10 hours with the VLA). This observation is in contrast with the previous suggestions that such objects should occupy gas-rich, extremely star-forming galaxies. Possible explanations include a paucity of molecular gas or an excess of high- excitation molecular gas, both of which could be the results of quasar feedback. In the radio continuum, we detect an average point-like (< 5 kpc) emission with luminosity νLν[33 GHz]=2.2 x 1042 erg s-1, consistent with optically-thin (α ≈ -1.0) synchrotron with some possible contribution from thermal free-free emission. The continuum radio emission of these radio-intermediate objects may be a bi-product of radiatively driven winds or may be due to weak jets confined to the host galaxy.

  2. NEBULAR: Spectrum synthesis for mixed hydrogen-helium gas in ionization equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, Mischa

    2016-08-01

    NEBULAR synthesizes the spectrum of a mixed hydrogen helium gas in collisional ionization equilibrium. It is not a spectral fitting code, but it can be used to resample a model spectrum onto the wavelength grid of a real observation. It supports a wide range of temperatures and densities. NEBULAR includes free-free, free-bound, two-photon and line emission from HI, HeI and HeII. The code will either return the composite model spectrum, or, if desired, the unrescaled atomic emission coefficients. It is written in C++ and depends on the GNU Scientific Library (GSL).

  3. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, EXPLOSIVES DETECTION TECHNOLOGY, SRI INSTRUMENTS, MODEL 8610C, GAS CHROMATOGRAPH/THERMIONIC IONIZATION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SRI Model 86 1 OC gas chromatograph (GC) is a transportable instrument that can provide on-site analysis of soils for explosives. Coupling this transportable gas chromatograph with a thermionic ionization detector (TID) allows for the determination of explosives in soil matri...

  5. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry: In Situ Molecular Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a relatively new imaging modality that allows mapping of a wide range of biomolecules within a thin tissue section. The technology uses a laser beam to directly desorb and ionize molecules from discrete locations on the tissue that are subsequently recorded in a mass spectrometer. IMS is distinguished by the ability to directly measure molecules in situ ranging from small metabolites to proteins, reporting hundreds to thousands of expression patterns from a single imaging experiment. This article reviews recent advances in IMS technology, applications, and experimental strategies that allow it to significantly aid in the discovery and understanding of molecular processes in biological and clinical samples. PMID:23259809

  6. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  7. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. Three electronic levels are accounted for in the microscopic model of the atom. Nonequilibrium processes with respect to population of levels and species plus temperature are considered. By using an asymptotic technique the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. The asymptotic procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer in which the gas reaches local equilibrium. A family of numerical examples is displayed for different flow regimes. Argon and helium models are used in these examples.

  8. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm 3 and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGES

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; ...

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m -1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  10. Numerical models for the diffuse ionized gas in galaxies. I. Synthetic spectra of thermally excited gas with turbulent magnetic reconnection as energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lieb, S.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Lesch, H.; Hultzsch, P. J. N.; Birk, G. T.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to verify whether turbulent magnetic reconnection can provide the additional energy input required to explain the up to now only poorly understood ionization mechanism of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in galaxies and its observed emission line spectra. Methods: We use a detailed non-LTE radiative transfer code that does not make use of the usual restrictive gaseous nebula approximations to compute synthetic spectra for gas at low densities. Excitation of the gas is via an additional heating term in the energy balance as well as by photoionization. Numerical values for this heating term are derived from three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic two-fluid plasma-neutral-gas simulations to compute energy dissipation rates for the DIG under typical conditions. Results: Our simulations show that magnetic reconnection can liberate enough energy to by itself fully or partially ionize the gas. However, synthetic spectra from purely thermally excited gas are incompatible with the observed spectra; a photoionization source must additionally be present to establish the correct (observed) ionization balance in the gas.

  11. Rapid comprehensive characterization of crude oils by thermogravimetry coupled to fast modulated gas chromatography-single photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, S; Fischer, M; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Matuschek, G; Streibel, T; Post, E; Denner, T; Zimmermann, R

    2013-09-01

    Comprehensive multi-dimensional hyphenation of a thermogravimetry device (i.e. a thermobalance) to gas chromatography and single photon ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TG-GC×SPI-MS) has been used to investigate two crude oil samples of different geographical origin. The source of the applied vacuum ultraviolet radiation is an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL). The soft photoionization favors the formation of molecular ions. Introduction of a fast, rapidly modulated gas chromatographic separation step in comparison with solely TG-SPI-MS enables strongly enhanced detection especially with such highly complex organic matrices as crude oil. In contrast with former TG-SPI-MS measurements, separation and identification of overlying substances is possible because of different GC retention times. The specific contribution of isobaric compounds to one mass signal is determined for alkanes, naphthalenes, alkylated benzenes, and other compounds.

  12. Early stages of styrene-isoprene copolymerization in gas phase clusters probed by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Hatem; Germanenko, Igor N; El-Shall, M Samy

    2006-04-06

    We present direct evidence for the formation of the covalent bonded styrene (isoprene)(2) oligomer and the isoprene dimer ions following resonance ionization of the gas phase styrene-isoprene binary clusters. The application of resonance ionization to study polymerization reactions in clusters provides new information on the structure and mechanism of formation of the early stages of polymerization and holds considerable promise for the discovery of new initiation mechanisms and for the development of novel materials with unique properties.

  13. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  14. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagatingmore » the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.« less

  15. Angle-resolved high-order above-threshold ionization of a molecule: sensitive tool for molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Busuladzić, M; Gazibegović-Busuladzić, A; Milosević, D B; Becker, W

    2008-05-23

    The strong-field approximation for ionization of diatomic molecules by an intense laser field is generalized to include rescattering of the ionized electron off the various centers of its molecular parent ion. The resulting spectrum and its interference structure strongly depend on the symmetry of the ground state molecular orbital. For N2, if the laser polarization is perpendicular to the molecular axis, we observe a distinct minimum in the emission spectrum, which survives focal averaging and allows determination of, e.g., the internuclear separation. In contrast, for O2, rescattering is absent in the same situation.

  16. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, Colleen E.; Leenheer, Jerry A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra.

  18. Gas chromatography with simultaneous detection: Ultraviolet spectroscopy, flame ionization, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gras, Ronda; Luong, Jim; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A

    2018-05-08

    An effective analytical strategy was developed and implemented to exploit the synergy derived from three different detector classes for gas chromatography, namely ultraviolet spectroscopy, flame ionization, and mass spectrometry for volatile compound analysis. This strategy was achieved by successfully hyphenating a user-selectable multi-wavelength diode array detector featuring a positive temperature coefficient thermistor as an isothermal heater to a gas chromatograph. By exploiting the non-destructive nature of the diode array detector, the effluent from the detector was split to two parallel detectors; namely a quadrupole mass spectrometer and a flame ionization detector. This multi-hyphenated configuration with the use of three detectors is a powerful approach not only for selective detection enhancement but also for improvement in structural elucidation of volatile compounds where fewer fragments can be obtained or for isomeric compound analysis. With the diode array detector capable of generating high resolution gas phase spectra, the information collected provides useful confirmatory information without a total dependence on the chromatographic separation process which is based on retention time. This information-rich approach to chromatography is achieved without incurring extra analytical time, resulting in improvements in compound identification accuracy, analytical productivity, and cost. Chromatographic performance obtained from model compounds was found to be acceptable with a relative standard deviation of the retention times of less than 0.01% RSD, and a repeatability at two levels of concentration of 100 and 1000 ppm (v/v) of less than 5% (n = 10). With this configuration, correlation of data between the three detectors was simplified by having near identical retention times for the analytes studied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preliminary study of silica aerogel as a gas-equivalent material in ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Zorloni, G.

    2017-12-01

    Since about two decades, a renewed interest on aerogels has risen. These peculiar materials show fairly unique properties. Thus, they are under investigation for both scientific and commercial purposes and new optimized production processes are studied. In this work, the possibility of using aerogel in the field of radiation detection is explored. The idea is to substitute the gas filling in a ionization chamber with the aerogel. The material possesses a density about 100 times greater than ambient pressure air. Where as the open-pore structure should allow the charge carriers to move freely. Small hydrophobic silica aerogel samples were studied. A custom ionization chamber, capable of working both with aerogel or in the classic gas set up, was built. The response of the chamber in current mode was investigated using an X-ray tube. The results obtained showed, under proper conditions, an enhancement of about 60 times of the current signal in the aerogel configuration with respect to the classic gas one. Moreover, some unusual behaviours were observed, i.e. time inertia of the signal and super-/sub-linear current response with respect to the dose rate. While testing high electric fields, aerogel configuration seemed to enhance the Townsend's effects. In order to represent the observed trends, a trapping-detrapping model is proposed, which is capable to predict semi-empirically the steady state currents measured. The time evolution of the signal is semi-quantitatively represented by the same model. The coefficients estimated by the fits are in agreement with similar trapping problems in the literature. In particular, a direct comparison between the benchmark of the FET silica gates and aerogel case endorses the idea that the same type of phenomenon occurs in the studied case.

  20. Invasion of gas into mica nanopores: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chao; Zhang, Fei; Qiao, Rui

    2018-06-01

    The invasion of gas into liquid-filled nanopores is encountered in many engineering problems but is not yet well understood. We report molecular dynamics simulations of the invasion of methane gas into water-filled mica pores with widths of 2–6 nm. Gas invades into a pore only when the pressure exceeds a breakthrough pressure and a thin residual water film is left on the mica wall as the gas phase moves deeper into the pore. The gas breakthrough pressure of pores as narrow as 2 nm can be modeled reasonably well by the capillary pressure if the finite thickness of residual liquid water film and the liquid–gas interface are taken into account. The movement of the front of the liquid meniscus during gas invasion can be quantitatively described using the classical hydrodynamics when the negative slip length on the strongly hydrophilic mica walls is taken into account. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the gas invasion in the system studied here will form the foundation for quantitative prediction of gas invasion in practical porous media.

  1. Polymeric molecular sieve membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Qiao, Zhenan; Chai, Songhai

    2017-08-15

    A porous polymer membrane useful in gas separation, the porous polymer membrane comprising a polymeric structure having crosslinked aromatic groups and a hierarchical porosity in which micropores having a pore size less than 2 nm are present at least in an outer layer of the porous polymer membrane, and macropores having a pore size of over 50 nm are present at least in an inner layer of the porous polymer membrane. Also described are methods for producing the porous polymer membrane in which a non-porous polymer membrane containing aromatic rings is subjected to a Friedel-Crafts crosslinking reaction in which a crosslinking molecule crosslinks the aromatic rings in the presence of a Friedel-Crafts catalyst and organic solvent under sufficiently elevated temperature, as well as methods for using the porous polymer membranes for gas or liquid separation, filtration, or purification.

  2. Ionization and dissociation of molecular ion beams by intense ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik

    2007-06-01

    Laser-induced dissociation and ionization of a diatomic molecular-ion beam were simultaneously measured using coincidence 3D momentum imaging, with direct separation of the two processes even where the fragment kinetic energy is the same for both processes. We mainly focus on the fundamental H2^+ molecule in 7-135 fs laser pulses having 10^13-10^15 W/cm^2 peak intensity. At high intensities the kinetic energy release (KER) distribution following ionization of H2^+ was measured to be broad and structureless. Its centroid shifts toward higher energies as the laser intensity is increased indicating that ionization shifts to smaller internuclear distances. In contrast, a surprising structure is observed near the ionization threshold, which we call above threshold Coulomb explosion (ATCE) [1]. The angular distributions of the two H^+ fragments are strongly peaked along the laser polarization, and the angular distribution is described well by [cos^2θ]^n, where n is the number of photons predicted by our ATCE model [1]. Our data indicates that n varies with the laser wavelength as predicted by the model. The KER and angular distributions of H2^+ dissociation change dramatically with decreasing pulse width over the 7-135 fs range in contrast to the reported trend for longer pulses. Others contributing to this work: A.M. Sayler, P.Q. Wang, J. McKenna, B. Gaire, Nora G. Johnson, E. Parke, K.D. Carnes, and B.D. Esry. Thank are due to Professor Zenghu Chang for providing the intense laser beams and Dr. Charles Fehrenbach for his help with the ion beams. [1] B.D. Esry, A.M. Sayler, P.Q. Wang, K.D. Carnes, and I. Ben-Itzhak, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 013003 (2006).

  3. Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) membrane assisted direct spray ionization mass spectrometry for agrochemicals screening in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Igor; Rodrigues, Marcella Ferreira; Chaves, Andréa Rodrigues; Vaz, Boniek Gontijo

    2018-02-01

    Paper spray ionization (PSI) has some limitations such as low sensitivity and ionization suppression when complex samples are analyzed. The use of sample preparation devices directly coupled to MS can avoid these restrictions. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are materials widely used as adsorbent in sample preparation methods such as solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction, and they can provide specifics cavities with affinity to a target molecule. Here, we introduce a new MIP membrane spray ionization method combining MIP and PSI. MIP was synthesized directly on a cellulose membrane. Monuron and 2,4,5-T (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid) were used as template molecules in MIP synthesis for diuron and 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) analyte sequesters, respectively. Apple, banana and grape methanolic extracts were used as matrices. The MIP membrane spray showed signal intensities of diuron and 2,4-D that were much higher compared to those obtained by non-imprinted polymers(NIP). Calibration curves exhibited R 2 > 0.99 for diuron and 2,4-D in all fruit extracts analyzed. LODs were found less than 0.60µgL -1 and LLOQs were found less than 2.00µgL -1 . The coefficients of variation and relative errors were less than 15% for almost all analyses. The apparent recovery test results ranged between 92,5% and 116.9%. Finally, the MIP membrane spray method was employed for the quantification of diuron and 2,4-D in real samples. Diuron contents were only found in three bananas (4.0, 6.5, and 9.9µgL -1 ). The proposed MIP membrane spray ionization method was straightforward, fast to carry out and provided satisfactory results for analyses of diuron and 2,4-D in apple, banana and grape samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular three-body Brauner-Briggs-Klar theory for ion-impact ionization of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, E.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular three-body Brauner-Briggs-Klar (M3BBK) theory is developed to study the single ionization of diatomic molecules by ion impact. The orientation-averaged molecular orbital (OAMO) approximation is used to reduce the required computer time without sacrificing the performance of the method. The post-collision interaction (PCI) between the scattered projectile and the ejected electron is included. The theory is applied to collision of protons with hydrogen molecules. Results are obtained for two different kinematical regimes: i) fast collisions and low emission energies, and ii) not so fast collisions and higher emission energies. For both considered regimes, experimental fully differential cross-sections as well as different theoretical calculations are available for comparison. These comparisons are carried out and discussed.

  5. Molecular-beam gas-sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. S.; Knuth, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system for rocket motor combustion chamber sampling is described. The history of the sampling system is reviewed. The problems associated with rocket motor combustion chamber sampling are reported. Several design equations are presented. The results of the experiments include the effects of cooling water flow rates, the optimum separation gap between the end plate and sampling nozzle, and preliminary data on compositions in a rocket motor combustion chamber.

  6. Nanostructured solid substrates for efficient laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) of low molecular weight compounds.

    PubMed

    Silina, Yuliya E; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-12-07

    Analytical applications often require rapid measurement of compounds from complex sample mixtures. High-speed mass spectrometry approaches frequently utilize techniques based on direct ionization of the sample by laser irradiation, mostly by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Compounds of low molecular weight are difficult to analyze by MALDI, however, because of severe interferences in the low m/z range from the organic matrix used for desorption/ionization. In recent years, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) techniques have shown promise for small molecule analysis, due to the unique properties of nanostructured surfaces, in particular, the lack of a chemical background in the low m/z range and enhanced production of analyte ions by SALDI. This short review article presents a summary of the most promising recent developments in SALDI materials for MS analysis of low molecular weight analytes, with emphasis on nanostructured materials based on metals and semiconductors.

  7. Dense Molecular Gas Tracers in the Outflow of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Fabian; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Warren, Steven R.; Hodge, Jacqueline; Levy, Rebecca C.; Meier, David S.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Ott, Jürgen; Rosolowsky, Erik; Scoville, Nick; Weiss, Axel; Zschaechner, Laura; Zwaan, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed study of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 using ALMA. We find that this feature is clearly associated with the edge of NGC 253's prominent ionized outflow, has a projected length of ˜300 pc, with a width of ˜50 pc, and a velocity dispersion of ˜40 km s-1, which is consistent with an ejection from the disk about 1 Myr ago. The kinematics of the molecular gas in this feature can be interpreted (albeit not uniquely) as accelerating at a rate of 1 km s-1 pc-1. In this scenario, the gas is approaching an escape velocity at the last measured point. Strikingly, bright tracers of dense molecular gas (HCN, CN, HCO+, CS) are also detected in the molecular outflow: we measure an HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) line ratio of ˜ 1/10 in the outflow, similar to that in the central starburst region of NGC 253 and other starburst galaxies. By contrast, the HCN/CO line ratio in the NGC 253 disk is significantly lower (˜ 1/30), similar to other nearby galaxy disks. This strongly suggests that the streamer gas originates from the starburst, and that its physical state does not change significantly over timescales of ˜1 Myr during its entrainment in the outflow. Simple calculations indicate that radiation pressure is not the main mechanism for driving the outflow. The presence of such dense material in molecular outflows needs to be accounted for in simulations of galactic outflows.

  8. Herschel Survey of Galactic OH+, H2O+, and H3O+: Probing the Molecular Hydrogen Fraction and Cosmic-Ray Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A.; Gerin, M.; Schilke, P.; Benz, A. O.; Winkel, B.; Menten, K. M.; Chambers, E. T.; Black, John H.; Bruderer, S.; Falgarone, E.; Godard, B.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gupta, H.; Lis, D. C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Persson, C. M.; Sonnentrucker, P.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wolfire, Mark G.; Wyrowski, F.

    2015-02-01

    In diffuse interstellar clouds the chemistry that leads to the formation of the oxygen-bearing ions OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ begins with the ionization of atomic hydrogen by cosmic rays, and continues through subsequent hydrogen abstraction reactions involving H2. Given these reaction pathways, the observed abundances of these molecules are useful in constraining both the total cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen (ζH) and molecular hydrogen fraction (f_H_2). We present observations targeting transitions of OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ made with the Herschel Space Observatory along 20 Galactic sight lines toward bright submillimeter continuum sources. Both OH+ and H2O+ are detected in absorption in multiple velocity components along every sight line, but H3O+ is only detected along 7 sight lines. From the molecular abundances we compute f_H_2 in multiple distinct components along each line of sight, and find a Gaussian distribution with mean and standard deviation 0.042 ± 0.018. This confirms previous findings that OH+ and H2O+ primarily reside in gas with low H2 fractions. We also infer ζH throughout our sample, and find a lognormal distribution with mean log (ζH) = -15.75 (ζH = 1.78 × 10-16 s-1) and standard deviation 0.29 for gas within the Galactic disk, but outside of the Galactic center. This is in good agreement with the mean and distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates previously inferred from H_3^+ observations. Ionization rates in the Galactic center tend to be 10-100 times larger than found in the Galactic disk, also in accord with prior studies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. Identifying Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in a Sample of MaNGA Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Ryan J.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency with which galaxies convert gas into stars is driven by the continuous cycle of accretion and feedback processes within the circumgalactic medium. Extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) can provide insights into the tumultuous processes that govern the evolution of galactic disks because eDIG emission traces both inflowing and outflowing gas. With the help of state-of-the-art, spatially-resolved spectroscopy from MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), we developed a computational method to identify eDIG based on the strength of and spatial extent of optical emission lines for a diverse sample of 550 nearby galaxies. This sample includes roughly half of the MaNGA galaxies that will become publicly available in summer 2016 as part of the Thirteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We identified signatures of eDIG in 8% of the galaxies in this sample, and we found that these signatures are particularly common among galaxies with active star formation and inclination angles >45 degrees. Our analysis of the morphology, incidence, and kinematics of eDIG has important implications for current models of accretion and feedback processes that regulate star formation in galaxies. We acknowledge support from the Astrophysics REU program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the National Astronomy Consortium, and The Grainger Foundation.

  10. The CO Transition from Diffuse Molecular Gas to Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Johnathan S.; Federman, Steven

    2017-06-01

    The atomic to molecular transitions occurring in diffuse interstellar gas surrounding molecular clouds are affected by the local physical conditions (density and temperature) and the radiation field penetrating the material. Our optical observations of CH, CH^{+}, and CN absorption from McDonald Observatory and the European Southern Observatory are useful tracers of this gas and provide the velocity structure needed for analyzing lower resolution ultraviolet observations of CO and H_{2} absorption from Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We explore the changing environment between diffuse and dense gas by using the column densities and excitation temperatures from CO and H_{2} to determine the gas density. The resulting gas densities from this method are compared to densities inferred from other methods such as C_{2} and CN chemistry. The densities allow us to interpret the trends from the combined set of tracers. Groupings of sight lines, such as those toward h and χ Persei or Chameleon provide a chance for further characterization of the environment. The Chameleon region in particular helps illuminate CO-dark gas, which is not associated with emission from H I at 21 cm or from CO at 2.6 mm. Expanding this analysis to include emission data from the GOT C+ survey allows the further characterization of neutral diffuse gas, including CO-dark gas.

  11. A high-dispersion molecular gas component in nearby galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the velocity dispersion of the atomic (H I) and molecular (H{sub 2}) gas components in the disks (R ≲ R {sub 25}) of a sample of 12 nearby spiral galaxies with moderate inclinations. Our analysis is based on sensitive high-resolution data from the THINGS (atomic gas) and HERACLES (molecular gas) surveys. To obtain reliable measurements of the velocity dispersion, we stack regions several kiloparsecs in size, after accounting for intrinsic velocity shifts due to galactic rotation and large-scale motions. We stack using various parameters: the galactocentric distance, star formation rate surface density, H Imore » surface density, H{sub 2} surface density, and total gas surface density. We fit single Gaussian components to the stacked spectra and measure median velocity dispersions for H I of 11.9 ± 3.1 km s{sup –1} and for CO of 12.0 ± 3.9 km s{sup –1}. The CO velocity dispersions are thus, surprisingly, very similar to the corresponding ones of H I, with an average ratio of σ{sub HI}/σ{sub CO}= 1.0 ± 0.2 irrespective of the stacking parameter. The measured CO velocity dispersions are significantly higher (factor of ∼2) than the traditional picture of a cold molecular gas disk associated with star formation. The high dispersion implies an additional thick molecular gas disk (possibly as thick as the H I disk). Our finding is in agreement with recent sensitive measurements in individual edge-on and face-on galaxies and points toward the general existence of a thick disk of molecular gas, in addition to the well-known thin disk in nearby spiral galaxies.« less

  12. A black-hole mass measurement from molecular gas kinematics in NGC4526.

    PubMed

    Davis, Timothy A; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Sarzi, Marc; Blitz, Leo

    2013-02-21

    The masses of the supermassive black holes found in galaxy bulges are correlated with a multitude of galaxy properties, leading to suggestions that galaxies and black holes may evolve together. The number of reliably measured black-hole masses is small, and the number of methods for measuring them is limited, holding back attempts to understand this co-evolution. Directly measuring black-hole masses is currently possible with stellar kinematics (in early-type galaxies), ionized-gas kinematics (in some spiral and early-type galaxies) and in rare objects that have central maser emission. Here we report that by modelling the effect of a black hole on the kinematics of molecular gas it is possible to fit interferometric observations of CO emission and thereby accurately estimate black-hole masses. We study the dynamics of the gas in the early-type galaxy NGC 4526, and obtain a best fit that requires the presence of a central dark object of 4.5(+4.2)(-3.1) × 10(8) solar masses (3σ confidence limit). With the next-generation millimetre-wavelength interferometers these observations could be reproduced in galaxies out to 75 megaparsecs in less than 5 hours of observing time. The use of molecular gas as a kinematic tracer should thus allow one to estimate black-hole masses in hundreds of galaxies in the local Universe, many more than are accessible with current techniques.

  13. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  14. Fabrication of gas sensor based on field ionization from SWCNTs with tripolar microelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shengbing; Zhang, Yong; Duan, Zhemin

    2012-12-01

    We report the nanofabrication of a sulfur dioxide (SO2) sensor with a tripolar on-chip microelectrode utilizing a film of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the field ionization cathode, where the ion flow current and the partial discharge current generated by the field ionization process of gaseous molecules can be gauged to gas species and concentration. The variation of the sensitivity is less than 4% for all of the tested devices, and the sensor has selectivity against gases such as He, NO2, CO, H2, SO2 and O2. Further, the sensor response presents well-defined and reproducible linear behavior with regard to concentration in the range investigated and a detection limitation of <˜0.5 ppm for SO2. More importantly, a tripolar on-chip microelectrode with SWCNTs as a cathode exhibits an impressive performance with respect to stability and anti-oxidation behavior, which are significantly better than had been possible before in the traditional bipolar sensor under explicit circumstances at room temperature.

  15. The ionized gas in the CALIFA early-type galaxies. I. Mapping two representative cases: NGC 6762 and NGC 5966

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.; Gomes, J. M.; Masegosa, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Lehnert, M. D.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Marquez, I.; Mast, D.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Marino, R. A.; Pasquali, A.; Perez, I.; Roth, M. M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Ziegler, B.

    2012-04-01

    As part of the ongoing CALIFA survey, we have conducted a thorough bidimensional analysis of the ionized gas in two E/S0 galaxies, NGC 6762 and NGC 5966, aiming to shed light on the nature of their warm ionized ISM. Specifically, we present optical (3745-7300 Å) integral field spectroscopy obtained with the PMAS/PPAK integral field spectrophotometer. Its wide field-of-view (1' × 1') covers the entire optical extent of each galaxy down to faint continuum surface brightnesses. To recover the nebular lines, we modeled and subtracted the underlying stellar continuum from the observed spectra using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. The pure emission-line spectra were used to investigate the gas properties and determine the possible sources of ionization. We show the advantages of IFU data in interpreting the complex nature of the ionized gas in NGC 6762 and NGC 5966. In NGC 6762, the ionized gas and stellar emission display similar morphologies, while the emission line morphology is elongated in NGC 5966, spanning ~6 kpc, and is oriented roughly orthogonal to the major axis of the stellar continuum ellipsoid. Whereas gas and stars are kinematically aligned in NGC 6762, the gas is kinematically decoupled from the stars in NGC 5966. A decoupled rotating disk or an "ionization cone" are two possible interpretations of the elongated ionized gas structure in NGC 5966. The latter would be the first "ionization cone" of such a dimension detected within a weak emission-line galaxy. Both galaxies have weak emission-lines relative to the continuum[EW(Hα) ≲ 3 Å] and have very low excitation, log([Oiii]λ5007/Hβ) ≲ 0.5. Based on optical diagnostic ratios ([Oiii]λ5007/Hβ, [Nii]λ6584/Hα, [Sii]λ6717, 6731/Hα, [Oi]λ6300/Hα), both objects contain a LINER nucleus and an extended LINER-like gas emission. The emission line ratios do not vary significantly with radius or aperture, which indicates that the nebular properties are spatially homogeneous. The gas emission

  16. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness.

  17. Determination of selected fatty acids in dried sweat spot using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Kanďár, Roman; Drábková, Petra; Andrlová, Lenka; Kostelník, Adam; Čegan, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for the determination of fatty acids in dried sweat spot and plasma samples using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Plasma and dried sweat spot samples were obtained from a group of blood donors. The sweat was collected from each volunteer during exercise. Sweat was spotted onto collection paper containing butylated hydroxytoluene. Fatty acids were derivatized with acetyl chloride in methanol to form methyl esters of fatty acids. The fatty acids in dried sweat spot samples treated with butylated hydroxytoluene and stored at -20°C were stable for 3 months. Our results indicate that sweat contains, among fatty acids with short chain, also fatty acids with long chain and unsaturated fatty acids. Linear relationships between percentage content of selected fatty acids in dried sweat spot and plasma were observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The detection of dissolved gases in transformer oil by gas chromatography with helium ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xian-qin; Fang, Hua; Li, Min-xian

    2017-07-01

    The GC-PDD with the technology of valve cutting and helium ionization detector was used to analyze the dissolved gases in ultra-high voltage(UHV) and extra-high voltage(EHV) transformer oil. The detection limit(DL) reached ppb grade, especially for the featuring gas—C2H2 and H2, whose DL could reach 5ppb and 11ppb respectively. The test reproducibility of the instrument was about 1% and the correlation coefficient of standard curve-r is greater or equal to 0.99, which showed obvious advantage compared with normal GC. In addition, the auxiliary gas of H2 was not used in this instrument, which completely improved the safety performance. Thus, the application of GC-PDD has significant meaning in warning potential malfunction inside the ultra-high voltage transformer in advance.

  19. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  20. Detection of ionized gas molecules in air by graphene and carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ji; Li, Bo; Yung, Hyun Young; Liu, Fangze; Hong, Sanghyung; Jung, Yung Joon; Kar, Swastik

    The liquid phase ions sensing by graphene and carbon nanotube has been demonstrated in many publications due to the minimum gate voltage easily shift induced by ionic gating effect, but it is still unclear for vapor phase ions sensing. Here we want to report that the ionized gas molecules in air can be also very sensitively detected by graphene and carbon nanotube networks under very low applied voltage, which shows the very high charge to current amplification factor, the value can be up to 108 A/C, and the direction of current-change can be used to differentiate the positive and negative ions. In further, the field effect of graphene device induced by vapor phase ions was discussed. NSF ECCS 1202376, NSF ECCS CAREER 1351424 and NSF DMREF 1434824, a Northeastern University Provost's Tier-1 seed Grant for interdisciplinary research, Technology Innovation Program (10050481) from Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy of Republic of Korea.

  1. Determination of clebopride in plasma by capillary gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P R; Jones, M D; Maddock, J

    1988-11-18

    A procedure for the analysis of clebopride in plasma using capillary gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed. Employing an ethoxy analogue as internal standard, the two compounds were extracted from basified plasma using dichloromethane. Subsequent reaction with heptafluorobutyryl imidazole produced volatile monoheptafluorobutyryl derivatives whose ammonia negative-ion mass spectra proved ideal for selected-ion monitoring. The recovery of clebopride from plasma at 0.536 nmol/l was found to be 85.5 +/- 0.9% (n = 3) whilst measurement down to 0.268 nmol/l was possible with a coefficient of variation of 7.9%. Plasma levels of the compound are reported in two volunteers following ingestion of 1 mg of clebopride as the malate salt.

  2. Can Sgr A* flares reveal the molecular gas density PDF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churazov, E.; Khabibullin, I.; Sunyaev, R.; Ponti, G.

    2017-11-01

    Illumination of dense gas in the Central Molecular Zone by powerful X-ray flares from Sgr A* leads to prominent structures in the reflected emission that can be observed long after the end of the flare. By studying this emission, we learn about past activity of the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center and, at the same time, we obtain unique information on the structure of molecular clouds that is essentially impossible to get by other means. Here we discuss how X-ray data can improve our knowledge of both sides of the problem. Existing data already provide (I) an estimate of the flare age, (II) a model-independent lower limit on the luminosity of Sgr A* during the flare and (III) an estimate of the total emitted energy during Sgr A* flare. On the molecular clouds side, the data clearly show a voids-and-walls structure of the clouds and can provide an almost unbiased probe of the mass/density distribution of the molecular gas with the hydrogen column densities lower than few 1023 cm-2. For instance, the probability distribution function of the gas density PDF(ρ) can be measured this way. Future high energy resolution X-ray missions will provide the information on the gas velocities, allowing, for example, a reconstruction of the velocity field structure functions and cross-matching the X-ray and molecular data based on positions and velocities.

  3. Cluster model studies of anion and molecular specificities via electrospray ionization photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xue -Bin

    2017-01-06

    Ion specificity, a widely observed macroscopic phenomenon in condensed phases and at interfaces, is essentially a fundamental chemical physical issue. We have been investigating such effects using cluster models in an “atom-by-atom” and “molecule-by-molecule” fashion not possible with condensed-phase methods. We use electrospray ionization (ESI) to generate molecular and ionic clusters to simulate key molecular entities involved in local binding regions, and characterize them employing negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy (NIPES). Inter- and intramolecular interactions and binding configurations are directly obtained as functions of cluster size and composition, providing insightful molecular-level description and characterization over the local active sites that playmore » crucial roles in determining solution chemistry and condensed phase phenomena. Finally, the topics covered in this article are relevant to a wide scope of research fields ranging from ion specific effects in electrolyte solutions, ion selectivity/recognition in normal functioning of life, to molecular specificity in aerosol particle formation, as well as in rational material design and synthesis.« less

  4. Properties of a weakly ionized NO gas sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyuan; Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zhyong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Pan, Zhigang

    2015-08-31

    Nitric oxide NO is one of the major targets for environmental monitoring, but the existing NO sensors are limited by their low sensitivity and narrow test range. Here, a NO gas sensor employing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was fabricated, and its properties in NO–N{sub 2} mixture were investigated from both emission and ionization. The current I{sub e} passing through the nanotubes cathode was found to decrease with increasing NO concentration and increase linearly in different slopes with the extracting voltage U{sub e}. It is shown that the Schottky barrier of the MWCNTs calculated by I{sub e} increased with NO concentrationmore » due to the adsorption of NO gas, which restrained the electron emission and consequently weakened the ionization. The positive ion currents I{sub c} passing through the collecting electrode at different voltages of U{sub e} were found to monotonically decrease with increasing NO concentration, which was induced by both of the reduced electron emission and the consumption of the two excited metastable states N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}∑{sub u}{sup +}) and N{sub 2}(a′{sup 1}∑{sub u}{sup −}) by NO. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity at the low temperature of 30 °C. The calculated conductivity was found to be able to take place of I{sub c} for NO detection in a wide voltage range of 80–150 V U{sub e}.« less

  5. Heating of the Interstellar Diffuse Ionized Gas via the Dissipation of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minter, Anthony H.; Spangler, Steven R.

    1997-08-01

    We have recently published observations that specify most of the turbulent and mean plasma characteristics for a region of the sky containing the interstellar diffuse ionized gas (DIG). These observations have provided virtually all of the information necessary to calculate the heating rate from dissipation of turbulence. We have calculated the turbulent dissipation heating rate employing two models for the interstellar turbulence. The first is a customary modeling as a superposition of magnetohydrodynamic waves. The second is a fluid-turbulence-like model based on the ideas of Higdon. This represents the first time that such calculations have been carried out with full and specific interstellar turbulence parameters. The wave model of interstellar turbulence encounters the severe difficulty that plausible estimates of heating by Landau damping exceed the radiative cooling capacity of the interstellar DIG by 3-4 orders of magnitude. Clearly interstellar turbulence does not behave like an ensemble of obliquely propagating fast magnetosonic waves. The heating rate due to two other wave dissipation mechanisms, ion-neutral collisional damping and the parametric decay instability, are comparable to the cooling capacity of the diffuse ionized medium. We find that the fluid-like turbulence model is an acceptable and realistic model of the turbulence in the interstellar medium once the effects of ion-neutral collisions are included in the model. This statement is contingent on an assumption that the dissipation of such turbulence because of Landau damping is several orders of magnitude less than that from an ensemble of obliquely propagating magnetosonic waves with the same energy density. Arguments as to why this may be the case are made in the paper. Rough parity between the turbulent heating rate and the radiative cooling rate in the DIG also depends on the hydrogen ionization fraction being in excess of 90% or on a model-dependent lower limit to the heating rate being

  6. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John

    2015-11-20

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s{sup −1}. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and themore » ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment.« less

  7. Ionization and current growth in N/sub 2/ at very high electric field to gas density ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Gylys, V.T.; Jelenkovic, B.M.; Phelps, A.V.

    1989-05-01

    Measurements and analyses have been made of electron impact ionization and of current growth in pulsed, low-current, prebreakdown discharges in parallel-plane geometry in N/sub 2/ at very high electric field to gas density ratios E/n and low products of the gas density n and electrode separation d. The E/n range and nd ranges were 1

  8. PHIBSS: MOLECULAR GAS, EXTINCTION, STAR FORMATION, AND KINEMATICS IN THE z = 1.5 STAR-FORMING GALAXY EGS13011166

    SciTech Connect

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Kurk, J.

    We report matched resolution imaging spectroscopy of the CO 3-2 line (with the IRAM Plateau de Bure millimeter interferometer) and of the H{alpha} line (with LUCI at the Large Binocular Telescope) in the massive z = 1.53 main-sequence galaxy EGS 13011166, as part of the ''Plateau de Bure high-z, blue-sequence survey'' (PHIBSS: Tacconi et al.). We combine these data with Hubble Space Telescope V-I-J-H-band maps to derive spatially resolved distributions of stellar surface density, star formation rate, molecular gas surface density, optical extinction, and gas kinematics. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas are remarkably similarmore » and are well modeled by a turbulent, globally Toomre unstable, rotating disk. The stellar surface density distribution is smoother than the clumpy rest-frame UV/optical light distribution and peaks in an obscured, star-forming massive bulge near the dynamical center. The molecular gas surface density and the effective optical screen extinction track each other and are well modeled by a ''mixed'' extinction model. The inferred slope of the spatially resolved molecular gas to star formation rate relation, N = dlog{Sigma}{sub starform}/dlog{Sigma}{sub molgas}, depends strongly on the adopted extinction model, and can vary from 0.8 to 1.7. For the preferred mixed dust-gas model, we find N = 1.14 {+-} 0.1.« less

  9. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  10. Gas solubility in dilute solutions: A novel molecular thermodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.

    2018-05-01

    We present an explicit molecular-based interpretation of the thermodynamic phase equilibrium underlying gas solubility in liquids, through rigorous links between the microstructure of the dilute systems and the relevant macroscopic quantities that characterize their solution thermodynamics. We apply the formal analysis to unravel and highlight the molecular-level nature of the approximations behind the widely used Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 57, 2168 (1935)] and Krichevsky-Ilinskaya [Acta Physicochim. 20, 327 (1945)] equations for the modeling of gas solubility. Then, we implement a general molecular-based approach to gas solubility and illustrate it by studying Lennard-Jones binary systems whose microstructure and thermodynamic properties were consistently generated via integral equation calculations. Furthermore, guided by the molecular-based analysis, we propose a novel macroscopic modeling approach to gas solubility, emphasize some usually overlook modeling subtleties, and identify novel interdependences among relevant solubility quantities that can be used as either handy modeling constraints or tools for consistency tests.

