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Sample records for gas monitoring chamber

  1. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  2. The Gas Monitoring of the Besiii Drift Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianggao; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuanbo; Wu, Zhi; Gu, Yunting; Ma, Xiaoyan; Jin, Yan; Liu, Rongguang; Tang, Xiao; Wang, Lan; Zhu, Qiming

    Two monitoring proportional counters (MPCs), installed at the inlet and outlet of the gas system of BESIII drift chamber (DC), were used to monitor the operation of the BESIII DC successfully and effectively as reported in this paper. The ratio of Gout/Gin (full energy photoelectron peak position of 55Fe 5.9 keV X-ray in inlet MPC as Gin and outlet MPC as Gout) is used as the main monitoring parameter. The MPC method is very useful for the gas detector system.

  3. Drift time spectrum and gas monitoring in the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer precision chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Daniel S.; Amram, Nir; Ball, Robert; ben Moshe, Meny; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, John W.; Dai, Tiesheng; Diehl, Edward B.; Etzion, Erez; Ferretti, Claudio; Goldfarb, Steven; Gregory, Jeffery; Kiesel, Mike; McKee, Shawn; Thun, Rudi; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wilson, Alan; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhou, Bing

    2008-04-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer incorporates 354 000 drift tubes assembled into 1200 Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) precision chambers, with a total gas volume of 723 m3. This MDT gas, Ar 93% and CO2 7% at 3 bar, is cycled through the spectrometer at a rate of one total detector volume per day. Achieving the 80 μm drift tube design resolution requires stringent gas quality control as a fundamental component of the MDT calibration program. We report on the design, deployment and performance of a dedicated MDT mini-chamber conceived for continuous monitoring and drift time calibration of the ATLAS MDT operating gas. This chamber enables measurement of the drift spectra from which gas properties relevant to MDT calibrations and stable operating conditions are determined. Located in the ATLAS gas facility at CERN, the mini-chamber produces hourly drift spectra which are automatically analyzed. Results are published online and disseminated to the ATLAS muon system conditions and calibration databases in real time.

  4. Continuous monitoring of soil gas efflux with Forced Diffusion (FD) chamber technique in a tundra ecosystem, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Park, S. J.; Lee, B. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Continuous measurements of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux provide essential information about the soil carbon budget in response to an abruptly changing climate at Arctic and Subarctic scales. The Forced Diffusion (FD) chamber technique has a gas permeable membrane, which passively regulates the mixing of atmosphere and soil air in the chamber, in place of the active pumping system inside a regular dynamics efflux chamber system (Risk et al., 2011). Here the system has been modified the sampling routine to eliminate the problem of sensor drift. After that, we deployed the FD chamber system in a tundra ecosystem over the discontinuous permafrost regime of Council, Alaska. The representative understory plants are tussock (17 %), lichen (32 %), and moss (51 %), within a 40 נ40 m plot at an interval of five meters (81 points total) for efflux-measurement by dynamic chamber. The FD chamber monitored soil CO2 efflux from moss, lichen, and tussock regimes at an interval of 30 min during the growing season of 2015. As the results, mean soil CO2 effluxes in sphagnum moss, lichen, and tussock were 1.98 ± 1.10 (coefficient of variance: 55.8 %), 3.34 ± 0.84 (CV: 25.0 %), and 5.32 ± 1.48 (CV: 27.8 %) gCO2/m2/d, respectively. The difference between the 30-min efflux interval and the average efflux of three 10-min intervals is not significant for sphagnum (n = 196), lichen (n = 918), and tussock (n = 918) under a 95 % confidence level. The deploying interval was then set to 30 min and synchronized with eddy covariance tower data. During the deployment period of 2015, soil CO2 efflux over moss, lichen, and tussock using the FD chamber system were 44 ± 24, 73 ± 18, and 117 ± 33 gCO2/m2/period, respectively. Using the dynamic chamber, mean ecosystem respiration (Re) ranges for moss, lichen, and tussock were 2.2-2.6, 1.8-2.0, and 3.3-3.6 gCO2/m2/d, respectively, during June and July of 2015. These techniques provide the representativeness of spatiotemporal variation of soil

  5. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  6. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  7. Formaldehyde vapor produced from hexamethylenetetramine and pesticide: Simultaneous monitoring of formaldehyde and ozone in chamber experiments by flow-based hybrid micro-gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Akira; Hozumi, Naruto; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Asako; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3 was performed by the developed flow analysis system to prove that HCHO vapor is produced from solid pesticide in the presence of O3. HCHO is produced in many ways, including as primary emissions from fuel combustion and in secondary production from anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds by photochemical reactions. In this work, HCHO production from pesticides was investigated for the first time. Commonly pesticide contains surfactant such as hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), which is a heterocyclic compound formed from six molecules of HCHO and four molecules of NH3. HMT can react with gaseous oxidants such as ozone (O3) to produce HCHO. In the present study, a flow analysis system was developed for simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3, and this system was used to determine if solid pesticides produced HCHO vapor in the presence of O3. HMT or the pesticide jimandaisen, which contains mancozeb as the active ingradient and HMT as a stabilizer was placed at the bottom of a 20-L stainless steel chamber. Air in the chamber was monitored using the developed flow system. Analyte gases were collected into an absorbing solution by a honeycomb-patterned microchannel scrubber that was previously developed for a micro gas analysis system (μGAS). Subsequently, indigotrisulfonate, a blue dye, was added to the absorbing solution to detect O3, which discolored the solution. HCHO was detected after mixing with the Hantzsch reaction reagent. Both gases could be detected at concentrations ranging from parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 1000 ppbv with good linearity. Both HMT and jimandaisen emitted large amount of HCHO in the presence of O3. PMID:26653496

  8. Comment on 'Proton beam monitor chamber calibration'.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that [Formula: see text]-values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication

  9. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  10. Carbon copy deaths: carbon monoxide gas chamber.

    PubMed

    Patel, F

    2008-08-01

    The news media can exert a powerful influence over suicidal behaviour. It has been observed that like-minded individuals are able to preplan a group suicide method using modern communication technology in the form of websites and online chatrooms and mobile phone texting. A case of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is presented to illustrate the recent phenomenon of cyber suicides by suffocation from a burning barbecue (charcoal burner) in 'gas chamber' conversions. Although barbecues (BBQ) are very popular in Britain and widely available, there have been relatively few reported cases of copycat deaths from CO gas suffocation. PMID:18586213

  11. Preliminary studies of a new monitor ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    A new monitor ionization chamber was developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) in order to monitor X-ray beams. The main difference of this monitor ionization chamber in relation to other monitor chambers is its geometry, which consists of a ring-shaped sensitive volume. Because of this geometry, the monitor chamber has a central hole through which the direct radiation beam passes. The operational characteristics of the monitor chamber were evaluated: saturation, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect. Besides these tests, the short- and medium-term stabilities of its response were also evaluated. During the tests the leakage current was always negligible. All results showed values within those recommended internationally (IEC, 1997. Medical electrical equipment-dosimeters with ionization chambers and/or semi-conductor detectors as used in X-ray diagnostic imaging. IEC 61674. International Electrotechnical Commission, Genève).

