Science.gov

Sample records for gas molecular ionization

  1. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  2. Molecular and ionized gas kinematics in the GC Radio Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, N.; Lang, C. C.; Mills, E. A. C.; Ludovici, D.; Ott, J.; Morris, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    We present NH3 and H64α+H63α VLA observations of the Radio Arc region, including the M0.20 - 0.033 and G0.10 - 0.08 molecular clouds. These observations suggest the two velocity components of M0.20 - 0.033 are physically connected in the south. Additional ATCA observations suggest this connection is due to an expanding shell in the molecular gas, with the centroid located near the Quintuplet cluster. The G0.10 - 0.08 molecular cloud has little radio continuum, strong molecular emission, and abundant CH3OH masers, similar to a nearby molecular cloud with no star formation: M0.25+0.01. These features detected in G0.10 - 0.08 suggest dense molecular gas with no signs of current star formation.

  3. Dissociation and ionization of molecular gas in the spiral arms of M51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lees, J. F.; Lo, K. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers derive the star formation rate and efficiency in the arm and interarm regions of M51 from observations of the molecular (Lo et al. 1987) and ionized (van der Hulst et al. 1988) phases of the interstellar medium, and show that the HI observations of Tilanus and Allen (1989) are consistent with dissociation of molecular gas by these young, massive stars if n sub H greater than or equal to 200 cm (-2). However, these stars are not able to dissociate or ionize all the gas, and at least 60 percent must remain molecular in the interarm regions. The efficiency of star formation in M51 seems to be similar to that in the Galaxy, and does not appear to be enhanced in the spiral arms. Therefore, the effect of the strong density wave may be only to concentrate the gas, and hence the young stars, to the arm regions.

  4. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS, IONIZED GAS, AND MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Megan; Mark Voit, G.; Hoffer, Aaron; De Messieres, Genevieve E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; McNamara, Brian R.; Nulsen, Paul E. J. E-mail: voit@pa.msu.edu

    2011-05-01

    We present measurements of 5-25 {mu}m emission features of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with strong optical emission lines in a sample of nine cool-core clusters of galaxies observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These systems provide a view of dusty molecular gas and star formation, surrounded by dense, X-ray-emitting intracluster gas. Past work has shown that BCGs in cool-core clusters may host powerful radio sources, luminous optical emission-line systems, and excess UV, while BCGs in other clusters never show this activity. In this sample, we detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), extremely luminous, rotationally excited molecular hydrogen line emission, forbidden line emission from ionized gas ([Ne II] and [Ne III]), and infrared continuum emission from warm dust and cool stars. We show here that these BCGs exhibit more luminous forbidden neon and H{sub 2} rotational line emission than star-forming galaxies with similar total infrared luminosities, as well as somewhat higher ratios of 70 {mu}m/24 {mu}m luminosities. Our analysis suggests that while star formation processes dominate the heating of the dust and PAHs, a heating process consistent with suprathermal electron heating from the hot gas, distinct from star formation, is heating the molecular gas and contributing to the heating of the ionized gas in the galaxies. The survival of PAHs and dust suggests that dusty gas is somehow shielded from significant interaction with the X-ray gas.

  5. Molecular, atomic, and ionized gas in the NGC 6334 star forming region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, K. E.; Jackson, J. M.; Paglione, T. A. D.; Lane, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    NGC 6334 is a nearby (1.7 kpc) giant molecular cloud which contains at least 7 distinct sites of massive star formation. Using the Far-infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FIFI) on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory we have imaged this region in the FIR fine structure lines of O(0) and C(+). The line intensity ratios are compared with the predicted line ratios from the PDR models of Wolfire, Tielens and Hollenbach (1990) (hereafter WTH) to determine the gas density and UV field strength. The (O I) 63 mu m/ 145 mu m intensity ratio is at least a factor of 10 lower than predicted. We suggest that self-absorption by cooler foreground material suppresses the (O I) 63 mu m line. We have also mapped CO J = 2 to 1 emission with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). In general, we find an anticorrelation of (C II) and CO emission. Particularly striking is a (C II) peak which is not associated with any CO, FIR or radio continuum source. Consequently, there is no local source of hard UV radiation. Either (1) the (C II) peak is illuminated by a cluster of embedded B stars, which radiate enough soft UV photons to ionize carbon, or (2) the (C II) peak is illuminated by a distant O star.

  6. Probing Conditions at Ionized/Molecular Gas Interfaces With High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle Franklin

    2017-08-01

    Regions of star formation and star death in our Galaxy trace the cycle of gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas in dense molecular clouds collapses to form stars, and stars at the end of their lives return the gas that made up their outer layers back out into the Galaxy. Hot stars generate copious amounts of ultraviolet photons which interact with the surrounding medium and dominate the energetics, ionization state, and chemistry of the gas. The interface where molecular gas is being dissociated into neutral atomic gas by far-UV photons from a nearby hot source is called a photodissociation or photon-dominated region (PDR). PDRs are found primarily in star forming regions where O and B stars serve as the source of UV photons, and in planetary nebulae where the hot core of the dying star acts as the UV source. The main target of this dissertation is molecular hydrogen (H2), the most abundant molecule in the Universe, made from hydrogen formed during the Big Bang. H2 makes up the overwhelming majority of molecules found in the ISM and in PDRs. Far-UV radiation absorbed by H2 will excite an electron in the molecule. The molecule then either dissociates ( 10% of the time; Field et al. 1966) or decays into excited rotational and vibrational ("rovibrational") levels of the electronic ground state. These excited rovibrational levels then decay via a radiative cascade to the ground rovibrational state (v = 0, J = 0), giving rise to a large number of transitions observable in emission from the mid-IR to the optical (Black & van Dishoeck, 1987). These transitions provide an excellent probe of the excitation and conditions within the gas. These transitions are also observed in warm H2, such as in shocks, where collisions excite H2 to higher rovibrational levels. High resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, with its ability to see through dust, and avoid telluric absorption and emission, serves as an effective tool to detect emission from ions, atoms, and molecules

  7. Kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas in nearby luminous infrared interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John; Font, Joan; Rosado, Margarita; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Borlaff, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    We have observed three luminous infrared galaxy systems which are pairs of interacting galaxies, with the Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system mounted on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, and combined the observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of these systems in CO emission to compare the physical properties of the star formation regions and the molecular gas clouds, and specifically the internal kinematics of the star-forming regions. We identified 88 star-forming regions in the Hα emission data cubes, and 27 molecular cloud complexes in the CO emission data cubes. The surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas are significantly higher in these systems than in non-interacting galaxies and the Galaxy, and are closer to the surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas of extreme star-forming galaxies at higher redshifts. The large values of the velocity dispersion also show the enhanced gas surface density. The H II regions are situated on the SFR - σv envelope, and so are also in virial equilibrium. Since the virial parameter decreases with the surface densities of both the star formation rate and the molecular gas, we claim that the clouds presented here are gravitationally dominated rather than being in equilibrium with the external pressure.

  8. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Zeng Li, Jin; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  9. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju; Wu, Yuefang

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  10. A Desorbed Gas Molecular Ionization Mechanism for Arcing Onset in Solar Arrays Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.; Degroot, W.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have hypothesized that the onset of Solar Array Arc (SAA) initiation in low-density space plasmas is caused by a desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism. Indeed past investigations performed at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility tend to not only support the desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism, but have gone as far as identifying the crucial molecular species that must be present for molecular ion dominated process to occur. When electrical breakdown occurs at a triple junction site on a solar array panel, a quasi-neutral plasma cloud is ejected. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is due to water vapor, the fastest process available is due to HO molecules and OH(+) ions, or more succinctly, dissociative molecular-ion dominated recombination processes: H2O(+) + e(-) yields H* + OH*. Recently published spectroscopic observations of solar array arc spectra in ground tests have revealed the well-known molecular OH band (302 to 309nm), as well as the molecular SiH band (387nm peak), and the molecular CH band (432nm peak). Note that the OH band is observed in emission arcs where water vapor is present. Strong atomic lines were also observed for H(sub beta) at 486nm and H(sub alpha) at 656.3nm in prior ground testing. Independent supporting evidence of desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanisms also come from measurements of arc current pulse widths at different capacitances. We will revisit an earlier first order approximation demonstrating the dependence of arc current pulse widths on the square root of the capacitance. The simple arc current pulse width model will be then be used to estimate the temperature of the arc plasma (currently believed to be somewhere in the range of 3 to 5 eV). The current paper then seeks to extend the outlined work by including numerous vacuum chamber measurements obtained with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A small solar array was mounted inside the vacuum

  11. [Gas chromatography with a Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector for measurement of molecular hydrogen(H2) in the atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian; Fang, Shuang-xi; Zhou, Ling-xi; Wang, Hong-yang; Zhang, Gen

    2015-01-01

    A high precision GC system with a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector was set up based on the commercial Agilent 7890A gas chromatography. The gas is identified by retention time and the concentration is calculated through the peak height. Detection limit of the system is about 1 x 10(-9) (mole fraction, the same as below). The standard deviation of 140 continuous injections with a standard cylinder( concentration is roughly 600 x 10(-9)) is better than 0.3 x 10(-9). Between 409.30 x 10(-9) and 867.74 x 10(-9) molecular hydrogen mole fractions and peak height have good linear response. By using two standards to quantify the air sample, the precision meets the background molecular hydrogen compatibility goal within the World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) program. Atmospheric molecular hydrogen concentration at Guangzhou urban area was preliminarily measured by this method from January to November 2013. The results show that the atmospheric molecular hydrogen mole fraction varies from 450 x 10(-9) to 700 x 10(-9) during the observation period, with the lowest value at 14:00 (Beijing time, the same as below) and the peak value at 20:00. The seasonal variation of atmospheric hydrogen at Guangzhou area was similar with that of the same latitude stations in northern hemisphere.

  12. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  13. THE ORIGIN OF THE 6.4 keV LINE EMISSION AND H{sub 2} IONIZATION IN THE DIFFUSE MOLECULAR GAS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Dogiel, V. A.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Tatischeff, V.; Terrier, R.

    2013-07-10

    We investigate the origin of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission recently detected by Suzaku and the source of H{sub 2} ionization in the diffuse molecular gas of the Galactic center (GC) region. We show that Fe atoms and H{sub 2} molecules in the diffuse interstellar medium of the GC are not ionized by the same particles. The Fe atoms are most likely ionized by X-ray photons emitted by Sgr A* during a previous period of flaring activity of the supermassive black hole. The measured longitudinal intensity distribution of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is best explained if the past activity of Sgr A* lasted at least several hundred years and released a mean 2-100 keV luminosity {approx}> 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. The H{sub 2} molecules of the diffuse gas cannot be ionized by photons from Sgr A*, because soft photons are strongly absorbed in the interstellar gas around the central black hole. The molecular hydrogen in the GC region is most likely ionized by low-energy cosmic rays, probably protons rather than electrons, whose contribution into the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is negligible.

  14. Gemini Near Infrared Field Spectrograph Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy MRK 573: In Situ Acceleration of Ionized and Molecular Gas Off Fueling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Travis C.; Machuca, C.; Diniz, M. R.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Riffel, R. A.; Schmitt, H. R.; Baron, F.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Straughn, A. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical emission-line and stellar kinematics of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using the Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at Gemini North and Dual Imaging Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. By obtaining full kinematic maps of the infrared ionized and molecular gas and stellar kinematics in approximately 700 x 2100 pc(exp 2) circumnuclear region of Mrk 573, we find that kinematics within the Narrow-Line Region are largely due to a combination of both rotation and in situ acceleration of material originating in the host disk. Combining these observations with large-scale, optical long-slit spectroscopy that traces ionized gas emission out to several kpcs, we find that rotation kinematics dominate the majority of the gas. We find that outflowing gas extends to distances less than 1 kpc, suggesting that outflows in Seyfert galaxies may not be powerful enough to evacuate their entire bulges.

  15. Gemini Near Infrared Field Spectrograph Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy Mrk 573: In Situ Acceleration of Ionized and Molecular Gas off Fueling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Travis C.; Machuca, C.; Diniz, M. R.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Riffel, R. A.; Schmitt, H. R.; Baron, F.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Straughn, A. N.; Revalski, M.; Pope, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical emission-line and stellar kinematics of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using the Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at Gemini North and Dual Imaging Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. By obtaining full kinematic maps of the infrared ionized and molecular gas and stellar kinematics in a ˜700 × 2100 pc2 circumnuclear region of Mrk 573, we find that kinematics within the Narrow-Line Region are largely due to a combination of both rotation and in situ acceleration of material originating in the host disk. Combining these observations with large-scale, optical long-slit spectroscopy that traces ionized gas emission out to several kpcs, we find that rotation kinematics dominate the majority of the gas. We find that outflowing gas extends to distances less than 1 kpc, suggesting that outflows in Seyfert galaxies may not be powerful enough to evacuate their entire bulges.

  16. Gas-Phase Stability of G-quadruplex DNA Determined by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Wang, Junmei; Smith, Suncerae I.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-01-01

    The relative gas-phase stabilities of seven quadruplex DNA structures, [d(TG4T)]4, [d(T2G3T)]4, [d(G4T4G4)]2, [d(T2AG3)2]2, d(T2AG3)4, d(T2G4)4, and d(G2T4)4, were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). MD simulations revealed that the G-quadruplexes maintained their structures in the gas phase although the G-quartets were distorted to some degree and ammonium ions, retained by [d(TG4T)]4 and [d(T2G3T)]4, played a key role in stabilizing the tetrad structure. Energy-variable collisional activated dissociation was used to assess the relative stabilities of each quadruplex based on E1/2 values, and the resulting order of relative stabilities was found to be [d(TG4T)]4 ≫ d(T2AG3)4 ∼ d(T2G4)4 > [d(T2G3T)]4 > [d(T2AG3)2]2 ∼ d(G2T4)4 ∼ [d(G4T4G4)]2. The stabilities from the E1/2 values generally paralleled the RMSD and relative free energies of the quadruplexes based on the MD energy analysis. One exception to the general agreement is [d(G4T4G4)]2 which had the lowest E1/2 value, but was determined to be the most stable quadruplex according to the free energy analysis and ranked fourth based on the RMSD comparison. This discrepancy is attributed to differences in the fragmentation pathway of the quadruplex. PMID:17719795

  17. Cross Sections for Ionization of Rare Gas Excimers by Electron Impact and Atomic and Molecular Processes in Excimer Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Theoretical cross sections for ionization of msetastable excimers - helium , neon, argon, krypton and zenon - and of metastable mercury are presented...AO-A086 698 GEORGIA INST OF TECH ATLANTA SCHOOL. OF PHYSICS FB20/5 CROSS SECTION1S FOR IONIZATION OF RARE GAS EXCIMERS By ELECTRON -- ETC(O) MAR 80 M...in Excimer Lasers. - -- 7 AUT 4OR(u) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER-) M. Raymond Flannery aW K. J./McCann . I F33615-78-C-20 128 9 PERFORMING

  18. Dispersal of molecular clouds by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, S. K.; Whitworth, A. P.; Bisbas, T.; Wünsch, R.; Hubber, D.

    2012-11-01

    Feedback from massive stars is believed to be a key element in the evolution of molecular clouds. We use high-resolution 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to explore the dynamical effects of a single O7 star-emitting ionizing photons at 1049 s-1 and located at the centre of a molecular cloud with mass 104 M⊙ and radius 6.4 pc; we also perform comparison simulations in which the ionizing star is removed. The initial internal structure of the cloud is characterized by its fractal dimension, which we vary between D=2.0 and 2.8, and the standard deviation of the approximately log-normal initial densityPDF, which is σ10 = 0.38 for all clouds. (i) As regards star formation, in the short term ionizing feedback is positive, in the sense that star formation occurs much more quickly (than in the comparison simulations), in gas that is compressed by the high pressure of the ionized gas. However, in the long term ionizing feedback is negative, in the sense that most of the cloud is dispersed with an outflow rate of up to ˜10-2 M⊙yr-1, on a time-scale comparable with the sound-crossing time for the ionized gas (˜1-2 Myr ), and triggered star formation is therefore limited to a few per cent of the cloud's mass. We will describe in greater detail the statistics of the triggered star formation in a companion paper. (ii) As regards the morphology of the ionization fronts (IFs) bounding the H II region and the systematics of outflowing gas, we distinguish two regimes. For low D≲2.2, the initial cloud is dominated by large-scale structures, so the neutral gas tends to be swept up into a few extended coherent shells, and the ionized gas blows out through a few large holes between these shells; we term these H II regions shell dominated. Conversely, for high D≳2.6, the initial cloud is dominated by small-scale structures, and these are quickly overrun by the advancing IF, thereby producing neutral pillars protruding into the H II region, whilst the ionized gas

  19. Quantification of Triacylglycerol Molecular Species in Edible Fats and Oils by Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector Using Correction Factors.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Obi, Junji; Nagai, Toshiharu; Iioka, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the resolution parameters and correction factors (CFs) of triacylglycerol (TAG) standards were estimated by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) to achieve the precise quantification of the TAG composition in edible fats and oils. Forty seven TAG standards comprising capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and/or linolenic acid were analyzed, and the CFs of these TAGs were obtained against tripentadecanoyl glycerol as the internal standard. The capillary column was Ultra ALLOY(+)-65 (30 m × 0.25 mm i.d., 0.10 μm thickness) and the column temperature was programmed to rise from 250°C to 360°C at 4°C/min and then hold for 25 min. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of the TAG standards were > 0.10 mg and > 0.32 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively, except for LnLnLn, and the LOD and LOQ values of LnLnLn were 0.55 mg and 1.84 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively. The CFs of TAG standards decreased with increasing total acyl carbon number and degree of desaturation of TAG molecules. Also, there were no remarkable differences in the CFs between TAG positional isomers such as 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-stearoyl-rac-glycerol, 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, and 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, which cannot be separated by GC-FID. Furthermore, this method was able to predict the CFs of heterogeneous (AAB- and ABC-type) TAGs from the CFs of homogenous (AAA-, BBB-, and CCC-type) TAGs. In addition, the TAG composition in cocoa butter, palm oil, and canola oil was determined using CFs, and the results were found to be in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Therefore, the GC-FID method using CFs can be successfully used for the quantification of TAG molecular species in natural fats and oils.

  20. Turbulence and the ionization of interstellar gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.

    2015-08-01

    Turbulence is widely observed in the ionized gas in the interstellar media of star-forming galaxies. Observations in the Milky Way indicate emission from that the warm ionized medium -- ionized gas far from massive stars, the most likely source of the ionization -- has a lognormal intensity distribution. This and other measurements indicate that the gas is well-described as a transonic turbulent fluid. Such a fluid can be produced by feedback from supernovae in the Galaxy. Understanding of this turbulence has also led to a natural explanation for a long-standing puzzle: how do ionizing photons travel through the largely-neutral interstellar medium and produce the ionization? In the turbulent gas, low-density pathways allow ionizing photons to propagate for kiloparsecs, with implications for radiative energy transport in star-forming galaxies.

  1. Single ionization of molecular iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dale L.; Tagliamonti, Vincent; Dragan, James; Gibson, George N.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a study of the single ionization of iodine, I2 over a range of wavelengths. Single ionization of I2 is unexpectedly found to have a contribution from inner molecular orbitals involving the 5 s electrons. The I+I+ dissociation channel was recorded through velocity map imaging, and the kinetic-energy release of each channel was determined with two-dimensional fitting of the images. Most of the measured kinetic-energy data were inconsistent with ionization to the X , A , and B states of I2 + , implying ionization from deeper orbitals. A pump-probe Fourier transform technique was used to look for modulation at the X - and A -state vibrational frequencies to see if they were intermediate states in a two-step process. X - and A -state modulation was seen only for kinetic-energy releases below 0.2 eV, consistent with dissociation through the B state. From these results and intensity-, polarization-, and wavelength-dependent experiments we found no evidence of bond softening, electron rescattering, or photon mediation through the X or A states to higher-energy single-ionization channels.

  2. Propagation of intense and short circularly polarized pulses in a molecular gas: From multiphoton ionization to nonlinear macroscopic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytova, M.; Lorin, E.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the propagation dynamics of short and intense circularly polarized pulses in an aligned diatomic gas. Compared to linearly polarized intense pulses, high harmonic generation (HHG) and the coherent generation of attosecond pulses in the intense-circular-polarization case are a new research area. More specifically, we numerically study the propagation of intense and short circularly polarized pulses in the one-electron H2+ molecular gas, using a micro-macro Maxwell-Schrödinger model. In this model, the macroscopic polarization is computed from the solution of a large number of time-dependent Schrödinger equations, the source of dipole moments, and using a trace operator. We focus on the intensity and the phase of harmonics generated in the H2+ gas as a function of the pulse-propagation distance. We show that short coherent circularly polarized pulses of same helicity can be generated in the molecular gas as a result of cooperative phase-matching effects.

  3. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  4. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of gas chromatography with a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector for measurements of molecular hydrogen in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Novelli, P C; Crotwell, A M; Hall, B D

    2009-04-01

    The Earth's troposphere contains approximately 160 Tg H2 with an average surface mixing ratio approximately 530 nmole mole(-1) (ppb) and lifetime of 2 years. Atmospheric H2 is typically measured using gas chromatography (GC) followed by hot mercuric oxide reduction detection (GC-HgO). Here we describe an alternate method using GC with a pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (HePPD). HePPD is a universal detector; when applied to H2, the GC-HePDD provides a wide linear range (0.3% over a range of 2000 ppb), a detection limit of approximately 0.03 pg, high precision (0.12%) and a stable response (+/-1.6% over nearly one year). HePPD is compared to HgO reduction using a suite of gravimetrically prepared reference gases spanning remote to urban concentrations. The method is excellent for atmospheric measurements as it provides a wide linear range with high precision, stability and reproducibility. We suggest these characteristics will improve the ability to maintain reference gases and improve measurements of atmospheric H2, thus providing better constraints on potential future changes in its sources and sinks.

  6. Toward Comprehensive Physical/Chemical Understanding of the Circumstellar Environments - Simultaneous Probing of Each of the Ionized/Atomic/Molecular Gas and Dust Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya

    We propose to continue our successful investigations into simultaneous probing of each of the ionized/atomic/molecular gas and dust components in planetary nebulae using primarily far-IR broadband images and spatially-resolved spectroscopic data cubes obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory to enhance our understanding of the circumstellar environments. This research originally started as the Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS) - an open time 1 program of the Herschel Space Observatory - in which 11 high-excitation PNs were observed to study the nebular energetics that involves very hot X-ray emitting plasma to very cold dust grains, whose density ranges over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and temperature ranges over 7 orders of magnitude. The HerPlaNS data include broadband maps, IFU spectral data cubes, and bolometer array spectral data cubes covering 50 to 670 microns. Because of the sheer volume and complexity of the data set, the original funding was exhausted almost exclusively to the initial data reduction and not much to the subsequent science analysis. However, we managed to perform a nearly full science analysis for one target, NGC 6781, for which the broadband maps confirm the nearly pole-on barrel structure of the amorphous carbonrich dust shell and the surrounding halo having temperatures of 26-40 K. We also demonstrated that spatially resolved far-IR line diagnostics would yield the (Te, ne) profiles, from which distributions of ionized, atomic, and molecular gases can be determined. Direct comparison of the dust and gas column mass maps constrained by the HerPlaNS data allowed to construct an empirical gas-to-dust mass ratio map, which shows a range of ratios with the median of 195 with a standard deviation of 110. The analysis also yielded estimates of the total mass of the shell to be 0.86 M_sun, consisting of 0.54 M_sun of ionized gas, 0.12 M_sun of atomic gas, 0.2 M_sun of molecular gas, and 0.004 M_sun of dust grains. These estimates

  7. Increasing Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Molecular Coverage during Fossil Oil Analysis by Combining Gas Chromatography and Atmospheric-Pressure Laser Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS).

    PubMed

    Benigni, Paolo; DeBord, J Daniel; Thompson, Christopher J; Gardinali, Piero; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-01-21

    Thousands of chemically distinct compounds are encountered in fossil oil samples that require rapid screening and accurate identification. In the present paper, we show for the first time, the advantages of gas chromatography (GC) separation in combination with atmospheric-pressure laser ionization (APLI) and ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for the screening of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fossil oils. In particular, reference standards of organics in shale oil, petroleum crude oil, and heavy sweet crude oil were characterized by GC-APLI-FT-ICR MS and APLI-FT-ICR MS. Results showed that, while APLI increases the ionization efficiency of PAHs, when compared to other ionization sources, the complexity of the fossil oils reduces the probability of ionizing lower-concentration compounds during direct infusion. When gas chromatography precedes APLI-FT-ICR MS, an increase (more than 2-fold) in the ionization efficiency and an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of lower-concentration fractions are observed, giving better molecular coverage in the m/z 100-450 range. That is, the use of GC prior to APLI-FT-ICR MS resulted in higher molecular coverage, higher sensitivity, and the ability to separate and characterize molecular isomers, while maintaining the ultrahigh resolution and mass accuracy of the FT-ICR MS separation.

  8. Ionized Gas in the Galactic Center: New Observations and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Wesley T.; Lacy, John H.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2012-08-01

    We present new observations of the [Ne II] emission from the ionized gas in Sgr A West with improved resolution and sensitivity. About half of the emission comes from gas with kinematics indicating it is orbiting in a plane tipped about 25° from the Galactic plane. This plane is consistent with that derived previously for the circumnuclear molecular disk and the northern arm and western arc ionized features. However, unlike most previous studies, we conclude that the ionized gas is not moving along the ionized features, but on more nearly circular paths. The observed speeds are close to, but probably somewhat less than expected for orbital motions in the potential of the central black hole and stars and have a small inward component. The spatial distribution of the emission is well fitted by a spiral pattern. We discuss possible physical explanations for the spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized gas, and conclude that both may be best explained by a one-armed spiral density wave, which also accounts for both the observed low velocities and the inward velocity component. We suggest that a density wave may result from the precession of elliptical orbits in the potential of the black hole and stellar mass distribution.

  9. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tsuey-Fen; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  10. Miniaturized gas ionization sensors using carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Modi, Ashish; Koratkar, Nikhil; Lass, Eric; Wei, Bingqing; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2003-07-10

    Gas sensors operate by a variety of fundamentally different mechanisms. Ionization sensors work by fingerprinting the ionization characteristics of distinct gases, but they are limited by their huge, bulky architecture, high power consumption and risky high-voltage operation. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of ionization microsensors featuring the electrical breakdown of a range of gases and gas mixtures at carbon nanotube tips. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate very high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering breakdown voltages several-fold in comparison to traditional electrodes, and thereby enabling compact, battery-powered and safe operation of such sensors. The sensors show good sensitivity and selectivity, and are unaffected by extraneous factors such as temperature, humidity, and gas flow. As such, the devices offer several practical advantages over previously reported nanotube sensor systems. The simple, low-cost, sensors described here could be deployed for a variety of applications, such as environmental monitoring, sensing in chemical processing plants, and gas detection for counter-terrorism.

  11. Miniaturized gas ionization sensors using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Ashish; Koratkar, Nikhil; Lass, Eric; Wei, Bingqing; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2003-07-01

    Gas sensors operate by a variety of fundamentally different mechanisms. Ionization sensors work by fingerprinting the ionization characteristics of distinct gases, but they are limited by their huge, bulky architecture, high power consumption and risky high-voltage operation. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of ionization microsensors featuring the electrical breakdown of a range of gases and gas mixtures at carbon nanotube tips. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate very high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering breakdown voltages several-fold in comparison to traditional electrodes, and thereby enabling compact, battery-powered and safe operation of such sensors. The sensors show good sensitivity and selectivity, and are unaffected by extraneous factors such as temperature, humidity, and gas flow. As such, the devices offer several practical advantages over previously reported nanotube sensor systems. The simple, low-cost, sensors described here could be deployed for a variety of applications, such as environmental monitoring, sensing in chemical processing plants, and gas detection for counter-terrorism.

  12. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane

    SciTech Connect

    Sayres, Scott G.; Ross, Matt W.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    The ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane is examined here with laser intensities ranging between 7x10{sup 12} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} at 624 nm. The ionization potential of silane determined using both multiphoton ionization (MPI) and tunneling ionization (TI) models agrees with the vertical ionization potential of the molecule. In addition, the application of the tunneling ionization model is extended here to the fragments of silane to determine their appearance potentials. MPI values for SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +}, SiH{sup +}, Si{sup +}, as well as H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are consistent with vertical potentials, whereas the TI measurements are found to be in accord with adiabatic potentials. The tunneling appearance potentials observed for the fragments H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are lower than reported for other techniques. In fact, the appearance potential measurements for these species resulting from silane are lower than their ionization potentials. The fragmentation rate of silane is determined to be nearly 20 times larger than the ionization rate. The main precursor for producing amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, SiH{sub 3}{sup +} is the dominant fragmentation product making up roughly a third of the total ion yield, a substantial increase from other techniques.

  13. Gas-Liquid Correlation of Ionization Energies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    ions and water. The threshold and reorganization energies of the hydrated electron are calculated from threshold energies of anions and their absorption...hydroxide ions and water. The threshold and reorganization energies of the hydrated electron are calculated from threshold energies of anions and their...threshold energy of the hydrated electron. 2. Free energy of emission and gas-phase ionization Consider the photoelectron emission by an aqueous

  14. The PRIME Lab gas ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knies, David L.; Elmore, David

    1994-06-01

    A gas ionization detection system was built for optimal identification of AMS radionuclides, in particular 10Be and 36Cl. For 36Cl, a combination of 1) the difference in arrival times for electrons at two anode plates and 2) a novel split anode plate has led to a reduction in misidentified 36S. A peak-stabilizing routine incorporated in the data acquisition system has allowed us to run at higher counting rates. Changing to propane gas has reduced random signal amplitude shifts.

  15. Structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Li, Wei; Zhao, Song-Feng

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory (so called MO-ADK theory) for 22 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model.

  16. Dust and Ionized Gas in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    1995-05-01

    The thesis presents results of a study of the optical and far-infrared properties of dust and ionized gas in a complete, blue magnitude-limited (B_T^0 < 12) sample of 56 luminous elliptical (E) galaxies. The main aim is to investigate the origin and fate of this interstellar material and possible implications for scenarios of galaxy formation and evolution. To ensure consistency in the assignment of morphological types, the galaxy sample was drawn exclusively from the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog of Bright Galaxies. A deep, systematic optical survey has been performed, including CCD imaging through both broad-band filters and narrow-band filters. For each galaxy we have constructed colour index (B-V, B-I) images and images of the H-alpha+ [N II]-emitting gas to derive the distributions of dust features and ionized gas. Long-slit spectra have also been obtained in two resolutions. Low-resolution spectra (covering the whole optical region) are used to study the properties of the underlying stellar populations (e.g., metallicity gradients), and to study the excitation mechanism of the ionized gas. Additional medium-resolution (~2A) spectra in the wavelength region around H-alpha have been obtained for all sample elliptical galaxies containing ionized gas to study the kinematics of the gas, and derive pure H-alpha luminosities. In this thesis, analysis of the extensive imaging data and of the medium-resolution spectra is reported. In Chapter 1 we report an early result of our survey: The galaxy IC 1459 is found to exhibit a large (15 Kpc diameter) H-alpha+[N II] emission-line region, showing spiral structure. Patchy dust absorption is also found in the inner part of the emission-line region. This galaxy was already shown to contain a massive stellar core which counter-rotates rapidly with respect to the stellar body of the galaxy. Interestingly, the sense of rotation of the spiral "arms" of the ionized gas distribution is the same as that of the rapidly rotating

  17. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.; Chevalier, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Brune, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  18. Ambipolar Diffusion Effects on Weakly Ionized Turbulence Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-04-01

    Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is a key process in molecular clouds (MCs). Non-ideal MHD turbulence simulations are technically very challenging because of the large Alfvén speed of ions in weakly ionized clouds. Using the Heavy-Ion Approximation method (Li, McKee & Klein 2006), we have carried out two-fluid simulations of AD in isothermal, turbulent boxes at a resolution of 5123, to investigate the effect of AD on the weakly ionized turbulence in MCs. Our simulation results show that the neutral gas component of the two-fluid system gradually transforms from an ideal MHD turbulence system to near a pure hydrodynamic turbulence system within the standard AD regime, in which the neutrals and ions are coupled over a flow time. The change of the turbulent state has a profound effect on the weakly ionized MCs.

  19. X-ray ionization and the chemistry of the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Kallman, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    The collection of unusually strong stellar X-ray sources in the vicinity of the Orion molecular cloud together bathe the gas with such an intensity of X-rays that they, rather than cosmic rays, dominate the ionization and heating of the gas. Estimates of the ionization rate and the elevation in temperature are presented, and the consequences for the gas chemistry are discussed. Strong small-scale inhomogeneities in molecular abundances and temperature are a distinguishing feature of ionization by stellar X-rays.

  20. Turbulence in the ionized gas of the Orion nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. J.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Henney, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    In order to study the nature, origin, and impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the ionized gas of the Orion nebula, we apply a variety of statistical techniques to observed velocity cubes. The cubes are derived from high resolving power (R ≈ 40 000) longslit spectroscopy of optical emission lines that span a range of ionizations. From velocity channel analysis (VCA), we find that the slope of the velocity power spectrum is consistent with predictions of Kolmogorov theory between scales of 8 and 22 arcsec (0.02 to 0.05 pc). The outer scale, which is the dominant scale of density fluctuations in the nebula, approximately coincides with the autocorrelation length of the velocity fluctuations that we determine from the second-order velocity structure function. We propose that this is the principal driving scale of the turbulence, which originates in the autocorrelation length of dense cores in the Orion molecular filament. By combining analysis of the non-thermal linewidths with the systematic trends of velocity centroid versus ionization, we find that the global champagne flow and smaller scale turbulence each contribute in equal measure to the total velocity dispersion, with respective root-mean-square widths of 4-5 km s-1. The turbulence is subsonic and can account for only one half of the derived variance in ionized density, with the remaining variance provided by density gradients in photoevaporation flows from globules and filaments. Intercomparison with results from simulations implies that the ionized gas is confined to a thick shell and does not fill the interior of the nebula.

  1. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper, we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  2. Enhanced Stability of Electrohydrodynamic Jets through Gas Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Sibel; Saville, Dudley A.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of the nonaxisymmetric instability growth rate of an electrohydrodynamic jet based on the measured total current overestimate experimental values. We show that this apparent discrepancy is the result of gas ionization in the surrounding gas and its effect on the surface charge density of the jet. As a result of gas ionization, a sudden drop in the instability growth rate occurs below a critical electrode separation, yielding highly stable jets that can be used for nano- to microscale printing.

  3. Enhanced stability of electrohydrodynamic jets through gas ionization.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Sibel; Saville, Dudley A; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2008-01-25

    Theoretical predictions of the nonaxisymmetric instability growth rate of an electrohydrodynamic jet based on the measured total current overestimate experimental values. We show that this apparent discrepancy is the result of gas ionization in the surrounding gas and its effect on the surface charge density of the jet. As a result of gas ionization, a sudden drop in the instability growth rate occurs below a critical electrode separation, yielding highly stable jets that can be used for nano- to microscale printing.

  4. Characterization of low-molecular weight iodine-terminated polyethylenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the use of derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zaikin, Vladimir G; Borisov, Roman S; Polovkov, Nikolai Yu; Zhilyaev, Dmitry I; Vinogradov, Aleksei A; Ivanyuk, Aleksei V

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with various derivatization approaches, have been applied to structure determination of individual oligomers and molecular-mass distributions (MMD) in low-molecular mass polyethylene having an iodine terminus. Direct GC/MS analysis has shown that the samples under investigation composed of polyethyelene-iodides (major components) and n-alkanes. Exchange reaction with methanol in the presence of NaOH gave rise to methoxy-derivatives and n-alkenes. Electron ionization mass spectra have shown that the former contained terminal methoxy groups indicating the terminal position of the iodine atom in the initial oligomers. MMD parameters have been determined with the aid of MALDI mass spectrometry followed by preliminary derivatization-formation of covalently bonded charge through the reaction of iodides with triphenylphosphine, trialkylamines, pyridine or quinoline. The mass spectra revealed well-resolved peaks for cationic parts of derivatized oligomers allowing the determination of MMD. The latter values have been compared with those calculated from GC/MS data.

  5. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  6. An advanced oxidation process using ionized gas for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ju; Chung, Paul Gene; Kwak, Dong Heui; Kim, Lee Hyung; Kim, Min Jeong

    2010-01-01

    This study on removing non-degradable materials in wastewater focused primarily on advanced oxidation methods such as ozone, ozone/UV and ozone/H2O2. Wastewater treatment using an ionized gas from plasma has been actively progressing. The ionized gas involves reactive species such as O2+, O2- cluster, O radical and OH radical. Since the ionized gas method has such outstanding characteristics as relatively simple structures, non-calorification, non-toxicity and low electricity consumption, it evidently of interest as a new process. A series of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of ionized gas as a useful element for the diminution of nondegradable organic matters. On the other hand, a large amount of organic matters were changed to hydrophilic and the compounds containing aromatic functional group gradually decreased. The results implied that the ionized gas has been able to degrade the non-biodegradable organic matters. Therefore, the oxidation process by using an ionized gas process could be considered as an effective alternative unit in water and wastewater treatment plants.

  7. Ionized gas in the Irr galaxy IC 10: The emission spectrum and ionization sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipova, V. P.; Egorov, O. V.; Lozinskaya, T. A.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the observations of the Irr galaxy IC 10 at the 6-m SAO telescope with the panoramic Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph (MPFS). Based on the results of these observations and our long-slit spectroscopy performed previously, we have investigated the ionized-gas emission spectrum in the region of intense star formation and refined the gas metallicity estimates. We show that the “diagnostic diagrams” constructed from our observations agree best with the new improved ionization models by Martin-Manjon et al. Using these models, we have determined the electron density and gas ionization parameter and ionizing-cluster characteristics, the age and mass, from the spectra of the investigated HII regions. The cluster ages and masses are shown to be within the ranges 2.5-5 Myr and (0.2-1) × 105 M ⊗, respectively.

  8. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  9. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Richard J.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hester, J. Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals.

  10. The rise of ionized gas in the Magellanic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Michael; Barger, Kathleen; Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The Small and Large Magellanic Clouds are a pair of interacting galaxies near the Milky Way. Tidal interactions have stripped gas from these galaxies, leaving behind gaseous debris such as the Magellanic Stream. We explore the morphology and kinematics of the neutral and ionized hydrogen gas in the trailing stream traveling toward the Milky Way. This comparison provides us with insight into the physical processes that are affecting the gas flowing through the Galactic halo. This is done using mapped H-alpha emission-line spectroscopy, obtained with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM), and archival 21-cm HI observations of the Stream near the Magellanic Clouds. We found that the neutral and ionized gas spatially and kinematically trace each other. With a map of the ionized gas in hand, we will continue to study the survival of this tidal relic.

  11. Helium Ionization in the Diffuse Ionized Gas Surrounding UCH ii Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish Roshi, D.; Churchwell, E.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of the singly ionized helium-to-hydrogen ratio ({n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+}) toward diffuse gas surrounding three ultracompact H ii (UCH ii) regions: G10.15-0.34, G23.46-0.20, and G29.96-0.02. We observe radio recombination lines of hydrogen and helium near 5 GHz using the GBT to measure the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio. The measurements are motivated by the low helium ionization observed in the warm ionized medium and in the inner Galaxy diffuse ionized regions. Our data indicate that the helium is not uniformly ionized in the three observed sources. Helium lines are not detected toward a few observed positions in sources G10.15-0.34 and G23.46-0.20, and the upper limits of the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio obtained are 0.03 and 0.05, respectively. The selected sources harbor stars of type O6 or hotter as indicated by helium line detection toward the bright radio continuum emission from the sources with mean {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} value 0.06 ± 0.02. Our data thus show that helium in diffuse gas located a few parsecs away from the young massive stars embedded in the observed regions is not fully ionized. We investigate the origin of the nonuniform helium ionization and rule out the possibilities (a) that the helium is doubly ionized in the observed regions and (b) that the low {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} values are due to additional hydrogen ionizing radiation produced by accreting low-mass stars. We find that selective absorption of ionizing photons by dust can result in low helium ionization but needs further investigation to develop a self-consistent model for dust in H ii regions.

  12. Helium Ionization in the Diffuse Ionized Gas Surrounding UCH ii Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshi, D. Anish; Churchwell, E.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of the singly ionized helium-to-hydrogen ratio ({n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+}) toward diffuse gas surrounding three ultracompact H ii (UCH ii) regions: G10.15-0.34, G23.46-0.20, and G29.96-0.02. We observe radio recombination lines of hydrogen and helium near 5 GHz using the GBT to measure the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio. The measurements are motivated by the low helium ionization observed in the warm ionized medium and in the inner Galaxy diffuse ionized regions. Our data indicate that the helium is not uniformly ionized in the three observed sources. Helium lines are not detected toward a few observed positions in sources G10.15-0.34 and G23.46-0.20, and the upper limits of the {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} ratio obtained are 0.03 and 0.05, respectively. The selected sources harbor stars of type O6 or hotter as indicated by helium line detection toward the bright radio continuum emission from the sources with mean {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} value 0.06 ± 0.02. Our data thus show that helium in diffuse gas located a few parsecs away from the young massive stars embedded in the observed regions is not fully ionized. We investigate the origin of the nonuniform helium ionization and rule out the possibilities (a) that the helium is doubly ionized in the observed regions and (b) that the low {n}{{He}+}/{n}{{{H}}+} values are due to additional hydrogen ionizing radiation produced by accreting low-mass stars. We find that selective absorption of ionizing photons by dust can result in low helium ionization but needs further investigation to develop a self-consistent model for dust in H ii regions.

  13. The Kinematics of the Ionized Gas in IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Joshua C.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2005-02-01

    We present the results of a WIYN integral field unit study of the kinematics of the ionized gas in IC 10, a dwarf irregular starburst galaxy in the Local Group. Though the velocity field of the ionized gas closely matches that of the H I, there are several kinematically interesting features in the galaxy. The diffuse ionized gas in the galaxy exhibits larger Hα line widths than the bright complexes. In one case this is due to an infusion of energy into the gas associated with the radio superbubble discovered by Yang & Skillman. We find that the amount of energy in this region is consistent with their hypothesis that the region contains 10 supernova remnants. We also detect a high-velocity (70 km s-1) expanding shell in the ionized gas, which is likely driven by three confirmed Wolf-Rayet stars that are located within the shell. Extrapolating from Hunter's initial mass function, we find that the central starburst region contains approximately equal energy contributions from stellar winds and supernovae (SNe), suggesting that SNe are just beginning to play a significant role in shaping the kinematics of the ionized gas. However, all of this energy cannot be easily accounted for in the kinematics of the gas. We detect an energetic flow of gas (3×1052 ergs), which we believe originates from the starburst region. We also detect a high-velocity (70 km s-1) feature not coincident with any structure in our Hα image. This feature, along with the flow and shell, can account for the energy produced by stellar wind and SNe. The flow resembles one discovered by Wilcots & Thurow in NGC 4214; together they suggest that the porosity of the interstellar medium contributes significantly to the high velocity of some portion of the ionized gas in irregular galaxies.

  14. Gas chromatography/chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis of anabolic steroids: ionization and collision-induced dissociation behavior.

    PubMed

    Polet, Michael; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2016-02-28

    The detection of new anabolic steroid metabolites and new designer steroids is a challenging task in doping analysis. Switching from electron ionization gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS/MS) to chemical ionization (CI) has proven to be an efficient way to increase the sensitivity of GC/MS/MS analyses and facilitate the detection of anabolic steroids. CI also extends the possibilities of GC/MS/MS analyses as the molecular ion is retained in its protonated form due to the softer ionization. In EI it can be difficult to find previously unknown but expected metabolites due to the low abundance or absence of the molecular ion and the extensive (and to a large extent unpredictable) fragmentation. The main aim of this work was to study the CI and collision-induced dissociation (CID) behavior of a large number of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) as their trimethylsilyl derivatives in order to determine correlations between structures and CID fragmentation. Clarification of these correlations is needed for the elucidation of structures of unknown steroids and new metabolites. The ionization and CID behavior of 65 AAS have been studied using GC/CI-MS/MS with ammonia as the reagent gas. Glucuronidated AAS reference standards were first hydrolyzed to obtain their free forms. Afterwards, all the standards were derivatized to their trimethylsilyl forms. Full scan and product ion scan analyses were used to examine the ionization and CID behavior. Full scan and product ion scan analyses revealed clear correlations between AAS structure and the obtained mass spectra. These correlations were confirmed by analysis of multiple hydroxylated, methylated, chlorinated and deuterated analogs. AAS have been divided into three groups according to their ionization behavior and into seven groups according to their CID behavior. Correlations between fragmentation and structure were revealed and fragmentation pathways were postulated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley

  15. MOLECULAR AND IONIZED HYDROGEN IN 30 DORADUS. I. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Seaquist, Ernest R.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Pellegrini, Eric W.

    2015-07-10

    We present the first fully calibrated H{sub 2} 1–0 S(1) image of the entire 30 Doradus nebula. The observations were conducted using the NOAO Extremely Wide-field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) on the CTIO 4 m Blanco Telescope. Together with a NEWFIRM Brγ image of 30 Doradus, our data reveal the morphologies of the warm molecular gas and ionized gas in 30 Doradus. The brightest H{sub 2}-emitting area, which extends from the northeast to the southwest of R136, is a photodissociation region (PDR) viewed face-on, while many clumps and pillar features located at the outer shells of 30 Doradus are PDRs viewed edge-on. Based on the morphologies of H{sub 2}, Brγ, CO, and 8 μm emission, the H{sub 2} to Brγ line ratio, and Cloudy models, we find that the H{sub 2} emission is formed inside the PDRs of 30 Doradus, 2–3 pc to the ionization front of the H ii region, in a relatively low-density environment <10{sup 4} cm{sup −3}. Comparisons with Brγ, 8 μm, and CO emission indicate that H{sub 2} emission is due to fluorescence, and provide no evidence for shock excited emission of this line.

  16. Determination of Hexachlorocyclohexane by Gas Chromatography Combined with Femtosecond Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xixiang; Imasaka, Tomoko; Li, Adan; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-12-01

    Structural isomers and enantiomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) were separated using a chiral column by gas chromatography and quantitatively determined by multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser (200 and 267 nm) as the ionization source. The order of elution of the enantiomers (i.e., (+)-α-HCH and (-)-α-HCH) was predicted from stabilization energies calculated for the complexes using permethylated γ-cyclodextrin as the stationary phase of the column, and the results were compared with the experimental data. The molecular ions observed for HCH were weak, even though they can be ionized through a process of resonance enhanced two-photon ionization at 200 nm. This unfavorable result can be attributed to the dissociation of the molecular ion, as predicted from quantum chemical calculations.

  17. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  18. The distribution of ionized gas in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Sadler, E. M.; Zeilinger, W. W.; Bertin, G.; Bertola, F.; Danzinger, J.; Dejonghe, H.; Saglia, R. P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    1993-12-01

    We present and discuss H-alpha+(N II) imaging observations of fifteen nearby elliptical and SO galaxies with extended optical emission lines. The morphology of the emitting regions suggests that the ionized gas usually lies in a disk which is often geometrically decoupled from the stellar body, as expected in a triaxial galaxy. The presence of a gaseous disk makes these galaxies suitable for testing their gravitational field in a straightforward way. The presence of dust in many of the disks, together with the observed morphological properties, suggests that the ionized gas in most of these galaxies is more closely associated with the cold Interstellar Medium (ISM) than with the hot X-ray component. The mass of ionized gas in the galaxies studied here is typically 10-100 times that in a 'normal' early-type galaxy of similar optical luminosity. These appear to be galaxies where an unusually high fraction of the cold gas has been ionized, rather than unusually gas-rich systems in an overall sense. The extra ionizing source may be related to an active nucleus, since the continuum radio emission from these galaxies is typically 10-15 times more powerful than in 'normal' ellipticals of the smae optical luminosity.

  19. Ionization fronts in coupled MHD-gas simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Partially ionized plasmas are ubiquitous in both nature and the laboratory, and their behaviour is best described by models which take into account the interactions between the neutral and charged species. We present a new non-linear, 3-dimensional, finite difference Gas-MHD Interactions Code designed to solve simultaneously the time evolution of fluid equations of both species in the conservation form as well as collisional interactions between them via appropriate choices of source term; in particular, we present results from this code in simulating Alfvén ionization in a partially ionized plasma. In this fashion, larger changes in the ionization fraction than were addressable in the linear limit are possible. Alfvén ionization is shown to impart plasmas with an inherent resistance to rapid recombination, where the recombination itself is significant enough to drive relative motion between the ionised and neutral species at speeds in excess of the critical velocity.

  20. Axisymmetric model of the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Simpson, J. P.; Haas, M. R.; Erickson, E. F.

    1991-01-01

    New ionization and thermal equilibrium models for the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula with an axisymmetric two-dimensional 'blister' geometry/density distribution are presented. The HII region is represented more realistically than in previous models, while the physical detail of the microphysics and radiative transfer of the earlier spherical modeling is maintained. The predicted surface brightnesses are compared with observations for a large set of lines at different positions to determine the best-fitting physical parameters. The model explains the strong singly ionized line emission along the lines of sight near the Trapezium.

  1. Axisymmetric model of the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Simpson, J. P.; Haas, M. R.; Erickson, E. F.

    1991-01-01

    New ionization and thermal equilibrium models for the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula with an axisymmetric two-dimensional 'blister' geometry/density distribution are presented. The HII region is represented more realistically than in previous models, while the physical detail of the microphysics and radiative transfer of the earlier spherical modeling is maintained. The predicted surface brightnesses are compared with observations for a large set of lines at different positions to determine the best-fitting physical parameters. The model explains the strong singly ionized line emission along the lines of sight near the Trapezium.

  2. Kinematic Study of Ionized and Molecular Gases in Ultracompact HII Region in Monoceros R2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwihyun; Lacy, John H.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Monoceros R2 (Mon R2) is an UltraCompact HII region (UCHII) surrounded by several PhotoDissociation Regions (PDRs). It is an excellent example to investigate the chemistry and physics of early stage of massive star formation due to its proximity (830pc) and brightness. Previous studies suggest that the wind from the star holds the ionized gas up against the dense molecular core and the higher pressure at the head drives the ionized gas along the shell. In order for the model to work, there should be evidence for dense molecular gas along the shell walls, irradiated by the UCHII region and perhaps entrained into the flow along the walls.We obtained the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) spectra of Mon R2 to study the kinematic patterns in the areas where ionized and molecular gases interact. The position-velocity maps from the high resolution (R~45,000) H- and K-band (1.4-2.5μm) IGRINS spectra demonstrate that the ionized gases (Brackett and Pfund series, He and Fe emission lines; Δv ≈ 40km/s) flow along the walls of the surrounding clouds. This is consistent with the model by Zhu et al. (2008). In the PV maps of the H2 emission lines there is no obvious motion (Δv ≈ 10km/s) of the molecular hydrogen right at the ionization boundary. This implies that the molecular gas is not taking part in the flow as the ionized gas is moving along the cavity walls.This work used the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) that was developed under a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with the financial support of the US National Science Foundation (NSF; grant AST-1229522), of the University of Texas at Austin, and of the Korean GMTProject of KASI.

  3. Shock-wave structure in a partially ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. S.; Huang, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a steady plane shock in a partially ionized gas has been investigated using the Boltzmann equation with a kinetic model as the governing equation and the discrete ordinate method as a tool. The effects of the electric field induced by the charge separation on the shock structure have also been studied. Although the three species of an ionized gas travel with approximately the same macroscopic velocity, the individual distribution functions are found to be very different. In a strong shock the atom distribution function may have double peaks, while the ion distribution function has only one peak. Electrons are heated up much earlier than ions and atoms in a partially ionized gas. Because the interactions of electrons with atoms and with ions are different, the ion temperature can be different from the atom temperature.