  11. Gas solubility in dilute solutions: A novel molecular thermodynamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Chialvo, Ariel A

    2018-05-07

    We present an explicit molecular-based interpretation of the thermodynamic phase equilibrium underlying gas solubility in liquids, through rigorous links between the microstructure of the dilute systems and the relevant macroscopic quantities that characterize their solution thermodynamics. We apply the formal analysis to unravel and highlight the molecular-level nature of the approximations behind the widely used Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 57, 2168 (1935)] and Krichevsky-Ilinskaya [Acta Physicochim. 20, 327 (1945)] equations for the modeling of gas solubility. Then, we implement a general molecular-based approach to gas solubility and illustrate it by studying Lennard-Jones binary systems whose microstructure and thermodynamic properties were consistently generated via integral equation calculations. Furthermore, guided by the molecular-based analysis, we propose a novel macroscopic modeling approach to gas solubility, emphasize some usually overlook modeling subtleties, and identify novel interdependences among relevant solubility quantities that can be used as either handy modeling constraints or tools for consistency tests.

  12. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gregory T; Wilhide, Joshua A; LaCourse, William R

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  13. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  14. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  15. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.

    2015-11-15

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. Themore » interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place.« less

  16. Ionized gas diagnostics from protoplanetary discs in the Orion nebula and the abundance discrepancy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Núñez-Díaz, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Flores-Fajardo, N.; López-Martín, L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Henney, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy of a field located near the Trapezium Cluster using the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS). The observed field contains a variety of morphological structures: five externally ionized protoplanetary discs (also known as proplyds), the high-velocity jet HH 514 and a bowshock. Spatial distribution maps are obtained for different emission line fluxes, the c(Hβ) extinction coefficient, electron densities and temperatures, ionic abundances of different ions from collisionally excited lines (CELs), C2 + and O2 + abundances from recombination lines (RLs) and the abundance discrepancy factor of O2 +, ADF(O2 +). We distinguish the three most prominent proplyds (177-341, 170-337 and 170-334) and analyse their impact on the spatial distributions of the above mentioned quantities. We find that collisional de-excitation has a major influence on the line fluxes in the proplyds. If this is not properly accounted for then physical conditions deduced from commonly used line ratios will be in error, leading to unreliable chemical abundances for these objects. We obtain the intrinsic emission of the proplyds 177-341, 170-337 and 170-334 by a direct subtraction of the background emission, though the last two present some background contamination due to their small sizes. A detailed analysis of 177-341 spectra making use of suitable density diagnostics reveals the presence of high-density gas (3.8 × 105 cm-3) in contrast to the typical values observed in the background gas of the nebula (3800 cm-3). We also explore how the background subtraction could be affected by the possible opacity of the proplyd and its effect on the derivation of physical conditions and chemical abundances of the proplyd 177-341. We construct a physical model for the proplyd 177-341 finding a good agreement between the predicted and observed line ratios. Finally, we find that the use of reliable physical conditions returns an ADF(O2 +) about zero

  17. Analysis of multiple scattering contributions in electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueguang; Hossen, Khokon; Wang, Enliang; Pindzola, M. S.; Dorn, Alexander; Colgan, James

    2017-10-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the low-energy (E 0 = 31.5 eV) electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen (H2). Triple differential cross sections are measured for a range of fixed emission angles of one outgoing electron between {θ }1=-70^\\circ and -130° covering the full 4π solid angle of the second electron. The energy sharing of the outgoing electrons varies from symmetric ({E}1={E}2=8 eV) to highly asymmetric (E 1 = 1 eV and E 2 = 15 eV). In addition to the binary and recoil lobes, a structure is observed perpendicular to the incoming beam direction which is due to multiple scattering of the projectile inside the molecular potential. The absolutely normalized experimental cross sections are compared with results from the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) calculations. Molecular alignment dependent TDCC results demonstrate that these structures are only present if the molecule axis is lying in the scattering plane.

  18. Molecular identification of Mucorales in human tissues: contribution of PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alanio, A; Garcia-Hermoso, D; Mercier-Delarue, S; Lanternier, F; Gits-Muselli, M; Menotti, J; Denis, B; Bergeron, A; Legrand, M; Lortholary, O; Bretagne, S

    2015-06-01

    Molecular methods are crucial for mucormycosis diagnosis because cultures are frequently negative, even if microscopy suggests the presence of hyphae in tissues. We assessed PCR/electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for Mucorales identification in 19 unfixed tissue samples from 13 patients with proven or probable mucormycosis and compared the results with culture, quantitative real-time PCR, 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer region (ITS PCR) and 18S PCR sequencing. Concordance with culture identification to both genus and species levels was higher for PCR/ESI-MS than for the other techniques. Thus, PCR/ESI-MS is suitable for Mucorales identification, within 6 hours, for tissue samples for which microscopy results suggest the presence of hyphae. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cold gas properties of the Herschel Reference Survey. III. Molecular gas stripping in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Cortese, L.; Boquien, M.; Boissier, S.; Catinella, B.; Gavazzi, G.; Lagos, C.; Saintonge, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Herschel Reference Survey is a complete volume-limited, K-band-selected sample of nearby objects including Virgo cluster and isolated objects. Using a recent compilation of Hi and CO data for this sample we study the effects of the cluster environment on the molecular gas content of spiral galaxies. With the subsample of unperturbed field galaxies, we first identify the stellar mass as the scaling variable that traces the total molecular gas mass of galaxies better. We show that, on average, Hi-deficient galaxies are significantly offset (4σ) from the M(H2) vs. Mstar relation for Hi-normal galaxies. We use the M(H2) vs. Mstar scaling relation to define the H2-deficiency parameter as the difference, on logarithmic scale, between the expected and observed molecular gas mass for a galaxy of given stellar mass. The H2-deficiency parameter shows a weak and scattered relation with the Hi-deficiency parameter, here taken as a proxy for galaxy interactions with the surrounding cluster environment. We also show that, as for the atomic gas, the extent of the molecular disc decreases with increasing Hi-deficiency. All together, these results show that cluster galaxies have, on average, a lower molecular gas content than similar objects in the field. Our analysis indicates that ram pressure stripping is the physical process responsible for this molecular gas deficiency. The slope of the H2 - def vs. Hi - def relation is less than unity, while the D(Hi)/D(i) vs. Hi - def relation is steeper than the D(CO)/D(i) vs. Hi - def relation, thereby indicating that the molecular gas is removed less efficiently than the atomic gas. This result can be understood if the atomic gas is distributed on a relatively flat disc that is more extended than the stellar disc. It is thus less anchored to the gravitational potential well of the galaxy than the molecular gas phase, which is distributed on an exponential disc with a scalelength rCO ≃ 0.2r24.5(g). There is a clear trend between the

  20. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: A Technique to Access the Information beyond the Molecular Weight of the Analyte

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-01-01

    The Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique extensively used for production of gas phase ions (without fragmentation) of thermally labile large supramolecules. In the present review we have described the development of Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) during the last 25 years in the study of various properties of different types of biological molecules. There have been extensive studies on the mechanism of formation of charged gaseous species by the ESI. Several groups have investigated the origin and implications of the multiple charge states of proteins observed in the ESI-mass spectra of the proteins. The charged analytes produced by ESI can be fragmented by activating them in the gas-phase, and thus tandem mass spectrometry has been developed, which provides very important insights on the structural properties of the molecule. The review will highlight recent developments and emerging directions in this fascinating area of research. PMID:22611397

  1. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: a technique to access the information beyond the molecular weight of the analyte.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-01-01

    The Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique extensively used for production of gas phase ions (without fragmentation) of thermally labile large supramolecules. In the present review we have described the development of Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) during the last 25 years in the study of various properties of different types of biological molecules. There have been extensive studies on the mechanism of formation of charged gaseous species by the ESI. Several groups have investigated the origin and implications of the multiple charge states of proteins observed in the ESI-mass spectra of the proteins. The charged analytes produced by ESI can be fragmented by activating them in the gas-phase, and thus tandem mass spectrometry has been developed, which provides very important insights on the structural properties of the molecule. The review will highlight recent developments and emerging directions in this fascinating area of research.

  2. The Properties and Evolution of the Highly Ionized Gas in MR 2251-178

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, Hagai; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Nandra, Kirpal; Turner, T. J.

    2004-08-01

    We present the first XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 obtained in 2000 and 2002. The EPIC pn spectra show a power-law continuum with a slope of Γ=1.6 at high energies absorbed by at least two warm absorbers (WAs) intrinsic to the source. The underlying continuum in the earlier observation shows a ``soft excess'' at low X-ray energies, which can be modeled as an additional power law with Γ=2.9. The spectra also show a weak narrow iron Kα emission line. The high-resolution grating spectrum obtained in 2002 shows emission lines from N VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X, as well as absorption lines from the low-ionization ions of O III, O IV, and O V, and other confirmed and suspected weaker absorption lines. The O III-O V lines are consistent with the properties of the emission-line gas observed as extended optical [O III] emission in this source. The signal-to-noise ratio of the 2000 grating data is too low to detect any lines. We suggest a model for the high-resolution spectrum that consists of two or three WA components. The two-component model has a high-ionization WA with a column density of 1021.5-1021.8 cm-2 and a low-ionization absorber with a column density of 1020.3 cm-2. In the three-component model we add a lower ionization component that produces the observed iron M shell absorption lines. We investigate the spectral variations in MR 2251-178 over a period of 8.5 yr using data from ASCA, BeppoSAX, and XMM-Newton. All X-ray observations can be fitted with the above two power laws and the two absorbers. The observed luminosity variations seem to correlate with variations in the soft X-ray continuum. The 8.5 yr history of the source suggests a changing X-ray absorber due to material that enters and disappears from the line of sight on timescales of several months. We also present, for the first time, the entire Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of MR 2251-178. We detect emission from N III, C III, and O VI

  3. The Properties and the Evolution of the Highly Ionized Gas in MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, hagai; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Nandra, Kirpal; Turner, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 obtained in 2000 and 2002. The EPIC-pn spectra show a power-law continuum with a slope of Gamma = 1.6 at high energies absorbed by at least two warm absorbers (WAs) intrinsic to the source. The underlying continuum in the earlier observation shows a soft excess at low X-ray energies which can be modeled as an additional power-law with Gamma = 2.9. The spectra also show a weak narrow iron K alpha emission line. The high-resolution grating spectrum obtained in 2002 shows emission lines from N VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X, as well as absorption lines from the low-ionization ions of O III, O IV, and O V, and other confirmed and suspected weaker absorption lines. The O III - O V lines are consistent with the properties of the emission line gas observed as extended optical (O III) emission in this source. The signal-to-noise of the 2000 grating data is too low to detect any lines. We suggest a model for the high-resolution spectrum which consist of two or three warm-absorber (WA) components. The two-components model has a high-ionization WA with a column density of 10(exp 21.5)-10 (exp 21.8) sq cm and a low-ionization absorber with a column density of 10(exp 20.3) sq cm. In the three-components model we add a lower ionization component that produces the observed iron M-shell absorption lines. We investigate the spectral variations in MR 2251-178 over a period of 8.5 years using data from ASCA, BeppoSAX, and XMM-Newton. All X-ray observations can be fitted with the above two power laws and the two absorbers. The observed luminosity variations seems to correlate with variations in the soft X-ray continuum. The 8.5 year history of the source suggests a changing X-ray absorber due to material that enters and disappears from the line-of-sight on timescales of several months. We also present, for the first time, the entire FUSE spectrum of MR 2251-178. We detect emission from N III, C III

  4. Very metal-poor galaxies: ionized gas kinematics in nine objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The study of ionized gas morphology and kinematics in nine extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) 6-m telescope is presented. Some of these very rare objects (with currently known range of O/H of 7.12 < 12 + log(O/H) < 7.65, or ) are believed to be the best proxies of `young' low-mass galaxies in the high-redshift Universe. One of the main goals of this study is to look for possible evidence of star formation (SF) activity induced by external perturbations. Recent results from HI mapping of a small subsample of XMD star-forming galaxies provided confident evidence for the important role of interaction-induced SF. Our observations provide complementary or new information that the great majority of the studied XMD dwarfs have strongly disturbed gas morphology and kinematics or the presence of detached components. We approximate the observed velocity fields by simple models of a rotating tilted thin disc, which allows us the robust detection of non-circular gas motions. These data, in turn, indicate the important role of current/recent interactions and mergers in the observed enhanced SF. As a by-product of our observations, we obtained data for two Low Surface Brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies: Anon J012544+075957 that is a companion of the merger system UGC 993, and SAO 0822+3545 which shows off-centre, asymmetric, low star formation rate star-forming regions, likely induced by the interaction with the companion XMD dwarf HS 0822+3542. Based on observations obtained with the Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS 6-m telescope. E-mail: moisav@gmail.com (AVM); sap@sao.ru (SAP); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK)

  5. Densities and filling factors of the diffuse ionized gas in the Solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Müller, P.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We analyse electron densities and filling factors of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the Solar neighbourhood. Methods: We have combined dispersion measures and emission measures towards 38 pulsars at distances known to better than 50%, from which we derived the mean density in clouds, N_c, and their volume filling factor, F_v, averaged along the line of sight. The emission measures were corrected for absorption by dust and contributions from beyond the pulsar distance. Results: The scale height of the electron layer for our sample is 0.93± 0.13 kpc and the midplane electron density is 0.023± 0.004 cm-3, in agreement with earlier results. The average density along the line of sight is < n_e> = 0.018± 0.002 cm-3 and is nearly constant. Since < n_e> = F_vN_c, an inverse relationship between Fv and Nc is expected. We find F_v(N_c) = (0.011± 0.003) N_c-1.20± 0.13, which holds for the ranges N_c= 0.05-1 cm-3 and F_v= 0.4-0.01. Near the Galactic plane the dependence of Fv on Nc is significantly stronger than away from the plane. Fv does not systematically change along or perpendicular to the Galactic plane, but the spread about the mean value of 0.08± 0.02 is considerable. The total pathlength through the ionized regions increases linearly to about 80 pc towards |z| = 1 kpc. Conclusions: Our study of Fv and Nc of the DIG is the first one based on a sample of pulsars with known distances. We confirm the existence of a tight, nearly inverse correlation between Fv and Nc in the DIG. The exact form of this relation depends on the regions in the Galaxy probed by the pulsar sample. The inverse F_v-Nc relation is consistent with a hierarchical, fractal density distribution in the DIG caused by turbulence. The observed near constancy of < n_e> then is a signature of fractal structure in the ionized medium, which is most pronounced outside the thin disk.

  6. [S IV] in the NGC 5253 Supernebula: Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John H.; Turner, Jean L.; Kruger, Andrew; Richter, Matt; Crosthwaite, Lucian P.

    2012-08-01

    The nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a deeply embedded radio-infrared supernebula excited by thousands of O stars. We have observed this source in the 10.5 μm line of S +3 at 3.8 km s-1 spectral and 1farcs4 spatial resolution, using the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the IRTF. The line profile cannot be fit well by a single Gaussian. The best simple fit describes the gas with two Gaussians, one near the galactic velocity with FWHM 33.6 km s-1 and another of similar strength and FWHM 94 km s-1 centered ~20 km s-1 to the blue. This suggests a model for the supernebula in which gas flows toward us out of the molecular cloud, as in a "blister" or "champagne flow" or in the H II regions modelled by Zhu.

  7. Anomalous abundances of solar energetic particles and coronal gas: Coulomb effects and First Ionization Potential (FIP) ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The first ionization potential (FIP) ordering of elemental abundances in solar energetic particles and in the corona which can both be explained Coulomb effects is discussed. Solar energetic particles (SEP) and coronal gas have anomalous abundances relative to the photosphere. The anomalies are similar in both cases: which led to the conclusion that SEP acceleration is not selective, but merely preserves the source abundances. It is argued that SEP acceleration can be selective, because identical selectivity operates to determine the coronal abundances. The abundance anomalies are ordered by first ionization potential (FIP).

  8. Extragalactic chemistry of molecular gas: lessons from the local universe.

    PubMed

    García-Burillo, S; Fuente, A; Martín-Pintado, J; Usero, A; Graciá-Carpio, J; Planesas, P

    2006-01-01

    Observational constraints provided by high resolution and high sensitivity observations of external galaxies made in the millimetre and sub-millimetre range have started to put on a firm footing the study of the extragalactic chemistry of molecular gas. In particular, the availability of multi-species and multi-line surveys of nearby galaxies is central to the interpretation of existent and forthcoming millimetre observations of the high redshift universe. Probing the physical and chemical status of molecular gas in starbursts and active galaxies (AGN) requires the use of specific tracers of the relevant energetic phenomena that are known to be at play in these galaxies: large-scale shocks, strong UV fields, cosmic rays and X-rays. We present below the first results of an ongoing survey, allying the IRAM 30 m telescope with the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI), devoted to the study of the chemistry of molecular gas in a sample of starbursts and AGN of the local universe. These observations highlight the existence of a strong chemical differentiation in the molecular disks of starbursts and AGN.

  9. Mutual influence of molecular diffusion in gas and surface phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takuma; Kamino, Takafumi; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Takagi, Shu; Kinefuchi, Ikuya

    2018-01-01

    We develop molecular transport simulation methods that simultaneously deal with gas- and surface-phase diffusions to determine the effect of surface diffusion on the overall diffusion coefficients. The phenomenon of surface diffusion is incorporated into the test particle method and the mean square displacement method, which are typically employed only for gas-phase transport. It is found that for a simple cylindrical pore, the diffusion coefficients in the presence of surface diffusion calculated by these two methods show good agreement. We also confirm that both methods reproduce the analytical solution. Then, the diffusion coefficients for ink-bottle-shaped pores are calculated using the developed method. Our results show that surface diffusion assists molecular transport in the gas phase. Moreover, the surface tortuosity factor, which is known to be uniquely determined by physical structure, is influenced by the presence of gas-phase diffusion. This mutual influence of gas-phase diffusion and surface diffusion indicates that their simultaneous calculation is necessary for an accurate evaluation of the diffusion coefficients.

  10. Compression of turbulent magnetized gas in giant molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnboim, Yuval; Federrath, Christoph; Krumholz, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Interstellar gas clouds are often both highly magnetized and supersonically turbulent, with velocity dispersions set by a competition between driving and dissipation. This balance has been studied extensively in the context of gases with constant mean density. However, many astrophysical systems are contracting under the influence of external pressure or gravity, and the balance between driving and dissipation in a contracting, magnetized medium has yet to be studied. In this paper, we present three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of compression in a turbulent, magnetized medium that resembles the physical conditions inside molecular clouds. We find that in some circumstances the combination of compression and magnetic fields leads to a rate of turbulent dissipation far less than that observed in non-magnetized gas, or in non-compressing magnetized gas. As a result, a compressing, magnetized gas reaches an equilibrium velocity dispersion much greater than would be expected for either the hydrodynamic or the non-compressing case. We use the simulation results to construct an analytic model that gives an effective equation of state for a coarse-grained parcel of the gas, in the form of an ideal equation of state with a polytropic index that depends on the dissipation and energy transfer rates between the magnetic and turbulent components. We argue that the reduced dissipation rate and larger equilibrium velocity dispersion has important implications for the driving and maintenance of turbulence in molecular clouds and for the rates of chemical and radiative processes that are sensitive to shocks and dissipation.

  11. Multiple Point Dynamic Gas Density Measurements Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard; Panda, Jayanta

    1999-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique for measuring dynamic gas density properties is described. Molecular Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the time-history of gas density simultaneously at eight spatial locations at a 50 kHz sampling rate. The data are analyzed using the Welch method of modified periodograms to reduce measurement uncertainty. Cross-correlations, power spectral density functions, cross-spectral density functions, and coherence functions may be obtained from the data. The technique is demonstrated using low speed co-flowing jets with a heated inner jet.

  12. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Shocked molecular gas and the origin of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reach, William; Gusdorf, Antoine; Richter, Matthew

    2018-06-01

    When massive stars reach the end of their ability to remain stable with core nuclear fusion, they explode in supernovae that drive powerful shocks into their surroundings. Because massive stars form in and remain close to molecular clouds they often drive shocks into dense gas, which is now believed to be the origin of a significant fraction of galactic cosmic rays. The nature of the supernova-molecular cloud interaction is not well understood, though observations are gradually elucidating their nature. The range of interstellar densities, and the inclusion of circumstellar matter from the late-phase mass-loss of the stars before their explosions, leads to a wide range of possible appearances and outcomes. In particular, it is not even clear what speed or physical type of shocks are present: are they dense, magnetically-mediated shocks where H2 is not dissociated, or are they faster shocks that dissociate molecules and destroy some of the grains? SOFIA is observing some of the most significant (in terms of cosmic ray production potential and infrared energy output) supernova-molecular cloud interactions for measurement of the line widths of key molecular shocks tracers: H2, [OI], and CO. The presence of gas at speeds 100 km/s or greater would indicate dissociative shocks, while speeds 30 km/s and slower retain most molecules. The shock velocity is a key ingredient in modeling the interaction between supernovae and molecular clouds including the potential for formation of cosmic rays.

  14. IZI: INFERRING THE GAS PHASE METALLICITY (Z) AND IONIZATION PARAMETER (q) OF IONIZED NEBULAE USING BAYESIAN STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Kewley, Lisa; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.

    2015-01-10

    We present a new method for inferring the metallicity (Z) and ionization parameter (q) of H II regions and star-forming galaxies using strong nebular emission lines (SELs). We use Bayesian inference to derive the joint and marginalized posterior probability density functions for Z and q given a set of observed line fluxes and an input photoionization model. Our approach allows the use of arbitrary sets of SELs and the inclusion of flux upper limits. The method provides a self-consistent way of determining the physical conditions of ionized nebulae that is not tied to the arbitrary choice of a particular SELmore » diagnostic and uses all the available information. Unlike theoretically calibrated SEL diagnostics, the method is flexible and not tied to a particular photoionization model. We describe our algorithm, validate it against other methods, and present a tool that implements it called IZI. Using a sample of nearby extragalactic H II regions, we assess the performance of commonly used SEL abundance diagnostics. We also use a sample of 22 local H II regions having both direct and recombination line (RL) oxygen abundance measurements in the literature to study discrepancies in the abundance scale between different methods. We find that oxygen abundances derived through Bayesian inference using currently available photoionization models in the literature can be in good (∼30%) agreement with RL abundances, although some models perform significantly better than others. We also confirm that abundances measured using the direct method are typically ∼0.2 dex lower than both RL and photoionization-model-based abundances.« less

  15. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization. II. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and hyperfine-selective generation of molecular cations

    SciTech Connect

    Germann, Matthias; Willitsch, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.willitsch@unibas.ch

    2016-07-28

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is a widely used technique for studying molecular photoionization and producing molecular cations for spectroscopy and dynamics studies. Here, we present a model for describing hyperfine-structure effects in the REMPI process and for predicting hyperfine populations in molecular ions produced by this method. This model is a generalization of our model for fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in one-photon ionization of molecules presented in Paper I [M. Germann and S. Willitsch, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 044314 (2016)]. This generalization is achieved by covering two main aspects: (1) treatment of the neutral bound-bound transition including the hyperfine structuremore » that makes up the first step of the REMPI process and (2) modification of our ionization model to account for anisotropic populations resulting from this first excitation step. Our findings may be used for analyzing results from experiments with molecular ions produced by REMPI and may serve as a theoretical background for hyperfine-selective ionization experiments.« less

  16. Molecular Gas in Disks around Young Stars with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Factor, Samuel; Lieman-Sifry, Jesse; Flaherty, Kevin; Daley, Cail; Mann, Rita; Roberge, Aki; Di Francesco, James; Williams, Jonathan; Ricci, Luca; Matthews, Brenda; Bally, John; Johnstone, Doug; Kospal, Agnes; Moor, Attila; Kamp, Inga; Wilner, David; Andrews, Sean; Kastner, Joel H.; Abraham, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Molecular gas is a critical component of the planet formation process. In this poster, we present two analyses of the molecular gas component of circumstellar disks at extremes (young, old) of the pre-main sequence phase.(1) We characterize the molecular gas content of the disk around d216-0939, a pre-main sequence star in the Orion Nebula Cluster, using ALMA observations of CO(3-2), HCO+(4-3), and HCN(4-3) observed at 0.5" resolution. We model the density and temperature structure of the disk, returning abundances generally consistent with chemical modeling of protoplanetary disks, and obtain a dynamical mass measurement of the central star of 2.2+/-0.4 M_sun, which is inconsistent with the previously determined spectral type of K5. We also report the detection of a spatially unresolved high-velocity blue-shifted excess emission feature with a measurable position offset from the central star, consistent with an object in Keplerian orbit at 60+/-20 au. The feature is due to a local temperature and/or density enhancement consistent with either a hydrodynamic vortex or the expected signature of the envelope of a forming protoplanet within the disk, providing evidence that planet formation is ongoing within this massive and relatively isolated Orion proplyd. This work is published in Factor et al. (2017). (2) We present ~0.4" resolution images of CO(3-2) and associated continuum emission from the gas-bearing debris disk around the nearby A star 49 Ceti, observed with ALMA. We analyze the ALMA visibilities in tandem with the broadband spectral energy distribution to measure the radial surface density profiles of dust and gas emission from the system. The radial extent of the gas disk (~220 au) is smaller than that of the dust disk (~300 au), consistent with recent observations of other gas-bearing debris disks. While there are so far only three broad debris disks with well characterized radial dust profiles at millimeter wavelengths, 49 Ceti’s disk shows a markedly

  17. Gas-Phase Stability of Negatively Charged Organophosphate Metabolites Produced by Electrospray Ionization and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Daiki; Mizuno, Hajime; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2017-12-01

    The formation mechanisms of singly and multiply charged organophosphate metabolites by electrospray ionization (ESI) and their gas phase stabilities were investigated. Metabolites containing multiple phosphate groups, such as adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and D- myo-inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) were observed as doubly deprotonated ions by negative-ion ESI mass spectrometry. Organophosphates with multiple negative charges were found to be unstable and often underwent loss of PO3 -, although singly deprotonated analytes were stable. The presence of fragments due to the loss of PO3 - in the negative-ion ESI mass spectra could result in the misinterpretation of analytical results. In contrast to ESI, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) produced singly charged organophosphate metabolites with no associated fragmentation, since the singly charged anions are stable. The stability of an organophosphate metabolite in the gas phase strongly depends on its charge state. The fragmentations of multiply charged organophosphates were also investigated in detail through density functional theory calculations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Diffuse ionized gas in galaxies across the Hubble sequence at the CALIFA resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Couto, G. S.; Stasińska, G.; García-Benito, R.; Vale Asari, N.; Pérez, E.; González Delgado, R. M.; Sánchez, S. F.; de Amorim, A. L.

    2018-03-01

    We use spatially resolved spectroscopy from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey to study the nature of the line emitting gas in galaxies of different Hubble types, focusing on the separation of star-forming (SF) regions from those better characterized as diffuse ionized gas (DIG). The diagnosis is carried out in terms of the equivalent width of H α (WH α). Three nebular regimes are identified. Regions where WH α < 3 Å define what we call the hDIG, the component of the DIG where photoionization is dominated by hot, low-mass, evolved stars. Regions where WH α > 14 Å trace SF complexes. WH α values in the intermediate 3-14 Å range reflect a mixed regime (mDIG) where more than one process contributes. This three-tier scheme is inspired both by theoretical and empirical considerations. Its application to CALIFA galaxies of different types and inclinations leads to the following results: (i) the hDIG component is prevalent throughout ellipticals and S0's as well as in bulges, and explains the strongly bimodal distribution of WH α both among and within galaxies. (ii) Early-type spirals have some hDIG in their discs, but this component becomes progressively less relevant for later Hubble types. (iii) hDIG emission is also present above and below galactic discs, as seen in several edge-on spirals in our sample. (iv) The SF/mDIG proportion grows steadily from early- to late-type spirals, and from inner to outer radii. (v) Besides circumventing basic inconsistencies in conventional DIG/SF separation criteria based on the H α surface brightness, our WH α-based method produces results in agreement with a classical excitation diagram analysis.

  19. Diffuse ionized gas in galaxies across the Hubble sequence at the CALIFA resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Couto, G. S.; Stasińska, G.; García-Benito, R.; Vale Asari, N.; Pérez, E.; Gonzalez Delgado, R. M.; Sánchez, S. F.; de Amorim, A. L.

    2017-11-01

    We use spatially resolved spectroscopy from the CALIFA survey to study the nature of the line emitting gas in galaxies of different Hubble types, focusing on the separation of star-forming (SF) regions from those better characterized as diffuse ionized gas (DIG). The diagnosis is carried out in terms of the equivalent width of Hα (W_{Hα}). Three nebular regimes are identified: Regions where W_{Hα} < 3 Å define what we call the hDIG, the component of the DIG where photoionization is dominated by hot, low mass, evolved stars. Regions where W_{Hα} > 14 Å trace SF complexes. W_{Hα} values in the intermediate 3-14 Å range reflect a mixed regime (mDIG) where more than one process contributes.This three-tier scheme is inspired both by theoretical and empirical considerations. Its application to CALIFA galaxies of different types and inclinations leads to the following results: (i) The hDIG component is prevalent throughout ellipticals and S0's as well as in bulges, and explains the strongly bimodal distribution of W_{{Hα} both among and within galaxies. (ii) Early type spirals have some hDIG in their disks, but this component becomes progressively less relevant for later Hubble types. (iii) hDIG emission is also present above and below galactic disks, as seen in several edge-on spirals in our sample. (iv) The SF/mDIG proportion grows steadily from early to late types spirals, and from inner to outer radii. (v) Besides circumventing basic inconsistencies in conventional DIG/SF separation criteria based on the &Hα surface brightness, our W_{Hα}-based method produces results in agreement with a classical excitation diagram analysis.

  20. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of electrolyte from spent lithium ion batteries and its characterization by gas chromatography with chemical ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönnighoff, Xaver; Friesen, Alex; Konersmann, Benedikt; Horsthemke, Fabian; Grützke, Martin; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-06-01

    The aging products of the electrolyte from a commercially available state-of-the-art 18650-type cell were investigated. During long term cycling a huge difference in their performance and lifetime at different temperatures was observed. By interpretation of a strong capacity fading of cells cycled at 20 °C compared to cells cycled at 45 °C a temperature depending aging mechanism was determined. To investigate the influence of the electrolyte on this fading, the electrolyte was extracted by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and then analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with electron impact (EI) ionization and mass selective detection. To obtain more information with regard to the identification of unknown decomposition products further analysis with positive chemical ionization (PCI) and negative chemical ionization (NCI) was performed. 17 different volatile organic aging products were detected and identified. So far, seven of them were not yet known in literature and several formation pathways were postulated taking previously published literature into account.

  1. Ionization-Induced Self-Channeling of an Ultrahigh-Power Subnanosecond Microwave Beam in a Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafir, G.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Levko, D.; Cao, Y.; Leopold, J. G.; Gad, R.; Bernshtam, V.; Fisher, A.

    2018-03-01

    Ionization-induced self-channeling of a ≤500 MW , 9.6 GHz, <1 ns microwave beam injected into air at ˜4.5 ×103 Pa or He at ˜103 Pa is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The plasma, generated by the impact ionization of the gas driven by the microwave beam, has a radial density distribution reducing towards the beam axis, where the microwave field is highest, because the ionization rate is a decreasing function of the microwave amplitude. This forms a plasma channel which prevents the divergence of the microwave beam. The experimental data obtained using various diagnostic methods are in good agreement with the results of analytical calculations, as well as particle in cell Monte Carlo collisional modeling.

  2. Aerial surveillance for gas and liquid hydrocarbon pipelines using a flame ionization detector (FID)

    SciTech Connect

    Riquetti, P.V.; Fletcher, J.I.; Minty, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    A novel application for the detection of airborne hydrocarbons has been successfully developed by means of a highly sensitive, fast responding Flame Ionization Detector (FID). The traditional way to monitor pipeline leaks has been by ground crews using specific sensors or by airborne crews highly trained to observe anomalies associated with leaks during periodic surveys of the pipeline right-of-way. The goal has been to detect leaks in a fast and cost effective way before the associated spill becomes a costly and hazardous problem. This paper describes a leak detection system combined with a global positioning system (GPS) and a computerizedmore » data output designed to pinpoint the presence of hydrocarbons in the air space of the pipeline`s right of way. Fixed wing aircraft as well as helicopters have been successfully used as airborne platforms. Natural gas, crude oil and finished products pipelines in Canada and the US have been surveyed using this technology with excellent correlation between the aircraft detection and in situ ground detection. The information obtained is processed with a proprietary software and reduced to simple coordinates. Results are transferred to ground crews to effect the necessary repairs.« less

  3. Ethanol analysis by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame-ionization and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin

    2011-09-01

    Ethanol is the most frequently identified compound in forensic toxicology. Although confirmation involving mass spectrometry is desirable, relatively few methods have been published to date. A novel technique utilizing a Dean's Switch to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame-ionization (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation is presented. Using 100 μL of sample, the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.005 and 0.010 g/dL, respectively. The zero-order linear range (r(2) > 0.990) was determined to span the concentrations of 0.010 to 1.000 g/dL. The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 3.1%. Quantitative accuracy was within ±8%, ±6%, ±3%, and ±1.5% at concentrations of 0.010, 0.025, 0.080, and 0.300 g/dL, respectively. In addition, 1,1-difluoroethane was validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validated FID-MS method provides a procedure for the quantitation of ethyl alcohol in blood by FID with simultaneous confirmation by MS and can also be utilized as an identification method for inhalants such as 1,1-difluoroethane.

  4. Do Radio Jets Contribute to Driving Ionized Gas Outflows in Moderate Luminosity Type 2 AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Julia; Sajina, Anna; Lacy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This poster examines the role of AGN-driven feedback in low to intermediate power radio galaxies. We begin with [OIII] measurements of ionized gas outflows in 29 moderate AGN-luminosity z~0.3-0.7 dust-obscured Type 2 AGN. We aim to examine the relative role of the AGN itself, of star-formation and of nascent radio jets in driving these outflows. The strength of the AGN and star formation are based on the [OIII] luminosities, and the far-IR luminosities respectively. For the radio jets, we present multi-frequency radio (X, S, and L-bands) JVLA imaging of our sample, which allows us both to constrain the overall radio power, but also look for signatures of young radio sources, including Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources, as well as small-scale jets. While radio jet-driven outflows are well known for powerful radio-loud galaxies, this study allows us to constrain the degree to which this mechanism is significant at more modest radio luminosities of L5GHz~10^22-25 W/Hz.

  5. A new 3-D View of Ionized Gas Conditions in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stephanie

    2018-01-01

    We present a 3D version of common emission line diagnostic diagrams used to identify the source of ionization in galaxies, and highlight interesting features in this new 3D space, which are associated with global galaxy properties. Namely, we combine the BPT and Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagrams, and apply it to a set of >300,000 galaxies from the SDSS survey. Among other features, we show that the usual “branch” of star-forming galaxies becomes a curved surface in the new 3D space. Understanding the underlying reasons can shed light on the nearby galaxy population but also aid our interpretation of high-redshift surveys, which indicate a strong evolution of emission line ratios. Despite efforts to explain the origin of this strong evolution, a consensus has not yet been reached. Yet, the implications are crucial to our understanding of galaxy growth across cosmic time, and in particular to assess how star forming regions differed at earlier times (gas properties? stellar properties? a combination?). We perform this analysis within the framework of the NOAO Data Lab (datalab.noao.edu) jointly with public visualization tools. The final workflow will be released publicly.

  6. Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-25

    identify by block number) FIELW GROUP SUB-GROUP 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and Identify by block number) Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN...AND TASK OBJECTIVES Aluminum gallium nitride (AIGaN) has long been recognized as a promising radiation hard optoelectronic material. AIGaN has a wide...Efficient, pure, low temperature sources for the gas source molecular beam epitaxial (GSMBE) growth of aluminum gallium nitride will essentially

  7. Effects of gas reservoir configuration and pore radius on shale gas nanoflow: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huiquan; Guo, Guang-Jun; Geng, Ming; Zhang, Zhengcai; Zhang, Mingmin; Gao, Kai

    2018-05-28

    We calculated methane transport through cylindrical graphite nanopores in cyclical steady-state flows using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. First, two typical gas reservoir configurations were evaluated: open (OS) and closed (CS) systems in which pores connect to the gas reservoir without/with a graphite wall parallel to the gas flow. We found that the OS configuration, which is commonly used to study nanoflows, exhibited obvious size effects. Smaller gas reservoir cross-sectional areas were associated with faster gas flows. Because Knudsen diffusion and slip flow in pores are interrupted in a gas reservoir that does not have walls as constraints, OSs cannot be relied upon in cyclical nanoflow simulations. Although CSs eliminated size effects, they introduced surface roughness effects that stem from the junction surface between the gas reservoir and the pore. To obtain a convergent nanoflow, the length of a side of the gas reservoir cross-section should be at least 2 nm larger than the pore diameter. Second, we obtained methane flux data for various pore radii (0.5-2.5 nm) in CSs and found that they could be described accurately using the Javadpour formula. This is the first direct molecular simulation evidence to validate this formula. Finally, the radial density and flow-velocity distributions of methane in CS pores were analyzed in detail. We tested pores with a radius between 0.5 nm and 2.5 nm and determined that the maximum ratio (∼34%) of slip flow to overall flow occurred in the pore with a radius of 1.25 nm. This study will aid in the design of gas reservoir configurations for nanoflow simulations and is helpful in understanding shale gas nanoflows.

  8. Effects of gas reservoir configuration and pore radius on shale gas nanoflow: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Huiquan; Guo, Guang-Jun; Geng, Ming; Zhang, Zhengcai; Zhang, Mingmin; Gao, Kai

    2018-05-01

    We calculated methane transport through cylindrical graphite nanopores in cyclical steady-state flows using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. First, two typical gas reservoir configurations were evaluated: open (OS) and closed (CS) systems in which pores connect to the gas reservoir without/with a graphite wall parallel to the gas flow. We found that the OS configuration, which is commonly used to study nanoflows, exhibited obvious size effects. Smaller gas reservoir cross-sectional areas were associated with faster gas flows. Because Knudsen diffusion and slip flow in pores are interrupted in a gas reservoir that does not have walls as constraints, OSs cannot be relied upon in cyclical nanoflow simulations. Although CSs eliminated size effects, they introduced surface roughness effects that stem from the junction surface between the gas reservoir and the pore. To obtain a convergent nanoflow, the length of a side of the gas reservoir cross-section should be at least 2 nm larger than the pore diameter. Second, we obtained methane flux data for various pore radii (0.5-2.5 nm) in CSs and found that they could be described accurately using the Javadpour formula. This is the first direct molecular simulation evidence to validate this formula. Finally, the radial density and flow-velocity distributions of methane in CS pores were analyzed in detail. We tested pores with a radius between 0.5 nm and 2.5 nm and determined that the maximum ratio (˜34%) of slip flow to overall flow occurred in the pore with a radius of 1.25 nm. This study will aid in the design of gas reservoir configurations for nanoflow simulations and is helpful in understanding shale gas nanoflows.