  12. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  13. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers,...

  14. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers,...

  15. Parallel plate ionization chamber in low pressure helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Qian, J.; Casperson, R. J.; Terry, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    A parallel plate ionization chamber was constructed for beam intensity monitoring. The chamber is placed in a gas-filled volume 1.5m upstream from the gas-filled separator SASSYER. Its output current will be used to determine absolute reaction cross sections. In a dedicated test experiment with a 100 MeV ^32S beam and an applied potential of 300V, the signal current had an average standard deviation of 0.4%, and demonstrated a linear relationship (R^2 = 0.9894) with the beam intensity. Also, at an intensity of 6 particle nanoamperes, the current exhibited a linear dependence (R^2 = 0.9813) on voltage, indicating that the chamber was operating in the proportional counter region. Our results agreed well with predictions made using extrapolated Townsend coefficients, though we observed a constant systematic and constant deviation between these estimates and our output current. This work was supported under US DOE grant number DE-FG0291ER-40609 and the Yale College Dean's Fellowship for Research in the Sciences.

  16. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  17. 108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground flue that leads to stack. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Microstrip gas chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and micro gap chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.G.; Harris, J.W.; Wieman, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors report developments of the Microstrip Gas Chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and the Micro Gap Chamber. By coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics), they built MSGCs of high gain stability and low leakage current. They were tested in Ar-CH{sub 4} (10%) and He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of 17-20% were measured for 6keV x-rays. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material. Micro Gap Chamber was successfully tested in He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) and Ar-C{sub 2}H{sub 6}(50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of about 20% were obtained. Both detectors are expected to have high rate capability.

  19. Anterior chamber gas bubbles in open globe injury.

    PubMed

    Barnard, E B G; Baxter, D; Blanch, R

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old soldier who was in close proximity to the detonation of an improvised explosive device (IED). Bubbles of gas were visible within the anterior chamber of his left eye. The authors propose that intraocular gas, present acutely after trauma, is diagnostic of open globe injury and is of particular importance in remote military environments.

  20. Microstrip Gas Chambers on glass and ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.G.; Wieman, H.; Harris, J.W.; Mitchell, J.T.; Hong, W.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1993-11-01

    We report developments of Microstrip Gas Chambers (MSGC) fabricated on glass and ceramic substrates with various resistivities. Low resistivity of the substrate is found to be critical for achieving stable operation of microstrip gas chambers. The microstrip pattern consists of 10 {mu}m wide anodes and 90 {mu}m wide cathodes with a 200 {mu}m anode-to-anode pitch. High-quality microstrips are fabricated using the dry etch after UV-photolithography. Our chambers are tested in an Ar(90)-CH{sub 4}(10) gas mixture at atmospheric pressure with a 100 {mu}Ci {sup 55}Fe source. An energy resolution (FWHM) of 15% has been achieved for 6 keV soft X-rays. At a rate of 5 {times} 10{sup 4} photons/sec/mm{sup 2}, gas gains are stable within a few percents. Long-term tests of gain stability and rate capability are yet to be pursued.

  1. Gas and aerosol wall losses in Teflon film smog chambers

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Grosjean, D.

    1985-12-01

    Large smog chambers (approx.60 m/sup 3/) constructed of FEP Teflon film are frequently used to study photochemistry and aerosol formation in model chemical systems. In a previous paper a theory for aerosol wall loss rates in Teflon film smog chambers was developed; predicted particle loss rates were in good agreement with measured rates. In the present paper, measurements of wall deposition rates and the effects of wall losses on measurements of gas-to-particle conversion in smog chambers are discussed. Calculations indicate that a large fraction of the aerosol formed in several smog chamber experiments was on the chamber walls at the end of the experiment. Estimated values for particulate organic carbon yield for several precursor hydrocarbons increased by factors of 1.3-6.0 when wall deposition was taken into account. The theory is also extended to loss rates of gaseous species. Such loss rates are either limited by diffusion through a concentration boundary layer near the surface or by uptake at the surface. It is shown that for a typical 60-m/sup 3/ Teflon film smog chamber, gas loss rates are limited by surface reaction rates if mass accommodation coefficients are less than 6 x 10/sup -6/. It follows that previously reported loss rates of several gases in a chamber of this type were limited by surface reactions.

  2. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of beta particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10(5) Bq/m(3).

  3. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of β particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7×105 Bq/m3.

  4. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhilin; Chang Ruiming; Mu Long; Song Guoyang; Wang Heyi; Wu Guanyin; Wei Xiye

    2010-07-15

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of {beta} particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10{sup 5} Bq/m{sup 3}.

  5. Comment on ‘Proton beam monitor chamber calibration’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M.

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that {{k}Q} -values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication.

  6. Comment on ‘Proton beam monitor chamber calibration’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M.

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961–71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that {{k}Q} -values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961–71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication.

  7. Gas scintillation drift chambers with wave shifter fiber readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Weiss, Steven; Parsons, Ann; Lin, Robert P.; Smith, Garth

    1988-01-01

    Results for a prototype xenon gas scintillation drift chamber are presented. Its operation is discussed using two types of light detection schemes: one based on an Anger camera geometry and one based on an array of wave-shifting light fibers. The results are judged to demonstrate the instrument's potential.

  8. An inexpensive dual-chamber particle monitor: laboratory characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rufus Edwards; Kirk R. Smith; Brent Kirby; Tracy Allen; Charles D. Litton; Susanne Hering

    2006-06-15

    In developing countries, high levels of particle pollution from the use of coal and biomass fuels for household cooking and heating are a major cause of ill health and premature mortality. Existing monitoring equipment makes routine quantification of household particle pollution levels difficult. Recent advances have enabled the development of a small, portable, data-logging particle monitor modified from commercial smoke alarm technology that can meet the needs of surveys in the developing world at reasonable cost. Laboratory comparisons of a prototype particle monitor developed at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) with gravimetric filters, a tapered element oscillating microbalance, and a TSI DustTrak to quantify the UCB particle monitor response as a function of both concentration and particle size and to examine sensor response in relation to changes in temperature, relative humidity, and elevation are presented. UCB particle monitors showed good linearity in response to different concentrations of laboratory-generated oleic acid aerosols with a coarse and fine size distributions. The photoelectric and ionization chamber showed a wide range of responses based on particle size and, thus, require calibration with the aerosol of interest. The ionization chamber was five times more sensitive to fine rather than coarse particles, whereas the photoelectric chamber was five times more sensitive to coarse than fine. The ratio of the response between the two sensors has the potential for mass calibration of individual data points based on estimated parameters of the size distribution. The results demonstrate the significant potential of this monitor, which will facilitate the evaluation of interventions (improved fuels, stoves, and ventilation) on indoor air pollution levels and research on the impacts of indoor particle levels on health in developing countries. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Characterization of Gas Transport Properties of Fractured Rocks By Borehole and Chamber Tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Shimaya, S.; Maejima, T.