  4. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  5. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  6. Ionized Gas In The Galactic Center: New Observations, Interpretation, And Speculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Wesley; Lacy, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    We Present new observations of the [Ne II] emission from the ionized gas in Sgr A West with improved resolution and sensitivity. About half of the emission comes from gas with kinematics indicating it is moving on nearly circular orbits in a plane tipped about 25 degrees from the Galactic plane. This plane is consistent with that derived previously for the circumnuclear molecular disk and the northern arm and western arc ionized features. However, unlike most previous studies, we conclude that the ionized gas is not moving along the ionized features, but rather diagonally across them. The observed speeds are close to, but probably somewhat less than expected for orbital motions in the potential of the central black hole and stars. The spatial distribution of the emission is best fitted by a spiral pattern. We discuss possible physical explanations for the spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized gas, but are unable to find a satisfactory model. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0607312.

  7. Fabrication of a miniaturized ionization gas sensor with polyimide spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walewyns, T.; Scheen, G.; Tooten, E.; El Fissi, L.; Dupuis, P.; Francis, L. A.

    2011-06-01

    Gas sensing can be achieved by fingerprinting the ionization characteristics of distinct species. In this study, the fabrication of a miniaturized gas ionization sensor using polyimide as sacrificial layer is reported. The sensor consists of two planar metallic electrodes with a gap spacing obtained by the polyimide under-etching. This known sacrificial layer has the advantage besides a high planarization factor, to be CMOS compatible. Furthermore, its chemical resistance up to high temperatures, high resistance to radiation from both electrons and neutrons, and low outgassing are of primary importance to avoid interferences with the ionization gas sensing. A suspended micro-bridge with dimensions 20 μm width and 220 μm length has been developed and released by using etching holes in the membrane. The ionization characteristics of air at controlled temperature, humidity and pressure (21°C, 40% humidity and 1 atm) have been obtained during non-destructive electrical characterizations, with a breakdown voltage of 350 V for a 6 μm gap. The growth of metallic nanowires templated in ion track-etched polyimide on the electrode is envisioned in order to enhance the ionization field and to reduce the required measurement power of the sensor.

  8. Highly ionized gas in the Galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the values of electron density n(sub e) and gas pressure P/k in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Galactic halo, as inferred from C IV emission and absorption lines and using current C IV atomic data. In a homogeneous model with 4.7 less than or equal to log T less than or equal to 5.3, the data are consistent with 0.01 less than or equal to n(sub e) less than or equal to 0.02/cu cm and 2200 less than or equal to P/k less than or equal to 3700/cu cm K, a factor of 2-3 higher than advocated by Martin & Bowyer (1990) and comparable to the thermal pressure in the disk. If some of the C IV absorption arises from nonemitting, photoionized gas, then the inferred density and pressure will increase accordingly. The volume filling factor for homogeneous models ranges from 0.5% to 5%. Because of the constraints arising from filling factor and radiated power, most of the C IV must arise from gas near the peak of the cooling curve, at log t less than or equal to 5.6. We relate both emission-line and absorption-line observations to recent models in which turbulent mixing layers and isobarically cooling supernova remnants (SNRs) provide significant amounts of halo gas at approximately 10(exp 5.3) K and process 20-40 solar mass/yr with a power of approximately 10(exp 41) ergs/sec. Since the observed C IV and N V absorption scale heights have been reported to differ, at 4.9 kpc and 1.6 kpc, respectively, we examine inhomogeneous models with different exponential scale heights of T, P, and SN energy input. The ISM may change its character with distance above the Galactic plane, as superbubbles and mixing layers dominate over isolated SNRs as the source of the C IV. For appropiate scale heights, the midplane pressure is twice the homogeneous values quoted above. The O IV lambda 1034 diffuse emission line, which can be used as a temperature diagnostic of the hot gas, is predicted to be comparable in strength to that of C IV lambda 1549 (approximately 6000 photons

  9. Ionization front in a high-current gas dischargea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-03-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  10. Ionization front in a high-current gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-02-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  11. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, R.J.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Hester, J.J. Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-03-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals. 19 refs.

  12. A VUV Photoionization and Ab Initio Determination of the Ionization Energy of a Gas-Phase Sugar (Deoxyribose).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashree; Golan, Amir; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Krylov, Anna I; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-05

    The ionization energy of gas-phase deoxyribose was determined using tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation coupled to an effusive thermal source. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies of the ground and first four excited states of α-pyranose, the structure that dominates in the gas phase, were calculated using high-level electronic structure methods. An appearance energy of 9.1(±0.05) eV was recorded, which agrees reasonably well with a theoretical value of 8.8 eV for the adiabatic ionization energy. A clear picture of the dissociative photoionization dynamics of deoxyribose emerges from the fragmentation pattern recorded using mass spectrometry and from ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. The experimental threshold 9.4 (±0.05) eV for neutral water elimination upon ionization is captured well in the calculations, and qualitative insights are provided by molecular orbital analysis and molecular dynamics snapshots along the reaction coordinate.

  13. Ionization chamber for measurements of high-level tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and calibration of a simple ionization-chamber apparatus for measurement of high level tritium gas is described. The apparatus uses an easily constructed but rugged chamber containing the unknown gas and an inexpensive digital multimeter for measuring the ion current. The equipment after calibration is suitable for measuring 0.01 to 100% tritium gas in hydrogen-helium mixes with an accuracy of a few percent. At both the high and low limits of measurements deviations from the predicted theoretical current are observed. These are briefly discussed.

  14. Viscosity Coefficient Curve Fits for Ionized Gas Species Grant Palmer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viscosity coefficient curve fits for neutral gas species are available from many sources. Many do a good job of reproducing experimental and computational chemistry data. The curve fits are usually expressed as a function of temperature only. This is consistent with the governing equations used to derive an expression for the neutral species viscosity coefficient. Ionized species pose a more complicated problem. They are subject to electrostatic as well as intermolecular forces. The electrostatic forces are affected by a shielding phenomenon where electrons shield the electrostatic forces of positively charged ions beyond a certain distance. The viscosity coefficient for an ionized gas species is a function of both temperature and local electron number density. Currently available curve fits for ionized gas species, such as those presented by Gupta/Yos, are a function of temperature only. What they did was to assume an electron number density. The problem is that the electron number density they assumed was unrealistically high. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the proper expression for determining the viscosity coefficient of an ionized species as a function of both temperature and electron number density will be presented. Then curve fit coefficients will be developed using the more realistic assumption of an equilibrium electron number density. The results will be compared against previous curve fits and against highly accurate computational chemistry data.

  15. Viscosity Coefficient Curve Fits for Ionized Gas Species Grant Palmer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viscosity coefficient curve fits for neutral gas species are available from many sources. Many do a good job of reproducing experimental and computational chemistry data. The curve fits are usually expressed as a function of temperature only. This is consistent with the governing equations used to derive an expression for the neutral species viscosity coefficient. Ionized species pose a more complicated problem. They are subject to electrostatic as well as intermolecular forces. The electrostatic forces are affected by a shielding phenomenon where electrons shield the electrostatic forces of positively charged ions beyond a certain distance. The viscosity coefficient for an ionized gas species is a function of both temperature and local electron number density. Currently available curve fits for ionized gas species, such as those presented by Gupta/Yos, are a function of temperature only. What they did was to assume an electron number density. The problem is that the electron number density they assumed was unrealistically high. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the proper expression for determining the viscosity coefficient of an ionized species as a function of both temperature and electron number density will be presented. Then curve fit coefficients will be developed using the more realistic assumption of an equilibrium electron number density. The results will be compared against previous curve fits and against highly accurate computational chemistry data.

  16. Highly Ionized Gas as a Diagnostic of the Inner NLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. J.; Mullaney, J.; Jin, C.; Davies, R.

    2010-05-01

    The spectra of AGN, from the ultraviolet to the near infrared, exhibit emission lines covering a wide range of ionization states, from neutral species such as [O i] λ 6300, up to [Fe iv] λ 5303. Here we report on some recent studies of the properties of highly ionized lines (HILs), plus two case studies of individual objects. Future IFU observations at high spatial and good spectral resolution will probe the excitation and kinematics of the gas in the zone between the extended NLR and unresolved BLR. Multi-component SED fitting can be used to link the source of photoionization with the strengths and ratios of the HILs.

  17. Studying Simple Molecular Ionization using Radiation Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Christopher; Lemmer, Kristina; Western Michigan University Aerospace LaboratoryPlasma Experiments Team

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on radiation emission from the formation of simple molecular plasma using a DC glow discharge. The purpose is to measure the emission from argon and molecular nitrogen gas as a function of time with an optical emission spectroscopy system operating in kinetic mode as the gases go from their neutral state to ionized state. The end goal of the research is to develop a diagnostic tool that will be used to study the formation of plasma discharges from complex molecules. The kinetic mode of the CCD camera allows for fast data acquisition so that the species present and their relative concentrations as a function of time can be measured as the plasma is forming. The primary difficulty in the development of this diagnostic tool is designing a device and data analysis technique to allow for kinetic mode operation of the CCD camera. Experimental devices have been designed and built to enable the CCD to operate in kinetic mode, including a fiber optic adapter, camera mount, and twin razor blade system. The twin blades allow for the reduction of exposed pixels on the CCD camera and thereby allow the camera to store data on rows of pixels, rather than imaging the entire camera, allowing for faster data transfer. PhD in Aerospace Engineering.

  18. Field-dressed orbitals in strong-field molecular ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemering, Robert; Njoya, Oumarou; Weinacht, Thomas; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the importance of considering the shape of field-dressed molecular orbitals in interpreting angle-dependent measures of strong-field ionization from excited states. Our calculations of angle-dependent ionization for three homologous polyatomic molecules with very similar valence orbitals show that one has to take into account the shape of the field-dressed orbitals rather than the field-free orbitals in order to rationalize the experimental measurements.

  19. The Vertical Structure of Diffuse Ionized Gas in Galactic Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnarao, Dhanesh; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper provides the most sensitive velocity resolved observations of diffuse Hα, [S II] λ6716, and [N II] λ6584 emission in the Galaxy, tracing the warm (~8000K) ionized component of the interstellar medium. The vertical extent of this diffuse gas can directly impact the midplane pressure, influencing cold molecular clouds and star formation in the disk. Here, we analyze the vertical structure of the warm ionized medium around multiple spiral arm components of the Galaxy. Diffuse halo emission is isolated using longitude varying velocity channels guided by CO emission tracing cold molecular gas in the disk. We find exponential electron density squared (or emission measure) scale heights and analyze its behavior as a function of Galactocentric radius and the presence of cold molecular clouds and star forming regions in the disk. Statistical analysis of the behavior of [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα line ratios along some of these spiral arms disentangle the complex physical conditions of the warm ionized gas as a function of height and in-situ electron density. Some spiral arm sections, in particular the far Carina arm, have significantly larger (>3x) scale heights than previously studied arms that tend to increase as a function of Galactocentric radius.

  20. Investigation of combwax of honeybees with high-temperature gas chromatography and high-temperature gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. II: High-temperature gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aichholz, R; Lorbeer, E

    2000-06-23

    Crude combwax of six various honey bee species have been analyzed by high-temperature gas chromatography (HTGC)-chemical ionization mass spectrometry after a two-step silylation procedure. An optimized chromatographic procedure, described previously, enables the separation of high-molecular mass lipid compounds resulting in a characteristic fingerprint of the combwaxes of different honeybee species. The coupling of HTGC to mass spectrometry requires appropriate instrumentation in order to achieve sufficient sensitivity at high elution temperatures and avoid loss of chromatographic resolution. Chemical ionization was carried out using methane as reagent gas in order to determine the molecular mass of the individual compounds by means of abundant quasi molecular ions. To confirm the presence of unsaturated wax esters, ammonia was used as reagent gas. More than 80 lipid constituents were separated and characterized by their mass spectra. Representative chemical ionization mass spectra of individual compounds are presented. Both, HTGC-flame ionization detection data and the results of the HTGC-mass spectrometric investigations enabled a rapid profiling of the individual classes of compounds in crude combwaxes.

  1. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song-Feng, Zhao; Fang, Huang; Guo-Li, Wang; Xiao-Xin, Zhou

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  2. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  3. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  4. Quantum control of molecular tunneling ionization in the spatiotemporal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki; Morishita, Toru

    2011-06-15

    We report on a method that can control molecular photoionization in both space and time domains. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}) phase-controlled two-color laser pulses consisting of fundamental and second-harmonic light achieves the selective ionization of asymmetric molecules in the space domain, and manipulates the birth time and direction of photoelectron emission on an attosecond time scale. This method provides a powerful tool for tracking the quantum dynamics of photoelectrons by using phase-dependent oriented molecules as a phase reference in simultaneous ion-electron detection.

  5. Molecular Gas in the Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Linda C.; Koda, Jin

    The outskirts of galaxies offer extreme environments where we can test our understanding of the formation, evolution and destruction of molecules and their relationship with star formation and galaxy evolution. We review the basic equations that are used in normal environments to estimate physical parameters like the molecular gas mass from CO line emission and dust continuum emission. Then we discuss how those estimates may be affected when applied to the outskirts, where the average gas density, metallicity, stellar radiation field and temperature may be lower. We focus on observations of molecular gas in the outskirts of the Milky Way, extragalactic disk galaxies, early-type galaxies, groups and clusters. The scientific results show the versatility of molecular gas, as it has been used to trace Milky Way spiral arms out to a galactocentric radius of 15 kpc, to study star formation in extended ultraviolet disk galaxies, to probe galaxy interactions in polar-ring S0 galaxies and to investigate ram pressure stripping in clusters. Throughout the chapter, we highlight the physical stimuli that accelerate the formation of molecular gas, including internal processes such as spiral arm compression and external processes such as interactions.

  6. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    SEARS,T.J.; HALL,G.E.; PRESES,J.M.; WESTON,R.E.,JR.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule. The work of group members Fockenberg and Muckerman is described in separate abstracts of this volume.

  7. Equation of state for a partially ionized gas. II.

    PubMed

    Baker, George A

    2003-11-01

    The derivation of equations of state for fluid phases of a partially ionized gas or plasma is addressed from a fundamental point of view. A spherical cellular model is deduced for the hot curve limit (or ideal Fermi gas). Next the Coulomb interactions are added to the spherical cellular model for general ionic charge Z. Then an independent electron model within a Z electron cell plus several many-body effects are employed. Numerical examples of the theory for several elements (H, Li, N, Na, K, Ni, Rb, Pd, Cs, and Er) are reported. These results reduce in various limits of temperature and density to the expected behavior. They display electron, localization-delocalization phase transitions of liquid-gas character. In the higher Z elements, a second possible critical point has been found. The critical pressure, electron density and temperature for the lower-density critical points seem to obey power laws as a function of Z.

  8. Residual-gas-ionization beam profile monitors in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Fite, J.; Jao, S.; Trabocchi, C.

    2010-05-02

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) are in RHIC to measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings. These work by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last two years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  9. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2006-12-01

    Aerodynamic effects in ionized gases, often neglected phenomena, have been subject of a renewed interest in recent years. After a brief historical account, we discuss a selected number of effects and unresolved problems that appear to be relevant in both aeronautic and propulsion applications in subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow. Interaction between acoustic shock waves and weakly ionized gas is manifested either as plasma-induced shock wave dispersion and acceleration or as shock-wave induced double electric layer in the plasma, followed by the localized increase of the average electron energy and density, as well as enhancement of optical emission. We describe the phenomenology of these effects and discuss several experiments that still do not have an adequate interpretation. Critical for application of aerodynamic effects is the energy deposition into the flow. We classify and discuss some proposed wall-free generation schemes with respect to the efficiency of energy deposition and overall generation of the aerodynamic body force.

  10. Approximate Thermodynamics State Relations in Partially Ionized Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2003-12-30

    In practical applications, the thermodynamic state relations of partially ionized gas mixtures are usually approximated in terms of the state relations of the pure partially ionized constituent gases or materials in isolation. Such approximations are ordinarily based on an artificial partitioning or separation of the mixture into its constituent materials, with material k regarded as being confined by itself within a compartment or subvolume with volume fraction {alpha}k and possessing a fraction {beta}k of the total internal energy of the mixture. In a mixture of N materials, the quantities {alpha}k and {beta}k constitute an additional 2N--2 independent variables. The most common procedure for determining these variables, and hence the state relations for the mixture, is to require that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and pressure. This intuitively reasonable procedure is easily shown to reproduce the correct thermal and caloric state equations for a mixture of neutral (non-ionized) ideal gases. Here we wish to point out that (a) this procedure leads to incorrect state equations for a mixture of partially ionized ideal gases, whereas (b) the alternative procedure of requiring that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and free electron density reproduces the correct thermal and caloric state equations for such a mixture. These results readily generalize to the case of partially degenerate and/or relativistic electrons, to a common approximation used to represent pressure ionization effects, and to two-temperature plasmas. This suggests that equating the subvolume electron number densities or chemical potentials instead of pressures is likely to provide a more accurate approximation even in nonideal plasma mixtures.

  11. X-ray FEL induced multiphton ionization and molecular dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li

    2014-05-01

    X-ray Free electron lasers (FELs) enable multiphoton absorption at the core levels which is not possible with conventional light sources. Multiphoton ionization and the subsequent core-hole states relaxation lead to dramatic dynamics of the molecules. We present our experimental as well as theoretical results on multiphoton ionization and molecular fragmentation dynamics with the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Laboratory. We investigated simple diatomic system, N2 molecules, where we used multiphoton ionization as an internal clock for imaging the dynamics in time and the internuclear separation domain. We observed the modification of the ionization dynamic by varying the x-ray beam parameters and the effect of the spatial distribution on the ionization. We also investigated a complex system, C60, where we developed a full model to simulate the multiphoton ionization that results in various molecular ions and atomic carbon ions up to charge 6+. The calculation agrees well with our experimental results in ion kinetic energy distribution and charge state distribution. Moreover, our model provides further insights into the photoionization and dissociation dynamics as a function of time and molecular size. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Thank T. Osipov, B. Murphy, Z. Jurek, S.-K. Son, R. Santra, and N. Berrah, M. Hoener, O. Gessner, F. Tarantelli, S.T. Pratt, O. Kornilov, C. Buth, M. Güehr, E. Kanter, C. Bostedt, J. D. Bozek, P. H. Bucksbaum, M. Chen, R. Coffee, J. Cryan, L. DiMauro, M. Glownia, E. Kukk, S.R. Leone, L. Avaldi, P. Bolognesi, J. Eland, J. Farrell, R. Feifel, L. Frasinski, D.T. Ha, K. Hoffmann, B. McFarland, C. Miron, M. Mucke, R. Squibb, K. Ueda for their contributions to this work.

  12. Detection of Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Erin; Gallagher, J. S., III; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2017-08-01

    We present the first kinematic study of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) in the nearby, face-on disk galaxy M83 using optical emission-line spectroscopy from the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to decompose the [N ii]λ λ 6548, 6583, Hα, and [S ii]λ λ 6717, 6731 emission lines into H ii region and diffuse ionized gas emission. Extraplanar, diffuse gas is distinguished by its emission-line ratios ([N ii]λ6583/Hα ≳ 1.0) and its rotational velocity lag with respect to the disk ({{Δ }}v=-24 km s-1 in projection). With interesting implications for isotropy, the velocity dispersion of the diffuse gas, σ =96 km s-1, is a factor of a few higher in M83 than in the Milky Way and nearby, edge-on disk galaxies. The turbulent pressure gradient is sufficient to support the eDIG layer in dynamical equilibrium at an electron scale height of {h}z=1 kpc. However, this dynamical equilibrium model must be finely tuned to reproduce the rotational velocity lag. There is evidence of local bulk flows near star-forming regions in the disk, suggesting that the dynamical state of the gas may be intermediate between a dynamical equilibrium and a galactic fountain flow. As one of the first efforts to study eDIG kinematics in a face-on galaxy, this study demonstrates the feasibility of characterizing the radial distribution, bulk velocities, and vertical velocity dispersions in low-inclination systems. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) under program 2015-2-SCI-004 (PI: E. Boettcher).

  13. Hydration of Gas-Phase Ions Formed by Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Klassen, John S.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    The hydration of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization was investigated. Evidence that the hydrated ions are formed by two mechanisms is presented. First, solvent condensation during the expansion inside the electrospray source clearly occurs. Second, some solvent evaporation from more extensively solvated ions or droplets is apparent. To the extent that these highly solvated ions have solution-phase structures, then the final isolated gas-phase structure of the ion will be determined by the solvent evaporation process. This process was investigated for hydrated gramicidin S in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Unimolecular dissociation rate constants of isolated gramicidin S ions with between 2 and 14 associated water molecules were measured. These rate constants increased from 16 to 230 s−1 with increasing hydration, with smaller values corresponding to magic numbers. PMID:10497808

  14. Atmospheric pressure soft ionization for gas chromatography with dielectric barrier discharge ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-DBDI-MS).

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Mario F; Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-05-30

    In this study, a gas chromatography (GC) system was interfaced to a high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer by means of an active capillary plasma ionization source, based on dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI). This allowed highly efficient soft ionization of gas-phase, chromatographically resolved compounds at ambient pressure. Several pesticides and illicit drugs were analyzed, and the limits of detections (LODs) were as low as 30 pg mL(-1) for the GC-DBDI-MS coupling (corresponding to 60 fg on-column sensitivity) and 30 fg mL(-1) for SPME-GC-DBDI-MS.

  15. Gentle protein ionization assisted by high-velocity gas flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengxiang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2005-10-01

    Gentle protein electrospray ionization is achieved using the high-velocity gas flow of an air amplifier to improve desolvation in conventional ESI and generate intact folded protein ions in the gas phase. Comparisons are made between the ESI spectra of a number of model proteins, including ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and myoglobin, over a range of pH values under optimized conditions, with and without using an air amplifier to achieve high-velocity gas flow. Previously reported increased ion signals are confirmed. In addition, the peaks recorded using the air amplifier are shown to be narrower, corresponding to more complete desolvation. Significant changes in the charge-state distribution also are observed, with a shift to lower charge state at high-velocity flow. The relationship between the observed charge-state distribution and protein conformation was explored by comparing the charge-state shifts and the distributions of charge states for proteins that are or are not stable in their native conformations in low pH solutions. The data suggest retention of native or nativelike protein conformations using the air amplifier in all cases examined. This is explained by a mechanism in which the air amplifier rapidly creates small droplets from the original large ESI droplets and these microdroplets then desolvate without a significant decrease in pH, resulting in retention of the folded protein conformations. Furthermore, the holoform of ionized myoglobin is visible at pH 3.5, a much lower value than the minimum needed to see this form in conventional ESI. These results provide evidence for the importance of the conditions used in the desolvation process for the preservation of the protein conformation and suggest that the conditions achieved when using high-velocity gas flows to assist droplet evaporation and ion desolvation are much gentler than those in conventional ESI experiments.

  16. Accurate Structure Parameters for Tunneling Ionization Rates of Gas-Phase Linear Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Guo-Li; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2017-03-01

    In the molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402], the ionization rate depends on the structure parameters of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed. We determine systematically and tabulate accurate structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for 123 gas-phase linear molecules by solving time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are constructed numerically using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11664035, 11674268, 11465016, 11364038, 11364039, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001 and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  17. Ionized gas clouds near the Sagittarius Arm tangent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Li-Gang; Dong, Jian; Gao, Xu-Yang; Han, Jin-Lin

    2017-04-01

    Radio recombination lines (RRLs) are the best tracers of ionized gas. Simultaneous observations of multi-transitions of RRLs can significantly improve survey sensitivity. We conducted pilot RRL observations near the Sagittarius Arm tangent by using the 65-m Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope (TMRT) equipped with broadband feeds and a digital backend. Six hydrogen RRLs (H96 α - H101α) at C band (6289 MHz-7319 MHz) were observed simultaneously toward a sky area of 2° × 1.2° by using on-the-fly mapping mode. These transitions were then stacked together for detection of ionized gas. Star forming complexes G48.6+0.1 and G49.5-0.3 were detected in the integrated intensity map. We found agreements between our measured centroid velocities and previous results for the 21 known HII regions in the mapped area. For more than 80 cataloged HII region candidates without previous RRL measurements, we obtained new RRL spectra at 30 targeted positions. In addition, we detected 25 new discrete RRL sources with spectral S/N > 5 σ, and they were not listed in the catalogs of previously known HII regions. The distances for 44 out of these 55 new RRL sources were estimated.

  18. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. ECC study in positron impact ionization in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campeanu, R. I.; Zohouri Haghian, N.

    2012-12-01

    The electron capture to the continuum phenomenon in positron impact ionization of molecular hydrogen is studied with the distorted wave Born approximation. Our theoretical model produces results which are in better agreement with the experiment than the more elaborate models of [J. Fiol, V.D. Rodriguez, R.O. Barrachina, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34, 933 (2001)] and [A. Benedek, R.I. Campeanu, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 40, 1589 (2007)] previously employed in this study.

  20. A Hot Molecular Outflow Driven by the Ionized Jet Associated with IRAS 16562-3959

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Brooks, Kate J.; Rathborne, Jill; Güsten, Rolf

    2011-08-01

    We report molecular line observations in the CO J = 3 → 2, 6 → 5, and 7 → 6 transitions, made using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Telescope, toward the massive and dense core IRAS 16562-3959. This core harbors a string of radio sources thought to be powered by a central collimated jet of ionized gas. The molecular observations show the presence of high-velocity gas exhibiting a quadrupolar morphology, most likely produced by the presence of two collimated outflows. The southeast-northwest (SE-NW) molecular outflow is aligned with the string of radio continuum sources, suggesting it is driven by the jet. We find that the excitation temperature of the gas in the SE-NW outflow is high, with values of 145 and 120 K for the blueshifted and redshifted lobes, respectively. This outflow has a total mass of 1.92 M sun, a total momentum of ~89 M sun km s-1, and an averaged momentum rate of ~3.0 × 10-2 M sun km s-1 yr-1, values characteristic of flows driven by young massive stellar objects with high luminosities (L bol ~ 2 × 104 L sun). Complementary data taken with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment in high density and shock tracers support the picture that IRAS 16562-3959 is an accreting young massive star associated with an ionized jet, which is the energy source of a molecular outflow.

  1. Description of ionization in the molecular approach to atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, C.; Jouin, H.; Pons, B.; Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular treatments of atomic collisions have traditionally been restricted to low nuclear velocities because of their failure to reproduce the fall of the capture cross sections at higher velocities. The limitation has recently been seen to be due to their description of ionizing processes. This feature is shown here to be a general one for multicharged ion-atom collisions. Its origin and characteristics are described and illustrated for the prototypical Li{sup 3+}+H(1s) reaction. Ionization appears as a result of the inertia of the electron cloud to adiabatically follow the nuclear motion. This gives rise to nonadiabatic transitions, which represent an ionizing flux whenever the nuclear velocity is high enough that the energy of the traveling molecular orbitals involved is positive in both moving atomic reference frames. Two strongly connected mechanisms appear, corresponding to the relative translational and rotational nuclear motions. Because of the finiteness of the basis, these mechanisms terminate with unphysical trapping effects. While interesting {ital per se}, knowledge of these features is also useful with respect to improving molecular treatments of atomic collisions with the addition of pseudostates. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-05

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources.

  3. Ionization impact on molecular clouds and star formation. Numerical simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.

    2012-11-01

    At all the scales of Astrophysics, the impact of the ionization from massive stars is a crucial issue. At the galactic scale, the ionization can regulate star formation by supporting molecular clouds against gravitational collapse and at the stellar scale, indications point toward a possible birth place of the Solar System close to massive stars. At the molecular cloud scale, it is clear that the hot ionized gas compresses the surrounding cold gas, leading to the formation of pillars, globules, and shells of dense gas in which some young stellar objects are observed. What are the formation mechanisms of these structures? Are the formation of these young stellar objects triggered or would have they formed anyway? Do massive stars have an impact on the distribution of the surrounding gas? Do they have an impact on the mass distribution of stars (the initial mass function, IMF)? This thesis aims at shedding some light on these questions, by focusing especially on the formation of the structures between the cold and the ionized gas. We present the state of the art of the theoretical and observational works on ionized regions (H ii regions) and we introduce the numerical tools that have been developed to model the ionization in the hydrodynamic simulations with turbulence performed with the HERACLES code. Thanks to the simulations, we present a new model for the formation of pillars based on the curvature and collapse of the dense shell on itself and a new model for the formations of cometary globules based on the turbulence of the cold gas. Several diagnostics have been developed to test these new models in the observations. If pillars are formed by the collapse of the dense shell on itself, the velocity spectrum of a nascent pillar presents a large spectra with a red-shifted and a blue-shifted components that are caused by the foreground and background parts of the shell that collapse along the line of sight. If cometary globules emerge because of the turbulence of

  4. Electron Impact Ionization and Fragmentation Dynamics of Small Atomic and Molecular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    New ionization and fragmentation reactions emerge if target atoms or molecules are embedded in an environment as it is the case in small clusters or in the condensed phase. These can be intermolecular energy and charge transfer processes or a completely modified fragmentation behavior of the molecular ions. Here we study low energy electron impact induced ionization with a multi-electron and ion imaging spectrometer (reaction microscope) and a supersonic gas jet target which can produce small clusters of various target species. Interatomic reactions are studied for the model system of weakly bound Ar2 dimers. Here, the coincident detection of three electrons and two ions gives detailed insight in interatomic Coulombic decay and radiative charge transfer processes. Such processes were also found in bio-relevant systems like water clusters. We studied pure and water-mixed clusters of tetrahydrofuran (C4H8O, THF) which is the simplest analog of deoxyribose in the DNA backbone. One observation is that ionization of the outermost valence orbital for the monomer leads to stable THF ions. In contrast if THF is bound to another THF or a water molecule the molecular ring breaks. In addition we identify intermolecular Coulombic decay induced by energy transfer from a water molecule ionized in the inner valence shell to the neighboring THF molecule.

  5. The Ionization of the Warm Gas in Early-type Galaxies and Its UV Upturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renbin; Blanton, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    It has long been known that the majority of early-type galaxies contain warm ionized gas producing optical emission lines. These warm ionized gas are spatially extended to kpc scales. Their line ratios satisify the criteria of Low-ionization Nuclear Emission-line Regions (LINERs) on all major line-ratio diagnostic diagrams. However, their ionization mechanism has been hotly debated. Multiple ionization mechanisms can produce the same kind of line ratios, including photoionization by a central AGN, photoionization by hot evolved stars (e.g. post-AGB stars), collisional ionization by fast shocks, photoionization by hot X-ray emitting gas, and conductive heating or turbulent mixing. Therefore, determining the ionization mechanism requires other information.

  6. Molecular Strong Field Ionization viewed with Photoelectron Velocity Map Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Peter

    In this thesis, work is presented on molecular strong-field ionization, during which an electron is removed from polyatomic molecules in the presence of strong laser fields. This is a process which is the basis of a number of experimental techniques to uncover electronic dynamics in atoms and molecules on the femtosecond and attosecond timescale. 'Strong' refers to an electric field strength which leads to a response from the system which can not be modeled perturbatively. These fields can be easily produced in the focus of femtosecond laser radiation, as is done in this work. With the use of velocity map imaging of the photoelectron in coincidence with the fragment ion, multiple ionization--dissociation pathways can be distinguished. It is shown that as opposed to early attempts to model the process, multiple low-lying states are populated in the ion, and also the signatures of multielectron dynamics are revealed. By changing the laser pulse duration from 30 fs to below 10 fs, control is demonstrated over which quantum states of the ion are populated. It is also shown that for pulses shorter than 10 fs (which is a timescale below the shortest vibrational period in molecules), ionization pathways that involve motion of the nuclei are almost completely shut off. Finally, the origin of electrons with <1 meV kinetic energy is discussed. A two-step model is proposed for creating the electrons: the first step is population transfer to high-lying excited states of the neutral molecule by the laser field; the second step is ionization. Different ionization mechanisms are examined and their viability is checked against available data.

  7. The 30 Doradus Nebula: An Imaging Study of Molecular and Ionized Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry; Seaquist, E. R.; Matzner, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present the very first, fully calibrated H2 1--0 S(1) image of the entire 30 Doradus nebula. The observations were carried out using the NOAO Extremely Wide Field Infrared Imager on the CTIO 4-meter telescope. Together with a Brγ image of 30 Dor taken by NEWFIRM, our images reveal the morphologies of the warm molecular gas and ionized gas in 30 Doradus. Based on the morphologies of H2 and Brγ, line ratio H2 to Brγ, and Cloudy models, we found that the H2 emission is formed inside the photodissociation regions of 30 Doradus, very close to the surface in association with the ionization front of the HII region. We also suggest that the bright H2-emitting area, which expands from the northeast to the southwest of R136, is a photodissociation region viewed face-on, while many clumps and elephant trunk features located at the outer shells of 30 Doradus are also photodissociation regions viewed edge-on. The characteristic radiation to gas pressure ratio is evaluated at selected regions in 30 Doradus, and we conclude that radiation pressure is not the dominating force at the current phase of 30 Doradus, while the pressurization of stellar winds and the injection of photoevaporative flows are likely the major feedback mechanisms acting to reduce the observed ionization parameter in 30 Doradus.

  8. Ionized carbon in side-illuminated molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1990-01-01

    The C II fine-structure line has been observed in five sources for which the ionization front/molecular cloud interface is viewed approximately edge-on. The LSR velocity of the C II emission is generally in good agreement with that observed for molecular species such as CO. However, the observed linewidths of 3-14 km/s are typically wider than those of molecular lines and often show rapid spatial variations in the observed regions. The C II brightness temperature are typically equal to or slightly higher than the dust temperature at all locations observed. In the optically thin approximation, C II excitation temperatures are 100 K or more and column densities are 10 to the 18th/sq cm for all sources except M17, which has a more intense and complicated line profile with a larger spatial extent than any other source observed.

  9. The Impact of Diffuse Ionized Gas on Emission-line Ratios and Gas Metallicity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of galaxies observed by MaNGA, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impact the measurements of emission line ratios, hence the gas-phase metallicity measurements and the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams. We demonstrate that emission line surface brightness (SB) is a reasonably good proxy to separate HII regions from regions dominated by diffuse ionized gas. For spatially-adjacent regions or regions at the same radius, many line ratios change systematically with emission line surface brightness, reflecting a gradual increase of dominance by DIG towards low SB. DIG could significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradient. Because DIG tend to have a higher temperature than HII regions, at fixed metallicity DIG displays lower [NII]/[OII] ratios. DIG also show lower [OIII]/[OII] ratios than HII regions, due to extended partially-ionized regions that enhance all low-ionization lines ([NII], [SII], [OII], [OI]). The contamination by DIG is responsible for a substantial portion of the scatter in metallicity measurements. At different surface brightness, line ratios and line ratio gradients can differ systematically. As DIG fraction could change with radius, it can affect the metallicity gradient measurements in systematic ways. The three commonly used strong-line metallicity indicators, R23, [NII]/[OII], O3N2, are all affected in different ways. To make robust metallicity gradient measurements, one has to properly isolate HII regions and correct for DIG contamination. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves HII regions towards composite or LINER-like regions.

  10. Molecular surface analysis by laser ionization of desorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Lykke, K.R.; Wurz, P.; Parker, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    While elemental analysis of surfaces has progressed dramatically over the past ten years, quantitative molecular surface analysis remains difficult. This is particularly true in the analysis of complex materials such as polymers and rubbers which contain a wide compliment of additives and pigments to enhance their material characteristics. For mass spectrometric analysis the difficulty is two fold. First, desorption of surface molecules must be accompanied with minimal fragmentation and collateral surface damage. Second, the desorbed molecules must be ionized for subsequent mass analysis with high efficiency and without significant cracking. This paper focuses on the second of these problems.

  11. Molecular surface analysis by laser ionization of desorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Lykke, K.R.; Wurz, P.; Parker, D.H.

    1992-07-01

    While elemental analysis of surfaces has progressed dramatically over the past ten years, quantitative molecular surface analysis remains difficult. This is particularly true in the analysis of complex materials such as polymers and rubbers which contain a wide compliment of additives and pigments to enhance their material characteristics. For mass spectrometric analysis the difficulty is two fold. First, desorption of surface molecules must be accompanied with minimal fragmentation and collateral surface damage. Second, the desorbed molecules must be ionized for subsequent mass analysis with high efficiency and without significant cracking. This paper focuses on the second of these problems.

  12. Multi-wavelength Study of Diffuse Atomic and Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven Robert; Rice, Johnathan; Flagey, Nicolas; Ritchey, Adam M.; Welty, Daniel E.; Goldsmith, Paul; Langer, William; Pineda, Jorge L.; Lambert, David L.; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2017-06-01

    Diffuse atomic and molecular gas is revealed through a combination of absorption lines against background targets and emission. We describe a project that combines results on ultraviolet (UV) and visible absorption with those obtained from the Herschel key program GOTC+ (Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+) to develop a comprehensive picture of neutral diffuse gas in the Galaxy. [C II], H I, and CO emission acquired for the GOTC+ survey reveal the presence of warm neutral atomic gas, cold neutral atomic gas, CO-dark H2 gas (molecular gas not seen in CO emission), and denser molecular gas in different kinematic components. We derive the component structure (number of clouds and their column densities) seen in absorption at visible wavelengths from Ca II, Ca I, K I, CH, CH+, and CN and compare that to the emission from [C II], H I, and CO and its isotopologues. Absorption lines from additional atoms (including C I, O I, and Ni II) and molecules (CO) from UV spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope are used to expand the kinematic correspondences. Preliminary results on physical conditions (gas temperature and density) inferred from analyses of CN chemistry and excitation of neutral and singly-ionized carbon, neutral oxygen, and CO are also presented.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Description of Partially Ionized Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagattuta, Ken

    2004-11-01

    A report on work in progress: the approach to steady-state of partially ionized dense plasmas, containing more than one atomic element, is being simulated with the quasi-classical method known as Fermi Molecular Dynamics (FMD). We recap the FMD method, recalling its several advantages and disadvantages, and present an overview of past work. we have continued to develop the FMD method as a tool for simulating the behaviors of a variety of inhomogeneous, partially ionized, dense plasma systems, in cases for which more rigorous methods are still unavailable. Predictions of the average ionization state Z* of atoms, in a plasma containing more than one atomic element, is complicated by many factors, especially under conditions of high density, and not too high temperature. Average atom models become problematic when two or more atomic elements are present together. In order to address this problem, we have applied the FMD method to plasmas containing selected mixtures of atomic elements, determining Z* for each element over a range of temperatures and densities. LANL archived abstract: LA-UR-04-2186

  14. Revisiting molecular ionization: Does a molecule like to share?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Esry, B. D.

    2012-06-01

    The ever-increasing detail obtained in strong-field experiments calls for a deeper understanding of the laser-molecule interaction. For instance, recent measurements reported in PRL 107, 143004 (2011) reveal a limitation in understanding strong-field ionization dynamics in terms of the strong-field approximation. We have addressed the question of how the electron and the nuclei share the energy when H2^+ breaks up in the presence of an intense IR field via the process: H2^++nφ->p+p+e^-. Solving the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation and calculating the ionization probability resolved as a function of the asymptotic electron energy and the nuclear kinetic energy release (KER) allow us to give an answer. The energy sharing is non-trivial and plays an important role in the prediction of, for instance, the KER. We also address the limitations of current understanding of molecular ionization by comparing to models like the strong-field approximation and the Floquet picture. Such benchmarking may be facilitated by XUV+IR pump-probe schemes and carrier-envelope-phase control that allow for time-resolved and spatial probing of the dynamics.

  15. Molecular gas in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casoli, F.; Sauty, S.; Gerin, M.; Boselli, A.; Fouque, P.; Braine, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Lequeux, J.; Dickey, J.

    1998-03-01

    The molecular hydrogen content of a galaxy is a key parameter for its activity and future evolution. Its variations with basic properties such as size, mass, morphological type, and environment, the ratio of molecular to atomic gas masses, should provide us with a better view of galaxy evolution. Such studies have been done in the past by Sage (1993a) or the FCRAO group (e.g. Young & Knezek 1989), and have led to controversial results, for example about the MHH /MHI ratio. While Sage (1993a), using a distance-limited sample of 65 galaxies and the \\COA line emission as a tracer of the HH mass, finds that most galaxies have MHH /MHI lower than 1, Young & Knezek (1989) and Young et al. (1995), from a different sample of 178 objects, claim equal amounts of gas in the molecular and atomic phase. Here we again tackle this problem, by gathering a much larger sample of 582 objects, not only from the literature but also from several \\COA surveys that we have completed and which are largely unpublished. Our sample is clearly not complete and contains a large number of cluster galaxies as well as many more massive objects than a distance-limited sample. Contrary to previous analyses, we have taken into account the non-detections by using the survival analysis method. Our sample includes 105 isolated galaxies, observed by us, that we use as a reference sample in order to determine whether cluster galaxies are CO-deficient. We find that the ratio of HH and HI masses is on the average lower than 1, with = log(0.20) +/- 0.04 (median = log(0.27) +/- 0.04). For spirals with types Sa to Sc, we have slightly higher values: log(0.28) and log(0.34) respectively. The actual HH masses and MHH /MHI ratios could be lower than given above if, as suggested by recent gamma -ray and 1.3 mm continuum data, the conversion factor between \\COA emissivities and HH masses for large spiral galaxies is lower than the value adopted here (X=2.310(20) cm(-2) /(Kkms(-1) )). The

  16. The ionization fraction gradient across the Horsehead edge: an archetype for molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, J. R.; Pety, J.; Gerin, M.; Hily-Blant, P.; Le Bourlot, J.

    2009-05-01

    Context: The ionization fraction (i.e., the electron abundance) plays a key role in the chemistry and dynamics of molecular clouds. Aims: We study the H13CO^+, DCO+ and HOC+ line emission towards the Horsehead, from the shielded core to the UV irradiated cloud edge, i.e., the photodissociation region (PDR), as a template to investigate the ionization fraction gradient in molecular clouds. Methods: We analyze an IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer map of the H13CO+ J=1-0 line at a 6.8''× 4.7'' resolution, complemented with IRAM-30 m H13CO+ and DCO+ higher-J line maps and new HOC+ and CO+ observations. We compare self-consistently the observed spatial distribution and line intensities with detailed depth-dependent predictions of a PDR model coupled with a nonlocal radiative transfer calculation. The chemical network includes deuterated species, 13C fractionation reactions and HCO^+/HOC+ isomerization reactions. The role of neutral and charged PAHs in the cloud chemistry and ionization balance is investigated. Results: The detection of the HOC+ reactive ion towards the Horsehead PDR proves the high ionization fraction of the outer UV irradiated regions, where we derive a low [ HCO^+] /[ HOC^+] ≃ 75-200 abundance ratio. In the absence of PAHs, we reproduce the observations with gas-phase metal abundances, [Fe+Mg+...], lower than 4 × 10 -9 (with respect to H), and a cosmic-ray ionization rate of ζ=(5± 3)× 10 -17 s-1. The inclusion of PAHs modifies the ionization fraction gradient and increases the required metal abundance. Conclusions: The ionization fraction in the Horsehead edge follows a steep gradient, with a scale length of ~0.05 pc (or ~25''), from [ e^-] ≃ 10-4 (or n_e~˜ 1-5 cm-3) in the PDR to a few times ~10-9 in the core. PAH- anions play a role in the charge balance of the cold and neutral gas if substantial amounts of free PAHs are present ([PAH] > 10-8). Based on observations obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and 30 m telescope

  17. Electron impact, hyperthermal surface ionization and fast GC-MS in supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Amirav, A.; Dagan, S.

    1995-03-01

    Supersonic Molecular Beams (SMB) are characterized by undirectional motion with controlled hyperthermal kinetic energy (0.1-30 eV), intramolecular vibrational super-cooling, mass focusing as in an ideal high load jet separator, very high flow rate (on the gas chromatography flow rate scale) up to 240 ml/min and sample inlet at atmospheric pressure. These features make SMB an ideal sample introduction method, enable a unique fast GC inlet and result in important implications to molecular ionization processes including electron impact (EI) and hyperthermal. surface ionization (HSI). The authors` research is aimed at exploring and exposing the benefits of SMB for analytical organic mass spectrometry. The experimental apparatus is shown and is described. A 50 cm long megabore capillary column connects the atmospheric pressure open inlet to a supersonic nozzle, and serves as an ultra fast GC short column. The authors demonstrate ultrafast GC-MS achieved with this 50 cm transfer line capillary. One of the main features of this unique GC is the carrier gas relatively high flow rate of up to 240 ml/min which is possible due to the flow rates involved with the supersonic beam interface. This ultrafast GC is extensively described. Alternatively, a conventional GC with a short (4 meter) column serves as a fast GC inlet with intermediate GC resolution and unlimited choice of column length, ID and flow rate. Electron impact ionization in supersonic molecular beams is achieved using a Brink type open ion source operated with {approximately} 10-20 mA emission current. A background ion filtration method is applied, based on differences in the ion energy emerging from the hyperthermal molecular kinetic energy in the seeded SMB. Background ion filtration is achieved in the authors` VG-SXP-600 quadrupole through biasing of its exit lens and the cancellation of its internal ion energy ramping with mass.

  18. Combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry of sphingolipids. I. Glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and cerebrosides of the spleen in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Oshima, M; Ariga, T; Murata, T

    1977-08-01

    Trimethylsilylated glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and glucocerebrosides were analysed by combined gas chromatography (GC)-chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometry. Isobutane, methane and ammonia were used as reactant gasses for chemical ionization. Essentially the same fragment ions were detected in the spectra with the different reactant gases. Purified glucocerebrosides isolated from the spleen of a patient with Gaucher's disease were clearly separated into their 8 molecular species by gas chromatography. Three other minor components were detected by spectrometry, and these 11 molecular species of glucocerbrosides from the spleen of the patient with Gaucher's disease have been analysed. The ceramides obtained by periodate oxidation and then alkaline reduction of the glucocerebrosides were also separated into 11 molecular species by GC-CI mass spectrometry. Molecular weight could be determined using the major fragment ion of m/e (M+-90) in the spectra of ceramides and cerebrosides. The chemical ionization method is useful for structural analysis and determination of the molecular species of sphingoglycolipids.

  19. Cluster chemical ionization for improved confidence level in sample identification by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2003-01-01

    Upon the supersonic expansion of helium mixed with vapor from an organic solvent (e.g. methanol), various clusters of the solvent with the sample molecules can be formed. As a result of 70 eV electron ionization of these clusters, cluster chemical ionization (cluster CI) mass spectra are obtained. These spectra are characterized by the combination of EI mass spectra of vibrationally cold molecules in the supersonic molecular beam (cold EI) with CI-like appearance of abundant protonated molecules, together with satellite peaks corresponding to protonated or non-protonated clusters of sample compounds with 1-3 solvent molecules. Like CI, cluster CI preferably occurs for polar compounds with high proton affinity. However, in contrast to conventional CI, for non-polar compounds or those with reduced proton affinity the cluster CI mass spectrum converges to that of cold EI. The appearance of a protonated molecule and its solvent cluster peaks, plus the lack of protonation and cluster satellites for prominent EI fragments, enable the unambiguous identification of the molecular ion. In turn, the insertion of the proper molecular ion into the NIST library search of the cold EI mass spectra eliminates those candidates with incorrect molecular mass and thus significantly increases the confidence level in sample identification. Furthermore, molecular mass identification is of prime importance for the analysis of unknown compounds that are absent in the library. Examples are given with emphasis on the cluster CI analysis of carbamate pesticides, high explosives and unknown samples, to demonstrate the usefulness of Supersonic GC/MS (GC/MS with supersonic molecular beam) in the analysis of these thermally labile compounds. Cluster CI is shown to be a practical ionization method, due to its ease-of-use and fast instrumental conversion between EI and cluster CI, which involves the opening of only one valve located at the make-up gas path. The ease-of-use of cluster CI is analogous

  20. Plasma channel created by ionization of gas by a surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, V. N.; Kuz’min, G. P.; Minaev, I. M. Rukhadze, A. A.; Tikhonevich, O. V.

    2015-09-15

    Conditions for gas ionization in the field of a slow surface wave excited by a microwave source are considered. The gas ionization rate and the plasma density distribution over the radius of the discharge tube were studied by the optical method. The experiments were conducted in a dielectric tube with a radius much smaller than the tube length, the gas pressure being ∼1–3 Torr. It is shown that the stationary distribution of the plasma density is determined by diffusion processes.

  1. Nonadiabatic molecular alignment of linear molecules probed by strong-field ionization yields of photoelectrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, G.; Kaya, N.; Strohaber, J.; Hart, N. A.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of rotational wave packets of laser-aligned linear molecules were studied with femtosecond laser-driven strong-field ionization (SFI). The dynamics were observed as a function of the delay between a femtosecond probe pulse and a linearly polarized aligning pump pulse. The induced nonadiabatic molecular alignment was directly monitored by the total SFI yield. The measured revival signatures were compared to the calculated degree of molecular alignment taking into account the effects of electronic structure and symmetry of the molecules. By fitting the calculated alignment parameter to the measured experimental data, we also determined the molecular rotational constants of N2, CO, O2, and C2H2 gas molecules.

  2. Properties of molecular gas in galaxies in the early and mid stages of interaction. II. Molecular gas fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Kuno, Nario; Iono, Daisuke; Tamura, Yoichi; Tosaki, Tomoka; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    We have investigated properties of the interstellar medium in interacting galaxies in early and mid stages using mapping data of 12CO(J = 1-0) and H i. Assuming the standard CO-H2 conversion factor, we found no difference in molecular gas mass, atomic gas mass, and total gas mass (the sum of atomic and molecular gas mass) between interacting galaxies and isolated galaxies. However, interacting galaxies have a higher global molecular gas fraction f_{mol}^{global} (the ratio of molecular gas mass to total gas mass averaged over a whole galaxy) at 0.71 ± 0.15 than isolated galaxies (0.52 ± 0.18). The distribution of the local molecular gas fraction fmol, the ratio of the surface density of molecular gas to that of the total gas, is different from the distribution in typical isolated galaxies. By a pixel-to-pixel comparison, isolated spiral galaxies show a gradual increase in fmol along the surface density of total gas until it is saturated at 1.0, while interacting galaxies show no clear relation. We performed pixel-to-pixel theoretical model fits by varying metallicity and external pressure. According to the model fitting, external pressure can explain the trend of fmol in the interacting galaxies. Assuming half of the standard CO-H2 conversion factor for interacting galaxies, the results of pixel-to-pixel theoretical model fitting get worse than adopting the standard conversion factor, although f_{mol}^{global} of interacting galaxies (0.62 ± 0.17) becomes the same as in isolated galaxies. We conclude that external pressure occurs due to the shock prevailing over a whole galaxy or due to collisions between giant molecular clouds even in the early stage of the interaction. The external pressure accelerates an efficient transition from atomic gas to molecular gas. Regarding the chemical timescale, high fmol can be achieved at the very early stage of interaction even if the shock induced by the collision of galaxies ionizes interstellar gas.

  3. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Svetozar

    2006-10-01

    Successful application of gas discharges in aerodynamics requires their efficient generation, sustaining and control at supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions. Wall-free plasma formations that meet the requirements may then act as time-controlled and space-localized actuators to modify the flow. Potential candidates for this challenging task are plasmas contained in open or linear-cavity microwave field structures. We present and discuss direct observations of aerodynamic effects activated or modified by wall-free discharges. Further, we compare two generic types of wall-free discharges. First group, applicable for inlet-type structures, consists of a periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids generated in a linear cavity, using the outgoing wave from a microwave antenna and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to the standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an ``effective focusing'' in the near field of the antenna (Fresnel region) as a result of diffraction effects and mode structure. Second group, applicable to supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers, are the surface microwave discharges enhanced by a structure of Hertz dipoles. Standard microwave discharge phenomenology, such as microwave breakdown, mode structure and plasma parameters, is revisited to present a quantitative interpretation of the observed effects. Special attention is given to complex phenomena specific to flow-plasma interaction (double electric layers, ionization waves, instabilities), which provide the physical basis for localized heating in the aerodynamic flow.