  9. Molecular gas in high-mass filament WB673

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanova, Maria S.; Salii, Svetlana V.; Sobolev, Andrej M.; Olofsson, Anders Olof Henrik; Ladeyschikov, Dmitry A.; Thomasson, Magnus

    2017-12-01

    We studied the distribution of dense gas in a filamentary molecular cloud containing several dense clumps. The center of the filament is given by the dense clump WB673. The clumps are high-mass and intermediate-mass starforming regions. We observed CS (2-1), 13CO (1-0), C18O(1-0), and methanol lines at 96 GHz toward WB673 with the Onsala Space Observatory 20-m telescope. We found CS (2-1) emission in the inter-clump medium so the clumps are physically connected and the whole cloud is indeed a filament. Its total mass is 104 M⊙ and mass-to-length ratio is 360M⊙ pc-1 from 13CO (1-0) data. Mass-to-length ratio for the dense gas is 3.4 - 34M⊙ pc-1 from CS (2-1) data. The PV-diagram of the filament is V-shaped. We estimated physical conditions in the molecular gas using methanol lines. Location of the filament on the sky between extended shells suggests that it could be a good example to test theoretical models of formation of the filaments via multiple compression of interstellar gas by supersonic waves.

  10. Molecular Gas Feeding the Circumnuclear Disk of the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.

    The interaction between a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the surrounding material is of primary importance in modern astrophysics. The detection of the molecular 2 pc circumnuclear disk (CND) immediately around the Milky Way SMBH, SgrA*, provides a unique opportunity to study SMBH accretion at subparsec scales. Our new wide-field CS( J = 2 − 1) map toward the Galactic center (GC) reveals multiple dense molecular streamers that originated from the ambient clouds 20 pc further out, and that are connected to the central 2 pc of the CND. These dense gas streamers appear to carry gas directly toward themore » nuclear region and might be captured by the central potential. Our phase-plot analysis indicates that these streamers show a signature of rotation and inward radial motion with progressively higher velocities as the gas approaches the CND and finally ends up corotating with the CND. Our results might suggest a possible mechanism of gas feeding the CND from 20 pc around 2 pc in the GC. In this paper, we discuss the morphology and the kinematics of these streamers. As the nearest observable Galactic nucleus, this feeding process may have implications for understanding the processes in extragalactic nuclei.« less

  11. Molecular Gas Feeding the Circumnuclear Disk of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Kim, Woong-Tae; Tang, Ya-Wen; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The interaction between a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the surrounding material is of primary importance in modern astrophysics. The detection of the molecular 2 pc circumnuclear disk (CND) immediately around the Milky Way SMBH, SgrA*, provides a unique opportunity to study SMBH accretion at subparsec scales. Our new wide-field CS(J = 2 - 1) map toward the Galactic center (GC) reveals multiple dense molecular streamers that originated from the ambient clouds 20 pc further out, and that are connected to the central 2 pc of the CND. These dense gas streamers appear to carry gas directly toward the nuclear region and might be captured by the central potential. Our phase-plot analysis indicates that these streamers show a signature of rotation and inward radial motion with progressively higher velocities as the gas approaches the CND and finally ends up corotating with the CND. Our results might suggest a possible mechanism of gas feeding the CND from 20 pc around 2 pc in the GC. In this paper, we discuss the morphology and the kinematics of these streamers. As the nearest observable Galactic nucleus, this feeding process may have implications for understanding the processes in extragalactic nuclei.

  12. PHIBSS: Unified Scaling Relations of Gas Depletion Time and Molecular Gas Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.; Saintonge, A.; Combes, F.; García-Burillo, S.; Neri, R.; Bolatto, A.; Contini, T.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Lilly, S.; Lutz, D.; Wuyts, S.; Accurso, G.; Boissier, J.; Boone, F.; Bouché, N.; Bournaud, F.; Burkert, A.; Carollo, M.; Cooper, M.; Cox, P.; Feruglio, C.; Freundlich, J.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Juneau, S.; Lippa, M.; Naab, T.; Renzini, A.; Salome, P.; Sternberg, A.; Tadaki, K.; Übler, H.; Walter, F.; Weiner, B.; Weiss, A.

    2018-02-01

    This paper provides an update of our previous scaling relations between galaxy-integrated molecular gas masses, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs), in the framework of the star formation main sequence (MS), with the main goal of testing for possible systematic effects. For this purpose our new study combines three independent methods of determining molecular gas masses from CO line fluxes, far-infrared dust spectral energy distributions, and ∼1 mm dust photometry, in a large sample of 1444 star-forming galaxies between z = 0 and 4. The sample covers the stellar mass range log(M */M ⊙) = 9.0–11.8, and SFRs relative to that on the MS, δMS = SFR/SFR(MS), from 10‑1.3 to 102.2. Our most important finding is that all data sets, despite the different techniques and analysis methods used, follow the same scaling trends, once method-to-method zero-point offsets are minimized and uncertainties are properly taken into account. The molecular gas depletion time t depl, defined as the ratio of molecular gas mass to SFR, scales as (1 + z)‑0.6 × (δMS)‑0.44 and is only weakly dependent on stellar mass. The ratio of molecular to stellar mass μ gas depends on (1+z{)}2.5× {(δ {MS})}0.52× {({M}* )}-0.36, which tracks the evolution of the specific SFR. The redshift dependence of μ gas requires a curvature term, as may the mass dependences of t depl and μ gas. We find no or only weak correlations of t depl and μ gas with optical size R or surface density once one removes the above scalings, but we caution that optical sizes may not be appropriate for the high gas and dust columns at high z. Based on observations of an IRAM Legacy Program carried out with the NOEMA, operated by the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimetre Range (IRAM), which is funded by a partnership of INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  13. SDSS-IV MaNGA: the impact of diffuse ionized gas on emission-line ratios, interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas metallicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew; Haffner, L. Matthew; Walterbos, René; Maiolino, Roberto; Tremonti, Christy; Thomas, Daniel; Drory, Niv; Jones, Amy; Belfiore, Francesco; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Nitschelm, Christian; Andrews, Brett; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cheung, Edmond; Li, Cheng; Law, David R.; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Storchi Bergmann, Thaisa; Simmons, Audrey

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of 365 nearly face-on star-forming galaxies observed by Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impacts the measurements of emission-line ratios, hence the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas-phase metallicity measurements. At fixed metallicity, DIG-dominated low ΣHα regions display enhanced [S II]/Hα, [N II]/Hα, [O II]/Hβ and [O I]/Hα. The gradients in these line ratios are determined by metallicity gradients and ΣHα. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves H II regions towards composite or low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LI(N)ER)-like regions. A harder ionizing spectrum is needed to explain DIG line ratios. Leaky H II region models can only shift line ratios slightly relative to H II region models, and thus fail to explain the composite/LI(N)ER line ratios displayed by DIG. Our result favours ionization by evolved stars as a major ionization source for DIG with LI(N)ER-like emission. DIG can significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradients derived using strong-line methods. Metallicities derived using N2O2 are optimal because they exhibit the smallest bias and error. Using O3N2, R23, N2 = [N II]/Hα and N2S2Hα to derive metallicities introduces bias in the derived metallicity gradients as large as the gradient itself. The strong-line method of Blanc et al. (IZI hereafter) cannot be applied to DIG to get an accurate metallicity because it currently contains only H II region models that fail to describe the DIG.

  14. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution. IV. Star Formation and a Rotating Core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Neff, Susan Gale; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-01-01

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features.We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0".18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 micron [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution approx. 4 km/s: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  15. Warm Molecular Hydrogen and Ionized Neon in the HH 2 Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Cabrit, S.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Moro-Martín, A.; Cesarsky, D.

    2003-06-01

    We report on spectro-imaging observations of the Herbig-Haro 2 outflow with the ISOCAM camera on board the Infrared Space Observatory. The [Ne II] 12.81 μm and [Ne III] 15.55 μm lines are detected only toward the jet working surface (HH 2H), consistent with the high excitation of this knot in the optical range, while H2 pure rotational emission is found all over the shocked region HH 2. The low-energy transition S(2) traces warm gas (T~400 K) peaked toward knots E and F and extended ejecta (T~250-380 K) with masses of a few times 10-3 Msolar in the high-velocity CO outflow extending between the powering source and HH 2. Such emission could arise from low-velocity C-type shocks (v~=10-15 km s-1). The higher transitions S(3)-S(7) trace the emission of hot shocked gas (T=1000-1400 K) from individual optical knots in the HH 2 region. The ortho-to-para (OTP) ratio exhibits large spatial variations between 1.2 (knot E) and 2.5 (knot H), well below its value at LTE. The emission of the S(3)-S(7) lines is well accounted for by planar C-shock models with a typical velocity Vs=20-30 km s-1 propagating into a medium of density ni=104-105 cm-3 with an initial OTP ratio close to 1 in the preshock gas. In the leading edge of the jet, where the geometry of the emission allows a simple modeling, a good agreement is found with velocities derived from the optical proper motions measured in the ionized gas. Based on observations with the Infrared Space Observatory, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  16. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  17. Highly-ionized metals as probes of the circumburst gas in the natal regions of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, K. E.; Watson, D.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Bolmer, J.; Arabsalmani, M.; Cano, Z.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J.; Kaper, L.; Krogager, J.-K.; Pugliese, G.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Selsing, J.; Sparre, M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vergani, S. D.

    2018-06-01

    We present here a survey of high-ionization absorption lines in the afterglow spectra of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) obtained with the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph. Our main goal is to investigate the circumburst medium in the natal regions of GRBs. Our primary focus is on the N V λλ 1238,1242 line transitions, but we also discuss other high-ionization lines such as O VI, C IV and Si IV. We find no correlation between the column density of N V and the neutral gas properties such as metallicity, H I column density and dust depletion, however the relative velocity of N V, typically a blueshift with respect to the neutral gas, is found to be correlated with the column density of H I. This may be explained if the N V gas is part of an H II region hosting the GRB, where the region's expansion is confined by dense, neutral gas in the GRB's host galaxy. We find tentative evidence (at 2σ significance) that the X-ray derived column density, NH, X, may be correlated with the column density of N V, which would indicate that both measurements are sensitive to the column density of the gas located in the vicinity of the GRB. We investigate the scenario where N V (and also O VI) is produced by recombination after the corresponding atoms have been stripped entirely of their electrons by the initial prompt emission, in contrast to previous models where highly-ionized gas is produced by photoionization from the GRB afterglow.

  18. Demonstration of Laser Induced Acoustic Desoprtion - Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIAD-CIMS) for Fragment-Free Measurements of Organic Aerosol Molecular Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, E. C.; Abdelhamid, A.; Berry, J.; Alton, M.

    2017-12-01

    Organic compounds account for a significant portion of fine atmospheric aerosol. Current analytical techniques have provided insights on organic aerosol (OA) sources, composition, and chemical modification pathways. Despite this knowledge, large uncertainties remain and hinder our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate, air quality, and health. Measuring OA composition is challenging due to the complex chemical composition and the wide variation in the properties (e.g., vapor pressure, solubility, reactivity) of organic compounds. In many current measurement techniques, the ability to chemically resolve and quantify OA components is complicated by molecular decomposition, matrix effects, and/or preferential ionization mechanisms. Here, we utilize a novel desorption technique, laser induced acoustic desorption (LIAD), that generates fragment-free, neutral gas-phase molecules. We couple LIAD with a high-resolution chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) to provide molecular composition OA measurements. Through a series of laboratory experiments, we demonstrate the ability of this technique to measure large, thermally labile species without fragmentation/thermal decomposition. We discuss quantification and detection limits of this technique. We compare LIAD-CIMS measurements with thermal desorption-CIMS measurements using off-line measurements of ambient aerosol collected in Boulder, CO. Lastly, we discuss future development for on-line measurements of OA using LIAD-CIMS.

  19. Photoelectron resonance capture ionization-aerosol mass spectrometry of the ozonolysis products of oleic acid particles: Direct measure of higher molecular weight oxygenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahardis, James; Lafranchi, Brian W.; Petrucci, Giuseppe A.

    2005-04-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of particle-phase 9-octadecenoic acid (oleic acid) and gas-phase ozone in a flow reactor was studied by photoelectron resonance capture ionization (PERCI) mass spectrometry. This soft ionization technique facilitated one of the first simultaneous, direct observations of all four of the major products predicted for this reaction: nonanal, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, and azelaic acid. In addition, a series of higher molecular weight oxygenated compounds were observed directly for the first time. The proposed structures are all cyclic oxygenates and contain the oxygen-oxygen moiety, including secondary ozonides and cyclic geminal diperoxides. Mechanisms for the formation of these products are proposed. The mechanisms are generally 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions that lead to five- and six-member oxygen-containing rings. The mechanisms are shown to involve short-lived Criegee intermediates reacting with aldehydes and other Criegee intermediates. Atmospheric implications of these higher molecular weight compounds are suggested and include enhancing the fatty acid medium's capacity to act as a source of radicals due to the prominence of the peroxide moiety. The low volatility coupled with the high polarity of these compounds may alter particle phase hygroscopicity that can enhance the cloud condensation nuclei properties of these particles.

  20. A new method for differentiating adducts of common drinking water DBPs from higher molecular weight DBPs in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiangru

    2009-05-01

    With the presence of bromide in source waters, numerous brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed during chlorination. Many of them are polar/highly polar DBPs and thus hard to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) is reported to be an effective method in finding polar brominated DBPs by setting precursor ion scans of m/z 79 and 81. But as a soft ionization technique, ESI could form adducts of common DBPs, which may complicate ESI-MS/MS spectra and hinder the efforts in finding new brominated DBPs. In this paper, a new method was developed for differentiating adducts of common DBPs from higher molecular weight DBPs. This method was based on the ESI-MS/MS precursor ion scans of the fragments that correspond to the molecular ions of common DBPs. Adducts of common DBPs were selectively detected in the ESI-MS/MS spectra of a simulated drinking water sample. Moreover, the structures of several new brominated DBPs in the sample were tentatively proposed.

  1. Dynamic Contraction of the Positive Column of a Self-Sustained Glow Discharge in Molecular Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Contraction of the gas discharge, when current contracts from a significant volume of weakly ionized plasma into a thin arc channel, was attracted attention of scientists for more than a century. Studies of the contraction (also called constriction) mechanisms, besides carrying interesting science, are of practical importance, especially when contraction should be prevented. A set of time-dependent two-dimensional equations for the non-equilibrium weakly-ionized nitrogen/ air plasma is formulated. The process is described by a set of time-dependent continuity equations for the electrons, positive and negative ions; gas and vibrational temperature; by taking into account the convective heat and plasma losses by the transverse flux. Transition from the uniform to contracted state was analyzed. It was shown that such transition experiences a hysteresis, and that the critical current of the transition increases when the pressure (gas density) drops. Possible coexistence of the contracted and uniform state of the plasma in the discharge where the current flows along the density gradient of the background gas was discussed. In this talk the problems related to the dynamic contraction of the current channel inside a quasineutral positive column of a self-sustained glow discharge in molecular gas in a rectangular duct with convection cooling will be discussed. Study presented in this talk was stimulated by the fact that there are large number of experiments on the dynamic contraction of a glow discharge in nitrogen and air flows and a many of possible applications. Similar processes play a role in the powerful gas-discharge lasers. In addition, the problem of dynamic contraction in the large volume of non-equilibrium weakly ionized plasma is closely related to the problem of streamer to leader transitions in lightning and blue jets.

  2. Approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds with laser desorption/ionization techniques and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Nina; Shevchenko, Denys; Bergquist, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes various approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight (LMW) compounds by different laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry techniques (LDI-MS). It is common to use an agent to assist the ionization, and small molecules are normally difficult to analyze by, e.g., matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) using the common matrices available today, because the latter are generally small organic compounds themselves. This often results in severe suppression of analyte peaks, or interference of the matrix and analyte signals in the low mass region. However, intrinsic properties of several LDI techniques such as high sensitivity, low sample consumption, high tolerance towards salts and solid particles, and rapid analysis have stimulated scientists to develop methods to circumvent matrix-related issues in the analysis of LMW molecules. Recent developments within this field as well as historical considerations and future prospects are presented in this review.

  3. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Tissue Damage in the Feather Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage. PMID:24586618

  4. Superbasic alkyl-substituted bisphosphazene proton sponges: a new class of deprotonating matrices for negative ion matrix-assisted ionization/laser desorption mass spectrometry of low molecular weight hardly ionizable analytes.

    PubMed

    Calvano, C D; Cataldi, T R I; Kögel, J F; Monopoli, A; Palmisano, F; Sundermeyer, J

    2016-07-30

    Here hardly ionizable and low molecular weight compounds are detected in negative ion mode by using novel superbasic proton sponges based on 1,8-bisphosphazenylnaphthalene (PN) as MALDI matrices. Among the selected proton sponges, 1,8-bis(trispyrrolidinophosphazenyl)naphthalene (TPPN) has shown the best behaviour as matrix since it allows the direct detection of intact cholesterol without derivatization also in real challenging samples. Very weakly acidic compounds such as sterols, steroids, fatty alcohols and saccharides were detected in reflectron negative ion mode by a MALDI TOF/TOF system equipped with a neodymium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Nd:YLF) laser (345 nm) with typical mass accuracy of 10 ppm. MS/MS experiments were performed by using ambient air as the collision gas. Contrary to traditional MALDI matrices, superbasic proton sponges allowed the easy deprotonation of an alcohol functional group without a previous chemical derivatization step. Experimental evidence indicates that analyte deprotonation is achieved in the condensed phase, i.e. PN superbasic proton sponges operate according to a recently proposed model named matrix assisted ionization/laser desorption (MAILD). A detection limit of 3 pmol/spot of cholesterol (model compound) with a signal-to-noise ratio ≥ 10 was typically obtained. For the first time, the usefulness of novel superbasic proton sponges is demonstrated for MALDI detection of hardly ionizable compounds such as sterols, steroids, fatty alcohols and saccharides. The leading candidate TPPN has been successfully applied for negative ion MAILD-MS analysis of cholesterol, fatty acids and phospholipids in egg yolk and brain tissue extracts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Electrospray Ionization Efficiency Is Dependent on Different Molecular Descriptors with Respect to Solvent pH and Instrumental Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Kiontke, Andreas; Oliveira-Birkmeier, Ariana; Opitz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, electrospray ionization for mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become one of the most commonly employed techniques in analytical chemistry, mainly due to its broad applicability to polar and semipolar compounds and the superior selectivity which is achieved in combination with high resolution separation techniques. However, responsiveness of an analytical method also determines its suitability for the quantitation of chemical compounds; and in electrospray ionization for mass spectrometry, it can vary significantly among different analytes with identical solution concentrations. Therefore, we investigated the ESI-response behavior of 56 nitrogen-containing compounds including aromatic amines and pyridines, two compound classes of high importance to both, synthetic organic chemistry as well as to pharmaceutical sciences. These compounds are increasingly analyzed employing ESI mass spectrometry detection due to their polar, basic character. Signal intensities of the peaks from the protonated molecular ion (MH+) were acquired under different conditions and related to compound properties such as basicity, polarity, volatility and molecular size exploring their quantitative impact on ionization efficiency. As a result, we found that though solution basicity of a compound is the main factor initially determining the ESI response of the protonated molecular ion, other factors such as polarity and vaporability become more important under acidic solvent conditions and may nearly outweigh the importance of basicity under these conditions. Moreover, we show that different molecular descriptors may become important when using different types of instruments for such investigations, a fact not detailed so far in the available literature. PMID:27907110

  6. Improved molecular level identification of organic compounds using comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography, dual ionization energies and high resolution mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Worton, David R.; Decker, Monika; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; ...

    2017-05-22

    A new analytical methodology combining comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC), dual ionization energies and high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry has been developed that improves molecular level identification of organic compounds in complex environmental samples. GC×GC maximizes compound separation providing cleaner mass spectra by minimizing erroneous fragments from interferences and co-eluting peaks. Traditional electron ionization (EI, 70 eV) provides MS fragmentation patterns that can be matched to published EI MS libraries while vacuum ultraviolet photoionization (VUV, 10.5 eV) yields MS with reduced fragmentation enhancing the abundance of the molecular ion providing molecular formulas when combined with high resolution massmore » spectrometry. We demonstrate this new approach by applying it to a sample of organic aerosol. In this sample, 238 peaks were matched to EI MS library data with FM ≥ 800 but a fifth (42 compounds) were determined to be incorrectly identified because the molecular formula was not confirmed by the VUV MS data. This highlights the importance of using a complementary technique to confirm compound identifications even for peaks with very good matching statistics. In total, 171 compounds were identified by EI MS matching to library spectra with confirmation of the molecular formula from the high resolution VUV MS data and were not dependent on the matching statistics being above a threshold value. A large number of unidentified peaks were still observed with FM < 800, which in routine analysis would typically be neglected. Where possible, these peaks were assigned molecular formulas from the VUV MS data (211 in total). In total, the combination of EI and VUV MS data provides more than twice as much molecular level peak information than traditional approaches and improves confidence in the identification of individual organic compounds. The molecular formula data from the VUV MS data was used, in

  7. Improved molecular level identification of organic compounds using comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography, dual ionization energies and high resolution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Worton, David R.; Decker, Monika; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel

    A new analytical methodology combining comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC), dual ionization energies and high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry has been developed that improves molecular level identification of organic compounds in complex environmental samples. GC×GC maximizes compound separation providing cleaner mass spectra by minimizing erroneous fragments from interferences and co-eluting peaks. Traditional electron ionization (EI, 70 eV) provides MS fragmentation patterns that can be matched to published EI MS libraries while vacuum ultraviolet photoionization (VUV, 10.5 eV) yields MS with reduced fragmentation enhancing the abundance of the molecular ion providing molecular formulas when combined with high resolution massmore » spectrometry. We demonstrate this new approach by applying it to a sample of organic aerosol. In this sample, 238 peaks were matched to EI MS library data with FM ≥ 800 but a fifth (42 compounds) were determined to be incorrectly identified because the molecular formula was not confirmed by the VUV MS data. This highlights the importance of using a complementary technique to confirm compound identifications even for peaks with very good matching statistics. In total, 171 compounds were identified by EI MS matching to library spectra with confirmation of the molecular formula from the high resolution VUV MS data and were not dependent on the matching statistics being above a threshold value. A large number of unidentified peaks were still observed with FM < 800, which in routine analysis would typically be neglected. Where possible, these peaks were assigned molecular formulas from the VUV MS data (211 in total). In total, the combination of EI and VUV MS data provides more than twice as much molecular level peak information than traditional approaches and improves confidence in the identification of individual organic compounds. The molecular formula data from the VUV MS data was used, in

  8. Hα and [SII] emission from warm Ionized GAS in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin C.

    2014-06-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [SII] λ6716 and Hα spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310° < l < 345°. Using extinction-corrected Hα intensities (I{sub Hα}{sup c}), we measure an exponential scale height of electron density squared in the arm of H{sub n{sub e{sup 2}}}=0.30 kpc (assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc), intermediate between that observed in the inner Galaxy and in the Perseus Arm. The [S II]/Hα line ratio is enhanced at large |z| and in sightlines with faint I{sub Hα}{sup c}. We find that the [S II]/Hα line ratiomore » has a power-law relationship with I{sub Hα}{sup c} from a value of ≈1.0 at I{sub Hα}{sup c}<0.2 R (Rayleighs) to a value of ≈0.08 at I{sub Hα}{sup c}≳100 R. The line ratio is better correlated with Hα intensity than with height above the plane, indicating that the physical conditions within the WIM vary systematically with electron density. We argue that the variation of the line ratio with height is a consequence of the decrease of electron density with height. Our results reinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse Hα emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.« less

  9. SIGGMA: A SURVEY OF IONIZED GAS IN THE GALAXY, MADE WITH THE ARECIBO TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; McIntyre, T.; Terzian, Y.

    A Survey of Ionized Gas in the Galaxy, made with the Arecibo telescope (SIGGMA), uses the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) to fully sample the Galactic plane (30 Degree-Sign {<=} l {<=} 75 Degree-Sign and -2 Degree-Sign {<=} b {<=} 2 Degree-Sign ; 175 Degree-Sign {<=} l {<=} 207 Degree-Sign and -2 Degree-Sign {<=} b {<=} 1 Degree-Sign ) observable with the telescope in radio recombination lines (RRLs). Processed data sets are being produced in the form of data cubes of 2 Degree-Sign (along l) Multiplication-Sign 4 Degree-Sign (along b) Multiplication-Sign 151 (number of channels), archived and made public. Themore » 151 channels cover a velocity range of 600 km s{sup -1} and the velocity resolution of the survey changes from 4.2 km s{sup -1} to 5.1 km s{sup -1} from the lowest frequency channel to the highest frequency channel. RRL maps with 3.'4 resolution and a line flux density sensitivity of {approx}0.5 mJy will enable us to identify new H II regions, measure their electron temperatures, study the physics of photodissociation regions with carbon RRLs, and investigate the origin of the extended low-density medium. Twelve Hn{alpha} lines fall within the 300 MHz bandpass of ALFA; they are resampled to a common velocity resolution to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) by a factor of three or more and preserve the line width. SIGGMA will produce the most sensitive fully sampled RRL survey to date. Here, we discuss the observing and data reduction techniques in detail. A test observation toward the H II region complex S255/S257 has detected Hn{alpha} and Cn{alpha} lines with S/N > 10.« less

  10. MOLECULAR GAS DISK STRUCTURES AROUND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Keiichi; Papadopoulos, Padeli P.; Spaans, Marco

    We present new high-resolution numerical simulations of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a central R {<=} 32 parsecs region around a supermassive black hole (1.3 x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) at a galactic center. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of the ISM (Wada and Norman 2002) with the nuclear starburst now includes tracking of the formation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) out of the neutral hydrogen phase as a function of the evolving ambient ISM conditions with a finer spatial resolution (0.125 pc). In a quasi-equilibrium state, mass fraction of H{sub 2} is about 0.4 (total H{sub 2} mass is {approx_equal}1.5 xmore » 10{sup 6} M{sub sun}) of the total gas mass for the uniform far ultra-violet (FUV) with G {sub 0} = 10 in Habing unit. As shown in the previous model, the gas forms an inhomogeneous disk, whose scale height becomes larger in the outer region. H{sub 2} forms a thin nuclear disk in the inner {approx_equal}5 pc, which is surrounded by molecular clouds swelled up toward h {approx}< 10 pc. The velocity field of the disk is highly turbulent in the torus region, whose velocity dispersion is {approx_equal}20 km s{sup -1} on average. Average supernova (SN) rate of {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1} is large enough to energize these structures. Gas column densities toward the nucleus larger than 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} are observed if the viewing angle is smaller than {theta} {sub v} {approx_equal} 50 deg. from the edge-on. However, the column densities are distributed over almost two orders of magnitude around the average for any given viewing angle due to the clumpy nature of the torus. For a stronger FUV (G {sub 0} = 100), the total H{sub 2} mass in an equilibrium is only slightly smaller ({approx_equal}0.35), a testimony to the strong self-shielding nature of H{sub 2}, and the molecular gas is somewhat more concentrated in a midplane. Other properties of the ISM are not very sensitive either to the FUV intensity or the SN rate. Finally, the

  11. Penning ionization and ion fragmentation of formamide HCONH2 by He∗, Ne∗, and Ar∗ in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Tamika A.; Siska, P. E.

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectra from Penning ionization by metastable atom bombardment (MAB) in the title system at kinetic energies near 1 kcal/mol are reported. The experiments employ a supersonic excited noble gas beam crossing an effusive beam of formamide vapor. Product ions are extracted perpendicular to the plane of the beams, analyzed by a quadrupole mass filter, and counted by a scintillation-type ion counter. Relative to 70 eV electron impact, the He∗ and Ne∗ spectra show more extensive breakage of C-N and C-H bonds despite the smaller available energy, while the Ar∗ spectrum shows only the molecular ion (m /z 45), H atom elimination (44), and the decarbonylation products CO+NH3+ (17). Fragmentation in the latter system has been analyzed using a combination of ab initio calculations and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory with tunneling correction; good agreement with the experimental 45/44/17 intensity ratio 100/6.8±0.7/6.2±1.7 is obtained. 15% of m/z 17 and 50% of m /z 44 is attributed to tunneling. The ab initio decarbonylation reaction path yields a hydrogen bonded H2N-HCO+ transition state, which transfers a proton while proceeding downhill to the observed products, while both the path and the energetics support the earlier conclusion that the lowest lying electronically excited state of the ion (2π or 2a″) crosses the ground state early along the reaction path, thereby dominating the dynamics of decarbonylation.

  12. New Perspectives on the Dynamical State of Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Erin; Zweibel, Ellen; Gallagher, John S.; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2018-01-01

    Gaseous, disk-halo interfaces are an important boundary in the baryon cycle in galaxies like the Milky Way, and their structure, support, and kinematics carry clues about the star formation feedback and accretion processes that produce them. Due to their unexpectedly large scale heights, which are often several times greater than their thermal scale heights, it is unclear whether they are in dynamical equilibrium, or are evidence of a galactic fountain, wind, or accretion flow. In the nearby, edge-on disk galaxies NGC 891 and NGC 5775, we test a dynamical equilibrium model of the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) layer by quantifying the thermal, turbulent, magnetic field, and cosmic ray pressure gradients using optical emission-line spectroscopy from the SparsePak IFU at the WIYN Observatory and the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope and radio continuum observations from Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey. The vertical pressure gradients are too shallow to produce the observed scale heights at the moderate galactocentric radii where the gas is believed to be found (R < 8 kpc). For the low-inclination galaxy M83, we develop a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to decompose the [NII]λλ6548, 6583, Hα, and [SII]λλ6717, 6731 emission lines into multiple components, and identify eDIG emission based on its rotational velocity lag and elevated [NII]/Hα and [SII]/Hα line ratios. The median, line-of-sight velocity dispersion of the eDIG layer, σ = 96 km/s, greatly exceeds the horizontal velocity dispersions observed in edge-on eDIG layers (σ = 20 - 60 km/s), presenting the possibility that these layers have anisotropic random motions. The role of an anisotropic velocity dispersion in producing eDIG scale heights, as well as the absence of evidence for large-scale inflow or outflow, motivates further study of eDIG dynamics in face-on galaxies with a range of star formation rates. This work was supported by the NSF

  13. Tracing kinematic (mis)alignments in CALIFA merging galaxies. Stellar and ionized gas kinematic orientations at every merger stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Wild, V.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Marquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Ziegler, B.; del Olmo, A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Mast, D.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Marino, R. A.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Walcher, C. J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Bomans, D. J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bekeraitė, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved stellar and/or ionized gas kinematic properties for a sample of 103 interacting galaxies, tracing all merger stages: close companions, pairs with morphological signatures of interaction, and coalesced merger remnants. In order to distinguish kinematic properties caused by a merger event from those driven by internal processes, we compare our galaxies with a control sample of 80 non-interacting galaxies. We measure for both the stellar and the ionized gas components the major (projected) kinematic position angles (PAkin, approaching and receding) directly from the velocity distributions with no assumptions on the internal motions. This method also allow us to derive the deviations of the kinematic PAs from a straight line (δPAkin). We find that around half of the interacting objects show morpho-kinematic PA misalignments that cannot be found in the control sample. In particular, we observe those misalignments in galaxies with morphological signatures of interaction. On the other hand, thelevel of alignment between the approaching and receding sides for both samples is similar, with most of the galaxies displaying small misalignments. Radial deviations of the kinematic PA orientation from a straight line in the stellar component measured by δPAkin are large for both samples. However, for a large fraction of interacting galaxies the ionized gas δPAkin is larger than the typical values derived from isolated galaxies (48%), indicating that this parameter is a good indicator to trace the impact of interaction and mergers in the internal motions of galaxies. By comparing the stellar and ionized gas kinematic PA, we find that 42% (28/66) of the interacting galaxies have misalignments larger than 16°, compared to 10% from the control sample. Our results show the impact of interactions in the motion of stellar and ionized gas as well as the wide the variety of their spatially resolved kinematic distributions. This study also provides a local

  14. Highly ionized gas absorption in the disk and halo toward HD 167756 at 3.5 kilometers per second resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of interstellar Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption lines along the 4 kpc path to the inner Galaxy star HD 167756 at z = -0.85 kpc are presented. The spectra were obtained with the echelle mode of Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 23 to 38. The high resolution of the measurements full width at half maximum (FWHM = 3.5 km/s) results in fully resolved line profiles for the highly ionized gas absorption. The measurements provide information on the column density per unit velocity, N(v), as a function of velocity for Si IV, C IV, and N V. The C IV and N V profiles extend from -70 to +70 km/s, while the Si IV profiles extend from -40 to +70 km/s. The integrated logarithmic column densities are long N(Si IV) = 13.09 +/- 0.02, log N(C IV) = 13.83 +/- 0.02, and log N(N V) = 13.56 +/- 0.03. The N V profile is broad, asymmetric, and featureless, while the Si IV profile contains narrow absorption components near V(sub LSR) = -19, 0, +20, and +52 km/s with Doppler spread parameters, b about = 10-12 km/s. The C IV profile contains both broad and narrow structure. The high ion feature near +52 km/s is also detected in the low-ionization lines of Ca II, O I, Si II, and Fe II. The other narrow Si IV and C IV components occur within several km/s of components seen in low-ionization species. The sight line contains at least two types of highly ionized gas. One type gives rise to a broad N V profile, and the other results in the more structured Si IV profile. The C IV profile contains contributions from both types of highly ionized gas. The broad but asymmetric N V profile is well represented by a large Galactic scale height gas which is participating in Galactic rotation and has a combination of thermal and turbulent broadening with b(sub tot) about = 42 km/s. The C IV to N V abundance ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.3 for the gas implies T about 1.6 x 10(exp 5) K or about 8 x 10

  15. Understanding the molecular signatures in leaves and flowers by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R G; Pradeep, T

    2013-08-07

    The difference in size, shape, and chemical cues of leaves and flowers display the underlying genetic makeup and their interactions with the environment. The need to understand the molecular signatures of these fragile plant surfaces is illustrated with a model plant, Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don). Flat, thin layer chromatographic imprints of leaves/petals were imaged using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS), and the results were compared with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of their extracts. Tandem mass spectrometry with DESI and ESI, in conjunction with database records, confirmed the molecular species. This protocol has been extended to other plants. Implications of this study in identifying varietal differences, toxic metabolite production, changes in metabolites during growth, pest/pathogen attack, and natural stresses are shown with illustrations. The possibility to image subtle features like eye color of petals, leaf vacuole, leaf margin, and veins is demonstrated.

  16. Characterising the Dense Molecular Gas in Exceptional Local Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnard, Richard C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The interferometric facilities now coming online (the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) and the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA)) and those planned for the coming decade (the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA)) in the radio to sub-millimetre regimes are opening a window to the molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies. However, our understanding of similar galaxies in the local universe is still far from complete and the data analysis techniques and tools needed to interpret the observations in consistent and comparable ways are yet to be developed. I first describe the Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) script developed to empower a public radiative transfer code. I characterise both the public code and MCMC script, including an exploration of the effect of observing molecular lines at high redshift where the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) can provide a significant background, as well as the effect this can have on well-known local correlations. I present two studies of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) in the local universe making use of literature and collaborator data. In the first of these, NGC6240, I use the wealth of available data and the geometry of the source to develop a multi-phase, multi-species model, finding evidence for a complex medium of hot diffuse and cold dense gas in pressure equilibrium. Next, I study the prototypical ULIRG Arp 220; an extraordinary galaxy rendered especially interesting by the controversy over the power source of the western of the two merger nuclei and its immense luminosity and dust obscuration. Using traditional grid based methods I explore the molecular gas conditions within the nuclei and find evidence for chemical differentiation between the two nuclei, potentially related to the obscured power source. Finally, I investigate the potential evolution of proto-clusters over cosmic time with sub-millimetre observations of 14 radio galaxies, unexpectedly finding

  17. Molecular gas in supernova local environments unveiled by EDGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, L.; Mora, L.; González-Gaitán, S.; Bolatto, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maeda, K.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Sánchez, S. F.; Wong, T.; Badenes, C.; Blitz, L.; Marino, R. A.; Utomo, D.; Van de Ven, G.

    2017-06-01

    CO observations allow estimation of the gas content of molecular clouds, which trace the reservoir of cold gas fuelling star formation, as well as determination of extinction via H2 column density, N(H2). Here, we study millimetric and optical properties at 26 supernovae (SNe) locations of different types in a sample of 23 nearby galaxies, by combining molecular 12C16O (J = 1 → 0) resolved maps from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution (EDGE) survey and optical Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. We found an even clearer separation between type II and type Ibc SNe in terms of molecular gas than is found in the optical using Hα emission as a proxy for the current star formation (SF) rate, which reinforces the fact that SNe Ibc are more associated with SF environments. While AV at SN locations is similar for SNe II and SNe Ibc and higher than for SNe Ia, N(H2) is significantly higher for SNe Ibc than for SNe II and Ia. When compared with alternative extinction estimations made directly from SN photometry and spectroscopy, we find that our SNe Ibc also have redder colour excess, but showed standard Na I D absorption pseudo-equivalent widths (˜1 Å). In some cases, we find no extinction when IT is estimated from the environment but high amounts of extinction when measured from SN observations, which suggests that circumstellar material or dust sublimation may be playing a role. This work serves as a benchmark for future studies combining last-generation millimetre and optical IFS instruments to reveal the local environmental properties of extragalactic SNe.

  18. High-Flux Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes for Gas Separation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hannes; Voss, Hartwig; Kaltenborn, Nadine; Kämnitz, Susanne; Wollbrink, Alexander; Feldhoff, Armin; Caro, Jürgen; Roitsch, Stefan; Voigt, Ingolf

    2017-06-26

    Carbon membranes have great potential for highly selective and cost-efficient gas separation. Carbon is chemically stable and it is relative cheap. The controlled carbonization of a polymer coating on a porous ceramic support provides a 3D carbon material with molecular sieving permeation performance. The carbonization of the polymer blend gives turbostratic carbon domains of randomly stacked together sp 2 hybridized carbon sheets as well as sp 3 hybridized amorphous carbon. In the evaluation of the carbon molecular sieve membrane, hydrogen could be separated from propane with a selectivity of 10 000 with a hydrogen permeance of 5 m 3 (STP)/(m 2 hbar). Furthermore, by a post-synthesis oxidative treatment, the permeation fluxes are increased by widening the pores, and the molecular sieve carbon membrane is transformed from a molecular sieve carbon into a selective surface flow carbon membrane with adsorption controlled performance and becomes selective for carbon dioxide. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toburen, L. H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets.