    2014-12-01

    Gas transport characteristics of fractured rocks is a great concern to variety of engineering applications such as underground storage of LPG, nuclear waste disposal, CCS and gas flooding in the oil field. Besides absolute permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressure as a function of water saturation have direct influences to the results of two phase flow simulation. However, number of the reported gas flow tests for fractured rocks are limited, therefore, the applicability of the conventional two-phase flow functions used for porous media, such as Mualem-van Genuchten model, to prediction of the gas transport in the fractured rock mass are not well understood. The authors conducted the two types of in-situ tests, with different scales, a borehole gas-injection test and a chamber gas-injection test in fractured granitic rock. These tests were conducted in the Cretaceous granitic rocks at the Namikata underground LPG storage cavern construction site in Ehime Prefecture in Japan, preceding to the cavern scale gas-tightness test. A borehole injection test was conducted using vertical and sub-vertical boreholes drilled from the water injection tunnel nearly at the depth of the top of the cavern, EL-150m. A new type downhole gas injection equipment that is capable to create a small 'cavern' within a borehole was developed. After performing a series of preliminary tests to investigate the hydraulic conductivity and gas-tightness, i.e. threshold pressure, gas injection tests were conducted under different gas pressure. Fig.1 shows an example of the test results From a chamber test using a air pressurizing chamber with volume of approximately166m3, the gas-tightness was confirmed within the uncertainty of 22Pa under the storage pressure of 0.7MPa, however, significant air leakage occurred possibly through an open fracture intersecting the chamber just after cavern pressure exceeds the initial hydrostatic pressure at the ceiling level of the chamber. Anomalies

  10. Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers

    DOEpatents

    Gong, Wen G.

    1997-01-01

    By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

  11. Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Taler, J.; Taler, D.

    2009-07-01

    The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

  12. Improvements in NDIR gas detection within the same optical chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Silva-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) is a well known technique for gas concentration monitoring. Lead salt photoconductors and thermopile detectors are typically used. Together with gas filter correlation (GFC) they are the basis for a reference standard in environmental gas monitoring like carbon monoxide determination and other gas species. To increase gas sensitivity, a multi-pass optical cavity is often used. In this contribution we propose a new optical design that allows for auto-reference multiple gas detection. It basically consists of an array of White's cell multi-pass camera that allows multiple channels with independent lengths inside the same volume. We explore its performance for carbon monoxide detection and based on recent commercial developments in infrared detector and emitter technologies.

  13. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  14. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  15. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  16. Gas exchange in NASA's biomass production chamber: a preprototype closed human life support system.

    PubMed

    Corey, K A; Wheeler, R M

    1992-01-01

    An important aspect of environmental control in a life-support system is the monitoring and regulation of atmospheric gases (Sager et al. 1988) at concentrations required for the maintenance of all life forms. It will be necessary to know the rates of CO2 use, oxygen evolution, and water flux through evapotranspiration by a crop stand under various environmental conditions, so that appropriate designs and control systems for maintaining mass balances of those gases can be achieved for a full range of environmental regimes. Mass budgets of gases will also enable evaluation of crop health by monitoring directly the rates of gas exchange and indirectly the rate of accumulation of dry matter, based on rates of carbon dioxide use. This article focuses on the unique capabilities of the NASA biomass production chamber for monitoring and evaluating gas exchange rates, with special emphasis on results with wheat and soybean, two candidate species identified by NASA for CELSS.

  17. Ion-chamber-based loss monitor system for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Brown, D.; Browman, A.; Macek, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    A new loss monitor system has been designed and installed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The detectors are ion chambers filled with N{sub 2} gas. The electronics modules have a threshold range of 1:100, and they can resolve changes in beam loss of about 2% of the threshold settings. They can generate a trip signal in 2 {mu}s if the beam loss is large enough; if the response time of the Fast Protect System is included the beam will be shut off in about 37 {mu}s.

  18. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

  19. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

    1996-03-12

    A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

  20. Drift-Chamber Gas System Controls Development for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    M. F. Vineyard; T. J. Carroll; M. N. Lack

    1996-07-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) is a superconducting toroidal magnet with a large volume of drift chambers for charged particle tracking. The performance of these chambers depends on accurate monitoring and control of the mixture, flow rate, pressure, temperature, and contaminant levels of the gas. To meet these requirements, a control system is being developed with EPICS. The interface hardware consists of VME ADCs and three RS-232 low-level hardware controllers. The RS-232 instruments include MKS 647A mass flow controllers to control and monitor the gas mixture and flow, MKS 146B pressure gauge controllers to measure pressures, and a Panametrics hygrometer to monitor temperatures and the concentrations of oxygen, water vapor, and ethane. Many of the parameters are available as analog signals which will be monitored with XYCOM VME analog input cards and configured for alarms and data logging. The RS-232 interfaces will be used for remote control of the hardware and verification of the analog readings. Information will be passed quickly and efficiently to and from the user through a graphical user interface. A discussion of the requirements and design of the system is presented.

  1. Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Luke; Edsall, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring (GHASM) will employ Integrated System Health Monitoring (ISHM) of cryogenic fluids in the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The preliminary focus of development incorporates the passive monitoring and eventual commanding of the Nitrogen System. ISHM offers generic system awareness, adept at using concepts rather than specific error cases. As an enabler for autonomy, ISHM provides capabilities inclusive of anomaly detection, diagnosis, and abnormality prediction. Advancing ISHM and Autonomous Operation functional capabilities enhances quality of data, optimizes safety, improves cost effectiveness, and has direct benefits to a wide spectrum of aerospace applications.

  2. Trace Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Space technology is contributing to air pollution control primarily through improved detectors and analysis methods. Miniaturized mass spectrometer is under development to monitor vinyl chloride and other hydrocarbon contaminants in an airborne laboratory. Miniaturized mass spectrometer can be used to protect personnel in naval and medical operations as well as aboard aircraft.

  3. Gas mixture studies for streamer operated Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, A.; Longhin, A.; Mengucci, A.; Pupilli, F.; Ventura, M.