  4. Molecular gas in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming

    2001-10-01

    A systematic study of the molecular gas properties in strongly interacting galaxies (SIGs) has been undertaken, which includes two parts: (1)a statistical study of a large, optically-selected, complete sample of SIGs; (2)a case study of the nearest colliding pair NGC 4038/9 (``the Antennae'') with multi-transition data of both 12CO and 13CO. Consisting of 126 galaxies in 92 systems, our complete sample of SIGs includes all the SIGs in the northern sky with optical magnitude BT < 14.5. CO data have been collected for 95 SIGs (59 of which were observed by us) as well as for comparison samples of 59 weakly interacting and 69 isolated spiral galaxies. The statistical analysis of the samples shows that the SIGs, especially the colliding and merging systems, have a higher CO luminosity than isolated spiral galaxies. However, there is no significant difference in the atomic gas contents between the samples. This indicates that the excess CO emission is not due to the conversion of atomic gas to molecular gas, but may be more plausibly accounted for by a lower CO-to- H2 conversion factor X. For the Antennae galaxies, we have obtained high quality, fully sampled, single dish maps at 12CO J = 1-0 and 32 transitions with an angular resolution of 15' (1.5 kpc), together with 12CO J = 2-1, 13CO J = 2-1 and 3-2 data at selected regions with similar resolutions. Our Nobeyama 45m map recovers twice as much 12CO J = 1-0 flux as was reported by Wilson et al. (2000). The 12CO J = 1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 emission all peak in an off-nucleus region adjacent to where the two disks overlap. The 12CO/13 CO J = 2-1 and 3-2 integrated intensity ratios are remarkably high in the overlap region. Detailed LVG modeling indicates that the 12 CO and 13CO emission come from different spatial components. The 12CO emission originates from a nonvirialized low density gas component with a large velocity gradient. Such a large velocity gradient can produce ``over luminous'' CO emission, and the derived X

  5. Gas ionization induced by a high speed plasma injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Gas ionization induced by a fast plasma injection has been observed with the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) Experiment on Spacelab-1. When an impulsive high-density plasma was injected from the orbiter, waves near the lower-hybrid frequency were enhanced, and the surrounding gas drifting with the orbiter was ionized for several tens of milliseconds after the plasma injection. The long-duration gas ionization was observed only when the plasma flux incoming to the orbiter cargo bay and the orbital velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field were relatively large. This effect has been explained by the concept of critical velocity ionization (CVI) for the gas drifting with the orbiter, although the gas velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field was less than the Alfven critical velocity.

  6. Determination of equilibrium composition of thermally ionized monoatomic gas under different physical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, M. S.; Rydalevskaya, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Perfect gas mixtures that result from thermal ionization of spatially and chemically homogeneous monoatomic gases are considered. Equilibrium concentrations of the components of such mixtures are determined using integration over the momentum space and summation with respect to energy levels of the distribution functions that maximize the entropy of system under condition for constancy of the total number of nuclei and electrons. It is demonstrated that such a method allows significant simplification of the calculation of the equilibrium composition for ionized mixtures at different temperatures and makes it possible to study the degree of ionization of gas versus gas density and number in the periodic table of elements.

  7. Electron impact ionization of the gas-phase sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, Irina; Markush, Pavlo; Zavilopulo, Anatoly; Shpenik, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Ionization and dissociative ionization of the sorbitol molecule by electron impact have been studied using two different experimental methods. In the mass range of m/ z = 10-190, the mass spectra of sorbitol were recorded at the ionizing electron energies of 70 and 30 eV. The ion yield curves for the fragment ions have been analyzed and the appearance energies of these ions have been determined. The relative total ionization cross section of the sorbitol molecule was measured using monoenergetic electron beam. Possible fragmentation pathways for the sorbitol molecule were proposed.

  8. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  9. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-15

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  10. The Molecular Gas Outflow of NGC 1068 Imaged by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Burillo, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have used the ALMA array to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), and CS(7-6)) in the central r˜2 kpc of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with spatial resolutions ˜0.3″-0.5″ (˜20-35 pc). The sensitivity and spatial resolution of ALMA give a detailed view of the distribution and kinematics of the dense molecular gas. The gas kinematics from r˜50 pc out to r˜400 pc reveal a massive outflow in all molecular tracers. The tight correlation between the ionized gas outflow, the radio jet, and the occurrence of outward motions in the disk suggests that the outflow is AGN driven. The outflow rate estimated in the CND, M/dt˜63+21-37 M⊙ yr-1, is an order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate at these radii. The molecular outflow could quench star formation in the inner r˜400 pc of the galaxy on short timescales of ≤1 Myr and regulate gas accretion in the CND.

  11. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  12. A Three Dimensional Beam Profile Monitor Based on Residual Gas Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.A.; Shapira, D.

    1998-11-04

    A three-dimensional beam profile monitor based on tracking the ionization of the residual gas molecules in the evacuated beam pipe is described. Tracking in position and time of the ions and electrons produced in the ionization enables simultaneous position sampling in three dimensions. Special features which make it possible to sample very low beam currents were employed.

  13. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  14. Infrared spectroscopy of ionized corannulene in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galué, Héctor Alvaro; Rice, Corey A.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Oomens, Jos

    2011-02-01

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of radical cationic and protonated corannulene were recorded by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy using the IR free electron laser for infrared experiments. Electrospray ionization was used to generate protonated corannulene and an IRMPD spectrum was recorded in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer monitoring H-loss as a function of IR frequency. The radical cation was produced by 193-nm UV photoionization of the vapor of corannulene in a 3D quadrupole trap and IR irradiation produces H, H2, and C2Hx losses. Summing the spectral response of the three fragmentation channels yields the IRMPD spectrum of the radical cation. The spectra were analyzed with the aid of quantum-chemical calculations carried out at various levels of theory. The good agreement of theoretical and experimental spectra for protonated corannulene indicates that protonation occurs on one of the peripheral C-atoms, forming an sp3 hybridized carbon. The spectrum of the radical cation was examined taking into account distortions of the C5v geometry induced by the Jahn-Teller effect as a consequence of the degenerate 2E1 ground electronic state. As indicated by the calculations, the five equivalent Cs minima are separated by marginal barriers, giving rise to a dynamically distorted system. Although in general the character of the various computed vibrational bands appears to be in order, only a qualitative match to the experimental spectrum is found. Along with a general redshift of the calculated frequencies, the IR intensities of modes in the 1000-1250 cm-1 region show the largest discrepancy with the harmonic predictions. In addition to CH "in-plane" bending vibrations, these modes also exhibit substantial deformation of the pentagonal inner ring, which may relate directly to the vibronic interaction in the radical cation.

  15. Determination of stimulants using gas chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a soft ionization source.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Avila, Viorica; Cooley, James; Urdahl, Randall; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mass spectral fragmentation of a small set of stimulants in a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a soft ionization source using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from different plasma gases. It was postulated that the use of a plasma gas such as Xe, which emits photons at a lower energy than Kr or Ar, would lead to softer ionization of the test compounds, and thus to less fragmentation. A set of nine stimulants: cocaine, codeine, nicotine, methadone, phenmetrazine, pentylenetetrazole, niketamide, fencamfamine, and caffeine, was analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS) in positive ion mode with this soft ionization source, using either Xe, Kr, or Ar as plasma gases. Working solutions of the test compounds at 0.1 to 100 ng/μL were used to establish instrument sensitivity and linearity. All test compounds, except methadone and pentylenetetrazole, exhibited strong molecular ions and no fragmentation with Xe-microplasma photoionization (MPPI). Methadone exhibited significant fragmentation not only with Xe, but also with Kr and Ar, and pentylenetetrazole could not be ionized with Xe, probably because its ionization energy is above 8.44 eV. The Kr- and Ar-MPPI mass spectra of the test compounds showed that the relative intensity of the molecular ion decreased as the photon energy increased. When coupled to a TOF mass spectrometer this soft ionization source has demonstrated signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios from 7 to 730 at 100 pg per injection (depending on the compound), and a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude (100 pg to 100 ng) for some of the test compounds. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Amorphous Molecular Organic Solids for Gas Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; McGrail, B. Peter; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2009-07-06

    We show that molecular organic compounds with large accessible internal cavities, as part of their rigid molecular structure, display exceptional ability for gas storage and separation in the amorphous solid state. This finding suggests for the first time that long-range molecular order is not a prerequisite for organic molecules to be engineered as porous materials

  17. Interferometer-free Fourier-synthesized laser field generator estimated by molecular tunnelling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, H.; Saito, N.

    2017-07-01

    Intense nanosecond four-colour Fourier-synthesized laser fields induce orientation-selective ionization based on directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization. The interferometer-free laser field generator ensures high stability and high reproducibility. Phase-sensitive, orientation-selective molecular tunneling ionization provides a simple way to estimate the relative phase differences between the fundamental light and each harmonic by data-fitting analysis.

  18. Influence of ionization on ultrafast gas-based nonlinear fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Nazarkin, A; Travers, J C; Nold, J; Hölzer, P; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2011-10-10

    We numerically investigate the effect of ionization on ultrashort high-energy pulses propagating in gas-filled kagomé-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers by solving an established uni-directional field equation. We consider the dynamics of two distinct regimes: ionization induced blue-shift and resonant dispersive wave emission in the deep-UV. We illustrate how the system evolves between these regimes and the changing influence of ionization. Finally, we consider the effect of higher ionization stages.

  19. Air ionization as a control technology for off-gas emissions of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Szulejko, Jan E; Kumar, Pawan; Kwon, Eilhann E; Adelodun, Adedeji A; Reddy, Police Anil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    High energy electron-impact ionizers have found applications mainly in industry to reduce off-gas emissions from waste gas streams at low cost and high efficiency because of their ability to oxidize many airborne organic pollutants (e.g., volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) to CO2 and H2O. Applications of air ionizers in indoor air quality management are limited due to poor removal efficiency and production of noxious side products, e.g., ozone (O3). In this paper, we provide a critical evaluation of the pollutant removal performance of air ionizing system through comprehensive review of the literature. In particular, we focus on removal of VOCs and odorants. We also discuss the generation of unwanted air ionization byproducts such as O3, NOx, and VOC oxidation intermediates that limit the use of air-ionizers in indoor air quality management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Observations of extended and counterrotating disks of ionized gas in S0 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Jullien-Dettmar, Marlies; Barteldrees, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    While many E/S0 galaxies have been found to show emission line spectra in their nuclear regions, the question of the presence and nature of extended disks of ionized gas in these galaxies has been addressed only in recent years. Typically the ionized gas is detected in the inner region on a scale of approx. 1 kpc (e.g., Phillips et al. 1986, Caldwell 1984). Here researchers present evidence that the disks of ionized gas of at least some S0 galaxies are much more extended than previously believed. In addition, with the detection of the counterrotation of gas and stars in NGC 7007 they strengthen the basis for arguments that the source of gas in S0 galaxies is external

  1. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cherenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Yodh, G. B.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cherenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nucleon) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cherenkov counter provides an absolute energy distribution for the response of the calorimeter for 5 or = Z 26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cherenkov pulse height was obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cherenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi squared between Monte Carlo simulted data and flight data. Best fit power laws, dN/dE = AE-gamma, were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E (-2.7) are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer. The data from the ionization calorimeter and the gas Cherenkov are thus completely self-consistent.

  2. Structured Molecular Gas Reveals Galactic Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 13CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  3. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  4. The ionization conditions in the Milky Way halo - Infalling gas toward the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Observations of gas in the Milky Way halo are studied with an eye toward the theoretical predictions of the Galactic Fountain model for the production of halo gas. Data are shown that indicate significant variations in the ionization conditions in infalling halo gas in the northern galactic hemisphere. Understanding the nature of Milky Way halo gas plays a critical role in interpreting QSO absorption lines in the investigation of galaxies at high redshift.

  5. The ionization conditions in the Milky Way halo - Infalling gas toward the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Observations of gas in the Milky Way halo are studied with an eye toward the theoretical predictions of the Galactic Fountain model for the production of halo gas. Data are shown that indicate significant variations in the ionization conditions in infalling halo gas in the northern galactic hemisphere. Understanding the nature of Milky Way halo gas plays a critical role in interpreting QSO absorption lines in the investigation of galaxies at high redshift.

  6. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  7. Femtosecond interferometry of propagation of a laminar ionization front in a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gizzi, L. A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Labate, L.; Tomassini, P.; Galimberti, M.; Koester, P.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; De Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.

    2006-09-15

    We use optical interferometry to investigate ultrafast ionization induced by an intense, ultrashort laser pulse propagating in a helium gas. Besides standard phase shift information, our interferograms show a localized region of fringe visibility depletion (FVD) that moves along the laser propagation axis at luminal velocity. We find that such a loss of visibility can be quantitatively explained by the ultrafast change of refractive index due to the field ionization of the gas in the laser pulse width. We demonstrate that by combining the post facto phase shift distribution with the probe pulse transit effect in the ionizing region, the analysis of the observed FVD yields significant information on the ultrafast dynamics of propagation of the ionization front in the gas.

  8. Ionization heating in rare-gas clusters under intense XUV laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas

    2010-07-15

    The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses ({lambda}=32 nm, I=10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with small rare-gas clusters (Ar{sub 147}) is studied by quasiclassical molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis supports a very general picture of the charging and heating dynamics in finite samples under short-wavelength radiation that is of relevance for several applications of free-electron lasers. First, up to a certain photon flux, ionization proceeds as a series of direct photoemission events producing a jellium-like cluster potential and a characteristic plateau in the photoelectron spectrum as observed in Bostedt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133401 (2008)]. Second, beyond the onset of photoelectron trapping, nanoplasma formation leads to evaporative electron emission with a characteristic thermal tail in the electron spectrum. A detailed analysis of this transition is presented. Third, in contrast to the behavior in the infrared or low vacuum ultraviolet range, the nanoplasma energy capture proceeds via ionization heating, i.e., inner photoionization of localized electrons, whereas collisional heating of conduction electrons is negligible up to high laser intensities. A direct consequence of the latter is a surprising evolution of the mean energy of emitted electrons as function of laser intensity.

  9. Measurements of ultrafast laser-driven ionization and extreme gas nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedpour, Sina; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Wahlstrand, Jared; Milchberg, Howard

    2013-10-01

    A 2D spectral interferometry method for measuring high laser field phenomena such as laser-driven ionization and high field nonlinearity is introduced. The method is based on Single-shot Supercontinuum Spectral Interferometry, in which a chirped supercontinuum is used to probe the time-dependent refractive index induced by a pump pulse. A thin gas target ensures uniform intensity and minimizes refraction of the probe beam due to refractive index gradients. An imaging spectrometer allows measurement of the spatial dependence of the response along one direction. To measure in 2D, a motorized mirror scans the probe beam across the spectrometer slit. The technique has 3 micron spatial and 5 fs temporal resolution. The effective interaction length is measured interferometrically, allowing absolute calibration of the refractive index change. We present measurements of the absolute ionization rates of noble and molecular gases and their high field nonlinear response. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Dept. of Energy.

  10. Nonlinear optical response of multiply ionized noble-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar(1, 3), Maryam; Romanov(2, 3), Dmitri; Levis(1, 3), Robert

    2016-05-01

    Calculation of dynamic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of ionized species using ab initio methods presents computational and conceptual difficulties, as these ionized species often have open-shell electronic system. We use multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method with extended basis sets for calculating dynamic polarizability and second-order hyperpolarizabilities of atomic noble gases and their multiply charged cations in non-resonant regime. The calculations were performed at wavelengths ranging from about 100 nm to the red of the first multi-photon resonance all the way toward the static regime. The results were benchmarked to those of CCSD calculations for ions of even-number charge. The second-order hyperpolarizability coefficients were found to decrease when the electrons are progressively removed from the system. At higher ionization states, these coefficients become less dispersive as a function of wavelength. The values and even the signs of the γ (2) coefficients were found to depend on the spin of the ionic quantum state. Thus, for Ne+3 and Ne+4, in low-spin states (2 Pu, and 1 Sg, respectively) the sign of γ (2) is positive, whereas in high-spin states (4 Su, and 3 Pg) the sign is negative. The calculated hyperpolarizabilities of multiply ionized atoms relate to experiments on very bright high-order harmonic generation in multiply ionized plasmas.

  11. [Determination of acetanilide herbicide residues in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques].

    PubMed

    Shen, Weijian; Xu, Jinzhong; Yang, Wenquan; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Ding, Tao; Wu, Bin

    2007-09-01

    An analytical method of solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques was established for simultaneous determination of 12 acetanilide herbicide residues in tea-leaves. Herbicides were extracted from tea-leaf samples with ethyl acetate. The extract was cleaned-up on an active carbon SPE column connected to a Florisil SPE column. Analytical screening was determined by the technique of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with either electron impact ionization (EI) or negative chemical ionization (NCI). It is reliable and stable that the recoveries of all herbicides were in the range from 50% to 110% at three spiked levels, 10 microg/kg, 20 microg/kg and 40 microg/kg, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were no more than 10.9%. The two different ionization techniques are complementary as more ion fragmentation information can be obtained from the EI mode while more molecular ion information from the NCI mode. By comparison of the two techniques, the selectivity of NCI-SIM was much better than that of EI-SIM method. The sensitivities of the both techniques were high, the limit of quantitative (LOQ) for each herbicide was no more than 2.0 microg/kg, and the limit of detection (LOD) with NCI-SIM technique was much lower than that of EI-SIM when analyzing herbicides with several halogen atoms in the molecule.

  12. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  13. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-367-006 (1 May 1991) --- One of the four compressed gas canisters on the forward port side of Discovery's cargo bay releases gas on flight day 4 of the STS-39 mission. The canisters are part of STS-39's Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment.

  14. Gauging Metallicity of Diffuse Gas under an Uncertain Ionizing Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Johnson, Sean D.; Zahedy, Fakhri S.; Rauch, Michael; Mulchaey, John S.

    2017-06-01

    Gas metallicity is a key quantity used to determine the physical conditions of gaseous clouds in a wide range of astronomical environments, including interstellar and intergalactic space. In particular, considerable effort in circumgalactic medium (CGM) studies focuses on metallicity measurements because gas metallicity serves as a critical discriminator for whether the observed heavy ions in the CGM originate in chemically enriched outflows or in more chemically pristine gas accreted from the intergalactic medium. However, because the gas is ionized, a necessary first step in determining CGM metallicity is to constrain the ionization state of the gas which, in addition to gas density, depends on the ultraviolet background radiation field (UVB). While it is generally acknowledged that both the intensity and spectral slope of the UVB are uncertain, the impact of an uncertain spectral slope has not been properly addressed in the literature. This Letter shows that adopting a different spectral slope can result in an order of magnitude difference in the inferred CGM metallicity. Specifically, a harder UVB spectrum leads to a higher estimated gas metallicity for a given set of observed ionic column densities. Therefore, such systematic uncertainties must be folded into the error budget for metallicity estimates of ionized gas. An initial study shows that empirical diagnostics are available for discriminating between hard and soft ionizing spectra. Applying these diagnostics helps reduce the systematic uncertainties in CGM metallicity estimates.

  15. The kinematics of Milky Way halo gas. I - Observations of low-ionization species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet interstellar line day observed with the IUE toward 70 halo stars and four extragalactic sight lines are analyzed in a study of the large-scale kinematic properties of the Milky Way halo gas. The motions of the low-ionization gas is focused on. Large systematic velocities are found, and a pronounced asymmetry in the absorption characteristics of halo gas toward the Galactic poles is indicated. In the north, substantial amounts of material are falling toward the disk at velocities up to about 120 km/s in the most extreme case. Toward the south, low-ionization material shows no extreme or systematic motions.

  16. The kinematics of Milky Way halo gas. I - Observations of low-ionization species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet interstellar line day observed with the IUE toward 70 halo stars and four extragalactic sight lines are analyzed in a study of the large-scale kinematic properties of the Milky Way halo gas. The motions of the low-ionization gas is focused on. Large systematic velocities are found, and a pronounced asymmetry in the absorption characteristics of halo gas toward the Galactic poles is indicated. In the north, substantial amounts of material are falling toward the disk at velocities up to about 120 km/s in the most extreme case. Toward the south, low-ionization material shows no extreme or systematic motions.

  17. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  18. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rondo, L; Ehrhart, S; Kürten, A; Adamov, A; Bianchi, F; Breitenlechner, M; Duplissy, J; Franchin, A; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Dunne, E M; Flagan, R C; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Keskinen, H; Kim, J; Jokinen, T; Lehtipalo, K; Leiminger, M; Praplan, A; Riccobono, F; Rissanen, M P; Sarnela, N; Schobesberger, S; Simon, M; Sipilä, M; Smith, J N; Tomé, A; Tröstl, J; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Vaattovaara, P; Winkler, P M; Williamson, C; Wimmer, D; Baltensperger, U; Kirkby, J; Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Worsnop, D R; Curtius, J

    2016-03-27

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  19. Microplume model of spatial-yield spectra. [applying to electron gas degradation in molecular nitrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Singhal, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic representation for the spatial (radial and longitudinal) yield spectra is developed in terms of a model containing three simple 'microplumes'. The model is applied to electron energy degradation in molecular nitrogen gas for 0.1 to 5 keV incident electrons. From the nature of the cross section input to this model it is expected that the scaled spatial yield spectra for other gases will be quite similar. The model indicates that each excitation, ionization, etc. plume should have its individual spatial and energy dependence. Extensions and aeronomical and radiological applications of the model are discussed.

  20. Molecularly imprinted polymers as analyte sequesters and selective surfaces for easy ambient sonic-spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa; Sanvido, Gustavo Braga; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira

    2010-04-01

    The use of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as a selective surface for ambient mass spectrometry is demonstrated. The MIP is used to sequester target analytes from urine and easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS) is shown to be able to efficiently desorb the analytes from the MIP surface and then transfer them in protonated forms to the gas phase for MS analysis. A set of five phenothiazines (chlorpromazine, perphenazine, triflupromazine, thioridazine and prochlorperazine) were chosen from a proof-of-principle class of drug samples. A chlorpromazine-imprinted methacrylic polymer was synthesized and used to prepare a MIP probe. The MIP-EASI-MS technique using acidified methanol as solvent has been shown to allow quantification of all five drugs in urine with LOQ of ca. 1 micromol L(-1).

  1. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic Stream with Mapped WHAM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Hernandez, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We present early stages of an Hα survey of the Magellanic Stream using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). While the neutral component of the Stream may extend 200° across the sky (Nidever et al. 2010), its ionized gas has not yet been studied in detail. Fox et al. 2014 find that the tidal debris in the Magellanic System contains twice as much ionized gas as neutral and may extend 30° away from the H I emission. However, such absorption-line studies are not sensitive to the overall morphology of the ionized gas. Using targeted Hα emission observations of the Magellanic Stream, Barger et al. 2015 find that although the warm ionized gas tracks the neutral gas, it often spans a few degrees away from the H I emission at slightly offset velocities. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to diffuse emission (~ 10s of mR) and its velocity resolution (12 km/s) to isolate Stream emission, we are now conducting the first full Hα survey of its ionized component. Here we present early results, including spatial and kinematic comparisons to the well-established neutral profile of the Stream. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  2. High resolution gas ionization chamber in proportional mode for low energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Arnold Milenko; Döbeli, Max; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2017-09-01

    The operation of the ETH gas ionization detector as a proportional chamber, where a secondary ionization avalanche is initiated between the Frisch grid and anode, was investigated for ions covering the mass range from H to 127I. By amplifying the detector electron signal through secondary ionization, the limitations due to the sensitivity of the detector electronics are minimized. It could be demonstrated that in the energy range of a few hundreds of keV and below a proportional chamber clearly outperforms a conventionally used gas ionization detector. Protons below 10 keV were measured with a resolution better than 1.4 keV and a good linearity of the particle energy and detector signal was found in the energy range between 50 and 1000 keV. At higher energies almost no difference in resolution for the two operation modes could be found.

  3. PHOTOCHEMICAL HEATING OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Glassgold, A. E.; Najita, J. R.

    2015-09-10

    Photochemical heating is analyzed with an emphasis on the heating generated by chemical reactions initiated by the products of photodissociation and photoionization. The immediate products are slowed down by collisions with the ambient gas and then heat the gas. In addition to this direct process, heating is also produced by the subsequent chemical reactions initiated by these products. Some of this chemical heating comes from the kinetic energy of the reaction products and the rest from collisional de-excitation of the product atoms and molecules. In considering dense gas dominated by molecular hydrogen, we find that the chemical heating is sometimes as large, if not much larger than, the direct heating. In very dense gas, the total photochemical heating approaches 10 eV per photodissociation (or photoionization), competitive with other ways of heating molecular gas.

  4. Prediction of Shock Wave Structure in Weakly Ionized Gas Flow by Solving MGD Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Z. T.; Oviedo-Rojas, Ruben; Chow, Alan; Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the recent research results of shockwave structure predictions using a new developed code. The modified Rankine-Hugoniot relations across a standing normal shock wave are discussed and adopted to obtain jump conditions. Coupling a electrostatic body force to the Burnett equations, the weakly ionized flow field across the shock wave was solved. Results indicated that the Modified Rankine-Hugoniot equations for shock wave are valid for a wide range of ionization fraction. However, this model breaks down with small free stream Mach number and with large ionization fraction. The jump conditions also depend on the value of free stream pressure, temperature and density. The computed shock wave structure with ionization provides results, which indicated that shock wave strength may be reduced by existence of weakly ionized gas.

  5. Theoretical and Experimental Research of Capabilities of MHD Technology to Control Gas Flow with Non-Equilibrium Ionization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    experimental research of capabilities of using of MHD technology to control gas flow with non-equilibrium ionization. Cold gas flows will be considered, where...and MHD generator will be developed. Requirements to ionizer, MHD generator and flow parameters at which self- sustained operational mode of ionizer and...MHD generator is realized will be formulated. Possibilities of using of MHD control in gas-dynamical systems will be considered. Traditional use of

  6. Properties of Diffuse Molecular Gas in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Studies of the interstellar medium in the lower-metallicity Magellanic Clouds explore somewhat different environmental conditions from those typically probed in our own Galactic ISM. Recent studies based on optical/UV spectra of SMC and LMC targets, for example, have revealed unexpected differences in gas-phase abundance patterns {for various atomic and molecular species} and have begun to explore the effects of differences in metallicity on the atomic-to-molecular transition and resulting molecular fraction f{H_2} - a key aspect in the formation of molecular clouds. We propose a more detailed study of the abundances, depletions, and local physical conditions characterizing diffuse molecular material in the Magellanic Clouds, using STIS E140H and E230M spectra of two sight lines with N{H_2} > 10^20 cm^-2 {both probing the outskirts of molecular clouds seen in CO emission}. The two STIS settings will include lines from various neutral and ionized species {with a range in depletion behavior}, several C I multiplets, and several bands of CO and C_2. By probing and characterizing the atomic-to-molecular transition in the Magellanic Clouds, we will address key issues regarding the effects of differences in metallicity on the relationship between the atomic and molecular gas in galaxies; on cloud structure, physical conditions, and diffuse cloud chemistry; and on the composition and properties of interstellar dust. The results of this project should thus aid in the interpretation of observations of atomic and molecular material in more distant low-metallicity systems.

  7. Gas-phase chemiluminescence and chemi-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of chemiluminescence (or more broadly chemi-excitation) and chemi-ionization have major similarities from a fundamental kinetic and dynamic point of view. However, since the former has primarily been investigated using optical spectroscopic techniques and the latter largely by mass spectroscopic (and other gaseous electronic) methods, the two phenomena have apparently never, explicitly been discussed together in one volume. In addition to a number of review articles on each individual subject, several meetings and books have had chemiluminescence and bioluminescence as their theme and those have been dominated by condensed phase work. On the other hand, chemi-ionization is often discussed in the contest of gaseous electronics, plasma chemistry and combustion. It is the goal of this book to present a more unified understanding of the two phenomena.

  8. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  9. The Massive Stellar Population in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    1995-01-01

    We compare Far-UV, H alpha, and optical broadband images of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, to investigate the massive stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas. The H-alpha/FUV ratio is higher in HII regions than in the DIG, possibly indicating that an older population ionizes the DIG. The broad-band colors support this conclusion. The HII region population is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG colors resemble an older population with constant star formation. Our results indicate that there may be enough massive field stars to ionize the DIG, without the need for photon leakage from HII regions.

  10. KINEMATICS IN PARTIALLY IONIZED MOLECULAR CLOUDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TRANSITION TO COHERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Caselli, Paola; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: caselli@mpe.mpg.de

    2015-01-10

    A previous paper by Bailey and Basu shows analysis of density and mass-to-flux ratio maps for simulations with either an ionization profile which takes into account photoionization (step-like profile) or a cosmic ray only ionization profile. We extend this study to analyze the effect of these ionization profiles on velocity structures, kinematics, and synthetic spectra. Clump regions are found to occur at the convergence of two flows with a low velocity region and velocity direction transition occurring at the junction. Models with evident substructure show that core formation occurs on the periphery of these velocity valleys. Analysis of synthetic spectra reveals the presence of large non-thermal components within low-density gas, especially for models with the step-like ionization profile. All cores show small, sub-thermal relative motions compared to background gas. Large deviations within this analysis are due to the line of sight intersecting low- and high-density regions across the velocity switch transition. Positive deviations correspond to a foreground core moving away from the observer while negative deviations correspond to a background core moving toward the observer. Comparison of velocities resulting from different ionization profiles suggest that high ionization fractions yield supersonic velocities, up to two times the sound speed, while regions with low ionization fractions tend to be subsonic or mildly supersonic. This suggests that the transition to coherence within cores could be a transition between high and low ionization fractions within the gas.

  11. Kinematics in Partially Ionized Molecular Clouds: Implications for the Transition to Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu; Caselli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    A previous paper by Bailey & Basu shows analysis of density and mass-to-flux ratio maps for simulations with either an ionization profile which takes into account photoionization (step-like profile) or a cosmic ray only ionization profile. We extend this study to analyze the effect of these ionization profiles on velocity structures, kinematics, and synthetic spectra. Clump regions are found to occur at the convergence of two flows with a low velocity region and velocity direction transition occurring at the junction. Models with evident substructure show that core formation occurs on the periphery of these velocity valleys. Analysis of synthetic spectra reveals the presence of large non-thermal components within low-density gas, especially for models with the step-like ionization profile. All cores show small, sub-thermal relative motions compared to background gas. Large deviations within this analysis are due to the line of sight intersecting low- and high-density regions across the velocity switch transition. Positive deviations correspond to a foreground core moving away from the observer while negative deviations correspond to a background core moving toward the observer. Comparison of velocities resulting from different ionization profiles suggest that high ionization fractions yield supersonic velocities, up to two times the sound speed, while regions with low ionization fractions tend to be subsonic or mildly supersonic. This suggests that the transition to coherence within cores could be a transition between high and low ionization fractions within the gas.

  12. The Contribution of Field OB Stars to the Ionization of the Diffuse Ionized Gas in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, René A. M.

    2000-10-01

    We present a study of the ionizing stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) and H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. We compare our Schmidt Hα image to the far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1520 Å) image from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). The Hα/FUV ratio is higher in H II regions than in the DIG, suggesting an older population of ionizing stars in the DIG. Assuming ionization equilibrium, we convert the Hα flux to the number of Lyman continuum photons NLyc. When compared to models of evolving stellar populations, the NLyc/FUV ratio in H II regions is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG ratio resembles an older burst population, or a steady state population built up by constant star formation, which is probably a more accurate description of the stellar population in the field. The UIT data is complemented with archival FUV and optical images of a small portion of the disk of M33 obtained with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These images overlap low- and mid-luminosity H II regions as well as DIG, so we can investigate the stellar population in these environments. Using the HST FUV and optical photometry, we assign spectral types to the stars observed in DIG and H II regions. The photometry indicates that ionizing stars are present in the DIG. We compare the predicted ionizing flux with the amount required to produce the observed Hα emission, and we find that field OB stars in the HST images can account for 40%+/-12% of the ionization of the DIG, while the stars in H II regions can provide 107%+/-26% of the Hα luminosity of the H II regions. Due to the limited coverage of the HST data, we cannot determine if stars outside the HST fields ionize some of the DIG located in the HST fields, nor can we determine if photons from stars inside the HST fields leak out of the area covered by the HST fields. We do not find any correlation between leakage of ionizing photons and Hα luminosity for the H II regions in our HST

  13. Probing ionization conditions of Galactic halo gas using H-alpha observations of the Magellanic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Kat; Madsen, Gregory J.; Fox, Andrew; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Nidever, David L.; Lehner, Nicolas; Haffner, L. Matthew; Hill, Alex S.

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy interactions have greatly disturbed and redistributed the gas in the Magellanic System throughout the halos of the Milky Way. Using the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM) telescope, we have completed the highest sensitivity and kinematically resolved emission-line survey of the entire Magellanic Stream. These observations enable us to determine how the ionization conditions change over 100-degrees across the sky, including the region below the South Galactic Pole. We explore the sources of that ionization and find that photoionization from the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds is insufficient to explain the observed H-alpha emission. We further investigate whether energetic processes associated with the Milky Way's center or interactions with the halo could provide the remaining ionization. The gas in the Magellanic Steam could supply enough gas to maintain or even boost the star formation in the Milky Way, but only if it can survive the journey to the Galaxy's disk.

  14. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  15. The Townsend coefficient of ionization in atmospheric pressure rare gas plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the work the influence of the processes characteristic for atmospheric pressure heavy inert gases discharge plasma on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient were investigated. Krypton plasma was considered. Calculations have shown that the greatest impact on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient has dissociative recombination of molecular ions, followed by descending influence processes occur: stepwise ionization, the electron-electron collisions and superelastic ones. The effect of these processes begins to appear at concentrations of electrons and excited particles higher than 1012 cm-3. At times shorter than the time of molecular ions formation, when dissociative recombination is absent, should expect a significant increase of the ionization coefficient.

  16. Black hole mass measurements using ionized gas discs: systematic dust effects

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, Maarten

    2008-10-08

    Using detailed Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations in realistic models for galactic nuclei, we investigate the influence of interstellar dust in ionized gas discs on the rotation curves and the resulting black hole mass measurements. We find that absorption and scattering by interstellar dust leaves the shape of the rotation curves basically unaltered, but slightly decreases the central slope of the rotation curves. As a result, the ''observed'' black hole masses are systematically underestimated by some 10 to 20% for realistic optical depths. We therefore argue that the systematic effect of dust attenuation should be taken into account when estimating SMBH masses using ionized gas kinematics.

  17. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    PubMed

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-03

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS.

  18. The Gaia-ESO Survey: dynamics of ionized and neutral gas in the Lagoon nebula (M 8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Bonito, R.; Prisinzano, L.; Zwitter, T.; Bayo, A.; Kalari, V.; Jiménez-Esteban, F. M.; Costado, M. T.; Jofré, P.; Randich, S.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lardo, C.; Morbidelli, L.; Zaggia, S.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: We present a spectroscopic study of the dynamics of the ionized and neutral gas throughout the Lagoon nebula (M 8), using VLT-FLAMES data from the Gaia-ESO Survey. The new data permit exploration of the physical connections between the nebular gas and the stellar population of the associated star cluster NGC 6530. Methods: We characterized through spectral fitting emission lines of Hα, [N II] and [S II] doublets, [O III], and absorption lines of sodium D doublet, using data from the FLAMES-Giraffe and UVES spectrographs, on more than 1000 sightlines toward the entire face of the Lagoon nebula. Gas temperatures are derived from line-width comparisons, densities from the [S II] doublet ratio, and ionization parameter from Hα/[N II] ratio. Although doubly-peaked emission profiles are rarely found, line asymmetries often imply multiple velocity components along the same line of sight. This is especially true for the sodium absorption, and for the [O III] lines. Results: Spatial maps for density and ionization are derived, and compared to other known properties of the nebula and of its massive stars 9 Sgr, Herschel 36 and HD 165052 which are confirmed to provide most of the ionizing flux. The detailed velocity fields across the nebula show several expanding shells, related to the cluster NGC 6530, the O stars 9 Sgr and Herschel 36, and the massive protostar M 8East-IR. The origins of kinematical expansion and ionization of the NGC 6530 shell appear to be different. We are able to put constrains on the line-of-sight (relative or absolute) distances between some of these objects and the molecular cloud. The data show that the large obscuring band running through the middle of the nebula is being compressed by both sides, which might explain its enhanced density. We also find an unexplained large-scale velocity gradient across the entire nebula. At larger distances, the transition from ionized to neutral gas is studied using the sodium lines. Based on observations

  19. Dust and Molecular Gas in the Winds of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Alexander N.

    Galactic winds provide a fundamental mechanism for galaxy evolution. The outflow of material in winds remains the most likely culprit responsible for a host of galaxy observations, plus mounting evidence for galactic winds at times in the past points to their importance in understanding the history of the universe. Therefore, detailed observations of galactic winds are critical to fleshing out the narrative of galaxy evolution. In particular, the dust and molecular gas of a galaxy's interstellar medium (ISM) play crucial roles in the absorption, scattering, and reemission of starlight, the heating of the ISM, and provide critical materials for star formation. We present results from archival Spitzer Space Telescope ata and exceptionally deep Herschel Space Observatory data of the dust and molecular gas found in and around 20 nearby galaxies known to host galactic-scale winds. Selecting nearby galaxies has allowed us the resolution and sensitivity to differentiate dust and molecular gas outside the galaxies and observe their typically faint emission. These are the most detailed surveys currently available of the faint dust and molecular gas components in galactic winds, and we have utilized them to address the following questions: i) What are the location and morphology of dust and molecular gas, and how do these components compare with better known neutral and ionized gas features? ii) How much do dust and molecular gas contribute to the mass and energy of galactic winds? iii) Do the properties of the dust and molecular gas correlate with the properties of the wind-hosting galaxy? Spitzer archival data has revealed kiloparsec-scale polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) structures in the extraplanar regions of nearly all the wind-hosting galaxies we investigated. We found a nearly linear correlation between the extraplanar PAH emission and the total infrared flux, a proxy for star formation. Our results also suggest a correlation between the height of extraplanar

  20. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions with attosecond bichromatic intense XUV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2012-01-01

    Angular distributions of molecular above-threshold ionization (MATI) in bichromatic attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) linear polarization laser pulses have been theoretically investigated. Multiphoton ionization in a prealigned molecular ion H2+ produces clear MATI spectra which show a forward-backward asymmetry in angular and momentum distributions which is critically sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP) φ, the time delay Δτ between the two laser pulses, and the photoelectron kinetic energies Ee. The features of the asymmetry in MATI angular distributions are described well by multiphoton perturbative ionization models. Phase differences of continuum electron wave functions can be extracted from the CEP φ and time delay Δτ dependent ionization asymmetry ratio created by interfering multiphoton ionization pathways. At large internuclear distances MATI angular distributions exhibit more complex features due to laser-induced electron diffraction where continuum electron wavelengths are less than the internuclear distance.

  1. An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jong, Edmund C; Macek, Paul V; Perera, Inoka E; Luxbacher, Kray D; McNair, Harold M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely used as a tracer gas because of its detectability at low concentrations. This attribute of SF6 allows the quantification of both small-scale flows, such as leakage, and large-scale flows, such as atmospheric currents. SF6's high detection sensitivity also facilitates greater usage efficiency and lower operating cost for tracer deployments by reducing quantity requirements. The detectability of SF6 is produced by its high molecular electronegativity. This property provides a high potential for negative ion formation through electron capture thus naturally translating to selective detection using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS). This paper investigates the potential of using gas chromatography (GC) with NCI-MS for the detection of SF6. The experimental parameters for an ultra-trace SF6 detection method utilizing minimal customizations of the analytical instrument are detailed. A method for the detection of parts per trillion (ppt) level concentrations of SF6 for the purpose of underground ventilation tracer gas analysis was successfully developed in this study. The method utilized a Shimadzu gas chromatography with negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry system equipped with an Agilent J&W HP-porous layer open tubular column coated with an alumina oxide (Al2O3) S column. The method detection limit (MDL) analysis as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency of the tracer data showed the method MDL to be 5.2 ppt.

  2. The highly ionized, high-velocity gas in NGC 6231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Derck

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that clusters of massive stars are influenced by the presence of strong winds, that they are sources of diffuse X-rays from shocked gas, and that this gas can be vented into the surrounding region or the halo through the champagne effect. However, the details of how these different environments interact and evolve are far from complete. This paper attributes the broad C IVλλ1500 absorption features (extending to -1900 km s-1) that are seen in the spectra of main sequence B stars in NGC 6231 to gas in the cluster environment and not the B stars themselves. It is shown that the presence of a WC star, WR 79, in the cluster makes this gas detectable because its wind enriches the cluster gas with carbon. Given the available data, it is not clear whether the absorbing gas is simply the far wind of WR 79 or a collective cluster wind enriched by carbon from the wind of WR 79. If it is simply due to the wind, then this wind must flow, unimpeded for more than 2 pc, suggesting that the inner region of the cluster is nearly devoid of obstructing material. If it is actually a collective wind from the cluster, then we could be witnessing an important stage of galactic feedback. In either case, the observations provide a unique and significant piece to the puzzle of how massive, open clusters evolve.

  3. Study of the surface ionization detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Wu, Dapeng; Chen, Shiheng; Peng, Hong; Guan, Yafeng

    2011-09-23

    The structure of the surface ionization detector (SID) and the operation parameters of GC-SID were investigated to reduce peak tailing and to enhance sensitivity. The performances of the GC-SID, including its repeatability, linearity, sensitivity, selectivity, and tolerance towards water vapor, were evaluated systematically. Compared with nitrogen-phosphorus detector (NPD), the SID was able to detect fg level triethylamine, and selectively respond to alkylamines, some anilines, and some nitrogen heterocyclic compounds. Among alkylamines, the SID sensitivity to diisobutylamine was rather small. Even so, it was also still 10 times higher than that on NPD. The SID selectivity, defined as the sensitivity ratio between triethylamine and various tested non-nitrogen compounds, was higher than 10(6). It was found that the SID is highly tolerant towards water vapor, allowing direct injection of water sample. Finally, the GC-SID was applied to directly measure trace amines in headspace gases of rotted meat and trace simazine in tap water. The SID sensitivity to simazine was proven to be 5 times higher than that on flame ionization detector (FID). This study suggests that the SID is a promising GC detector. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Delivering Transmembrane Peptide Complexes to the Gas Phase Using Nanodiscs and Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2017-07-01

    The gas-phase conformations of dimers of the channel-forming membrane peptide gramicidin A (GA), produced from isobutanol or aqueous solutions of GA-containing nanodiscs (NDs), are investigated using electrospray ionization-ion mobility separation-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The IMS arrival times measured for (2GA + 2Na)2+ ions from isobutanol reveal three different conformations, with collision cross-sections (Ω) of 683 Å2 (conformation 1, C1), 708 Å2 (C2), and 737 Å2 (C3). The addition of NH4CH3CO2 produced (2GA + 2Na)2+ and (2GA + H + Na)2+ ions, with Ω similar to those of C1, C2, and C3, as well as (2GA + 2H)2+, (2GA + 2NH4)2+, and (2GA + H + NH4)2+ ions, which adopt a single conformation with a Ω similar to that of C2. These results suggest that the nature of the charging agents, imparted by the ESI process, can influence dimer conformation in the gas phase. Notably, the POPC NDs produced exclusively (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions; the DMPC NDs produced both (2GA + 2H)2+ and (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions. While the Ω of (2GA + 2H)2+ is similar to that of C2, the (2GA + 2NH4)2+ ions from NDs adopt a more compact structure, with a Ω of 656 Å2. It is proposed that this compact structure corresponds to the ion conducting single stranded head-to-head helical GA dimer. These findings highlight the potential of NDs, combined with ESI, for transferring transmembrane peptide complexes directly from lipid bilayers to the gas phase.

  5. Delivering Transmembrane Peptide Complexes to the Gas Phase Using Nanodiscs and Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2017-10-01

    The gas-phase conformations of dimers of the channel-forming membrane peptide gramicidin A (GA), produced from isobutanol or aqueous solutions of GA-containing nanodiscs (NDs), are investigated using electrospray ionization-ion mobility separation-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The IMS arrival times measured for (2GA + 2Na)2+ ions from isobutanol reveal three different conformations, with collision cross-sections (Ω) of 683 Å2 (conformation 1, C1), 708 Å2 (C2), and 737 Å2 (C3). The addition of NH4CH3CO2 produced (2GA + 2Na)2+ and (2GA + H + Na)2+ ions, with Ω similar to those of C1, C2, and C3, as well as (2GA + 2H)2+, (2GA + 2NH4)2+, and (2GA + H + NH4)2+ ions, which adopt a single conformation with a Ω similar to that of C2. These results suggest that the nature of the charging agents, imparted by the ESI process, can influence dimer conformation in the gas phase. Notably, the POPC NDs produced exclusively (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions; the DMPC NDs produced both (2GA + 2H)2+ and (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions. While the Ω of (2GA + 2H)2+ is similar to that of C2, the (2GA + 2NH4)2+ ions from NDs adopt a more compact structure, with a Ω of 656 Å2. It is proposed that this compact structure corresponds to the ion conducting single stranded head-to-head helical GA dimer. These findings highlight the potential of NDs, combined with ESI, for transferring transmembrane peptide complexes directly from lipid bilayers to the gas phase. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cerenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.; Yodh, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cerenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nuc) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cerenkov counter provides an absolute energy calibration for the response of the calorimeter for the Z range of 5-26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cerenkov pulse height has been obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cerenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi-squared between a Monte Carlo simulated data and flight data. Best fit power laws were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E exp-2.7, are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer.

  7. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Gas Ionization by Short Intense Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre; Bruhwiler, David; Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Catravas, Palma; Toth, Csaba; Shadwick, Brad; Cary, John; Giacone, Rodolfo; Verboncoeur, John; Mardahl, Peter

    2001-10-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can generate accelerating gradients orders of magnitude larger than those obtained in conventional metal structures. In many LWFA experiments, the leading edge of the short, intense laser pulse completely ionizes a background neutral gas. An important question is the effect of laser ionization on the evolution of the laser pulse. Dispersive effects can modify the length and shape of the pulse as it propagates through the gas/plasma. Pulse steepening or break-up can affect the growth of the plasma wake. We will present particle-in-cell simulations using the ADK [M.V. Ammosov et al., Sov. Phys. JETP 64, p. 1191 (1986)] tunneling ionization model in the XOOPIC [J.P. Verboncoeur et al., J. Comp. Phys. 104, p. 321 (1993)] code. These simulations will be compared with experimental LWFA results from the l'OASIS laboratory of LBNL [W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, p. 2510 (2001)].

  8. Formation and Fragmentation of Protonated Molecules after Ionization of Amino Acid and Lactic Acid Clusters by Collision with Ions in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Poully, Jean-Christophe; Vizcaino, Violaine; Schwob, Lucas; Delaunay, Rudy; Kocisek, Jaroslav; Eden, Samuel; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Méry, Alain; Rangama, Jimmy; Adoui, Lamri; Huber, Bernd

    2015-08-03

    Collisions between O(3+) ions and neutral clusters of amino acids (alanine, valine and glycine) as well as lactic acid are performed in the gas phase, in order to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on these biologically relevant molecular systems. All monomers and dimers are found to be predominantly protonated, and ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on model systems indicate that for amino acids, this is due to proton transfer within the clusters after ionization. For lactic acid, which has a lower proton affinity than amino acids, a significant non-negligible amount of the radical cation monomer is observed. New fragment-ion channels observed from clusters, as opposed to isolated molecules, are assigned to the statistical dissociation of protonated molecules formed upon ionization of the clusters. These new dissociation channels exhibit strong delayed fragmentation on the microsecond time scale, especially after multiple ionization. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations. PMID:25975362

  10. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations.

  11. Limitations of a residual gas ionization beam profile monitor for the SSC Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Tsyganov, E.; Zinchenko, A.

    1992-11-01

    A residual gas ionization beam profile monitor for the superconducting Super Collider is considered in detail using the Monte Carlo simulation code. It is shown that a good spatial resolution could be obtained using a combination of strong electrical and magnetic fields.

  12. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  15. Kinematics of the ionized gas in the Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Gutiérrez, M.; Rosado, M.; Georgiev, L.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.

    2001-01-01

    We present Hα and [S Ii] observations for the Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613 using the PUMA scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. Our goal is to analyze the kinematics of the ionized gas in the complex sample of superbubbles located in the whole extension of our field (10\\arcmin ), which includes most of the optical emission of this galaxy, and to study the inter-relationship between young stellar associations and nebulae based on a previous study that we have made on the stellar associations of the central region of this galaxy. The ionized gas in this galaxy is distributed in classical H Ii regions and in a series of superbubbles (also called giant shells) covering a large fraction of the optical extent of the galaxy. We present a catalog of kinematical properties of both the H Ii regions of this galaxy and the superbubbles. We have also compared the kinematics of the ionized gas in H Ii regions to search for possible dynamic differences between neutral and ionized gas.

  16. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  17. Properties of the highly ionized disk and halo gas toward two distant high-latitude stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) intermediate -resolution observations of S III, Si III, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption along the sight lines to HD 18100 (l = 217.9 deg, b = -62.7, d = 3.1 kpc, z = -2.8 kpc) and HD 100340 (l = 258.9 deg, b = +61.2 deg, d = 5.3 kpc, z = 4.6 kpc) are presented. These small science aperture spectra have resolutions ranging from 11 to 20 km/s full width at half maximum (FWHM) and S/N from 30 to 65 per diode substep. Strong absorption by moderately and highly ionized gas is seen in each direction. The absorption in the direction of the south Galactic polar region (HD 18100) is kinematically simple, while the absorption in the direction of north Galactic polar region (HD 100304) is kinematically complex. In each case the absorption by the highly ionized gas lies within the velocity range of absorption by neutral and weakly ionized gas. Along each sight line, the velocity dispersion determined from the unsaturated absorption lines increases with the energy required to create each ion. The logarithmic column densities for Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V are log N(atoms/sq cm = 12.71, 13.10, 13.58, and 12.75 toward HD 18100 and log N = 12.88, 13.31, 13.83, and 13.04 toward HD 100340. Average ionic ratios among these species are very similar along the two sight lines. Differences in profile shape between the absorption for AL II, Si IV, C IV, and N V provide additional support for the claim of Savage, Sembach, & Cardelli (1994) that there exists two types of highly ionized gas in the interstellar medium. One type of highly ionized gas is responsible for the structured Si IV absorption and part of the C IV absorption. In this gas N(C IV)/N(Si IV) approximately 3.0 and N(C IV)/N(N V) greater than 6. The absorption by this gas seems to be associated with some type of self-regulating interface or mixing layer between the warm and hot interstellar medium. The other type of highly ionized gas is responsible for most of the N V

  18. Miniaturized ionization gas sensors from single metal oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Prades, Juan Daniel; Hackner, Angelika; Fischer, Thomas; Mueller, Gerhard; Mathur, Sanjay; Morante, Joan Ramon

    2011-02-01

    Gas detection experiments were performed with individual tin dioxide (SnO2) nanowires specifically configured to observe surface ion (SI) emission response towards representative analyte species. These devices were found to work at much lower temperatures (T≈280 °C) and bias voltages (V≈2 V) than their micro-counterparts, thereby demonstrating the inherent potential of individual nanostructures in building functional nanodevices. High selectivity of our miniaturized sensors emerges from the dissimilar sensing mechanisms of those typical of standard resistive-type sensors (RES). Therefore, by employing this detection principle (SI) together with RES measurements, better selectivity than that observed in standard metal oxide sensors could be demonstrated. Simplicity and specificity of the gas detection as well as low-power consumption make these single nanowire devices promising technological alternatives to overcome the major drawbacks of solid-state sensor technologies.