  20. Ionization of the diffuse gas in galaxies: Hot low-mass evolved stars at work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Morisset, C.; Stasinska, G.; Binette, L.

    2011-10-01

    The Diffuse Ionized Medium (DIG) is visible through its faint optical line emission outside classical HII regions (Reynolds 1971) and turns out to be a major component of the interstellar medium in galaxies. OB stars in galaxies likely represent the main source of ionizing photons for the DIG. However, an additional source is needed to explain the increase of [NII]/Hα, [SII]/Hα with galactic height.

  1. An Experimental and Computational Evaluation of the Importance of Molecular Diffusion in Gas Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jeremy J.

    The accidental release of hazardous, denser-than-air gases during their transport or manufacture is a vital area of study for process safety researchers. This project examines the importance of molecular diffusion on the developing concentration field of a gas gravity current released into a calm environment. Questions which arose from the unexpectedly severe explosion in 2005 at Buncefield, England were of particular interest. The accidental overfilling of a large tank with gasoline on a completely calm morning led to a massive open air explosion. Forensic evidence showed that at the time of ignition, a vapor cloud, most of which now appears to have been within the flammability limits, covered approximately 120,000 m2. Neither the severity of the explosion, nor the size of the vapor cloud would have been anticipated. Experiments were conducted in which carbon dioxide was released from a sunken source into a one meter wide channel devoid of any wind. These experiments were designed in such a way as to mitigate the formation of a raised head at the front of the gravity current which would have resulted in turbulent entrainment of air. This was done to create a flow in which molecular diffusion was the controlling form of mixing between the carbon dioxide and air. Concentration measurements were taken using flame ionization detection at varying depths and down channel locations. A model of the experiments was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics. The only form of mixing allowed between carbon dioxide and air in the model was molecular diffusion. In this manner the accuracy of the assertion that molecular diffusion was controlling in our experiments was checked and verified. Experimental measurements showed a large variation of gas concentration with depth of the gravity current at the very beginning of the channel where the gas emerged up from the sunken source and began flowing down channel. Due to this variation, molecular diffusion caused the vertical concentration

  2. Ionization of Local Interstellar Gas Based on STIS and FUSE spectra of Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Seth; Linsky, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    The ultraviolet contains many resonance line transitions that are sensitive to a range of ionization stages of ions present in the local interstellar medium (LISM). We couple observations of high resolution ultraviolet spectrographs, STIS and GHRS on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) in order to make a comprehensive survey of the ionization structure of the local interstellar medium. In particular, we focus on the sight line toward G191-B2B, a nearby (69 pc) white dwarf. We present interstellar detections of highly ionized elements (e.g., SiIII, CIII, CIV, etc) and compare them directly to neutral or singly ionized LISM detections (e.g., SiII, CII, etc). The extensive observations of G191-B2B provides an opportunity for a broad study of ionization stages of several elements, while a survey of several sight lines provides a comprehensive look at the ionization structure of the LISM. We acknowledge support for this project through NASA FUSE Grant NNX06AD33G.

  3. Radiative properties of molecular nitrogen ions produced by helium Penning ionization and argon effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George, III; Song, Kyo-Dong

    1994-01-01

    The development of hypersonic aerospace vehicles requires a better understanding on the thermal and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics of participating species in shock layers. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes developed for such flowfields overestimate the radiation in the spectral region of 300 - 600 nm. A speculation for this overestimation is that inclusion of Ar, CO2, and H2O at the upper atmosphere flight region makes a significant impact on radiative kinetics of molecular nitrogen ions. To define the effects of minority species on the radiative kinetics of N2(+), an experimental setup was made by using the helium Penning ionization. The vibrational and rotational temperature were measured by mapping the vibrational and rotational distributions of N2(+) emission with high spectroscopic resolution and absolute intensity measurements. Measured vibrational temperatures were in the range from 18,000 to 36,000 K, and rotational temperatures were in the range from 300 to 370 K. The irradiance of 391.44 nm line and rotational and vibrational temperatures were analyzed to define argon and CO2 effects on the N2(+) emission. When Ar or CO2 is injected with N2, the rotational temperature did not change. The irradiances were reduced by 34 percent and 78 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. The vibrational temperatures were increased by 24.1 percent and 82.9 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. It appears that there are no significant effects from small concentrations of Ar and CO2 at the upper atmosphere flight region.

  4. WISDOM Project - III. Molecular gas measurement of the supermassive black hole mass in the barred lenticular galaxy NGC4429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Onishi, Kyoko; van de Voort, Freeke; Cappellari, Michele; Iguchi, Satoru; Liu, Lijie; North, Eve V.; Sarzi, Marc; Smith, Mark D.

    2018-01-01

    As part of the mm-Wave Interferometric Survey of Dark Object Masses project we present an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the nearby fast-rotating early-type galaxy NGC4429, that is barred and has a boxy/peanut-shaped bulge. This estimate is based on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle-2 observations of the 12CO(3-2) emission line with a linear resolution of ≈13 pc (0.18 arcsec × 0.14 arcsec). NGC4429 has a relaxed, flocculent nuclear disc of molecular gas that is truncated at small radii, likely due to the combined effects of gas stability and tidal shear. The warm/dense 12CO(3-2) emitting gas is confined to the inner parts of this disc, likely again because the gas becomes more stable at larger radii, preventing star formation. The gas disc has a low velocity dispersion of 2.2^{+0.68}_{-0.65} km s-1. Despite the inner truncation of the gas disc, we are able to model the kinematics of the gas and estimate a mass of (1.5 ± 0.1^{+0.15}_{-0.35}) × 108 M⊙ for the SMBH in NGC4429 (where the quoted uncertainties reflect the random and systematic uncertainties, respectively), consistent with a previous upper limit set using ionized gas kinematics. We confirm that the V-band mass-to-light ratio changes by ≈30 per cent within the inner 400 pc of NGC4429, as suggested by other authors. This SMBH mass measurement based on molecular gas kinematics, the sixth presented in the literature, once again demonstrates the power of ALMA to constrain SMBH masses.

  5. Investigation of ionization-induced electron injection in a wakefield driven by laser inside a gas cell

    DOE PAGES

    Audet, T. L.; Hansson, M.; Lee, P.; ...

    2016-02-16

    Ionization-induced electron injection was investigated experimentally by focusing a driving laser pulse with a maximum normalized potential of 1.2 at different positions along the plasma density profile inside a gas cell, filled with a gas mixture composed of 99%H 2+1%N 2. Changing the laser focus position relative to the gas cell entrance controls the accelerated electron bunch properties, such as the spectrum width, maximum energy, and accelerated charge. Simulations performed using the 3D particle-in-cell code WARP with a realistic density profile give results that are in good agreement with the experimental ones. Lastly, we discuss the interest of this regimemore » for optimizing the bunch charge in a selected energy window.« less

  6. Molecular gas in elliptical galaxies with dust lanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Ishizuki, Sumio

    1992-01-01

    We have searched for CO(1-0) line emission in eight dust lane elliptical and lenticular galaxies using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. Five of the eight galaxies, including the well-studied elliptical NGC 1052, have CO emission at above the 5-sigma level, with inferred molecular gas masses ranging from 10 exp 8 to a few times 10 exp 9 solar masses. Our selection criterion differs from previous surveys in that it does not depend on the FIR fluxes, and thus is less sensitive to the sizes and distances of the host galaxies or to the degree to which dust is heated. The relatively high detection rate of CO in these ellipticals suggests a close correlation between molecular mass and cold dust. Compared with previously studied samples of FIR selected early-type galaxies, our sample has on average four times more CO emission per unit FIR (40-120 microns) luminosity. If the intrinsic gas-to-dust ratio of these galaxies as similar to that of the Milky Way, then only about 5 percent of the dust mass in dust lane ellipticals radiates substantially at 60 and 100 microns, and the remaining dust must be colder than about 30 K.

  7. Present-day Galactic Evolution: Low-metallicity, Warm, Ionized Gas Inflow Associated with High-velocity Cloud Complex A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin Hα Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s-1 in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full Hα intensity map of Complex A across (\\mathit {l, b}) = (124{^\\circ }, 18{^\\circ }) to (171°, 53°) and deep targeted observations in Hα, [S II] λ6716, [N II] λ6584, and [O I] λ6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The Hα data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 106 M ⊙. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn & Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 104 K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  8. PRESENT-DAY GALACTIC EVOLUTION: LOW-METALLICITY, WARM, IONIZED GAS INFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD COMPLEX A

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.

    2012-12-20

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s{sup -1} in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full H{alpha} intensity map of Complex A across (l, b) = (124 Degree-Sign , 18 Degree-Sign ) to (171 Degree-Sign , 53 Degree-Sign ) and deep targeted observationsmore » in H{alpha}, [S II] {lambda}6716, [N II] {lambda}6584, and [O I] {lambda}6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The H{alpha} data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn and Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 10{sup 4} K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.« less

  9. Making a molecular gas in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2017-04-01

    Ultracold molecules are exciting systems for a large range of scientific explorations including studies of novel phases of matter and precision measurement. In this talk, I will present a brief story of the first quantum gas of molecules, KRb, created under my PhD advisor, Deborah Jin, in 2008. A complete surprise was finding ultracold chemistry in such a system through measurements of reactant losses. In particular, long-range physics that determines KRb reactant collision rates, including van der Waals interactions, quantum statistics, and dipolar interactions, were studied extensively. However, the short-range behavior of these chemical reactions remains unknown. A legacy of her work is carried out in my lab at Harvard, where we are integrating physical chemistry tools with cold atom techniques to study ultracold chemistry with KRb molecules. In particular, we aim to elucidate the four-center reaction 2 KRb ->K2 + Rb2 by detecting the reaction products through ionization - both identify the product species and mapping out their complete quantum states.

  10. The Lack of Influence of Metallicity on Cooling and Collapse of Ionized Gas in Small Protogalactic Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jappsen, A.-K.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2005-12-01

    We study the influence of low levels of metal enrichment on the cooling and collapse of ionized gas in small protogalactic halos. We use three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, run with the publicly available parallel code GADGET (Springel et al. 2001). We implement a sink particle algorithm. This allows us to safely represent gas that has collapsed beyond the resolution limit without causing numerical errors within the resolved regions of the simulation. We also include the necessary framework for following the non-equilibrium chemistry of H2 in the protogalactic gas, and a treatment of radiative heating and cooling. Our initial conditions represent protogalaxies forming within a fossil H ii region---a previously ionized H ii region that has not yet had time to cool and recombine. Prior to cosmological reionization, such regions should be relatively common, since the characteristic lifetimes of the likely ionizing sources are significantly shorter than a Hubble time. We show that in these regions, H2 is the dominant and most effective coolant, even in the presence of small amounts of metals. It is the amount of H2 which forms that controls whether or not the gas can collapse and form stars. For metallicities Z ≤ 10-3 Z⊙, we find that metal line cooling alters the density and temperature evolution of the gas by less than 1% compared to the metal-free case at densities below 1 cm-3 and temperatures above 2000 K. However, at higher densities and lower temperatures, metal line cooling does become rather more important, and will affect the ability of the gas to fragment. We also show that an external ultraviolet background delays or suppresses the cooling and collapse of the gas regardless of whether or not it is metal-enriched. RSK and A-KJ acknowledge support from the Emmy Noether Program of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (grant no. KL1358/1). M-MML acknowledges support from NSF grants AST99-85392 and AST03-07854, and NASA grant NAG5

  11. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Walter, Fabian

    2013-08-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecularmore » gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau

  12. Cloud-scale Molecular Gas Properties in 15 Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun孙, Jiayi嘉懿; Leroy, Adam K.; Schruba, Andreas; Rosolowsky, Erik; Hughes, Annie; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Meidt, Sharon; Schinnerer, Eva; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bigiel, Frank; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Chevance, Mélanie; Groves, Brent; Herrera, Cinthya N.; Hygate, Alexander P. S.; Pety, Jérôme; Querejeta, Miguel; Usero, Antonio; Utomo, Dyas

    2018-06-01

    We measure the velocity dispersion, σ, and surface density, Σ, of the molecular gas in nearby galaxies from CO spectral line cubes with spatial resolution 45–120 pc, matched to the size of individual giant molecular clouds. Combining 11 galaxies from the PHANGS-ALMA survey with four targets from the literature, we characterize ∼30,000 independent sightlines where CO is detected at good significance. Σ and σ show a strong positive correlation, with the best-fit power-law slope close to the expected value for resolved, self-gravitating clouds. This indicates only a weak variation in the virial parameter α vir ∝ σ 2/Σ, which is ∼1.5–3.0 for most galaxies. We do, however, observe enormous variation in the internal turbulent pressure P turb ∝ Σσ 2, which spans ∼5 dex across our sample. We find Σ, σ, and P turb to be systematically larger in more massive galaxies. The same quantities appear enhanced in the central kiloparsec of strongly barred galaxies relative to their disks. Based on sensitive maps of M31 and M33, the slope of the σ–Σ relation flattens at Σ ≲ 10 M ⊙ pc‑2, leading to high σ for a given Σ and high apparent α vir. This echoes results found in the Milky Way and likely originates from a combination of lower beam-filling factors and a stronger influence of local environment on the dynamical state of molecular gas in the low-density regime.

  13. The ionized gas at the centre of IC 10: a possible localized chemical pollution by Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; López-Martín, L.; Esteban, C.

    2011-03-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrograph at the 3.5-m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory of the intense star-forming region [HL90] 111 at the centre of the starburst galaxy IC 10. We have obtained maps with a spatial sampling of 1 × 1 arcsec2= 3.9× 3.9 pc2 of different emission lines and analysed the extinction, physical conditions, nature of the ionization and chemical abundances of the ionized gas, as well determined locally the age of the most recent star formation event. By defining several apertures, we study the main integrated properties of some regions within [HL90] 111. Two contiguous spaxels show an unambiguous detection of the broad He IIλ4686 emission line, this feature seems to be produced by a single late-type WN star. We also report a probable N and He enrichment in the precise spaxels where the Wolf-Rayet (WR) features are detected. The enrichment pattern is roughly consistent with that expected for the pollution of the ejecta of a single or a very small number of WR stars. Furthermore, this chemical pollution is very localized (˜2 arcsec ˜7.8 pc) and it should be difficult to detect in star-forming galaxies beyond the Local Volume. We also discuss the use of the most common empirical calibrations to estimate the oxygen abundances of the ionized gas in nearby galaxies from 2D spectroscopic data. The ionization degree of the gas plays an important role when applying these empirical methods, as they tend to give lower oxygen abundances with increasing ionization degree. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astrónomico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Plank Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Visiting Astronomer at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  14. Application of FIGAERO (Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to field and chamber organic aerosol: Implications for carboxylic acid formation and gas-particle partitioning from monoterpene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Thornton, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present measurements of a large suite of gas and particle phase carboxylic acid containing compounds made with a Filter Inlet for Gas and AEROsol (FIGAERO) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. A prototype operated with acetate negative ion proton transfer chemistry was deployed on the Julich Plant Atmosphere Chamber to study a-pinene oxidation, and a modified version was deployed at the SMEAR II forest station in Hyytiälä, Finland and SOAS, in Brent Alabama. We focus here on results from JPAC and Hyytiälä, where we utilized the same ionization method most selective towards carboxylic acids. In all locations, 100's of organic acid compounds were observed in the gas and particles and many of the same composition acids detected in the gas-phase were detected in the particles upon temperature programmed thermal desorption. Particulate organics detected by FIGAERO are highly correlated with organic aerosol mass measured by an AMS, providing additional volatility and molecular level information about collected aerosol. The fraction of a given compound measured in the particle phase follows expected trends with elemental composition, but many compounds would not be well described by an absorptive partitioning model assuming unity activity coefficients. Moreover the detailed structure in the thermal desorption signals reveals a contribution from thermal decomposition of large molecular weight organics and or oligomers with implications for partitioning measurements and model validation

  15. Adaptation of the Black Yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to Ionizing Radiation: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing...damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl , which are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation, harbor large of amounts of microorganisms, including fungal...species [3,4]. Furthermore, Zhdanova et al. reported that beta and gamma radiation promoted directional growth of fungi isolated from the Chernobyl

  16. A simple and sensitive quantitation of N,N-dimethyltryptamine by gas chromatography with surface ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Ishii, A; Seno, H; Suzuki, O; Hattori, H; Kumazawa, T

    1997-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) by gas chromatography (GC) with surface ionization detection (SID) is presented. Whole blood or urine, containing DMT and gramine (internal standard), was subjected to solid-phase extraction with a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge before analysis by GC-SID. The calibration curve was linear in the DMT range of 1.25-20 ng/mL blood or urine. The detection limit of DMT was about 0.5 ng/mL (10 pg on-column). The recovery of both DMT and gramine spiked in biological fluids was above 86%.

  17. Far-IR spectroscopy of the galactic center: Neutral and ionized gas in the central 10 pc of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D. J.; Watson, D. M.; Townes, C. H.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Hollenbach, D.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1983-01-01

    The 3P1 - 3P2 fine structure line emission from neutral atomic oxygen at 63 microns in the vicinity of the galactic center was mapped. The emission is extended over more than 4' (12 pc) along the galactic plane, centered on the position of Sgr A West. The line center velocities show that the O I gas is rotating around the galactic center with an axis close to that of the general galactic rotation, but there appear also to be noncircular motions. The rotational velocity at R is approximately 1 pc corresponds to a mass within the central pc of about 3 x 10(6) solar mass. Between 1 and 6 pc from the center the mass is approximately proportional to radius. The (O I) line probability arises in a predominantly neutral, atomic region immediately outside of the ionized central parsec of out galaxy. Hydrogen densities in the (O I) emitting region are 10(3) to 10(6) cm(-3) and gas temperatures are or = 100 K. The total integrated luminosity radiated in the line is about 10(5) solar luminosity, and is a substantial contribution to the cooling of the gas. Photoelectric heating or heating by ultraviolet excitation of H2 at high densities (10(5) cm(-3)) are promising mechanisms for heating of the gas, but heating due to dissipation of noncircular motions of the gas may be an alternative possibility. The 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line of (O III) at 88 microns toward Sgr A West was also detected. The (O III) emission comes from high density ionized gas (n 10(4) cm(-3)), and there is no evidence for a medium density region (n 10(3) cm(-3)), such as the ionized halo in Sgr A West deduced from radio observations. This radio halo may be nonthermal, or may consist of many compact, dense clumps of filaments on the inner edges of neutral condensations at R or = 2 pc.

  18. Determination of red blood cell fatty acid profiles: Rapid and high-confident analysis by chemical ionization-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schober, Yvonne; Wahl, Hans Günther; Renz, Harald; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (FA) profiles have been acknowledged as biomarkers in various human diseases. Nevertheless, common FA analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) requires long analysis time. Hence, there is a need for feasible methods for high throughput analysis in clinical studies. FA was extracted from red blood cells (RBC) and derivatized to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A method using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with ammonia-induced chemical ionization (CI) was developed for the analysis of FA profiles in human RBC. We compared this method with classical single GC-MS using electron impact ionization (EI). The FA profiles of 703 RBC samples were determined by GC-MS/MS. In contrast to EI ammonia-induced CI resulted in adequate amounts of molecular ions for further fragmentation of FAME. Specific fragments for confident quantification and fragmentation were determined for 45 FA. The GC-MS/MS method has a total run time of 9min compared to typical analysis times of up to 60min in conventional GC-MS. Intra and inter assay variations were <10% for all FA analyzed. Analysis of RBC FA composition revealed an age-dependent increase of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, and a decline of the omega-6 linoleic acid with a corresponding rise of the omega-3 index. The combination of ammonia-induced CI and tandem mass spectrometry after GC separation allows for high-throughput, robust and confident analysis of FA profiles in the clinical laboratory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Free energy landscape and molecular pathways of gas hydrate nucleation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuanfei; Porras, Anna; Li, Tianshu

    2016-12-07

    Despite the significance of gas hydrates in diverse areas, a quantitative knowledge of hydrate formation at a molecular level is missing. The impediment to acquiring this understanding is primarily attributed to the stochastic nature and ultra-fine scales of nucleation events, posing a great challenge for both experiment and simulation to explore hydrate nucleation. Here we employ advanced molecular simulation methods, including forward flux sampling (FFS), p B histogram analysis, and backward flux sampling, to overcome the limit of direct molecular simulation for exploring both the free energy landscape and molecular pathways of hydrate nucleation. First we test the half-cage order parameter (H-COP) which we developed for driving FFS, through conducting the p B histogram analysis. Our results indeed show that H-COP describes well the reaction coordinates of hydrate nucleation. Through the verified order parameter, we then directly compute the free energy landscape for hydrate nucleation by combining both forward and backward flux sampling. The calculated stationary distribution density, which is obtained independently of nucleation theory, is found to fit well against the classical nucleation theory (CNT). Subsequent analysis of the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories show that although on average, hydrate formation is facilitated by a two-step like mechanism involving a gradual transition from an amorphous to a crystalline structure, there also exist nucleation pathways where hydrate crystallizes directly, without going through the amorphous stage. The CNT-like free energy profile and the structural diversity suggest the existence of multiple active transition pathways for hydrate nucleation, and possibly also imply the near degeneracy in their free energy profiles among different pathways. Our results thus bring a new perspective to the long standing question of how hydrates crystallize.

  20. Free energy landscape and molecular pathways of gas hydrate nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Yuanfei; Porras, Anna; Li, Tianshu, E-mail: tsli@gwu.edu

    Despite the significance of gas hydrates in diverse areas, a quantitative knowledge of hydrate formation at a molecular level is missing. The impediment to acquiring this understanding is primarily attributed to the stochastic nature and ultra-fine scales of nucleation events, posing a great challenge for both experiment and simulation to explore hydrate nucleation. Here we employ advanced molecular simulation methods, including forward flux sampling (FFS), p{sub B} histogram analysis, and backward flux sampling, to overcome the limit of direct molecular simulation for exploring both the free energy landscape and molecular pathways of hydrate nucleation. First we test the half-cage ordermore » parameter (H-COP) which we developed for driving FFS, through conducting the p{sub B} histogram analysis. Our results indeed show that H-COP describes well the reaction coordinates of hydrate nucleation. Through the verified order parameter, we then directly compute the free energy landscape for hydrate nucleation by combining both forward and backward flux sampling. The calculated stationary distribution density, which is obtained independently of nucleation theory, is found to fit well against the classical nucleation theory (CNT). Subsequent analysis of the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories show that although on average, hydrate formation is facilitated by a two-step like mechanism involving a gradual transition from an amorphous to a crystalline structure, there also exist nucleation pathways where hydrate crystallizes directly, without going through the amorphous stage. The CNT-like free energy profile and the structural diversity suggest the existence of multiple active transition pathways for hydrate nucleation, and possibly also imply the near degeneracy in their free energy profiles among different pathways. Our results thus bring a new perspective to the long standing question of how hydrates crystallize.« less

  1. Molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions for core ionization of ethane, carbon tetrafluoride and 1,1-difluoroethylene

    DOE PAGES

    Menssen, A.; Trevisan, C. S.; Schöffler, M. S.; ...

    2016-02-15

    Molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs) are measured in this paper in electron–ion momentum imaging experiments and compared with complex Kohn variational calculations for carbon K-shell ionization of carbon tetrafluoride (CF 4), ethane (C 2H 6) and 1,1-difluoroethylene (C 2H 2F 2). While in ethane the polarization averaged MFPADs show a tendency at low energies for the photoelectron to be emitted in the directions of the bonds, the opposite effect is seen in CF 4. A combination of these behaviors is seen in difluoroethylene where ionization from the two carbons can be distinguished experimentally because of their different K-shell ionizationmore » potentials. Excellent agreement is found between experiment and simple static-exchange or coupled two-channel theoretical calculations. Finally, however, simple electrostatics do not provide an adequate explanation of the suggestively simple angular distributions at low electron ejection energies.« less

  2. Determination of atomic hydrogen in non-thermal hydrogen plasmas by means of molecular beam threshold ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Guo; Xu, Yong; Yang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2005-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen plays important roles in chemical vapor deposition of functional materials, plasma etching and new approaches to chemical synthesis of hydrogen-containing compounds. The present work reports experimental determinations of atomic hydrogen near the grounded electrode in medium-pressure dielectric barrier discharge hydrogen plasmas by means of molecular beam threshold ionization mass spectrometry (MB-TIMS). At certain discharge conditions (a.c. frequency of 24 kHz, 28 kV of peak-to-peak voltage), the measured hydrogen dissociation fraction is decreased from approximately 0.83% to approximately 0.14% as the hydrogen pressure increases from 2.0 to 14.0 Torr. A simulation method for extraction of the approximate electron beam energy distribution function in the mass spectrometer ionizer and a semi-quantitative approach to calibrate the mass discrimination effect caused by the supersonic beam formation and the mass spectrometer measurement are reported. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  4. Stability investigations of relaxing molecular gas flows. Results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, Yurii N.; Ershov, Igor V.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents results of systematic investigations of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The effect can be a new way for control stability and laminar turbulent transition in aerodynamic flows. The consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows is presented. Nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin — Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both classical linear and nonlinear energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of this article is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flow control and laminarization.

  5. An investigation of electronic states of some molecules and molecular cations using mass analyzed threshold ionization and photoinduced Rydberg ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstein, Jason David

    1999-11-01

    Mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) experiments have enabled mapping of the n-dependent Rydberg state survival probability for a series of molecules. Utilizing vacuum and extreme ultraviolet (VUV/XUV) photons, one photon Rydberg manifold spectra of argon, hydrogen chloride, nitrogen, benzene, and oxygen were produced, and the prospects of photoinduced Rydberg ionization (PIRI) experiments examined. It was found that the widths of Rydberg manifolds for the molecules studied are quite different. Hydrogen chloride and nitrogen have the narrowest manifold width, followed by benzene, and then oxygen. These varying widths are most strongly correlated with the angular momentum (i.e., quantum defect) of the initially prepared Rydberg orbital. PIRI experiments required the use of a static cell, rather than a molecular jet assembly, for the more efficient production of higher amounts of VUV/XUV radiation, and hence more Rydberg signal needed to observe PIRI. Armed with the ability to produce tunable VUV/XUV radiation, and to determine the feasibility of a PIRI experiment, the MATI and fragment PIRI spectra of trans-1,3-butadiene (BD) were recorded. The MATI spectrum is vibrationally resolved and was analyzed with the help of ab initio calculations and other published results. The fragment PIRI spectrum of the A<==X transition of BD+ is not vibrationally resolved, but information regarding the wavelength dependence of fragmentation pathways has been gathered and interpreted. It was found that at low photodissociation photon energies, production of C3H3+ dominates, but at higher photon energies, C2H4 + is also produced. The production of each fragment showed a definite PIRI wavelength dependence.

  6. MOLECULAR GAS VELOCITY DISPERSIONS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Schruba, Andreas, E-mail: caldu@mpia.de, E-mail: schruba@mpe.mpg.de

    In order to characterize the distribution of molecular gas in spiral galaxies, we study the line profiles of CO (1 – 0) emission in Andromeda, our nearest massive spiral galaxy. We compare observations performed with the IRAM 30 m single-dish telescope and with the CARMA interferometer at a common resolution of 23 arcsec ≈ 85 pc × 350 pc and 2.5 km s{sup −1}. When fitting a single Gaussian component to individual spectra, the line profile of the single dish data is a factor of 1.5 ± 0.4 larger than the interferometric data one. This ratio in line widths ismore » surprisingly similar to the ratios previously observed in two other nearby spirals, NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, but measured at ∼0.5–1 kpc spatial scale. In order to study the origin of the different line widths, we stack the individual spectra in five bins of increasing peak intensity and fit two Gaussian components to the stacked spectra. We find a unique narrow component of FWHM = 7.5 ± 0.4 km s{sup −1} visible in both the single dish and the interferometric data. In addition, a broad component with FWHM = 14.4 ± 1.5 km s{sup −1} is present in the single-dish data, but cannot be identified in the interferometric data. We interpret this additional broad line width component detected by the single dish as a low brightness molecular gas component that is extended on spatial scales >0.5 kpc, and thus filtered out by the interferometer. We search for evidence of line broadening by stellar feedback across a range of star formation rates but find no such evidence on ∼100 pc spatial scale when characterizing the line profile by a single Gaussian component.« less

  7. Analysis of acylcarnitines as their N-demethylated ester derivatives by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z H; Gage, D A; Bieber, L L; Sweeley, C C

    1991-11-15

    A novel approach to the analysis of acylcarnitines has been developed. It involves a direct esterification using propyl chloroformate in aqueous propanol followed by ion-pair extraction with potassium iodide into chloroform and subsequent on-column N-demethylation of the resulting acylcarnitine propyl ester iodides. The products, acyl N-demethylcarnitine propyl esters, are volatile and are easily analyzed by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. For medium-chain-length (C4-C12) acylcarnitine standards, detection limits are demonstrated to be well below 1 ng starting material using selected ion monitoring. Well-separated gas chromatographic peaks and structure-specific mass spectra are obtained with samples of synthetic and biological origin. Seven acylcarnitines have been characterized in the urine of a patient suffering from medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

  8. Structural characterization of saturated branched chain fatty acid methyl esters by collisional dissociation of molecular ions generated by electron ionization[S

    PubMed Central

    Ran-Ressler, Rinat R.; Lawrence, Peter; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Saturated branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) are present as complex mixtures in numerous biological samples. The traditional method for structure elucidation, electron ionization (EI) mass spectrometry, sometimes does not unambiguously enable assignment of branching in isomeric BCFA. Zirrolli and Murphy (Zirrolli , J. A. , and R. A. Murphy. 1993. Low-energy tandem mass spectrometry of the molecular ion derived from fatty acid methyl esters: a novel method for analysis of branched-chain fatty acids. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 4: 223–229.) showed that the molecular ions of four BCFA methyl ester (BCFAME) yield highly characteristic fragments upon collisional dissociation using a triple quadrupole instrument. Here, we confirm and extend these results by analysis using a tabletop 3-D ion trap for activated molecular ion EI-MS/MS to 30 BCFAME. iso-BCFAME produces a prominent ion (30-100% of base peak) for [M-43] (M-C3H7), corresponding to the terminal isopropyl moiety in the original iso-BCFAME. Anteiso-FAME yield prominent ions (20-100% of base peak) corresponding to losses on both side of the methyl branch, [M-29] and [M-57], and tend to produce more prominent m/z 115 peaks corresponding to a cyclization product around the ester. Dimethyl and tetramethyl FAME, with branches separated by at least one methylene group, yield fragment on both sides of the sites of methyl branches that are more than 6 C away from the carboxyl carbon. EI-MS/MS yields uniquely specific ions that enable highly confident structural identification and quantification of BCFAME. PMID:22021637

  9. Molecular gas excitation in Kleinmann-Low nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callejo, Gonzague; Lemaire, Jean-Louis; Le Petit, F.; Pineau Des Forets, Guillaume; Field, David

    2004-12-01

    The Orion molecular cloud OMC-1 is the perfect object for the study of the dense interstellar medium accounting for active star formation; the intrinsic complexity of this region serves as a stallion, both for observing techniques and for interstellar medium modelling. A detailed dynamic and spectroscopic study has been performed using VLT and CFHT observations of the infrared Kleinmann-Low nebula; yielding a complete small-scale structure in velocity and most importantly powerful diagnosis tools in order to put a new light into the gas behaviour. These results allow to build up a consistent model of the gas excitation, and a clear dynamical view of the region. The crucial action of the shock waves is confirmed, and the discrepancies between the observations and the standard models are discussed. The consequences of this modelling will be discussed in terms of extinction, magnetic field, and other quantities related to induced star formation. The goodness of the models used for the interpretations will be also discussed and some future directions of investigation enhanced.

  10. The Ionized Gas and Nuclear Environment in NGC 3783. IV; Variability and Modeling of the 900 ks CHANDRA Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Brandt, W. N.; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Gabel, Jack R.; Hamann, Frederick W.; George, Steven B.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the 900 ks spectrum of NGC3783 obtained by Chandra in 2000-2001 (Kaspi et al. 2002). We split the data in various ways to look for time dependent and luminosity dependent spectral variations. This analysis, the measured equivalent widths of a large number of X-ray lines, and our photoionization calculations, lead us to the following conclusions: 1) NGC 3783 fluctuated in luminosity, by a factor N 1.5, during individual 170 ks observations. The fluctuations were not associated with significant spectral variations. 2) On a longer time scale, of 20-120 days, we discovered two very different spectral shapes that are noted the high state and the low state spectra. The observed changes between the two can be described as the appearance and disappearance of a soft continuum component. The spectral variations are not related, in a simple way, to the brightening or the fading of the short wavelength continuum, as observed in other objects. NGC3783 seems to be the first AGN to show this unusual behavior. 3) The appearance of the soft continuum component is consistent with beeing the only spectral variation and there is no need to invoke changes in the absorber s opacity. In particular, all absorption lines with reliable measurements show the same equivalent width, within the observational uncertainties, during high and low states. 4) Photoionization model calculations show that a combination of three ionization components, each split into two kinematic components, explain very well the intensity of almost all absorption lines and the bound-free absorption. The components span a large range of ionization and a total column of about 3 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter Moreover, all components are thermally stable and are situated on the vertical branch of the stability curve.. This means that they are in pressure equilibrium and perhaps occupy the same volume of space. This is the first detection of such a multi-component equilibrium gas in

  11. Molecular Simulation of Gas Solubility in Nitrile Butadiene Rubber.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, M; Sutton, A P; Mostofi, A A

    2017-01-12

    Molecular simulation is used to compute the solubility of small gases in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) with a Widom particle-insertion technique biased by local free volume. The convergence of the method is examined as a function of the number of snapshots upon which the insertions are performed and the number of insertions per snapshot and is compared to the convergence of the unbiased Widom insertion technique. The effect of varying the definition of local free volume is also investigated. The acrylonitrile content of the polymer is altered to examine its influence on the solubility of helium, CO 2 , and H 2 O, and the solubilities of polar gases are found to be enhanced relative to those of nonpolar gases, in qualitative agreement with experiment. To probe this phenomenon further, the solubilities are decomposed into contributions from the neighborhoods of different atoms, using a Voronoi cell construction, and a strong bias is found for CO 2 and H 2 O in particular to be situated near nitrogen sites in the elastomer. Temperature is shown to suppress the solubility of CO 2 and H 2 O but to increase that of helium. Increasing pressure is found to suppress the solubility of all gases but at different rates, according to a balance between their molecular sizes and electrostatic interactions with the polymer. These results are relevant to the use of NBR seals at elevated temperatures and pressures, such as in oil and gas wells.

  12. HST FOS spectroscopy of M87: Evidence for a disk of ionized gas around a massive black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, Richard J.; Ford, Holland C.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.; Hartig, George F.; Dressel, Linda L.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Bohlin, Ralph; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Margon, Bruce; Kochhar, Ajay K.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to observe the central region of M87, we have obtained spectra covering approximately 4600-6800 A at a spectral dispersion approximately 4.4 A per resolution element through the .26 sec diameter entrance aperture. One spectrum was obtained centered on the nucleus of M87 and two centered 0.25 sec off the nucleus at position angles of 21 deg and 201 deg, thus sampling the anticipated major axis of the disklike structure (described in a companion Letter) expected to lie approximately perpendicular to the axis of the M87 jet. Pointing errors for these observations are estimated to be less than 0.02 sec. Radial velocities of the ionized gas in the two positions 0.25 sec on either side of the nucleus are measured to be approx. equals +/- 500 km/s relative to the M87 systemic velocity. These observations plus emission-line spectra obtained at two additional locations near the nucleus show the ionized gas to be in Keplerian rotation about a mass M = (2.4 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp 9) solar mass within the inner 0.25 sec of M87. Our results provide strong evidence for the presence of a supermassive nuclear black hole in M87.

  13. Narrowband HST images of M87: Evidence for a disk of ionized gas around a massive black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Holland C.; Harms, Richard J.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.; Hartig, George F.; Dressel, Linda L.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Margon, Bruce; Kochhar, Ajay K.

    1994-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (HST WFPC2) narrowband H-alpha + (N II) images of M87 which show a small disk of ionized gas with apparent spiral structure surrounding the nucleus of M87. The jet projects approximately 19.5 deg from the minor axis of the disk, which suggests that the jet is approximately normal to the disk. In a companion Letter, Harms et al. measure the radial velocities at r = +/- 0.25 sec along a line perpendicular to the jet, showing that one side of the disk is approaching at 500 +/- 50 km/s and the other side of the disk is receding at 500 +/- 50 km/s. Absorption associated with the disk and the sense of rotation imply that the apparent spiral arms trail the rotation. The observed radial velocites corrected for a 42 deg inclination of the disk imply rotation at +/- 750 km/s. Analysis of velocity measurements at four positions near the nucleus gives a total mass of approximately 2.4 +/- 0.7 x 10(exp 9) solar mass within 18 pc of the nucleus, and a mass-to-light ratio (M/L)(sub I) = 170. We conclude that there is a disk of ionized gas feeding a massive black hole in the center of M87.

  14. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  15. Highly ionized gas in the Gum nebula and elsewhere - A comparison of IUE and Copernicus satellite results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Savage, Blair D.

    1992-01-01

    The data from six high-dispersion IUE echelle spectra are averaged in order to obtain an interstellar absorption line spectrum with an S/N of about 30 and a resolution of about 25 km/s. The interstellar lines of C IV and Si IV are very strong and broad and N V is detected. The profiles for these species and Al III are compared to the Copernicus satellite profiles for O VI. The high ionization lines toward HD 64760 are much stronger and broader than those recorded toward Zeta Pup and Gamma super 2 Vel, the two exciting stars of the Gum nebula. The profiles for Al III and Si IV are similar and considerably narrower than the O VI profile. An origin in photoionized Gum nebula gas is suggested as the most likely explanation for Al III and Si IV. The C IV profile has a high positive velocity wing extending to approximately +80 km/s, which is similar in appearance to the positive velocity portion of the O VI profile. It is inferred that a substantial part of the observed C IV has an origin in the collisionally ionized gas most likely rsponsible for the O VI.

  16. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  17. Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of CO 2 clusters in collision with metastable rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Ryo; Tanaka, Hideyasu; Yamakita, Yoshihiro; Misaizu, Fuminori; Ohno, Koichi

    2000-09-01

    Penning ionization electron spectra (PIES) of CO 2 clusters have been observed for the first time. An unusually fast electron band with excess kinetic energies of 1.4-2.9 eV with respect to the monomer band for the ionic X state was observed for CO 2 clusters in collision with He*(2 3S) atoms. While for PIES with Ne*(3 3P), no such unusual band was observed. The unusual band is ascribed to autoionization into stable structures of ionic clusters to which direct ionization processes are almost impossible due to very small Franck-Condon overlaps associated with a very large geometry difference between the ionic and neutral clusters.