    2016-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers operated in streamer mode are interesting detectors in neutrino and astro-particle physics applications (like OPERA and ARGO experiments). Such experiments are typically characterized by large area apparatuses with no stringent requirements on detector aging and rate capabilities. In this paper, results of cosmic ray tests performed on a RPC prototype using different gas mixtures are presented, the principal aim being the optimization of the TetraFluoroPropene concentration in Argon-based mixtures. The introduction of TetraFluoroPropene, besides its low Global Warming Power, is helpful because it simplifies safety requirements allowing to remove also isobutane from the mixture. Results obtained with mixtures containing SF6, CF4, CO2, N2 and He are also shown, presented both in terms of detectors properties (efficiency, multiple-streamer probability and time resolution) and in terms of streamer characteristics.

  4. Development of a Liquefied Noble Gas Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron; Aidala, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have been used for various applications in recent years for detecting neutrinos, neutrons, photons, and potentially dark matter. The University of Michigan is developing a detector with liquid argon to produce scintillation light and ionization electrons. Our data collection method will allow high-resolution energy measurement and spatial reconstruction of detected particles by using multi-pixel silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and a cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire endplate. We have already designed a liquid argon condenser and purification unit surrounded by an insulating vacuum, constructed circuitry for temperature and pressure sensors, and created software to obtain high-accuracy sensor readouts. The status of detector development will be presented. Funded through the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project.

  5. Improved Back-Side Purge-Gas Chambers For Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezell, Kenneth G.; Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved chambers for inert-gas purging of back sides of workpieces during plasma arc welding in keyhole (full-penetration) mode based on concept of directing flows of inert gases toward, and concentrating them on, hot weld zones. Tapered chamber concentrates flow of inert gas on plasma arc plume and surrounding metal.

  6. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.303 Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. Thermal dryer systems which... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. 77.303 Section 77.303 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL...

  7. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.303 Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. Thermal dryer systems which... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. 77.303 Section 77.303 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL...

  8. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.303 Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. Thermal dryer systems which... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. 77.303 Section 77.303 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL...

  9. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.303 Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. Thermal dryer systems which... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. 77.303 Section 77.303 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL...

  10. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.303 Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. Thermal dryer systems which... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. 77.303 Section 77.303 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL...

  11. A new mini gas ionization chamber for IBA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A. M.; Cassimi, A.; Döbeli, M.; Mallepell, M.; Monnet, I.; Simon, M. J.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.

    2011-12-01

    Novel prototypes of high resolution gas ionization chambers ( GIC) were designed with increased compactness and simplicity of the setup. They have no Frisch-grid and a simple anode wire. Under certain operating conditions these mini detectors have an energy resolution comparable with that of state-of-the-art GICs of much higher complexity. They can be operated both under vacuum and atmospheric pressure. First measurements were made with protons in the energy range of 0.3-1.0 MeV. For protons at 0.3 MeV an energy resolution of about 12 keV was achieved. With a 72 MeV 129Xe beam a relative resolution of 1.4% was obtained. Due to their versatility and reduced size the detectors can easily be applied in the field of ion beam analysis ( IBA) and accelerator mass spectrometry ( AMS) . Since they are almost completely insensitive to radiation damage they are especially suited for use in high fluence applications such as scanning transmission ion microscopy ( STIM). A comparison of the radiation hardness of the mini GIC with a Si PIN diode was therefore performed. The GIC showed no peak shift or change in energy resolution at all after collecting 10 15 protons per cm 2 while the performance of the Si detector clearly started to degrade at 10 12 particles per cm 2.

  12. A Novel Infrared Gas Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingding; Zhong, Hongjie

    2000-03-01

    In the paper a novel non-dispersive infrared(IR) gas monitor is described.It is based on the principle that certain gases absorb IR radiation at specific(and often unique) wavelengths.Conventional devices typically include several primary components:a broadband source, usually an incandescent filament,a rotating chopper shutter,a narrow-band filter,a sample tube and a detector. We have developed a number of IR light emitting diodes(LED) having narrow optical bandwidths and which can be intensity modulated by electrical means,for example InAsSbP(4.2 micron)LED.The IR LED can thus replace the thermal source,narrow-band filter and chopper assembly of the conventional IR gas monitor,yielding a solid state,low- powered,compact and almost maintenance-free instrument with high sensitivity and stability and which free of the effects of mechanical vibration too. The detector used in the IR gas monitor is the solid-state detector,such as PbS,PbSe, InSb,HgCdTe,TGS,LT and PZT detector etc. The different configuration of the IR gas monitor is designed.For example,two-path version for measuring methane concentration by monitoring the 3.31 micron absorption band,it can eliminate the interference effects,such as to compensate for LED intensity changes caused by power and temperature variations,and for signal fluctuations due to changes in detector bias. we also have designed portable single-beam version without the sample tube.Its most primary advantage is very cheap(about cost USD 30 ).It measures carbon dioxide concentration by monitoring the 4.25 micron absorption band.Thought its precisions is low,it is used to control carbon dioxide concentration in the air in the green houses and plastic houses(there are about twenty millon one in the China).Because more carbon dioxide will increase the quanity of vegetable and flower production to a greatextent. It also is used in medical,sanitary and antiepidemic applications,such as hospital, store,hotel,cabin and ballroom etc. Key words

  13. Reply to comment on 'Proton beam monitor chamber calibration'.

    PubMed

    Gomà, Carles; Lorentini, Stefano; Meer, David; Safai, Sairos

    2016-09-01

    This reply shows that the discrepancy of about 3% between Faraday cup dosimetry and reference dosimetry using a cylindrical ionization chamber found in Gomà (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) seems to be due to an overestimation of the beam quality correction factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398 for the cylindrical chamber used, rather than to 'unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry', as suggested by Palmans and Vatnitsky (2016 Phys. Med. Biol. 61 6585-93). Furthermore, this work shows that a good agreement between reference dosimetry and Faraday cup dosimetry is possible, provided accurate beam quality correction factors for proton beams are used. The review on W air values presented by Palmans and Vatnitsky is believed to be inaccurate, as it is based on the imprecise assumption of ionization chamber perturbation correction factors in proton beams being equal to unity. PMID:27535895

  14. Technical note: drifting versus anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai-Haase, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-12-01

    Stream networks have recently been discovered to be major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross-comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams with different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (2) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil collar to seal the chambers to the water surface, rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  15. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Scaling of the flowfield in a combustion chamber with a gas-gas injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Wei; Cai, Guo-Biao; Jin, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The scaling of the flowfield in a gas-gas combustion chamber is investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally. To obtain the scaling criterion of the gas-gas combustion flowfield, formulation analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes equations for a gaseous multi-component mixing reaction flow is conducted and dimensional analysis on the gas-gas combustion phenomena is also carried out. The criterion implies that the size and the pressure of the gas-gas combustion chamber can be changed. Based on the criterion, multi-element injector chambers with different geometric sizes and at different chamber pressures ranging from 3 MPa to 20 MPa are numerically simulated. A multi-element injector chamber is designed and hot-fire tested at five chamber pressures from 1.64 MPa to 3.68 MPa. Wall temperature measurements are used to understand the similarity of combustion flowfields in the tests. The results have verified the similarities between combustion flowfields under different chamber pressures and geometries, with the criterion applied.