  19. Dust and ionized gas in active radio elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, D. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present broad and narrow bandwidth imaging of three southern elliptical galaxies which have flat-spectrum active radio cores (NGC 1052, IC 1459 and NGC 6958). All three contain dust and extended low excitation optical line emission, particularly extensive in the case of NGC 1052 which has a large H alpha + (NII) luminosity. Both NGC 1052 and IC 1459 have a spiral morphology in emission-line images. All three display independent strong evidence that a merger or infall event has recently occurred, i.e., extensive and infalling HI gas in NGC 1052, a counter-rotating core in IC 1459 and Malin-Carter shells in NGC 6958. This infall event is the most likely origin for the emission-line gas and dust, and the authors are currently investigating possible excitation mechanisms (Sparks et al. 1990).

  20. Positron Impact Ionization in Noble Gas Atoms and Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, J. P.

    2005-05-01

    Results are presented for absolute positronium formation and direct ionization by positron impact on Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, CO and O2 at energies from threshold up to 90 eV. The experiments use a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam and exploit the properties of positron orbits in a magnetic field [1]. Results for the noble gases are compared with theoretical predictions and with measurements obtained using a significantly different method [2]. Results for diatomic molecules are compared to other available measurements and theoretical calculations where available. There is generally good agreement between the experimental measurements, providing an important benchmark for theoretical calculations. Intriguing features in Ar and O2 will be discussed. [1] J.P. Sullivan, S.J. Gilbert, J.P. Marler, R.G. Greaves, S.J. Buckman and C.M. Surko., Phys. Rev. A. 66, 042708 (2002) [2] J.P. Marler, J.P. Sullivan and C.M. Surko, Phys. Rev. A (2005), in press.

  1. Chirp control of multi-photon resonance ionization and charge-resonance enhanced ionization on molecular harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hang; Li, Wenliang; Feng, Liqiang

    2017-05-01

    The effects of the multi-photon resonance ionization (MPRI) and the charge-resonance enhanced ionization (CREI) on the molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHHG) from H2+ have been investigated by using the chirped pulses. It is found that the MHHG only comes from the MPRI in the shorter pulse duration. As the pulse duration increases, both the MPRI and the CREI contribute to the MHHG. But the MPRI plays the main role in the generations of the above-threshold harmonics and the CREI mainly contributes to the below-threshold harmonics. With the introductions of the up-chirped and the down-chirped pulses, the contributions of the MHHG from the CREI and the MPRI can be enhanced, respectively. Finally, the isotopic investigation (e.g. T2+) shows that due to the slower nuclear motion of the heavy nuclei, the contributions of MHHG from the CERI can be suppressed in the heavy nuclei.

  2. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  3. Ionization of H_2 by X-Rays in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notani, Masahiro; Oka, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies of the Galactic center using the infrared spectrum of H_3^+ have revealed a high ionization rate of H_2 on the order of ζ ˜ 3×10^{-15} s^{-1} in wide regions of the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), a region with a radius of ˜ 150 pc at the Galactic center. So far we have ascribed this ionization rate, which is an order of magnitude higher than in the Galactic disk, to cosmic rays because of a high density of supernova remnants in the CMZ. In view of the abundant intense X-ray sources from 1 keV to several 10 keV in the region, however, there may be a significant ionization by X-rays also. We estimate the ionization rate due to X-rays based on the large scale ART-P X-ray map of the Galactic center region. The calculations proceed in two steps. First we allow for the attenuation of the observed X-rays by the foreground gas to obtain the original intensities of the X-ray sources. We then use the corrected X-ray flux to calculate ionization rates of H_2 in the CMZ. The calculation is also related to the heating of the gas by X-rays. Discussion of the details of calculations and the results will be presented. Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., and McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632 882 Geballe, T. R., and Oka, T. 2010, ApJ, 709 L70. Pavlinskii, M. N., Grebenev, S. A., and Syunyaev, R. A. 1992, Sov. Astron. Lett., 18 116. Morrison, R. and McCammon, D. 1983, ApJ, 270 119.

  4. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  5. Stellar and ionized gas kinematics of the interacting Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, B.; Arribas, S.; Mediavilla, E.

    2001-11-01

    Integral field spectroscopy in the central 16''x 12'' (2.4 kpc x 1.8 kpc, if H0 = 75 km s-1 Mpc-1) of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992 has been obtained using the fibre system INTEGRAL. The data are mainly used to study the stellar and ionized gas kinematics. In spite of the photometric disruptions in the outer parts (r > 6 kpc) produced by the interaction with its close companion (NGC 2993), the present stellar velocity field shows regular rotation. The ionized gas presents several kinematically distinct components. Apart from the outflowing component already reported by other authors, we found an additional (high ionization) kinematic component which seems to be associated with the boundaries of the figure-of-eight-shaped emission detected in the 6 cm radio map. We locate the hidden nucleus in the apex of the biconical structure defined by the [O iii] emission, coincident with the outflow origin and with the center of the dust lane. We do not find any clear evidence of direct influence of the interaction in the kinematics of the stars or the ionized gas in the circumnuclear region of NGC 2992.

  6. Kinematics and ionization of extended gas in active galaxies. III. The extranuclear properties of NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.A.; Wilson, A.S.; Whittle, M.

    1987-08-01

    The kinematic and ionization structure of the extranuclear gas of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 has been investigated using a grid of 28 high- and seven low-dispersion long-slit spectra. The velocity field of most of the gas more than 15 arcsec from the nucleus is well described by a rotating disk with an approximately flat rotation curve. The kinematic line of nodes coincides with the major axis of the outermost continuum light, and the disk inclination derived from the axial ratio of the outer isophotes and the kinematic fit are broadly consistent. The progressive change of the position angle of the major axes of the brighter isophotes are evidently due to a superposition of oval or barlike distortions in the galactic plane. The observed ionization structure of the gas can be understood as a mixture of two disk components projected on top of each other. Much of the ionization pattern in the other disk may result from partial beaming of the ionizing continuum radiation as it escapes from the nucleus. 60 references.

  7. Hose Instability and Wake Generation By An Intense Electron Beam in a Self-Ionized Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Barnes, C.D.; Clayton, C.E.; O'Connell, C.; Decker, F.J.; Fonseca, R.A.; Huang, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Krejcik, P.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; Tsung, F.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /Southern California U. /UCLA /SLAC

    2006-04-12

    The propagation of an intense relativistic electron beam through a gas that is self-ionized by the beam's space charge and wakefields is examined analytically and with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Instability arises from the coupling between a beam and the offset plasma channel it creates when it is perturbed. The traditional electron hose instability in a preformed plasma is replaced with this slower growth instability depending on the radius of the ionization channel compared to the electron blowout radius. A new regime for hose stable plasma wakefield acceleration is suggested.

  8. IONIZED GAS IN THE FIRST 10 kpc OF THE INTERSTELLAR GALACTIC HALO: METAL ION FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Howk, J. Christopher; Consiglio, S. Michelle E-mail: smconsiglio@ucla.edu

    2012-11-10

    We present direct measures of the ionization fractions of several sulfur ions in the Galactic warm ionized medium (WIM). We obtained high-resolution ultraviolet absorption-line spectroscopy of post-asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular clusters Messier 3 [(l, b) = (42.{sup 0}2, +78.{sup 0}7), d = 10.2 kpc, and z = 10.0 kpc] and Messier 5 [(l, b) = (3.{sup 0}9, +46.{sup 0}8), d = 7.5 kpc, and z = +5.3 kpc] with the Hubble Space Telescope and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer to measure, or place limits on, the column densities of S I, S II, S III, S IV, S VI, and H I. These clusters also house millisecond pulsars, whose dispersion measures give an electron column density from which we infer the H II column in these directions. We find fractions of S{sup +2} in the WIM for the M 3 and M 5 sight lines x(S{sup +2}) {identical_to} N(S{sup +2})/N(S) = 0.33 {+-} 0.07 and 0.47 {+-} 0.09, respectively, with variations perhaps related to location. With negligible quantities of the higher ionization states, we conclude that S{sup +} and S{sup +2} account for all of the S in the WIM. We extend the methodology to study the ion fractions in the warm and hot ionized gas of the Milky Way, including the high ions Si{sup +3}, C{sup +3}, N{sup +4}, and O{sup +5}. The vast majority of the Galactic ionized gas is warm (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K) and photoionized (the WIM) or very hot (T > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) and collisionally ionized. The common tracer of ionized gas beyond the Milky Way, O{sup +5}, traces <1% of the total ionized gas mass of the Milky Way.

  9. Strong Field Molecular Ionization in the Impulsive Limit: Freezing Vibrations with Short Pulses.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Péter; Tagliamonti, Vincent; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-02-12

    We study strong-field molecular ionization as a function of pulse duration. Experimental measurements of the photoelectron yield for a number of molecules reveal competition between different ionization continua (cationic states) which depends strongly on pulse duration. Surprisingly, in the limit of short pulse duration, we find that a single ionic continuum dominates the yield, whereas multiple continua are produced for longer pulses. Using calculations which take vibrational dynamics into account, we interpret our results in terms of nuclear motion and nonadiabatic dynamics during the ionization process.

  10. The cage fragmentation of doubly ionized norbornane: A Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippenberg, S.; Hajgató, B.

    2013-10-01

    Results are reported of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics calculations performed on the singlet dication of norbornane, starting from the neutral ground state geometry. Intramolecular rearrangements and charge dissociation processes, which probably take place in the innermost valence ionization spectrum, are discussed and an analysis by means of natural bond orders and Wiberg bond indices has been performed. The outcome of these simulations and the observed cage fragmentation might explain a tremendous rise of electron-impact (e, 2e) ionization cross sections of norbornane at electron binding energies around the double-ionization threshold.

  11. Molecular gas in the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieten, Ch.; Neininger, N.; Guélin, M.; Ungerechts, H.; Lucas, R.; Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Beck, R.; Wielebinski, R.

    2006-07-01

    Aims.We study the distribution of the molecular gas in the Andromeda galaxy (M 31) and compare this with the distributions of the atomic gas and the emission from cold dust at λ 175 μm.Methods.We obtained a new 12CO(J = 1-0)-line survey of the Andromeda galaxy with the highest resolution to date (23 arcsec, or 85 pc along the major axis), observed On-the-Fly with the IRAM 30-m telescope. We fully sampled an area of 2°× 0.5 ° with a velocity resolution of 2.6{ km s-1}. In several selected regions we also observed the 12CO(2-1)-line.Results.Emission from the 12CO(1-0) line was detected from galactocentric radius R=3 kpc to R=16 kpc with a maximum in intensity at R˜ 10 kpc. The molecular gas traced by the (velocity-integrated) (1-0)-line intensity is concentrated in narrow arm-like filaments, which often coincide with the dark dust lanes visible at optical wavelengths. Between R=4 kpc and R=12 kpc the brightest CO filaments define a two-armed spiral pattern that is described well by two logarithmic spirals with a pitch angle of 7°-8°. The arm-interarm brightness ratio averaged over a length of 15 kpc along the western arms reaches about 20 compared to 4 for H I at an angular resolution of 45 arcsec. For a constant conversion factor X_CO, the molecular fraction of the neutral gas is enhanced in the spiral arms and decreases radially from 0.6 on the inner arms to 0.3 on the arms at R≃ 10 kpc. The apparent gas-to-dust ratios N(H I)/I175 and (N(H I)+2N(H_2))/I175 increase by a factor of 20 between the centre and R≃ 14{ kpc}, whereas the ratio 2N(H_2)/I175 only increases by a factor of 4.Conclusions.Either the atomic and total gas-to-dust ratios increase by a factor of 20 or the dust becomes colder towards larger radii. A strong variation of X_CO with radius seems unlikely. The observed gradients affect the cross-correlations between gas and dust. In the radial range R=8-14 kpc total gas and cold dust are well correlated; molecular gas correlates better with

  12. Molecular gas associated with IRAS 10361-5830

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Rubio, M.; Romero, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas and dust in the molecular clump linked to IRAS 10361-5830, located in the environs of the bubble-shaped Hii region Gum 31 in the Carina region, with the aim of determining the main parameters of the associated material and of investigating the evolutionary state of the young stellar objects identified there. Methods: Using the APEX telescope, we mapped the molecular emission in the J = 3-2 transition of three CO isotopologues, 12CO, 13CO and C18O, over a 1.´5 × 1.´5 region around the IRAS position. We also observed the high-density tracers CS and HCO+ toward the source. The cold- dust distribution was analyzed using submillimeter continuum data at 870 μm obtained with the APEX telescope. Complementary IR and radio data at different wavelengths were used to complete the study of the interstellar medium. Results: The molecular gas distribution reveals a cavity and a shell-like structure of ~0.32 pc in radius centered at the position of the IRAS source, with some young stellar objects projected onto the cavity. The total molecular mass in the shell and the mean H2volume density are ~40 M⊙ and ~(1-2) × 103 cm-3. The cold-dust counterpart of the molecular shell has been detected in the far-IR at 870 μm and in Herschel data at 350 μm. Weak extended emission at 24 μm from warm dust is projected onto the cavity, as well as weak radio continuum emission. Conclusions: A comparison of the distribution of cold and warm dust, and molecular and ionized gas allows us to conclude that a compact Hii region has developed in the molecular clump, indicating that this is an area of recent massive star formation. Probable exciting sources capable of creating the compact Hii region are investigated. The 2MASS source 10380461-5846233 (MSX G286.3773-00.2563) seems to be responsible for the formation of the Hii region. FITS files with datacubes corresponding to 12CO, 13CO, C180 maps are only available at the CDS via anonymous

  13. Characterization of molecular recognition in gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-08-01

    Molecular recognition is an important topic when searching for new, selective coating materials for chemical sensing. Recently, the general idea of molecular recognition in the gas phase was challenged by Grate et al. However, in earlier thickness-shear mode resonator (TSMR) investigations, convincing evidence was presented for specific recognition of particular analyte target molecules. In this study, the authors systematically investigated coatings previously shown to be highly selective, such as the bucket-like cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for the specific detection of the bases pyridine and DMMP (dimethylmethylphosphonate), and phthalocyanines to specifically detect benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX).

  14. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Steinkamp, F Lucus; Giordano, Braden C

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane (i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane ( i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  16. The molecular gas mass of M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Schuster, K.; Rosolowsky, E.; Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Combes, F.; Kramer, C.; Henkel, C.; Herpin, F.; Israel, F.; Koribalski, B. S.; Mookerjea, B.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Röllig, M.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van der Werf, P.; Wiedner, M.

    2017-03-01

    Do some environments favor efficient conversion of molecular gas into stars? To answer this, we need to be able to estimate the H2 mass. Traditionally, this is done using CO observations and a few assumptions but the Herschel observations which cover the far-IR dust spectrum make it possible to estimate the molecular gas mass independently of CO and thus to investigate whether and how the CO traces H2. Previous attempts to derive gas masses from dust emission suffered from biases. Generally, dust surface densities, H i column densities, and CO intensities are used to derive a gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) and the local CO intensity to H2 column density ratio (XCO), sometimes allowing for an additional CO-dark gas component (Kdark). We tested earlier methods, revealing degeneracies among the parameters, and then used a sophisticated Bayesian formalism to derive the most likely values for each of the parameters mentioned above as a function of position in the nearby prototypical low metallicity (12 + log (O/H) 8.4) spiral galaxy M 33. The data are from the IRAM Large Program mapping in the CO(2-1) line along with high-resolution H i and Herschel dust continuum observations. Solving for GDR, XCO, and Kdark in macropixels 500 pc in size, each containing many individual measurements of the CO, H i, and dust emission, we find that (i) allowing for CO dark gas (Kdark) significantly improves fits; (ii) Kdark decreases with galactocentric distance; (iii) GDR is slightly higher than initially expected and increases with galactocentric distance; (iv) the total amount of dark gas closely follows the radially decreasing CO emission, as might be expected if the dark gas is H2 where CO is photodissociated. The total amount of H2, including dark gas, yields an average XCO of twice the galactic value of 2 × 1020 cm-2/ K km s-1, with about 55% of this traced directly through CO. The rather constant fraction of dark gas suggests that there is no large population of diffuse H2 clouds

  17. Molecular Gas in Elliptical Galaxies: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, Joanna F.; Knapp, G. R.; Rupen, Michael P.; Phillips, T. G.

    1992-09-01

    In the paper "Molecular Gas in Elliptical Galaxies" by Joanna F. Lees, G. R. Knapp, Michael P. Rupen, and T. G. Phillips (ApJ, 379,177 [1991]), an error appeared on page 208. Two numbers which were quoted from Young and Knezek (1989) were inadvertently not converted from their CO-H_2_ conversion factor to ours (a difference of 40%). Page 208, column (1), lines 6-7 should read:

  18. INTEGRAL Field Spectroscopy of the Extended Ionized Gas in Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colina, Luis; Arribas, Santiago; Clements, David

    2004-02-01

    Integral field optical spectroscopy with the INTEGRAL system has been used to investigate for the first time the two-dimensional kinematic and ionization properties of the extended, warm, ionized gas in Arp 220 over an area of 75.0"×40.0" (i.e., 28×15 kpc). The structure of the ionized gas is divided into well-identified regions associated with the X-ray-emitting plumes and extended lobes, previously studied in detail by McDowell and collaborators. The overall ionization state of the warm gas in the plumes and lobes, as traced by the [N II]/Hα line, is consistent with high-velocity shocks expanding in a neutral ambient medium. Changes in the ionization state of the gas along the major axis of the plumes are detected, in particular in the outer regions of the northwestern plume, where the transition between the main stellar body of the galaxy and a broad, low surface brightness tidal tail is located. If the plumes are produced by a starburst-driven galactic wind, the efficiency in the conversion of mechanical to radiation energy is a factor of at least 10 smaller than in galactic winds developed in edge-on spiral galaxies with well-defined rotation and axis of outflow. The kinematic properties of the lobes, with an average velocity of +8 km s-1 (east lobe) and -79 km s-1 (west lobe), are to a first order in agreement with the predictions of the merger scenario, according to which the lobes are tidally induced gas condensations produced during the merging process. The largest velocity gradients of 50 km s-1 kpc-1 and velocity deviations of up to +280 and -320 km s-1 from the systemic velocity are associated not with the plumes but with the outer stellar envelope and broad tidal tails at distances of up to 7.5 kpc, indicating that the large-scale kinematics of the extended ionized gas in Arp 220 is most likely dominated by the tidally induced motions, and not by galactic winds associated with nuclear starbursts. Based on observations with the William Herschel

  19. In-gas-cell laser ionization studies of plutonium isotopes at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjalainen, I.; Moore, I. D.; Kron, T.; Raeder, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Tomita, H.; Trautmann, N.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    In-gas-cell resonance laser ionization has been performed on long-lived isotopes of Pu at the IGISOL facility, Jyväskylä. This initiates a new programme of research towards high-resolution optical spectroscopy of heavy actinide elements which can be produced in sufficient quantities at research reactors and transported to facilities elsewhere. In this work a new gas cell has been constructed for fast extraction of laser-ionized elements. Samples of 238-240,242Pu and 244Pu have been evaporated from Ta filaments, laser ionized, mass separated and delivered to the collinear laser spectroscopy station. Here we report on the performance of the gas cell through studies of the mass spectra obtained in helium and argon, before and after the radiofrequency quadrupole cooler-buncher. This provides valuable insight into the gas phase chemistry exhibited by Pu, which has been additionally supported by measurements of ion time profiles. The resulting monoatomic yields are sufficient for collinear laser spectroscopy. A gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis of the Pu samples shows a good agreement with the assay provided by the Mainz Nuclear Chemistry department.

  20. Generation of naphthoquinone radical anions by electrospray ionization: solution, gas-phase, and computational chemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Vessecchi, Ricardo; Naal, Zeki; Lopes, José N C; Galembeck, Sérgio E; Lopes, Norberto P

    2011-06-02

    Radical anions are present in several chemical processes, and understanding the reactivity of these species may be described by their thermodynamic properties. Over the last years, the formation of radical ions in the gas phase has been an important issue concerning electrospray ionization mass spectrometry studies. In this work, we report on the generation of radical anions of quinonoid compounds (Q) by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The balance between radical anion formation and the deprotonated molecule is also analyzed by influence of the experimental parameters (gas-phase acidity, electron affinity, and reduction potential) and solvent system employed. The gas-phase parameters for formation of radical species and deprotonated species were achieved on the basis of computational thermochemistry. The solution effects on the formation of radical anion (Q(•-)) and dianion (Q(2-)) were evaluated on the basis of cyclic voltammetry analysis and the reduction potentials compared with calculated electron affinities. The occurrence of unexpected ions [Q+15](-) was described as being a reaction between the solvent system and the radical anion, Q(•-). The gas-phase chemistry of the electrosprayed radical anions was obtained by collisional-induced dissociation and compared to the relative energy calculations. These results are important for understanding the formation and reactivity of radical anions and to establish their correlation with the reducing properties by electrospray ionization analyses.

  1. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  2. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  3. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  4. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  5. Chemical Abundances and Properties of the Ionized Gas in NGC 1705

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annibali, F.; Tosi, M.; Pasquali, A.; Aloisi, A.; Mignoli, M.; Romano, D.

    2015-11-01

    We obtained [O iii] narrow-band imaging and multi-slit MXU spectroscopy of the blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy NGC 1705 with FORS2@VLT to derive chemical abundances of planetary nebulae and H ii regions and, more in general, to characterize the properties of the ionized gas. The auroral [O iii]λ 4363 line was detected in all but 1 of the 11 analyzed regions, allowing for a direct estimate of their electron temperature. The only object for which the [O iii]λ 4363 line was not detected is a possible low-ionization PN, the only one detected in our data. For all the other regions, we derived the abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon out to ˜1 kpc from the galaxy center. We detect for the first time in NGC 1705 a negative radial gradient in the oxygen metallicity of -0.24+/- 0.08 dex kpc-1. The element abundances are all consistent with values reported in the literature for other samples of dwarf irregular and BCD galaxies. However, the average (central) oxygen abundance, 12+{log}({{O}}/{{H}})=7.96+/- 0.04, is ˜0.26 dex lower than previous literature estimates for NGC 1705 based on the [O iii]λ 4363 line. From classical emission line diagnostic diagrams, we exclude a major contribution from shock excitation. On the other hand, the radial behavior of the emission line ratios is consistent with the progressive dilution of radiation with increasing distance from the center of NGC 1705. This suggests that the strongest starburst located within the central ˜150 pc is responsible for the ionization of the gas out to at least ˜1 kpc. The gradual dilution of the radiation with increasing distance from the center reflects the gradual and continuous transition from the highly ionized H ii regions in the proximity of the major starburst into the diffuse ionized gas.

  6. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)−CO−N2−noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system. PMID:26039983

  7. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-06-09

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)-CO-N2-noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system.

  8. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  9. Ultralow-voltage field-ionization discharge on whiskered silicon nanowires for gas-sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Banan Sadeghian, Ramin; Islam, M Saif; Saif Islam, M

    2011-02-01

    Several hundred million volts per centimetre of electric-field strength are required to field-ionize gas species. Such fields are produced on sharp metallic tips under a bias of a few kilovolts. Here, we show that field ionization is possible at dramatically lower fields on semiconductor nanomaterials containing surface states, particularly with metal-catalysed whiskers grown on silicon nanowires. The low-voltage field-ionization phenomena observed here cannot be explained solely on the basis of the large field-amplification effect of suspended gold nanoparticles present on the whisker tips. We postulate that field penetration causes upward band-bending at the surface of exposed silicon containing surface states in the vicinity of the catalyst. Band-bending enables the valence electron to tunnel into the surface states at reduced fields. This work provides a basis for development of low-voltage ionization sensors. Although demonstrated on silicon, low-voltage field ionization can be detected on any sharp semiconductor tip containing proper surface states.

  10. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    PubMed

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information.

  11. Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2007-04-23

    Since the first observations that a very small ionized fraction (order of 1 ppm) could strongly affect the gas flow, numerous experiments with partially or fully wall-free discharges have demonstrated the dispersion of shock waves, the enhancement of lateral forces in the flow, the prospects of levitation, and other aerodynamic effects with vast potential of application. A review of physical effects and observations are given along with current status of their interpretation. Special attention will be given to the physical problems of energy efficiency in generating wall-free discharges and the phenomenology of filamentary discharges. Comments and case examples are given on the current status of availability of necessary data for modelling and simulation of the aerodynamic phenomena in weakly ionized gas.

  12. Inner polar ionized-gas disks and properties of their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil'chenko, Olga K.

    2015-02-01

    I have analyzed line-of-sight velocity fields of the stellar and ionized-gas components for the volume-limited sample of nearby lenticular galaxies by using the raw data of the ATLAS-3D survey undertaken with the integral-field spectrograph SAURON. Among 200 nearby lenticular galaxies, I distinguish 20 cases of nearly orthogonal rotation of the inner ionized gas with respect to the central stellar components; so I estimate a frequency of the inner polar disks in nearby S0 galaxies as 10%. Properties of the central stellar populations - mean ages, metallicities, magnesium-to-iron ratios - are derived through the Lick indices. The typical stellar population properties of the polar-disk host galaxies are exactly the same as the stellar population properties of the complete sample.

  13. Circumnuclear molecular gas in megamaser disk galaxies NGC 4388 and NGC 1194

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Seth, Anil; Lyubenova, Mariya; Van de Ven, Glenn; Läsker, Ronald; Walsh, Jonelle

    2014-06-20

    We explore the warm molecular and ionized gas in the centers of two megamaser disk galaxies using K-band spectroscopy. Our ultimate goal is to determine how gas is funneled onto the accretion disk, here traced by megamaser spots on sub-parsec scales. We present NIR IFU data with a resolution of ∼50 pc for two galaxies: NGC 4388 with VLT/SINFONI and NGC 1194 with Keck/OSIRIS+AO. The high spatial resolution and rich spectral diagnostics allow us to study both the stellar and gas kinematics as well as gas excitation on scales only an order of magnitude larger than the maser disk. We find a drop in the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner ∼100 pc of NGC 4388, a common signature of a dynamically cold central component seen in many active nuclei. We also see evidence for noncircular gas motions in the molecular hydrogen on similar scales, with the gas kinematics on 100 parsec scales aligned with the megamaser disk. In contrast, the high ionization lines and Brγ trace outflow along the 100 parsec-scale jet. In NGC 1194, the continuum from the accreting black hole is very strong, making it difficult to measure robust two-dimensional kinematics, but the spatial distribution and line ratios of the molecular hydrogen and Brγ have consistent properties between the two galaxies.

  14. Photon-echo studies of collisional relaxation in weakly ionized noble-gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, M R

    1983-06-01

    Photon-echo relaxation rates are measured in weakly ionized plasmas of binary mixtures of noble gases, in which the photon echo generated on a transition in one noble-gas species is damped primarily by atoms of the second species. The special cases of pure krypton and xenon are extensions of previous work in pure helium, neon, and argon. With the exception of mixtures with helium as the perturber, measured relaxation rates are consistent with collisional line-broadening calculations.

  15. Seeded optically driven avalanche ionization in molecular and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polynkin, Pavel; Pasenhow, Bernard; Driscoll, Nicholas; Scheller, Maik; Wright, Ewan M.; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2012-10-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the dual laser-pulse plasma excitation in molecular and noble gases at atmospheric pressure. Dilute plasma channels generated through filamentation of ultraintense femtosecond laser pulses in air, argon, and helium are densified through the application of multijoule nanosecond heater pulses. Plasma densification in molecular gases is always accompanied by the fragmentation of the plasma channels into discrete bubbles, while in atomic gases, under certain conditions, the densified channels remain smooth and continuous. The densification effect in atomic gases persists through considerably longer delays between the femtosecond and nanosecond pulses compared to that in molecular gases. Using rate equations we trace this difference in the temporal dynamics of densification to the different cooling mechanisms operative in atomic and molecular cases.

  16. DNA protection by ectoine from ionizing radiation: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Marc Benjamin; Meyer, Susann; Schröter, Maria-Astrid; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Solomun, Tihomir; Sturm, Heinz

    2017-09-27

    Ectoine, a compatible solute and osmolyte, is known to be an effective protectant of biomolecules and whole cells against heating, freezing and extreme salinity. Protection of cells (human keratinocytes) by ectoine against ultraviolet radiation has also been reported by various authors, although the underlying mechanism is not yet understood. We present the first electron irradiation of DNA in a fully aqueous environment in the presence of ectoine and at high salt concentrations. The results demonstrate effective protection of DNA by ectoine against the induction of single-strand breaks by ionizing radiation. The effect is explained by an increase in low-energy electron scattering at the enhanced free-vibrational density of states of water due to ectoine, as well as the use of ectoine as an ˙OH-radical scavenger. This was demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  17. X-Ray Gas Ionization Studies with a Single-Walled Nanotube (SWNT) Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asare Agyapong, Paul

    Due to their high surface areas, Single-Walled Nanotubes (SWNTs) and their thin films, are wonderful media for sensing applications. To establish the radiation sensing mechanism and limits of an SWNT ion sensor, we performed gas ionization studies with an Amptek Mini-x x-ray source. We irradiated the sensor under varying conditions of source to sensor distance, gas concentration, and fill-gas type. The mechanism of the SWNT sensor, which is responsive to the gaseous ions the radiation generates, resembles that of conventional gas filled detectors with reduced power requirements. Additionally, the small size of the sensor favors the development of miniaturized and portable radiation detectors which retain high sensitivity. Sensor responsiveness to radiation, such as x-rays and gamma rays, can be maximized by enclosure in various noble gasses, which are chemically non-reactive, have small magnitudes of ionization potentials, and readily produce charged species when subjected to radiation. When encapsulated with gaseous argon, the SWNT sensors were shown to be up to 246% more sensitive to 1.34 Sv dose of 20 keV x-rays than sensors enclosed in air. The dependence of the sensors' electrical response to fill-gas material helps to push the minimum detection capabilities of this technology to new limits. Optimal performance may result through the use of more readily ionized gasses such as xenon or penning gas mixtures. Through Monte Carlo simulation and PIN diode measurements, the x-ray source intensity was determined and used to establish exposure rates for each test case. These sensors display changes in resistivity when exposed to charged ions, with no direct response to x-rays, gamma rays, and neutron radiation particles.

  18. Probing the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions by Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roussis, Stilianos G; Proulx, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This work explores the possibility of Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to determine the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions. Information about the molecular weight distributions is needed for fundamental studies on the nature of heavy crude oils and bitumens and for the development of novel recovery and processing methods. The method does not depend on thermal processes for the introduction of the fractions into the gas phase of the mass spectrometer, which is a considerable advantage over most other ionization methods. The Ag+ electrospray mass spectra of the fractions analyzed by using a toluene/methanol/cyclohexane (60:28:12%) solvent system display bimodal distributions in the ranges m/z approximately 300 to approximately 3000 and m/z 3000 to approximately 20,000. The abundances of the high molecular weight peak distributions can be reduced by in-source collisional activation experiments. Comparisons with the results obtained for model heteroatom-containing compounds (molecular weight < 600 Da) and high molecular weight polystyrene standards (up to one million Da) indicate that the majority of the structures in the saturate, naphthenoaromatic and polar aromatic fractions, and a significant portion of the asphaltenes, are small molecules. However, a considerable portion of the asphaltenes and some portion of the other fractions contain high molecular weight structures bound by covalent or strong non-covalent bonds. The results obtained by the Ag+ ESI method in this study for the saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions in a bitumen are in qualitative agreement with published molecular weight average results obtained for Cold Lake bitumen fractions analyzed by conventional gel permeation chromatography and field desorption mass spectrometry. Further work is needed to study the nature of the bonds and the interactions of the molecules in the asphaltene fractions by Ag+ ESI-MS.

  19. A Pre-ionization System to Limit Neutral Gas in a Compact Toroid Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allfrey, Ian; Roche, Thomas; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Garate, Eusebio; Gota, Hiroshi; Asai, Tomohiko; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Fusion plasmas require long lifetimes and high temperatures, both of which are limited by particle loss, among other factors. Therefore, refueling a long-lived advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in C-2U is necessary, and injecting a supersonic compact toroid (CT) is an effective means of introducing particles into the FRC core. However, neutral gas that trails the CT into the target chamber cools the FRC. Pre-ionization (PI) system assists the break down between electrodes of the CT injector (CTI), so the amount of introduced gas can be lowered by up to a factor of two, effectively increasing the ionization fraction; thus, reducing the amount of neutral gas in the system. Additionally, the PI decreases the delay in CTI breakdown so a highly reproducible operation is achievable. The PI system consists of a fast, high voltage, pulse discharge circuit coupled to a Teflon insulated semi-rigid coaxial cable inserted into the CTI. System details and experimental data will be presented, in addition to issues such as the introduction of impurities and pre-ionizer lifetime.

  20. Molecular gas in the central parsec of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurlo, Anna

    2015-08-01

    In the central parsec of the Galaxy the environment of the black hole presents two different gas structures: the neutral Circumnuclear Disc (CND) and the ionized Minispiral. In order to study the transition between the two structures we have investigated the presence of neutral gas in the inner part of the CND, where the ionized Minispiral lies. Such study is carried out through spectro-imaging data of the central cavity observed with VLT/SPIFFI. Such data cover several H2 lines and the Brγ line. In order to preserve the spatial resolution and avoid edge effects we applied a new line fitting method, which consists on a regularized three- dimensional fit. Thank to the new method we present the highest resolution maps of the H2 emission in the Central parsec, together with velocity and width maps. The analysis of the H2 1-0 S(1) line leads to the detection of three components of the emission: one in the background of the Minispiral, one in the CND, and one in the Minispiral northern arm. This finding is confirmed by others ortho lines 1-0 S(3) and Q(3). Some para lines are detectable, but no complete map can be achieved. However some portion of the field have been studied for all detectable lines and in particular a strong emission at the entrance of the Minicavity is detected. Lines fluxes allow to trace excitation diagrams which lead to excitation temperature of 1200 K in the CND and T>1500 K in the central cavity. The clear higher temperature of the gas in the central cavity is related to the higher density of UV photons and cosmic rays and this means that H2 molecules have thus a shorter mean life during which thermalization cannot fully occur, it is possible for molecular hydrogen to be formed in a state where peculiar state are favoured. The hypothesis is that we are observing not all the H2 but just the one which is situated at the border of the clouds, a mince shell of gas, heated by the UV central field, which gives a new and interesting picture not only of

  1. Radiative Cooling of Warm Molecular Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Kaufman, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the radiative cooling of warm (T >= 100 K), fully molecular astrophysical gas by rotational and vibrational transitions of the molecules H2O, CO, and H2. Using an escape probability method to solve for the molecular level populations, we have obtained the cooling rate for each molecule as a function of temperature, density, and an optical depth parameter. A four-parameter expression proves useful in fitting the run of cooling rate with density for any fixed values of the temperature and optical depth parameter. We identify the various cooling mechanisms which are dominant in different regions of the astrophysically relevant parameter space. Given the assumption that water is very abundant in warm regions of the interstellar medium, H2O rotational transitions are found to dominate the cooling of warm interstellar gas over a wide portion of the parameter space considered. While chemical models for the interstellar medium make the strong prediction that water will be produced copiously at temperatures above a few hundred degrees, our assumption of a high water abundance has yet to be tested observationally. The Infrared Space Observatory and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite will prove ideal instruments for testing whether water is indeed an important coolant of interstellar and circumstellar gas.

  2. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  3. Fluctuations in microwave background radiation due to secondary ionization of the intergalactic gas in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunyayev, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary heating and ionization of the intergalactic gas at redshifts z approximately 10-30 could lead to the large optical depth of the Universe for Thomson scattering and could smooth the primordial fluctuations formed at z approximately 1500. It is shown that the gas motions connected with the large scale density perturbations at z approximately 10-15 must lead to the generation of secondary fluctuations of microwave background. The contribution of the rich clusters of galaxies and young galaxies to the fluctuations of microwave background is also estimated.

  4. Ionized gas dynamics in the inner 2 pc of Sgr A West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, John H.; Irons, Wesley T.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2014-05-01

    We present a data cube of the [NeII] (12.8 μm) emission from the inner 2 pc of Sgr A West with 1″ and 4 km s-1 resolution, and with substantially better SNR and velocity resolution than previous observations of the ionized gas. We compare the observations to two proposed models of the gas motions and distribution: flows along tidally stretched streamers, and more nearly circular motions with density wave compression. The density wave model provides a considerably better fit to the kinematics of the northern arm and western arc. Neither model fits the eastern arm and bar kinematics well.

  5. MOLECULAR GAS IN YOUNG DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Kiss, Cs.; Juhasz, A.; Kospal, A.; Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Henning, Th.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-10-10

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old ({approx}>8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordial origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesimals can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk of HD21997.

  6. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  7. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  8. Examination of a molecular se beam by mass spectrometry with electron ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Mylymko, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    The methodology and results of mass-spectrometric studies of producing positive ions as a result of the dissociative ionization of a molecular selenium beam by electron impact are discussed. The appearance energies of fragment ions were determined from the ionization efficiency curves. The dynamics of production of molecular selenium ions in the temperature range of 420-500 K was also examined. The energy dependences of efficiency of production of singly charged Se n + ions for n = 1-4 and the doubly charged selenium ion in the interval from the threshold to 36 eV were studied for the first time. The observed specific features of effective ionization cross sections were analyzed.

  9. ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Klaassen, Pamela D.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-11-20

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  10. Validity boundary of orbital-free molecular dynamics method corresponding to thermal ionization of shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chang; Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping; He, X. T.

    2016-11-01

    With 6LiD as an example, we show that the applicable region of the orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD) method in a large temperature range is determined by the thermal ionization process of bound electrons in shell structures. The validity boundary of the OFMD method is defined roughly by the balance point of the average thermal energy of an electron and the ionization energy of the lowest localized electronic state. This theoretical proposition is based on the observation that the deviation of the OFMD method originates from its less accurate description to the charge density in partially ionized shells, as compared with the results of the extended first-principles molecular dynamics method, which well reproduces the charge density of shell structures.

  11. COLD MOLECULAR GAS IN MERGER REMNANTS. I. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR GAS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Junko; Iono, Daisuke; Komugi, Shinya; Espada, Daniel; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Matsuda, Yuichi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Yun, Min S.; Crocker, Alison F.; Narayanan, Desika; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Wilner, David J.; Pan, Hsi-An

    2014-09-01

    We present the ≲1 kpc resolution {sup 12}CO imaging study of 37 optically selected local merger remnants using new and archival interferometric maps obtained with ALMA, CARMA, the Submillimeter Array, and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We supplement a sub-sample with single-dish measurements obtained at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope for estimating the molecular gas mass (10{sup 7} {sup –} {sup 11} M {sub ☉}) and evaluating the missing flux of the interferometric measurements. Among the sources with robust CO detections, we find that 80% (24/30) of the sample show kinematical signatures of rotating molecular gas disks (including nuclear rings) in their velocity fields, and the sizes of these disks vary significantly from 1.1 kpc to 9.3 kpc. The size of the molecular gas disks in 54% of the sources is more compact than the K-band effective radius. These small gas disks may have formed from a past gas inflow that was triggered by a dynamical instability during a potential merging event. On the other hand, the rest (46%) of the sources have gas disks that are extended relative to the stellar component, possibly forming a late-type galaxy with a central stellar bulge. Our new compilation of observational data suggests that nuclear and extended molecular gas disks are common in the final stages of mergers. This finding is consistent with recent major-merger simulations of gas-rich progenitor disks. Finally, we suggest that some of the rotation-supported turbulent disks observed at high redshifts may result from galaxies that have experienced a recent major merger.

  12. H-alpha LEGUS: Unveiling the Interplay Between Stars, Star Clusters, and Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali

    2014-10-01

    We propose to obtain narrow-band, H-alpha observations for a significant subset of the star-forming, nearby galaxies recently targeted by the LEGUS treasury program (GO-13364). LEGUS is observing these galaxies in five broad-band filters: NUV, U, B, V, and I. The new H-alpha observations will reveal thousands of previously undetected HII regions, including those ionized by stellar clusters and single massive stars, allow us to measure their luminosities and sizes, and to separate discrete sources from diffuse ionized gas. We will use our narrow-band imaging survey to: (1) establish the connection between star and cluster formation, and determine the prevelance with which isolated massive stars form in different galaxies; (2) determine whether the initial cluster mass function is universal; (3) investigate the size evolution of ionized gas bubbles, and how this depends on cluster age and mass, as well as on local galactic conditions; and (4) place stringent limits on the leakage of ionizing photons from HII regions, and better understand how the interplay between properties of the ionizing source and the morphology of the HII region impacts leakage. The broad goal of this study is to better understand how feedback from massive stars affects the surrounding medium. Ultimately, the interplay between feedback and the ISM on these scales will enable a better understanding of galaxy-scale outflows in the early universe, a process critical to galaxy evolution. This program naturally lends itself to an improvement of the scientific output by involving the general public via an already established Citizen Science program.

  13. Coupling of gas chromatography and electrospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of anabolic steroids as trimethylsilyl derivatives in human urine.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eunju; Jeong, Eun Sook; Cha, Sangwon; Lee, Jaeick

    2017-04-29

    In this study, gas chromatography (GC) was interfaced with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with electrospray ionization source (ESI) and the relevant parameters were investigated to enhance the ionization efficiency. In GC-ESI, the distances (x-, y- and z) and angle between the ESI needle, GC capillary column and MS orifice were set to 7 (x-distance), 4 (y-distance), and 1 mm (z-distance). The ESI spray solvent, acid modifier and nebulizer gas flow were methanol, 0.1% formic acid and 5 arbitrary units, respectively. Based on these results, analytical conditions for GC-ESI/HRMS were established. In particular, the results of spray solvent flow indicated a concentration-dependent mechanism (peak dilution effect), and other parameters also greatly influenced the ionization performance. The developed GC-ESI/HRMS was then applied to the analysis of anabolic steroids as trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives in human urine to demonstrate its application. The ionization profiles of TMS-derivatized steroids were investigated and compared with those of underivatized steroids obtained from gas chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (GC-ESI/MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS). The steroids exhibited ionization profiles based on their structural characteristics, regardless of the analyte phase or derivatization. Groups I and II with conjugated or unconjugated keto functional groups at C3 generated the [M+H](+) and [M+H-TMS](+) ions, respectively. On the other hand, Groups III and IV gave rise to the characteristic fragment ions [M+H-TMS-H2O](+) and [M+H-2TMS-H2O](+), corresponding to loss of a neutral TMS·H2O moiety from the protonated molecular ion by in-source dissociation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to successfully ionize and analyze steroids as TMS derivatives using ESI coupled with GC. The present system has enabled the ionization of TMS derivatives under ESI conditions and

  14. Charge-distribution effect of imaging molecular structure by high-order above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bingbing; Fu Panming; Guo Yingchun; Zhang Bin; Zhao Zengxiu; Yan Zongchao

    2010-10-15

    Using a triatomic molecular model, we show that the interference pattern in the high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) spectrum depends dramatically on the charge distribution of the molecular ion. Therefore the charge distribution can be considered a crucial factor for imaging a molecular geometric structure. Based on this study, a general destructive interference formula for each above-threshold ionization channel is obtained for a polyatomic molecule concerning the positions and charge values of each nuclei. Comparisons are made for the HATI spectra of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}. These results may shed light on imaging complex molecular structure by the HATI spectrum.

  15. Trapping molecular ions formed via photo-associative ionization of ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Chen, Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J; Hudson, Eric R

    2011-11-14

    The formation of (40)Ca(2)(+) molecular ions is observed in a hybrid (40)Ca magneto-optical and ion trap system. The molecular ion formation process is determined to be photo-associative ionization of ultracold (40)Ca atoms. A lower bound for the two-body rate constant is found to be beta ≥ 2 ± 1 × 10(-15) cm(3) Hz. Ab initio molecular potential curves are calculated for the neutral Ca(2) and ionic Ca(2)(+) molecules and used in a model that identifies the photo-associative ionization pathway. As this technique does not require a separate photo-association laser, it could find use as a simple, robust method for producing ultracold molecular ions.

  16. DETERMINATION OF PHTHALATES IN WATER AND SOIL BY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY UNDER CHEMICAL IONIZATION CONDITIONS WITH ISOBUTANE AS REAGENT GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate determination is important because phthalates often are major impurities in samples and can have significant health effects. Tandem mass spectrometry under chemical ionization mass spectrometry conditions with isobutane as the reagent gas was used to determine 11 phthal...

  17. Double ionization effect in electron accelerations by high-intensity laser pulse interaction with a neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2013-11-01

    We study the effect of laser-induced double-ionization of a helium gas (with inhomogeneous density profile) on vacuum electron acceleration. For enough laser intensity, helium gas can be found doubly ionized and it strengthens the divergence of the pulse. The double ionization of helium gas can defocus the laser pulse significantly, and electrons are accelerated by the front of the laser pulse in vacuum and then decelerated by the defocused trail part of the laser pulse. It is observed that the electrons experience a very low laser-intensity at the trailing part of the laser pulse. Hence, there is not much electron deceleration at the trailing part of the pulse. We found that the inhomogeneity of the neutral gas reduced the rate of tunnel ionization causing less defocusing of the laser pulse and thus the electron energy gain is reduced.

  18. INTEGRAL-FIELD STELLAR AND IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS OF PECULIAR VIRGO CLUSTER SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cortés, Juan R.; Hardy, Eduardo; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P. E-mail: ehardy@nrao.cl

    2015-01-01

    We present the stellar and ionized gas kinematics of 13 bright peculiar Virgo cluster galaxies observed with the DensePak Integral Field Unit at the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in order to look for kinematic evidence that these galaxies have experienced gravitational interactions or gas stripping. Two-dimensional maps of the stellar velocity V, stellar velocity dispersion σ, and the ionized gas velocity (Hβ and/or [O III]) are presented for the galaxies in the sample. The stellar rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles are determined for 13 galaxies, and the ionized gas rotation curves are determined for 6 galaxies. Misalignments between the optical and kinematical major axes are found in several galaxies. While in some cases this is due to a bar, in other cases it seems to be associated with gravitational interaction or ongoing ram pressure stripping. Non-circular gas motions are found in nine galaxies, with various causes including bars, nuclear outflows, or gravitational disturbances. Several galaxies have signatures of kinematically distinct stellar components, which are likely signatures of accretion or mergers. For all of our galaxies, we compute the angular momentum parameter λ {sub R}. An evaluation of the galaxies in the λ {sub R} ellipticity plane shows that all but two of the galaxies have significant support from random stellar motions, and have likely experienced gravitational interactions. This includes some galaxies with very small bulges and truncated/compact Hα morphologies, indicating that such galaxies cannot be fully explained by simple ram pressure stripping, but must have had significant gravitational encounters. Most of the sample galaxies show evidence for ICM-ISM stripping as well as gravitational interactions, indicating that the evolution of a significant fraction of cluster galaxies is likely strongly impacted by both effects.

  19. Relating polarizability to volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, moments of momentum, and other molecular properties

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, Shamus A.; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2014-08-21

    Semiquantitative relationships between the mean static dipole polarizability and other molecular properties such as the volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, and moments of momentum are explored. The relationships are tested using density functional theory computations on the 1641 neutral, ground-state, organic molecules in the TABS database. The best polarizability approximations have median errors under 5%.

  20. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Technical report, January 1990--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The objective of our effort is to carry out theoretical studies of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization processes in molecules and molecular fragments. These studies are designed to provide a quantitatively robust analysis and prediction of key spectral features of interest in several ongoing experimental studies and applications of this technique.

  1. LC-MS with electron ionization of cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Ori; Amirav, Aviv

    2005-06-01

    A new approach is described for the combination of electron ionization and LC-MS based on sample ionization as vibrationally cold molecules in a supersonic molecular beam (Cold EI). Cold EI of sample compounds in liquid solutions (methanol, acetonitrile, water, etc.) is achieved through spray formation, followed by soft thermal vaporization of the sample particles prior to their supersonic expansion and direct electron ionization of the sample compounds while they are contained in a supersonic molecular beam (SMB). Cold EI mass spectra were demonstrated to combine an enhanced molecular ion and improved mass spectral information (in comparison with standard EI), plus all the library searchable fragments. Cold EI enables the ionization of a broad range of compounds, including the full range of non-polar samples. Four orders of magnitude linear dynamic range is demonstrated and a detection limit of 2 pg was achieved for a 774 amu compound in single ion monitoring mode at m/z = 774. The method and apparatus are under continuous development and we feel that it can excel particularly in the analysis of unknown samples, while enabling fast LC-MS analysis through automated mass spectral deconvolution of coeluting LC peaks. In addition, the same MS system can also serve as an advanced GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams.

  2. High-Ionization Gas Associated with a Supershell Surrounding the Perseus OB1 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauth, D. C.; Howk, J. C.; Sembach, K. R.; Lauroesch, J. T.; Meyer, D. M.

    2002-05-01

    We present Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of high-ionization interstellar absorption toward HD 14434, an O5.5 V star in the Per OB1 Association. This star lies in the direction of the H I supershell GS139-03-69 (Heiles 1979, ApJ, 229, 533). In addition, a supershell-like bubble is detected from WHAM maps of the Perseus arm (Madsen, Haffner, & Reynolds astro-ph/0112232). We detect intermediate velocity interstellar Si IV and C IV absorption centered at VLSR = -73 km s-1, while low-ionization Perseus arm gas is detected at approximately -50 km s-1. Neither N V nor O VI is detected at these velocities, although Fe III, a tracer of warm ionized gas, is seen. The column densities in the -73 km s-1 component are log N(C IV}) = 13.93 +/- 0.02, log N(Si IV}) = 13.35 +/- 0.02, log N(N V}) <= 12.65, and log N(O VI}) <= 13.32. The observed C IV/Si IV ratio of 3.8 +/- 0.3 is similar to the Galactic average. Analysis of the C IV and Si IV line widths yields a temperature of T ~ 12,000 K for this component. No C IV or Si IV is produced via collisions at such low temperatures. We explore two models for the origins of the intermediate velocity C IV and Si IV absorption: photoionization or non-equilibrium collisional processes. Either of these could be related to the origins of the high-ionization gas with a supershell. This work is based on data obtained for the Guaranteed Time Team by the NASA-CNES-CSA FUSE mission. Financial support has been provided by NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  3. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    This report focuses on progress in seven areas: (1) Gas-Phase Reactions of Fe(Benzyne){sup +} with Simple Alkyl Halides; (2) Photodissociation and Collision-Induced Dissociation of Molecular Ions From Methylphenol and Chloromethylphenol; (3) Isotopomer Differentiation Using Metal Ion Chemical Ionization Reagents; (4) Multiple Excitation Collisional Activation (MECA) in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry; (5) Chemistry of Fe{sup +}-Arene Ions with Halobenzenes; (6) Gas-Phase Photodissociaton Study of Ag(Benzene){sup +} and Ag(Toluene){sup +}; and (7) Reactivity of Ti{sup 2+} and V{sup 2+} with Small Alkanes.

  4. Direct detection of atomic ions from molecular photofragmentation during nonresonant multiphoton ionization of sputtered species

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Burnett, J.W.; White, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    The photoionization of sputtered Cu, Al, and Ru atoms and dimers was investigated by measuring velocity distributions using both resonant and nonresonant photoionization. Nonresonant ionization produced an atomic distribution that peaked at the same velocity as the respective dimer distribution, indicating that virtually all the nonresonant atomic ion signal is from photofragmented dimers. Various mechanisms of dimer photofragmentation are discussed. Domination of the atomic photoion channel by molecule fragmentation appears to be a general phenomenon that must be accounted for in all gas-phase multiphoton nonresonant ionization experiments at easily achievable laser power densities ({le} 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}).