  18. THE KINEMATICS AND IONIZATION OF NUCLEAR GAS CLOUDS IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Neumayer, Nadine, E-mail: Geoff.Bicknell@anu.edu.au, E-mail: Ralph.Sutherland@anu.edu.au, E-mail: nadine.neumayer@universe-cluster.de

    2013-03-20

    Neumayer et al. established the existence of a blueshifted cloud in the core of Centaurus A, within a few parsecs of the nucleus and close to the radio jet. We propose that the cloud has been impacted by the jet, and that it is in the foreground of the jet, accounting for its blueshifted emission on the southern side of the nucleus. We consider both shock excitation and photoionization models for the excitation of the cloud. Shock models do not account for the [Si VI] and [Ca VIII] emission line fluxes. However, X-ray observations indicate a source of ionizing photonsmore » in the core of Centaurus A; photoionization by the inferred flux incident on the cloud can account for the fluxes in these lines relative to Brackett-{gamma}. The power-law slope of the ionizing continuum matches that inferred from synchrotron models of the X-rays. The logarithm of the ionization parameter is -1.9, typical of that in Seyfert galaxies and consistent with the value proposed for dusty ionized plasmas. The model cloud density depends upon the Lorentz factor of the blazar and the inclination of our line of sight to the jet axis. For acute inclinations, the inferred density is consistent with expected cloud densities. However, for moderate inclinations of the jet to the line of sight, high Lorentz factors imply cloud densities in excess of 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} and very low filling factors, suggesting that models of the gamma-ray emission should incorporate jet Lorentz factors {approx}< 5.« less

  19. Which molecular features affect the intrinsic hepatic clearance rate of ionizable organic chemicals in fish?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greater knowledge of biotransformation rates for ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) in fish is required to properly assess the bioaccumulation potential of many environmentally relevant contaminants. In this study we measured in vitro hepatic clearance rates for 50 IOCs using a p...

  20. A tripolar-electrode ionization gas sensor using a carbon nanotube cathode for NO detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hui; Li, Kun; Li, Quanfu

    2018-06-01

    Nitric oxide accounts for more than 95% of the total NO X emission from power plants, which is a major air pollutant. Therefore, it is imperative to accurately detect NO for environmental protection. A tripolar-electrode ionization sensor with a carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode is proposed for NO detection. The non-self-sustaining discharge state and the tripolar-electrode configuration ensures a long nanotube life, which ensures a good stability and fast response of the sensor. Experimental results demonstrate that the tripolar-electrode ionization sensor with 120 µm separations has an intrinsic monotonously decreasing response to NO and exhibits a fast response time of 7 s and recovery time of 8 s. More consumption of the two metastable states N2(A3  ∑  u +) and N2(aʹ1  ∑  u +) of N2 with the increasing of NO concentration is responsible for this. The tripolar-electrode ionization sensor also shows excellent long-term stability of at least one month due to the long CNT life. In addition, the weak effect of SO2 introduction on NO response indicates a good selectivity of the sensor to NO.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of Coulomb explosion, melting and shock wave creation in silicon after an ionization pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhongyu; Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu; Chen, Di

    Strong electronic stopping power of swift ions in a semiconducting or insulating substrate can lead to localized electron stripping. The subsequent repulsive interactions among charged target atoms can cause Coulomb explosion. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we simulate Coulomb explosion in silicon by introducing an ionization pulse lasting for different periods, and at different substrate temperatures. We find that the longer the pulse period, the larger the melting radius. The observation can be explained by a critical energy density model assuming that melting required thermal energy density is a constant value and the total thermal energy gained from Coulomb explosion ismore » linearly proportional to the ionization period. Our studies also show that melting radius is larger at higher substrate temperatures. The temperature effect is explained due to a longer structural relaxation above the melting temperature at original ionization boundary due to lower heat dissipation rates. Furthermore, simulations show the formation of shock waves, created due to the compression from the melting core.« less

  2. EDITORIAL: The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2011-03-01

    This special issue consists of papers that are associated with invited lectures, workshop papers and hot topic papers presented at the 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG XX). This conference was organized in Novi Sad (Serbia) from 13 to 17 July 2010 by the Institute of Physics of the University of Belgrade. It is important to note that this is not a conference 'proceedings'. Following the initial selection process by the International Scientific Committee, all papers were submitted to the journal by the authors and have been fully peer reviewed to the standard required for publication in Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST). The papers are based on presentations given at the conference but are intended to be specialized technical papers covering all or part of the topic presented by the author during the meeting. The ESCAMPIG conference is a regular biennial Europhysics Conference of the European Physical Society focusing on collisional and radiative aspects of atomic and molecular physics in partially ionized gases as well as on plasma-surface interaction. The conference focuses on low-temperature plasma sciences in general and includes the following topics: Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function Physical basis of plasma chemistry Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) Plasma diagnostics Plasma and discharges theory and simulation Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas Low-pressure plasma sources High-pressure plasma sources Plasmas and gas flows Laser-produced plasmas During ESCAMPIG XX special sessions were dedicated to workshops on: Atomic and molecular collision data for plasma modeling, organized by Professors Z Lj Petrovic and N Mason Plasmas in medicine, organized by Dr N Puac and Professor G Fridman. The conference topics were represented in the

  3. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  4. Electron energy deposition in N2 gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.; Victor, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The processes by which energetic electrons lose energy in a weakly ionized gas of molecular nitrogen are analyzed and calculations are carried out taking into account the discrete nature of the excitation processes. The excitation, ionization, dissociation and heating efficiencies are computed for energies up to 200 eV absorbed in a gas with fractional ionizations varying from 10(-6) to 10(-2). Individual vibrational excitations up to the seventh vibrational level are presented.

  5. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  6. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications.more » Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.« less

  7. Molecular Insights into the pH-Dependent Adsorption and Removal of Ionizable Antibiotic Oxytetracycline by Adsorbent Cyclodextrin Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Cai, Xiyun; Xiong, Weina; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Haitong; Yang, Xianhai; Li, Chao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pH on adsorption and removal efficiency of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) by environmental adsorbents are an area of debate, because of its dual mediation towards adsorbents and adsorbate. Here, we probe the pH-dependent adsorption of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline (comprising OTCH2 +, OTCH±, OTC−, and OTC2−) onto cyclodextrin polymers (CDPs) with the nature of molecular recognition and pH inertness. OTCH± commonly has high adsorption affinity, OTC− exhibits moderate affinity, and the other two species have negligible affinity. These species are evidenced to selectively interact with structural units (e.g., CD cavity, pore channel, and network) of the polymers and thus immobilized onto the adsorbents to different extents. The differences in adsorption affinity and mechanisms of the species account for the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. The mathematical equations are derived from the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of quantitatively relating adsorption affinity of OTC at varying pH to adsorbent properties. A combination of the MLR analysis for OTC and molecular recognition of adsorption of the species illustrates the nature of the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. Based on this finding, γ-HP-CDP is chosen to adsorb and remove OTC at pH 5.0 and 7.0, showing high removal efficiency and strong resistance to the interference of coexisting components. PMID:24465975

  8. Highly sensitive and selective analysis of urinary steroids by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with positive chemical ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) provides greater separation space than conventional GC. Because of fast peak elution, a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) is the usual structure-specific detector of choice. The quantitative capabilities of a novel GC×GC fast quadrupole MS were investigated with electron ionization (EI), and CH4 or NH3 positive chemical ionization (PCI) for analysis of endogenous urinary steroids targeted in anti-doping tests. Average precisions for steroid quantitative analysis from replicate urine extractions were 6% (RSD) for EI and 8% for PCI-NH3. The average limits of detection (LOD) calculated by quantification ions for 12 target steroids spiked into steroid-free urine matrix (SFUM) were 2.6 ng mL−1 for EI, 1.3 ng mL−1 for PCI-CH4, and 0.3 ng mL−1 for PCI-NH3, all in mass scanning mode. The measured limits of quantification (LOQ) with full mass scan GC×GC-qMS were comparable with the LOQ values measured by one-dimensional GC-MS in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. PCI-NH3 yields fewer fragments and greater (pseudo)molecular ion abundances than EI or PCI-CH4. These data show a benchtop GC×GC-qMS system has the sensitivity, specificity, and resolution to analyze urinary steroids at normal urine concentrations, and that PCI-NH3, not currently available on most GC×GC-TOFMS instruments, is of particular value for generation of structure-specific ions. PMID:22606686

  9. Molecular Communication over Gas Stream Channels using Portable Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giannoukos, Stamatios; Marshall, Alan; Taylor, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy

    2017-11-01

    The synthetic generation/coding and transmission of olfactory information over a gas stream or an odor network is a new and unexplored field. Application areas vary from the entertainment or advertisement industry to security and telemedicine. However, current technological limitations frustrate the accurate reproduction of decoded and transmitted olfactory data. This study describes the development, testing, and characterization of a novel odor emitter (OE) that is used to investigate the generation-encoding of gaseous standards with odorous characteristics with a regulatable way, for scent transmission purposes. The calibration and the responses of a developed OE were examined using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS). Experiments were undertaken for a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at different temperatures and flow rates. Individual compounds and mixtures were tested to investigate periodic and dynamic transmission characteristics within two different size tubular containers for distances up to 3 m. Olfactory information transmission is demonstrated using MS as the main molecular sensor for odor detection and monitoring and for the first time spatial encryption of olfactory information is shown. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Molecular Communication over Gas Stream Channels using Portable Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannoukos, Stamatios; Marshall, Alan; Taylor, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy

    2017-07-01

    The synthetic generation/coding and transmission of olfactory information over a gas stream or an odor network is a new and unexplored field. Application areas vary from the entertainment or advertisement industry to security and telemedicine. However, current technological limitations frustrate the accurate reproduction of decoded and transmitted olfactory data. This study describes the development, testing, and characterization of a novel odor emitter (OE) that is used to investigate the generation-encoding of gaseous standards with odorous characteristics with a regulatable way, for scent transmission purposes. The calibration and the responses of a developed OE were examined using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS). Experiments were undertaken for a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at different temperatures and flow rates. Individual compounds and mixtures were tested to investigate periodic and dynamic transmission characteristics within two different size tubular containers for distances up to 3 m. Olfactory information transmission is demonstrated using MS as the main molecular sensor for odor detection and monitoring and for the first time spatial encryption of olfactory information is shown.

  11. On ionizing shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniel, A.; Igra, O.; Ben-Dor, G.; Mond, M.

    The flow field in the ionizing relaxation zone developed behind a normal shock wave in an electrically neutral, homogeneous, two temperature mixture of thermally ideal gases (molecules, atoms, ions, electrons) was numerically solved. The heat transfer between the electron gas and the other components was taken into account while all the other transport phenomena (molecular, turbulent and radiative) were neglected in the relaxation zone, since it is dominated by inelastic collisions. The threshold cross sections measured by Specht (1981), for excitation of argon by electron collisions, were used. The calculated results show good agreement with the results of the shock tube experiments presented by Glass and Liu (1978), especially in the electron avalanche region. A critical examination was made of the common assumptions regarding the average energy with which electrons are produced by atom-atom collisions and the relative effectiveness of atom-atom collisions (versus electron-atom collisions) in ionizing excited argon.

  12. Physical properties of the ionized gas and brightness distribution in NGC4736

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, I.; Dottori, H.; Cepa, J.; Vilchez, J.

    1998-03-01

    In this work we study the galaxy NGC4736, using narrow band interference filters imaging centered at the emission lines {Oii} {3727+3729}, Hβ, {Oiii} {5007}, Hα, {Sii} {6716+6730} and {Siii} {9070} and nearby continua. We have obtained sizes, positions, emission line absolute fluxes, and continua intensities for 90 Hii regions, mainly distributed in a ring-like structure of 3.2kpc in diameter. The Hα luminosities are in the range 37.3 <= log L_Hα <= 39.4 ergs(-1) . The Hii regions size distribution presents a characteristic diameter D_0 = 115pc and verifies the relation log (L_Hα ) ~D(3) . The temperature of the ionizing sources and the metallicity of the Hii regions are respectively in the ranges 3.410(4) <~T_⋆ <~ 4.010(4) K and 8.5 <~12 + log (O/H) <~9.3. The masses of the ionizing clusters are in the range 510(3) <~M_T/M_sun <~210(5) . The continua radial surface brightness distribution is better fitted by the superposition of a de Vaucouleurs', a thin and a thick exponential disk laws. The monochromatic colors show that outside the star forming ring the disk presents a younger stellar population than inside it. Tables 3 and 4 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  13. Molecular Data for a Biochemical Model of DNA Radiation Damage: Electron Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of DNA Bases and Sugar-Phosphate Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the database for building up a biochemical model of DNA radiation damage, electron impact ionization cross sections of sugar-phosphate backbone and DNA bases have been calculated using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. It is found that the total ionization cross sections of C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. Of the four DNA bases, the ionization cross section of guanine is the largest, then in decreasing order, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The order is in accordance with the known propensity of oxidation of the bases by ionizing radiation. Dissociative ionization (DI), a process that both ionizes and dissociates a molecule, is investigated for cytosine. The DI cross section for the formation of H and (cytosine-Hl)(+), with the cytosine ion losing H at the 1 position, is also reported. The threshold of this process is calculated to be 17.1 eV. Detailed analysis of ionization products such as in DI is important to trace the sequential steps in the biochemical process of DNA damage.

  14. Phibss: Molecular Gas, Extinction, Star Formation, and Kinematics in the z = 1.5 Star-forming Galaxy EGS13011166

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Kurk, J.; Wuyts, S.; Combes, F.; Freundlich, J.; Bolatto, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Neri, R.; Nordon, R.; Bournaud, F.; Burkert, A.; Comerford, J.; Cox, P.; Davis, M.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; García-Burillo, S.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Lutz, D.; Naab, T.; Newman, S.; Saintonge, A.; Shapiro Griffin, K.; Shapley, A.; Sternberg, A.; Weiner, B.

    2013-08-01

    We report matched resolution imaging spectroscopy of the CO 3-2 line (with the IRAM Plateau de Bure millimeter interferometer) and of the Hα line (with LUCI at the Large Binocular Telescope) in the massive z = 1.53 main-sequence galaxy EGS 13011166, as part of the "Plateau de Bure high-z, blue-sequence survey" (PHIBSS: Tacconi et al.). We combine these data with Hubble Space Telescope V-I-J-H-band maps to derive spatially resolved distributions of stellar surface density, star formation rate, molecular gas surface density, optical extinction, and gas kinematics. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas are remarkably similar and are well modeled by a turbulent, globally Toomre unstable, rotating disk. The stellar surface density distribution is smoother than the clumpy rest-frame UV/optical light distribution and peaks in an obscured, star-forming massive bulge near the dynamical center. The molecular gas surface density and the effective optical screen extinction track each other and are well modeled by a "mixed" extinction model. The inferred slope of the spatially resolved molecular gas to star formation rate relation, N = dlogΣstar form/dlogΣmol gas, depends strongly on the adopted extinction model, and can vary from 0.8 to 1.7. For the preferred mixed dust-gas model, we find N = 1.14 ± 0.1. Based on observations with the Plateau de Bure millimetre interferometer, operated by the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimetre Range (IRAM), which is funded by a partnership of INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). Based also on data acquired with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in Germany, Italy, and the United States. LBT Corporation partners are LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; The University of

  15. The integrated radio continuum spectrum of M33 - Evidence for free-free absorption by cool ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, F. P.; Mahoney, M. J.; Howarth, N.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the integrated radio continuum flux density of M33 at frequencies between 22 and 610 MHz and discuss the radio continuum spectrum of M33 between 22 MHz and 10 GHz. This spectrum has a turnover between 500 and 900 MHz, depending on the steepness of the high frequency radio spectrum of M33. Below 500 MHz the spectrum is relatively flat. We discuss possible mechanisms to explain this spectral shape and consider efficient free-free absorption of nonthermal emission by a cool (not greater than 1000 K) ionized gas to be a very likely possibility. The surface filling factor of both the nonthermal and the thermal material appears to be small (of order 0.001), which could be explained by magnetic field/density fluctuations in the M 33 interstellar medium. We briefly speculate on the possible presence of a nuclear radio source with a steep spectrum.

  16. Observation of increased space-charge limited thermionic electron emission current by neutral gas ionization in a weakly-ionized deuterium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Yu, J. H.; Doerner, R. P.

    2015-09-14

    The thermionic electron emission current emitted from a laser-produced hot spot on a tungsten target in weakly-ionized deuterium plasma is measured. It is found to be one to two orders of magnitude larger than expected for bipolar space charge limited thermionic emission current assuming an unperturbed background plasma. This difference is attributed to the plasma being modified by ionization of background neutrals by the emitted electrons. This result indicates that the allowable level of emitted thermionic electron current can be significantly enhanced in weakly-ionized plasmas due to the presence of large neutral densities.

  17. THE IONIZED GAS IN NEARBY GALAXIES AS TRACED BY THE [NII] 122 AND 205 μm TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A.; Wolfire, M.

    2016-08-01

    The [N ii] 122 and 205 μ m transitions are powerful tracers of the ionized gas in the interstellar medium. By combining data from 21 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH and Beyond the Peak surveys, we have compiled 141 spatially resolved regions with a typical size of ∼1 kpc, with observations of both [N ii] far-infrared lines. We measure [N ii] 122/205 line ratios in the ∼0.6–6 range, which corresponds to electron gas densities of n {sub e} ∼ 1–300 cm{sup −3}, with a median value of n {sub e} = 30 cm{sup −3}. Variations in the electron densitymore » within individual galaxies can be as high as a factor of ∼50, frequently with strong radial gradients. We find that n {sub e} increases as a function of infrared color, dust-weighted mean starlight intensity, and star-formation rate (SFR) surface density (Σ{sub SFR}). As the intensity of the [N ii] transitions is related to the ionizing photon flux, we investigate their reliability as tracers of the SFR. We derive relations between the [N ii] emission and SFR in the low-density limit and in the case of a log-normal distribution of densities. The scatter in the correlation between [N ii] surface brightness and Σ{sub SFR} can be understood as a property of the n {sub e} distribution. For regions with n {sub e} close to or higher than the [N ii] line critical densities, the low-density limit [N ii]-based SFR calibration systematically underestimates the SFR because the [N ii] emission is collisionally quenched. Finally, we investigate the relation between [N ii] emission, SFR, and n {sub e} by comparing our observations to predictions from the MAPPINGS-III code.« less

  18. Improving quantitative gas chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry results using a modified ion source: demonstration for a pharmaceutical application.

    PubMed

    D'Autry, Ward; Wolfs, Kris; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2011-07-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a well established analytical technique. However, mass spectrometers with electron ionization sources may suffer from signal drifts, hereby negatively influencing quantitative performance. To demonstrate this phenomenon for a real application, a static headspace-gas chromatography method in combination with electron ionization-quadrupole mass spectrometry was optimized for the determination of residual dichloromethane in coronary stent coatings. Validating the method, the quantitative performance of an original stainless steel ion source was compared to that of a modified ion source. Ion source modification included the application of a gold coating on the repeller and exit plate. Several validation aspects such as limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity and precision were evaluated using both ion sources. It was found that, as expected, the stainless steel ion source suffered from signal drift. As a consequence, non-linearity and high RSD values for repeated analyses were obtained. An additional experiment was performed to check whether an internal standard compound would lead to better results. It was found that the signal drift patterns of the analyte and internal standard were different, consequently leading to high RSD values for the response factor. With the modified ion source however, a more stable signal was observed resulting in acceptable linearity and precision. Moreover, it was also found that sensitivity improved compared to the stainless steel ion source. Finally, the optimized method with the modified ion source was applied to determine residual dichloromethane in the coating of coronary stents. The solvent was detected but found to be below the limit of quantification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gas-phase ionization energetics, electron-transfer kinetics, and ion solvation thermochemistry of decamethylmetallocenes, chromocene, and cobaltocene

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.F.; Richardson, D.E.; Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    The gas-phase free energies of ionization, [Delta]G[sub i][degrees] for Cp*[sub 2]Mn, Cp*[sub 2]Fe, Cp*[sub 2]Ni, Cp*[sub 2]Os, Cp[sub 2]Cr, and Cp[sub 2]Co (Cp = [eta][sup 5]-cyclopentadienyl, Cp[sup *] = [eta][sup 5]-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) have been determined by using the electron-transfer equilibrium (ETE) technique and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The high-resolution valence photoelectron spectra of bis(benzene)chromium(0), Bz[sub 2]Cr, Cp*[sub 2]Os, and Cp*[sub 2]Ru have also been measured. Most of the [Delta]G[sub i][degrees] values are referenced to the estimated [Delta]G[sub i][degrees] value of Bz[sub 2]Cr, for which the narrow first ionization band at 5.473 [+-] 0.005 eV is assigned as themore » adiabatic ionization potential. The [Delta]S[sub i][degrees] for ionization of Bz[sub 2]Cr is assumed to be equal to the electronic entropy change, [Delta]S[sub elec][degrees] (=1.4 cal mol[sup [minus]1] K[sup [minus]1]), and the difference between the integrated heat capacities for Bz[sub 2]Cr and Bz[sub 2]Cr[sup +] is also assumed to be negligible near room temperature [Delta]H[sub i,0][degrees] [approx] [Delta]H[sub i,350][degrees], leading to [Delta]G[sub i][degrees] (Bz[sub 2]-Cr) = 125.6 [+-] 1.0 kcal mol[sup [minus]1]. Through the use of thermochemical cycles, estimates are given for the average heterolytic and homolytic M-Cp bond disruption enthalpies of Cp[sub 2]Cr[sup +/0] and Cp[sub 2]Co[sup +/0]. 46 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  20. The VLT/MUSE view of the central galaxy in Abell 2052. Ionized gas swept by the expanding radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmaverde, Barbara; Capetti, Alessandro; Marconi, Alessandro; Venturi, Giacomo

    2018-04-01

    We report observations of the radio galaxy 3C 317 (at z = 0.0345) located at the center of the Abell cluster A2052, obtained with the VLT/MUSE integral field spectrograph. The Chandra images of this cluster show cavities in the X-ray emitting gas, which were produced by the expansion of the radio lobes inflated by the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Our exquisite MUSE data show with unprecedented detail the complex network of line emitting filaments enshrouding the northern X-ray cavity. We do not detect any emission lines from the southern cavity, with a luminosity asymmetry between the two regions higher than 75. The emission lines produced by the warm phase of the interstellar medium (WIM) enable us to obtain unique information on the properties of the emitting gas. We find dense gas (up to 270 cm-3) that makes up part of a global quasi spherical outflow that is driven by the radio source, and obtain a direct estimate of the expansion velocity of the cavities (265 km s-1). The emission lines diagnostic rules out ionization from the AGN or from star-forming regions, suggesting instead ionization from slow shocks or from cosmic rays. The striking asymmetric line emission observed between the two cavities contrasts with the less pronounced differences between the north and south sides in the hot gas; this represents a significant new ingredient for our understanding of the process of the exchange of energy between the relativistic plasma and the external medium. We conclude that the expanding radio lobes displace the hot tenuous phase of the interstellar medium (ISM), but also impact the colder and denser ISM phases. These results show the effects of the AGN on its host and the importance of radio mode feedback. The reduced datacube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A19

  1. The galaxy NGC 1566 - Distribution and kinematics of the ionized gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, G.; Duquennoy, A.

    1982-10-01

    H-alpha narrowband observations are the basis of a study of ionized hydrogen in the large spiral galaxy NGC 1566 which has yielded a catalog of 418 H II regions covering the main body of the galaxy, supplemented by 59 positions and estimated H-alpha luminosities for regions located in the pseudo-outer ring where no H-alpha plate is available. A discussion of luminosity function, diameter distribution and spiral structure notes evidence for a double two-armed spiral pattern. The plane of the galaxy appears warped, and the efficiency of the two different spiral patterns in star formation is different. A preliminary radial velocity field is determined from three interferograms in H-alpha light, and is found to be acceptably fitted by a simple bulge-plus-disk dynamical model in which the apparent disk mass-to-light ratio sharply increases from center to edge.

  2. Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy in Glow Discharge: A New Dimension for Gas Chromatography Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheverev, V. A.; Khromov, N. A.; Kojiro, D. R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Admixtures to helium of 100 ppm and 5 ppm of nitrogen, and 100 ppm and 10 ppm of carbon monoxide were identified and measured in the helium discharge afterglow using an electrical probe placed into the plasma. For nitrogen and carbon monoxide gases, the measured electron energy spectra display distinct characteristic peaks (fingerprints). Location of the peaks on the energy scale is determined by the ionization energies of the analyte molecules. Nitrogen and carbon monoxide fingerprints were also observed in a binary mixture of these gases in helium, and the relative concentration analytes has been predicted. The technically simple and durable method is considered a good candidate for a number of analytical applications, and in particular, in GC and for analytical flight instrumentation.

  3. Method and system for gas flow mitigation of molecular contamination of optics

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, Gildardo; Johnson, Terry; Arienti, Marco

    A computer-implemented method for determining an optimized purge gas flow in a semi-conductor inspection metrology or lithography apparatus, comprising receiving a permissible contaminant mole fraction, a contaminant outgassing flow rate associated with a contaminant, a contaminant mass diffusivity, an outgassing surface length, a pressure, a temperature, a channel height, and a molecular weight of a purge gas, calculating a flow factor based on the permissible contaminant mole fraction, the contaminant outgassing flow rate, the channel height, and the outgassing surface length, comparing the flow factor to a predefined maximum flow factor value, calculating a minimum purge gas velocity and amore » purge gas mass flow rate from the flow factor, the contaminant mass diffusivity, the pressure, the temperature, and the molecular weight of the purge gas, and introducing the purge gas into the semi-conductor inspection metrology or lithography apparatus with the minimum purge gas velocity and the purge gas flow rate.« less

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Nonlinearity in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-12

    nucleotide-binding protein 1 HSP27 heat shock protein 27 IR ionizing radiation LDH-A lactate dehydrogenase A PDI protein disulfide isomerase precursor 2...sc-9322, SCB, CA), E-FABP (sc-16060, SCB, CA), and LDH-A (sc-27230, SCB, CA), cytokeratin I (sc- 17091, SCB, CA), CaM (sc-1989, SCB, CA), HSP27 (sc...the 24 hour time point included: calmodulin (CaM), heat shock protein 27 ( HSP27 ), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) and protein disulfide isomerase

  5. Discrepant post filter ionized calcium concentrations by common blood gas analyzers in CRRT using regional citrate anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Patrik; Kuhn, Sven-Olaf; Stracke, Sylvia; Gründling, Matthias; Knigge, Stephan; Selleng, Sixten; Helm, Maximilian; Friesecke, Sigrun; Abel, Peter; Kallner, Anders; Nauck, Matthias; Petersmann, Astrid

    2015-09-08

    Ionized calcium (iCa) concentration is often used in critical care and measured using blood gas analyzers at the point of care. Controlling and adjusting regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) involves measuring the iCa concentration in two samples: systemic with physiological iCa concentrations and post filter samples with very low iCa concentrations. However, modern blood gas analyzers are optimized for physiological iCa concentrations which might make them less suitable for measuring low iCa in blood with a high concentration of citrate. We present results of iCa measurements from six different blood gas analyzers and the impact on clinical decisions based on the recommendations of the dialysis' device manufacturer. The iCa concentrations of systemic and post filter samples were measured using six distinct, frequently used blood gas analyzers. We obtained iCa results of 74 systemic and 84 post filter samples from patients undergoing RCA for CRRT at the University Medicine of Greifswald. The systemic samples showed concordant results on all analyzers with median iCa concentrations ranging from 1.07 to 1.16 mmol/L. The medians of iCa concentrations for post filter samples ranged from 0.21 to 0.50 mmol/L. Results of >70% of the post filter samples would lead to major differences in decisions regarding citrate flow depending on the instrument used. Measurements of iCa in post filter samples may give misleading information in monitoring the RCA. Recommendations of the dialysis manufacturer need to be revised. Meanwhile, little weight should be given to post filter iCa. Reference methods for low iCa in whole blood containing citrate should be established.

  6. Prediction of response factors for gas chromatography with flame ionization detection: Algorithm improvement, extension to silylated compounds, and application to the quantification of metabolites

    PubMed Central

    de Saint Laumer, Jean‐Yves; Leocata, Sabine; Tissot, Emeline; Baroux, Lucie; Kampf, David M.; Merle, Philippe; Boschung, Alain; Seyfried, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that the relative response factors of volatile compounds were predictable from either combustion enthalpies or their molecular formulae only 1. We now extend this prediction to silylated derivatives by adding an increment in the ab initio calculation of combustion enthalpies. The accuracy of the experimental relative response factors database was also improved and its population increased to 490 values. In particular, more brominated compounds were measured, and their prediction accuracy was improved by adding a correction factor in the algorithm. The correlation coefficient between predicted and measured values increased from 0.936 to 0.972, leading to a mean prediction accuracy of ± 6%. Thus, 93% of the relative response factors values were predicted with an accuracy of better than ± 10%. The capabilities of the extended algorithm are exemplified by (i) the quick and accurate quantification of hydroxylated metabolites resulting from a biodegradation test after silylation and prediction of their relative response factors, without having the reference substances available; and (ii) the rapid purity determinations of volatile compounds. This study confirms that Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and using predicted relative response factors is one of the few techniques that enables quantification of volatile compounds without calibrating the instrument with the pure reference substance. PMID:26179324

  7. Two γ-ray bursts from dusty regions with little molecular gas.

    PubMed

    Hatsukade, B; Ohta, K; Endo, A; Nakanishi, K; Tamura, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kohno, K

    2014-06-12

    Long-duration γ-ray bursts are associated with the explosions of massive stars and are accordingly expected to reside in star-forming regions with molecular gas (the fuel for star formation). Previous searches for carbon monoxide (CO), a tracer of molecular gas, in burst host galaxies did not detect any emission. Molecules have been detected as absorption in the spectra of γ-ray burst afterglows, and the molecular gas is similar to the translucent or diffuse molecular clouds of the Milky Way. Absorption lines probe the interstellar medium only along the line of sight, so it is not clear whether the molecular gas represents the general properties of the regions where the bursts occur. Here we report spatially resolved observations of CO line emission and millimetre-wavelength continuum emission in two galaxies hosting γ-ray bursts. The bursts happened in regions rich in dust, but not particularly rich in molecular gas. The ratio of molecular gas to dust (<9-14) is significantly lower than in star-forming regions of the Milky Way and nearby star-forming galaxies, suggesting that much of the dense gas where stars form has been dissipated by other massive stars.

  8. Spatial variation of the physical conditions of molecular gas in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, James M.; Eckart, Andreas; Wild, Wolfgang; Genzel, Reinhard; Harris, Andrew I.; Downes, Dennis; Jaffe, D. T.; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1990-01-01

    Multi-line studies of CO-12, CO-13, C-18O, HCN, and HCO(+) at 3 mm, 1.3 mm, and 0.8 mm using the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope, with the IRAM superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) receivers and the Max Planck Institute for External Physics (MPE) 350 GHz SIS receiver, show that the densities and temperatures of molecular gas in external galaxies change significantly with position. CO-12 measures the densities and temperature of diffuse interclump molecular gas, but not the bulk of the molecular gas. Simple one-component models, with or without external heating, cannot account for the weakness of the CO-12 J = 3 to 2 line relative to J = 2 to 1 and J = 1 to 0. CO-12 does not trace the bulk of the molecular gas, and optical depth effects obviate a straightforward interpretation of CO-12 data. Instead, researchers turned to the optically thin CO isotopes and other molecular species. Isotopic CO lines measure the bulk of the molecular gas, and HCN and HCO(+) pick out denser regions. Researchers find a warm ridge of gas in IC 342 (Eckart et al. 1989), denser gas in the starburst nucleus of IC 342, and a possible hot-spot in NGC 2903. In IC 342, NGC 2146, and NGC 6764, the CO-13 J = 2 to 1 line is subthermally populated, implying gas densities less than or equal to 10(exp 4) cm(-3).

  9. Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Cluster Galaxies at z = 1.46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masao; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Kohno, Kotaro; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Koyama, Yusei; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Tamura, Yoichi; Suzuki, Tomoko L.

    2018-04-01

    We present molecular gas reservoirs of 18 galaxies associated with the XMMXCS J2215.9–1738 cluster at z = 1.46. From Band 7 and Band 3 data of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we detect dust continuum emission at 870 μm and the CO J = 2–1 emission line from 8 and 17 member galaxies, respectively, within a clustercentric radius of R 200. The molecular gas masses derived from the CO and/or dust continuum luminosities show that the fraction of molecular gas mass and the depletion timescale for the cluster galaxies are larger than expected from the scaling relations of molecular gas on stellar mass and offset from the main sequence of star-forming galaxies in general fields. The galaxies closer to the cluster center in terms of both projected position and accretion phase seem to show a larger deviation from the scaling relations. We speculate that the environment of the galaxy cluster helps feed the gas through inflow to the member galaxies and reduce the efficiency of star formation. The stacked Band 3 spectrum of 12 quiescent galaxies with M stellar ∼ 1011 M ⊙ within 0.5R 200 shows no detection of a CO emission line, giving the upper limit of molecular gas mass and molecular gas fraction to be ≲1010 M ⊙ and ≲10%, respectively. Therefore, the massive galaxies in the cluster core quench the star formation activity while consuming most of the gas reservoirs.

  10. PREFACE: The 19th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases Preface: The 19th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F. J.

    2009-07-01

    The 19th Europhysics Sectional Conference on the Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG-2008) took place in Granada (Spain) from 15 to 19 July 2008. The conference was mainly organized by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), with the collaboration and support of the University of Córdoba (UCO) and the Research Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT). It is already 35 years since the first ESCAMPIG in 1973. The first editions of ESCAMPIG were in consecutive years (1973 and 1974) but later on it became a biennial conference of the European Physical Society (EPS) initially focusing on the collisional and radiative atomic and molecular processes in low temperature plasmas. The successive ESCAMPIGs took place in Bratislava in 1976 (3rd), Essen in 1978 (4th), Dubrovnik in 1980 (5th) and so on until the last one organized in Granada in 2008 (19th), the first ESCAMPIG in Spain. A number of changes have taken place in the Granada edition of ESCAMPIG. First, the previous six topics that have remained unchanged for almost two decades (since 1990) have now been updated to become twelve new topics which, in the opinion of the International Scientific Committee (ISC), will enhance the opportunity for discussions and communication of new findings and developments in the field of low temperature plasmas. The new list of topics for ESCAMPIG is: • Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas • Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function • Physical basis of plasma chemistry • Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) • Plasma diagnostics • Plasma and dicharges theory and simulation • Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas • Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas • Low pressure plasma sources • High pressure plasma sources • Plasmas and gas flows • Laser produced plasmas Secondly, a new prize has been created, the `William Crookes' prize in Plasma Physics to be

  11. [Dose rate-dependent cellular and molecular effects of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Wideł, Maria; Szurko, Agnieszka; Maniakowski, Zbigniew

    2008-09-11

    The aim of radiation therapy is to kill tumor cells while minimizing damage to normal cells. The ultimate effect of radiation can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death as well as cytogenetic damage resulting in genetic instability and/or cell death. The destructive effects of radiation arise from direct and indirect ionization events leading to peroxidation of macromolecules, especially those present in lipid-rich membrane structures as well as chromatin lipids. Lipid peroxidative end-products may damage DNA and proteins. A characteristic feature of radiation-induced peroxidation is an inverse dose-rate effect (IDRE), defined as an increase in the degree of oxidation(at constant absorbed dose) accompanying a lower dose rate. On the other hand, a low dose rate can lead to the accumulation of cells in G2, the radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle since cell cycle control points are not sensitive to low dose rates. Radiation dose rate may potentially be the main factor improving radiotherapy efficacy as well as affecting the intensity of normal tissue and whole-body side effects. A better understanding of dose rate-dependent biological effects may lead to improved therapeutic intervention and limit normal tissue reaction. The study reviews basic biological effects that depend on the dose rate of ionizing radiation.

  12. Molecular Gas Properties in M83 from CO PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, Fumi; Hirota, Akihiko; Baba, Junichi; Muraoka, Kazuyuki

    2018-02-01

    We have obtained 12CO(1–0) data of the nearby barred spiral galaxy M83 from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and Nobeyama 45 m observations. By combining these two data sets, the total CO flux has been recovered, and a high angular resolution (2\\prime\\prime corresponding to ∼40 pc at the distance of M83) has been achieved. The field of view is 3\\prime corresponding to ∼3.4 kpc and covers the galactic center, bar, and spiral arm regions. In order to investigate how these galactic structures affect gas properties, we have created a probability distribution function (PDF) of the CO integrated intensity ({I}CO}), peak temperature, and velocity dispersion for a region with each structure. We find that the {I}CO} PDF for the bar shows a bright-end tail while that for the arm does not. As the star formation efficiency is lower in the bar, this difference in PDF shape is contrary to the trend in Milky Way studies where the bright-end tail is found for star-forming molecular clouds. While the peak temperature PDFs are similar for the bar and arm regions, velocity dispersion in the bar is systematically larger than in the arm. This large velocity dispersion is likely a major cause of the bright-end tail and of suppressed star formation. We also investigate an effect of stellar feedback to PDF profiles and find that the different {I}CO} PDFs between bar and arm regions cannot be explained by the feedback effect, at least at the current spatial scale.

  13. Hydroxyl as a Tracer of Dark Gas in a Diffuse Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Josh; Donate, Emmanuel; Magnani, Loris A.

    2017-06-01

    In an attempt to determine the extent of dark molecular gas at high Galactic latitudes, we have conducted a survey of OH at 18 cm in a region containing the diffuse molecular cloud MBM 53. Dark molecular gas is a term that refers to molecular hydrogen that is either difficult or impossible to detect by conventional spectroscopic means. While models of photo-dissociation regions predict that some molecular hydrogen is found under conditions where other species are too low in abundance to be detected by radio spectroscopy, recent estimates have predicted that as much dark molecular gas exists as that normally detected by CO(1-0) surveys. However, more sensitive surveys either in the CO(1-0) line or other tracers should detect some of this gas. We observed 44 lines of sight at 18 cm to see if very sensitive OH observations could detect some of the dark molecular gas in the Pegasus-Pisces region. Our data were taken with the 305 m Arecibo radiotelescope and have typical rms values of 6-7 mK. We compared our OH observations with the Georgia/Harvard-Smithsonian CfA high-latitude CO(1-0) survey. Of 8 OH detections at 1667 MHz, 5 were not detected by the CO survey and indicate that at least some of the dark molecular gas may be traced by sensitive OH observations.