  16. Calculating the detection limits of chamber-based soil greenhouse gas flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Parkin, T B; Venterea, R T; Hargreaves, S K

    2012-01-01

    Renewed interest in quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from soil has led to an increase in the application of chamber-based flux measurement techniques. Despite the apparent conceptual simplicity of chamber-based methods, nuances in chamber design, deployment, and data analyses can have marked effects on the quality of the flux data derived. In many cases, fluxes are calculated from chamber headspace vs. time series consisting of three or four data points. Several mathematical techniques have been used to calculate a soil gas flux from time course data. This paper explores the influences of sampling and analytical variability associated with trace gas concentration quantification on the flux estimated by linear and nonlinear models. We used Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the minimum detectable fluxes (α = 0.05) of linear regression (LR), the Hutchinson/Mosier (H/M) method, the quadratic method (Quad), the revised H/M (HMR) model, and restricted versions of the Quad and H/M methods over a range of analytical precisions and chamber deployment times (DT) for data sets consisting of three or four time points. We found that LR had the smallest detection limit thresholds and was the least sensitive to analytical precision and chamber deployment time. The HMR model had the highest detection limits and was most sensitive to analytical precision and chamber deployment time. Equations were developed that enable the calculation of flux detection limits of any gas species if analytical precision, chamber deployment time, and ambient concentration of the gas species are known.

  17. Technical Note: Drifting vs. anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-09-01

    Stream networks were recently discovered as major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams having different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (2) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil seal to the water surface rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  18. Pressure Loads by Gas in an Enclosed Chamber in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J; Badders, D C

    2002-08-08

    New algorithms that efficiently calculate the volume of a closed chamber are presented in this paper. The current pressure in the enclosed chamber can then be computed, based on the user-specified gas law, from the updated volume and the initial volume and pressure of the chamber. This pressure load function is very useful in modeling common features, such as air pocket, airbag, piston, and gun barrel, in structural analyses.

  19. Gas gain uniformity tests performed on multiwire proportional chambers for the LHCb muon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A.; de Andrade Filho, L. M.; Barbosa, A. F.; Graulich, J. S.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P.; Mair, K.; Polycarpo, E.; Reis, A.; Rodrigues, F.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schoch Vianna, C.

    2008-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and the results of the gas gain uniformity tests performed as part of the quality control of the multiwire proportional chambers produced at CERN for the LHCb muon system. The test provides a relative gas gain measurement over the whole chamber sensitive area. It is based on the analysis of the pulse height spectrum obtained when the chamber is exposed to a 241Am radioactive source. Since the measurement is normalized to the peak of a precise pulse generator, the gain uniformity can also be evaluated among different gas gaps and different chambers. In order to cope with the specific requirements related to the relatively high number of chambers and to their varying geometry, a standalone and compact data acquisition system has been developed which is programmable at the hardware level and may be applied to many other applications requiring precise time-to-digital and analog-to-digital conversion, in correlated or non-correlated mode.

  20. Wall ablation, gas dynamics, and the history of wall stresses in ICF target chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D. )

    1989-09-30

    We calculate the history of wall stresses for spherical aluminum LMF-type ICF target chambers 10 cm thick with 1400-MJ pellets using a simple computer program called CHAMBER that incorporates the physics of first-wall ablation and chamber gas dynamics, including dissociation, ionization, and gas reverberations. By considering the time dependence of the wall stresses, we calculate peak stresses that are higher or lower than previous estimates based on the dynamic formula {sigma}{sub dyn} {approx}Pr/{Delta}R, depending on the radius of the chamber. Here P is the interior pressure, R is the chamber radius, and {Delta}R is the wall thickness. In particular, the previous estimates are too small for chambers with radii R > 4 m or R < 0.5 m, because the ablation impulse dominates the stress for R > 4 m, and the post-ablation pressure impulse dominates for R < 0.5 cm. CHAMER also shows that considerably more wall mass can be ablated after the x-ray-vaporized mass fills the chamber if the thermalized vapor radiates more energy to the wall than the wall can conduct away by heat condition, as in small chambers. Venting of a chamber can reduce the wall stress only to that caused by the ablation impulse, and only for vents with radii comparable to the radius of the chamber. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  1. Gas turbine structural mounting arrangement between combustion gas duct annular chamber and turbine vane carrier

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J.; Charron, Richard C.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2016-10-18

    A gas turbine engine ducting arrangement (10), including: an annular chamber (14) configured to receive a plurality of discrete flows of combustion gases originating in respective can combustors and to deliver the discrete flows to a turbine inlet annulus, wherein the annular chamber includes an inner diameter (52) and an outer diameter (60); an outer diameter mounting arrangement (34) configured to permit relative radial movement and to prevent relative axial and circumferential movement between the outer diameter and a turbine vane carrier (20); and an inner diameter mounting arrangement (36) including a bracket (64) secured to the turbine vane carrier, wherein the bracket is configured to permit the inner diameter to move radially with the outer diameter and prevent axial deflection of the inner diameter with respect to the outer diameter.

  2. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  3. Modeling gas exchange in a closed plant growth chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. D.; Hendrix, J. E.; Wheeler, R. M.; Ross, C. W.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid transport models for fluxes of water vapor and CO2 have been developed for one crop of wheat and three crops of soybean grown in a closed plant growth chamber. Correspondence among these fluxes is discussed. Maximum fluxes of gases are provided for engineering design requirements of fluid recycling equipment in growth chambers. Furthermore, to investigate the feasibility of generalized crop models, dimensionless representations of water vapor fluxes are presented. The feasibility of such generalized models and the need for additional data are discussed.

  4. Modeling Gas Exchange in a Closed Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. D.; Hendrix, J. E.; Wheeler, R. M.; Ross, C. W.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid transport models for fluxes of water vapor and CO2 have been developed for one crop of wheat and three crops of soybean grown in a closed plant a growth chamber. Correspondence among these fluxes is discussed. Maximum fluxes of gases are provided for engineering design requirements of fluid recycling equipment in growth chambers. Furthermore, to investigate the feasibility of generalized crop models, dimensionless representations of water vapor fluxes are presented. The feasibility of such generalized models and the need for additional data are discussed.