  5. The Cygnus X region. XVI - The ionized gas behind the dark cloud between the North America and Pelican nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heske, A.; Wendker, H. J.

    1985-07-01

    Radio recombination line observations are presented for the ionized gas at selected positions behind the dark cloud separating the North America and Pelican nebulae. The high angular resolution of about 3 arcmin makes it possible to sample the different structural components. The lines are dominated by ionized gas physically similar to that of the visible nebulae. A further extended background source is identified and briefly discussed in terms of an Ori A-type H II region in the Perseus spiral arm.

  6. A novel benzene quantitative analysis method using miniaturized metal ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic system

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuxiang; Liu, Fuqi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel benzene quantitative analysis method utilizing miniaturized metal ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic system was investigated. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was installed for electrical current-voltage data measurement. Measurement data was analyzed by non-linear bistable dynamics system. Results demonstrated that this method realized benzene concentration quantitative determination. This method is promising in laboratory safety management in benzene leak detection. PMID:26218927

  7. A novel benzene quantitative analysis method using miniaturized metal ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuxiang; Liu, Fuqi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel benzene quantitative analysis method utilizing miniaturized metal ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic system was investigated. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was installed for electrical current-voltage data measurement. Measurement data was analyzed by non-linear bistable dynamics system. Results demonstrated that this method realized benzene concentration quantitative determination. This method is promising in laboratory safety management in benzene leak detection.

  8. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  9. Spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of the ionized gas in IZw18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Hernández-Fernández, J. D.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Brinchmann, J.; Durret, F.; Kunth, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed 2D study of the ionized ionized interstellar medium (ISM) of IZw18 using new Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer-integral field unit (PMAS-IFU) optical observations. IZw18 is a high-ionization galaxy which is among the most metal-poor starbursts in the local Universe. This makes IZw18 a local benchmark for understanding the properties most closely resembling those prevailing at distant starbursts. Our IFU aperture (˜1.4 × 1.4 kpc2) samples the entire IZw18 main body and an extended region of its ionized gas. Maps of relevant emission lines and emission line ratios show that higher-excitation gas is preferentially located close to the north-west knot and thereabouts. We detect a Wolf-Rayet feature near the north-west knot. We derive spatially resolved and integrated physical-chemical properties for the ionized gas in IZw18. We find no dependence between the metallicity indicator R23 and the ionization parameter (as traced by [O III]/[O II]) across IZw18. Over ˜0.30 kpc2, using the [O III] λ4363 line, we compute Te[O III] values (˜15 000-25 000 K), and oxygen abundances are derived from the direct determinations of Te[O III]. More than 70 per cent of the higher-Te[O III] (≳22 000 K) spaxels are He IIλ4686-emitting spaxels too. From a statistical analysis, we study the presence of variations in the ISM physical-chemical properties. A galaxy-wide homogeneity, across hundreds of parsecs, is seen in O/H. Based on spaxel-by-spaxel measurements, the error-weighted mean of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.11 ± 0.01 is taken as the representative O/H for IZw18. Aperture effects on the derivation of O/H are discussed. Using our IFU data we obtain, for the first time, the IZw18 integrated spectrum.

  10. Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E

    2007-02-26

    With the advent of coupled chemical/hydrodynamic reactive flow models for high explosives, understanding detonation chemistry is of increasing importance to DNT. The accuracy of first principles detonation codes, such as CHEETAH, are dependent on an accurate representation of the species present under detonation conditions. Ionic species and non-molecular phases are not currently included coupled chemistry/hydrodynamic simulations. This LDRD will determine the prevalence of such species during high explosive detonations, by carrying out experimental and computational investigation of common detonation products under extreme conditions. We are studying the phase diagram of detonation products such as H{sub 2}O, or NH{sub 3} and mixtures under conditions of extreme pressure (P > 1 GPa) and temperature (T > 1000K). Under these conditions, the neutral molecular form of matter transforms to a phase dominated by ions. The phase boundaries of such a region are unknown.

  11. Radical Generation from the Gas-Phase Activation of Ionized Lipid Ozonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Shane R.; Pham, Huong T.; in het Panhuis, Marc; Trevitt, Adam J.; Mitchell, Todd W.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2017-07-01

    Reaction products from the ozonolysis of unsaturated lipids at gas-liquid interfaces have the potential to significantly influence the chemical and physical properties of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. In this study, the gas-phase dissociation behavior of lipid secondary ozonides is investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry. Secondary ozonides were formed by reaction between a thin film of unsaturated lipids (fatty acid methyl esters or phospholipids) with ozone before being transferred to the gas phase as [M + Na]+ ions by electrospray ionization. Activation of the ionized ozonides was performed by either energetic collisions with helium buffer-gas or laser photolysis, with both processes yielding similar product distributions. Products arising from the decomposition of the ozonides were characterized by their mass-to-charge ratio and subsequent ion-molecule reactions. Product assignments were rationalized as arising from initial homolysis of the ozonide oxygen-oxygen bond with subsequent decomposition of the nascent biradical intermediate. In addition to classic aldehyde and carbonyl oxide-type fragments, carbon-centered radicals were identified with a number of decomposition pathways that indicated facile unimolecular radical migration. These findings reveal that photoactivation of secondary ozonides formed by the reaction of aerosol-bound lipids with tropospheric ozone may initiate radical-mediated chemistry within the particle resulting in surface modification.

  12. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  13. Radical Generation from the Gas-Phase Activation of Ionized Lipid Ozonides.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Shane R; Pham, Huong T; In Het Panhuis, Marc; Trevitt, Adam J; Mitchell, Todd W; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2017-07-01

    Reaction products from the ozonolysis of unsaturated lipids at gas-liquid interfaces have the potential to significantly influence the chemical and physical properties of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. In this study, the gas-phase dissociation behavior of lipid secondary ozonides is investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry. Secondary ozonides were formed by reaction between a thin film of unsaturated lipids (fatty acid methyl esters or phospholipids) with ozone before being transferred to the gas phase as [M + Na](+) ions by electrospray ionization. Activation of the ionized ozonides was performed by either energetic collisions with helium buffer-gas or laser photolysis, with both processes yielding similar product distributions. Products arising from the decomposition of the ozonides were characterized by their mass-to-charge ratio and subsequent ion-molecule reactions. Product assignments were rationalized as arising from initial homolysis of the ozonide oxygen-oxygen bond with subsequent decomposition of the nascent biradical intermediate. In addition to classic aldehyde and carbonyl oxide-type fragments, carbon-centered radicals were identified with a number of decomposition pathways that indicated facile unimolecular radical migration. These findings reveal that photoactivation of secondary ozonides formed by the reaction of aerosol-bound lipids with tropospheric ozone may initiate radical-mediated chemistry within the particle resulting in surface modification. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Modeling of gas ionization and plasma flow in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2016-12-01

    A one-dimensional model to study the gas ionization and plasma flow in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters(APPTs) is established in this paper. The discharge process of the APPT used in the LES-6 satellite is simulated to validate the model. The simulation results for the impulse bit and propellant utilization give values of 29.05 μN s and 9.56%, respectively, which are in good agreement with experimental results. To test the new ionization sub-model, the discharge process of a particular APPT, XPPT-1, is simulated, and a numerical result for the propellant utilization of 62.8% is obtained, which also agrees well with experiment. The gas ionization simulation results indicate that an APPT with a lower average propellant ablation rate and higher average electric field intensity between electrodes should have higher propellant utilization. The plasma density distribution between the electrodes of APPTs can also be obtained using the new model, and the numerical results show that the plasma generation and flow are discontinuous, which is in good agreement with past experimental results of high-speed photography. This model provides a new tool with which to study the physical mechanisms of APPTs and a reference for the design of high-performance APPTs.

  15. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring.

  16. Ionized Gas in E/S0 Galaxies with Dust Lanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funes, Jose G.; J., S.; Finkelman, I.; Borsch, N.; Vaisanen, P.; Kniazev, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from an ongoing program to study the properties of dust and ionized gas in E/S0 galaxies with dust lanes. Our observational program comprises of H-alpha and broad-band images obtained with the SAAO 1.9m, the VATT 1.8m and the 1m telescope on WO. A detailed analysis of 30 galaxies shows the presence of a diffusely distributed ionized gas component in most objects. The extended gas morphology is typically smooth and closely follows the dust structure, with a clear correlation between the mass of both components. The dust content in each galaxy is estimated by measuring the extinction by the extragalactic dust in the dark lanes. The derived extinction law is used to correct the measured colors for intrinsic dust extinction and the data are fitted with a stellar population synthesis model. We find that the line-emission and colors of most objects are consistent with the presence of an “old” stellar population ( 10 Gyr) and a small fraction of a “young” population ( 10- 100 Myr). The younger stellar population may have formed at a later stage of the evolution of the galaxy through either a merger event or a secondary star-formation burst. Strong evidence for the external origin of the ISM is provided by the apparent inclination of the dust and ionized gas disks with respect to the galactic plane in a large fraction of our sample galaxies. Further spectroscopic observations will be obtained to study the gaseous disks dynamics and to characterize the underlying stellar populations for evidence of multiple phases of star formation and assembly history.

  17. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  18. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  19. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  20. Multiple Ionization of Free Ubiquitin Molecular Ions in Extreme Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Reitsma, Geert; Egorov, Dmitrii; Gonzalez-Magaña, Olmo; Bari, Sadia; Boschman, Leon; Bodewits, Erwin; Schnorr, Kirsten; Schmid, Georg; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Moshammer, Robert; Hoekstra, Ronnie

    2016-08-26

    The fragmentation of free tenfold protonated ubiquitin in intense 70 femtosecond pulses of 90 eV photons from the FLASH facility was investigated. Mass spectrometric investigation of the fragment cations produced after removal of many electrons revealed fragmentation predominantly into immonium ions and related ions, with yields increasing linearly with intensity. Ionization clearly triggers a localized molecular response that occurs before the excitation energy equilibrates. Consistent with this interpretation, the effect is almost unaffected by the charge state, as fragmentation of sixfold deprotonated ubiquitin leads to a very similar fragmentation pattern. Ubiquitin responds to EUV multiphoton ionization as an ensemble of small peptides.

  1. Fundamental Transitions and Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Molecular Ions with Few ppt Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobov, Vladimir I.; Hilico, L.; Karr, J.-Ph.

    2017-06-01

    We calculate ionization energies and fundamental vibrational transitions for H2 + , D2 + , and HD+ molecular ions. The nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics expansion for the energy in terms of the fine structure constant α is used. Previous calculations of orders m α6 and m α7 are improved by including second-order contributions due to the vibrational motion of nuclei. Furthermore, we evaluate the largest corrections at the order m α8. That allows us to reduce the fractional uncertainty to the level of 7.6 ×10-12 for fundamental transitions and to 4.5 ×10-12 for the ionization energies.

  2. Fundamental Transitions and Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Molecular Ions with Few ppt Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Korobov, Vladimir I; Hilico, L; Karr, J-Ph

    2017-06-09

    We calculate ionization energies and fundamental vibrational transitions for H_{2}^{+}, D_{2}^{+}, and HD^{+} molecular ions. The nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics expansion for the energy in terms of the fine structure constant α is used. Previous calculations of orders mα^{6} and mα^{7} are improved by including second-order contributions due to the vibrational motion of nuclei. Furthermore, we evaluate the largest corrections at the order mα^{8}. That allows us to reduce the fractional uncertainty to the level of 7.6×10^{-12} for fundamental transitions and to 4.5×10^{-12} for the ionization energies.

  3. Imaging spectrophotometry of ionized gas in NGC 1068. I - Kinematics of the narrow-line region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Gerald; Bland, Jonathan; Tully, R. Brent

    1990-01-01

    The kinematics of collisionally excited forbidden N II 6548, 6583 across the inner 1 arcmin diameter of the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 is mapped using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer and low-noise CCD. The stack of monochromatic images, which spatially resolved the high-velocity gas, was analyzed for kinematic and photometric content. Profiles agree well with previous long-slit work, and their complete spatial coverage makes it possible to constrain the gas volume distribution. It is found that the narrow-line region is distributed in a thick center-darkened, line-emitting cylinder that envelopes the collimated radio jet. Three distinct kinematic subsystems, of which the cylinder is composed, are discussed in detail. Detailed behavior of the emission-line profiles, at the few points in the NE quadrant with simple kinematics, argues that the ionized gas develops a significant component of motion perpendicular to the jet axis.

  4. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, G.A.; Jessup, D.A.; Borella, H.M.; Franks, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (5/sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 6/sup 2//sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations.

  5. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J.-C.; Traykov, E.; van Beveren, C.; van den Bergh, P.; van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-02-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency.

  6. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J-C; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency. PMID:28224987

  7. Multiple ionization of rare gas atoms irradiated with intense VUV radiation.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, H; de Castro, A R B; Gürtler, P; Laarmann, T; Laasch, W; Schulz, J; Möller, T

    2005-01-21

    The interaction of intense vacuum-ultraviolet radiation from a free-electron laser with rare gas atoms is investigated. The ionization products of xenon and argon atomic beams are analyzed with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. At 98 nm wavelength and approximately 10(13) W/cm(2) multiple charged ions up to Xe6+ (Ar4+) are detected. From the intensity dependence of multiple charged ion yields the mechanisms of multiphoton processes were derived. In the range of approximately 10(12)-10(13) W/cm(2) the ionization is attributed to sequential multiphoton processes. The production of multiple charged ions saturates at 5-30 times lower power densities than at 193 and 564 nm wavelength, respectively.

  8. Molecular ionization of cyclohexanone in femtosecond laser fields: An application of ADK theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Q.; Mineo, H.; Wu, D.; Jin, M. X.; Chin, C. H.; Teranishi, Y.; Chao, S. D.; Ding, D.; Lin, S. H.

    2009-08-01

    The mechanisms of ionization and dissociation of cyclohexanone (C6H10O) in a 90 fs, 788 nm linearly polarized laser field ranging from 1013 to 1014 W/cm2 by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) have been investigated. The ion yields as a function of laser intensity have been measured experimentally. By comparison with the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory based on a hydrogen-like model, the ionization mechanism of cyclohexanone in this intense femtosecond laser field has been understood. Considering the importance of molecular nuclear motions, we propose that the Franck-Condon (F-C) factor can provide the excess vibrational energy in the molecular ion. This energy is required for the decomposition of the molecular ion which finally results in the observed mass spectrum.

  9. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles.

    PubMed

    Woeller, F H; Kojiro, D R; Carle, G C

    1984-04-01

    Gas chromatography has found highly successful application in NASA's flight programs. Gas chromatographs have been flown to both Mars and Venus where detailed compositional measurements were made. These instruments were quite small and relatively sensitive when compared to commercially available instruments; however, they do not appear adequate for future missions currently being planned. The earlier flight GC's had incorporated thermistor bead thermal conductivity cells as the detector. This detector requires very precise temperature control and only provides about 1 ppm sensitivity. Temperature stabilization causes the detector to be quite heavy, i.e., about 200 g. Greater sensitivity will be required for measurements of trace components in extraterrestrial environments. Review of other detector types revealed the metastable ionization detector as a likely candidate because of its superior thermal stability and high sensitivity. The metastable detector, first described by Lovelock as an argon ionization detector, has been studied and somewhat modified by others. The commercial design by Hartmann and Dimick was used for comparison purposes in our work. In the past, three features of the metastable detector are prominent: it has part-per-billion sensitivity, contamination must be carefully controlled, and anomalous response is common. Since it is an ionization detector, however, temperature instabilities do not cause the major perturbations experienced by the thermal conductivity detectors. This paper describes a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design, while its weight is quite small. The prototype has been used in our laboratories routinely for 2 years, and the concept will be incorporated into a flight GC for use in the Space Shuttle.

  10. A VUV photoionization measurement and ab-initio calculation of the ionization energy of gas phase SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2008-12-05

    In this work we report on the detection and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of gas phase SiO2 generated in situ via laser ablation of silicon in a CO2 molecular beam. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for SiO and SiO2 and ionization energy estimates are revealed from such measurements. A state-to-state ionizationenergy of 12.60 (+-0.05) eV is recorded by fitting two prominent peaks in the PIE curve for the following process: 1SUM O-Si-O --> 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+. Electronic structure calculations aid in the interpretation of the photoionization process and allow for identification of the symmetric stretch of 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+ which is observed in the PIE spectrum to be 0.11 eV (890 cm-1) above the ground state of the cation and agrees with the 892 cm-1 symmetric stretch frequency calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level.

  11. Time-resolved measurement of internal conversion dynamics in strong-field molecular ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliamonti, Vincent; Kaufman, Brian; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We time-resolve coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics during strong-field molecular ionization by measuring the momentum-resolved photoelectron yield as a function of pump-probe delay for a pair of strong-field laser pulses. The sub-10-fs pulses are generated using a specially designed ultrafast optical pulse shaper and the electrons are measured using velocity map imaging. Our measurements, in conjunction with calculations that solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, allow us to time-resolve resonance-enhanced strong-field ionization and break it down into three basic steps: (1) Stark-shifted resonant excitation of a high-lying neutral state of the molecule, (2) nonadiabatic dynamics (internal conversion) in which multiple electronic states are coupled, and (3) coupling to the continuum (ionization).

  12. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. [in model for cooling of hot Galactic corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Bruna, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  13. Ionized gas outflow in the isolated S0 galaxy NGC 4460

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexei; Karachentsev, Igor; Kaisin, Serafim

    2010-04-01

    We used integral-field and long-slit spectroscopy to study a bright extended nebulosity recently discovered in the isolated lenticular galaxy NGC 4460 during an Hα survey of nearby galaxies. An analysis of archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX and Hubble Space Telescope images indicates that current star formation is entirely concentrated in the central kiloparsec of the galaxy disc. The observed ionized gas parameters (morphology, kinematics and ionization state) can be explained by a gas outflow above the plane of the galaxy, caused by star formation in the circumnuclear region. Galactic wind parameters in NGC 4460 (outflow velocity, total kinetic energy) are several times smaller, compared with the known galactic wind in NGC 253, which is explained by the substantially lower total star formation rate. We discuss the cause of the star formation processes in NGC 4460 and in two other known isolated lenticular (S0) and elliptical (E) galaxies of the Local Volume: NGC 404 and 855. We provide evidence suggesting that the feeding of isolated galaxies by intergalactic gas on a cosmological time-scale is a steady process without significant variations. Based on observations collected with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is operated under the financial support of the Science Department of Russia (registration number 01-43). E-mail: moisav@gmail.com

  14. CAN THE LYMAN CONTINUUM LEAKED OUT OF H II REGIONS EXPLAIN DIFFUSE IONIZED GAS?

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2009-09-20

    We present an attempt to explain the diffuse Halpha emission of a face-on galaxy M 51 with the 'standard' photoionization model, in which the Lyman continuum (Lyc) escaping from H II regions propagates large distances into the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). The diffuse Halpha emission of M 51 is analyzed using thin slab models and exponential disk models in the context of the 'on-the-spot' approximation. The scale height of the ionized gas needed to explain the diffuse Halpha emission with the scenario is found to be of the order of {approx}1-2 kpc, consistent with those of our Galaxy and edge-on galaxies. The model also provides a vertical profile, when the galaxy is viewed edge-on, consisting of two-exponential components. However, it is found that an incredibly low absorption coefficient of kappa{sub 0} {approx} 0.4-0.8 kpc{sup -1} at the galactic plane, or, equivalently, an effective cross section as low as sigma{sub eff} {approx} 10{sup -5} of the photoionization cross section at 912 A is required to allow the stellar Lyc photons to travel through the H I disk. Such a low absorption coefficient is out of accord with the properties of the ISM. Furthermore, we found that even the model that has the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) phase only and no H I gas phase shows highly concentrated Halpha emissions around H II regions, and can account for only {approx}<26% of the Halpha luminosity of the DIG. This result places a strong constraint on the ionizing source of the DIG. We also report that the Halpha intensity distribution functions not only of the DIG, but also of H II regions in M 51, appear to be lognormal.

  15. WARM IONIZED GAS REVEALED IN THE MAGELLANIC BRIDGE TIDAL REMNANT: CONSTRAINING THE BARYON CONTENT AND THE ESCAPING IONIZING PHOTONS AROUND DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J. E-mail: haffner@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-07-10

    The Magellanic System includes some of the nearest examples of galaxies disturbed by galaxy interactions. These interactions have redistributed much of their gas into the halos of the Milky Way (MW) and the Magellanic Clouds. We present Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper kinematically resolved observations of the warm ionized gas in the Magellanic Bridge over the velocity range of +100 to +300 km s{sup -1} in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full H{alpha} intensity map and the corresponding intensity-weighted mean velocity map of the Magellanic Bridge across (l, b) = (281 Degree-Sign .5, -30 Degree-Sign .0) to (302. Degree-Sign 5, -46. Degree-Sign 7). Using the H{alpha} emission from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-Tail and the Bridge, we estimate that the mass of the ionized material is between (0.7-1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, compared to 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} for the neutral mass over the same region. The diffuse Bridge is significantly more ionized than the SMC-Tail, with an ionization fraction of 36%-52% compared to 5%-24% for the Tail. The H{alpha} emission has a complex multiple-component structure with a velocity distribution that could trace the sources of ionization or distinct ionized structures. We find that incident radiation from the extragalactic background and the MW alone are insufficient to produced the observed ionization in the Magellanic Bridge and present a model for the escape fraction of the ionizing photons from both the SMC and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). With this model, we place an upper limit of 4.0% for the average escape fraction of ionizing photons from the LMC and an upper limit of 5.5% for the SMC. These results, combined with the findings of a half a dozen other studies for dwarf galaxies in different environments, provide compelling evidence that only a small percentage of the ionizing photons escape from dwarf galaxies in the present epoch to

  16. Jet-driven outflows of ionized gas in the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C.; Bessiere, P.; Short, P.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fast outflows of gas, driven by the interaction between the radio jets and interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy, are being observed in an increasing number of galaxies. One such example is the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293. In this paper we present integral field unit observations taken with OASIS on the William Herschel Telescope, enabling us to map the spatial extent of the ionized gas outflows across the central regions of the galaxy. The jet-driven outflow in 3C 293 is detected along the inner radio lobes with a mass outflow rate ranging from ˜0.05 to 0.17 M⊙ yr-1 (in ionized gas) and corresponding kinetic power of ˜0.5-3.5 × 1040 erg s-1. Investigating the kinematics of the gas surrounding the radio jets (i.e. not directly associated with the outflow), we find linewidths broader than 300 km s-1 up to 5 kpc in the radial direction from the nucleus (corresponding to 3.5 kpc in the direction perpendicular to the radio axis at maximum extent). Along the axis of the radio jet linewidths >400 km s-1 are detected out to 7 kpc from the nucleus and linewidths of >500 km s-1 at a distance of 12 kpc from the nucleus, indicating that the disturbed kinematics clearly extend well beyond the high surface brightness radio structures of the jets. This is suggestive of the cocoon structure seen in simulations of jet-ISM interaction and implies that the radio jets are capable of disturbing the gas throughout the central regions of the host galaxy in all directions.

  17. Ionization gas sensing of the ion flow current in a microtripolar electrode system with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhongyu; Cai, Bingchu; Xu, Dong

    2008-06-01

    We report the tests of a tripolar on-chip microelectrode system with carbon nanotubes, where the ion flow current (Ii) and the partial discharge current produced by the field ionization process of gaseous molecules can be measured to characterize the gas species and concentration. A theoretical account is given regarding the underlying differences between their sensing mechanisms. Further, comparative analysis of these two outputs in response to the concentration dynamic changes of ethanol/acetone in N2 demonstrates the explicit cases of improved sensitivity and selectivity of the Ii measurement.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of the response of a gas to a spherical piston: implications for sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ruuth, Steven J; Putterman, Seth; Merriman, Barry

    2002-09-01

    Sonoluminescence is the phenomena of light emission from a collapsing gas bubble in a liquid. Theoretical explanations of this extreme energy focusing are controversial and difficult to validate experimentally. We propose to use molecular dynamics simulations of the collapsing gas bubble to clarify the energy focusing mechanism, and determine physical parameters that restrict theories of the light emitting mechanism. In this paper, we model the interior of a collapsing noble gas bubble as a hard sphere gas driven by a spherical piston boundary moving according to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. We also include a simplified treatment of ionization effects in the gas at high temperatures. The effects of water vapor are neglected in the model. By using fast, tree-based algorithms, we can exactly follow the dynamics of 10(6) particle systems during the collapse. Our preliminary model shows strong energy focusing within the bubble, including the formation of shocks, strong ionization, and temperatures in the range of 50 000-500 000 K. Our calculations show that the gas-liquid boundary interaction has a strong effect on the internal gas dynamics, and that the gas passes through states where the mean free path is greater than the characteristic distance over which the temperature varies. We also estimate the duration of the light pulse from our model, which predicts that it scales linearly with the ambient bubble radius. As the number of particles in a physical sonoluminescing bubble is within the foreseeable capability of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose that fine scale sonoluminescence experiments can be viewed as excellent test problems for advancing the art of molecular dynamics.

  19. Ionized gas outflows and global kinematics of low-z luminous star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, S.; Colina, L.; Bellocchi, E.; Maiolino, R.; Villar-Martín, M.

    2014-08-01

    We study the kinematic properties of the ionised gas outflows and ambient interstellar medium (ISM) in a large and representative sample of local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) (58 systems, 75 galaxies) at galactic and sub-galactic (i.e., star-forming clumps) scales, thanks to integral field spectroscopy (IFS)-based high signal-to-noise integrated spectra. The velocity dispersion of the ionized ISM in U/LIRGs (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 70 km s-1) is larger than in lower luminosity local star-forming galaxies (⟨ σ ⟩ ~ 25 km s-1). While for isolated disc LIRGs star formation appears to sustain turbulence, gravitational energy release associated with interactions and mergers plays an important role in driving σ in the U/LIRG range. We find that σ has a dependency on the star formation rate density (ΣSFR), which is weaker than expected if it were driven by the energy released by the starburst. The relatively small role of star formation (SF) driving the σ in U/LIRGs is reinforced by the lack of an increase in σ associated with high luminosity SF clumps. We also find that the impact of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) in ULIRGs is strong, increasing on average σ by a factor 1.5. Low-z U/LIRGs cover a range of velocity dispersion (σ ~ 30 to 100 km s-1) and star formation rate density (ΣSFR ~ 0.1 to 20 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2) similar to those of high-z SFGs. Moreover, the observed weak dependency of σ on ΣSFR for local U/LIRGs (σ ∝ ΣSFR+0.06) is in very good agreement with that measured in some high-z samples. The presence of ionized gas outflows in U/LIRGs seems universal based on the detection of a broad, usually blueshifted, Hα line. The observed dependency of the maximum velocity of the outflow (Vmax) on the star formation rate (SFR) is of the type Vmax(non - AGN) ∝ SFR(LIR)+ 0.24. We find that AGNs in U/LIRGs are able to generate faster (~×2) and more massive (~× 1.4) ionized gas outflows than pure starbursts. The derived ionized mass

  20. Quantum control of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki

    2015-11-01

    In photoexcitation processes, if the motion of excited electrons can be precisely steered by the instantaneous electric field of an arbitrary waveform of a Fourier-synthesized laser field, the resultant matter response can be achieved within one optical cycle, usually within the attosecond (1 as =10-18s) regime. Fourier synthesis of laser fields has been achieved in various ways. However, the general use of Fourier-synthesized laser fields for the control of matter is extremely limited. Here, we report the quantum control of a nonlinear response of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 ×1012W /c m2) Fourier-synthesized laser fields consisting of fundamental, second-, third-, and fourth-harmonic light achieves the orientation-selective ionization; we utilized the orientation-selective ionization for measurement of the relative phase differences between the fundamental and each harmonic light. Our findings impact not only light-wave engineering but also the control of matter, possibly triggering the creation and establishment of a new methodology that uses Fourier-synthesized laser fields.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, EXPLOSIVES DETECTION TECHNOLOGY, SRI INSTRUMENTS, MODEL 8610C, GAS CHROMATOGRAPH/THERMIONIC IONIZATION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SRI Model 86 1 OC gas chromatograph (GC) is a transportable instrument that can provide on-site analysis of soils for explosives. Coupling this transportable gas chromatograph with a thermionic ionization detector (TID) allows for the determination of explosives in soil matri...

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, EXPLOSIVES DETECTION TECHNOLOGY, SRI INSTRUMENTS, MODEL 8610C, GAS CHROMATOGRAPH/THERMIONIC IONIZATION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SRI Model 86 1 OC gas chromatograph (GC) is a transportable instrument that can provide on-site analysis of soils for explosives. Coupling this transportable gas chromatograph with a thermionic ionization detector (TID) allows for the determination of explosives in soil matri...

  3. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  4. High-ionization Gas in Active Galactic Nuclei: Line Profiles and Physical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodíguez-Ardila, A.; Riffel, R.; Mazzalay, X.; Portilla, J. G.

    2012-08-01

    SOAR/Goodman spectroscopy is employed to detect the coronal lines [Fe VII] 3759, 5159, and 6087 Å, [Ne V] 3423 Å and [Fe X] 6083 Å, the former three suitable to determine the temperature and density of the high-ionization gas. The spectra allow us to fully characterize the profiles of the most conspicuous lines (asymmetries, shifts from the centroid position and line width). The combined results allow us to detect signatures of outflows in the coronal gas and thus set up constrains on the origin of the CLs in AGNs. In addition, AO GEMINI/NIFS IFU spectroscopy is used to study the coronal gas morphology at spatial scales of a few parsecs in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. We found that the gas distribution is rather inhomogeneous and asymmetric. From the comparison of the CL [Mg VIII] with the VLA 6 cm radio emission we found evidence that the CL gas kinematics and morphology is strongly related to the radio jet morphology. All above results allow us to confirm the role that coronal lines have to trace outflows at the inner tens of parsecs of AGNs.

  5. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  6. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  7. Calculations of molecular ionization energies using a self-consistent-charge Hartree-Fock-Slater method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Ellis, D. E.; Adachi, H.; Averill, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical-variational method for performing self-consistent molecular calculations in the Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) model is presented. Molecular wavefunctions are expanded in terms of basis sets constructed from numerical HFS solutions of selected one-center atomlike problems. Binding energies and wavefunctions for the molecules are generated using a discrete variational method for a given molecular potential. In the self-consistent-charge (SCC) approximation to the complete self-consistent-field (SCF) method, results of a Mulliken population analysis of the molecular eigenfunctions are used in each iteration to produce 'atomic' occupation numbers. The simplest SCC potential is then obtained from overlapping spherical atomlike charge distributions. Molecular ionization energies are calculated using the transition-state procedure; results are given for CO, H2O, H2S, AlCl, InCl, and the Ni5O surface complex. Agreement between experimental and theoretical ionization energies for the free-molecule valence levels is generally within 1 eV. The simple SCC procedure gives a reasonably good approximation to the molecular potential, as shown by comparison with experiment, and with complete SCF calculations for CO, H2O, and H2S.

  8. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. Three electronic levels are accounted for in the microscopic model of the atom. Nonequilibrium processes with respect to population of levels and species plus temperature are considered. By using an asymptotic technique the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. The asymptotic procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer in which the gas reaches local equilibrium. A family of numerical examples is displayed for different flow regimes. Argon and helium models are used in these examples.

  9. Characteristics of krypton ion emission from a gas field ionization source with a single atom tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shichi, Hiroyasu; Matsubara, Shinichi; Hashizume, Tomihiro

    2017-06-01

    A scanning ion beam instrument equipped with a gas field ionization source (GFIS) has been commercialized, but only helium and neon are currently available as GFISs. The characteristics of krypton ion emission from a single atom tip (SAT) have not been reported yet. In this study, the characteristics of krypton ion emission were investigated by field ion microscopy. At 65 K, the krypton ion emission current reached approximately 40 pA, which is 1 order of magnitude higher than that at 130 K. As the krypton gas pressure was increased, the krypton ion current increased. At a pressure of 0.3 Pa, the emission current was anticipated to reach 200 pA, which may be high enough for nanofabrication. The variation of the krypton ion current was as low as 5% in one hour. We concluded that a krypton ion beam instrument equipped with a GFIS will be a powerful tool for nanofabrication.

  10. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm(3) and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone.

  11. The influence of molecular pre-orientation on the resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Miao; Li, Jing-Lun; Yu, Jie; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the influence of molecular pre-orientation on the resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) dynamics, taking the LiH molecule for example. The LiH molecule is first pre-oriented by a single-cycle pulse (SCP) in terahertz (THz) region, and then excited by the femtosecond pump pulse, and finally ionized by the femtosecond probe pulse. We focus on the impact of the pre-orientation on the ionization probability, energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distribution (PAD). It is found that the ionization probability and peak intensity of energy-resolved photoelectron spectra are significantly affected by molecular orientation. The angle-resolved photoelectron spectra are related to the molecular orientation. The PAD can be changed by varying the delay time between the THz SCP and pump pulse. We also investigate the effect of temperature on excitation and ionization dynamics.

  12. STRONG MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION AND KINEMATICS OF THE MULTIPHASE GAS IN RADIO GALAXIES WITH FAST JET-DRIVEN OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillard, P.; Ogle, P. M.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Appleton, P. N.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.; Tadhunter, C.; Evans, D. A.; Evans, A. S.

    2012-03-10

    Observations of ionized and neutral gas outflows in radio galaxies (RGs) suggest that active galactic nucleus (AGN) radio jet feedback has a galaxy-scale impact on the host interstellar medium, but it is still unclear how the molecular gas is affected. Thus, it is crucial to determine the physical conditions of the molecular gas in powerful RGs to understand how radio sources may regulate the star formation in their host galaxies. We present deep Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) high-resolution spectroscopy of eight nearby RGs that show fast H I outflows. Strikingly, all of these H I-outflow RGs have bright H{sub 2} mid-IR lines that cannot be accounted for by UV or X-ray heating. This strongly suggests that the radio jet, which drives the H I outflow, is also responsible for the shock excitation of the warm H{sub 2} gas. In addition, the warm H{sub 2} gas does not share the kinematics of the ionized/neutral gas. The mid-IR-ionized gas lines (with FWHM up to 1250 km s{sup -1} for [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m) are systematically broader than the H{sub 2} lines, which are resolved by the IRS in Almost-Equal-To 60% of the detected lines (with FWHM up to 900 km s{sup -1}). In five sources, 3C 236, 3C 293, 3C 459, 4C 12.50, and PKS 1549-79, the [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m line, and to a lesser extent the [Ne III] 15.5 {mu}m and [Ne V] 14.3 {mu}m lines, clearly exhibits blueshifted wings (up to -900 km s{sup -1} with respect to the systemic velocity) that match well the kinematics of the outflowing H I or ionized gas. The H{sub 2} lines do not show these broad wings, except tentative detections in 4C 12.50, 3C 459, and PKS 1549-79. This shows that, contrary to the H I gas, the H{sub 2} gas is inefficiently coupled to the AGN jet-driven outflow of ionized gas. While the dissipation of a small fraction (<10%) of the jet kinetic power can explain the turbulent heating of the molecular gas, our data show that the bulk of the warm molecular gas is not expelled from these galaxies.

  13. Ultraintense X-Ray Induced Ionization, Dissociation, and Frustrated Absorption in Molecular Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hoener, M.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B.; Berrah, N.; Kornilov, O.; Gessner, O.; Pratt, S. T.; Kanter, E. P.; Guehr, M.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Cryan, J.; Glownia, M.; McFarland, B.; Petrovic, V.; Blaga, C.; DiMauro, L.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Coffee, R.; Messerschmidt, M.

    2010-06-25

    Sequential multiple photoionization of the prototypical molecule N{sub 2} is studied with femtosecond time resolution using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). A detailed picture of intense x-ray induced ionization and dissociation dynamics is revealed, including a molecular mechanism of frustrated absorption that suppresses the formation of high charge states at short pulse durations. The inverse scaling of the average target charge state with x-ray peak brightness has possible implications for single-pulse imaging applications.

  14. Ultraintense x-ray induced ionization, dissociation and frustrated absorption in molecular nitrogen.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoener, M.; Fang, L.; Kornilov, O.; Gessner, O.; Pratt, S. T.; Guhr, M.; Kanter, E. P.; Blaga, C.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Buth, C.; Chen, M.; Coffee, R.; Cryan, J.; DiMauro, L.; Glownia, M.; Hosler, E.; Kukk, E.; Leone, S. R.; McFarland, B.; Messerschmidt, M.; Murphy, B.; Petrovic, V.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Western Michigan Univ.; LBNL; Ohio State Univ.; Louisiana State Univ.; LLNL; Univ. of Turku; Univ. of California at Berkeley; Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL; LCLS

    2010-06-23

    Sequential multiple photoionization of the prototypical molecule N2 is studied with femtosecond time resolution using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). A detailed picture of intense x-ray induced ionization and dissociation dynamics is revealed, including a molecular mechanism of frustrated absorption that suppresses the formation of high charge states at short pulse durations. The inverse scaling of the average target charge state with x-ray peak brightness has possible implications for single-pulse imaging applications.

  15. The energy and momentum input of supernova explosions in structured and ionized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the early impact of single and binary supernova (SN) explosions on dense gas clouds with three-dimensional, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations. The effect of cloud structure, radiative cooling and ionizing radiation from the progenitor stars on the net input of kinetic energy, fkin = Ekin/ESN, thermal energy, ftherm = Etherm/ESN, and gas momentum, fP = P/PSN, to the interstellar medium (ISM) is tested. For clouds with bar{n} = 100cm^{-3}, the momentum generating Sedov and pressure-driven snowplough phases are terminated early (∝0.01 Myr) and radiative cooling limits the coupling to ftherm ˜ 0.01, fkin ˜ 0.05, and fP ˜ 9, significantly lower than for the case without cooling. For pre-ionized clouds, these numbers are only increased by ˜50 per cent, independent of the cloud structure. This only suffices to accelerate ˜5 per cent of the cloud to radial velocities ≳30 km s-1. A second SN might enhance the coupling efficiencies if delayed past the Sedov phase of the first explosion. Such very low coupling efficiencies cast doubts on many subresolution models for SN feedback, which are, in general, validated a posteriori. Ionizing radiation appears not to significantly enhance the coupling of SNe to the surrounding gas as it drives the ISM into inert dense shells and cold clumps, a process which is unresolved in galaxy-scale simulations. Our results indicate that the momentum input of SNe in ionized, structured clouds is larger (more than a factor of 10) than the corresponding momentum yield of the progenitor's stellar winds.

  16. Turbulent Dynamo in a Conducting Fluid and a Partially Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Siyao; Lazarian, A.

    2016-12-01

    By following the Kazantsev theory and taking into account both microscopic and turbulent diffusion of magnetic fields, we develop a unified treatment of the kinematic and nonlinear stages of a turbulent dynamo process, and we study the dynamo process for a full range of magnetic Prandtl number P m and ionization fractions. We find a striking similarity between the dependence of dynamo behavior on P m in a conducting fluid and { R } (a function of ionization fraction) in a partially ionized gas. In a weakly ionized medium, the kinematic stage is largely extended, including not only exponential growth but a new regime of dynamo characterized by a linear-in-time growth of magnetic field strength, and the resulting magnetic energy is much higher than the kinetic energy carried by viscous-scale eddies. Unlike the kinematic stage, the subsequent nonlinear stage is unaffected by microscopic diffusion processes and has a universal linear-in-time growth of magnetic energy with the growth rate as a constant fraction 3/38 of the turbulent energy transfer rate, showing good agreement with earlier numerical results. Applying the analysis to the first stars and galaxies, we find that the kinematic stage is able to generate a field strength only an order of magnitude smaller than the final saturation value. But the generation of large-scale magnetic fields can only be accounted for by the relatively inefficient nonlinear stage and requires longer time than the free-fall time. It suggests that magnetic fields may not have played a dynamically important role during the formation of the first stars.

  17. Ambient gas/particle partitioning. 1. Sorption mechanisms of apolar, polar, and ionizable organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Arp, Hans Peter H; Schwarzenbach, René P; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2008-08-01

    There remain several ambiguities in the literature regarding the dominating sorption mechanisms involved in gas/particle partitioning, particularly for polar and ionizable compounds. The various hypothetical mechanisms would depend differently on relative humidity (RH) and the presence of various aerosol components. Thus, in order to resolve these ambiguities, here we measured the RH-dependency of gas/particle partitioning constants, K(ip), for four diverse aerosol samples and a large set of chemicals covering apolar, polar, and ionizable organic compounds. In addition, we also removed the water-soluble components from two ambient particle samples to study how their presence influences sorption behavior. The measured K(ip) values collectively indicate that a dual-phase sorption mechanism is occurring, in which organic compounds partition into a RH-independent water-insoluble organic matter phase and additionally into a RH-dependent mixed-aqueous phase. All K(ip) values could be successfully fitted to a RH-dependent dual-phase sorption model. The trends in K(ip) data further support findings that the sorption behavior of ambient aerosol samples is different from raw mineral surfaces and soot.

  18. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGES

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; ...

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  19. Constraining the ionized gas evolution with CMB-spectroscopic survey cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yin-Zhe

    2017-07-01

    We forecast the prospective constraints on the ionized gas model fgas (z) at different evolutionary epochs via the tomographic cross-correlation between kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect and the reconstructed momentum field at different redshifts. The experiments we consider are the Planck and CMB Stage-4 survey for CMB and the SDSS-III for the galaxy spectroscopic survey. We calculate the tomographic cross-correlation power spectrum, and use the Fisher matrix to forecast the detectability of different fgas (z) models. We find that for constant fgas model, Planck can constrain the error of fgas (σfgas) at each redshift bin to ∼0.2, whereas four cases of CMB-S4 can achieve σfgas ∼10-3. For fgas (z) =fgas,0 / (1 + z) model the error budget will be slightly broadened. We also investigate the model fgas (z) =fgas,0 /(1 + z) α. Planck is unable to constrain the index of redshift evolution, but the CMB-S4 experiments can constrain the index α to the level of σα ∼ 0.01-0.1. The tomographic cross-correlation method will provide an accurate measurement of the ionized gas evolution at different epochs of the Universe.

  20. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    SciTech Connect

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  1. Collisions of fast multicharged ions in gas targets: Charge transfer and ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachter, A. S.

    1981-05-01

    Measurements of cross sections for charge transfer and ionization of H2 and rare-gas targets were made with fast, highly stripped projectiles in charge states as high as 59+. An empirical scaling rule for electron-capture cross section in H2 valid at energies above 275 keV/amu was found. Similar scaling might exist for other target gases. Cross sections are generally in good agreement with theory. A scaling rule was found for electron loss from H in collisions with a fast highly stripped projectile, based on Olson's classical-trajectory Monte-Carlo calculations, and confirmed by measurements in an H2 target. A similar scaling rule was for net ionization of rare-gas targets, based on Olson's CTMC calculations and the independent-electron model. Measurements are essentially consistent with the scaled cross sections. Calculations and measurements of recoil-ion charge-state spectra show large cross sections for the production of highly charged slow recoil ions.

  2. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  3. Study on the Characteristics of Gas Molecular Mean Free Path in Nanopores by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qixin; Cai, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents studies on the characteristics of gas molecular mean free path in nanopores by molecular dynamics simulation. Our study results indicate that the mean free path of all molecules in nanopores depend on both the radius of the nanopore and the gas-solid interaction strength. Besides mean free path of all molecules in the nanopore, this paper highlights the gas molecular mean free path at different positions of the nanopore and the anisotropy of the gas molecular mean free path at nanopores. The molecular mean free path varies with the molecule’s distance from the center of the nanopore. The least value of the mean free path occurs at the wall surface of the nanopore. The present paper found that the gas molecular mean free path is anisotropic when gas is confined in nanopores. The radial gas molecular mean free path is much smaller than the mean free path including all molecular collisions occuring in three directions. Our study results also indicate that when gas is confined in nanopores the gas molecule number density does not affect the gas molecular mean free path in the same way as it does for the gas in unbounded space. These study results may bring new insights into understanding the gas flow’s characteristic at nanoscale. PMID:25046745

  4. CO/H2, C/CO, OH/CO, and OH/O2 in dense interstellar gas: from high ionization to low metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Sternberg, Amiel

    2015-07-01

    We present numerical computations and analytic scaling relations for interstellar ion-molecule gas-phase chemistry down to very low metallicities (10-3 × solar), and/or up to high driving ionization rates. Relevant environments include the cool interstellar medium (ISM) in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies, early enriched clouds at the reionization and Pop-II star formation era, and in dense cold gas exposed to intense X-ray or cosmic ray sources. We focus on the behaviour for H2, CO, CH, OH, H2O and O2, at gas temperatures ˜100 K, characteristic of a cooled ISM at low metallicities. We consider shielded or partially shielded one-zone gas parcels, and solve the gas-phase chemical rate equations for the steady-state `metal-molecule abundances for a wide range of ionization parameters, ζ/n, and metallicties, Z '. We find that the OH abundances are always maximal near the H-to-H2 conversion points, and that large OH abundances persist at very low metallicities even when the hydrogen is predominantly atomic. We study the OH/O2, C/CO and OH/CO abundance ratios, from large to small, as functions of ζ/n and Z '. Much of the cold dense ISM for the Pop-II generation may have been OH-dominated and atomic rather than CO-dominated and molecular.

  5. Dust and ionized gas in elliptical galaxies: Signatures of merging collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Dejong, Teije

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally elliptical galaxies were thought to be essentially devoid of interstellar matter. However, recent advances in instrumental sensitivity have caused a renaissance of interest in dust and gas in - or associated with - elliptical galaxies. In particular, the technique of co-adding IRAS survey scans has led to the detection of more than half of all ellipticals with BT less than 11 mag. in the Revised Shapley-Ames catalog, indicating the presence of 10(exp 7) - 10(exp 8) solar mass of cold interstellar matter (Jura et al. 1987). In addition, CCD multi-color surface photometry shows dust patches in about 30 percent of the cases studied to date (e.g., Veron-Cetty & Veron 1988). Thorough study of the gas and dust in ellipticals is important to (1) determine its origin (mass-loss from late-type stars, merging collisions with other galaxies or accretion inflows from cooling X-ray gas), and (2) investigate the 3-D shape of ellipticals, as can be derived from the orientation of the dust lanes and the 2-D velocity field of the gas. An important result of our comprehensive CCD imaging program is that a relevant fraction (approximately 40 percent) of the sample objects exhibits dust patches within extended H-alpha+(NII) line-emitting filaments. This common occurrence can be easily accounted for if the dust and gas have an external origin, i.e., mergers or interactions with gas-rich galaxies. Evidence supporting this suggestion: (1) the ionized gas is usually dynamically decoupled from the stellar velocity field (see, e.g., Sharples et al. 1983, Bertola & Bettoni 1988); (2) it is shown in a companion paper (Goudfrooij et al. 1992) that internal stellar mass loss alone can not account for the dust content of elliptical galaxies.

  6. Radiation sterilization of medical devices. Effects of ionizing radiation on ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, R.; Schüttler, C.; Bögl, K. W.

    1995-02-01

    Sterilization by ionizing radiation has become, next to ethylene oxide treament, the most important "cold" sterilization process for medical devices made from plastics. The effects of ionizing radiation on the most important polymer for medical devices, ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene, are briefly described in this review.

  7. Adaptation of the Black Yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to Ionizing Radiation: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly L.; Mostaghim, Anahita; Cuomo, Christina A.; Soto, Carissa M.; Lebedev, Nikolai; Bailey, Robert F.; Wang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual genes

  8. Gas kinematics and ionization along the extended sight line to HD 116852

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    We present Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph intermediate observations of the interstellar medium toward HD 116852, a low halo star at a distance of 4.8 kpc (z = -1.3 kpc) in the direction l = 304. deg 9, b = 16.deg 1. The small science aperture observations have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 30 to 90 and resolutions of 11 to 18 km/s (FWHM). We confirm the optical MK classification of this star through an analysis of its ultraviolet photosperic and stellar wind profiles. We detect interstellar lines of Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V together with lines of C I, C I*, C I**, Si II, Ge II, P II, and Ni II. We convert the Mg II, P II, S II, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V profiles into measure of apparent column density as a function of LSR velocity. Gas scale height, velocity dispersion, and differential Galactic rotation effects govern the profile shapes. A simple computer model of the expected sight line column density profiles for the low and high ion species indicates that the gas velocity dispersions and scale heights increase as the ionization level of the gas increases. We find scale heigts H greater than or = 1 kpc for the high ions, which are comparable to the z-distance of the star, whereas we find H approximatley = 0.6 to 0.7 kpc for A1 III and H approximatley 0.1 kpc for P II and Ge II. An enhancement in the Al II profile near -15 km/s accounts for approximately 25% of the A1 III column along the sight line and probably arises within gas located approximately 500 pc below the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm link. Portions of the broad underlying A1 III distribution are associated with the higher ionization lines, perhaps in conductive interfaces. The presence of N V and the column density ratios of Si IV, C IV, and N V favor the interpretation that much of the high ion absorption is produced by collisional ionization in gas with T = 1-3 x 10(exp 5) K. An enhancement near -35 km/s in both the Si IV and C IV profiles may be due to an outflow from the Norma

  9. Gas kinematics and ionization along the extended sight line to HD 116852

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    We present Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph intermediate observations of the interstellar medium toward HD 116852, a low halo star at a distance of 4.8 kpc (z = -1.3 kpc) in the direction l = 304. deg 9, b = 16.deg 1. The small science aperture observations have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 30 to 90 and resolutions of 11 to 18 km/s (FWHM). We confirm the optical MK classification of this star through an analysis of its ultraviolet photosperic and stellar wind profiles. We detect interstellar lines of Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V together with lines of C I, C I*, C I**, Si II, Ge II, P II, and Ni II. We convert the Mg II, P II, S II, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V profiles into measure of apparent column density as a function of LSR velocity. Gas scale height, velocity dispersion, and differential Galactic rotation effects govern the profile shapes. A simple computer model of the expected sight line column density profiles for the low and high ion species indicates that the gas velocity dispersions and scale heights increase as the ionization level of the gas increases. We find scale heigts H greater than or = 1 kpc for the high ions, which are comparable to the z-distance of the star, whereas we find H approximatley = 0.6 to 0.7 kpc for A1 III and H approximatley 0.1 kpc for P II and Ge II. An enhancement in the Al II profile near -15 km/s accounts for approximately 25% of the A1 III column along the sight line and probably arises within gas located approximately 500 pc below the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm link. Portions of the broad underlying A1 III distribution are associated with the higher ionization lines, perhaps in conductive interfaces. The presence of N V and the column density ratios of Si IV, C IV, and N V favor the interpretation that much of the high ion absorption is produced by collisional ionization in gas with T = 1-3 x 10(exp 5) K. An enhancement near -35 km/s in both the Si IV and C IV profiles may be due to an outflow from the Norma

  10. Quantitative analysis of molecular surfaces: areas, volumes, electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Felipe A; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Brinck, Tore; Murray, Jane S; Politzer, Peter

    2010-11-01

    We describe a procedure for performing quantitative analyses of fields f(r) on molecular surfaces, including statistical quantities and locating and evaluating their local extrema. Our approach avoids the need for explicit mathematical representation of the surface and can be implemented easily in existing graphical software, as it is based on the very popular representation of a surface as collection of polygons. We discuss applications involving the volumes, surface areas and molecular surface electrostatic potentials, and local ionization energies of a group of 11 molecules.