  14. Molecular formulae of marine and terrigenous dissolved organic matter detected by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Engbrodt, Ralph; Dittmar, Thorsten; Kattner, Gerhard

    2005-07-01

    The chemical structure of refractory marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still largely unknown. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR-MS) was used to resolve the complex mixtures of DOM and provide valuable information on elemental compositions on a molecular scale. We characterized and compared DOM from two sharply contrasting aquatic environments, algal-derived DOM from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) and terrigenous DOM from pore water of a tropical mangrove area in northern Brazil. Several thousand molecular formulas in the mass range of 300-600 Da were identified and reproduced in element ratio plots. On the basis of molecular elemental composition and double-bond equivalents (DBE) we calculated an average composition for marine DOM. O/C ratios in the marine samples were lower (0.36 ± 0.01) than in the mangrove pore-water sample (0.42). A small proportion of chemical formulas with higher molecular mass in the marine samples were characterized by very low O/C and H/C ratios probably reflecting amphiphilic properties. The average number of unsaturations in the marine samples was surprisingly high (DBE = 9.9; mangrove pore water: DBE = 9.4) most likely due to a significant contribution of carbonyl carbon. There was no significant difference in elemental composition between surface and deep-water DOM in the Weddell Sea. Although there were some molecules with unique marine elemental composition, there was a conspicuous degree of similarity between the terrigenous and algal-derived end members. Approximately one third of the molecular formulas were present in all marine as well as in the mangrove samples. We infer that different forms of microbial degradation ultimately lead to similar structural features that are intrinsically refractory, independent of the source of the organic matter and the environmental conditions where degradation took place.

  15. The MASSIVE Survey. VI. The Spatial Distribution and Kinematics of Warm Ionized Gas in the Most Massive Local Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Ene, Irina; Davis, Timothy A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Goulding, Andy D.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Nyland, Kristina; Thomas, Jens

    2017-03-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of the existence, spatial distribution, and kinematics of warm ionized gas as traced by the [O II] 3727 Å emission line in 74 of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. All of our galaxies have deep integral-field spectroscopy from the volume- and magnitude-limited MASSIVE survey of early-type galaxies with stellar mass {log}({M}* /{M}⊙ )> 11.5 (M K < -25.3 mag) and distance D < 108 Mpc. Of the 74 galaxies in our sample, we detect warm ionized gas in 28, which yields a global detection fraction of 38 ± 6% down to a typical [O II] equivalent width limit of 2 Å. MASSIVE fast rotators are more likely to have gas than MASSIVE slow rotators with detection fractions of 80 ± 10% and 28 ± 6%, respectively. The spatial extents span a wide range of radii (0.6-18.2 kpc; 0.1-4R e ), and the gas morphologies are diverse, with 17/28 ≈ 61 ± 9% being centrally concentrated, 8/28 ≈ 29 ± 9% exhibiting clear rotation out to several kiloparsecs, and 3/28 ≈ 11 ± 6% being extended but patchy. Three out of four fast rotators show kinematic alignment between the stars and gas, whereas the two slow rotators with robust kinematic measurements available exhibit kinematic misalignment. Our inferred warm ionized gas masses are roughly ˜105 M ⊙. The emission line ratios and radial equivalent width profiles are generally consistent with excitation of the gas by the old underlying stellar population. We explore different gas origin scenarios for MASSIVE galaxies and find that a variety of physical processes are likely at play, including internal gas recycling, cooling out of the hot gaseous halo, and gas acquired via mergers.

  16. Time-dependent gas-liquid interaction in molecular-sized nanopores.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueting; Li, Penghui; Qiao, Yu; Li, Yibing

    2014-10-08

    Different from a bulk phase, a gas nanophase can have a significant effect on liquid motion. Herein we report a series of experimental results on molecular behaviors of water in a zeolite β of molecular-sized nanopores. If sufficient time is provided, the confined water molecules can be "locked" inside a nanopore; otherwise, gas nanophase provides a driving force for water "outflow". This is due to the difficult molecular site exchanges and the relatively slow gas-liquid diffusion in the nanoenvironment. Depending on the loading rate, the zeolite β/water system may exhibit either liquid-spring or energy-absorber characteristics.

  17. Time-dependent Gas-liquid Interaction in Molecular-sized Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yueting; Li, Penghui; Qiao, Yu; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Different from a bulk phase, a gas nanophase can have a significant effect on liquid motion. Herein we report a series of experimental results on molecular behaviors of water in a zeolite β of molecular-sized nanopores. If sufficient time is provided, the confined water molecules can be “locked” inside a nanopore; otherwise, gas nanophase provides a driving force for water “outflow”. This is due to the difficult molecular site exchanges and the relatively slow gas-liquid diffusion in the nanoenvironment. Depending on the loading rate, the zeolite β/water system may exhibit either liquid-spring or energy-absorber characteristics. PMID:25293525

  18. I(CO)/N(H2) conversions and molecular gas abundances in spiral and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip; Black, John H.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of emission in the J = 1-0 rotational transition of interstellar CO are used to obtain column densities and masses of hydrogen. By taking into account the effects of variations in molecular cloud parameters on conversion factors between integrated CO intensity and molecular hydrogen column density, it is shown that conversion factors are very sensitive to the kinetic temperature of the emitting gas. Results indicate that the gas temperatures in systems with high star formation rates can be quite high, and it is suggested that use of a standard conversion factor will lead to systematic overestimation of the amount of molecular gas.

  19. Intercomparison of infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy and gas chromatography-flame ionization for trace analysis of ethane.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Sven; Miekisch, Wolfram; Halmer, Daniel; Schubert, Jochen; Hering, Peter; Mürtz, Manfred

    2008-04-15

    Comparison of two different methods for the measurement of ethane at the parts-per-billion (ppb) level is reported. We used cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS) in the 3 microm wavelength region and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for the analysis of various gas samples containing ethane fractions in synthetic air. Intraday and interday reproducibilities were studied. Intercomparing the results of two series involving seven samples with ethane mixing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 100 ppb, we found a reasonable agreement between both methods. The scatter plot of GC-FID data versus CALOS data yields a linear regression slope of 1.07 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, some of the ethane mixtures were checked over the course of 1 year, which proved the long-term stability of the ethane mixing ratio. We conclude that CALOS shows equivalent ethane analysis precision compared to GC-FID, with the significant advantage of a much higher time resolution (<1 s) since there is no requirement for sample preconcentration. This opens new analytical possibilities, e.g., for real-time monitoring of ethane traces in exhaled human breath.

  20. Headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) for the determination of dissolved methane in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Tjandraatmadja, G; Toifl, M; Goodman, N

    2014-01-01

    There is currently a need for a simple, accurate and reproducible method that quantifies the amount of dissolved methane in wastewater in order to realize the potential methane that can be recovered and account for any emissions. This paper presents such a method, using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection fitted with a GS-Gas PRO column coupled with a headspace auto sampler. A practical limit of detection for methane of 0.9 mg L(-1), with a retention time of 1.24 min, was obtained. It was found that the reproducibility and accuracy of the method increased significantly when samples were collected using an in-house constructed bailer sampling device and with the addition of 100 μL hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 25% sodium chloride (NaCl) and sonication for 30 min prior to analysis. Analysis of wastewater samples and wastewater sludge collected from a treatment facility were observed to range from 12.51 to 15.79 mg L(-1) (relative standard deviation (RSD) 8.1%) and 17.56 to 18.67 mg L(-1) (RSD 3.4%) respectively. The performance of this method was validated by repeatedly measuring a mid-level standard (n=8; 10 mg L(-1)), with an observed RSD of 4.6%.

  1. Time-Resolved Molecular Characterization of Limonene/Ozone Aerosol using High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia

    2009-09-09

    Molecular composition of limonene/O3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) as a function of reaction time. SOA was generated by ozonation of D-limonene in a reaction chamber and sampled at different time intervals using a cascade impactor. The SOA samples were extracted into acetonitrile and analyzed using a HR-ESI-MS instrument with a resolving power of 100,000 (m/Δm). The resulting mass spectra provided detailed information about the extent of oxidation inferred from the O:C ratios, double bond equivalency (DBE) factors, and aromaticity indexes (AI) in hundreds of identified individual SOA species.

  2. Properties and Evolution of the Highly Ionized Gas in MR 2251-178

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, S.; Netzer, H.; Chelouche, D.; George, I.; Turner, T.; Nandra, K.

    2004-06-01

    We present the first XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178. We model the X-ray spectrum with two power laws, one at high energies with a slope of Γ=1.6 and the other to model the soft excess with a slope of Γ=2.9, both absorbed by at least two warm absorbers (WAs). The high-resolution grating spectrum shows emission lines from N VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X, as well as absorption lines from the low ionization ions O III, O IV, and O V. A study of the spectral variations in MR 2251-178 over a period of 8.5 years yields that all X-ray observations can be fitted with the above model. Luminosity variations over timescales of years seem to correlate with the soft excess variations but not with the WA properties' variations. The overall picture is that of a stratified WA that enters and disappears from the line-of-sight on timescales of several months. We also present the first FUSE spectrum of MR 2251-178. The general characteristics of the UV and X-ray absorbers seem to be consistent.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Thiols in Fossil Fuels by Michael Addition Reaction Derivatization and Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Suoqi; Liu, Xuxia; Shi, Quan

    2016-10-04

    Thiols widely occur in sediments and fossil fuels. However, the molecular composition of these compounds is unclear due to the lack of appropriate analytical methods. In this work, a characterization method for thiols in fossil fuels was developed on the basis of Michael addition reaction derivatization followed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS). Model thiol compound studies showed that thiols were selectively reacted with phenylvinylsulfone and transformed to sulfones with greater than 98% conversions. This method was applied to a coker naphtha, light and heavy gas oils, and crude oils from various geological sources. The results showed that long alkyl chain thiols are readily present in petroleum, which have up to 30 carbon atoms. Large DBE dispersity of thiols indicates that naphthenic and aromatic thiols are also present in the petroleum. This method is capable of detecting thiol compounds in the part per million range by weight. This method allows characterization of thiols in a complex hydrocarbon matrix, which is complementary to the comprehensive analysis of sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

  4. Global molecular identification from graphs. Neutral and ionized main-group diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    James, Bryan; Caviness, Ken; Geach, Jonathan; Walters, Chris; Hefferlin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Diophantine equations and inequalities are presented for main-group closed-shell diatomic molecules. Specifying various bond types (covalent, dative, ionic, van der Waals) and multiplicities, it becomes possible to identify all possible molecules. While many of the identified species are probably unstable under normal conditions, they are interesting and present a challenge for computational or experimental analysis. Ionized molecules with net charges of -1, 1, and 2 are also identified. The analysis applies to molecules with atoms from periods 2 and 3 but can be generalized by substituting isovalent atoms. When closed-shell neutral diatomics are positioned in the chemical space (with axes enumerating the numbers of valence electrons of the free atoms), it is seen that they lie on a few parallel isoelectronic series.

  5. Influence of Ionization Source Conditions on the Gas-Phase Protomer Distribution of Anilinium and Related Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attygalle, Athula B.; Xia, Hanxue; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The gas-phase-ion generation technique and specific ion-source settings of a mass spectrometer influence heavily the protonation processes of molecules and the abundance ratio of the generated protomers. Hitherto that has been attributed primarily to the nature of the solvent and the pH. By utilizing electrospray ionization and ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate, even in the seemingly trivial case of protonated aniline, that the protomer ratio strongly depends on the source conditions. Under low in-source ion activation, nearly 100% of the N-protomer of aniline is produced, and it can be subsequently converted to the C-protomer by collisional activation effected by increasing the electrical potential difference between the entrance and exit orifices of the first vacuum region. This activation and transformation process takes place even before the ion is mass-selected and subjected to IM separation. Despite the apparent simplicity of the problem, the preferred protonation site of aniline in the gas phase—the amino group or the aromatic ring—has been a topic of controversy. Our results not only provide unambiguous evidence that ring- and nitrogen-protonated aniline can coexist and be interconverted in the gas phase, but also that the ratio of the protomers depends on the internal energy of the original ion. There are many dynamic ion-transformation and fragmentation processes that take place in the different physical compartments of a Synapt G2 HDMS instrument. Such processes can dramatically change the very identity even of small ions, and therefore should be taken into account when interpreting product-ion mass spectra.

  6. Simultaneous determination of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and ethanol in human blood by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Schlatter, J; Chiadmi, F; Gandon, V; Chariot, P

    2014-01-01

    Methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and ethanol, which are commonly used as biomarkers of several diseases, in acute intoxications, and forensic settings, can be detected and quantified in biological fluids. Gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry techniques are complex, require highly trained personnel and expensive materials. Gas chromatographic determinations of ethanol, methanol, and acetone have been reported in one study with suboptimal accuracy. Our objective was to improve the assessment of these compounds in human blood using GC with flame ionization detection. An amount of 50 µl of blood was diluted with 300 µl of sterile water, 40 µl of 10% sodium tungstate, and 20 µl of 1% sulphuric acid. After centrifugation, 1 µl of the supernatant was injected into the gas chromatograph. We used a dimethylpolysiloxane capillary column of 30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 µm. We observed linear correlations from 7.5 to 240 mg/l for methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone and from 75 to 2400 mg/l for ethanol. Precision at concentrations 15, 60, and 120 mg/l for methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone and 150, 600, and 1200 mg/ml for ethanol were 0.8-6.9%. Ranges of accuracy were 94.7-98.9% for methanol, 91.2-97.4% for acetaldehyde, 96.1-98.7% for acetone, and 105.5-111.6% for ethanol. Limits of detection were 0.80 mg/l for methanol, 0.61 mg/l for acetaldehyde, 0.58 mg/l for acetone, and 0.53 mg/l for ethanol. This method is suitable for routine clinical and forensic practices.

  7. Adsorption of gas molecules on a manganese phthalocyanine molecular device and its possibility as a gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dongqing; Zhao, Wenkai; Cui, Bin; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Desheng

    2018-01-17

    A theoretical investigation of the gas detection performance of manganese(ii) phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecular junctions for six different gases (NO, CO, O 2 , CO 2 , NO 2 , and NH 3 ) is executed through a non-equilibrium Green's function technique in combination with spin density functional theory. Herein, we systematically studied the adsorption structural configurations, the adsorption energy, the charge transfer, and the spin transport properties of the MnPc molecular junctions with these gas adsorbates. Remarkably, NO adsorption can achieve an off-state of the Mn spin; this may be an effective measure to switch the molecular spin. In addition, our results indicate that by measuring spin filter efficiency and the changes in total current through the molecular junctions, the CO, NO, O 2 , and NO 2 gas molecules can be detected selectively. However, the CO 2 and NH 3 gas adsorptions are difficult to be detected due to weak van der Waals interaction between these two gases and central Mn atom. Our findings provide important clues to the application of nanosensors for highly sensitive and selective based on MnPc molecular junction systems.

  8. Infrared imaging spectroscopy of the Galactic center - Distribution and motions of the ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, T. M.; Beckwith, S. V. W.; Forrest, W. J.; Pipher, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    High spatial spectral resolution IR images of the Galactic center in the Br-gamma recombination line of hydrogen were taken. A coherent filament of gas extending from north of IRS 1, curving around IRS 16/Sgr A complex, and continuing to the southwest, is seen. Nine stellar sources have associated Br-gamma emission. The total Br-gamma line flux in the filament is approximately 3 x 10 exp -15 W/sq m. The distribution and kinematics of the northern arm suggest orbital motion; the observations are accordingly fit with elliptical orbits in the field of a central point of mass.

  9. Probing the extent and content of low ionization gas in galaxies: QSO absorption and HI emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womble, Donna S.

    1993-01-01

    The small projected separations of some QSO's and low-redshift galaxies provide unique opportunities to study the extent and content of gas in galaxies through observation of absorption in the QSO spectra. Observations of these systems provide valuable information on the connection between the absorbing gas and the galaxy, as well as detailed information on the morphology and environment of the galaxy itself. While there is direct evidence that galaxies can produce the intervening-type QSO absorption lines, over the past decade, the study of such 'QSO-galaxy pairs' (at low redshift) has been considered unsuccessful because new detections of absorption were seldom made. A fundamental problem concerning the relation between these low-redshift systems and those seen at moderate to high redshift remains unresolved. Direct and indirect measures of galaxy absorption cross sections at moderate to high redshifts (z is approximately greater than 20.5) are much larger than the optical and HI sizes of local galaxies. However, direct comparison of the low and moderate to high redshift systems is difficult since different ions are observed in different redshift regimes. Observations are presented for a new sample of QSO-galaxy pairs. Nine new QSO's which shine through nearby galaxies (on the sky-plane) were observed to search for CaII absorption in the QSO spectra at the foreground galaxy redshifts.

  10. Increasing ion and fusion yield in a dense plasma focus by combination of pre-ionization and heavy ion gas admixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanfarmaei, B.; Yousefi, H. R.; Salem, M. K.; Sari, A. H.

    2018-04-01

    The results of an experimental study of pre-ionization and heavy gas introduced into driven gas in a plasma focus device are reported. To achieve this purpose, we made use of two methods: first, the pre-ionization method by applying the shunt resistor and second, the admixture of heavy ions. We applied the different shunt resistors and found the optimum amount to be 200 MΩ at an optimum pressure of 0.5 Torr. Ion yield that was measured by array of Faraday cups and the energy of fast ions that was calculated by using the time-of-flight method were raised up to 22% and 45%, and the impurity caused by anode's erosion was reduced approximately by 67% in comparison to when there was no pre-ionization. Also, we have used the admixture of 5% argon ions with nitrogen (working gas) to improve the ion yield up to 45% in comparison with pure nitrogen. Finally, for the first time, we have utilized the combination of these methods together and have, consequently, reached the maximum ion yield and fusion yield. With this new method, ion yield raised up to 70% greater than that of the previous condition, i.e., without pre-ionization and heavy ion admixture.

  11. THE IMPACT OF MOLECULAR GAS ON MASS MODELS OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, B. S.; Blok, W. J. G. de; Walter, F.

    2016-04-15

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from HERACLES. We combine our data with THINGS, SINGS, and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (H i from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and H i kinematics, with small differences in themore » inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors α{sub CO} to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density—the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES, and KINGFISH data. We study the relative effect that the addition of the molecular gas has on the halo rotation curves for Navarro–Frenk–White and the observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal halos. The contribution of the molecular gas varies for galaxies in our sample—for those galaxies where there is a substantial molecular gas content, using different values of α{sub CO} can result in significant differences to the relative contribution of the molecular gas and hence the shape of the dark matter halo rotation curves in the central regions of galaxies.« less

  12. Origins Space Telescope: Tracing Dark Molecular Gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika; Li, Qi; Krumholz, Mark; Dave, Romeel; Origins Space Telescope Science and Technology Definition Team

    2018-01-01

    We present theoretical models for quantifying the fraction of CO-dark molecular gas in galaxies. To do this, we combine novel thermal, chemical, and radiative equilibrium calculations with high-resolution cosmological zoom galaxy formation models. We discuss how this dark molecular gas will be uncovered by the Origins Space Telescope, one of the four science and technology definition studies of NASA Headquarters for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal survey.

  13. The Circumnuclear Molecular Gas in Seyfert 1 versus Seyfert 2 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kade, Kiana

    2018-06-01

    The distribution and kinematics of the circumnuclear molecular gas in local Seyfert galaxies is investigated as part of the Keck OSIRIS Nearby AGN (KONA) survey. The two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the molecular hydrogen, traced by 1-0 S(1) H2 2.12 micron emission, is probed down to scales of 5-30 parsecs in 20 type 1 and 20 type 2 Seyferts. Verifying previous studies with smaller samples, these Seyferts show evidence of a circumnuclear disk of molecular gas that is both geometrically and optically thick. A comparison of the molecular hydrogen characteristics in type 1 and type 2 Seyferts indicates there is no significant difference in the flux distribution, the velocity dispersion, or the velocity/velocity dispersion ratio with in the central 200 pc. We will also present upper limits on the central black hole mass based on the observed molecular gas kinematics.

  14. Transition-matrix theory for two-photon ionization of rare-gas atoms and isoelectronic ions with application to argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anthony F.; Jiang, Tsin-Fu

    1987-08-01

    A transition-matrix theory for two-photon ionization processes in rare-gas atoms or isoelectronic ions is presented. Uncoupled ordinary differential equations are obtained for the radial functions needed to calculate the two-photon transition amplitude. The implications of these equations are discussed in detail. In particular, the role of correlations involving virtually excited electron pairs, which are known to be essential to the description of single-photon processes, is examined for multiphoton ionization processes. Additionally, electron scattering interactions between two electron-hole pairs are introduced into our transition amplitude in the boson approximation since these have been found important in two-photon ionization of xenon by L'Huillier and Wendin [J. Phys. B 20, L37 (1987)]. Application of our theory is made to two-photon ionization of the 3p subshell of argon below the one-photon ionization threshold. Our results are compared to previous calculations of McGuire [Phys. Rev. A 24, 835 (1981)], of Moccia, Rahman, and Rizzo [J. Phys. B 16, 2737 (1983)], and of Pindzola and Kelly [Phys. Rev. A 11, 1543 (1975)]. Results are presented for both circularly and linearly polarized photons. Among our findings are, firstly, that the electron scattering interactions, which have not been included in previous calculations for argon, produce a substantial reduction in the two-photon single-ionization cross section below the one-photon ionization threshold, which is in agreement with findings of L'Huillier and Wendin for xenon. Secondly, we find that de-excitation of virtually excited electron pairs by absorption of a photon is important for describing the interaction of the atom with the photon field, as in the case of single-photon ionization processes, but that further excitation of virtually excited electron pairs by the photon field has completely negligible effects, indicating a major simplification of the theory for higher-order absorption processes.

  15. Abundant molecular gas and inefficient star formation in intracluster regions: ram pressure stripped tail of the Norma galaxy ESO137-001

    SciTech Connect

    Jáchym, Pavel; Combes, Françoise; Cortese, Luca

    For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram-pressure-stripped tail, out to a large 'intracluster' distance from the galaxy. With the Actama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, we have detected {sup 12}CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} in three Hα bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star formingmore » H II regions. The amount of ∼1.5 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H{sub 2} factor could overestimate the H{sub 2} content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray-emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low SFE (τ{sub dep} > 10{sup 10} yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H{sub 2} in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase.« less

  16. High molecular gas fractions in normal massive star-forming galaxies in the young Universe.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, L J; Genzel, R; Neri, R; Cox, P; Cooper, M C; Shapiro, K; Bolatto, A; Bouché, N; Bournaud, F; Burkert, A; Combes, F; Comerford, J; Davis, M; Schreiber, N M Förster; Garcia-Burillo, S; Gracia-Carpio, J; Lutz, D; Naab, T; Omont, A; Shapley, A; Sternberg, A; Weiner, B

    2010-02-11

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas. As this is relatively rare in the local Universe, galaxies like the Milky Way form only a few new stars per year. Typical massive galaxies in the distant Universe formed stars an order of magnitude more rapidly. Unless star formation was significantly more efficient, this difference suggests that young galaxies were much more molecular-gas rich. Molecular gas observations in the distant Universe have so far largely been restricted to very luminous, rare objects, including mergers and quasars, and accordingly we do not yet have a clear idea about the gas content of more normal (albeit massive) galaxies. Here we report the results of a survey of molecular gas in samples of typical massive-star-forming galaxies at mean redshifts of about 1.2 and 2.3, when the Universe was respectively 40% and 24% of its current age. Our measurements reveal that distant star forming galaxies were indeed gas rich, and that the star formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch. The average fraction of cold gas relative to total galaxy baryonic mass at z = 2.3 and z = 1.2 is respectively about 44% and 34%, three to ten times higher than in today's massive spiral galaxies. The slow decrease between z approximately 2 and z approximately 1 probably requires a mechanism of semi-continuous replenishment of fresh gas to the young galaxies.

  17. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  18. Evaluation of PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry for rapid molecular diagnosis of bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Perreten, Vincent; Endimiani, Andrea; Thomann, Andreas; Wipf, Juliette R K; Rossano, Alexandra; Bodmer, Michèle; Raemy, Andreas; Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A; Ecker, David J; Sampath, Rangarajan; Bonomo, Robert A; Washington, Cicely

    2013-06-01

    Bovine mastitis, an inflammatory disease of the mammary gland, is one of the most costly diseases affecting the dairy industry. The treatment and prevention of this disease is linked heavily to the use of antibiotics in agriculture and early detection of the primary pathogen is essential to control the disease. Milk samples (n=67) from cows suffering from mastitis were analyzed for the presence of pathogens using PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) and were compared with standard culture diagnostic methods. Concurrent identification of the primary mastitis pathogens was obtained for 64% of the tested milk samples, whereas divergent results were obtained for 27% of the samples. The PCR/ESI-MS failed to identify some of the primary pathogens in 18% of the samples, but identified other pathogens as well as microorganisms in samples that were negative by culture. The PCR/ESI-MS identified bacteria to the species level as well as yeasts and molds in samples that contained a mixed bacterial culture (9%). The sensitivity of the PCR/ESI-MS for the most common pathogens ranged from 57.1 to 100% and the specificity ranged from 69.8 to 100% using culture as gold standard. The PCR/ESI-MS also revealed the presence of the methicillin-resistant gene mecA in 16.2% of the milk samples, which correlated with the simultaneous detection of staphylococci including Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrated that PCR/ESI-MS, a more rapid diagnostic platform compared with bacterial culture, has the significant potential to serve as an important screening method in the diagnosis of bovine clinical mastitis and has the capacity to be used in infection control programs for both subclinical and clinical disease. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of Molecular-Shape Selectivity of Zeolites by Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Chuang, Yao-Yuan; Ho, Grace Hsiuying; Chuang, Shiow-Huey; Tsai, Tseng-Chang; Lee, Chi-Young; Tsai, Shang-Tien; Huang, Jun-Fu

    2008-01-01

    A sorption experiment using a gas chromatograph is described that can help students understand the "molecular-shape selectivity" behavior of zeolites in the subnano regime. Hexane isomers are used as probe molecules to demonstrate the sorption phenomena. In the experiment, a zeolite adsorbs certain hexane isomers with molecular sizes smaller than…

  20. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  1. Gas phase reactions of doubly charged alkaline earth and transition metal(II)-ligand complexes generated by electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Martin; Leary, Julie A.

    1997-03-01

    Doubly charged metal(II)-complexes of [alpha] 1-3, [alpha] 1-6 mannotriose and the conserved trimannosyl core pentasaccharide as well as doubly charged complexes of Co(II), Mn(II), Ca(II) and Sr(II) with acetonitrile generated by electrospray ionization were studied by low energy collision induced dissociation (CID). Two main fragmentation pathways were observed for the metal(II)-oligosaccharide complexes. Regardless of the coordinating metal, loss of a neutral dehydrohexose residue (162 Da) from the doubly charged precursor ion is observed, forming a doubly charged product ion. However, if the oligosaccharide is coordinated to Co(II) or Mn(II), loss of a dehydroxyhexose cation is also observed. Investigation of the low mass region of the mass spectra of the metal coordinated oligosaccharides revealed intense signals corresponding to [metal(II) + (CH3CN)n2+ (where n = 1-6) species which were being formed by the metal(II) ions and the acetonitrile present in the sample. Analysis of these metal(II)-acetonitrile complexes provided further insight into the processes occurring upon low energy CID of doubly charged metal complexes. The metal(II)-acetonitrile system showed neutral loss and ligand cleavage as observed with the oligosaccharide complexes, as well as a series of six different dissociation mechanisms, most notable among them reduction from [metal(II) + (CH3CN)n2+ to the bare [metal(I)]+ species by electron transfer. Depending on the metal and collision gas chosen, one observes electron transfer from the ligand to the metal, electron transfer from the collision gas to the metal, proton transfer between ligands, heterolytic cleavage of the ligands, reactive collisions and loss of neutral ligands.

  2. Biases in Metallicity Measurements from Global Galaxy Spectra: The Effects of Flux Weighting and Diffuse Ionized Gas Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Ryan L.; Shapley, Alice E.; Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin

    2017-12-01

    Galaxy metallicity scaling relations provide a powerful tool for understanding galaxy evolution, but obtaining unbiased global galaxy gas-phase oxygen abundances requires proper treatment of the various line-emitting sources within spectroscopic apertures. We present a model framework that treats galaxies as ensembles of H II and diffuse ionized gas (DIG) regions of varying metallicities. These models are based upon empirical relations between line ratios and electron temperature for H II regions, and DIG strong-line ratio relations from SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU data. Flux-weighting effects and DIG contamination can significantly affect properties inferred from global galaxy spectra, biasing metallicity estimates by more than 0.3 dex in some cases. We use observationally motivated inputs to construct a model matched to typical local star-forming galaxies, and quantify the biases in strong-line ratios, electron temperatures, and direct-method metallicities as inferred from global galaxy spectra relative to the median values of the H II region distributions in each galaxy. We also provide a generalized set of models that can be applied to individual galaxies or galaxy samples in atypical regions of parameter space. We use these models to correct for the effects of flux-weighting and DIG contamination in the local direct-method mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relations, and in the mass-metallicity relation based on strong-line metallicities. Future photoionization models of galaxy line emission need to include DIG emission and represent galaxies as ensembles of emitting regions with varying metallicity, instead of as single H II regions with effective properties, in order to obtain unbiased estimates of key underlying physical properties.

  3. New places and phases of CO-poor/CI-rich molecular gas in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Bisbas, Thomas G.; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2018-04-01

    In this work we extend the work on the recently discovered role of Cosmic Rays (CRs) in regulating the average CO/H_2 abundance ratio in molecular clouds (and thus their CO line visibility) in starburst galaxies, and find that it can lead to a CO-poor/CI-rich H_2 gas phase even in environments with Galactic or in only modestly enhanced CR backgrounds expected in ordinary star-forming galaxies. Furthermore, the same CR-driven astro-chemistry raises the possibility of a widespread phase transition of molecular gas towards a CO-poor/CI-rich phase in: a) molecular gas outflows found in star-forming galaxies, b) active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and c) near synchrotron-emitting radio jets and the radio-loud cores of powerful radio galaxies. For main sequence galaxies we find that CRs can render some of their molecular gas mass CO-invisible, compounding the effects of low metallicities. Imaging the two fine structure lines of atomic carbon with resolution high enough to search beyond the CI/CO-bright line regions associated with central starbursts can reveal such a CO-poor/CI-rich molecular gas phase, provided that relative brightness sensitivity levels of Tb(CI 1 - 0)/Tb(CO J = 1 - 0) ˜0.15 are reached. The capability to search for such gas in the Galaxy is now at hand with the new high-frequency survey telescope HEAT deployed in Antarctica and future ones to be deployed in Dome A. ALMA can search for such gas in star-forming spiral disks, galactic molecular gas outflows and the CR-intense galactic and circumgalactic gas-rich environments of radio-loud objects.

  4. Structural characterization of saturated branched chain fatty acid methyl esters by collisional dissociation of molecular ions generated by electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Ran-Ressler, Rinat R; Lawrence, Peter; Brenna, J Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Saturated branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) are present as complex mixtures in numerous biological samples. The traditional method for structure elucidation, electron ionization (EI) mass spectrometry, sometimes does not unambiguously enable assignment of branching in isomeric BCFA. Zirrolli and Murphy (Zirrolli , J. A. , and R. A. Murphy. 1993. Low-energy tandem mass spectrometry of the molecular ion derived from fatty acid methyl esters: a novel method for analysis of branched-chain fatty acids. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 4: 223-229.) showed that the molecular ions of four BCFA methyl ester (BCFAME) yield highly characteristic fragments upon collisional dissociation using a triple quadrupole instrument. Here, we confirm and extend these results by analysis using a tabletop 3-D ion trap for activated molecular ion EI-MS/MS to 30 BCFAME. iso-BCFAME produces a prominent ion (30-100% of base peak) for [M-43] (M-C₃H₇), corresponding to the terminal isopropyl moiety in the original iso-BCFAME. Anteiso-FAME yield prominent ions (20-100% of base peak) corresponding to losses on both side of the methyl branch, [M-29] and [M-57], and tend to produce more prominent m/z 115 peaks corresponding to a cyclization product around the ester. Dimethyl and tetramethyl FAME, with branches separated by at least one methylene group, yield fragment on both sides of the sites of methyl branches that are more than 6 C away from the carboxyl carbon. EI-MS/MS yields uniquely specific ions that enable highly confident structural identification and quantification of BCFAME.

  5. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in contrasted freshwater environments by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and EEM-PARAFAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parot, Jérémie; Parlanti, Edith; Guéguen, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a key parameter in the fate, transport and mobility of inorganic and organic pollutants in natural waters. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled to parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) provide insights on the main fluorescent DOM constituents. However, the molecular structures associated with PARAFAC DOM remain poorly understood. In this study, DOM from rivers, marshes and algal culture was characterized by EEM-PARAFAC and electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-MS, Orbitrap Q Exactive). The high resolution of the Orbitrap (i.e. 140,000) allowed us to separate unique molecular species from the complex DOM mixtures. The majority of chemical species were found within the mass to charge ratio (m/z) 200 to 400. Weighted averages of neutral mass were 271.254, 236.480, 213.992Da for river, marsh and algal-derived DOM, respectively, congruent with previous studies. The assigned formula were dominated by CHO in humic-rich river waters whereas N- and S-containing compounds were predominant in marsh and algal samples. Marsh consisted of N and S-containing compounds, which were presumed to be linear alkylbenzene sulfonates. And the double bond equivalent (DBE) was higher in the marsh and in comparison was lower in the algal culture. Kendrick masses, used to identify homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units in high resolution mass spectra, and Van Krevelen diagrams, plot of molar ratio of hydrogen to carbon (H/C) versus oxygen to carbon (O/C), will be discussed in relation to PARAFAC components to further discriminate freshwater systems based on the origin and maturity of DOM. Together, these results showed that ESI-FT-MS has a great potential to distinguish freshwater DOM at the molecular level without any fractionation.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods.

    PubMed

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-10

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  7. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Australian Groundwater Through the Improvised Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detection Technique.

    PubMed

    Faustorilla, Maria Vilma; Chen, Zuliang; Dharmarajan, Rajarathnam; Naidu, Ravendra

    2017-09-01

    Assessment of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from contaminated sites demands routine and reliable measurement at trace levels. However, the detection limits of these methods need to be improved. This study developed the programmable temperature vaporization-large volume injection (PTV-LVI) method to quantify TPHs through gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. This configuration enhances the method sensitivity for trace level detections through large volume injections and pre-concentration of analytes along the injection liner. The method was evaluated for the three commonly observed hydrocarbon fractions: C10-C14, C15-C28 and C29-C36. In comparison with conventional injection methods (splitless and pulsed splitless), PTV-LVI showed R2 values > 0.999 with enhanced limits of detection and limits of quantification values. The method was applied to real samples for routine environmental monitoring of TPHs in an Australian contaminated site characterized by refueling station. Analysis of groundwater samples in the area showed a wide range of TPH concentrations as follows: 66-1,546,000 (C10-C14), 216-22,762 (C15-C28) and 105-2,103 (C29-C36) μg/L. This method has detected trace levels, thereby measuring a wider concentration range of TPHs. These more accurate measurements can lead to the appropriate application of risk assessments and remediation techniques. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Exploring petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater by double solid phase extraction coupled to gas chromatography-flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Pindado Jiménez, Oscar; Pérez Pastor, Rosa Ma; Escolano Segovia, Olga; del Reino Querencia, Susana

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes an analytical procedure for measuring aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons fractions present in groundwater. In this method, hydrocarbons are solid phase extracted (SPE) twice from the groundwater and the resulting fractions are analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The first SPE disposes the hydrocarbons present in groundwater in organic solvents and the second SPE divides them into aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The validation study is carried out and its uncertainties are discussed. Identifying the main sources of uncertainty is evaluated through applying the bottom-up approach. Limits of detection for hydrocarbons ranges are below 5 µg L(-1), precision is not above of 30%, and acceptable recoveries are reached for aliphatic and aromatic fractions studied. The uncertainty due to volume of the sample, factor of calibration and recovery are the highest contributions. The expanded uncertainty range from 13% to 26% for the aliphatic hydrocarbons ranges and from 14% to 23% for the aromatic hydrocarbons ranges. As application, the proposed method is satisfactorily applied to a set of groundwater samples collected in a polluted area where there is evidence to present a high degree of hydrocarbons. The results have shown the range of aliphatic hydrocarbons >C21-C35 is the most abundant, with values ranging from 215 µg L(-1) to 354 µg L(-1), which it is associated to a contamination due to diesel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of free amino compounds in betalainic fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography with flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Florian; Graneis, Stephan; Schreiter, Pat P-Y; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-06-14

    Amino acids and amines are the precursors of betalains. Therefore, the profiles of free amino compounds in juices obtained from cactus pears [Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill. cv. Bianca, cv. Gialla, and cv. Rossa], pitaya fruits [Selenicereus megalanthus (K. Schumann ex Vaupel) Moran, Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, and Hylocereus undatus (Haworth) Britton & Rose], and in extracts from differently colored Swiss chard [Beta vulgaris L. ssp. cicla (L.) Alef. cv. Bright Lights] petioles and red and yellow beets (B. vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris var. conditiva Alef. cv. Burpee's Golden) were investigated for the first time. Amino compounds were derivatized with propyl chloroformate. While gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry was used for peak assignment, GC flame ionization detection was applied for quantification of individual compounds. Whereas proline was the major free amino compound of cactus pear and pitaya fruit juices, glutamine dominated in Swiss chard stems and beets, respectively. Interestingly, extremely high concentrations of dopamine were detected in Swiss chard stems and beets. Furthermore, the cleavage of betaxanthins caused by derivatization in alkaline reaction solutions is demonstrated for the first time. Amino acids and amines thus released might increase the actual free amino compound contents of the respective sample. To evaluate the contribution of betaxanthin cleavage to total amino acid and amine concentration, isolated betaxanthins were derivatized according to the "EZ:faast" method prior to quantification of the respective amino compounds released. On a molar basis, betaxanthin contribution to overall amino compound contents was always below 6.4%.

  10. Seasonal variation of gastroprotective terpenoids in Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae) quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID).