  5. Spin Start Line Effects on the J2X Gas Generator Chamber Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The J2X Gas Generator engine design has a spin start line connected near to the turbine inlet vanes. This line provides helium during engine startup to begin turbomachinery operation. The spin start line also acts as an acoustic side branch which alters the chamber's acoustic modes. The side branch effectively creates 'split modes' in the chamber longitudinal modes, in particular below the first longitudinal mode and within the frequency range associated with the injection-coupled response of the Gas Generator. Interaction between the spin start-modified chamber acoustics and the injection-driven response can create a higher system response than without the spin start attached to the chamber. This work reviews the acoustic effects of the spin start line as seen throughout the workhorse gas generator test program. A simple impedance model of the spin start line is reviewed. Tests were run with no initial spin start gas existing in the line, as well as being initially filled with nitrogen gas. Tests were also run with varying spin start line lengths from 0" to 40". Acoustic impedance changes due to different spin start gas constituents and line lengths are shown. Collected thermocouple and static pressure data in the spin start line was used to help estimate the fluid properties along the line length. The side branch impedance model was coupled to a chamber impedance model to show the effects on the overall chamber response. Predictions of the spin start acoustic behavior for helium operation are shown and compared against available data.

  6. Beam-loss monitoring system with free-air ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Shibata, S.; Hiramatsu, S.; Uchino, K.; Takashima, T.

    1980-08-01

    A monitoring system for proton beam losses was installed in the proton synchrotron at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). The system consists of 56 air ionization chambers (AIC) for radiation detectors, 56 integrators, 56 variable gain amplifiers, two multiplexers, a computer interface circuit, a manual controller and a high tension power supply. The characteristics of the AIC, time resolution, radiation measurement upper limit saturation, kinetic energy dependence of the sensitivity, chamber activation effect, the beam loss detection system and the results of observations with the monitoring system are described.

  7. Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tie; Song, Xiange; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Wenyu

    2014-04-01

    The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper, we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power. The combustion chamber includes three main components: combustion module, heat exchange cavity and thermal head. Its feature is that the structure can divide "combustion" process and "heat transfer" process into two apparent individual steps and make them happen one by one. Since natural gas can mix with air fully before burning, the combustion process can be easily completed without the second wind. The flame can avoid contacting the thermal head of Stirling engine, and the temperature fields can be easily controlled. The designed combustion chamber is manufactured and its performance is tested by an experiment which includes two steps. The experimental result of the first step proves that the mixture of air and natural gas can be easily ignited and the flame burns stably. In the second step of experiment, the combustion heat flux can reach 20 kW, and the energy utilization efficiency of thermal head has exceeded 0.5. These test results show that the thermal performance of combustion chamber has reached the design goal. The designed combustion chamber can be applied to a real Stirling engine heated by natural gas which is to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power.

  8. Wafer chamber having a gas curtain for extreme-UV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    An EUVL device includes a wafer chamber that is separated from the upstream optics by a barrier having an aperture that is permeable to the inert gas. Maintaining an inert gas curtain in the proximity of a wafer positioned in a chamber of an extreme ultraviolet lithography device can effectively prevent contaminants from reaching the optics in an extreme ultraviolet photolithography device even though solid window filters are not employed between the source of reflected radiation, e.g., the camera, and the wafer. The inert gas removes the contaminants by entrainment.

  9. Degradation in the efficiency of glass Resistive Plate Chambers operated without external gas supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baesso, P.; Cussans, D.; Thomay, C.; Velthuis, J.; Burns, J.; Quillin, S.; Stapleton, M.; Steer, C.

    2015-06-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) are particle detectors commonly used by the high energy physics community. Their normal operation requires a constant flow of gas mixture to prevent self-poisoning which reduces the chamber's capability to detect particles. We studied how quickly the efficiency of two RPCs drops when operated in sealed mode, i.e. without refreshing the gas mixture. The test aim is to determine how RPCs could be used as particle detectors in non-laboratory applications, such as those exploiting muon tomography for geological imaging or homeland security. The two sealed RPCs were operated in proportional mode for a period of more than three months, and their efficiencies were recorded continuously and analysed in 8-hours intervals. The results show that the efficiency drops on average by 0.79 ± 0.01 % every 24 hours of operation and returns close to the initial value after purging the old gas mixture and flushing the chambers with fresh gas.

  10. Measurement of Greenhouse Gas Flux from Agricultural Soils Using Static Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Sarah M.; Ruark, Matthew D.; Oates, Lawrence G.; Jokela, William E.; Dell, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape management practices. The static chamber-based method described here is based on trapping gases emitted from the soil surface within a chamber and collecting samples from the chamber headspace at regular intervals for analysis by gas chromatography. Change in gas concentration over time is used to calculate flux. This method can be utilized to measure landscape-based flux of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane, and to estimate differences between treatments or explore system dynamics over seasons or years. Infrastructure requirements are modest, but a comprehensive experimental design is essential. This method is easily deployed in the field, conforms to established guidelines, and produces data suitable to large-scale GHG emissions studies. PMID:25146426

  11. Measurement of greenhouse gas flux from agricultural soils using static chambers.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sarah M; Ruark, Matthew D; Oates, Lawrence G; Jokela, William E; Dell, Curtis J

    2014-08-03

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape management practices. The static chamber-based method described here is based on trapping gases emitted from the soil surface within a chamber and collecting samples from the chamber headspace at regular intervals for analysis by gas chromatography. Change in gas concentration over time is used to calculate flux. This method can be utilized to measure landscape-based flux of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane, and to estimate differences between treatments or explore system dynamics over seasons or years. Infrastructure requirements are modest, but a comprehensive experimental design is essential. This method is easily deployed in the field, conforms to established guidelines, and produces data suitable to large-scale GHG emissions studies.

  12. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  13. Real-time dielectric-film thickness measurement system for plasma processing chamber wall monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Yong; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    An in-situ real-time processing chamber wall monitoring system was developed. In order to measure the thickness of the dielectric film, two frequencies of small sinusoidal voltage (∼1 V) signals were applied to an electrically floated planar type probe, which is positioned at chamber wall surface, and the amplitudes of the currents and the phase differences between the voltage and current were measured. By using an equivalent sheath circuit model including a sheath capacitance, the dielectric thickness can be obtained. Experiments were performed in various plasma condition, and reliable dielectric film thickness was obtained regardless of the plasma properties. In addition, availability in commercial chamber for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was verified. This study is expected to contribute to the control of etching and deposition processes and optimization of periodic maintenance in semiconductor manufacturing process.