  11. Reduced fragmentation in liquid injection field desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry by use of helium for the thermalization of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Bernhard Linden, H; Gross, Jürgen H

    2012-02-15

    To exploit the softness of liquid injection field desorption/ionization (LIFDI), the molecular ions, M(+•), need to be transferred from their origin at the field emitter through the mass analyzer without disrupting their integrity. To preserve the molecular ions, ion-activating events like collisions must therefore be avoided. In hybrid quadrupole Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometers, however, multiple ion-guiding and ion-trapping events occur prior to mass analysis. The effects thereof compromised initial spectra from a LIFDI and electrospray ionization (ESI) combination (LIFDI-ESI) ion source and, thus, called for refined experimental conditions. A hybrid quadrupole FT-ICR instrument equipped with a new LIFDI-ESI combination ion source was used to obtain LIFDI spectra of polystyrene 1050, of 2,3,4-tridodecyloxybenzaldehyde, and of sewing machine oil as well as a field ionization (FI) spectrum of pentafluoroiodobenzene. The abundance of molecular ions, M(+•), was optimized, in particular by variation of the trapping conditions inside the instrument's accumulation RF-hexapole ion trap. Ion-buffer gas collisions in the instrument's accumulation RF-hexapole ion trap were detrimental to the easy-to-fragment molecular ions of hydrocarbon species, whereas more robust even-electron ions were not affected. Exchanging the instrument's standard supply of argon buffer gas for helium resulted in a remarkable improvement. Together with further adjustments of potentials applied along the ion transfer path, hydrocarbon species could be analyzed. The use of helium buffer gas remarkably improved LIFDI spectra, because the loss of molecular ions by dissociation during transfer from the LIFDI source into the ICR cell was significantly reduced. Hydrocarbon species could be analyzed while fragmentation of ions was avoided for the most part. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Molecular resolution and fragmentation of fulvic acid by electrospray ionization/multistage tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Gates, Paul M.; Furlong, E.T.; Ferrer, I.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular weight distributions of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, were investigated by electrospray ionization/quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI/QMS), and fragmentation pathways of specific fulvic acid masses were investigated by electrospray ionization/ion trap multistage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MST/MS). ESI/QMS studies of the free acid form of low molecular weight poly(carboxylic acid) standards in 75% methanol/25% water mobile phase found that negative ion detection gave the optimum generation of parent ions that can be used for molecular weight determinations. However, experiments with poly(acrylic acid) mixtures and specific high molecular weight standards found multiply charged negative ions that gave a low bias to molecular mass distributions. The number of negative charges on a molecule is dependent on the distance between charges. ESI/MST/MS of model compounds found characteristic water loss from alcohol dehydration and anhydride formation, as well as CO2 loss from decarboxylation, and CO loss from ester structures. Application of these fragmentation pathways to specific masses of fulvic acid isolated and fragmented by ESI/MST/MS is indicative of specific structures that can serve as a basis for future structural confirmation after these hypothesized structures are synthesized.

  13. Saturation region of helium ionization detector for gas-solid and gas-liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Andrawes, F.F.; Brazell, R.S.; Gibson, E.K.

    1980-05-01

    In the saturation region of the helium detector field intensity, the detector response is independent of the electrical field. In this region (at applied potential between 200 to 2000 volts per centimeter of electrode surface) the detector is operated at a low background current, and a low noise level, but it still exhibits a stable and sensitive response. The detector in this region can be operated with high purity grade helium without any further elaborate purification processes to yield a positive response to all compounds and gases tested. The operation of the detector in this mode has been adapted to both gas-solid and gas-liquid chromatography, with temperature programming. A sample can be introduced to the column via a gas sampling injection valve or via a syringe by direct injection into a modified injection port. The detector response is linear over a range of 10/sup 6/ units with a detection limit in the picogram range for organic compounds. 11 figures.

  14. Molecular typing of Meningiomas by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Surgical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Norton, Isaiah; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Dunn, Ian F.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most frequent intracranial tumors. The majority is benign slow-growing tumors but they can be difficult to treat depending on their location and size. While meningiomas are well delineated on magnetic resonance imaging by their uptake of contrast, surgical limitations still present themselves from not knowing the extent of invasion of the dura matter by meningioma cells. The development of tools to characterize tumor tissue in real or near real time could prevent recurrence after tumor resection by allowing for more precise surgery, i.e. removal of tumor with preservation of healthy tissue. The development of ambient ionization mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of tissue and its implementation in the surgical decision-making workflow carry the potential to fulfill this need. Here, we present the characterization of meningioma and dura mater by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to validate the technique for the molecular assessment of surgical margins and diagnosis of meningioma from surgical tissue in real-time. Nine stereotactically resected surgical samples and three autopsy samples were analyzed by standard histopathology and mass spectrometry imaging. All samples indicated a strong correlation between results from both techniques. We then highlight the value of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the molecular subtyping/subgrouping of meningiomas from a series of forty genetically characterized specimens. The minimal sample preparation required for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry offers a distinct advantage for applications relying on real-time information such as surgical decision-making. The technology here was tested to distinguish meningioma from dura mater as an approach to precisely define surgical margins. In addition we classify meningiomas into fibroblastic and meningothelial subtypes and more notably recognize meningiomas with NF2 genetic aberrations. PMID

  15. The Cosmic-Ray Ionization Rate in the Galactic Disk, as Determined from Observations of Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Wolfire, Mark G.

    2017-08-01

    We have obtained estimates for the cosmic-ray ionization rate (CRIR) in the Galactic disk, using a detailed model for the physics and chemistry of diffuse interstellar gas clouds to interpret previously published measurements of the abundance of four molecular ions: ArH+, OH+, {{{H}}}2{{{O}}}+, and {{{H}}}3+. For diffuse atomic clouds at Galactocentric distances in the range {R}g∼ 4{--}9 {kpc}, observations of ArH+, OH+, and {{{H}}}2{{{O}}}+ imply a mean primary CRIR of (2.2+/- 0.3) \\exp [({R}0-{R}g)/4.7 {kpc}]× {10}-16 {{{s}}}-1 per hydrogen atom, where {R}0=8.5 {kpc}. Within diffuse molecular clouds observed toward stars in the solar neighborhood, measurements of {{{H}}}3+ and H2 imply a primary CRIR of (2.3+/- 0.6)× {10}-16 {{{s}}}-1 per H atom, corresponding to a total ionization rate per H2 molecule of (5.3+/- 1.1)× {10}-16 {{{s}}}-1, in good accord with previous estimates. These estimates are also in good agreement with a rederivation, presented here, of the CRIR implied by recent observations of carbon and hydrogen radio recombination lines along the sight line to Cas A. Here, our best-fit estimate for the primary CRIR is 2.9× {10}-16 {{{s}}}-1 per H atom. Our results show marginal evidence that the CRIR in diffuse molecular clouds decreases with cloud extinction, {A}{{V}}({tot}), with a best-fit dependence \\propto {A}{{V}}{({tot})}-1 for {A}{{V}}({tot})≥slant 0.5.

  16. Strong molecular alignment dependence of H2 electron impact ionization dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Pflüger, T; Xu, S; Colgan, J; Pindzola, M S; Senftleben, A; Ullrich, J; Dorn, A

    2012-09-21

    Low-energy (E(0) = 54 eV) electron impact single ionization of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) has been investigated as a function of molecular alignment in order to benchmark recent theoretical predictions [Colgan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 233201 (2008) and Al-Hagan et al., Nature Phys. 5, 59 (2009)]. In contrast to any previous work, we observe distinct alignment dependence of the (e,2e) cross sections in the perpendicular plane in good overall agreement with results from time-dependent close-coupling calculations. The cross section behavior can be consistently explained by a rescattering of the ejected electron in the molecular potential resulting in an effective focusing along the molecular axis.

  17. Strong Molecular Alignment Dependence of H2 Electron Impact Ionization Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Pflüger, T.; Xu, S.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.; Senftleben, A.; Ullrich, J.; Dorn, A.

    2012-09-01

    Low-energy (E0=54eV) electron impact single ionization of molecular hydrogen (H2) has been investigated as a function of molecular alignment in order to benchmark recent theoretical predictions [Colgan , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 101, 233201 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.233201 and Al-Hagan , Nature Phys.NPAHAX1745-2473 5, 59 (2009)10.1038/nphys1135]. In contrast to any previous work, we observe distinct alignment dependence of the (e,2e) cross sections in the perpendicular plane in good overall agreement with results from time-dependent close-coupling calculations. The cross section behavior can be consistently explained by a rescattering of the ejected electron in the molecular potential resulting in an effective focusing along the molecular axis.

  18. Observations of feedback from radio-quiet quasars - II. Kinematics of ionized gas nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Liu, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence and energetics of quasar feedback is a major unresolved problem in galaxy formation theory. In this paper, we present Gemini Integral Field Unit observations of ionized gas around 11 luminous, obscured, radio-quiet quasars at z ˜ 0.5 out to ˜15 kpc from the quasar; specifically, we measure the kinematics and morphology of [O III] λ5007 Å emission. The round morphologies of the nebulae and the large line-of-sight velocity widths (with velocities containing 80 per cent of the emission as high as 103 km s-1) combined with relatively small velocity difference across them (from 90 to 520 km s-1) point towards wide-angle quasi-spherical outflows. We use the observed velocity widths to estimate a median outflow velocity of 760 km s-1, similar to or above the escape velocities from the host galaxies. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion declines slightly towards outer parts of the nebulae (by 3 per cent kpc-1 on average). The majority of nebulae show blueshifted excesses in their line profiles across most of their extents, signifying gas outflows. For the median outflow velocity, we find dot{E}_kin between 4 × 1044 and 3 × 1045 erg s-1 and dot{M} between 2 × 103 and 2 × 104 M⊙ yr-1. These values are large enough for the observed quasar winds to have a significant impact on their host galaxies. The median rate of converting bolometric luminosity to kinetic energy of ionized gas clouds is ˜2 per cent. We report four new candidates for `superbubbles' - outflows that may have broken out of the denser regions of the host galaxy.

  19. Rapid comprehensive characterization of crude oils by thermogravimetry coupled to fast modulated gas chromatography-single photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, S; Fischer, M; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Matuschek, G; Streibel, T; Post, E; Denner, T; Zimmermann, R

    2013-09-01

    Comprehensive multi-dimensional hyphenation of a thermogravimetry device (i.e. a thermobalance) to gas chromatography and single photon ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TG-GC×SPI-MS) has been used to investigate two crude oil samples of different geographical origin. The source of the applied vacuum ultraviolet radiation is an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL). The soft photoionization favors the formation of molecular ions. Introduction of a fast, rapidly modulated gas chromatographic separation step in comparison with solely TG-SPI-MS enables strongly enhanced detection especially with such highly complex organic matrices as crude oil. In contrast with former TG-SPI-MS measurements, separation and identification of overlying substances is possible because of different GC retention times. The specific contribution of isobaric compounds to one mass signal is determined for alkanes, naphthalenes, alkylated benzenes, and other compounds.

  20. Cosmic-Ray Heated Molecular Gas in NGC 253.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, C. M.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Bolatto, A. D.; Jackson, J. M.; Savage, M. L.; Davidson, J. A.; Higdon, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    We report observations of the CO J=7-6 transition toward the nucleus of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. This is the highest-excitation CO measurement in this source to date, and allows an estimate of the molecular gas excitation conditions. Application of a large velocity gradient, escape probability model shows that the 12CO and 13CO line intensities are consistent with the full 4 x 107 Mo of molecular gas being at high excitation, T > 100 K, nH2>104 cm-3. This is in contrast with previous studies which invoke multiple molecular gas components. The mass of warm, dense molecular gas is about 30 times the atomic gas mass as traced through its [CII] and [OI] line emission. This large mass ratio is inconsistent with photodissociation region models where the gas is heated by far-UV starlight. It is also not likely that a substantial fraction of the gas is heated by shocks in outflows or cloud-cloud collisions, based on energetic considerations and fluorescent near-IR H2 line ratios. On the other hand, the best mechanism for heating the gas is cosmic rays, which provides a natural means of uniformly heating the full volume of molecular clouds. With the tremendous supernova rate in the nucleus of NGC 253, the CR heating rate is at least 800 times greater than in the Galaxy, more than sufficient to heat the bulk of the molecular gas to 100 K or higher.

  1. Study on the characteristics of gas molecular mean free pathin nanopores by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qixin; Cai, Zhiyong

    2014-07-18

    This paper presents studies on the characteristics of gas molecular mean freepath in nanopores by molecular dynamics simulation. Our study results indicate that themean free path of all molecules in nanopores depend on both the radius of the nanoporeand the gas-solid interaction strength. Besides mean free path of all molecules in thenanopore, this paper highlights the gas molecular mean free path at different positions ofthe nanopore and the anisotropy of the gas molecular mean free path at nanopores. Themolecular mean free path varies with the molecule's distance from the center of thenanopore. The least value of the mean free path occurs at the wall surface of the nanopore.The present paper found that the gas molecular mean free path is anisotropic when gas isconfined in nanopores. The radial gas molecular mean free path is much smaller than themean free path including all molecular collisions occuring in three directions. Our studyresults also indicate that when gas is confined in nanopores the gas molecule number densitydoes not affect the gas molecular mean free path in the same way as it does for the gas inunbounded space. These study results may bring new insights into understanding the gasflow's characteristic at nanoscale.

  2. Silver nanoparticles on zeolite surface for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of low molecular weight compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mengrui; Fujino, Tatsuya

    2013-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles loaded on NH4+-type zeolite, AgNPs-NH4ZSM5, was developed as an inorganic matrix for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of low molecular weight compounds. It was found that AgNPs-NH4ZSM5 could work as an efficient Ag+ donor to ionize analytes and that zeolite worked as a heat bath to prevent the destruction of AgNPs after the photoexcitation. The AgNPs-NH4ZSM5 was applied to laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of biologically active substances with low molecular weights including acetylsalicylic acid, L-histidine, glucose, urea, cholesterol, and those in human serum.

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy of quinoline derivatives. Correlation of experimental ionization potentials with calculated molecular energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. A.; Julliard, M.; Chanon, F.; Chanon, M.; Gracian, F.; Pfister-Guillouzo, G.

    1997-03-01

    Experimental ionization potentials of quinoline 1 and substituted quinolines: 6-methylquinoline 2, 2,6-dimethylquinoline 3, 6-methoxyquinoline 4, 3-bromoquinoline 5, 2-chloro-4-methylquinoline 6, 4-hydroxyquinoline 7, 4-hydroxy-2-methylquinoline 8, 2-hydroxy-4-methylquinoline 9, 4-methoxyquinoline 10, 4- methoxy-2-methylquinoline 11, 2-methoxy-4-methylquinoline 12, were measured by photoelectron spectroscopy. Molecular orbital energies of the same derivatives were calculated by the Austin Method 1. The assignments of the bands of the photoelectron spectra were done with the aid of the theoretical calculations and on the basis of the substituent effects. For quinolines 1-6 a good agreement was found between the experimental ionization potentials and the calculated orbital energies.

  4. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry: In Situ Molecular Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a relatively new imaging modality that allows mapping of a wide range of biomolecules within a thin tissue section. The technology uses a laser beam to directly desorb and ionize molecules from discrete locations on the tissue that are subsequently recorded in a mass spectrometer. IMS is distinguished by the ability to directly measure molecules in situ ranging from small metabolites to proteins, reporting hundreds to thousands of expression patterns from a single imaging experiment. This article reviews recent advances in IMS technology, applications, and experimental strategies that allow it to significantly aid in the discovery and understanding of molecular processes in biological and clinical samples. PMID:23259809

  5. Analysis of pesticide residues by fast gas chromatography in combination with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Húsková, Renáta; Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana; Svorc, Lubomír

    2009-08-28

    A combination of fast GC with narrow-bore column and bench top quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) detector in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode (with methane as reagent gas) is set up and utilized for the ultratrace analysis of 25 selected pesticides. The observed pesticides, belonging to the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), were from different chemical classes. A comparative study with electron impact (EI) ionization was also carried out (both techniques in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode). The programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector in solvent vent mode and narrow-bore column (15mx0.15mm I.D.x0.15microm film of 5% diphenyl 95% dimethylsiloxane stationary phase) were used for effective and fast separation. Heptachlor (HPT) as internal standard (I.S.) was applied for the comparison of results obtained from absolute and normalized peak areas. Non-fatty food matrices were investigated. Fruit (apple - matrix-matched standards; orange, strawberry, plum - real samples) and vegetable (lettuce - real sample) extracts were prepared by a quick and effective QuEChERS sample preparation technique. Very good results were obtained for the characterization of fast GC-NCI-MS method analysing EDCs pesticides. Analyte response was linear from 0.01 to 150microgkg(-1) with the R(2) values in the range from 0.9936 to 1.0000 (calculated from absolute peak areas) and from 0.9956 to 1.0000 (calculated from peak areas normalized to HPT). Instrument limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were found at pgmL(-1) level and for the majority of analytes were up to three orders of magnitude lower for NCI compared to EI mode. In both ionization modes, repeatability of measurements expressed as relative standard deviation (RSDs) was less than 10% which is in very good agreement with the criterion of European Union.

  6. Identifying Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in a Sample of MaNGA Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Ryan J.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency with which galaxies convert gas into stars is driven by the continuous cycle of accretion and feedback processes within the circumgalactic medium. Extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) can provide insights into the tumultuous processes that govern the evolution of galactic disks because eDIG emission traces both inflowing and outflowing gas. With the help of state-of-the-art, spatially-resolved spectroscopy from MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), we developed a computational method to identify eDIG based on the strength of and spatial extent of optical emission lines for a diverse sample of 550 nearby galaxies. This sample includes roughly half of the MaNGA galaxies that will become publicly available in summer 2016 as part of the Thirteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We identified signatures of eDIG in 8% of the galaxies in this sample, and we found that these signatures are particularly common among galaxies with active star formation and inclination angles >45 degrees. Our analysis of the morphology, incidence, and kinematics of eDIG has important implications for current models of accretion and feedback processes that regulate star formation in galaxies. We acknowledge support from the Astrophysics REU program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the National Astronomy Consortium, and The Grainger Foundation.

  7. Accuracy of commercial blood gas analyzers for monitoring ionized calcium at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul; Visnick, Helen; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Variable ionized calcium measurements in post filter blood samples during continuous renal replacement therapy (renal dialysis) using regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) have been reported using commercial blood gas analyzers, resulting in analyzer-dependent differences in decisions regarding adjustment of citrate dose. We evaluated accuracy for measurement of iCa at low concentrations by 4 commercial blood gas analyzers using primary reference solutions formulated down to 0.15mmol/l iCa. Of the 4 analyzers tested, GEM Premier 4000 demonstrates acceptable accuracy for iCa measurement with a median deviation of -6.7% (-0.01mmol/l) at 0.15mmol/l, while other analyzers tested show increasingly positive biases from +40% (+0.06mmol/l) to +60% (+0.09mmol/l) relative to target. These relative differences are consistent with discordant results reported for measurement of iCa in blood during RCA. Interference from sodium with measured iCa and carryover from system rinse solution to sample are likely contributors to variability. We conclude the GEM Premier 4000 shows acceptable accuracy for measuring iCa at low concentrations required to control citrate dose during RCA. The method presented here may be used to test accuracy of any blood gas analyzer prior to use in clinical applications requiring measurement of iCa at low concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of residual epichlorohydrin in sevelamer hydrochloride by static headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Kaliaperumal; Arularasu, Govindasamy T; Devaraj, Perumalsamy; Pillai, Karnam Chandrasekara

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive static headspace gas chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of residual epichlorohydrin (ECH) in sevelamer hydrochloride (SVH) drug substance. This method utilized a Phenomenex Zebron ZB-WAX GC column, helium as carrier gas with flame ionization detection. The critical experimental parameters, such as, headspace vial incubation time and incubation temperature were studied and optimized. The method was validated as per United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in terms of detection limit (DL), quantitation limit (QL), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity and robustness. A linear range from 0.30 to 10 Îg/mL was obtained with the coefficient of determination (r(2)) 0.999. The DL and QL of ECH were 0.09 Îg/mL and 0.30 Îg/mL, respectively. The recovery obtained for ECH was between 91.7 and 96.6%. Also, the specificity of the method was proved through gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method was applied successfully to determine the content of residual ECH in SVH bulk drug.

  9. Determination of Residual Epichlorohydrin in Sevelamer Hydrochloride by Static Headspace Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Kaliaperumal; Arularasu, Govindasamy T.; Devaraj, Perumalsamy; Pillai, Karnam Chandrasekara

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive static headspace gas chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of residual epichlorohydrin (ECH) in sevelamer hydrochloride (SVH) drug substance. This method utilized a Phenomenex Zebron ZB-WAX GC column, helium as carrier gas with flame ionization detection. The critical experimental parameters, such as, headspace vial incubation time and incubation temperature were studied and optimized. The method was validated as per United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in terms of detection limit (DL), quantitation limit (QL), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity and robustness. A linear range from 0.30 to 10 μg/mL was obtained with the coefficient of determination (r2) 0.999. The DL and QL of ECH were 0.09 μg/mL and 0.30 μg/mL, respectively. The recovery obtained for ECH was between 91.7 and 96.6%. Also, the specificity of the method was proved through gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method was applied successfully to determine the content of residual ECH in SVH bulk drug. PMID:21179319

  10. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  11. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  12. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  13. Iodide Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Trace gas Measurement in Different Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Philipp; Phillips, Gavin J.; Crowley, John N.

    2017-04-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is a versatile and specific technique to simultaneously measure various atmospheric trace gases with good temporal resolution and detection limits in the ppt range (Huey et al., 1995). Our Iodide-CIMS with polonium ionizer and quadrupole mass filter has been used in the past to make measurements of halogenated and organic nitrates and peracetic acid (Phillips et al., 2012; Phillips et al., 2013). Here we present a modified I-CIMS instrument with an electrical discharge ion source that is able to detect a wider variety of gas-phase molecules including peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs), peracetic acid (PAA), ClNO2, HCl, SO2 and organic acids. We show the results of three different field campaigns that took place in maritime, mixed urban/rural and forested environment and outline the instrumental design and the ion chemistry involved. In aged marine air masses (CYPHEX 2014) we measured elevated levels of HCl, ClNO2 and SO2, whereas in the boreal forest (IBAIRN 2016) organic acids resulting from biogenic VOC oxidation were predominant. In mixed urban/rural sites (NOTOMO 2015) both low- and high-NOx conditions were encountered and SO2, PAN, PAA, HCl and ClNO2 were observed.

  14. Measurement of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, A. R.; Gonçalves, J. A. C.; Mangiarotti, A.; Botelho, S.; Bueno, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    Tissue-equivalent gases (TEGs), often made of a hydrocarbon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, have been employed in microdosimetry for decades. However, data on the first Townsend ionization coefficient (α) in such mixtures are scarce, regardless of the chosen hydrocarbon. In this context, measurements of α in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas (CH4 - 64.4%, CO2 - 32.4%, and N2 - 3.2%) were performed in a uniform field configuration for density-normalized electric fields (E/N) up to 290 Td. The setup adopted in our previous works was improved for operating at low pressures. The modifications introduced in the apparatus and the experimental technique were validated by comparing our results of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane with those from the literature and Magboltz simulations. The behavior of α in the methane-based TEG was consistent with that observed for pure methane. All the experimental results are included in tabular form in the Supplementary material.

  15. The ionized gas in the CALIFA early-type galaxies. I. Mapping two representative cases: NGC 6762 and NGC 5966

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.; Gomes, J. M.; Masegosa, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Lehnert, M. D.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Marquez, I.; Mast, D.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Marino, R. A.; Pasquali, A.; Perez, I.; Roth, M. M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Ziegler, B.

    2012-04-01

    As part of the ongoing CALIFA survey, we have conducted a thorough bidimensional analysis of the ionized gas in two E/S0 galaxies, NGC 6762 and NGC 5966, aiming to shed light on the nature of their warm ionized ISM. Specifically, we present optical (3745-7300 Å) integral field spectroscopy obtained with the PMAS/PPAK integral field spectrophotometer. Its wide field-of-view (1' × 1') covers the entire optical extent of each galaxy down to faint continuum surface brightnesses. To recover the nebular lines, we modeled and subtracted the underlying stellar continuum from the observed spectra using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. The pure emission-line spectra were used to investigate the gas properties and determine the possible sources of ionization. We show the advantages of IFU data in interpreting the complex nature of the ionized gas in NGC 6762 and NGC 5966. In NGC 6762, the ionized gas and stellar emission display similar morphologies, while the emission line morphology is elongated in NGC 5966, spanning ~6 kpc, and is oriented roughly orthogonal to the major axis of the stellar continuum ellipsoid. Whereas gas and stars are kinematically aligned in NGC 6762, the gas is kinematically decoupled from the stars in NGC 5966. A decoupled rotating disk or an "ionization cone" are two possible interpretations of the elongated ionized gas structure in NGC 5966. The latter would be the first "ionization cone" of such a dimension detected within a weak emission-line galaxy. Both galaxies have weak emission-lines relative to the continuum[EW(Hα) ≲ 3 Å] and have very low excitation, log([Oiii]λ5007/Hβ) ≲ 0.5. Based on optical diagnostic ratios ([Oiii]λ5007/Hβ, [Nii]λ6584/Hα, [Sii]λ6717, 6731/Hα, [Oi]λ6300/Hα), both objects contain a LINER nucleus and an extended LINER-like gas emission. The emission line ratios do not vary significantly with radius or aperture, which indicates that the nebular properties are spatially homogeneous. The gas emission

  16. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness.

  17. Determination of selected fatty acids in dried sweat spot using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Kanďár, Roman; Drábková, Petra; Andrlová, Lenka; Kostelník, Adam; Čegan, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for the determination of fatty acids in dried sweat spot and plasma samples using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Plasma and dried sweat spot samples were obtained from a group of blood donors. The sweat was collected from each volunteer during exercise. Sweat was spotted onto collection paper containing butylated hydroxytoluene. Fatty acids were derivatized with acetyl chloride in methanol to form methyl esters of fatty acids. The fatty acids in dried sweat spot samples treated with butylated hydroxytoluene and stored at -20°C were stable for 3 months. Our results indicate that sweat contains, among fatty acids with short chain, also fatty acids with long chain and unsaturated fatty acids. Linear relationships between percentage content of selected fatty acids in dried sweat spot and plasma were observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The detection of dissolved gases in transformer oil by gas chromatography with helium ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xian-qin; Fang, Hua; Li, Min-xian

    2017-07-01

    The GC-PDD with the technology of valve cutting and helium ionization detector was used to analyze the dissolved gases in ultra-high voltage(UHV) and extra-high voltage(EHV) transformer oil. The detection limit(DL) reached ppb grade, especially for the featuring gas—C2H2 and H2, whose DL could reach 5ppb and 11ppb respectively. The test reproducibility of the instrument was about 1% and the correlation coefficient of standard curve-r is greater or equal to 0.99, which showed obvious advantage compared with normal GC. In addition, the auxiliary gas of H2 was not used in this instrument, which completely improved the safety performance. Thus, the application of GC-PDD has significant meaning in warning potential malfunction inside the ultra-high voltage transformer in advance.

  19. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. L.; Lottes, S. A.; Bouillard, J. X.

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance, and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  20. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmissivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2016-01-25

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmissivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach could serve as a basis for non-invasive in situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmissivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments, and might also pave the way to advanced schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  1. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmissivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmissivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach could serve as a basis for non-invasive in situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmissivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments, and might also pave the way to advanced schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  2. Determination of ibogaine in plasma by gas chromatography--chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ley, F R; Jeffcoat, A R; Thomas, B F

    1996-02-02

    Ibogaine is naturally occurring indole alkaloid that is currently being considered as a treatment medication for drug dependence. Although there have been a variety of investigations regarding the mechanisms of action and pharmacology of ibogaine, relatively little has been reported regarding quantitative methods. Because of the paucity of analytical methodologies, studies involving the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of ibogaine have also been limited. A method is described for the determination of ibogaine levels in plasma by gas chromatography -- methane chemical ionization mass spectrometry. [13C2H3]Ibogaine was synthesized and used as an internal standard to control for recovery during sample preparation. The assay requires one ml of plasma and is shown to be a selective and sensitive means of ibogaine quantitation.

  3. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-07-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  4. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  5. The Effect of the Argon Carrier Gas in the Multiphoton Dissociation-Ionization of Tetracene

    PubMed Central

    Poveda, Juan Carlos; Román, Alejandro San; Guerrero, Alfonso; Álvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The multiphoton dissociation-ionization of tetracene at 355 nm using 6.5 nanosecond laser pulses, with and without argon as a carrier gas (CG), has been studied and compared. Ion fragments were analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). The results show that the dynamic of photodissociation at ∼1010 W cm−2 intensities is strongly influenced by the CG. The suppression of fragmentation channels primarily those relating to the formation of the CHm+ (m = 2, 4), C2H4+ and C5H4+2 ions. CH5+ and CH6+ were observed which have not been reported before in photodissociation tetracene experiments. PMID:19325732

  6. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  7. Rapid measurement of phytosterols in fortified food using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Duong, Samantha; Strobel, Norbert; Buddhadasa, Saman; Stockham, Katherine; Auldist, Martin; Wales, Bill; Orbell, John; Cran, Marlene

    2016-11-15

    A novel method for the measurement of total phytosterols in fortified food was developed and tested using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Unlike existing methods, this technique is capable of simultaneously extracting sterols during saponification thus significantly reducing extraction time and cost. The rapid method is suitable for sterol determination in a range of complex fortified foods including milk, cheese, fat spreads, oils and meat. The main enhancements of this new method include accuracy and precision, robustness, cost effectiveness and labour/time efficiencies. To achieve these advantages, quantification and the critical aspects of saponification were investigated and optimised. The final method demonstrated spiked recoveries in multiple matrices at 85-110% with a relative standard deviation of 1.9% and measurement uncertainty value of 10%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Flame temperature measurements by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F

    2012-10-01

    Here we report nonintrusive local rotational temperature measurements of molecular oxygen, based on coherent microwave scattering (radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in room air and hydrogen/air flames. Analyses of the rotational line strengths of the two-photon molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition have been used to determine the hyperfine rotational state distribution of the ground X(3)Σ(v'=0) state. Rotationally resolved 2+1 REMPI spectra of the molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition at different temperatures were obtained experimentally by radar REMPI. Rotational temperatures have been determined from the resulting Boltzmann plots. The measurements in general had an accuracy of ~±60 K in the hydrogen/air flames at various equivalence ratios. Discussions about the decreased accuracy for the temperature measurement at elevated temperatures have been presented.

  9. Properties of a weakly ionized NO gas sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyuan; Zhang, Yong Pan, Zhigang; Yang, Shuang; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Shengtao; Min, Daomin; Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Dingxin; Yang, Aijun; Li, Xin

    2015-08-31

    Nitric oxide NO is one of the major targets for environmental monitoring, but the existing NO sensors are limited by their low sensitivity and narrow test range. Here, a NO gas sensor employing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was fabricated, and its properties in NO–N{sub 2} mixture were investigated from both emission and ionization. The current I{sub e} passing through the nanotubes cathode was found to decrease with increasing NO concentration and increase linearly in different slopes with the extracting voltage U{sub e}. It is shown that the Schottky barrier of the MWCNTs calculated by I{sub e} increased with NO concentration due to the adsorption of NO gas, which restrained the electron emission and consequently weakened the ionization. The positive ion currents I{sub c} passing through the collecting electrode at different voltages of U{sub e} were found to monotonically decrease with increasing NO concentration, which was induced by both of the reduced electron emission and the consumption of the two excited metastable states N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}∑{sub u}{sup +}) and N{sub 2}(a′{sup 1}∑{sub u}{sup −}) by NO. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity at the low temperature of 30 °C. The calculated conductivity was found to be able to take place of I{sub c} for NO detection in a wide voltage range of 80–150 V U{sub e}.

  10. CONSTRAINING STELLAR FEEDBACK: SHOCK-IONIZED GAS IN NEARBY STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sungryong; Calzetti, Daniela; Gallagher, John S. III; Martin, Crystal L.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Pellerin, Anne

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the properties of feedback-driven shocks in eight nearby starburst galaxies using narrow-band imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope. We identify the shock-ionized component via the line diagnostic diagram [O III] (λ5007)/Hβ versus [S II] (λλ6716, 6731) (or [N II] (λ6583))/Hα, applied to resolved regions 3-15 pc in size. We divide our sample into three sub-samples: sub-solar, solar, and super-solar, for consistent shock measurements. For the sub-solar sub-sample, we derive three scaling relations: (1) L{sub shock}∝SFR{sup 0.62}, (2) L{sub shock}∝Σ{sub SFR,{sub HL}} {sup 0.92}, and (3) L{sub shock}/L{sub tot}∝(L{sub H} /L{sub ☉,{sub H}}){sup –0.65}, where L{sub shock} is the Hα luminosity from shock-ionized gas, Σ{sub SFR,{sub HL}} the star formation rate (SFR) per unit half-light area, L{sub tot} the total Hα luminosity, and L{sub H} /L{sub ☉,{sub H}} the absolute H-band luminosity from the Two Micron All Sky Survey normalized to solar luminosity. The other two sub-samples do not have enough number statistics, but appear to follow the first scaling relation. The energy recovered indicates that the shocks from stellar feedback in our sample galaxies are fully radiative. If the scaling relations are applicable in general to stellar feedback, our results are similar to those by Hopkins et al. for galactic superwinds. This similarity should, however, be taken with caution at this point, as the underlying physics that enables the transition from radiative shocks to gas outflows in galaxies is still poorly understood.

  11. The Connection Between Reddening, Gas Covering Fraction, and the Escape of Ionizing Radiation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen A.; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max; Bogosavljević, Milan; Shapley, Alice E.

    2016-09-01

    Using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed z∼ 3 galaxies, we establish an empirical relationship between reddening (E(B-V)), neutral gas covering fraction ({f}{{cov}}({{H}} {{I}})), and the escape of ionizing (Lyman continuum, LyC) photons. Our sample includes 933 galaxies at z∼ 3,121 of which have deep spectroscopic observations (≳ 7 hr) at 850≲ {λ }{{rest}}≲ 1300 Å with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph on Keck. The high covering fraction of outflowing optically thick {{H}} {{I}} indicated by the composite spectra of these galaxies implies that photoelectric absorption, rather than dust attenuation, dominates the depletion of LyC photons. By modeling the composite spectra as the combination of an unattenuated stellar spectrum including nebular continuum emission with one that is absorbed by {{H}} {{I}} and reddened by a line-of-sight extinction, we derive an empirical relationship between E(B-V) and {f}{{cov}}({{H}} {{I}}). Galaxies with redder UV continua have larger covering fractions of {{H}} {{I}} characterized by higher line-of-sight extinctions. We develop a model which connects the ionizing escape fraction with E(B-V), and which may be used to estimate the ionizing escape fraction for an ensemble of galaxies. Alternatively, direct measurements of the escape fraction for our sample allow us to constrain the intrinsic LyC-to-UV flux density ratio to be < S(900 \\mathring{{A}} )/S(1500 \\mathring{{A}} ){> }{{int}}≳ 0.20, a value that favors stellar population models that include weaker stellar winds, a flatter initial mass function, and/or binary evolution. Last, we demonstrate how the framework discussed here may be used to assess the pathways by which ionizing radiation escapes from high-redshift galaxies. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous

  12. Lighting the dark molecular gas and a Bok globule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya G.

    Stars are the building blocks of galaxies. The gas present in galaxies is the primary fuel for star formation. Galaxy evolution depends on the amount of gas present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Stars are born mainly from molecular gas in the GMCs. Robust knowledge of the molecular hydrogen H2 gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. Since H2 is not readily observable in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), the molecular gas content has traditionally been inferred using indirect tracers like carbon-monoxide (CO), dust emission, gamma ray interactions, and star formation efficiency. Physical processes resulting in enhancement and reduction of these indirect tracers can result in misleading estimates of molecular gas masses. My dissertation work is based on devising a new temperature power law distribution model for H2, a direct tracer, to calculate the total molecular gas mass in galaxies. The model parameters are estimated using mid infrared (MIR) H2 rotational line fluxes obtained from IRS-Spitzer (Infrared Spectrograph-Spitzer) instrument and the model is extrapolated to a suitable lower temperature to recover the total molecular gas mass. The power law model is able to recover the dark molecular gas, undetected by CO, in galaxies at metallicity as low as one-tenth of our Milky Way value. I have applied the power law model in U/LIRGs and shocks of Stephan's Quintet to understand molecular gas properties, where shocks play an important role in exciting H2. Comparing the molecular gas content derived through our power law model can be useful in studying the application of our model in mergers. The parameters derived by our model is useful in understanding variation in molecular gas properties in shock regions of Stephan's Quintet. Low mass stars are formed in small isolated dense cores known as Bok globules. Multiple star formation events are seen in a Bok globule. In my thesis I also studied a Bok globule, B207, and determined the

  13. Possibility of gas sensor based on C20 molecular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenkai; Yang, Chuanlu; Zou, Dongqing; Sun, Zhaopeng; Ji, Guomin

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of diatomic gas detection (NO, CO, O2) by making use of the transport properties of the C20 molecular junctions. The calculations are performed by using nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism in combination with density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we systematically study the most stable adsorption structural configurations, adsorption energy, and the transport properties on C20 molecular junctions with these diatomic gas molecules. It is found that NO and O2 gas molecule can be detected selectively. We suggest its possibility of nanosensors for highly sensitive and selective based on C20 molecular junction systems.

  14. A reservoir of ionized gas in the galactic halo to sustain star formation in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher

    2011-11-18

    Without a source of new gas, our Galaxy would exhaust its supply of gas through the formation of stars. Ionized gas clouds observed at high velocity may be a reservoir of such gas, but their distances are key for placing them in the galactic halo and unraveling their role. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to blindly search for ionized high-velocity clouds (iHVCs) in the foreground of galactic stars. We show that iHVCs with 90 ≤ |v(LSR)| ≲ 170 kilometers per second (where v(LSR) is the velocity in the local standard of rest frame) are within one galactic radius of the Sun and have enough mass to maintain star formation, whereas iHVCs with |v(LSR)| ≳ 170 kilometers per second are at larger distances. These may be the next wave of infalling material.

  15. Mapping the gas kinematics and ionization structure of four ultraluminous IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, R. J.; Crawford, C. S.; Abraham, R. G.

    1999-10-01

    We present a study of the morphology, kinematics and ionization structure of the extended emission-line regions in four intermediate-redshift (0.118gas kinematics in the hyperluminous system IRAS F20460+1925 lack coherent structure, with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) >1000kms-1 within 1arcsec of the nucleus, suggesting that any merger is well-advanced. Emission-line intensity ratios point to active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization for the excitation of this gas at the systemic velocity. An isolated blob ~8kpc from the nucleus with a much smaller velocity dispersion may lie in a structure similar to the photoionization cones seen in lower-luminosity objects. A second, spatially unresolved, narrow-line component is also present on nucleus, blueshifted by ~=990kms-1 from the systemic and plausibly powered by photoionizing shocks. IRAS F23060+0505 has more ordered kinematics, with a region of increased FWHM coincident with the blue half of a dipolar velocity field. The systemic velocity rotation curve is asymmetric in appearance, as a result either of the on-going merger or of nuclear dust obscuration. From a higher-resolution ISIS spectrum, we attribute the blue asymmetry in the narrow-line profiles to a spatially resolved nuclear outflow. Emission-line intensity ratios suggest shock+precursor ionization for the systemic component, consistent with the X-ray view of a heavily obscured AGN. The lower-luminosity objects IRAS F01217+0122 and F01003-2238 complete the sample. The former has a featureless velocity field with a high FWHM, a high-ionization AGN spectrum and a ~1Gyr old starburst continuum. IRAS F01003-2238 has a dipolar velocity field and an Hii region emission-line spectrum with a strong blue continuum. After correction for intrinsic extinction, the latter can be reproduced with ~107 O5 stars, sufficient to power the bolometric luminosity of the

  16. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  17. Time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics simulation of doubly charged uracil in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Tarifa, Pablo; Hervé du Penhoat, Marie-Anne; Vuilleumier, Rodophe; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano; Le Padellec, Arnaud; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Alcamí, Manuel; Moretto-Capelle, Patrick; Martín, Fernando; Politis, Marie-Françoise

    2014-02-01

    We use time-dependent density functional theory and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics methods to investigate the fragmentation of doubly ionized uracil in gas phase. Different initial electronic excited states of the dication are obtained by removing electrons from different inner-shell orbitals of the neutral species. We show that shape-equivalent orbitals lead to very different fragmentation patterns revealing the importance of the intramolecular chemical environment. The results are in good agreement with ionion coincidence measurements of uracil collision with 100 keV protons.

  18. Detection of a Noble Gas Molecular Ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Owen, P. J.; Cernicharo, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Ivison, R. J.; Krause, O.; Lim, T. L.; Matsuura, M.; Miller, S.; Olofsson, G.; Polehampton, E. T.

    2013-12-01

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of 36ArH+ at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed 36ArH+ emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  19. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Cyanide and Thiocyanate in Plasma by Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry (CI-GC-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    ORIGINAL PAPER Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS...chemical ioniza- tion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocya- nate in plasma...Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide

  1. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  2. Signatures of Molecular Orbital Structure in Lateral Electron Momentum Distributions from Strong-Field Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Ingo; Henkel, Jost; Lein, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Strong-field ionization of aligned diatomic and polyatomic molecules such as O2, N2, C2H4, and others in circularly polarized laser fields is investigated theoretically. By calculating the emission-angle-resolved lateral width of the momentum distribution perpendicular to the polarization plane, we show that nodal planes in molecular orbitals are directly imprinted on the angular dependence of the width. We demonstrate that orbital symmetries can be distinguished with the information obtained by observing the lateral width in addition to the angular distributions.

  3. Circumnuclear molecular gas in M87 detected with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahakis, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    We present the detection of circumnuclear molecular gas residing within 100 pc of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the galaxy M87 (3C 274), using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to image the gas on spatial scales from 100 to 10 pc. The proximity of M87, the archetypical giant elliptical radio galaxy at the centre of the Virgo galaxy cluster, presents a unique opportunity to investigate in detail the circumnuclear molecular gas revealed first by single-dish observations and recently imaged for the first time with ALMA (Vlahakis et al., in prep). ALMA's unique long baseline capability now allows us to make the first detailed investigation of the properties of the interstellar medium around the galaxy's SMBH on scales down to 10 pc (0.1 arcsec). Here, we present results of ALMA Band 3 CO J=1-0 observations obtained at different angular resolutions. With this data we are able to trace the bulk of the molecular gas as well as the continuum emission, providing the deepest and highest spatial resolution images yet of the molecular gas content of this giant elliptical galaxy. The highest resolution data allow us to unambiguously resolve the molecular gas structures for the first time and investigate, in unprecedented detail, the nature and origin of molecular gas that resides within the sphere of influence of the SMBH.

  4. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA. I. An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Viti, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Schinnerer, E.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Casasola, V.; Colina, L.; Costagliola, F.; Eckart, A.; Fuente, A.; Henkel, C.; Labiano, A.; Martín, S.; Márquez, I.; Muller, S.; Planesas, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Spaans, M.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We aim to understand if and how gas accretion can self-regulate. Methods: We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas (n(H2) ≃ 105 - 6 cm-3) tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), and CS(7-6)) and their underlying continuum emission in the central r ~ 2 kpc of NGC 1068 with spatial resolutions ~0.3″ - 0.5″ (~20-35 pc for the assumed distance of D = 14 Mpc). Results: The sensitivity and spatial resolution of ALMA give an unprecedented detailed view of the distribution and kinematics of the dense molecular gas (n(H2) ≥ 105 - 6cm-3) in NGC 1068. Molecular line and dust continuum emissions are detected from a r ~ 200 pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), from the 2.6 kpc-diameter bar region, and from the r ~ 1.3 kpc starburst (SB) ring. Most of the emission in HCO+, HCN, and CS stems from the CND. Molecular line ratios show dramatic order-of-magnitude changes inside the CND that are correlated with the UV/X-ray illumination by the active galactic nucleus (AGN), betraying ongoing feedback. We used the dust continuum fluxes measured by ALMA together with NIR/MIR data to constrain the properties of the putative torus using CLUMPY models and found a torus radius of 20+6-10pc. The Fourier decomposition of the gas velocity field indicates that rotation is perturbed by an inward radial flow in the SB ring and the bar region. However, the gas kinematics from r ~ 50 pc out to r ~ 400 pc reveal a massive (Mmol~ 2.7+0.9-1.2 × 107 M⊙) outflow in all molecular tracers. The tight correlation between the ionized gas outflow, the radio jet, and the occurrence of outward motions in the disk suggests that the outflow is AGN driven. Conclusions: The molecular outflow is likely

  5. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  6. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  7. Direct gas-phase detection of nerve and blister warfare agents utilizing active capillary plasma ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J-C; Schaer, M; P Siegenthaler, P; Zenobi, R

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasensitive direct gas-phase detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) is demonstrated utilizing active capillary plasma ionization and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Four G- agents, two V-agents and various blistering agents [including sulfur mustard (HD)] were detected directly in the gas phase with limits of detection in the low parts per trillion (ng m(-3)) range. The direct detection of HD was shown for dry carrier gas conditions, but signals vanished when humidity was present, indicating a possible direct detection of HD after sufficient gas phase pretreatment. The method provided sufficient sensitivity to monitor directly the investigated volatile CWAs way below their corresponding minimal effect dose, and in most cases even below the eight hours worker exposure concentration. In general, the ionization is very soft, with little to no in-source fragmentation. Especially for the G-agents, some dimer formation occurred at higher concentrations. This adds complexity, but also further selectivity, to the corresponding mass spectra. Our results show that the active capillary plasma ionization is a robust, sensitive, "plug and play" ambient ionization source suited (but not exclusively) to the very sensitive detection of CWAs. It has the potential to be used with portable MS instrumentation.

  8. Nearby early-type galaxies with ionized gas. VI. The Spitzer-IRS view. Basic data set analysis and empirical spectral classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panuzzo, P.; Rampazzo, R.; Bressan, A.; Vega, O.; Annibali, F.; Buson, L. M.; Clemens, M. S.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2011-04-01

    Context. A large fraction of early-type galaxies (ETGs) shows emission lines in their optical spectra, mostly with LINER characteristics. Despite the number of studies, the nature of the ionization mechanisms is still debated. Many ETGs also show several signs of rejuvenation episodes. Aims: We aim to investigate the ionization mechanisms and the physical processes of a sample of ETGs using mid-infrared spectra. Methods: We present here low resolution Spitzer-IRS spectra of 40 ETGs, 18 of which from our proposed Cycle 3 observations, selected from a sample of 65 ETGs showing emission lines in their optical spectra. We homogeneously extract the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra, and after the proper subtraction of a "passive" ETG template, we derive the intensity of the ionic and molecular lines and of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features. We use MIR diagnostic diagrams to investigate the powering mechanisms of the ionized gas. Results: The mid-infrared spectra of early-type galaxies show a variety of spectral characteristics. We empirically sub-divide the sample into five classes of spectra with common characteristics. Class-0, accounting for 20% of the sample, are purely passive ETGs with neither emission lines nor PAH features. Class-1 show emission lines but no PAH features, and account for 17.5% of the sample. Class-2, in which 50% of the ETGs are found, as well as having emission lines, show PAH features with unusual ratios, e.g. 7.7 μm/11.3 μm ≤ 2.3. Class-3 objects (7.5% of the sample) have emission lines and PAH features with ratios typical of star-forming galaxies. Class-4, containing only 5% of the ETGs, is dominated by a hot dust continuum. The diagnostic diagram [Ne iii]15.55 μm/[Ne ii]12.8 μm vs. [S iii]33.48 μm/[Si ii]34.82 μm, is used to investigate the different mechanisms ionizing the gas. According to the above diagram most of our ETGs contain gas ionized via either AGN-like or shock phenomena, or both. Conclusions: Most of

  9. Ionized Gas Kinematics in the Inner 2 pc of the Milky Way: A Spiral Wave in a Keplerian Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, John H.; Irons, W.

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies have been made of the ionized gas distribution and kinematics in Sgr A West, at the center of the Milky Way. Most of these have modeled the arcs of ionic emission as tidally stretched streamers, with the gas flowing along the streamers. A different model was proposed by Lacy et al. (1991), who argued that the observations required nearly circular motions for much of the gas, rather than motions along the streamers. Several physical explanation were suggested for how such a wave pattern could occur. None of the explanations were very compelling. We present new observations of the [Ne II] (12.8um) emission from Sgr A West, with improved spectral and spatial resolution (4 km/s and 1 arcsec). We compare the observations with models assuming the gas moves along elliptical orbits and models in which it moves across the streamers on circular orbits. The data strongly favor the latter model for much of the ionized gas. We still have no satisfactory physical explanation for how the gas is organized or ionized along what appears to be spiral wave. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0607312.

  10. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, Colleen E.; Leenheer, Jerry A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra.

  11. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Gas In Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Debris disks are generally thought to be the gas poor descendants of protoplanetary disks. While this characteristic may be true for most debris systems, recent surveys in rotational transitions of carbon monoxide led to a growing sample of debris disks where gas has been detected. The origin of gas in these disks is unclear yet. It may be secondary, i.e., similarly to dust grains it is continuously replenished via erosion of larger bodies. However, because of their youth, one cannot exclude that some disks may be hybrid in the sense that they retain their residual primordial gas, while the dust component may predominantly be second generation. The first observations of gaseous debris disks with ALMA provided examples of both types. This talk will review the currently known CO-rich debris disks with special emphasis on the origin of gas and on the commonly shared disk/host star properties.

  13. Pulsed field ionization electron spectroscopy and molecular structure of aluminum uracil.

    PubMed

    Krasnokutski, Serge A; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2007-10-25

    Al-uracil (Al-C4H4N2O2) was synthesized in a laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beam source and studied with pulsed field ionization-zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). The DFT calculations predicted several low-energy Al-uracil isomers with Al binding to the diketo, keto-enol, and dienol tautomers of uracil. The ZEKE spectroscopic measurements of Al-uracil determined the ionization energy of 43 064(5) cm-1 [or 5.340(6) eV] and a vibrational mode of 51 cm-1 for the neutral complex and several vibrational modes of 51, 303, 614, and 739 cm-1 for the ionized species. Combination of the ZEEK spectrum with the DFT and Franck-Condon factor calculations determined the preferred isomeric structure and electronic states of the Al-uracil complex. This isomer is formed by Al binding to the O4 atom of the diketo tautomer of uracil and has a planar Cs symmetry. The ground electronic states of the neutral and ionized species are 2A' ' and 1A', respectively. The 2A' ' neutral state has a slightly shorter Al-O4 distance than the 1A' ion state. However, the 1A' ion state has stronger metal-ligand binding compared to the 2A' ' state. The increased Al-O4 distance from the 2A' ' state to the 1A' state is attributed to the loss of the pi binding interaction between Al and O4 in the singlet ion state, whereas the increased metal-ligand binding strength is due to the additional charge-dipole interaction in the ion that surpasses the loss of the pi orbital interaction.

  14. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-11-20

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s{sup −1}. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment.

  15. Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic System: Early Results from WHAM-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, L. Matthew; Madsen, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    From its new vantage point at CTIO, the Wisconsin Hα Mapper is poised to explore the full distribution and kinematics of diffuse plasma in extended gaseous structures near the Magellanic Clouds. Shaped by the interaction between the Clouds and the Milky Way, the Bridge, Stream, and Leading Arm gas complexes have been studied extensively in 21 cm emission and optical/UV absorption. With spectral resolution of 12 km/s, WHAM is able to separate optical emission from these structures and brighter local gas near vLSR 0 km/s. Combined with its unprecedented sensitivity to the limit of atmospheric line confusion ( 10s of mR), we are embarking on a survey of the ionized component of the Magellanic System with WHAM. With observations of the southern component of our all-sky survey nearly completed, we have begun to examine some emission features toward the Magellanic System. Here we present a sample of several regions observed recently with WHAM in Hα. WHAM was built and continues to operate with ongoing support from NSF. The research presented here is currently funded by award AST-0607512 and an International Program Development Fund from the University of Sydney.