    PubMed

    Zermiani, Tailyn; Junior, Antonio A S; Ferreira, Renê A; Wagner, Theodoro M; Machado, Marina S; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Niero, Rivaldo

    2016-11-01

    The triterpenes friedelin (1), β-friedelinol (2) and 3,15-dioxo-21α-hydroxyfriedelane (3) in the aerial parts of Maytenus robusta, a Brazilian medicinal plant with antiulcer potential, were seasonally quantified by gas chromatography flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) using an external standard. The method was found to be linear, precise and sensitive. Compounds 1 and 2 were found in M. robusta leaves and branches, with highest concentrations in the leaves collected in autumn, i.e. 3.21 ± 0.16 and 12.60 ± 1.49 mg g-1 dry weight of 1 and 2, respectively. On the other hand, compound 3 was found only in the branches, with the highest concentrations in winter and autumn (0.21 ± 0.01 and 0.20 ± 0.02 mg g-1). The results allow to define the optimal season and plant parts for the collection of M. robusta as a phytotherapeutic drug.

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-01-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate. PMID:28281659

  13. The Relationship between the Dense Neutral and Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Thick Disks of Two Edge-on Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueff, Katherine M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Pitterle, Marissa; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Savage, Blair D.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution, optical images (BVI + Hα) of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Large Binocular Telescope, and WIYN 3.5 m telescope reveal an extensive population of filamentary dust absorption seen to z ~2-2.5 kpc. Many of these dusty thick disk structures have characteristics reminiscent of molecular clouds found in the Milky Way disk. Our Hα images show that the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies is dominated by a smooth, diffuse component. The strongly filamentary morphologies of the dust absorption have no counterpart in the smoothly distributed Hα emission. We argue that the thick disk DIG and dust-bearing filaments trace physically distinct phases of the thick disk ISM, the latter tracing a dense, warm or cold neutral medium. The dense, dusty matter in the thick disks of spiral galaxies is largely tracing matter ejected from the thin disk via energetic feedback from massive stars. The high densities of the gas may be a result of converging gas flows. This dense material fuels some thick disk star formation, as evidenced by the presence of thick disk H II regions. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope operated at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also, based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the US, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona, on behalf of the Arizona University System; Instituto Nazionale do Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute of Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; Ohio State University, and the Research Corporation, on

  14. Formaldehyde in Absorption: Tracing Molecular Gas in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) have been long-classified as the red, ellipsoidal branch of the classic Hubble tuning fork diagram of galactic structure. In part with this classification, ETGs are thought to be molecular and atomic gas-poor with little to no recent star formation. However, recent efforts have questioned this ingrained classification. Most notably, the ATLAS3D survey of 260 ETGs within ~40 Mpc found 22% contain CO, a common tracer for molecular gas. The presence of cold molecular gas also implies the possibility for current star formation within these galaxies. Simulations do not accurately predict the recent observations and further studies are necessary to understand the mechanisms of ETGs.CO traces molecular gas starting at densities of ~102 cm-3, which makes it a good tracer of bulk molecular gas, but does little to constrain the possible locations of star formation within the cores of dense molecular gas clouds. Formaldehyde (H2CO) traces molecular gas on the order of ~104 cm-3, providing a further constraint on the location of star-forming gas, while being simple enough to possibly be abundant in gas-poor ETGs. In cold molecular clouds at or above ~104 cm-3 densities, the structure of formaldehyde enables a phenomenon in which rotational transitions have excitation temperatures driven below the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), ~2.7 K. Because the CMB radiates isotropically, formaldehyde can be observed in absorption, independent of distance, as a tracer of moderately-dense molecular clouds and star formation.This novel observation technique of formaldehyde was incorporated for observations of twelve CO-detected ETGs from the ATLAS3D sample, including NGC 4710 and PGC 8815, to investigate the presence of cold molecular gas, and possible star formation, in ETGs. We present images from the Very Large Array, used in its C-array configuration, of the J = 11,0 - 11,1 transition of formaldehyde towards these sources. We report our

  15. Online Simultaneous Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange of Multitarget Gas-Phase Molecules by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Cha, Eunju; Cha, Sangwon; Kim, Sunghwan; Oh, Han Bin; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Lee, Jaeick

    2017-11-21

    In this study, a hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange method using gas chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (GC-ESI/MS) was first investigated as a novel tool for online H/D exchange of multitarget analytes. The GC and ESI source were combined with a homemade heated column transfer line. GC-ESI/MS-based H/D exchange occurs in an atmospheric pressure ion source as a result of reacting the gas-phase analyte eluted from GC with charged droplets of deuterium oxide infused as the ESI spray solvent. The consumption of the deuterated solvent at a flow rate of 2 μL min -1 was more economical than that in online H/D exchange methods reported to date. In-ESI-source H/D exchange by GC-ESI/MS was applied to 11 stimulants with secondary amino or hydroxyl groups. After H/D exchange, the spectra of the stimulants showed unexchanged, partially exchanged, and fully exchanged ions showing various degrees of exchange. The relative abundances corrected for naturally occurring isotopes of the fully exchanged ions of stimulants, except for etamivan, were in the range 24.3-85.5%. Methylephedrine and cyclazodone showed low H/D exchange efficiency under acidic, neutral, and basic spray solvent conditions and nonexchange for etamivan with an acidic phenolic OH group. The in-ESI-source H/D exchange efficiency by GC-ESI/MS was sufficient to determine the number of hydrogen by elucidation of fragmentation from the spectrum. Therefore, this online H/D exchange technique using GC-ESI/MS has potential as an alternative method for simultaneous H/D exchange of multitarget analytes.

  16. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF A DIFFUSE CLOUD ALONG A LINE OF SIGHT TOWARD W51: MOLECULAR FRACTION AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A.; Gerin, M.

    2012-10-20

    Absorption lines from the molecules OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sup +} {sub 3} have been observed in a diffuse molecular cloud along a line of sight near W51 IRS2. We present the first chemical analysis that combines the information provided by all three of these species. Together, OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} are used to determine the molecular hydrogen fraction in the outskirts of the observed cloud, as well as the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen. H{sup +} {sub 3} is used to infer the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H{sub 2} in the molecular interior ofmore » the cloud, which we find to be {zeta}{sub 2} = (4.8 {+-} 3.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. Combining the results from all three species we find an efficiency factor-defined as the ratio of the formation rate of OH{sup +} to the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H-of {epsilon} = 0.07 {+-} 0.04, much lower than predicted by chemical models. This is an important step in the future use of OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} on their own as tracers of the cosmic-ray ionization rate.« less

  17. Thermospray ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemical ionization gas chromatography- mass spectrometry of hexazinone metabolites in soil and vegetation extracts

    Treesearch

    Joseph B. Fischer; Jerry L. Michael

    1995-01-01

    We have used thermospray LC-MS to confirm three highly polar metabolites (A, B. and G) of the herbicide hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-l-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione]. and chemical ionization GC-MS to confirm two other metabolites (D and E) in extracts of soil and vegetation from a forest in the Central Alabama Piedmont. Selected-ion monitoring (...

  18. How Does Dense Molecular Gas Contribute to Star Formation in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Alia

    2017-01-01

    The starburst galaxy NGC 2146 is believed to have been formed approximately 800 Myr ago, when two galaxies collided with each other possibly leading to a burst of star formation. NGC 2146 is known as a starburst galaxy for the high frequency of star formation going on in its molecular clouds. These clouds serve as nurseries for star formation to occur. Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Carbon monoxide (CO) are molecules found in molecular gas clouds. HCN molecules are tracers for high density star forming gas. Whereas, CO molecules are tracers for low density star forming gas. In this project, we are observing these two molecules and their proximity to where the stars are forming in the galaxy to determine if the star formation is occurring in the same area as the high and low density molecular gas areas in starburst galaxy NGC 2146.

  19. The merging dwarf galaxy UM 448: chemodynamics of the ionized gas from VLT integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Barlow, M. J.; Walsh, J. R.; Westmoquette, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    ) population, and conclude that WR stars alone cannot be responsible for producing the observed N/O excess. Instead, the location and disturbed morphology of the N-enriched region suggest that interaction-induced inflow of metal-poor gas may be responsible.

  20. Generation of gas-phase ions from charged clusters: an important ionization step causing suppression of matrix and analyte ions in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xianwen; van Dongen, Joost L J; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Meijer, E W

    2016-12-30

    Ionization in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a very complicated process. It has been reported that quaternary ammonium salts show extremely strong matrix and analyte suppression effects which cannot satisfactorily be explained by charge transfer reactions. Further investigation of the reasons causing these effects can be useful to improve our understanding of the MALDI process. The dried-droplet and modified thin-layer methods were used as sample preparation methods. In the dried-droplet method, analytes were co-crystallized with matrix, whereas in the modified thin-layer method analytes were deposited on the surface of matrix crystals. Model compounds, tetrabutylammonium iodide ([N(Bu) 4 ]I), cesium iodide (CsI), trihexylamine (THA) and polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600), were selected as the test analytes given their ability to generate exclusively pre-formed ions, protonated ions and metal ion adducts respectively in MALDI. The strong matrix suppression effect (MSE) observed using the dried-droplet method might disappear using the modified thin-layer method, which suggests that the incorporation of analytes in matrix crystals contributes to the MSE. By depositing analytes on the matrix surface instead of incorporating in the matrix crystals, the competition for evaporation/ionization from charged matrix/analyte clusters could be weakened resulting in reduced MSE. Further supporting evidence for this inference was found by studying the analyte suppression effect using the same two sample deposition methods. By comparing differences between the mass spectra obtained via the two sample preparation methods, we present evidence suggesting that the generation of gas-phase ions from charged matrix/analyte clusters may induce significant suppression of matrix and analyte ions. The results suggest that the generation of gas-phase ions from charged matrix/analyte clusters is an important ionization step in MALDI-MS. Copyright

  1. The experiment of the elemental mercury was removed from natural gas by 4A molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cong; Chen, Yanhao

    2018-04-01

    Most of the world's natural gas fields contain elemental mercury and mercury compounds, and the amount of mercury in natural gas is generally 1μg/m3 200μg/m3. This paper analyzes the mercury removal principle of chemical adsorption process, the characteristics and application of mercury removal gent and the factors that affect the efficiency of mercury removal. The mercury in the natural gas is adsorbed by the mercury-silver reaction of the 4 molecular sieve after the manned treatment. The limits for mercury content for natural gas for different uses and different treatment processes are also different. From the environmental protection, safety and other factors, it is recommended that the mercury content of natural gas in the pipeline is less than 28μg / m3, and the mercury content of the raw material gas in the equipment such as natural gas liquefaction and natural gas condensate recovery is less than 0.01μg/m3. This paper mainly analyzes the existence of mercury in natural gas, and the experimental research process of using 4A molecular sieve to absorb mercury in natural gas.

  2. Gas-phase synthesis of singly and multiply charged polyoxovanadate anions employing electrospray ionization and collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Al Hasan, Naila M; Johnson, Grant E; Laskin, Julia

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with in-source fragmentation and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were used to generate a wide range of singly and multiply charged vanadium oxide cluster anions including VxOy(n-) and VxOyCl(n-) ions (x = 1-14, y = 2-36, n = 1-3), protonated clusters, and ligand-bound polyoxovanadate anions. The cluster anions were produced by electrospraying a solution of tetradecavanadate, V14O36Cl(L)5 (L = Et4N(+), tetraethylammonium), in acetonitrile. Under mild source conditions, ESI-MS generates a distribution of doubly and triply charged VxOyCl(n-) and VxOyCl(L)((n-1)-) clusters predominantly containing 14 vanadium atoms as well as their protonated analogs. Accurate mass measurement using a high-resolution LTQ/Orbitrap mass spectrometer (m/Δm = 60,000 at m/z 410) enabled unambiguous assignment of the elemental composition of the majority of peaks in the ESI-MS spectrum. In addition, high-sensitivity mass spectrometry allowed the charge state of the cluster ions to be assigned based on the separation of the major from the much less abundant minor isotope of vanadium. In-source fragmentation resulted in facile formation of smaller VxOyCl((1-2)-) and VxOy ((1-2)-) anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments enabled systematic study of the gas-phase fragmentation pathways of the cluster anions originating from solution and from in-source CID. Surprisingly simple fragmentation patterns were obtained for all singly and doubly charged VxOyCl and VxOy species generated through multiple MS/MS experiments. In contrast, cluster anions originating directly from solution produced comparatively complex CID spectra. These results are consistent with the formation of more stable structures of VxOyCl and VxOy anions through low-energy CID. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that solution-phase synthesis of one precursor cluster anion combined with gas-phase CID is an efficient approach for the top

  3. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Singly and Multiply Charged Polyoxovanadate Anions Employing Electrospray Ionization and Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Hasan, Naila M.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with in-source fragmentation and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were used to generate a wide range of singly and multiply charged vanadium oxide cluster anions including VxOy n- and VxOyCln- ions (x = 1-14, y = 2-36, n = 1-3), protonated clusters, and ligand-bound polyoxovanadate anions. The cluster anions were produced by electrospraying a solution of tetradecavanadate, V14O36Cl(L)5 (L = Et4N+, tetraethylammonium), in acetonitrile. Under mild source conditions, ESI-MS generates a distribution of doubly and triply charged VxOyCln- and VxOyCl(L)(n-1)- clusters predominantly containing 14 vanadium atoms as well as their protonated analogs. Accurate mass measurement using a high-resolution LTQ/Orbitrap mass spectrometer (m/Δm = 60,000 at m/z 410) enabled unambiguous assignment of the elemental composition of the majority of peaks in the ESI-MS spectrum. In addition, high-sensitivity mass spectrometry allowed the charge state of the cluster ions to be assigned based on the separation of the major from the much less abundant minor isotope of vanadium. In-source fragmentation resulted in facile formation of smaller VxOyCl(1-2)- and VxOy (1-2)- anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments enabled systematic study of the gas-phase fragmentation pathways of the cluster anions originating from solution and from in-source CID. Surprisingly simple fragmentation patterns were obtained for all singly and doubly charged VxOyCl and VxOy species generated through multiple MS/MS experiments. In contrast, cluster anions originating directly from solution produced comparatively complex CID spectra. These results are consistent with the formation of more stable structures of VxOyCl and VxOy anions through low-energy CID. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that solution-phase synthesis of one precursor cluster anion combined with gas-phase CID is an efficient approach for the top-down synthesis of a

  4. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Singly and Multiply Charged Polyoxovanadate Anions Employing Electrospray Ionization and Collision Induced Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Al Hasan, Naila M.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-07-02

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with in-source fragmentation and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were used to generate a wide range of singly and multiply charged vanadium oxide cluster anions including V xO y n– and V xO yCl n– ions (x = 1–14, y = 2–36, n = 1–3), protonated clusters, and ligand-bound polyoxovanadate anions. The cluster anions were produced by electrospraying a solution of tetradecavanadate, V 14O 36Cl(L) 5 (L = Et 4N +, tetraethylammonium), in acetonitrile. Under mild source conditions, ESI-MS generates a distribution of doubly and triply charged V xO yCl n– and V xOmore » yCl(L) (n–1)– clusters predominantly containing 14 vanadium atoms as well as their protonated analogs. Accurate mass measurement using a high-resolution LTQ/Orbitrap mass spectrometer (m/Δm = 60,000 at m/z 410) enabled unambiguous assignment of the elemental composition of the majority of peaks in the ESI-MS spectrum. In addition, high-sensitivity mass spectrometry allowed the charge state of the cluster ions to be assigned based on the separation of the major from the much less abundant minor isotope of vanadium. In-source fragmentation resulted in facile formation of smaller V xO yCl (1–2)– and V xO y (1–2)– anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments enabled systematic study of the gas-phase fragmentation pathways of the cluster anions originating from solution and from in-source CID. Surprisingly simple fragmentation patterns were obtained for all singly and doubly charged V xO yCl and V xO y species generated through multiple MS/MS experiments. In contrast, cluster anions originating directly from solution produced comparatively complex CID spectra. These results are consistent with the formation of more stable structures of V xO yCl and V xO y anions through low-energy CID. Finally and furthermore, our results demonstrate that solution-phase synthesis of one precursor cluster anion combined

  5. A molecular gas-rich GRB host galaxy at the peak of cosmic star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabsalmani, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Dannerbauer, H.; Feruglio, C.; Daddi, E.; Ciesla, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Duc, P.-A.; Basa, S.; Bournaud, F.; Elbaz, D.

    2018-05-01

    We report the detection of the CO(3-2) emission line from the host galaxy of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080207 at z = 2.086. This is the first detection of molecular gas in emission from a GRB host galaxy beyond redshift 1. We find this galaxy to be rich in molecular gas with a mass of 1.1 × 10^{11} M_{{\\odot }} assuming αCO = 4.36 M_{{\\odot }} (K km s^{-1} pc^2)^{-1}. The molecular gas mass fraction of the galaxy is ˜0.5, typical of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with similar stellar masses and redshifts. With an SFR_{FIR} of 260 M_{{\\odot }} yr^{-1}, we measure a molecular gas depletion time-scale of 0.43 Gyr, near the peak of the depletion time-scale distribution of SFGs at similar redshifts. Our findings are therefore in contradiction with the proposed molecular gas deficiency in GRB host galaxies. We argue that the reported molecular gas deficiency for GRB hosts could be the artefact of improper comparisons or neglecting the effect of the typical low metallicities of GRB hosts on the CO-to-molecular-gas conversion factor. We also compare the kinematics of the CO(3-2) emission line to that of the H α emission line from the host galaxy. We find the H α emission to have contributions from two separate components, a narrow and a broad one. The narrow component matches the CO emission well in velocity space. The broad component, with a full width at half-maximum of ˜1100 km s^{-1}, is separated by +390 km s^{-1} in velocity space from the narrow component. We speculate this broad component to be associated with a powerful outflow in the host galaxy or in an interacting system.

  6. Energetics of the molecular gas in the H2 luminous radio galaxy 3C 326: Evidence for negative AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Boulanger, F.; Salomé, P.; Guillard, P.; Lehnert, M. D.; Ogle, P.; Appleton, P.; Falgarone, E.; Pineau Des Forets, G.

    2010-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the gas conditions in the H2 luminous radio galaxy 3C 326 N at z ~ 0.1, which has a low star-formation rate (SFR ~ 0.07 M⊙ yr-1) in spite of a gas surface density similar to those in starburst galaxies. Its star-formation efficiency is likely a factor ~10-50 lower than those of ordinary star-forming galaxies. Combining new IRAM CO emission-line interferometry with existing Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopy, we find that the luminosity ratio of CO and pure rotational H2 line emission is factors 10-100 lower than what is usually found. This suggests that most of the molecular gas is warm. The Na D absorption-line profile of 3C 326 N in the optical suggests an outflow with a terminal velocity of ~-1800 km s-1 and a mass outflow rate of 30-40 M⊙ yr-1, which cannot be explained by star formation. The mechanical power implied by the wind, of order 1043 erg s-1, is comparable to the bolometric luminosity of the emission lines of ionized and molecular gas. To explain these observations, we propose a scenario where a small fraction of the mechanical energy of the radio jet is deposited in the interstellar medium of 3C 326 N, which powers the outflow, and the line emission through a mass, momentum and energy exchange between the different gas phases of the ISM. Dissipation times are of order 107-8 yrs, similar or greater than the typical jet lifetime. Small ratios of CO and PAH surface brightnesses in another 7 H2 luminous radio galaxies suggest that a similar form of AGN feedback could be lowering star-formation efficiencies in these galaxies in a similar way. The local demographics of radio-loud AGN suggests that secular gas cooling in massive early-type galaxies of ≥1011 M⊙ could generally be regulated through a fundamentally similar form of “maintenance-phase” AGN feedback. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer.

  7. The Second Galactic Center Black Hole? A Possible Detection of Ionized Gas Orbiting around an IMBH Embedded in the Galactic Center IRS13E Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Tsutsumi, Takahiro; Uehara, Kenta; Miyoshi, Makoto; Miyawaki, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi

    2017-11-01

    The Galactic Center is the nuclear region of the nearest spiral galaxy, the Milky Way, and contains the supermassive black hole with M˜ 4× {10}6 {M}⊙ , Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). One of the basic questions about the Galactic Center is whether or not Sgr A* is the only “massive” black hole in the region. The IRS13E complex is a very intriguing infrared (IR) object that contains a large dark mass comparable to the mass of an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) from the proper motions of the main member stars. However, the existence of the IMBH remains controversial. There are some objections to accepting the existence of the IMBH. In this study, we detected ionized gas with a very large velocity width ({{Δ }}{v}{FWZI}˜ 650 km s-1) and a very compact size (r˜ 400 au) in the complex using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We also found an extended component connecting with the compact ionized gas. The properties suggest that this is an ionized gas flow on the Keplerian orbit with high eccentricity. The enclosed mass is estimated to be {10}4 {M}⊙ by the analysis of the orbit. The mass does not conflict with the upper limit mass of the IMBH around Sgr A*, which is derived by the long-term astrometry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). In addition, the object probably has an X-ray counterpart. Consequently, a very fascinating possibility is that the detected ionized gas is rotating around an IMBH embedded in the IRS13E complex.

  8. Gas chromatographic column for the Viking 1975 molecular analysis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Bruner, F.; Simmonds, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    A gas chromatographic column has been developed for use in the remote analysis of the Martian surface. The column, which utilizes a liquid-modified organic adsorbent (Tenax) as the stationary phase, provides efficient transmission and resolution of nanogram quantities of organic materials in the presence of millionfold excesses of water and carbon dioxide.

  9. Kinetic theory of weakly ionized dilute gas of hydrogen-like atoms of the first principles of quantum statistics and dispersion laws of eigenwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyusarenko, Yurii V.; Sliusarenko, Oleksii Yu.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a microscopic approach to the construction of the kinetic theory of dilute weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms. The approach is based on the statements of the second quantization method in the presence of bound states of particles. The basis of the derivation of kinetic equations is the method of reduced description of relaxation processes. Within the framework of the proposed approach, a system of common kinetic equations for the Wigner distribution functions of free oppositely charged fermions of two kinds (electrons and cores) and their bound states—hydrogen-like atoms— is obtained. Kinetic equations are used to study the spectra of elementary excitations in the system when all its components are non-degenerate. It is shown that in such a system, in addition to the typical plasma waves, there are longitudinal waves of matter polarization and the transverse ones with a behavior characteristic of plasmon polaritons. The expressions for the dependence of the frequencies and Landau damping coefficients on the wave vector for all branches of the oscillations discovered are obtained. Numerical evaluation of the elementary perturbation parameters in the system on an example of a weakly ionized dilute gas of the 23Na atoms using the D2-line characteristics of the natrium atom is given. We note the possibility of using the results of the developed theory to describe the properties of a Bose condensate of photons in the diluted weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms.

  10. Molecular differentiation of five Cinnamomum camphora chemotypes using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry of raw leaves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiali; Cui, Meng; Deng, Min; Liu, Xingxing; Huang, Xueyong; Zhang, Xinglei; Luo, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Five chemotypes, the isoborneol-type, camphora-type, cineole-type, linalool-type and borneol-type of Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl have been identified at the molecular level based on the multivariate analysis of mass spectral fingerprints recorded from a total of 750 raw leaf samples (i.e., 150 leaves equally collected for each chemotype) using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Both volatile and semi-volatile metabolites of the fresh leaves of C. camphora were simultaneously detected by DAPCI-MS without any sample pretreatment, reducing the analysis time from half a day using conventional methods (e.g., GC-MS) down to 30 s. The pattern recognition results obtained using principal component analysis (PCA) was cross-checked by cluster analysis (CA), showing that the difference visualized by the DAPCI-MS spectral fingerprints was validated with 100% accuracy. The study demonstrates that DAPCI-MS meets the challenging requirements for accurate differentiation of all the five chemotypes of C. camphora leaves, motivating more advanced application of DAPCI-MS in plant science and forestry studies. PMID:28425482

  11. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for the detection of analytes extracted by thin-film molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Van Biesen, Geert; Wiseman, Justin M; Li, Jessica; Bottaro, Christina S

    2010-09-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the analysis of solid and liquid surfaces that has found numerous applications in the few years since its invention. For the first time, it is applied to the detection of analytes extracted by molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in a thin-film format. MIPs formed with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as the template were used for the extraction of this analyte from aqueous solutions spiked at concentrations of 0.0050-2.0 mg L(-1) (approximately 2 x 10(-8) to approximately 1 x 10(-5) M). The response was linear up to 0.50 mg L(-1), and then levelled off due to saturation of the active sites of the MIP. In MS/MS mode, the signal at 0.0050 mg L(-1) was still an order of magnitude higher than the signal of a blank. The MIP DESI-MS approach was also used for the analysis of tap water and river water spiked with 2,4-D and four analogues, which indicated that these analogues were also extracted to various extents. For practical applications of the MIP, a detection technique is required that can distinguish between these structurally similar compounds, and DESI-MS fulfills this purpose.

  12. Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) of low molecular weight organic compounds and synthetic polymers using zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takehiro; Kawasaki, Hideya; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2008-08-01

    We have developed surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles with anisotropic shapes (ZnO-SALDI-MS). The mass spectra showed low background noises in the low m/z, i.e. less than 500 u region. Thus, we succeeded in SALDI ionization on low molecular weight organic compounds, such as verapamil hydrochloride, testosterone, and polypropylene glycol (PPG) (average molecular weight 400) without using a liquid matrix or buffers such as citric acids. In addition, we found that ZnO-SALDI has advantages in post-source decay (PSD) analysis and produced a simple mass spectrum for phospholipids. The ZnO-SALDI spectra for synthetic polymers of polyethylene glycol (PEG), polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) showed the sensitivity and molecular weight distribution to be comparable to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectra with a 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) matrix. ZnO-SALDI shows good performance for synthetic polymers as well as low molecular weight organic compounds. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Ionized Gas in the Halos of Edge-on Starburst Galaxies: Evidence for Supernova-driven Superwinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Matthew D.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1996-05-01

    Supernova-driven galactic winds ("superwinds") have been invoked to explain many aspects of galaxy formation and evolution. Such winds should arise when the supernova rate is high enough to create a cavity of very hot shock-heated gas within a galaxy. This gas can then expand outward as a high-speed wind that can accelerate and heat ambient interstellar or circum-galactic gas causing it to emit optical line radiation and/or thermal X-rays. Theory suggests that such winds should be common in starburst galaxies and that the nature of the winds should depend on the star formation rate and distribution. In order to systematize our observational understanding of superwinds (determine their incidence rate and the dependence of their properties on the star formation that drives them) and to make quantitative comparisons with the theory of superwinds, we have analyzed data from an optical spectroscopic and narrow-band imaging survey of an infrared flux-limited (S_60 microns_ >= 5.4 Jy) sample of about 50 IR-warm (S_60 microns_/S_100 microns_ > 0.4), starburst galaxies whose stellar disks are viewed nearly edge-on (b/a ~> 2). This sample contains galaxies with infrared luminosities from ~10^10^-10^12^ L_sun_ and allows us to determine the properties of superwinds over a wide range of star formation rates. We have found that extraplanar emission-line gas is a very common feature of these edge-on, IR-bright galaxies and the properties of the extended emission-line gas are qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with the superwind theory. We can summarize these properties as morphological, ionization, dynamical, and physical. 1. Morphological properties.-Extraplanar filamentary and shell-like emission-line morphologies on scales of hundreds of parsecs to 10 kpc are common, there is a general "excess" of line emission along the minor axis, the minor axis emission-line "excess" correlates with "IR activity," and the minor axis emission-line "excess" also correlates with the

  14. LLAMA: normal star formation efficiencies of molecular gas in the centres of luminous Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; Burtscher, L.; Davies, R. I.; Koss, M.; Ricci, C.; Lutz, D.; Riffel, R.; Alexander, D. M.; Genzel, R.; Hicks, E. H.; Lin, M.-Y.; Maciejewski, W.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Riffel, R. A.; Schartmann, M.; Schawinski, K.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Saintonge, A.; Shimizu, T.; Sternberg, A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L.; Treister, E.; Veilleux, S.

    2018-02-01

    Using new Atacama Pathfinder Experiment and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope spectroscopy of the CO 2→1 line, we undertake a controlled study of cold molecular gas in moderately luminous (Lbol = 1043-44.5 erg s-1) active galactic nuclei (AGN) and inactive galaxies from the Luminous Local AGN with Matched Analogs (LLAMA) survey. We use spatially resolved infrared photometry of the LLAMA galaxies from 2MASS, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and the Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel), corrected for nuclear emission using multicomponent spectral energy distribution fits, to examine the dust-reprocessed star formation rates, molecular gas fractions and star formation efficiencies (SFEs) over their central 1-3 kpc. We find that the gas fractions and central SFEs of both active and inactive galaxies are similar when controlling for host stellar mass and morphology (Hubble type). The equivalent central molecular gas depletion times are consistent with the discs of normal spiral galaxies in the local Universe. Despite energetic arguments that the AGN in LLAMA should be capable of disrupting the observable cold molecular gas in their central environments, our results indicate that nuclear radiation only couples weakly with this phase. We find a mild preference for obscured AGN to contain higher amounts of central molecular gas, which suggests connection between AGN obscuration and the gaseous environment of the nucleus. Systems with depressed SFEs are not found among the LLAMA AGN. We speculate that the processes that sustain the collapse of molecular gas into dense pre-stellar cores may also be a prerequisite for the inflow of material on to AGN accretion discs.

  15. Gas permeation in a molecular crystal and space expansion.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Yuichi; Takamizawa, Satoshi

    2014-05-14

    A novel single-crystal membrane [Cu(II)2(4-F-bza)4(2-mpyz)]n (4-F-bza = 4-fluorobenzoate; 2-mpyz = 2-methylpyrazine) was synthesized and its identical permeability in any crystal direction in the correction for tortuosity proved that gas diffuses inside the channels without detour. H2 permeated by 1.18 × 10(-12) mol m m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1) with a high selectivity (Fα: 23.5 for H2/CO and 48.0 for H2/CH4) through its 2D-channels having a minimum diameter of 2.6 Å, which is narrower than the Lennard-Jones diameter of H2 (2.827 Å), CO (3.690 Å), and CH4 (3.758 Å). The high rate of permeation was well explained by a modified Knudsen diffusion model based on the space expansion effect, which agrees with the observed permselectivity enhanced for smaller gases in considering the expansion of a channel resulting from the collision of gas molecules or atoms onto the channel wall. An analysis of single-crystal X-ray data showed the expansion order to be H2 > Ar > CH4, which was expected from the permeation analysis. The permselectivity of a porous solid depends on the elasticity of the pores as well as on the diameter of the vacant channel and the size of the target gas.

  16. [Determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xia, Guanghui; Shen, Weijian; Yu, Keyao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Bian, Xiaohong; Xu, Jiyang

    2014-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The honey and royal jelly samples were treated with different preparation methods as the result of the different components. The honey sample was extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up with primary second amine, and the royal jelly sample was extracted with acetonitrile-water (1:1, v/v), and cleaned up with a C18 solid-phase extraction column. Finally, the extracts of the honey and royal jelly were analyzed by GC-NCI/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode separately. External standard calibration method was used for quantification. The linearities of calibration curves of the four insecticides were good with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99 in the range of 50-500 microg/L. The limits of the detection (LODs) of the four insecticides were in the range of 0.12- 5.0 microg/kg, and the limits of the quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.40-16.5 microg/kg. The recoveries of the four insecticides spiked in honey and royal jelly at three spiked levels (10, 15 and 20 microg/kg) were in the range of 78.2 -110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all below 14%. The sensitivity and selectivity of this method were good with no interfering peaks. The proposed method is simple quick and effective to analyze the four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly.

  17. Development and Validation of a Method for Alcohol Analysis in Brain Tissue by Headspace Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hao-Jung; Poklis, Justin L.; Poklis, Alphonse; Wolf, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is the most widely used and abused drug. While blood is the preferred specimen for analysis, tissue specimens such as brain serve as alternative specimens for alcohol analysis in post-mortem cases where blood is unavailable or contaminated. A method was developed using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) for the detection and quantification of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol in brain tissue specimens. Unfixed volatile-free brain tissue specimens were obtained from the Department of Pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Calibrators and controls were prepared from 4-fold diluted homogenates of these brain tissue specimens, and were analyzed using t-butanol as the internal standard. The chromatographic separation was performed with a Restek BAC2 column. A linear calibration was generated for all analytes (mean r2 > 0.9992) with the limits of detection and quantification of 100–110 mg/kg. Matrix effect from the brain tissue was determined by comparing the slopes of matrix prepared calibration curves with those of aqueous calibration curves; no significant differences were observed for ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol. The bias and the CVs for all volatile controls were ≤10%. The method was also evaluated for carryover, selectivity, interferences, bench-top stability and freeze-thaw stability. The HS-GC-FID method was determined to be reliable and robust for the analysis of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol concentrations in brain tissue, effectively expanding the specimen options for post-mortem alcohol analysis. PMID:27488829

  18. Fast Outflow of Molecular Gas in the Seyfert Galaxy IC 5063

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, T.; Oonk, R.; Tadhunter, C.

    2017-11-01

    AGN-driven gas outflows may play an important role in the evolution of galaxies, as they impact on the growth on the central supermassive black hole as well on the star formation of the host galaxy. Much of the detailed physics of these gas outflows, and their actual impact on the host galaxy, is still not well understood. We present a detailed analysis, using ALMA observations, of the radio-jet driven outflow of molecular gas in the nearby radio-loud Seyfert galaxy IC 5063 which allows to derive important physical parameters of the gas and the outflow which, in turn, provide crucial input to numerical models. In recent years, a surprising result in the field of AGN-driven outflows has been that the cold phases of the gas (atomic and molecular) in some galaxies are the massive components of these outflows, despite the huge amounts of energy involved in driving these outflows. However, why most of the outflowing gas should be molecular/atomic, and in general, what are the physical conditions of the gas in the outflows and what really drives them, are still open questions. We present the results obtained from ALMA observations of multiple CO transitions and other molecules of what appears to be a textbook case of a jet-driven multi- phase outflow in the central regions of the Seyfert galaxy IC 5063. The data on multiple transitions allow us to derive the physical conditions in the different regions of the outflowing molecular gas. The signature of the impact of the radio jet is clearly seen in the spatial distribution of the excitation temperature and pressure of the outflowing gas, with the highest excitation and pressure found for the gas with the highest outflow velocities. We obtain a detailed three- dimensional picture of the outflow, and its kinematics, and find that outflowing molecular gas is present across the entire region co-spatial with the radio plasma, providing unambiguous evidence that the radio jets/cocoon are responsible for the outflow. The

  19. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  20. MOLECULAR GAS EVOLUTION ACROSS A SPIRAL ARM IN M51

    SciTech Connect

    Egusa, Fumi; Scoville, Nick; Koda, Jin, E-mail: fegusa@ir.isas.jaxa.jp

    We present sensitive and high angular resolution CO(1-0) data obtained by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy observations toward the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51. The angular resolution of 0.''7 corresponds to 30 pc, which is similar to the typical size of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and the sensitivity is also high enough to detect typical GMCs. Within the 1' field of view centered on a spiral arm, a number of GMC-scale structures are detected as clumps. However, only a few clumps are found to be associated with each giant molecular association (GMA) and more than 90% ofmore » the total flux is resolved out in our data. Considering the high sensitivity and resolution of our data, these results indicate that GMAs are not mere confusion with GMCs but plausibly smooth structures. In addition, we have found that the most massive clumps are located downstream of the spiral arm, which suggests that they are at a later stage of molecular cloud evolution across the arm and plausibly are cores of GMAs. By comparing with H{alpha} and Pa{alpha} images, most of these cores are found to have nearby star-forming regions. We thus propose an evolutionary scenario for the interstellar medium, in which smaller molecular clouds collide to form smooth GMAs at spiral arm regions and then star formation is triggered in the GMA cores. Our new CO data have revealed the internal structure of GMAs at GMC scales, finding the most massive substructures on the downstream side of the arm in close association with the brightest H II regions.« less

  1. A VLT VIMOS study of the anomalous BCD Mrk996: mapping the ionized gas kinematics and abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Barlow, M. J.; Westmoquette, M. S.; Walsh, J. R.; Cuisinier, F.; Exter, K. M.

    2009-09-01

    A study of the blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Mrk996 based on high-resolution optical Very Large Telescope Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph integral field unit spectroscopy is presented. Mrk996 displays multicomponent line emission, with most line profiles consisting of a narrow, central Gaussian [full width at half-maximum (FWHM) ~ 110kms-1] with an underlying broad component (FWHM ~ 400kms-1). The broad HI Balmer component splits into two separate broad components inside a 1.5-arcsec radius from the nucleus; these are attributed to a two-armed minispiral. This spiral-like nucleus rotates in the same sense as the extended narrow line ionized gas but is offset by ~50kms-1 from the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The rotation curve of Mrk996 derived from the Hα narrow component yields a total mass of 5 × 108Msolar within a radius of 3kpc. From the Hα luminosity we infer a global star formation rate of ~2Msolaryr-1. The high excitation energy, high critical density [OIII] λ4363 and [NII] λ5755 lines are only detected from the inner region and exist purely in broad component form, implying unusual excitation conditions. Surface brightness, radial velocity and FWHM maps for several emission components are presented. A separate physical analysis of the broad and narrow emission line regions is undertaken. We derive an upper limit of 10000K for the electron temperature of the narrow line gas, together with an electron density of 170cm-3, typical of normal HII regions. For the broad line component, measured [OIII] and [FeIII] diagnostic line ratios are consistent with a temperature of 11000K and an electron density of 107cm-3. The broad line emission regions show N/H and N/O enrichment factors of ~20 relative to the narrow line regions, but no He/H, O/H, S/H or Ar/H enrichment is inferred. Previous studies indicated that Mrk996 showed anomalously high N/O ratios compared with BCDs of a similar metallicity. Our multicomponent analysis yields a revised metallicity

  2. Robust generation of Fourier-synthesized laser fields and their estimation of the optical phase by using quantum control of molecular tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Naoaki; Ohmura, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Intense (5.0 × 1012 W cm-2) nanosecond Fourier-synthesized laser fields consisting of fundamental, second-, third-, and fourth-harmonic light generated by an interferometer-free Fourier-synthesized laser field generator induce orientation-selective ionization based on directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization (TI). The laser field generator ensures adjustment-free operation, high stability, and high reproducibility. Phase-sensitive, orientation-selective molecular TI provides a simple way to estimate the relative phase differences between the fundamental light and each harmonic by data-fitting analysis. This application of Fourier-synthesized laser fields will facilitate not only lightwave engineering but also the control of matter.