  14. Multimodality Rodent Imaging Chambers for Use Under Barrier Conditions With Gas Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Chris; Kuntner, Claudia; Chow, Patrick; Silverman, Robert; Chatziioannou, Arion; Stout, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The ability to reproducibly and repeatedly image rodents in non-invasive imaging systems, such as small animal PET and CT, requires a reliable method for anesthetizing, positioning, and heating animals in a simple reproducible manner. In this paper we demonstrate that mice and rats can be reproducibly and repeatedly imaged using an imaging chamber designed to be rigidly mounted on multiple imaging systems. Procedures Mouse and rat imaging chambers were made of acrylic plastic and aluminum. MicroCT scans were used to evaluate the positioning reproducibility of the chambers in multi-modality and longitudinal imaging studies. The ability of the chambers to maintain mouse and rat body temperatures while anesthetized with gas anesthesia was also evaluated. Results Both the mouse and rat imaging chambers were able to reproducibly position the animals in the imaging systems with a small degree of error. Placement of the mouse in the mouse imaging chamber resulted in a mean distance of 0.23 mm per reference point in multimodality studies, whereas for longitudinal studies the mean difference was 1.11 mm. The rat chamber resulted in a mean difference of 0.46 mm in multimodality studies, and a mean difference of 4.31 mm in longitudinal studies per reference point. The chambers maintained rodent body temperatures at the set point temperature of 38°C. Conclusions The rodent imaging chambers were able to reproducibly position rodents in tomographs with a small degree of variability, and were compatible with routine use. The embedded anesthetic line and heating system was capable of maintaining the rodent’s temperature and anesthetic state, thereby enhancing rodent health and improving data collection reliability. PMID:18679755

  15. Lean stability augmentation study. [on gas turbine combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical conceptual design study and an experimental test program were conducted to investigate techniques and develop technology for improving the lean combustion limits of premixing, prevaporizing combustors applicable to gas turbine engine main burners. The use of hot gas pilots, catalyzed flameholder elements, and heat recirculation to augment lean stability limits was considered in the conceptual design study. Tests of flameholders embodying selected concepts were conducted at a pressure of 10 arm and over a range of entrance temperatures simulating conditions to be encountered during stratospheric cruise. The tests were performed using an axisymmetric flametube test rig having a nominal diameter of 10.2 cm. A total of sixteen test configurations were examined in which lean blowout limits, pollutant emission characteristics, and combustor performance were evaluated. The use of a piloted perforated plate flameholder employing a pilot fuel flow rate equivalent to 4 percent of the total fuel flow at a simulated cruise condition resulted in a lean blowout equivalence ratio of less than 0.25 with a design point (T sub zero = 600k, Phi = 0.6) NOx emission index of less than 1.0 g/kg.

  16. Evolved gas composition monitoring by repetitive injection gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    White, Robert L

    2015-11-20

    Performance characteristics and applications of a small volume gas chromatograph oven are described. Heating and cooling properties of the apparatus are evaluated and examples are given illustrating the advantages of greatly reducing the air bath volume surrounding fused silica columns. Fast heating and cooling of the oven permit it to be employed for repetitive injection analyses. By using fast gas chromatography separations to achieve short assay cycle times, the apparatus can be employed for on-line species-specific gas stream composition monitoring when volatile species concentrations vary on time scales of a few minutes or longer. This capability facilitates repeated sampling and fast gas chromatographic separations of volatile product mixtures produced during thermal analyses. Applications of repetitive injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry evolved gas analyses to monitoring purge gas effluent streams containing volatile acid catalyzed polymer cracking products are described. The influence of thermal analysis and chromatographic experimental parameters on effluent sampling frequency are delineated.

  17. Laboratory Connections. Gas Monitoring Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Michael H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three types of sensors; pressure, gas detection, and relative humidity. Explains their use for laboratory measurements of gas pressure and detection of specific gaseous species. Shows diagrams of devices and circuits along with examples and applications including microcomputer interfacing. (RT)

  18. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Indurthy, Dharmaraj; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Proga, Marek; Pavlovich, Zarko; Zwaska, Robert; Harris, Deborah; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; Erwin, Albert; Ping Huicana; Velissaris, Christos; Naples, Donna; Northacker, Dave; McDonald, Jeff; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett

    2004-11-10

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1-mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  19. Calibration and performance of a secondary emission chamber as a beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sivertz, M.; Chiang, I-H,; Rusek, A.

    2011-03-28

    We report on a study of the behavior of a secondary emission chamber (SEC). We show the dependence of the SEC signal on the charge and velocity of the primary beam for beams of protons, and heavy ions including Helium, Neon, Chlorine and Iron. We fill the SEC with a selection of different gases including Hydrogen, Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and air, studying the SEC response when it is acting as an ion chamber. We also investigate the behavior of the SEC at intermediate pressures between 10{sup -8} torr and atmospheric pressure. The SEC uses thin conducting foils as the source and collector of electrons in a vacuum chamber. When charged particles traverse the vacuum chamber, they pass through a series of thin conducting foils, alternating anode and cathode. Ionization produced in the cathode foils travels across the intervening gap due to an applied high voltage and is collected on the anode foils. Electron production is very inefficient because most of the ionization in the foils remains trapped within the foil due to the short range of most delta-rays and the work function of the foil. It is this inefficiency that allows the SEC to operate at high dose rates and short pulse duration where the standard ion chambers cannot function reliably. The SEC was placed in the NSRL ion beam to receive a variety of heavy ion beams under different beam conditions. We used these ion beams to study the response of the SEC to different species of heavy ion, comparing with proton beams. We studied the response to beam of different energies, and as a function of different counting rate. We compared the behaviour of the SEC when operating under positive and negative high voltage. The SEC can operate as an ion chamber if it is filled with gas. We measured the response of the SEC when filled with a variety of gases, from Hydrogen to Helium, Nitrogen, Argon and air. The performance of the SEC as an ion chamber is compared with the standard NSRL ion chamber, QC3. By evacuating the SEC and

  20. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium-contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-01-27

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  1. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  2. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  3. Use of a remote plasma source for CVD chamber clean and exhaust gas abatement applications

    SciTech Connect

    Holber, W.; Chen, X.; Smith, D.; Besen, M.

    1999-07-01

    Remote plasma sources have traditionally been used in semiconductor processing applications such as dry removal of photoresist, where the capability of delivering a large flux of atomic oxygen into a semiconductor process chamber, with little of the associated plasma used to dissociate the oxygen, has made them attractive. With the development of fluorine-compatible remote plasma sources, a range of new application opportunities has opened up. In remote cleaning of CVD chambers, the remote plasma source is positioned before the process chamber, and a stream of atomic fluorine from the source is flowed into the chamber, where it can effectively clean a wide variety of materials such as SiO{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and W. The cleaning process is purely chemical, with no associated in-situ plasma which can cause degradation of the process chamber. In exhaust gas abatement, the remote plasma source is located between the outlet of the etch or deposition process chamber and the mechanical pump. By adding appropriate gases, the exhaust stream from the chamber can be converted to form which can be managed more readily. Using a robust toroidal plasma source design, the ASTRON{trademark} remote plasma source has been used to address both of these areas. As an atomic fluorine source, over the typical operating range of 2--10 Torr several SLM of gases such as NF{sub 3} can be fully dissociated. As an exhaust gas abatement device, with operating pressure in the 0.1--1.0 Torr regime, abatement of perfluorocompounds (PFC's) at greater than 95% levels has been demonstrated. Using a variety of techniques--FTIR, RGA, and sample etching--the operation of this source technology and issues such as transport of atomic fluorine over substantial distances has been investigated.