  16. Gas-phase pesticide measurement using iodide ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murschell, Trey; Fulgham, S. Ryan; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2017-06-01

    Volatilization and subsequent processing in the atmosphere are an important environmental pathway for the transport and chemical fate of pesticides. However, these processes remain a particularly poorly understood component of pesticide lifecycles due to analytical challenges in measuring pesticides in the atmosphere. Most pesticide measurements require long (hours to days) sampling times coupled with offline analysis, inhibiting observation of meteorologically driven events or investigation of rapid oxidation chemistry. Here, we present chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with iodide reagent ions as a fast and sensitive measurement of four current-use pesticides. These semi-volatile pesticides were calibrated with injections of solutions onto a filter and subsequently volatilized to generate gas-phase analytes. Trifluralin and atrazine are detected as iodide-molecule adducts, while permethrin and metolachlor are detected as adducts between iodide and fragments of the parent analyte molecule. Limits of detection (1 s) are 0.37, 0.67, 0.56, and 1.1 µg m-3 for gas-phase trifluralin, metolachlor, atrazine, and permethrin, respectively. The sensitivities of trifluralin and metolachlor depend on relative humidity, changing as much as 70 and 59, respectively, as relative humidity of the sample air varies from 0 to 80 %. This measurement approach is thus appropriate for laboratory experiments and potentially near-source field measurements.

  17. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Cherkovets, V. E.; Rerikh, V. K.; Taran, M. D.

    2015-11-15

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. The interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place.

  18. Numerical studies of the behavior of ionized residual gas in an energy recovering linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula; Meseck, Atoosa

    2015-04-01

    Next generation light sources such as energy recovering linacs (ERLs) are highly sensitive to instabilities due to ionized residual gas, which must be mitigated for successful operation. Vacuum pumps are insufficient for removal of the ions, as the ions are trapped by the beam's electrical potential. Two effective measures are (i) introducing clearing gaps in the bunch train, and (ii) installing clearing electrodes which pull out the trapped ions from the electrical potential of the beam. In this paper, we present numerical studies on the behavior of ion clouds that interact with bunch trains in an ERL taking into account the effects of the clearing gaps and clearing electrodes. We present simulations with different compositions of the residual gas. Simulations are done using the MOEVE PIC Tracking software package developed at Rostock University, which has been upgraded to include the behavior of ion clouds in the environment of additional electromagnetic fields, such as generated by clearing electrodes. The simulations use the parameters of the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (bERLinPro) to allow for the deduction of appropriate measures for bERLinPro 's design and operation.

  19. Development of a Mesoscale Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Portable Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Mangan, Michael A; Moorman, Matthew W; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Allen, Amy; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of gas chromatography (GC) instrumentation enables field detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for chembio-applications such as clandestine human transport and disease diagnostics. We fabricated a mesoscale pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (micro-PDHID) for integrating with our previously described mini-GC hardware. Stainless steel electrodes fabricated by photochemical etching and electroforming facilitated rapid prototyping and enabled nesting of inter-electrode insulators for self-alignment of the detector core during assembly. The prototype was ∼10 cm(3) relative to >400 cm(3) of a commercial PDHID, but with a comparable time to sweep a VOC peak from the detector cell (170 ms and 127 ms, respectively). Electron trajectory modeling, gas flow rate, voltage bias, and GC outlet location were optimized for improving sensitivity. Despite 40-fold miniaturization, the micro-PDHID detected 18 ng of the human emanation, 3-methyl-2-hexenoic acid with <3-fold decrease in sensitivity relative to the commercial detector. The micro-PDHID was rugged and operated for 9 months without failure.

  20. Signature of superradiance from a nitrogen-gas plasma channel produced by strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Zeng, Bin; Xie, Hongqiang; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-03-01

    Recently, Yao et al. demonstrated the creation of coherent emissions in nitrogen gas with two-color (800 nm + 400 nm) ultrafast laser pulses [J. Yao, G. Li, C. Jing, B. Zeng, W. Chu, J. Ni, H. Zhang, H. Xie, C. Zhang, H. Li, H. Xu, S. L. Chin, Y. Cheng, and Z. Xu, New J. Phys. 15, 023046 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/2/023046]. Based on this two-color scheme, here we report on systematic investigation of temporal characteristics of the radiation emitted at 391 nm [N2+: B2Σu+(ν =0) -X2Σg+(ν =0)] by experimentally examining its temporal profiles with the increase of the plasma channel induced by the intense 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses at a nitrogen-gas pressure of ˜25 mbar. We reveal unexpected temporal profiles of the coherent emissions, which show significant superradiance signatures owing to the cooperation of an ensemble of excited N2+ molecules that are coherently radiating in phase. Our findings shed more light on the mechanisms behind the coherent laserlike emissions induced by strong-field ionization of molecules.

  1. Ionized gas diagnostics from protoplanetary discs in the Orion nebula and the abundance discrepancy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Núñez-Díaz, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Flores-Fajardo, N.; López-Martín, L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Henney, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy of a field located near the Trapezium Cluster using the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS). The observed field contains a variety of morphological structures: five externally ionized protoplanetary discs (also known as proplyds), the high-velocity jet HH 514 and a bowshock. Spatial distribution maps are obtained for different emission line fluxes, the c(Hβ) extinction coefficient, electron densities and temperatures, ionic abundances of different ions from collisionally excited lines (CELs), C2 + and O2 + abundances from recombination lines (RLs) and the abundance discrepancy factor of O2 +, ADF(O2 +). We distinguish the three most prominent proplyds (177-341, 170-337 and 170-334) and analyse their impact on the spatial distributions of the above mentioned quantities. We find that collisional de-excitation has a major influence on the line fluxes in the proplyds. If this is not properly accounted for then physical conditions deduced from commonly used line ratios will be in error, leading to unreliable chemical abundances for these objects. We obtain the intrinsic emission of the proplyds 177-341, 170-337 and 170-334 by a direct subtraction of the background emission, though the last two present some background contamination due to their small sizes. A detailed analysis of 177-341 spectra making use of suitable density diagnostics reveals the presence of high-density gas (3.8 × 105 cm-3) in contrast to the typical values observed in the background gas of the nebula (3800 cm-3). We also explore how the background subtraction could be affected by the possible opacity of the proplyd and its effect on the derivation of physical conditions and chemical abundances of the proplyd 177-341. We construct a physical model for the proplyd 177-341 finding a good agreement between the predicted and observed line ratios. Finally, we find that the use of reliable physical conditions returns an ADF(O2 +) about zero

  2. TANGO I: Interstellar medium in nearby radio galaxies. Molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña Flaquer, B.; Leon, S.; Combes, F.; Lim, J.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Powerful radio-AGN are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies that are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless, gas is needed at their very center to feed the nuclear activity. Aims: We study the molecular gas properties (i.e., mass, kinematics, distribution, origin) of these objects, and compare them with results for other known samples. Methods: At the IRAM-30m telescope, we performed a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission from the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio continuum fluxes. Results: The main result of our survey is that the molecular gas content of these galaxies is very low compared to spiral or FIR-selected galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass, including detections and upper limits, is 2.2 × 108 M⊙. When separated into FR-I and FR-II types, a difference in their H2 masses is found. The median value of FR-I galaxies is about 1.9 × 108 M⊙ and higher for FR-II galaxies, at about 4.5 × 108 M⊙. Which is probably entirely because of a Malmquist bias. Our results contrast with those of previous surveys, whose targets were mainly selected by means of their FIR emission, implying that we measure higher observed masses of molecular gas. Moreover, the shape of CO spectra suggest that a central molecular gas disk exists in 30% of these radio galaxies, a lower rate than in other active galaxy samples. Conclusions: We find a low level of molecular gas in our sample of radio-selected AGNs, indicating that galaxies do not need much molecular gas to host an AGN. The presence of a molecular gas disk in some galaxies and the wide range of molecular gas masses may be indicative of different origins for the gas, which we can not exclude at present (e.g., minor/major mergers, stellar mass loss, or accretion). Appendices and Figure 15 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. MILKY WAY STAR-FORMING COMPLEXES AND THE TURBULENT MOTION OF THE GALAXY'S MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Rahman, Mubdi; Murray, Norman E-mail: rahman@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: murray@cita.utoronto.ca

    2012-06-20

    We analyze Spitzer GLIMPSE, Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX), and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) images of the Milky Way to identify 8 {mu}m and free-free sources in the Galaxy. Seventy-two of the 88 WMAP sources have coverage in the GLIMPSE and MSX surveys suitable for identifying massive star-forming complexes (SFCs). We measure the ionizing luminosity functions of the SFCs and study their role in the turbulent motion of the Galaxy's molecular gas. We find a total Galactic free-free flux f{sub {nu}} = 46,177.6 Jy; the 72 WMAP sources with full 8 {mu}m coverage account for 34,263.5 Jy ({approx}75%), with both measurements made at {nu} = 94 GHz (W band). We find a total of 280 SFCs, of which 168 have unique kinematic distances and free-free luminosities. We use a simple model for the radial distribution of star formation to estimate the free-free and ionizing luminosity for the sources lacking distance determinations. The total dust-corrected ionizing luminosity is Q = (2.9 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 53} photons s{sup -1}, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of M-dot{sub *}= 1.2{+-}0.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We present the (ionizing) luminosity function of the SFCs and show that 24 sources emit half the ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy. The SFCs appear as bubbles in GLIMPSE or MSX images; the radial velocities associated with the bubble walls allow us to infer the expansion velocity of the bubbles. We calculate the kinetic luminosity of the bubble expansion and compare it to the turbulent luminosity of the inner molecular disk. SFCs emitting 80% of the total Galactic free-free luminosity produce a kinetic luminosity equal to 65% of the turbulent luminosity in the inner molecular disk. This suggests that the expansion of the bubbles is a major driver of the turbulent motion of the inner Milky Way molecular gas.

  4. Nanostructured solid substrates for efficient laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) of low molecular weight compounds.

    PubMed

    Silina, Yuliya E; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-12-07

    Analytical applications often require rapid measurement of compounds from complex sample mixtures. High-speed mass spectrometry approaches frequently utilize techniques based on direct ionization of the sample by laser irradiation, mostly by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Compounds of low molecular weight are difficult to analyze by MALDI, however, because of severe interferences in the low m/z range from the organic matrix used for desorption/ionization. In recent years, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) techniques have shown promise for small molecule analysis, due to the unique properties of nanostructured surfaces, in particular, the lack of a chemical background in the low m/z range and enhanced production of analyte ions by SALDI. This short review article presents a summary of the most promising recent developments in SALDI materials for MS analysis of low molecular weight analytes, with emphasis on nanostructured materials based on metals and semiconductors.

  5. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  6. The Properties and the Evolution of the Highly Ionized Gas in MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, hagai; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Nandra, Kirpal; Turner, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 obtained in 2000 and 2002. The EPIC-pn spectra show a power-law continuum with a slope of Gamma = 1.6 at high energies absorbed by at least two warm absorbers (WAs) intrinsic to the source. The underlying continuum in the earlier observation shows a soft excess at low X-ray energies which can be modeled as an additional power-law with Gamma = 2.9. The spectra also show a weak narrow iron K alpha emission line. The high-resolution grating spectrum obtained in 2002 shows emission lines from N VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X, as well as absorption lines from the low-ionization ions of O III, O IV, and O V, and other confirmed and suspected weaker absorption lines. The O III - O V lines are consistent with the properties of the emission line gas observed as extended optical (O III) emission in this source. The signal-to-noise of the 2000 grating data is too low to detect any lines. We suggest a model for the high-resolution spectrum which consist of two or three warm-absorber (WA) components. The two-components model has a high-ionization WA with a column density of 10(exp 21.5)-10 (exp 21.8) sq cm and a low-ionization absorber with a column density of 10(exp 20.3) sq cm. In the three-components model we add a lower ionization component that produces the observed iron M-shell absorption lines. We investigate the spectral variations in MR 2251-178 over a period of 8.5 years using data from ASCA, BeppoSAX, and XMM-Newton. All X-ray observations can be fitted with the above two power laws and the two absorbers. The observed luminosity variations seems to correlate with variations in the soft X-ray continuum. The 8.5 year history of the source suggests a changing X-ray absorber due to material that enters and disappears from the line-of-sight on timescales of several months. We also present, for the first time, the entire FUSE spectrum of MR 2251-178. We detect emission from N III, C III

  7. Very metal-poor galaxies: ionized gas kinematics in nine objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The study of ionized gas morphology and kinematics in nine extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) 6-m telescope is presented. Some of these very rare objects (with currently known range of O/H of 7.12 < 12 + log(O/H) < 7.65, or ) are believed to be the best proxies of `young' low-mass galaxies in the high-redshift Universe. One of the main goals of this study is to look for possible evidence of star formation (SF) activity induced by external perturbations. Recent results from HI mapping of a small subsample of XMD star-forming galaxies provided confident evidence for the important role of interaction-induced SF. Our observations provide complementary or new information that the great majority of the studied XMD dwarfs have strongly disturbed gas morphology and kinematics or the presence of detached components. We approximate the observed velocity fields by simple models of a rotating tilted thin disc, which allows us the robust detection of non-circular gas motions. These data, in turn, indicate the important role of current/recent interactions and mergers in the observed enhanced SF. As a by-product of our observations, we obtained data for two Low Surface Brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies: Anon J012544+075957 that is a companion of the merger system UGC 993, and SAO 0822+3545 which shows off-centre, asymmetric, low star formation rate star-forming regions, likely induced by the interaction with the companion XMD dwarf HS 0822+3542. Based on observations obtained with the Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS 6-m telescope. E-mail: moisav@gmail.com (AVM); sap@sao.ru (SAP); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK)

  8. Photoelectron angular distributions in molecular above threshold ionization by two colour circularly polarized ultrashort UV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-10-01

    Photoionization of an aligned molecular ion H? has been investigated with two colour circularly polarized ultrashort UV laser pulses by numerically solving the corresponding time dependent Schrödinger equation. Photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in molecular above threshold ionization (MATI) exhibit: (i) asymmetry resulting from interference of coherent electron wave packets from multiple pathway ionization, which depends critically on the relative carrier envelope phase (CEP) ? between the two colour laser pulses and photoelectron kinetic energies; (ii) rotation with respect to the molecular symmetry axes due to effects of the nonspherical two center Coulomb potential. Such features are described by multi-photon perturbative theoretical ionization models. The ionization probability is functions of both the CEP ? and the angle ? between the electron emission and the molecular axis. The influence of pulse intensity and ellipticity on PADs in MATI is also investigated. It is found that the asymmetry depends on the pulse intensity whereas the rotation angle is shown to be sensitive to the pulse ellipticity, both reflecting the orientation dependence of molecular ionization probabilities.

  9. FUSE and STIS Observations of Highly Ionized Gas along the Line of Sight towards HD 116852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, A. J.; Savage, B. D.; Fabian, D.; Richter, P.; Sembach, K. R.; Meyer, D. M.; Lauroesch, J.; Howk, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of high ion interstellar ultraviolet absorption along the sight line to HD 116852. At a distance of 4.8 kpc, HD 116852 is an O9 III star lying in the low Galactic halo, -1.3 kpc from the plane of the Galaxy in the direction l = 304.9o, b = -6.1o. The sight line passes underneath the Sagittarius-Carina and the Norma-Centaurus spiral arms. The STIS E140H grating observations provide high-resolution (FWHM ≈ 2.7 km s-1) spectra of the resonance doublets of Si 4, C 4 and N 5. These data are complemented by medium-resolution (FWHM ≈ 20 km s-1) FUSE spectra of O 6. We find evidence for three distinct types of absorbing gas present in the data. First, two narrow absorption components are resolved in the Si 4 and \\ion {C}{4} profiles, at approximate LSR velocities of -36 and -10 km s-1. These narrow components appear to be produced in gas associated with the Norma and Sagittarius spiral arms, at approximate z-distances of -1.0 and -0.5 kpc respectively. The temperature of the gas in in these narrow components, as implied by their b-values, suggests that the gas is photoionized. The ratio of C 4 to Si 4 in these narrow components is low compared to the Galactic average. Second, we detect an intermediate-width component in C 4 and Si 4, at +17 km s-1, which we propose could arise at the conductive interface at the boundary between a dense cloud and the surrounding medium. Finally, a broad collisionally ionized component of gas responsible for producing the smooth N 5 and O 6 profiles is observed; such absorption is also present to a lesser degree in the profiles of Si 4 and \\ion {C}{4}. The broad O 6 absorption is observed at a velocity displaced from the C 4 profile by almost 20 km s-1, an amount large enough to suggest that the two ions may not co-exist in the same physical location. If these two ions do exist together, then the ratio N(C 4)/N(O 6) is

  10. MBMS sampling from highly heated gas mixtures (1000-3000 K) and weakly ionized RF plasmas (800-2800 K) or laser plasmas (5000-20,000 K)

    SciTech Connect

    Campargue, R.; Lebehot, A.

    1995-03-01

    The properties of the free jet expansion and molecular beam skimming can be applied to the sampling of a wide variety of gaseous media, as those considered in this workshop: reactive systems, high temperature gases, flames, plasma flows, shock zone gases, laser ablation plumes, gas phase in CVD or in high temperature corrosion, etc. In the authors` laboratory, as well as in many molecular beam groups, the MBMS sampling is not generally made for analysing the gas stagnating in the nozzle, but for optimizing and using the beam source in research experiments. Nevertheless, this beam optimization has been of great interest to investigate and minimize the distortions through the interface used for MS sampling. They are due to the reality of the gas, the deviations from ideal free jet expansion, and the possible interactions along the MBMS sampling system, from the nozzle sampler to the quadrupole analyser. The first part of this paper is an historical review on the various distortions observed at Saclay in skimming, or in MBMS sampling from room temperature gases or gas mixtures. The second part deals with neutral energetic particles resulting either from the cluster generation in expansion or from the seeding and/or heating techniques. Finally the last part of the paper is devoted to recent developments in MBMS sampling of weakly ionized RF plasmas (800-2800 K) and laser sustained plasmas (5000-20000 K). The presentation is made with large reference to the authors` previous papers, especially their later review on jets and beams.

  11. HST/COS Observations of Ionized Gas Accretion at the Disk–Halo Interface of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Peek, J. E. G.; Werk, J. K.; Putman, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    We report the detection of accreting ionized gas at the disk–halo interface of the nearby galaxy M33. We analyze Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph absorption-line spectra of seven ultraviolet-bright stars evenly distributed across the disk of M33. We find Si iv absorption components consistently redshifted relative to the bulk M33's ISM absorption along all the sightlines. The Si iv detection indicates an enriched, disk-wide, ionized gas inflow toward the disk. This inflow is most likely multi-phase as the redshifted components can also be observed in ions with lower ionization states (e.g., S ii, P ii, Fe ii, Si ii). Kinematic modeling of the inflow is consistent with an accreting layer at the disk–halo interface of M33, which has an accretion velocity of {110}-20+15 {km} {{{s}}}-1 at a distance of {1.5}-1.0+1.0 kpc above the disk. The modeling indicates a total mass of ∼3.9 × 107 M⊙ for the accreting material at the disk–halo interface on the near side of the M33 disk, with an accretion rate of ∼2.9 M⊙ yr‑1. The high accretion rate and the level of metal enrichment suggest the inflow is likely to be the fallback of M33 gas from a galactic fountain and/or the gas pulled loosed during a close interaction between M31 and M33. Our study of M33 is the first to unambiguously reveal the existence of a disk-wide, ionized gas inflow beyond the Milky Way, providing a better understanding of gas accretion in the vicinity of a galaxy disk.

  12. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  13. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T.

  14. The SAURON project - XVI. On the sources of ionization for the gas in elliptical and lenticular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi, Marc; Shields, Joseph C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Jeong, Hyunjin; Shapiro, Kristen; Bacon, Roland; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Emsellem, Eric; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van de Ven, Glen; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2010-03-01

    Following our study on the incidence, morphology and kinematics of the ionized gas in early-type galaxies, we now address the question of what is powering the observed nebular emission. To constrain the likely sources of gas excitation, we resort to a variety of ancillary data we draw from complementary information on the gas kinematics, stellar populations and galactic potential from the SAURON data, and use the SAURON-specific diagnostic diagram juxtaposing the [OIII] λ5007/Hβ and [NI] λλ5197, 5200/Hβ line ratios. We find a tight correlation between the stellar surface brightness and the flux of the Hβ recombination line across our sample, which points to a diffuse and old stellar source as the main contributor of ionizing photons in early-type galaxies, with post-asymptotic giant branch (pAGB) stars being still the best candidate based on ionizing balance arguments. The role of AGN photoionization is confined to the central 2-3arcsec of an handful of objects with radio or X-ray cores. OB-stars are the dominant source of photoionization in 10 per cent of the SAURON sample, whereas for another 10 per cent the intense and highly ionized emission is powered by the pAGB population associated to a recently formed stellar subcomponent. Fast shocks are not an important source of ionization for the diffuse nebular emission of early-type galaxies since the required shock velocities can hardly be attained in the potential of our sample galaxies. Finally, in the most massive and slowly or non-rotating galaxies in our sample, which can retain a massive X-ray halo, the finding of a spatial correlation between the hot and warm phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) suggests that the interaction with the hot ISM provides an additional source of ionization besides old ultraviolet-bright stars. This is also supported by a distinct pattern towards lower values of the [OIII]/Hβ ratio. These results lead us to investigate the relative role of stellar and AGN photoionization

  15. Ionized Gas Outflows in AGN: A Detailed Study of their Physical Properties from the MAGNUM Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingozzi, Matilde; Marconi, Alessandro; Venturi, Giacomo; Cresci, Giovanni; Risaliti, Guido; Mannucci, Filippo; Carniani, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    I present an overview of our results from the MAGNUM survey (Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope), which aims at studying in detail the properties of AGN, including their interaction with the host galaxy (e.g., tentative evidence of "positive feedback"), and the ISM gas properties, both in the ionised gas with VLT/MUSE and in the molecular gas with ALMA. Nearby galaxies are the ideal laboratories for such a detailed analysis, thanks to the spatial information offered by their vicinity (the average spatial resolution is 50 pc). Data have been obtained for ten local galaxies so far, including the famous NGC 1068, Circinus and NGC 4945. Thanks to its unique combination of large field of view (1'x1') and spectral coverage (4800‑9300 Å), MUSE has allowed us to probe the kinematical and spatial structure of the kpc-scale AGN-driven outflows, to construct spatially resolved BPT diagrams to spatially disentangle the main ionisation mechanism and constrain the physical properties of the ISM (reddening, density, temperature, ionisation potential, shock excitation etc). The intrinsic outflow 3D shape and the physical properties of the gas can then be analysed in details through kinematical and photoionisation models.

  16. An ALMA detection of circumnuclear molecular gas in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahakis, Catherine E.; Leon, Stephane; Martin, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We present the detection of circumnuclear molecular gas in M87 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).M87 (3C 274) is an archetypal giant elliptical galaxy at the centre of the Virgo cluster and is a unique object in which to study the origin and properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a radio galaxy located in a dense environment. While a very well-known object across most of the electromagnetic spectrum, M87 has long lacked a detailed study in the (sub)millimeter range, requiring the advance in both sensitivity and angular resolution only now made possible by ALMA.Molecular gas in the inner part of M87 has previously been detected in single-dish observations, suggesting that the molecular gas likely resides in a circumnuclear disk-like structure. However, the unique ALMA capabilities now allow us to make the first detailed, interferometric, investigation of the properties of the ISM around the galaxy's supermassive black hole.Here, we present results of ALMA band 3 and 7 data which we have used to map the CO J=1-0 and CO J=3-2 lines, respectively. With this data we are able to trace the bulk of the molecular gas, the warmer denser gas, and the continuum emission, at an angular resolution of 1 arcsecond (~80 pc), providing the deepest and highest spatial resolution image yet of the molecular gas content of this giant elliptical galaxy.

  17. Characterization of B- and C-type low molecular weight glutenin subunits by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muccilli, Vera; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore; Masci, Stefania; Lafiandra, Domenico

    2005-02-01

    Low molecular weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) are typically subdivided into three groups, according to their molecular weights and isoelectric points, namely the B-, C-, and D groups. Enriched B- and C-type LMW-GS fractions extracted from the bread wheat cultivar Chinese Spring were characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directly interfaced with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and HPLC coupled off-line with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, in order to ascertain the number and relative molecular masses of the components present in each fraction and determine the number of cysteine residues. About 70 components were detected in each of the fractions examined by the combined use of these two techniques, with 18 components common to both fractions. Analysis of the fractions after alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine allowed determination of the number of the cysteines present in about 40 subunits. The proteins detected were tentatively classified based on the relative molecular masses and number of cysteine residues. Cross-contamination was found in both B- and C- fractions, along with the presence of D-type LMW-GS. The two fractions also contained unexpected components, probably lipid transfer proteins and omega-gliadins. The presence of extensive microheterogeneity was suggested by the detection of several co-eluting proteins with minor differences in their molecular masses.

  18. IZI: Inferring the Gas Phase Metallicity (Z) and Ionization Parameter (q) of Ionized Nebulae Using Bayesian Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Kewley, Lisa; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for inferring the metallicity (Z) and ionization parameter (q) of H II regions and star-forming galaxies using strong nebular emission lines (SELs). We use Bayesian inference to derive the joint and marginalized posterior probability density functions for Z and q given a set of observed line fluxes and an input photoionization model. Our approach allows the use of arbitrary sets of SELs and the inclusion of flux upper limits. The method provides a self-consistent way of determining the physical conditions of ionized nebulae that is not tied to the arbitrary choice of a particular SEL diagnostic and uses all the available information. Unlike theoretically calibrated SEL diagnostics, the method is flexible and not tied to a particular photoionization model. We describe our algorithm, validate it against other methods, and present a tool that implements it called IZI. Using a sample of nearby extragalactic H II regions, we assess the performance of commonly used SEL abundance diagnostics. We also use a sample of 22 local H II regions having both direct and recombination line (RL) oxygen abundance measurements in the literature to study discrepancies in the abundance scale between different methods. We find that oxygen abundances derived through Bayesian inference using currently available photoionization models in the literature can be in good (~30%) agreement with RL abundances, although some models perform significantly better than others. We also confirm that abundances measured using the direct method are typically ~0.2 dex lower than both RL and photoionization-model-based abundances.

  19. IZI: INFERRING THE GAS PHASE METALLICITY (Z) AND IONIZATION PARAMETER (q) OF IONIZED NEBULAE USING BAYESIAN STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Kewley, Lisa; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2015-01-10

    We present a new method for inferring the metallicity (Z) and ionization parameter (q) of H II regions and star-forming galaxies using strong nebular emission lines (SELs). We use Bayesian inference to derive the joint and marginalized posterior probability density functions for Z and q given a set of observed line fluxes and an input photoionization model. Our approach allows the use of arbitrary sets of SELs and the inclusion of flux upper limits. The method provides a self-consistent way of determining the physical conditions of ionized nebulae that is not tied to the arbitrary choice of a particular SEL diagnostic and uses all the available information. Unlike theoretically calibrated SEL diagnostics, the method is flexible and not tied to a particular photoionization model. We describe our algorithm, validate it against other methods, and present a tool that implements it called IZI. Using a sample of nearby extragalactic H II regions, we assess the performance of commonly used SEL abundance diagnostics. We also use a sample of 22 local H II regions having both direct and recombination line (RL) oxygen abundance measurements in the literature to study discrepancies in the abundance scale between different methods. We find that oxygen abundances derived through Bayesian inference using currently available photoionization models in the literature can be in good (∼30%) agreement with RL abundances, although some models perform significantly better than others. We also confirm that abundances measured using the direct method are typically ∼0.2 dex lower than both RL and photoionization-model-based abundances.

  20. Molecular-weight distributions of coal and petroleum asphaltenes from laser desorption/ionization experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ana R. Hortal; Paola Hurtado; Bruno Martinez-Haya; Oliver C. Mullins

    2007-09-15

    Molecular-weight distributions (MWDs) of asphaltenes extracted from coal and petroleum have been measured in laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric experiments. The dried-droplet and solvent-free sample preparation methods are compared. The coal asphaltenes have a relatively narrow MWD (full width 150 amu) with an average molecular weight of 340 amu. The petroleum asphaltenes display a broader MWD (full width 300 amu) and are heavier on average (680 amu). The LDI spectra also provide evidence for the formation of noncovalent clusters of the two types of asphaltenes during the desorption process. Petroleum and coal asphaltenes exhibit aggregation as do large model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with five or more fused rings also included in the study. Smaller PAHs (pyrene) exhibit less aggregation, especially when alkane-chain substituents are incorporated to the molecular structure. This indicates that asphaltenes possess large PAHs and, according to the relatively small molecular weights observed, that there is a preponderance of asphaltene molecules with only a single fused ring system. The coal asphaltenes present a significantly smaller propensity toward aggregation than their crude oil counterparts. This finding, coupled with the fact that (1) alkanes inhibit aggregation in LDI and (2) petroleum asphaltenes possess much more alkane carbon, indicates that coal asphaltenes have smaller PAHs on average than petroleum asphaltenes. This is further corroborated by the stronger ultraviolet absorbance of the coal asphaltenes at wavelengths shorter than 400 nm. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Cluster model studies of anion and molecular specificities via electrospray ionization photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xue -Bin

    2017-01-06

    Ion specificity, a widely observed macroscopic phenomenon in condensed phases and at interfaces, is essentially a fundamental chemical physical issue. We have been investigating such effects using cluster models in an “atom-by-atom” and “molecule-by-molecule” fashion not possible with condensed-phase methods. We use electrospray ionization (ESI) to generate molecular and ionic clusters to simulate key molecular entities involved in local binding regions, and characterize them employing negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy (NIPES). Inter- and intramolecular interactions and binding configurations are directly obtained as functions of cluster size and composition, providing insightful molecular-level description and characterization over the local active sites that playmore » crucial roles in determining solution chemistry and condensed phase phenomena. Finally, the topics covered in this article are relevant to a wide scope of research fields ranging from ion specific effects in electrolyte solutions, ion selectivity/recognition in normal functioning of life, to molecular specificity in aerosol particle formation, as well as in rational material design and synthesis.« less

  2. Dense molecular gas in starburst galaxies: Warmer than expected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhle, S.; Henkel, C.; de Maio, T.; Seaquist, E. R.

    2011-05-01

    Star formation processes and their feedback play a crucial role in the evolution of almost every galaxy, locally as well as at high redshifts. The question whether or not the initial mass function (IMF) is universal, i.e. the same in all kinds of environments, is still subject to intense debate. A number of recent observations have been interpreted as evidence for a top-heavy IMF, spanning a variety of objects, from the center of our Galaxy to circumnuclear starburst regions and ultra-compact dwarf galaxies. Hydrodynamical simulations can reproduce such a top-heavy IMF if the raw material of star formation, the dense molecular gas, is assumed to have a kinetic temperature of ˜ 100 K. Such a molecular gas phase is not observed in the dense cores in the Galactic plane, but may be present in active environments like the cores of starburst galaxies or near AGN. Unfortunately, the kinetic temperature of the molecular gas in many external galaxies is not well constrained, because many of the most common extragalactic tracer molecules suffer from a degeneracy between the kinetic temperature and the gas density in a non-LTE line ratio analysis. We demonstrate the diagnostic power of a selected set of para-formaldehyde lines as tracers of the kinetic temperature as well as the gas density in external galaxies using our non-LTE radiative transfer model. With this new observational tool, we have engaged in characterizing the properties of the dense molecular gas phase in a number of nearby starburst galaxies and near AGN. Our first results suggest the existence of a dense molecular gas phase that is significantly warmer than the dust and much warmer than dense molecular gas found in the Milky Way disk.

  3. Gas-Phase Stability of Negatively Charged Organophosphate Metabolites Produced by Electrospray Ionization and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Daiki; Mizuno, Hajime; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2017-09-01

    The formation mechanisms of singly and multiply charged organophosphate metabolites by electrospray ionization (ESI) and their gas phase stabilities were investigated. Metabolites containing multiple phosphate groups, such as adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and D-myo-inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) were observed as doubly deprotonated ions by negative-ion ESI mass spectrometry. Organophosphates with multiple negative charges were found to be unstable and often underwent loss of PO3 -, although singly deprotonated analytes were stable. The presence of fragments due to the loss of PO3 - in the negative-ion ESI mass spectra could result in the misinterpretation of analytical results. In contrast to ESI, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) produced singly charged organophosphate metabolites with no associated fragmentation, since the singly charged anions are stable. The stability of an organophosphate metabolite in the gas phase strongly depends on its charge state. The fragmentations of multiply charged organophosphates were also investigated in detail through density functional theory calculations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Observations of columnal recombination in the ionization tracks of energetic heavy nuclei in an argon-methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of ionization signals resulting from the passage of energetic heavy nuclei through a gas mixture consisting of 95 mol percent Ar plus 5 mol percent CH4, at an absolute pressure of 3 atm are presented. The measurements take place under a uniform electric field perpendicular to the ionization track. The signals were compared to the calculated energy losses, with an assumption of proportionality between energy loss rate and ionization rate. Significant deviations from proportionality are found for energy loss rate grater than about 3000 MeV sq cm/g, while fractional deviations are found to be proportional to the energy loss rate (dE/dx) exp m, where m is equal to about two. These results are attributed to the columnal recombination.

  5. Observations of columnal recombination in the ionization tracks of energetic heavy nuclei in an argon-methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of ionization signals resulting from the passage of energetic heavy nuclei through a gas mixture consisting of 95 mol percent Ar plus 5 mol percent CH4, at an absolute pressure of 3 atm are presented. The measurements take place under a uniform electric field perpendicular to the ionization track. The signals were compared to the calculated energy losses, with an assumption of proportionality between energy loss rate and ionization rate. Significant deviations from proportionality are found for energy loss rate grater than about 3000 MeV sq cm/g, while fractional deviations are found to be proportional to the energy loss rate (dE/dx) exp m, where m is equal to about two. These results are attributed to the columnal recombination.

  6. Self-injection and acceleration of electrons during ionization of gas atoms by a short laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.P.

    2006-04-15

    Using a relativistic three-dimensional single-particle code, acceleration of electrons created during the ionization of nitrogen and oxygen gas atoms by a laser pulse has been studied. Barrier suppression ionization model has been used to calculate ionization time of the bound electrons. The energy gained by the electrons peaks for an optimum value of laser spot size. The electrons created near the tail do not gain sufficient energy for a long duration laser pulse. The electrons created at the tail of pulse escape before fully interacting with the trailing part of the pulse for a short duration laser pulse, which causes electrons to retain sufficient energy. If a suitable frequency chirp is introduced then energy of the electrons created at the tail of the pulse further increases.

  7. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of electrolyte from spent lithium ion batteries and its characterization by gas chromatography with chemical ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönnighoff, Xaver; Friesen, Alex; Konersmann, Benedikt; Horsthemke, Fabian; Grützke, Martin; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-06-01

    The aging products of the electrolyte from a commercially available state-of-the-art 18650-type cell were investigated. During long term cycling a huge difference in their performance and lifetime at different temperatures was observed. By interpretation of a strong capacity fading of cells cycled at 20 °C compared to cells cycled at 45 °C a temperature depending aging mechanism was determined. To investigate the influence of the electrolyte on this fading, the electrolyte was extracted by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and then analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with electron impact (EI) ionization and mass selective detection. To obtain more information with regard to the identification of unknown decomposition products further analysis with positive chemical ionization (PCI) and negative chemical ionization (NCI) was performed. 17 different volatile organic aging products were detected and identified. So far, seven of them were not yet known in literature and several formation pathways were postulated taking previously published literature into account.

  8. Diffuse gas in retired galaxies: nebular emission templates and constraints on the sources of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jonas; Woods, Tyrone E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarzi, Marc; Chen, Yan-Mei; Oh, Kyuseok

    2016-10-01

    We present emission-line templates for passively-evolving (`retired') galaxies, useful for investigation of the evolution of the interstellar medium in these galaxies, and characterization of their high-temperature source populations. The templates are based on high signal-to-noise (>800) co-added spectra (3700-6800 Å) of ˜11 500 gas-rich Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies devoid of star formation and active galactic nuclei. Stacked spectra are provided for the entire sample and sub-samples binned by mean stellar age. In our previous paper, Johansson et al., these spectra provided the first measurements of the He II 4686 Å line in passively-evolving galaxies, and the observed He II/Hβ ratio constrained the contribution of accreting white dwarfs (the `single-degenerate' scenario) to the Type Ia supernova rate. In this paper, the full range of unambiguously detected emission lines are presented. Comparison of the observed [O I] 6300 Å/Hα ratio with photoionization models further constrains any high-temperature single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (with 1.5 ≲ T/105 K ≲ 10) to ≲3-6 per cent of the observed rate in the youngest age bin (i.e. highest SN Ia rate). Hence, for the same temperatures, in the presence of an ambient population of post-asymptotic giant branch stars, we exclude additional high-temperature sources with a combined ionizing luminosity of ≈1.35 × 1030 L⊙/M⊙,* for stellar populations with mean ages of 1-4 Gyr. Furthermore, we investigate the extinction affecting both the stellar and nebular continuum. The latter shows about five times higher values. This contradicts isotropically distributed dust and gas that renders similar extinction values for both cases.

  9. High S/N Observations of Low-Ionization Gas Through the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.; Roth, K. C.; Savage, B. D.; Lu, L.

    1993-12-01

    Optical absorption-line studies of extragalactic objects can now provide a sensitive probe of low-ionization gas over the full extent of the Galactic halo. Such work is particularly pertinent to a better understanding of the distances, metallicities, and sky coverage of the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) primarily observed in H I 21 cm emission. We have recently obtained high S/N, high resolution (20 km s(-1) ) KPNO 4-m echelle observations of the Ca II absorption toward the QSO 1821+643, the Seyfert galaxy Mkn 231, and SN 1993J in the galaxy M81. We detect a weak (W_lambda ~30 m Angstroms) Ca II component at an LSR velocity of -140 km s(-1) toward 1821+643 that corresponds to the Outer Arm H I HVC Complex. In the case of Mkn 231, we find no evidence of high-velocity Ca II absorption despite the location of this sightline near H I HVC Complex C. Our Ca II observations toward SN 1993J are especially exceptional in quality (S/N~500) and reveal absorption due to the Galactic halo, the disk of M81, and intergalactic material in the M81 group. Although the M81 disk gas dominates the absorption in the velocity region encompassing HVC Complex C, we do find a high-velocity component at +228 km s(-1) in Ca II that has also been seen in Mg II absorption with HST (Bowen et al. 1994, Ap. J. (Letters), in press). Our echelle spectra of SN 1993J also reveal detections of other interstellar atoms and molecules such as Ti II, Ca I, and CH(+) \\@. The Ti II measurement is particularly interesting in that it represents the first detection of Ti II toward an extragalactic object and indicates a Ti II scale height of about 1200 pc which is somewhat less than expected from observations of Ti II toward halo stars.

  10. Testing a Dynamical Equilibrium Model of the Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in NGC 891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Erin; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-12-01

    The observed scale heights of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) layers exceed their thermal scale heights by a factor of a few in the Milky Way and other nearby edge-on disk galaxies. Here, we test a dynamical equilibrium model of the eDIG layer in NGC 891, where we ask whether the thermal, turbulent, magnetic field, and cosmic-ray pressure gradients are sufficient to support the layer. In optical emission-line spectroscopy from the SparsePak integral field unit on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope, the Hα emission in position-velocity space suggests that the eDIG is found in a ring between galactocentric radii of {R}\\min ≤slant R≤slant 8 {kpc}, where {R}\\min ≥slant 2 {kpc}. We find that the thermal ({σ }{th}=11 km s-1) and turbulent ({σ }{turb}=25 km s-1) velocity dispersions are insufficient to satisfy the hydrostatic equilibrium equation given an exponential electron scale height of {h}z=1.0 {kpc}. Using a literature analysis of radio continuum observations from the CHANG-ES survey, we demonstrate that the magnetic field and cosmic-ray pressure gradients are sufficient to stably support the gas at R≥slant 8 kpc if the cosmic rays are sufficiently coupled to the system ({γ }{cr}=1.45). Thus, a stable dynamical equilibrium model is viable only if the eDIG is found in a thin ring around R = 8 kpc, and nonequilibrium models such as a galactic fountain flow are of interest for further study.

  11. Ethanol analysis by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame-ionization and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin

    2011-09-01

    Ethanol is the most frequently identified compound in forensic toxicology. Although confirmation involving mass spectrometry is desirable, relatively few methods have been published to date. A novel technique utilizing a Dean's Switch to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame-ionization (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation is presented. Using 100 μL of sample, the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.005 and 0.010 g/dL, respectively. The zero-order linear range (r(2) > 0.990) was determined to span the concentrations of 0.010 to 1.000 g/dL. The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 3.1%. Quantitative accuracy was within ±8%, ±6%, ±3%, and ±1.5% at concentrations of 0.010, 0.025, 0.080, and 0.300 g/dL, respectively. In addition, 1,1-difluoroethane was validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validated FID-MS method provides a procedure for the quantitation of ethyl alcohol in blood by FID with simultaneous confirmation by MS and can also be utilized as an identification method for inhalants such as 1,1-difluoroethane.

  12. Hα and [SII] Emission from Warm Ionized Gas in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Gostisha, Martin C.; Barger, Kathleen A.

    2014-06-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [SII] λ6716 and Hα spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310° < l < 345°. Using extinction-corrected Hα intensities (I_{{H} \\alpha }^c), we measure an exponential scale height of electron density squared in the arm of H_{n_e^2}= 0.30 \\, {kpc} (assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc), intermediate between that observed in the inner Galaxy and in the Perseus Arm. The [S II]/Hα line ratio is enhanced at large |z| and in sightlines with faint I_{{H} \\alpha }^c. We find that the [S II]/Hα line ratio has a power-law relationship with I_{{H} \\alpha }^c from a value of ≈1.0 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^c< 0.2 \\, {R} (Rayleighs) to a value of ≈0.08 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^c\\gtrsim 100 \\, {R}. The line ratio is better correlated with Hα intensity than with height above the plane, indicating that the physical conditions within the WIM vary systematically with electron density. We argue that the variation of the line ratio with height is a consequence of the decrease of electron density with height. Our results reinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse Hα emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.

  13. Improved gas chromatography-flame ionization detector analytical method for the analysis of epoxy fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mubiru, Edward; Shrestha, Kshitij; Papastergiadis, Antonios; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2013-11-29

    In this study an improved method for analysis of epoxy fatty acids is reported. Data obtained from analysis of polar fatty acids has previously been presented, but due to the high number of compounds that co-elute in the polar fraction, the resultant chromatograms are complex which may lead to compromising the accuracy of the data. A three steps separation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on a silica gel column to remove hydroxy fatty acid interferences was proposed. This approach is opposed to a two step separation procedure that has been often used to prevent analytical interferences caused by non-altered fatty acids. A gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) equipped with a polar CP-Sil 88™ column was used. Quantification was based on the use of methyl nonadecanoate (C19:0), as an internal standard. Individual mono epoxy fatty acids were well separated without co-eluting compounds. The optimized method was finally applied to screen epoxy fatty acids in 37 fresh oil samples. Results obtained for the total epoxy fatty acids were in the range 0.03-2mgg(-1) of oil with repeatability coefficient of variation (CV) ranging from 2.8 to 9.9% for duplicate analysis showing that the results obtained are repeatable.

  14. Terahertz ionization of highly charged quantum posts in a perforated electron gas.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher M; Stehr, Dominik; Kim, Hyochul; Truong, Tuan-Anh; Pryor, Craig; Petroff, Pierre M; Sherwin, Mark S

    2012-03-14

    "Quantum posts" are roughly cylindrical semiconductor nanostructures that are embedded in an energetically shallower "matrix" quantum well of comparable thickness. We report measurements of voltage-controlled charging and terahertz absorption of 30 nm thick InGaAs quantum wells and posts. Under flat-band (zero-electric field) conditions, the quantum posts each contain approximately six electrons, and an additional ~2.4 × 10(11) cm(-2) electrons populate the quantum well matrix. In this regime, absorption spectra show peaks at 3.5 and 4.8 THz (14 and 19 meV) whose relative amplitude depends strongly on temperature. These peaks are assigned to intersubband transitions of electrons in the quantum well matrix. A third, broader feature has a temperature-independent amplitude and is assigned to an absorption involving quantum posts. Eight-band k·p calculations incorporating the effects of strain and Coulomb repulsion predict that the electrons in the posts strongly repel the electrons in the quantum well matrix, "perforating" the electron gas. The strongest calculated transition, which has a frequency close to the center of the quantum post related absorption at 5 THz (20 meV), is an ionizing transition from a filled state to a quasi-bound state that can easily scatter to empty states in the quantum well matrix. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Serum total testosterone: immunoassay compared with negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R L; Herold, D A

    1996-05-01

    We have developed an electron capture negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure to quantify serum testosterone in the clinically relevant range 0.69-69.3 nmol/L and used this procedure to assess Ciba Corning Diagnostics ACS:180 testosterone immunoassay. The GC-MS method involves liquid-liquid extraction of serum samples and synthesis of a pentafluorobenzyloxime/silyl ether derivative of testosterone with excellent chromatographic and electron capturing properties. The ACS testosterone assay is the first fully automated nonradioactive testosterone immunoassay approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients' specimens (101, 57 males, 44 females) were analyzed by both techniques. A plot of the GC-MS (x) vs ACS (y) testosterone concentrations for men was linear (y = 1.07x + 0.19 nmol/L), showing excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between the two assays. Agreement of the two assays for female specimens was poor (y = 0.72x + 1.2 nmol/L), with a poor correlation (r2 = 0.31).

  16. Micro-flame ionization detector with a novel structure for portable gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Wang, Hua; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2010-08-15

    A micro-flame ionization detector (micro-FID) for portable gas chromatograph (GC) based on conventional mechanical fabrication techniques was developed and evaluated. Structure was redesigned and dimensions were optimized for best performance. Air is introduced from upper part of the detector, flowing downwards into the burning chamber along a narrow round gap between the collection electrode and the inner wall of the detector body, forming a uniform flow field around the burning jet. The lowest detection limit of the mu-FID was 5x10(-13)g/s for n-decane, with a linear response range of five orders of magnitude. The consumption of gases is only 10 ml/min for hydrogen, and 120 ml/min for air, that is about 1/3 of the gases required for conventional FIDs. A comparative study between the micro-FID and commercial FID was also performed that proved the advantages of the micro-FID. The micro-FID is simple in structure, low heating power, and low consumption of gases that not only decrease the cost of running, but also increase the portability of GC for filed applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Partially Ionized Gas in the w3 Complex - C90-ALPHA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-05-01

    We have mapped the distribution of the C9Oα line toward W3 with 90" resolution. The emission is centered at α=602h21m50s.6±δ=61°52'31"±9 (1950), that is, southwest of W3A (IRS 2) and toward W3 B (IRS 3). If the source and the beam are Gaussian shaped, the deconvolved source size is (121" ± 17", 88" ± 15") in (α, δ). The carbon emission covers a region which includes all of the compact radio continuum sources at the center of the W3 complex. The C II emission region shows a velocity gradient: from -39 km s-1 in the east to - 42 km s-1 in the west. It is not possible to derive uniquely the electron temperature and density of the partially ionized gas from our data or from our data in conjunction with other C II results. The carbon region may consist of shells surrounding the compact H II regions.

  18. Mass spectrometric evaluation of the gas phase structure of noncovalent quadruplex DNA obtained by electrospray ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, C.G.; Cheng, Xueheng; Bakhtiar, R.; Van Orden, S.; Smith, R.D.; Schlegel, C.; Camp, D.G. II

    1994-12-31

    A number of quanine-rich DNA sequences have been recognized which assemble into quadrupole-helical non-Watson/Crick hybridized structures. These sequences have been localized in a number of key regions in chromosomal DNA including telomers and transcriptional promoters. The preservation of this tetrameric association in the gas phase following electrospray ionization (ESI) has been reported in this laboratory. The authors have extended these studies by the preparation of four candidate quadruplex oligomers. Three of these (I, 5{prime}-dCGC GGG GCG-3{prime}; II, 5{prime}dCGC GGGG GCG-3{prime} and III, 5{prime}-dCGC GGGGG GCG-3{prime}) differ in the number of quanine residues available for G-quartet stacking in the quadruplex array and a fourth (HG, 5{prime}-dCGC AGGG GCG03{prime}) is a sequence prominent in human telomeric DNA. During their preparation, the authors observed remarkable stability of the multimeric species in the condensed phase including intact migration in HPLC under apparently {open_quotes}denaturing{close_quotes} conditions. Under standard conditions (aqueous solution of oligonucleotide samples and nozzle-skimmer interface) on a linear quadrupole mass spectrometer oligonucleotide samples showed the typical distribution of charge states for unassociated oligonucleotides. ESI from phosphate-EDTA buffered solutions with the utilization of a capillary/skimmer interface arrangement which provides mild conditions for transfer of ions through the atmosphere/vacuum interface afforded spectra which show prominent contributions from species with quadrupole stoichiometry together monomeric materials.

  19. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: A Technique to Access the Information beyond the Molecular Weight of the Analyte

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-01-01

    The Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique extensively used for production of gas phase ions (without fragmentation) of thermally labile large supramolecules. In the present review we have described the development of Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) during the last 25 years in the study of various properties of different types of biological molecules. There have been extensive studies on the mechanism of formation of charged gaseous species by the ESI. Several groups have investigated the origin and implications of the multiple charge states of proteins observed in the ESI-mass spectra of the proteins. The charged analytes produced by ESI can be fragmented by activating them in the gas-phase, and thus tandem mass spectrometry has been developed, which provides very important insights on the structural properties of the molecule. The review will highlight recent developments and emerging directions in this fascinating area of research. PMID:22611397

  20. Molecular above-threshold ionization spectra as an evidence of the three-point interference of electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasović, Elvedin; Milošević, Dejan B.; Gazibegović-Busuladžić, Azra; Čerkić, Aner; Busuladžić, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    We consider high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of polyatomic molecules ionized by a strong linearly polarized laser field. Improved molecular strong-field approximation by which the HATI process on polyatomic molecular species can be described is developed. Using this theory we calculate photoelectron angular-energy spectra for different triatomic molecules. Special attention is devoted to the minima that are observed in the calculated high-energy electron spectra of the ozone and carbon dioxide molecules. A key difference between these minima and minima that are observed in the corresponding spectra of diatomic molecules are presented.

  1. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  2. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gregory T; Wilhide, Joshua A; LaCourse, William R

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  3. Polymeric molecular sieve membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Qiao, Zhenan; Chai, Songhai

    2017-08-15

    A porous polymer membrane useful in gas separation, the porous polymer membrane comprising a polymeric structure having crosslinked aromatic groups and a hierarchical porosity in which micropores having a pore size less than 2 nm are present at least in an outer layer of the porous polymer membrane, and macropores having a pore size of over 50 nm are present at least in an inner layer of the porous polymer membrane. Also described are methods for producing the porous polymer membrane in which a non-porous polymer membrane containing aromatic rings is subjected to a Friedel-Crafts crosslinking reaction in which a crosslinking molecule crosslinks the aromatic rings in the presence of a Friedel-Crafts catalyst and organic solvent under sufficiently elevated temperature, as well as methods for using the porous polymer membranes for gas or liquid separation, filtration, or purification.