  3. HST/COS detection of a Ne VIII absorber towards PG 1407+265: an unambiguous tracer of collisionally ionized hot gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Muzahid, S.; Narayanan, A.; Srianand, R.; Wakker, B. P.; Charlton, J. C.; Pathak, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of Ne VIII in a zabs = 0.599 61 absorber towards the QSO PG1407+265 (zem= 0.94). Besides Ne VIII, absorption from H I Lyman series lines (H I λ1025-λ915), several other low (C II, N II, O II and S II), intermediate (C III, N III, N IV, O III, S IV and S V) and high (S VI, O VI and Ne VIII) ionization metal lines are detected. Disparity in the absorption line kinematics between different ions implies that the absorbing gas comprises of multiple ionization phases. The low and the intermediate ions (except S V) trace a compact (˜410 pc), metal-rich (Z ˜ Z⊙) and overdense (log nH ˜ -2.6) photoionized region that sustained star formation for a prolonged period. The high ions, Ne VIII and O VI, can be explained as arising in a low density (-5.3 ≤ log nH ≤ -5.0), metal-rich (Z ≳ Z⊙) and diffuse (˜180 kpc) photoionized gas. The S V, S VI and C IV [detected in the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) spectrum] require an intermediate photoionization phase with -4.2 < log nH < -3.5. Alternatively, a pure collisional ionization model, as used to explain the previous known Ne VIII absorbers, with 5.65 < log T < 5.72, can reproduce the S VI, O VI and Ne VIII column densities simultaneously in a single phase. However, even such models require an intermediate phase to reproduce any observable S V and/or C IV. Therefore, we conclude that when multiple phases are present, the presence of Ne VIII is not necessarily an unambiguous indication of collisionally ionized hot gas.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of pyrolysis oil by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sfetsas, Themistoklis; Michailof, Chrysa; Lappas, Angelos; Li, Qiangyi; Kneale, Brian

    2011-05-27

    Pyrolysis oils have attracted a lot of interest, as they are liquid energy carriers and general sources of chemicals. In this work, gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) techniques were used to provide both qualitative and quantitative results of the analysis of three different pyrolysis oils. The chromatographic methods and parameters were optimized and solvent choice and separation restrictions are discussed. Pyrolysis oil samples were diluted in suitable organic solvent and were analyzed by GC×GC-TOFMS. An average of 300 compounds were detected and identified in all three samples using the ChromaToF (Leco) software. The deconvoluted spectra were compared with the NIST software library for correct matching. Group type classification was performed by use of the ChromaToF software. The quantification of 11 selected compounds was performed by means of a multiple-point external calibration curve. Afterwards, the pyrolysis oils were extracted with water, and the aqueous phase was analyzed both by GC-FID and, after proper change of solvent, by GC×GC-TOFMS. As previously, the selected compounds were quantified by both techniques, by means of multiple point external calibration curves. The parameters of the calibration curves were calculated by weighted linear regression analysis. The limit of detection, limit of quantitation and linearity range for each standard compound with each method are presented. The potency of GC×GC-TOFMS for an efficient mapping of the pyrolysis oil is undisputable, and the possibility of using it for quantification as well has been demonstrated. On the other hand, the GC-FID analysis provides reliable results that allow for a rapid screening of the pyrolysis oil. To the best of our knowledge, very few papers have been reported with quantification attempts on pyrolysis oil samples using GC×GC-TOFMS most of which make use of the

  5. Molecular gas in the halo fuels the growth of a massive cluster galaxy at high redshift.

    PubMed

    Emonts, B H C; Lehnert, M D; Villar-Martín, M; Norris, R P; Ekers, R D; van Moorsel, G A; Dannerbauer, H; Pentericci, L; Miley, G K; Allison, J R; Sadler, E M; Guillard, P; Carilli, C L; Mao, M Y; Röttgering, H J A; De Breuck, C; Seymour, N; Gullberg, B; Ceverino, D; Jagannathan, P; Vernet, J; Indermuehle, B T

    2016-12-02

    The largest galaxies in the universe reside in galaxy clusters. Using sensitive observations of carbon monoxide, we show that the Spiderweb galaxy-a massive galaxy in a distant protocluster-is forming from a large reservoir of molecular gas. Most of this molecular gas lies between the protocluster galaxies and has low velocity dispersion, indicating that it is part of an enriched intergalactic medium. This may constitute the reservoir of gas that fuels the widespread star formation seen in earlier ultraviolet observations of the Spiderweb galaxy. Our results support the notion that giant galaxies in clusters formed from extended regions of recycled gas at high redshift. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Alma observations of massive molecular gas filaments encasing radio bubbles in the Phoenix cluster

    DOE PAGES

    Russell, H. R.; McDonald, M.; McNamara, B. R.; ...

    2017-02-14

    We report new ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) line emission from themore » $$2.1\\pm0.3\\times10^{10}\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}$$ molecular gas reservoir in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. The cold molecular gas is fuelling a vigorous starburst at a rate of $$500-800\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}\\rm\\; yr^{-1}$$ and powerful black hole activity in the form of both intense quasar radiation and radio jets. The radio jets have inflated huge bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot, X-ray atmospheres surrounding the host galaxy. The ALMA observations show that extended filaments of molecular gas, each $$10-20\\rm\\; kpc$$ long with a mass of several billion solar masses, are located along the peripheries of the radio bubbles. The smooth velocity gradients and narrow line widths along each filament reveal massive, ordered molecular gas flows around each bubble, which are inconsistent with gravitational free-fall. The molecular clouds have been lifted directly by the radio bubbles, or formed via thermal instabilities induced in low entropy gas lifted in the updraft of the bubbles. These new data provide compelling evidence for close coupling between the radio bubbles and the cold gas, which is essential to explain the self-regulation of feedback. As a result, the very feedback mechanism that heats hot atmospheres and suppresses star formation may also paradoxically stimulate production of the cold gas required to sustain feedback in massive galaxies.« less

  7. Strong-field approximation for ionization of a diatomic molecule by a strong laser field. II. The role of electron rescattering off the molecular centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busuladžić, M.; Gazibegović-Busuladžić, A.; Milošević, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2008-09-01

    The strong-field approximation for ionization of diatomic molecules by a strong laser field [D. B. Milošević, Phys. Rev. A 74, 063404 (2006)] is generalized to include rescattering of the ionized electron wave packet off the molecular centers (the electron’s parent ion or the second atom). There are four rescattering contributions to the ionization rate, which are responsible for the high-energy plateau in the electron spectra and which interfere in a complicated manner. The spectra are even more complicated due to the different symmetry properties of the atomic orbitals of which a particular molecular orbital consists. Nevertheless, a comparatively simple condition emerges for the destructive interference of all these contributions, which yields a curve in the (Epf,θ) plane. Here θ is the electron emission angle and Epf is the electron kinetic energy. The resulting suppression of the rescattering plateau can be strong and affect a large area of the (Epf,θ) plane, depending on the orientation of the molecule. We illustrate this using the examples of the 3σg molecular orbital of N2 and the 1πg molecular orbital of O2 for various orientations of these molecules with respect to the laser polarization axis. For N2 , for perpendicular orientation and the equilibrium internuclear distance R0 , we find that the minima of the ionization rate form the curve Epfcos2θ=π2/(2R02) in the (Epf,θ) plane. For O2 the rescattering plateau is absent for perpendicular orientation.

  8. Molecular gas in the host galaxy of a quasar at redshift z = 6.42.

    PubMed

    Walter, Fabian; Bertoldi, Frank; Carilli, Chris; Cox, Pierre; Lo, K Y; Neri, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Omont, Alain; Strauss, Michael A; Menten, Karl M

    2003-07-24

    Observations of molecular hydrogen in quasar host galaxies at high redshifts provide fundamental constraints on galaxy evolution, because it is out of this molecular gas that stars form. Molecular hydrogen is traced by emission from the carbon monoxide molecule, CO; cold H2 itself is generally not observable. Carbon monoxide has been detected in about ten quasar host galaxies with redshifts z > 2; the record-holder is at z = 4.69 (refs 1-3). Here we report CO emission from the quasar SDSS J114816.64 + 525150.3 (refs 5, 6) at z = 6.42. At that redshift, the Universe was only 1/16 of its present age, and the era of cosmic reionization was just ending. The presence of about 2 x 1010 M\\circ of H2 in an object at this time demonstrates that molecular gas enriched with heavy elements can be generated rapidly in the youngest galaxies.

  9. Resolving molecular gas to ~500 pc in a unique star forming disk galaxy at z~2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbin, Drew; Aravena, Manuel; Hodge, Jacqueline; Carilli, Chris Luke; Daddi, Emanuele; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Riechers, Dominik; Wagg, Jeff

    2018-06-01

    We have resolved molecular gas in a 'typical' star forming disk galaxy at z>2 down to the scale of ~500 pc. Previous observations of CO and [CI] lines on larger spatial scales have revealed bulk molecular and atomic gas properties indicating that the target is a massive disk galaxy with large gas reserves. Unlike many galaxies studied at high redshift, it is undergoing modest quiescent star formation rather than bursty centrally concentrated star formation. Therefore this galaxy represents an under-studied, but cosmologically important population in the early universe. Our new observations of CO (4-3) highlight the clumpy molecular gas fuelling star formation throughout the disk. Underlying continuum from cold dust provides a key constraint on star formation rate surface densities, allowing us to examine the star formation rate surface density scaling law in a never-before-tested regime of early universe galaxies.These observations enable an unprecedented view of the obscured star formation that is hidden to optical/UV imaging and trace molecular gas on a fine enough scale to resolve morphological traits and provide a view akin to single dish surveys in the local universe.

  10. The role of molecular gas in galaxy transition in compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Alatalo, K.; Zucker, C.; Appleton, P. N.; Gallagher, S.; Guillard, P.; Johnson, K.

    2017-11-01

    Compact groups (CGs) provide an environment in which interactions between galaxies and with the intra-group medium enable and accelerate galaxy transitions from actively star forming to quiescent. Galaxies in transition from active to quiescent can be selected, by their infrared (IR) colors, as canyon or infrared transition zone (IRTZ) galaxies. We used a sample of CG galaxies with IR data from the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) allowing us to calculate the stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) for each galaxy. Furthermore, we present new CO(1-0) data for 27 galaxies and collect data from the literature to calculate the molecular gas mass for a total sample of 130 galaxies. This data set allows us to study the difference in the molecular gas fraction (Mmol/M∗) and star formation efficiency (SFE = SFR/Mmol) between active, quiescent, and transitioning (I.e., canyon and IRTZ) galaxies. We find that transitioning galaxies have a mean molecular gas fraction and a mean SFE that are significantly lower than those of actively star-forming galaxies. The molecular gas fraction is higher than that of quiescent galaxies, whereas the SFE is similar. These results indicate that the transition from actively star-forming to quiescent in CG galaxies goes along with a loss of molecular gas, possibly due to tidal forces exerted from the neighboring galaxies or a decrease in the gas density. In addition, the remaining molecular gas loses its ability to form stars efficiently, possibly owing to turbulence perturbing the gas,as seen in other, well-studied examples such as Stephan's Quintet and HCG 57. Thus, the amount and properties of molecular gas play a crucial role in the environmentally driven transition of galaxies from actively star forming to quiescent. Full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/607/A110

  11. Warm and cold molecular gas conditions modeled in 87 galaxies observed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Glenn, Jason

    2018-01-01

    Molecular gas is the raw material for star formation, and like the interstellar medium (ISM) in general, it can exist in regions of higher and lower excitation. Rotational transitions of the CO molecule are bright and sensitive to cold molecular gas. While the majority of the molecular gas exists in the very cold component traced by CO J=1-0, the higher-J lines trace the highly excited gas that may be more indicative of star formation processes. The atmosphere is opaque to these lines, but the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory made them accessible for study of Galactic and extragalactic sources. We have conducted two-component, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) modeling of the CO lines from J=1‑0 through J=13‑12 in 87 galaxies observed by the Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). We used the nested sampling algorithm Multinest to compare the measured CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) to the ones produced by a custom version of the non-LTE code RADEX. This allowed us to fully examine the degeneracies in parameter space for kinetic temperature, molecular gas density, CO column density, and area filling factor.Here we discuss the major findings of our study, as well as the important implications of two-component molecular gas modeling. The average pressure of the warm gas is slightly correlated with galaxy LFIR, but that of the cold gas is not. A high-J (such as J=11-10) to J=1-0 line ratio is diagnostic of warm component pressure. We find a very large spread in our derived values of "alpha-CO," with no discernable trend with LFIR, and average molecular gas depletion times that decrease with LFIR. If only a few molecular lines are available in a galaxy's SLED, the limited ability to model only one component will change the results. A one-component fit often underestimates the flux of carbon monoxide (CO) J=1‑0 and the mass. If low-J lines are not included, mass is underestimated by an order of magnitude. Even when

  12. Gas-phase reactions in extraterrestrial environments: laboratory investigations by crossed molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated gas-phase reactions of N((2)D) with the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Titan by the crossed molecular beam technique. In all cases, molecular products containing a novel CN bond are formed, thus suggesting possible routes of formation of gas-phase nitriles in the atmosphere of Titan and primordial Earth. The same approach has been recently extended to the study of radical-radical reactions, such as the reaction of atomic oxygen with the CH(3) and C(3)H(5) radicals. Products other than those already considered in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and interstellar medium have been identified.

  13. Ionization Waves of Arbitrary Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, D.; Franke, P.; Katz, J.; Palastro, J. P.; Begishev, I. A.; Boni, R.; Bromage, J.; Milder, A. L.; Shaw, J. L.; Froula, D. H.

    2018-06-01

    Flying focus is a technique that uses a chirped laser beam focused by a highly chromatic lens to produce an extended focal region within which the peak laser intensity can propagate at any velocity. When that intensity is high enough to ionize a background gas, an ionization wave will track the intensity isosurface corresponding to the ionization threshold. We report on the demonstration of such ionization waves of arbitrary velocity. Subluminal and superluminal ionization fronts were produced that propagated both forward and backward relative to the ionizing laser. All backward and all superluminal cases mitigated the issue of ionization-induced refraction that typically inhibits the formation of long, contiguous plasma channels.

  14. Gas kinematics and star formation in the filamentary molecular cloud G47.06+0.26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Xu, Ye; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Yu, Naiping; Ning, Chang-Chun; Ju, Bing-Gang

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We performed a multi-wavelength study toward the filamentary cloud G47.06+0.26 to investigate the gas kinematics and star formation. Methods: We present the 12CO (J = 1-0), 13CO (J = 1-0) and C18O (J = 1-0) observations of G47.06+0.26 obtained with the Purple Mountain Observation (PMO) 13.7 m radio telescope to investigate the detailed kinematics of the filament. Radio continuum and infrared archival data were obtained from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL), the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) survey, and the Multi-band Imaging Photometer Survey of the Galaxy (MIPSGAL). To trace massive clumps and extract young stellar objects in G47.06+0.26, we used the BGPS catalog v2.0 and the GLIMPSE I catalog, respectively. Results: The 12CO (J = 1-0) and 13CO (J = 1-0) emission of G47.06+0.26 appear to show a filamentary structure. The filament extends about 45' (58.1 pc) along the east-west direction. The mean width is about 6.8 pc, as traced by the 13CO (J = 1-0) emission. G47.06+0.26 has a linear mass density of 361.5 M⊙pc-1. The external pressure (due to neighboring bubbles and H II regions) may help preventing the filament from dispersing under the effects of turbulence. From the velocity-field map, we discern a velocity gradient perpendicular to G47.06+0.26. From the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, we found nine BGPS sources in G47.06+0.26, that appear to these sources have sufficient mass to form massive stars. We obtained that the clump formation efficiency (CFE) is 18% in the filament. Four infrared bubbles were found to be located in, and adjacent to, G47.06+0.26. Particularly, infrared bubble N98 shows a cometary structure. CO molecular gas adjacent to N98 also shows a very intense emission. H II regions associated with infrared bubbles can inject the energy to surrounding gas. We calculated the kinetic energy, ionization energy, and thermal energy

  15. Combined Determination of Poly-β-Hydroxyalkanoic and Cellular Fatty Acids in Starved Marine Bacteria and Sewage Sludge by Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization or Mass Spectrometry Detection

    PubMed Central

    Odham, Göran; Tunlid, Anders; Westerdahl, Gunilla; Mårdén, Per

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of lipids from bacterial cells or sewage sludge samples followed by simple and rapid extraction procedures and room temperature esterification with pentafluorobenzylbromide allowed combined determinations of poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate constituents and fatty acids. Capillary gas chromatography and flame ionization or mass spectrometric detection was used. Flame ionization permitted determination with a coefficient of variation ranging from 10 to 27% at the picomolar level, whereas quantitative chemical ionization mass spectrometry afforded sensitivities for poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate constituuents in the attomolar range. The latter technique suggests the possibility of measuring such components in bacterial assemblies with as few as 102 cells. With the described technique using flame ionization detection, it was possible to study the rapid formation of poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate during feeding of a starved marine bacterium isolate with a complex medium or glucose and correlate the findings to changes in cell volumes. Mass spectrometric detection of short β-hydroxy acids in activated sewage sludge revealed the presence of 3-hydroxybutyric, 3-hydroxyhexanoic, and 3-hydroxyoctanoic acids in the relative proportions of 56, 5 and 39%, respectively. No odd-chain β-hydroxy acids were found. PMID:16347181

  16. Ionized Gas Kinematics around an Ultra-luminous X-Ray Source in NGC 5252: Additional Evidence for an Off-nuclear AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Im, Myungshin

    2017-08-01

    The Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5252 contains a recently identified ultra-luminous X-ray (ULX) source that has been suggested to be a possible candidate off-nuclear low-mass active galactic nucleus. We present follow-up optical integral-field unit observations obtained using Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs on the Gemini-North telescope. In addition to confirming that the ionized gas in the vicinity of the ULX is kinematically associated with NGC 5252, the new observations reveal ordered motions consistent with rotation around the ULX. The close coincidence of the excitation source of the line-emitting gas with the position of the ULX further suggests that ULX itself is directlymore » responsible for the ionization of the gas. The spatially resolved measurements of [N ii] λ 6584/H α surrounding the ULX indicate a low gas-phase metallicity, consistent with those of other known low-mass active galaxies but not that of its more massive host galaxy. These findings strengthen the proposition that the ULX is not a background source but rather that it is the nucleus of a small, low-mass galaxy accreted by NGC 5252.« less

  17. A molecular study of gas solubility in nitrile rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, Musab; Mostofi, Arash; Sutton, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important uses of elastomers in the oil industry is for seals to encase and protect sensitive monitoring equipment from contamination by gases and liquids at the high pressures and temperatures in the well. Failure of such seals sometimes occurs on decompression when they are returned to the surface. The conditions in the well lead to gases being absorbed by Nitrile rubber (NBR) seals. NBR exhibits a strong permselectivity towards CO2 compared to other gases; something attributed experimentally to the enhanced solubility of CO2. In this study an explanation is sought at the molecular level for this phenomenon. A series of molecular mechanics calculations are performed to compute solubilities of different gases in NBR. The effect of acrylonitrile content on their solubilities is studied for the first time by simulation, and we discuss the important issue of convergence with respect to the sampling of different elastomer configurations. It is observed that the presence of cyano groups has a marked impact on the solubility of CO2 and an explanation is offered.

  18. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces. II. Radiation-Gas Interactions and Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2017-12-01

    Momentum deposition by radiation pressure from young, massive stars may help to destroy molecular clouds and unbind stellar clusters by driving large-scale outflows. We extend our previous numerical radiation hydrodynamic study of turbulent star-forming clouds to analyze the detailed interaction between non-ionizing UV radiation and the cloud material. Our simulations trace the evolution of gas and star particles through self-gravitating collapse, star formation, and cloud destruction via radiation-driven outflows. These models are idealized in that we include only radiation feedback and adopt an isothermal equation of state. Turbulence creates a structure of dense filaments and large holes through which radiation escapes, such that only ˜50% of the radiation is (cumulatively) absorbed by the end of star formation. The surface density distribution of gas by mass as seen by the central cluster is roughly lognormal with {σ }{ln{{Σ }}}=1.3{--}1.7, similar to the externally projected surface density distribution. This allows low surface density regions to be driven outwards to nearly 10 times their initial escape speed {v}{esc}. Although the velocity distribution of outflows is broadened by the lognormal surface density distribution, the overall efficiency of momentum injection to the gas cloud is reduced because much of the radiation escapes. The mean outflow velocity is approximately twice the escape speed from the initial cloud radius. Our results are also informative for understanding galactic-scale wind driving by radiation, in particular, the relationship between velocity and surface density for individual outflow structures and the resulting velocity and mass distributions arising from turbulent sources.

  19. ESIprot: a universal tool for charge state determination and molecular weight calculation of proteins from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap mass spectrometers with relatively low resolution are frequently used for the analysis of natural products and peptides. Although ESI spectra of multiply charged protein molecules also can be measured on this type of devices, only average spectra are produced for the majority of naturally occurring proteins. Evaluating such ESI protein spectra would provide valuable information about the native state of investigated proteins. However, no suitable and freely available software could be found which allows the charge state determination and molecular weight calculation of single proteins from average ESI-MS data. Therefore, an algorithm based on standard deviation optimization (scatter minimization) was implemented for the analysis of protein ESI-MS data. The resulting software ESIprot was tested with ESI-MS data of six intact reference proteins between 12.4 and 66.7 kDa. In all cases, the correct charge states could be determined. The obtained absolute mass errors were in a range between -0.2 and 1.2 Da, the relative errors below 30 ppm. The possible mass accuracy allows for valid conclusions about the actual condition of proteins. Moreover, the ESIprot algorithm demonstrates an extraordinary robustness and allows spectral interpretation from as little as two peaks, given sufficient quality of the provided m/z data, without the necessity for peak intensity data. ESIprot is independent from the raw data format and the computer platform, making it a versatile tool for mass spectrometrists. The program code was released under the open-source GPLv3 license to support future developments of mass spectrometry software. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. An approach to spin-resolved molecular gas microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Jacob P.; De Marco, Luigi; Acevedo, Óscar L.; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Ultracold polar molecules are an ideal platform for studying many-body physics with long-range dipolar interactions. Experiments in this field have progressed enormously, and several groups are pursuing advanced apparatus for manipulation of molecules with electric fields as well as single-atom-resolved in situ detection. Such detection has become ubiquitous for atoms in optical lattices and tweezer arrays, but has yet to be demonstrated for ultracold polar molecules. Here we present a proposal for the implementation of site-resolved microscopy for polar molecules, and specifically discuss a technique for spin-resolved molecular detection. We use numerical simulation of spin dynamics of lattice-confined polar molecules to show how such a scheme would be of utility in a spin-diffusion experiment.

  1. Molecular Gas in Local Mergers: Understanding Mergers using High Density Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Swarnima; Scoville, N.; Sheth, K.

    2013-01-01

    NGC 6240 and Arp 220 can be considered the founding members of a very active class of objects called Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies or ULIRGs. They are in different stages of mergers and hence are excellent case studies to enhance our knowledge about the merging process. We have imaged the dense star-forming regions of these galaxies at sub-arcsec resolution with ALMA and CARMA. Multi-band imaging will allow multilevel excitation analysis of HCN, HCO+ and CS transitions which will be used to constrain the properties of the gas as a function of position and velocity (across line profiles). We aim to do an extensive multilevel excitation analysis of the merger as a function of radius which will enable in depth understanding of the gas dynamics and gas properties such as temperature and density. This will in turn probe the homogeneity of the gas in the merging system and hence the regions that facilitate high star formation rates. This tandem use of CARMA with ALMA to map these systems at different merger stages will help assemble a more integrated picture of the merger process. We will probe the distribution and dynamics of star forming gas and star formation activity in the dense disk structures to enable new theoretical understanding of the physics, dynamics, star formation activity and associated feedback in the most active and rapidly evolving galactic nuclei. Here we present preliminary observations of Arp 220 and NGC 6240 from ALMA and CARMA.

  2. Molecular Gas in Starburts: Understanding Mergers using High Density Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Swarnima; Scoville, N.; Walter, F.; Sheth, K.

    2014-01-01

    NGC 6240 and Arp 220 can be considered the founding members of a very active class of objects called Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies or ULIRGs. They are in different stages of mergers and hence are excellent case studies to enhance our knowledge about the merging process. We have imaged the dense star-forming regions of these galaxies at sub-arcsec resolution with ALMA and CARMA. Multi-band imaging allows multilevel excitation analysis of HCN, HCO+ and CS transitions which will constrain the properties of the gas as a function of position and velocity (across line profiles). We are doing an extensive multilevel excitation analysis of the merger as a function of radius which enables in depth understanding of the gas dynamics and gas properties such as temperature and density. This in turn probes the homogeneity of the gas in the merging system and hence the regions that facilitate high star formation rates. This tandem use of CARMA with ALMA to map these systems at different merger stages will assemble a more integrated picture of the merger process. We are probing the distribution and dynamics of star forming gas and star formation activity in the dense disk structures to enable new theoretical understanding of the physics, dynamics, star formation activity and associated feedback in the most active and rapidly evolving galactic nuclei. Here we present preliminary observations of Arp 220 and NGC 6240 from ALMA and CARMA.

  3. Molecular Gas in Starburts ARP 220 & NGC 6240: Understanding Mergers using High Density Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Swarnima; Scoville, Nicholas; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    NGC 6240 and Arp 220 can be considered the founding members of a very active class of objects called Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies or ULIRGs. They are in different stages of mergers and hence are excellent case studies to enhance our knowledge about the merging process. We have imaged the dense star-forming regions of these galaxies at sub-arcsec resolution with ALMA and CARMA. Multi-band imaging allows multilevel excitation analysis of HCN, HCO+ and CS transitions which will constrain the properties of the gas as a function of position and velocity (across line profiles). We are doing an extensive multilevel excitation analysis of the merger as a function of radius which enables in depth understanding of the gas dynamics and gas properties such as temperature and density. This in turn probes the homogeneity of the gas in the merging system and hence the regions that facilitate high star formation rates. This tandem use of CARMA with ALMA to map these systems at different merger stages will assemble a more integrated picture of the merger process. We are probing the distribution and dynamics of star forming gas and star formation activity in the dense disk structures to enable new theoretical understanding of the physics, dynamics, star formation activity and associated feedback in the most active and rapidly evolving galactic nuclei. Here we present our observations of Arp 220 and NGC 6240 from ALMA and CARMA.

  4. Application of the dressed-bound-state molecular strong-field approximation to above-threshold ionization of heteronuclear molecules: NO vs. CO.

    PubMed

    Busuladžić, M; Hasović, E; Becker, W; Milošević, D B

    2012-10-07

    We theoretically investigate high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of heteronuclear diatomic molecules applying the molecular strong-field approximation which includes dressing of the molecular bound state. We consider HATI of nitrogen monoxide molecules, which are characterized by the π symmetry of their highest occupied molecular orbital. We show that the HATI spectra of NO exhibit characteristic interference structures. We analyze the differences and similarities of the HATI spectra of NO molecules and the spectra of CO (σ symmetry) and O(2) (π(g) symmetry) molecules. The symmetry properties of the molecular HATI spectra governed by linearly and elliptically polarized fields are considered in detail. The yields of high-energy electrons, contributing to the plateau region of the photoelectron spectra, strongly depend on the employed ellipticity.

  5. The NGC 1614 interacting galaxy. Molecular gas feeding a "ring of fire"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, S.; Aalto, S.; Muller, S.; Beswick, R. J.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    Minor mergers frequently occur between giant and gas-rich low-mass galaxies and can provide significant amounts of interstellar matter to refuel star formation and power active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the giant systems. Major starbursts and/or AGN result when fresh gas is transported and compressed in the central regions of the giant galaxy. This is the situation in the starburst minor merger NGC 1614, whose molecular medium we explore at half-arcsecond angular resolution through our observations of 12CO (2-1) emission using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We compare our 12CO (2-1) maps with optical and Paα, Hubble Space Telescope and high angular resolution radio continuum images to study the relationships between dense molecular gas and the NGC 1614 starburst region. The most intense 12CO emission occurs in a partial ring with ~230 pc radius around the center of NGC 1614, with an extension to the northwest into the dust lane that contains diffuse molecular gas. We resolve ten giant molecular associations (GMAs) in the ring, which has an integrated molecular mass of ~8 × 108 M⊙. Our interferometric observations filter out a large part of the 12CO (1-0) emission mapped at shorter spacings, indicating that most of the molecular gas is diffuse and that GMAs only exist near and within the circumnuclear ring. The molecular ring is uneven with most of the mass on the western side, which also contains GMAs extending into a pronounced tidal dust lane. The spatial and kinematic patterns in our data suggest that the northwest extension of the ring is a cosmic umbilical cord that is feeding molecular gas associated with the dust lane and tidal debris into the nuclear ring, which contains the bulk of the starburst activity. The astrophysical process for producing a ring structure for the final resting place of accreted gas in NGC 1614 is not fully understood, but the presence of numerous GMAs suggests an orbit-crowding or resonance phenomenon. There is some evidence that

  6. A Multiwavelength Study of the Nature of Diffuse Atomic and Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Our proposed observations under the UV Initiative form a key component of a multiwavelength study of diffuse atomic and molecular clouds. The Herschel GOT C+ survey associated [C II] emission at 158 microns with emission from H I at 21 cm and CO at 2.6 mm, revealing the presence of warm neutral gas, cold neutral gas, CO-dark H2 gas, and molecular clouds. Ground-based measurements of Ca II, CH+, CH, and CN at visible wavelengths show absorption at the same velocities as the components seen in the GOT C+ survey. A main focus of our project is a detailed investigation of the nature of CO-dark H2 gas, interstellar material not associated with H I and CO emission. The presence of this additional material alters our view of molecular gas in galaxies and its connection to star formation rates. We propose ultraviolet observations of three targets with STIS that probe two of the pointings in the GOT C+ survey. Absorption from CO, at much greater sensitivies than is possible from surveying CO emission, will be sought. Analysis of CO, C I, and C2 absorption will yield the physical conditions (gas density and temperature) along the sight lines. The results will be compared with those inferred from CN chemistry based on the observations at visible wavelengths. Other probes seen at UV wavelengths, such as O I, Cu II, and Cl I, will provide a more complete picture of the environment seen in the atomic components of the GOT C+ survey. The outcome of the project will be the most detailed study of diffuse atomic and molecular gas from spectral measurements spanning nearly seven orders of magnitude in wavelength.

  7. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection: qualitative and quantitative analysis of West Australian sandalwood oil.

    PubMed

    Shellie, Robert; Marriott, Philip; Morrison, Paul

    2004-09-01

    The use of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS), GC-time-of-flight MS (TOFMS), comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GCxGC)-flame ionization detection (FID), and GCxGC-TOFMS is discussed for the characterization of the eight important representative components, including Z-alpha-santalol, epi-alpha-bisabolol, Z-alpha-trans-bergamotol, epi-beta-santalol, Z-beta-santalol, E,E-farnesol, Z-nuciferol, and Z-lanceol, in the oil of west Australian sandalwood (Santalum spicatum). Single-column GC-MS lacks the resolving power to separate all of the listed components as pure peaks and allow precise analytical measurement of individual component abundances. With enhanced peak resolution capabilities in GCxGC, these components are sufficiently well resolved to be quantitated using flame ionization detection, following initial characterization of components by using GCxGC-TOFMS.

  8. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M.; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  9. CF3+ fragmentation by electron impact ionization of perfluoro-propyl-vinyl-ethers, C5F10O, in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hayashi, Toshio; Miyawaki, Yudai; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-04-01

    The gas phase fragmentations of perfluoro-propyl-vinyl ether (PPVE, C5F10O) are studied experimentally. Dominant fragmentations of PPVE are found to be the result of a dissociative ionization reaction, i.e., CF3+ via direct bond cleavage, and C2F3O- and C3F7O- via electron attachment. Regardless of the appearance energy of around 14.5 eV for the dissociative ionization of CF3+, the observed ion efficiency for the CF3+ ion was extremely large the order of 10-20 cm-2, compared with only 10-21 cm-2 for the other channels. PPVE characteristically generated CF3+ as the largest abundant ion are advantageous for use of feedstock gases in plasma etching processes.

  10. Efficient rotational cooling of Coulomb-crystallized molecular ions by a helium buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A K; Versolato, O O; Kłosowski, L; Kristensen, S B; Gingell, A; Schwarz, M; Windberger, A; Ullrich, J; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Drewsen, M

    2014-04-03

    The preparation of cold molecules is of great importance in many contexts, such as fundamental physics investigations, high-resolution spectroscopy of complex molecules, cold chemistry and astrochemistry. One versatile and widely applied method to cool molecules is helium buffer-gas cooling in either a supersonic beam expansion or a cryogenic trap environment. Another more recent method applicable to trapped molecular ions relies on sympathetic translational cooling, through collisional interactions with co-trapped, laser-cooled atomic ions, into spatially ordered structures called Coulomb crystals, combined with laser-controlled internal-state preparation. Here we present experimental results on helium buffer-gas cooling of the rotational degrees of freedom of MgH(+) molecular ions, which have been trapped and sympathetically cooled in a cryogenic linear radio-frequency quadrupole trap. With helium collision rates of only about ten per second--that is, four to five orders of magnitude lower than in typical buffer-gas cooling settings--we have cooled a single molecular ion to a rotational temperature of 7.5(+0.9)(-0.7) kelvin, the lowest such temperature so far measured. In addition, by varying the shape of, or the number of atomic and molecular ions in, larger Coulomb crystals, or both, we have tuned the effective rotational temperature from about 7 kelvin to about 60 kelvin by changing the translational micromotion energy of the ions. The extremely low helium collision rate may allow for sympathetic sideband cooling of single molecular ions, and eventually make quantum-logic spectroscopy of buffer-gas-cooled molecular ions feasible. Furthermore, application of the present cooling scheme to complex molecular ions should enable single- or few-state manipulations of individual molecules of biological interest.

  11. Oxidation of Carbon Nanotubes in an Ionizing Environment.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ai Leen; Gidcumb, Emily; Zhou, Otto; Sinclair, Robert

    2016-02-10

    In this work, we present systematic studies on how an illuminating electron beam which ionizes molecular gas species can influence the mechanism of carbon nanotube oxidation in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). We found that preferential attack of the nanotube tips is much more prevalent than for oxidation in a molecular gas environment. We establish the cumulative electron doses required to damage carbon nanotubes from 80 keV electron beam irradiation in gas versus in high vacuum. Our results provide guidelines for the electron doses required to study carbon nanotubes within or without a gas environment, to determine or ameliorate the influence of the imaging electron beam. This work has important implications for in situ studies as well as for the oxidation of carbon nanotubes in an ionizing environment such as that occurring during field emission.

  12. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  13. Peptidylation for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng; Cen, Si-Ying; He, Huan; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-05-23

    Determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has been a great challenge in the analytical research field. Here we developed a universal peptide-based derivatization (peptidylation) strategy for the sensitive analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Upon peptidylation, the molecular weights of target analytes increase, thus avoiding serious matrix ion interference in the low-molecular-weight region in MALDI-TOF-MS. Since peptides typically exhibit good signal response during MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, peptidylation endows high detection sensitivities of low-molecular-weight analytes. As a proof-of-concept, we analyzed low-molecular-weight compounds of aldehydes and thiols by the developed peptidylation strategy. Our results showed that aldehydes and thiols can be readily determined upon peptidylation, thus realizing the sensitive and efficient determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Moreover, target analytes also can be unambiguously detected in biological samples using the peptidylation strategy. The established peptidylation strategy is a universal strategy and can be extended to the sensitive analysis of various low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS, which may be potentially used in areas such as metabolomics.

  14. Atomic and molecular hydrogen gas temperatures in a low-pressure helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral gas temperatures in hydrogen plasmas are important for experimental and modelling efforts in fusion technology, plasma processing, and surface modification applications. To provide values relevant to these application areas, neutral gas temperatures were measured in a low pressure (< 10 mTorr) radiofrequency helicon discharge using spectroscopic techniques. The atomic and molecular species were not found to be in thermal equilibrium with the atomic temperature being mostly larger then the molecular temperature. In low power operation (< 1 kW), the molecular hydrogen temperature was observed to be linearly proportional to the pressure while the atomic hydrogen temperature was inversely proportional. Both temperatures were observed to rise linearly with input power. For high power operation (5-20 kW), the molecular temperature was found to rise with both power and pressure up to a maximum of approximately 1200 K. Spatially resolved measurements near a graphite target demonstrated localised cooling near the sample surface. The temporal evolution of the molecular gas temperature during a high power 1.1 ms plasma pulse was also investigated and found to vary considerably as a function of pressure.

  15. A CONSTANT MOLECULAR GAS DEPLETION TIME IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bigiel, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Walter, F.

    2011-04-01

    We combine new sensitive, wide-field CO data from the HERACLES survey with ultraviolet and infrared data from GALEX and Spitzer to compare the surface densities of H{sub 2}, {Sigma}{sub H2}, and the recent star formation rate, {Sigma}{sub SFR}, over many thousands of positions in 30 nearby disk galaxies. We more than quadruple the size of the galaxy sample compared to previous work and include targets with a wide range of galaxy properties. Even though the disk galaxies in this study span a wide range of properties, we find a strong, and approximately linear correlation between {Sigma}{sub SFR} and {Sigma}{sub H2}more » at our common resolution of 1 kpc. This implies a roughly constant median H{sub 2} consumption time, {tau}{sup H2}{sub Dep} = {Sigma}{sub H2}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}, of {approx}2.35 Gyr (including heavy elements) across our sample. At 1 kpc resolution, there is only a weak correlation between {Sigma}{sub H2} and {tau}{sup H2}{sub Dep} over the range {Sigma}{sub H2} {approx} 5-100 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}, which is probed by our data. We compile a broad set of literature measurements that have been obtained using a variety of star formation tracers, sampling schemes, and physical scales and show that overall, these data yield almost exactly the same results, although with more scatter. We interpret these results as strong, albeit indirect evidence that star formation proceeds in a uniform way in giant molecular clouds in the disks of spiral galaxies.« less

  16. Molecular conformation of linear alkane molecules: From gas phase to bulk water through the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murina, Ezequiel L.; Fernández-Prini, Roberto; Pastorino, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    We studied the behavior of long chain alkanes (LCAs) as they were transferred from gas to bulk water, through the liquid-vapor interface. These systems were studied using umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation and we have calculated properties like free energy profiles, molecular orientation, and radius of gyration of the LCA molecules. The results show changes in conformation of the solutes along the path. LCAs adopt pronounced molecular orientations and the larger ones extend appreciably when partially immersed in the interface. In bulk water, their conformations up to dodecane are mainly extended. However, larger alkanes like eicosane present a more stable collapsed conformation as they approach bulk water. We have characterized the more probable configurations in all interface and bulk regions. The results obtained are of interest for the study of biomatter processes requiring the transfer of hydrophobic matter, especially chain-like molecules like LCAs, from gas to bulk aqueous systems through the interface.