  4. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  5. Dense Molecular Gas Tracers in the Outflow of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Fabian; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Warren, Steven R.; Hodge, Jacqueline; Levy, Rebecca C.; Meier, David S.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Ott, Jürgen; Rosolowsky, Erik; Scoville, Nick; Weiss, Axel; Zschaechner, Laura; Zwaan, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed study of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 using ALMA. We find that this feature is clearly associated with the edge of NGC 253's prominent ionized outflow, has a projected length of ∼300 pc, with a width of ∼50 pc, and a velocity dispersion of ∼40 km s‑1, which is consistent with an ejection from the disk about 1 Myr ago. The kinematics of the molecular gas in this feature can be interpreted (albeit not uniquely) as accelerating at a rate of 1 km s‑1 pc‑1. In this scenario, the gas is approaching an escape velocity at the last measured point. Strikingly, bright tracers of dense molecular gas (HCN, CN, HCO+, CS) are also detected in the molecular outflow: we measure an HCN(1–0)/CO(1–0) line ratio of ∼ 1/10 in the outflow, similar to that in the central starburst region of NGC 253 and other starburst galaxies. By contrast, the HCN/CO line ratio in the NGC 253 disk is significantly lower (∼ 1/30), similar to other nearby galaxy disks. This strongly suggests that the streamer gas originates from the starburst, and that its physical state does not change significantly over timescales of ∼1 Myr during its entrainment in the outflow. Simple calculations indicate that radiation pressure is not the main mechanism for driving the outflow. The presence of such dense material in molecular outflows needs to be accounted for in simulations of galactic outflows.

  6. A black-hole mass measurement from molecular gas kinematics in NGC4526.

    PubMed

    Davis, Timothy A; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Sarzi, Marc; Blitz, Leo

    2013-02-21

    The masses of the supermassive black holes found in galaxy bulges are correlated with a multitude of galaxy properties, leading to suggestions that galaxies and black holes may evolve together. The number of reliably measured black-hole masses is small, and the number of methods for measuring them is limited, holding back attempts to understand this co-evolution. Directly measuring black-hole masses is currently possible with stellar kinematics (in early-type galaxies), ionized-gas kinematics (in some spiral and early-type galaxies) and in rare objects that have central maser emission. Here we report that by modelling the effect of a black hole on the kinematics of molecular gas it is possible to fit interferometric observations of CO emission and thereby accurately estimate black-hole masses. We study the dynamics of the gas in the early-type galaxy NGC 4526, and obtain a best fit that requires the presence of a central dark object of 4.5(+4.2)(-3.1) × 10(8) solar masses (3σ confidence limit). With the next-generation millimetre-wavelength interferometers these observations could be reproduced in galaxies out to 75 megaparsecs in less than 5 hours of observing time. The use of molecular gas as a kinematic tracer should thus allow one to estimate black-hole masses in hundreds of galaxies in the local Universe, many more than are accessible with current techniques.

  7. Molecular identification of Mucorales in human tissues: contribution of PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alanio, A; Garcia-Hermoso, D; Mercier-Delarue, S; Lanternier, F; Gits-Muselli, M; Menotti, J; Denis, B; Bergeron, A; Legrand, M; Lortholary, O; Bretagne, S

    2015-06-01

    Molecular methods are crucial for mucormycosis diagnosis because cultures are frequently negative, even if microscopy suggests the presence of hyphae in tissues. We assessed PCR/electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for Mucorales identification in 19 unfixed tissue samples from 13 patients with proven or probable mucormycosis and compared the results with culture, quantitative real-time PCR, 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer region (ITS PCR) and 18S PCR sequencing. Concordance with culture identification to both genus and species levels was higher for PCR/ESI-MS than for the other techniques. Thus, PCR/ESI-MS is suitable for Mucorales identification, within 6 hours, for tissue samples for which microscopy results suggest the presence of hyphae.

  8. A combined electron-ion spectrometer for studying complete kinematics of molecular dissociation upon shell selective ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, K.; Banerjee, S. B.; Bapat, B.

    2013-07-15

    A combined electron-ion spectrometer has been built to study dissociation kinematics of molecular ions upon various electronic decay processes ensuing from ionization of neutral molecules. The apparatus can be used with various ionization agents. Ion time-of-flight (ToF) spectra arising from various electronic decay processes are acquired by triggering the ToF measurement in coincidence with energy analyzed electrons. The design and the performance of the spectrometer in a photoionization experiment is presented in detail. Electron spectra and ion time of flight spectra resulting from valence and 2p{sub 1/2} ionization of Argon and those from valence ionization of CO are presented to demonstrate the capability of the instrument. The fragment ion spectra show remarkable differences (both kinematic and cross sectional) dependent on the energy of the ejected electron, corresponding to various electron loss and decay mechanisms in dissociative photoionization of molecules.

  9. Galaxy chemical evolution models: the role of molecular gas formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollá, Mercedes; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Ascasibar, Yago; Gibson, Brad K.

    2017-06-01

    In our classical grid of multiphase chemical evolution models, star formation in the disc occurs in two steps: first, molecular gas forms, and then stars are created by cloud-cloud collisions or interactions of massive stars with the surrounding molecular clouds. The formation of both molecular clouds and stars are treated through the use of free parameters we refer to as efficiencies. In this work, we modify the formation of molecular clouds based on several new prescriptions existing in the literature, and we compare the results obtained for a chemical evolution model of the Milky Way Galaxy regarding the evolution of the Solar region, the radial structure of the Galactic disc and the ratio between the diffuse and molecular components, H i/H2. Our results show that the six prescriptions we have tested reproduce fairly consistent most of the observed trends, differing mostly in their predictions for the (poorly constrained) outskirts of the Milky Way and the evolution in time of its radial structure. Among them, the model proposed by Ascasibar et al. (in preparation), where the conversion of diffuse gas into molecular clouds depends on the local stellar and gas densities as well as on the gas metallicity, seems to provide the best overall match to the observed data.

  10. DENSITY OF WARM IONIZED GAS NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: LOW RADIO FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subhashis

    2013-08-10

    We have observed the Galactic center (GC) region at 0.154 and 0.255 GHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. A total of 62 compact likely extragalactic (EG) sources are detected. Their scattering sizes decrease linearly with increasing angular distance from the GC up to about 1 Degree-Sign . The apparent scattering sizes of the sources are more than an order of magnitude less than predicted earlier by the NE2001 model of Galactic electron distribution within 359. Degree-Sign 5 < l < 0. Degree-Sign 5 and -0. Degree-Sign 5 < b < 0. Degree-Sign 5 (Hyperstrong Scattering Region) of the Galaxy. High free-free optical depths ({tau}) are observed toward most of the extended non-thermal sources within 0. Degree-Sign 6 from the GC. Significant variation of {tau} indicates that the absorbing medium is patchy at an angular scale of {approx}10' and n{sub e} is {approx}10 cm{sup -3}, which matches the NE2001 model. This model predicts the EG sources to be resolved out from 1.4 GHz interferometric surveys. However, out of 10 EG sources expected in the region, 8 likely EG are present in the 1.4 GHz catalog. Ionized interfaces of dense molecular clouds to the ambient medium are most likely responsible for strong scattering and low radio frequency absorption. However, dense GC clouds traced by CS J = 1-0 emission are found to have a narrow distribution of {approx}0. Degree-Sign 2 across the Galactic plane. Angular distribution of most EG sources seen through the so-called Hyperstrong Scattering Region are random in b, and typically {approx}7 out of 10 sources will not be seen through the dense molecular clouds, which explains why most of them are not scatter broadened at 1.4 GHz.

  11. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution. IV. Star Formation and a Rotating Core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-05-01

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features. We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0.''18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 μm [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution ~4 km s-1: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  12. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution. IV. Star Formation and a Rotating Core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Neff, Susan Gale; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-01-01

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features.We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0".18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 micron [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution approx. 4 km/s: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  13. Ionized gas kinematics at high resolution. IV. Star formation and a rotating core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-05-20

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features. We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0.''18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 μm [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution ∼4 km s{sup –1}: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  14. Towards More Accurate Measurements of the Ionization Energy of Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprecher, D.; Beyer, M.; Liu, J.; Merkt, F.; Salumbides, E.; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.; Jungen, Ch.

    2013-06-01

    With two electrons and two protons, molecular hydrogen is the simplest molecule displaying all features of a chemical bond. H_2 is therefore a fundamental system for testing molecular quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics in molecules. The test can be performed by comparing measured and calculated intervals between different rovibronic states of H_2. Two further quantities that can be used for this test are the dissociation and ionization energies of H_2, and considerable efforts have been invested over more than 80 years to improve the precision and accuracy of experimental and theoretical determination of these two quantities. The current status of the comparison is that the theoretical and experimental values of the ionization and dissociation energies of H_2 agree within the combined uncertainty of 30 MHz (see also). The factors currently limiting the precision of the experimental determination will be discussed and the strategies that are being implemented towards overcoming these limitations will be presented. A long-term goal is to achieve a precision of better than 15 kHz, which is the ultimate limit imposed on the accuracy of the theoretical determination by the current uncertainty of the proton-to-electron mass ratio. E. J. Salumbides, G. D. Dickenson, T. I. Ivanov and W. Ubachs, {Phys. Rev. Lett.} 107 (4), 043005 (2011). K. Piszczatowski, G. Lach, M. Przybytek, J. Komasa, K. Pachuckiand and B. Jeziorski, {J. Chem. Theory Comput.} 5 (11), 3039 (2009). J. Liu, E. J. Salumbides, U. Hollenstein, J. C. J. Koelemeij, K. S. E. Eikema, W. Ubachs and F. Merkt, {J. Chem. Phys.} 130 (17), 174306 (2009). D. Sprecher, Ch. Jungen, W. Ubachs and F. Merkt, {Faraday Discuss.} 150, 51 (2011).

  15. SDSS-IV MaNGA: the impact of diffuse ionized gas on emission-line ratios, interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas metallicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew; Haffner, L. Matthew; Walterbos, René; Maiolino, Roberto; Tremonti, Christy; Thomas, Daniel; Drory, Niv; Jones, Amy; Belfiore, Francesco; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Nitschelm, Christian; Andrews, Brett; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cheung, Edmond; Li, Cheng; Law, David R.; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Storchi Bergmann, Thaisa; Simmons, Audrey

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of 365 nearly face-on star-forming galaxies observed by Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impacts the measurements of emission-line ratios, hence the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas-phase metallicity measurements. At fixed metallicity, DIG-dominated low ΣHα regions display enhanced [S II]/Hα, [N II]/Hα, [O II]/Hβ and [O I]/Hα. The gradients in these line ratios are determined by metallicity gradients and ΣHα. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves H II regions towards composite or low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LI(N)ER)-like regions. A harder ionizing spectrum is needed to explain DIG line ratios. Leaky H II region models can only shift line ratios slightly relative to H II region models, and thus fail to explain the composite/LI(N)ER line ratios displayed by DIG. Our result favours ionization by evolved stars as a major ionization source for DIG with LI(N)ER-like emission. DIG can significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradients derived using strong-line methods. Metallicities derived using N2O2 are optimal because they exhibit the smallest bias and error. Using O3N2, R23, N2 = [N II]/Hα and N2S2Hα to derive metallicities introduces bias in the derived metallicity gradients as large as the gradient itself. The strong-line method of Blanc et al. (IZI hereafter) cannot be applied to DIG to get an accurate metallicity because it currently contains only H II region models that fail to describe the DIG.

  16. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  17. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  18. The CO Transition from Diffuse Molecular Gas to Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Johnathan S.; Federman, Steven

    2017-06-01

    The atomic to molecular transitions occurring in diffuse interstellar gas surrounding molecular clouds are affected by the local physical conditions (density and temperature) and the radiation field penetrating the material. Our optical observations of CH, CH^{+}, and CN absorption from McDonald Observatory and the European Southern Observatory are useful tracers of this gas and provide the velocity structure needed for analyzing lower resolution ultraviolet observations of CO and H_{2} absorption from Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We explore the changing environment between diffuse and dense gas by using the column densities and excitation temperatures from CO and H_{2} to determine the gas density. The resulting gas densities from this method are compared to densities inferred from other methods such as C_{2} and CN chemistry. The densities allow us to interpret the trends from the combined set of tracers. Groupings of sight lines, such as those toward h and χ Persei or Chameleon provide a chance for further characterization of the environment. The Chameleon region in particular helps illuminate CO-dark gas, which is not associated with emission from H I at 21 cm or from CO at 2.6 mm. Expanding this analysis to include emission data from the GOT C+ survey allows the further characterization of neutral diffuse gas, including CO-dark gas.

  19. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors.

    PubMed

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2015-07-10

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable 'gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the 'gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules.

  20. Molecular-beam gas-sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. S.; Knuth, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system for rocket motor combustion chamber sampling is described. The history of the sampling system is reviewed. The problems associated with rocket motor combustion chamber sampling are reported. Several design equations are presented. The results of the experiments include the effects of cooling water flow rates, the optimum separation gap between the end plate and sampling nozzle, and preliminary data on compositions in a rocket motor combustion chamber.

  1. Low-Frequency Observations of Galactic Supernova Remnants and the Distribution of Low-Density Ionized Gas in the Interstellar Medium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    New long-wavelength observations of Galactic supernova remnants ( SNRs ) at 30.9 and 57.5 MHz are used to derive detailed low-frequency radio spectra...for 32 SNRs . Of these, approximately two-thirds show turnovers at low frequencies, implying the presence of a widespread, but inhomogeneous, ionized... SNRs and to constrain the physical properties of the ionized gas responsible for the absorption. Three generally accepted ionized components of the

  2. A high-dispersion molecular gas component in nearby galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Leroy, Adam; De Blok, W. J. G.; Ianjamasimanana, R.; Mogotsi, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the velocity dispersion of the atomic (H I) and molecular (H{sub 2}) gas components in the disks (R ≲ R {sub 25}) of a sample of 12 nearby spiral galaxies with moderate inclinations. Our analysis is based on sensitive high-resolution data from the THINGS (atomic gas) and HERACLES (molecular gas) surveys. To obtain reliable measurements of the velocity dispersion, we stack regions several kiloparsecs in size, after accounting for intrinsic velocity shifts due to galactic rotation and large-scale motions. We stack using various parameters: the galactocentric distance, star formation rate surface density, H I surface density, H{sub 2} surface density, and total gas surface density. We fit single Gaussian components to the stacked spectra and measure median velocity dispersions for H I of 11.9 ± 3.1 km s{sup –1} and for CO of 12.0 ± 3.9 km s{sup –1}. The CO velocity dispersions are thus, surprisingly, very similar to the corresponding ones of H I, with an average ratio of σ{sub HI}/σ{sub CO}= 1.0 ± 0.2 irrespective of the stacking parameter. The measured CO velocity dispersions are significantly higher (factor of ∼2) than the traditional picture of a cold molecular gas disk associated with star formation. The high dispersion implies an additional thick molecular gas disk (possibly as thick as the H I disk). Our finding is in agreement with recent sensitive measurements in individual edge-on and face-on galaxies and points toward the general existence of a thick disk of molecular gas, in addition to the well-known thin disk in nearby spiral galaxies.

  3. On-line derivatization gas chromatography with furan chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry for screening of amphetamines in urine.

    PubMed

    Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Ghule, Anil; Liu, Jen-Yu; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2006-12-22

    A simple alternative method with minimal sample pretreatment is investigated for screening of amphetamines in small volume (using only 20 microL) of urine sample. The method is sensitive and selective. The method uses gas chromatography (GC) direct sample introduction (DSI) for on-line derivatization (acylation) of amphetamines to improve sensitivity. Furan as chemical ionization (CI) reagent in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is used to improve selectivity. Low background with sharp protonated molecular ion peaks of analytes is the evidence of improvement in sensitivity and selectivity. Blank urine samples spiked with known amounts of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine is analyzed. Selected ion monitoring of the characteristic product ions (m/z 119+136+150+163) using furan CI-MS/MS in positive ion mode is used for quantification. Limits of detection (LOD) between 0.4 and 1.0 ng mL(-1) and limits of quantitation (LOQ) between 1.0 and 2.0 ng mL(-1) are established. Linear response over the range of 1-1000 ng mL(-1) (r(2)>0.997) is observed for all analytes, except for methamphetamine (2.0-1000 ng mL(-1)). Good accuracy between 86 and 113% and precision ranging from 4 to 18% is obtained. The method is also tested on real samples of urine from suspected drug abusers. This method could be used for screening and determination of amphetamines in urine samples, however needs additional work for full validation.

  4. Comparison of electron and chemical ionization modes for the quantification of thiols and oxidative compounds in white wines by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thibon, Cécile; Pons, Alexandre; Mouakka, Nadia; Redon, Pascaline; Méreau, Raphaël; Darriet, Philippe

    2015-10-09

    A rapid, sensitive method for assaying volatile impact compounds in white wine was developed using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) technology, with a triple quadrupole analyzer operating in chemical ionization and electron impact mode. This GC-MS/MS method made it possible to assay volatile thiols (3SH: 3-sulfanylhexanol, formerly 3MH; 3SHA: 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate, formerly 3MHA; 4MSP: 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one, formerly 4MMP; BM: benzenemethanethiol; E2SA: ethyl 2-sulfanylacetate; and 2FM: 2-furanmethanethiol) and odoriferous oxidation markers (Sotolon: 4,5-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5)H-furanone, methional, and phenylacetaldehyde) simultaneously in dry white wines, comparing electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) modes. More molecular ions were produced by CI than protonated molecules, despite the greater fragmentation caused by EI. So, even using the best reactant gas giving the highest signal for thiols, EI was the best ionization mode, with the lowest detection limits. For all compounds of interest, the limits of quantification (LOQ) obtained were well below their detection thresholds (ranging from 0.5 to 8.5ng/L for volatile thiols and 65-260ng/L for oxidation markers). Recovery rates ranged from 86% to 111%, reproducibility (in terms of relative standard deviation; RSD) was below 18% in all cases, with correlation coefficients above 0.991 for all analytes. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of compounds of interest in Sauvignon Blanc wines from a single estate and ten different vintages.

  5. PHIBSS: MOLECULAR GAS, EXTINCTION, STAR FORMATION, AND KINEMATICS IN THE z = 1.5 STAR-FORMING GALAXY EGS13011166

    SciTech Connect

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Kurk, J.; Wuyts, S.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Combes, F.; Freundlich, J.; Bolatto, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Neri, R.; Nordon, R.; Bournaud, F.; Comerford, J.; Cox, P.; Davis, M.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Naab, T.; Lutz, D. E-mail: linda@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-08-10

    We report matched resolution imaging spectroscopy of the CO 3-2 line (with the IRAM Plateau de Bure millimeter interferometer) and of the H{alpha} line (with LUCI at the Large Binocular Telescope) in the massive z = 1.53 main-sequence galaxy EGS 13011166, as part of the ''Plateau de Bure high-z, blue-sequence survey'' (PHIBSS: Tacconi et al.). We combine these data with Hubble Space Telescope V-I-J-H-band maps to derive spatially resolved distributions of stellar surface density, star formation rate, molecular gas surface density, optical extinction, and gas kinematics. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas are remarkably similar and are well modeled by a turbulent, globally Toomre unstable, rotating disk. The stellar surface density distribution is smoother than the clumpy rest-frame UV/optical light distribution and peaks in an obscured, star-forming massive bulge near the dynamical center. The molecular gas surface density and the effective optical screen extinction track each other and are well modeled by a ''mixed'' extinction model. The inferred slope of the spatially resolved molecular gas to star formation rate relation, N = dlog{Sigma}{sub starform}/dlog{Sigma}{sub molgas}, depends strongly on the adopted extinction model, and can vary from 0.8 to 1.7. For the preferred mixed dust-gas model, we find N = 1.14 {+-} 0.1.

  6. Manifestations of two-dimensional electron gas in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklja, Maija M.; Sharia, Onise; Tsyshevsky, Roman

    2017-03-01

    The existence of two-dimensional electron gas in molecular materials has not been reported or discussed. Intriguing properties of two-dimensional electron gas observed on interfaces of polar and nonpolar oxides spurred oxide electronics and advanced nanotechnology. Here we discover how an electrostatic instability occurs on polar surfaces of molecular crystals and explore its manifestations, chemical degradation of surfaces, charge separation, electrical conductivity, optical band-gap closure and surface metallization. A thin layer of polar surface of a dielectric molecular crystal becomes metallic due to interactions of polar molecules. Our findings are illustrated with two polymorphs of cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine crystals, the polar δ-phase and nonpolar β-phase. Our theory offers an explanation to a relative stability of the β-phase versus the explosive reactivity of δ-phase and to the experimentally observed difference in conductivity of these crystals. We predict that the electrostatic instability takes place on all polar molecular materials.

  7. THE ROTATING MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND THE IONIZED OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH IRAS 16547-4247

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Hernandez, Ramiro; Moran, James M.; RodrIguez, Luis F.; Garay, Guido

    2009-08-20

    We present Very Large Array 1.3 cm radio continuum and water maser observations as well as Submillimeter Array SO{sub 2} (226.300 GHz) and 1.3 mm dust continuum observations toward the massive star formation region IRAS 16547-4247. We find evidence of multiple sources in the central part of the region. There is evidence of a rotating structure associated with the most massive of these sources, traced at small scales ({approx}50 AU) by the water masers. At large scales ({approx}1000 AU), we find a velocity gradient in the SO{sub 2} molecular emission with a barely resolved structure that can be modeled as a rotating ring or two separate objects. The velocity gradients of the masers and of the molecular emission have the same sense and may trace the same structure at different size scales. The position angles of the structures associated with the velocity gradients are roughly perpendicular to the outflow axis observed in radio continuum and several molecular tracers. We estimate the mass of the most massive central source to be around 30 solar masses from the velocity gradient in the water maser emission. The main source of error in this estimate is the radius of the rotating structure. We also find water masers that are associated with the large-scale molecular outflow of the system, as well as water masers that are associated with other sources in the region. Our results suggest that the formation of this source, one of the most luminous protostars or protostellar clusters known, is taking place with the presence of ionized jets and disk-like structures.

  8. Ambient Ionization and FAIMS Mass Spectrometry for Enhanced Imaging of Multiply Charged Molecular Ions in Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Feider, Clara L.; Elizondo, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been increasingly used to investigate the molecular distribution of biological tissue samples. Here, we report the integration and optimization of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and liquid-microjunction surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP) with a chip-based high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) device to image metabolites, lipids, and proteins in biological tissue samples. Optimized FAIMS parameters for specific molecular classes enabled semitargeted detection of multiply charged molecular species at enhanced signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), improved visualization of spatial distributions, and, most importantly, allowed detection of species which were unseen by ambient ionization MSI alone. Under static DESI-FAIMS conditions selected for transmission of doubly charged cardiolipins (CL), for example, detection of 71 different CL species was achieved in rat brain, 23 of which were not observed by DESI alone. Diagnostic CL were imaged in a human thyroid tumor sample with reduced interference of isobaric species. LMJ-SSP-FAIMS enabled detection of 84 multiply charged protein ions in rat brain tissue, 66 of which were exclusive to this approach. Spatial visualization of proteins in substructures of rat brain, and in human ovarian cancerous, necrotic, and normal tissues was achieved. Our results indicate that integration of FAIMS with ambient ionization MS allows improved detection and imaging of selected molecular species. We show that this methodology is valuable in biomedical applications of MSI for detection of multiply charged lipids and proteins from biological tissues. PMID:27782388

  9. Ambient Ionization and FAIMS Mass Spectrometry for Enhanced Imaging of Multiply Charged Molecular Ions in Biological Tissues.

    PubMed

    Feider, Clara L; Elizondo, Natalia; Eberlin, Livia S

    2016-12-06

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been increasingly used to investigate the molecular distribution of biological tissue samples. Here, we report the integration and optimization of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and liquid-microjunction surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP) with a chip-based high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) device to image metabolites, lipids, and proteins in biological tissue samples. Optimized FAIMS parameters for specific molecular classes enabled semitargeted detection of multiply charged molecular species at enhanced signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), improved visualization of spatial distributions, and, most importantly, allowed detection of species which were unseen by ambient ionization MSI alone. Under static DESI-FAIMS conditions selected for transmission of doubly charged cardiolipins (CL), for example, detection of 71 different CL species was achieved in rat brain, 23 of which were not observed by DESI alone. Diagnostic CL were imaged in a human thyroid tumor sample with reduced interference of isobaric species. LMJ-SSP-FAIMS enabled detection of 84 multiply charged protein ions in rat brain tissue, 66 of which were exclusive to this approach. Spatial visualization of proteins in substructures of rat brain, and in human ovarian cancerous, necrotic, and normal tissues was achieved. Our results indicate that integration of FAIMS with ambient ionization MS allows improved detection and imaging of selected molecular species. We show that this methodology is valuable in biomedical applications of MSI for detection of multiply charged lipids and proteins from biological tissues.

  10. Discovery of nine extended ionized gas clouds in a z = 0.4 cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Koyama, Yusei; Kodama, Tadayuki; Gu, Liyi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2015-02-01

    From deep Hα imaging data of Suprime-Cam/Subaru, we discovered nine extended ionized gas clouds (EIG) around galaxies in the Abell 851 cluster (A851) at z = 0.4. We surveyed a 30 × 25 arcmin region, and the EIGs were found only near the cluster center (<2.3 arcmin ∼ 750 kpc). The parent galaxies of the EIGs are star-forming or post-starburst galaxies, all of which are spectroscopically confirmed members of the cluster. Four out of the nine parent galaxies show distortion of stellar distribution in the disk, which can be a sign of recent interaction, and the interaction may have made the EIGs. On the other hand, six parent galaxies (one overlaps those exhibiting distortion) show Hα emission without stars, which implies ram pressure stripping. The spectrum of the brightest parent galaxy shows a post-starburst signature and resembles the Hα stripped galaxies found in the Coma cluster. Meanwhile, two brightest parent galaxies in A851 are more massive than the EIG parent galaxies in the Coma cluster. This is consistent with a “downsizing” of star-forming galaxies, though it is still within the statistical variance. We also analyzed Suprime-Cam data of another z=0.39 cluster, CL0024+17, but found no EIGs. The key difference between A851 and CL0024+17 would be the existence of a subcluster colliding with the main body of A851, in which six or seven out of the nine parent galaxies in A851 exist, and the fraction of EIGs in the subcluster is significantly higher than the main subcluster of A851 and CL0024+17.

  11. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs] in processed meat products using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Olatunde S; Fatoki, Olalekan S; Opeolu, Beatrice O; Ximba, Bhekumusa J

    2014-08-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked, grilled and boiled meats were determined using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GC-FID). PAHs in the processed meats were extracted in n-hexane after hydrolysis with methanolic KOH. Clean-up was achieved using solid phase extraction in neutral-Si/basic-Si/acidic-Si/neutral-Si frits. The fractions, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkP), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), indeno[123-cd]pyrene (IP) and benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) were separated and quantified using GC-FID. The method and instrument limits of detections were 0.1, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3μg/kg and 0.5, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5μg/kg, respectively, for BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP. The method's recovery and precision generally varied between 83.69% and 94.25% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.18-15.60%; and 90.38-96.71% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.82-12.87% respectively. The concentration of BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP in smoked, grilled and boiled meat samples were ranged 0.64-31.54μg/kg, 0.07-7.04μg/kg, 0.09-15.03, 0.51-46.67μg/kg and 0.01-5.11μg/kg, respectively.

  12. SIGGMA: A SURVEY OF IONIZED GAS IN THE GALAXY, MADE WITH THE ARECIBO TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; McIntyre, T.; Terzian, Y.; Minchin, R.; Anderson, L.; Churchwell, E.; Lebron, M.; Roshi, D. Anish

    2013-10-01

    A Survey of Ionized Gas in the Galaxy, made with the Arecibo telescope (SIGGMA), uses the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) to fully sample the Galactic plane (30 Degree-Sign {<=} l {<=} 75 Degree-Sign and -2 Degree-Sign {<=} b {<=} 2 Degree-Sign ; 175 Degree-Sign {<=} l {<=} 207 Degree-Sign and -2 Degree-Sign {<=} b {<=} 1 Degree-Sign ) observable with the telescope in radio recombination lines (RRLs). Processed data sets are being produced in the form of data cubes of 2 Degree-Sign (along l) Multiplication-Sign 4 Degree-Sign (along b) Multiplication-Sign 151 (number of channels), archived and made public. The 151 channels cover a velocity range of 600 km s{sup -1} and the velocity resolution of the survey changes from 4.2 km s{sup -1} to 5.1 km s{sup -1} from the lowest frequency channel to the highest frequency channel. RRL maps with 3.'4 resolution and a line flux density sensitivity of {approx}0.5 mJy will enable us to identify new H II regions, measure their electron temperatures, study the physics of photodissociation regions with carbon RRLs, and investigate the origin of the extended low-density medium. Twelve Hn{alpha} lines fall within the 300 MHz bandpass of ALFA; they are resampled to a common velocity resolution to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) by a factor of three or more and preserve the line width. SIGGMA will produce the most sensitive fully sampled RRL survey to date. Here, we discuss the observing and data reduction techniques in detail. A test observation toward the H II region complex S255/S257 has detected Hn{alpha} and Cn{alpha} lines with S/N > 10.

  13. Resonant two-photon ionization of fluorene rare-gas van der Waals complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutwyler, Samuel; Even, Uzi; Jortner, Joshua

    1983-12-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied for the interrogation of the S0 → S1 electronic-vibrational excitations of van der Waals complexes of fluorene (FL) with rare-gas atoms and N2 in supersonic jets. Energy-resolved and mass-resolved spectra of FL ṡ Ne, FL ṡ Arn (n=1-3), FL ṡ Kr, FL ṡ Xe, and FL ṡ N2 were recorded over the energy range 0-800 cm-1 above the electronic origin of S1. The red microscopic spectral shifts of the electronic origins of FL ṡ R (R=Ar, Kr, and Xe) complexes are dominated by dispersive interactions, being proportional to the polarizability of R. The vibrational level structure of FL ṡ Rn (R=Ar, Kr, and Xe) complexes exhibits intramolecular vibrational excitations of FL, as well as intermolecular vibrations, which involve the relative motion of FL and R in the complex. The spectra of FL ṡ Ne and FL ṡ N2 reveal a rich vibrational structure in the vicinity of the electronic origin, indicating a substantial change of the nuclear configuration upon electronic excitation. Upper and lower bounds on the dissociation energies of FL ṡ R (R=Ne, Kr, and Xe) and FL ṡ Ar2 were inferred from the vibrational level structure in the mass-resolved spectra, where the disappearance of the signal of the parent van der Waals ion and the appearance of the ion signal of the fragments mark the onset of the vibrational predissociation process.

  14. Direct Probing of Criegee Intermediates from Gas-Phase Ozonolysis Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Torsten; Herrmann, Hartmut; Kurtén, Theo

    2017-09-27

    Criegee intermediates (CIs), mainly formed from gas-phase ozonolysis of alkenes, are considered as atmospheric oxidants besides OH and NO3 radicals as well as ozone. Direct CI measurement techniques are inevitably needed for reliable assessment of CIs' role in atmospheric processes. We found that CIs from ozonolysis reactions can be directly probed by means of chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a detection limit of about 10(4)-10(5) molecules cm(-3). Results from quantum chemical calculations support the experimental findings. The simplest CI, CH2OO, is detectable as an adduct with protonated ethers, preferably with protonated tetrahydrofuran. Kinetic measurements yielded k(CH2OO + SO2) = (3.3 ± 0.9) × 10(-11) and k(CH2OO + acetic acid) = (1.25 ± 0.30) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 295 ± 2 K, in very good agreement with recent measurements using diiodomethane photolysis for CH2OO generation. CIs from the ozonolysis of cyclohexene, acting as surrogate for cyclic terpenes, are followed as protonated species (CI)H(+) using protonated amines as reagent ions. Kinetic investigations indicate a different reactivity of cyclohexene-derived CIs compared with that of simple CIs, such as CH2OO. It is supposed that the aldehyde group significantly influences the CI reactivity of the cyclohexene-derived CIs. The direct CI detection method presented here should allow study of the formation and reactivity of a wide range of different CIs formed from atmospheric ozonolysis reactions.

  15. Internally heated membrane interfaced to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Kanu, A Bakarr; Thomas, C L P

    2013-07-15

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) mixtures in aqueous solutions have been investigated using a simple and efficient all-in-one on-line sampling, isolation, enrichment and pre-concentration internally heated membrane connected to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). In our previous study with the internally heated membrane, no GC column was used in the instrument. In this new study, we introduce a GC column in the instrument design and this makes it possible for mixtures to be investigated. This new experimental design enabled high resolution separation of analyte mixtures capable of being adsorbed, diffused, and desorbed from the device for detection with an FID. With the new design we present data from investigation of competitive adsorption effects on the membrane. The data showed that analyte adsorption and diffusion onto the membrane can be affected when mixtures of analytes are introduced. The application of multiple linear regressions approach to the data enabled us to correct for the problem of competitive adsorption. Analyte adsorption and diffusion was affected by the diffusion coefficients of the analytes; the higher the diffusion coefficient the better the extraction from the membrane. Increasing the sampling time from 1 to 4 min increases the response by 77%. The sampling time responses were linear up to 4 min sampling time. Above 4 min sampling time, the data deviate from linearity. The effect of adding salt to standards has no effect on analyte absorption onto the membrane. The detection limits for key VOCs studied with an internal standard calibration ranged from 0.2 to 194 ng cm(-3).

  16. Discovery of Nine Extended Ionized Gas Clouds in a z = 0.4 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Koyama, Yusei; Nakata, Fumiaki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2015-02-01

    From deep Hα imaging data of Suprime-Cam/Subaru, we discovered nine extended ionized gas clouds (EIG) around galaxies in the Abell 851 cluster (A851) at z = 0.4. We surveyed a 30 × 25 arcmin region, and the EIGs were found only near the cluster center (\\lt 2.3 arcmin ˜ 750 kpc). The parent galaxies of the EIGs are star-forming or post-starburst galaxies, all of which are spectroscopically confirmed members of the cluster. Four out of the nine parent galaxies show distortion of stellar distribution in the disk, which can be a sign of recent interaction, and the interaction may have made the EIGs. On the other hand, six parent galaxies (one overlaps those exhibiting distortion) show Hα emission without stars, which implies ram pressure stripping. The spectrum of the brightest parent galaxy shows a post-starburst signature and resembles the Hα stripped galaxies found in the Coma cluster. Meanwhile, two brightest parent galaxies in A851 are more massive than the EIG parent galaxies in the Coma cluster. This is consistent with a “downsizing” of star-forming galaxies, though it is still within the statistical variance. We also analyzed Suprime-Cam data of another z=0.39 cluster, CL0024+17, but found no EIGs. The key difference between A851 and CL0024+17 would be the existence of a subcluster colliding with the main body of A851, in which six or seven out of the nine parent galaxies in A851 exist, and the fraction of EIGs in the subcluster is significantly higher than the main subcluster of A851 and CL0024+17.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gas Transport in Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, David; Butler, Simon; Adolf, David

    2010-03-01

    Parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to determine the permeability of O2 and N2 through polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene and cis(1-4) polybutadiene. The permeability of both mixed and unmixed gas penetrants is studied within films of these well known gas barrier polymers. Results are obtained either through the solubility and diffusion (i.e. P=D*S) or via the permeability directly. Encouraging results are obtained. Additional analysis focuses on ``unmixed/mixed gas'' intracomparisons of the simulated permeability data in addition to corresponding penetrant and host polymer local dynamics.

  18. Liquid-Gas Mixtures in Contact with Walls: Molecular Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus Dammer, Stephan

    2005-11-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-gas mixtures in contact to solid walls. We present results concerning Lennard-Jones systems composed of three particle species, namely liquid, foreign gas, and wall particles, which are frozen on a lattice: (i) Close to the wall we observe a layering of the fluid which becomes more pronounced for increasingly hydrophilic walls. (ii) Close to smooth hydrophobic walls we find a two orders of magnitude increase in the number density of gas, which will favor bubble nucleation. (iii) To characterize the walls, we determined the contact angle by simulations of droplets and compare the result to Laplace's estimate of surface energies.

  19. Molecular gas of Planck cold dust clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuefang

    2015-08-01

    To probe dynamical processes and physical properties of Planck Cold Clumps, survey and mapping of 674 most reliable Planck cold dust clumps with J=1-0 of CO,13CO and C18O were made at PMO 13.7 m telescope. More than 600 molecular cores were obtained, which are mainly located in seven molecular complexes divided by Dame (1987). Parameters of cores in different regions are with some difference, showing different evolutional status and environment of the cores. As a whole they are quiescent. Some are with star forming activities. J=1-0 lines of HCO+ and HCN at CO emission peaks were also observed at PMO, of which 24 were mapped with IRAM 30 m telescope. Several cores were also observed with J=2-1 of CO and 13CO using CSO. Core splits were detected. Combining with infrared data more than 70% of CO cores are identified as starless. Planck cold clumps seem to be ideal samples to search for candidates of massive prestellar cores and pre-clusters.

  20. Tracing kinematic (mis)alignments in CALIFA merging galaxies. Stellar and ionized gas kinematic orientations at every merger stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Wild, V.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Marquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Ziegler, B.; del Olmo, A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Mast, D.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Marino, R. A.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Walcher, C. J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Bomans, D. J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bekeraitė, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved stellar and/or ionized gas kinematic properties for a sample of 103 interacting galaxies, tracing all merger stages: close companions, pairs with morphological signatures of interaction, and coalesced merger remnants. In order to distinguish kinematic properties caused by a merger event from those driven by internal processes, we compare our galaxies with a control sample of 80 non-interacting galaxies. We measure for both the stellar and the ionized gas components the major (projected) kinematic position angles (PAkin, approaching and receding) directly from the velocity distributions with no assumptions on the internal motions. This method also allow us to derive the deviations of the kinematic PAs from a straight line (δPAkin). We find that around half of the interacting objects show morpho-kinematic PA misalignments that cannot be found in the control sample. In particular, we observe those misalignments in galaxies with morphological signatures of interaction. On the other hand, thelevel of alignment between the approaching and receding sides for both samples is similar, with most of the galaxies displaying small misalignments. Radial deviations of the kinematic PA orientation from a straight line in the stellar component measured by δPAkin are large for both samples. However, for a large fraction of interacting galaxies the ionized gas δPAkin is larger than the typical values derived from isolated galaxies (48%), indicating that this parameter is a good indicator to trace the impact of interaction and mergers in the internal motions of galaxies. By comparing the stellar and ionized gas kinematic PA, we find that 42% (28/66) of the interacting galaxies have misalignments larger than 16°, compared to 10% from the control sample. Our results show the impact of interactions in the motion of stellar and ionized gas as well as the wide the variety of their spatially resolved kinematic distributions. This study also provides a local

  1. Dressed-bound-state molecular strong-field approximation: Application to above-threshold ionization of heteronuclear diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hasovic, E.; Busuladzic, M.; Becker, W.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2011-12-15

    The molecular strong-field approximation (MSFA), which includes dressing of the molecular bound state, is introduced and applied to above-threshold ionization of heteronuclear diatomic molecules. Expressions for the laser-induced molecular dipole and polarizability as functions of the laser parameters (intensity and frequency) and molecular parameters [molecular orientation, dipole, and parallel and perpendicular polarizabilities of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)] are presented. Our previous MSFA theory, which incorporates the rescattering effects, is generalized from homonuclear to heteronuclear diatomic molecules. Angle- and energy-resolved high-order above-threshold ionization spectra of oriented heteronuclear diatomic molecules, exemplified by the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule, exhibit pronounced minima, which can be related to the shape of their HOMO-electron-density distribution. For the CO molecule we have found an analytical condition for the positions of these minima. We have also shown that the effect of the dressing of the HOMO is twofold: (i) the laser-induced Stark shift decreases the ionization yield and (ii) the laser-induced time-dependent dipole and polarizability change the oscillatory structure of the spectra.

  2. Impact ionization of molecular oxygen by 3.5-MeV/u bare carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Saikat; Agnihotri, Aditya N.; Kasthurirangan, S.; Kumar, Ajay; Tachino, Carmen A.; Rivarola, Roberto D.; Martín, F.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2012-06-01

    We have measured the absolute double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) for electron emission in ionization of O2 molecules under the impact of 3.5-MeV/u C6+ ions. The data were collected between 10 and 600 eV, in an angular range of 30∘ to 150∘. The single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) in emission angle and electron energy are deduced from the electron DDCS spectra. Also, the total cross section has been obtained from the SDCS spectra. The DDCS spectra as well as the SDCS spectra are compared with continuum distorted-wave eikonal initial-state calculations which employ molecular wave functions built as linear combinations of atomic orbitals. The DDCS ratio i.e. σO2/2σO, derived by dividing the experimental DDCS for molecular oxygen with the theoretical DDCS for atomic oxygen, does not show any primary or secondary oscillations arising from Young-type interference, which is apparently in contrast to what has been observed earlier for H2 and in agreement with the model calculation. Similarly, the forward-backward angular asymmetry increases monotonically with the velocity of the emitted electrons. However, the results on the DDCSs, SDCSs, the asymmetry parameter, and the nonexistence of oscillations are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the model used.

  3. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications.

  4. Dissociation and ionization in capture of antiprotons by the hydrogen molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, James S.

    2005-05-01

    Antiprotonic atoms and anti-hydrogen are hot areas of current experimental research. Cross sections for antiproton capture will soon be measured directly for the first time by the ASACUSA collaboration at the CERN antiproton decelerator and trap. In the present work [1], cross sections and initial quantum number distributions are calculated for capture of the antiproton (p) and the negative muon (^-) by the hydrogen molecular ion H2^+ using the fermion molecular dynamics (FMD) method. The capture of p is found to be almost entirely adiabatic, occurring via target dissociation without ionization, but nonadiabatic effects are found to play a significant role in the capture of ^-, especially at the higher capture energies. Generally good agreement is obtained with the recent adiabatic classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC-a) calculation of Sakimoto [2]. The capture properties of H2^+ are shown to be completely different from those previously calculated for both the H atom and neutral H2 molecule. Proposed experiments [3] on p capture by H, H2 and H2^+, at the same relative collision energies, will provide a major test of our theoretical understanding [4].[1] J.S. Cohen, J. Phys. B (to be published).[2] K. Sakimoto, J. Phys. B 37, 2255 (2004).[3] Y. Yamazaki et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 154, 174 (1999); 214, 196 (2004); Hyperfine Interact. 138, 141 (2001).[4] J.S. Cohen, Rep. Prog. Phys. 67, 1769 (2004).

  5. A New View of Molecular Gas in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Morris, M.; Güsten, R.; Requena Torres, M.; Lang, C. C.; Butterfield, N.; Ott, J.

    2013-01-01

    On average, the molecular gas in the center of our Galaxy is significantly hotter (T = 50-300 K), denser (n > 10^4 cm^-3), and more turbulent than gas in the rest of the disk. I will present results from a recent series of observations that indicate that our understanding of the Galactic center (GC) molecular gas is incomplete, and that conditions in some clouds are even more extreme than previously thought. Using the Green Bank telescope, we have measured a very hot molecular gas component (T = 400-500 K ) in three largely quiescent GC giant molecular clouds using metastable inversion lines of ammonia from (8,8) to (15,15) . We further detect the (9,9) line in seven other GC clouds, indicating that this hot gas component may be a common feature of GC clouds, potentially yielding insight into the heating source of the molecular gas in this region. In addition, I will present new density constraints for the circumnuclear disk (CND), a reservoir of gas and dust 1.5 parsecs in radius from the central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. Recent estimates of the CND density vary by four orders of magnitude, which makes its future evolution uncertain: gas in the CND could either accrete onto the black hole, dissipate, or, if the density is higher than 10^7 cm^-3, exist in gravitationally-stable clumps capable of forming stars. However, our APEX measurements of highly excited lines of HCN and HCO+ indicate that although the CND gas is denser than most other GC clouds, it is not likely to be tidally stable and thus is unlikely to host star formation. Finally, I will present early results from a new Very Large Array study of gas on sub-parsec scales in a sample of GC clouds, all of which exhibit unexpectedly abundant Class I methanol maser emission. The widespread distribution of these masers suggests shocks play an important role in driving cloud evolution throughout this unique region of our Galaxy.

  6. Highly ionized gas absorption in the disk and halo toward HD 167756 at 3.5 kilometers per second resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of interstellar Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption lines along the 4 kpc path to the inner Galaxy star HD 167756 at z = -0.85 kpc are presented. The spectra were obtained with the echelle mode of Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 23 to 38. The high resolution of the measurements full width at half maximum (FWHM = 3.5 km/s) results in fully resolved line profiles for the highly ionized gas absorption. The measurements provide information on the column density per unit velocity, N(v), as a function of velocity for Si IV, C IV, and N V. The C IV and N V profiles extend from -70 to +70 km/s, while the Si IV profiles extend from -40 to +70 km/s. The integrated logarithmic column densities are long N(Si IV) = 13.09 +/- 0.02, log N(C IV) = 13.83 +/- 0.02, and log N(N V) = 13.56 +/- 0.03. The N V profile is broad, asymmetric, and featureless, while the Si IV profile contains narrow absorption components near V(sub LSR) = -19, 0, +20, and +52 km/s with Doppler spread parameters, b about = 10-12 km/s. The C IV profile contains both broad and narrow structure. The high ion feature near +52 km/s is also detected in the low-ionization lines of Ca II, O I, Si II, and Fe II. The other narrow Si IV and C IV components occur within several km/s of components seen in low-ionization species. The sight line contains at least two types of highly ionized gas. One type gives rise to a broad N V profile, and the other results in the more structured Si IV profile. The C IV profile contains contributions from both types of highly ionized gas. The broad but asymmetric N V profile is well represented by a large Galactic scale height gas which is participating in Galactic rotation and has a combination of thermal and turbulent broadening with b(sub tot) about = 42 km/s. The C IV to N V abundance ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.3 for the gas implies T about 1.6 x 10(exp 5) K or about 8 x 10

  7. Dense gas in the Galactic central molecular zone is warm and heated by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, Adam; Henkel, Christian; Ao, Yiping; Riquelme, Denise; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Requena-Torres, Miguel A.; Immer, Katharina; Testi, Leonardo; Ott, Juergen; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Darling, Jeremy; Aalto, Susanne; Stanke, Thomas; Kendrew, Sarah; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Longmore, Steven; Dale, James; Guesten, Rolf; Menten, Karl M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The Galactic center is the closest region where we can study star formation under extreme physical conditions like those in high-redshift galaxies. Aims: We measure the temperature of the dense gas in the central molecular zone (CMZ) and examine what drives it. Methods: We mapped the inner 300 pc of the CMZ in the temperature-sensitive J = 3-2 para-formaldehyde (p - H2CO) transitions. We used the 32,1-22,0/ 30,3-20,2 line ratio to determine the gas temperature in n ~ 104-105 cm-3 gas. We have produced temperature maps and cubes with 30'' and 1 km s-1 resolution and published all data in FITS form. Results: Dense gas temperatures in the Galactic center range from ~60 K to >100 K in selected regions. The highest gas temperatures TG> 100 K are observed around the Sgr B2 cores, in the extended Sgr B2 cloud, the 20 km s-1 and 50 km s-1 clouds, and in "The Brick" (G0.253+0.016). We infer an upper limit on the cosmic ray ionization rate ζCR< 10-14s-1. Conclusions: The dense molecular gas temperature of the region around our Galactic center is similar to values found in the central regions of other galaxies, in particular starburst systems. The gas temperature is uniformly higher than the dust temperature, confirming that dust is a coolant in the dense gas. Turbulent heating can readily explain the observed temperatures given the observed line widths. Cosmic rays cannot explain the observed variation in gas temperatures, so CMZ dense gas temperatures are not dominated by cosmic ray heating. The gas temperatures previously observed to be high in the inner ~75 pc are confirmed to be high in the entire CMZ. The data can be accessed from doi:10.7910/DVN/27601 and are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A50

  8. Elemental quantitation of carbon via production of polyatomic anions in gas chromatography-plasma assisted reaction chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haferl, Peter J; Zheng, Kunyu; Wang, Haopeng; Jorabchi, Kaveh

    2017-06-01

    Elemental mass spectrometry offers quantitation and isotopic analysis without the need for compound-specific standards. We have recently introduced plasma assisted reaction chemical ionization (PARCI) as an efficient elemental ionization method for halogens. Here, we report a new ionization chemistry in PARCI for facile quantitation of elemental carbon in gas chromatography eluates. We demonstrate that in-plasma reactions of organic compounds followed by afterglow ionization lead to formation of polyatomic anions (CN(-), OCN(-), and CO3(-)), among which CN(-) offers the best analytical sensitivity with a detection limit of ~25 pg (21 pg/s) carbon on column. Using a mixture of pesticides with wide variations in structures and heteroatom content, we demonstrate that CN(-) ion response is quantitatively correlated with the carbon concentration over two orders of magnitude (r (2) = 0.985). We show that the novel GC-PARCI-MS method provides recoveries within 80-120% using a single standard for all analytes, highlighting the strength of elemental quantitation. Further, the ability of GC-PARCI-MS to identify (13)C-tagged molecules without a priori knowledge of chemical formulas of analytes is demonstrated. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  9. Molecular Spectra in an Ultracold Strontium Rydberg Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Joseph D.; Camargo, Francisco; Ding, Roger; Woehl, Germano, Jr.; Dunning, F. Barry; Killian, Thomas C.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between a ground state atom and a highly excited Rydberg electron creates a potential that can support ultra-long-range bound molecular states comprising a Rydberg atom and several ground-state atoms. We excite these molecular states using two-photon spectroscopy in an ultracold gas of 84 Sr. In a thermal gas, we observe a highly structured spectrum of many-body bound states with one Rydberg atom and as many as three ground-state atoms in various vibrational levels. We also describe the spectrum in a dense, quantum degenerate gas, which is sensitive to the properties of the polaron formed by the binding of many atoms in the quantum gas to the Rydberg impurity. Because of the absence of a p-wave shape resonance in e-Sr scattering, the molecular spectrum in Sr provides a sensitive probe of the excitation dynamics in a quantum gas in a different regime than is accessible using Rb. Research supported by the AFOSR under Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0007, the NSF under Grants No. 1301773 and No. 1205946, the Robert A, Welch Foundation under Grants No. C-0734 and No. C-1844.

  10. WARM MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, C. K.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Lord, S.; Schulz, B.; Gao, Y.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Isaak, K. G.; Petric, A. O.; Charmandaris, V.; Evans, A. S.; Inami, H.; Iwasawa, K.; Leech, J.; Sanders, D. B.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present our initial results on the CO rotational spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the J to J–1 transitions from J = 4 up to 13 from Herschel SPIRE spectroscopic observations of 65 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey. The observed SLEDs change on average from one peaking at J ≤ 4 to a broad distribution peaking around J ∼ 6 to 7 as the IRAS 60-to-100 μm color, C(60/100), increases. However, the ratios of a CO line luminosity to the total infrared luminosity, L {sub IR}, show the smallest variation for J around 6 or 7. This suggests that, for most LIRGs, ongoing star formation (SF) is also responsible for a warm gas component that emits CO lines primarily in the mid-J regime (5 ≲ J ≲ 10). As a result, the logarithmic ratios of the CO line luminosity summed over CO (5–4), (6–5), (7–6), (8–7) and (10–9) transitions to L {sub IR}, log R {sub midCO}, remain largely independent of C(60/100), and show a mean value of –4.13 (≡log R{sub midCO}{sup SF}) and a sample standard deviation of only 0.10 for the SF-dominated galaxies. Including additional galaxies from the literature, we show, albeit with a small number of cases, the possibility that galaxies, which bear powerful interstellar shocks unrelated to the current SF, and galaxies, in which an energetic active galactic nucleus contributes significantly to the bolometric luminosity, have their R {sub midCO} higher and lower than R{sub midCO}{sup SF}, respectively.

  11. Gossypetin ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice liver--a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amitava; Manna, Krishnendu; Das, Dipesh Kr; Kesh, Swaraj Bandhu; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Ujjal; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Sikder, Kunal; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Mahua; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Banerji, Asoke; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-10-01

    Radioprotective action of gossypetin (GTIN) against gamma (γ)-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver was explored in the present article. Our main aim was to evaluate the protective efficacy of GTIN against radiation-induced alteration