  4. A telescience monitoring and control concept for a CELSS plant growth chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Daryl N.; Mian, Arshad

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the use of telescience to monitor and control a Space Station CELSS plant growth chamber (PGC). The proposed telescience control system contains controllers for PGC subsystems, a local master controller, and remote controllers. The benefits of telescience are discussed and the functional requirements of the PGC are outlined. A typical monitoring and control scenario is described. It is suggested that the proposed concept would provide remote access to a ground-based CELSS research facility, Space Station plant growth facilities, lunar-based CELSS facilities, and manned interplanetary spacecraft.

  5. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  6. Photochemical transformation of flue gas from a coal-fired power plant: a smog chamber study

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna, K.J.; Luria, M.; Meagher, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between the formation of sulfate aerosols and other secondary products and various environmental parameters is reported. Actual flue gas is used in these experiments which were conducted in smog chambers. Smog chamber techniques and instrumentation have progressed recently and are being utilized for the purposes of this study to simulate urban smog with emphasis on the photochemistry of sulfur dioxide. The purpose for examining the oxidation process of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate aerosols is because of the implication of sulfates in health effects, visibility degradation, and acidic precipitation.

  7. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  8. Monitoring the primo vascular system in lymphatic vessels by using window chambers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Gil, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Kim, Young-Il; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to develop a window chamber system in the skin of rats and to monitor the primo vascular system (PVS) inside the lymphatic vessels along the superficial epigastric vessels. The PVS in lymphatic vessels has been observed through many experiments under in vivo conditions, but monitoring the in vivo PVS in situ inside lymphatic vessels for a long time is difficult. To overcome the obstacles, we adapted the window chamber system for monitoring the PVS and Alcian blue (AB) staining dye solution for the contrast agent. The lymphatic vessels in the skin on the lateral side of the body, connecting the inguinal lymph nodes to the axillary lymph nodes, were the targets for setting the window system. After AB had been injected into the inguinal lymph nodes with a glass capillary, the morphological changes of the stained PVS were monitored through the window system for up to twenty hours, and the changes in the AB intensity in the PVS were quantified by using image processing. The results and histological images are presented in this study.

  9. Monitoring the primo vascular system in lymphatic vessels by using window chambers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Gil, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Kim, Young-Il; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to develop a window chamber system in the skin of rats and to monitor the primo vascular system (PVS) inside the lymphatic vessels along the superficial epigastric vessels. The PVS in lymphatic vessels has been observed through many experiments under in vivo conditions, but monitoring the in vivo PVS in situ inside lymphatic vessels for a long time is difficult. To overcome the obstacles, we adapted the window chamber system for monitoring the PVS and Alcian blue (AB) staining dye solution for the contrast agent. The lymphatic vessels in the skin on the lateral side of the body, connecting the inguinal lymph nodes to the axillary lymph nodes, were the targets for setting the window system. After AB had been injected into the inguinal lymph nodes with a glass capillary, the morphological changes of the stained PVS were monitored through the window system for up to twenty hours, and the changes in the AB intensity in the PVS were quantified by using image processing. The results and histological images are presented in this study. PMID:27446651

  10. Monitoring the primo vascular system in lymphatic vessels by using window chambers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungdae; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Gil, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Kim, Young-Il; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a window chamber system in the skin of rats and to monitor the primo vascular system (PVS) inside the lymphatic vessels along the superficial epigastric vessels. The PVS in lymphatic vessels has been observed through many experiments under in vivo conditions, but monitoring the in vivo PVS in situ inside lymphatic vessels for a long time is difficult. To overcome the obstacles, we adapted the window chamber system for monitoring the PVS and Alcian blue (AB) staining dye solution for the contrast agent. The lymphatic vessels in the skin on the lateral side of the body, connecting the inguinal lymph nodes to the axillary lymph nodes, were the targets for setting the window system. After AB had been injected into the inguinal lymph nodes with a glass capillary, the morphological changes of the stained PVS were monitored through the window system for up to twenty hours, and the changes in the AB intensity in the PVS were quantified by using image processing. The results and histological images are presented in this study. PMID:27446651

  11. The role of the heating of the vacuum chamber on the water content in plasma and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Ochkin, V. N.; Bafoev, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    The behavior of the H2O concentration in stainless steel chamber is compared for the cases of gas with and without plasma discharge at different temperatures of chamber wall. The experiments were performed with the use of mixtures of rare gases and water vapor. In absence of plasma discharge the dynamics of the density of the water molecules was determined by their interaction with the surface. In the presence of a gas discharge the concentration of water molecules in the volume of the chamber was determined by optical actinometry method. The role of the chamber wall temperature is discussed.

  12. Concept for a Low Pressure Gas Fill in a Direct Drive IFE Target Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Saswathi; Aristova, Maria; Gentile, Charles

    2009-11-01

    A concept using a low pressure nobel gas has been advanced for attenuating the interaction of (post detonation) He ions on first wall components. In this configuration approximately 1 torr of Ar gas is introduced into the target chamber for the purpose of interacting with energetic He ions before they impinge on first wall surfaces. As a result, effluent processing systems must be designed to take into account a high Ar gas load. Therefore, a two-stage cryopumping system will be configured in line with an array of turbomolecular drag pumps to remove Ar from the effluent gas stream. After exiting the reaction chamber, effluent will pass through the first cryopump stage, at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), which will remove argon as well as any trace contaminants from the gas stream. The remaining effluent, consisting of H and He, will pass through the second cryopumping stage, at liquid He temperature (4.2 K), to remove H isotopes from the gas stream. This poster will discuss specific concepts for efficient plasma exhaust processing.

  13. Web-based monitoring tools for Resistive Plate Chambers in the CMS experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. S.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D.; Goh, J.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J. W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. K.; Park, S. K.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Costantini, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W. V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O. M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H. S.; Morales, M. I. P.; Bernardino, S. C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.

    2014-10-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) are used in the CMS experiment at the trigger level and also in the standard offline muon reconstruction. In order to guarantee the quality of the data collected and to monitor online the detector performance, a set of tools has been developed in CMS which is heavily used in the RPC system. The Web-based monitoring (WBM) is a set of java servlets that allows users to check the performance of the hardware during data taking, providing distributions and history plots of all the parameters. The functionalities of the RPC WBM monitoring tools are presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of growing luminosity and environmental conditions that are tracked over time.

  14. Eco-friendly gas mixtures for Resistive Plate Chambers based on tetrafluoropropene and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Benussi, L.; Piccolo, D.; Bianco, S.; Ferrini, M.; Muhammad, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.

    2016-08-01

    Due to the recent restrictions deriving from the application of the Kyoto protocol, the main components of the gas mixtures presently used in the Resistive Plate Chambers systems of the LHC experiments will be most probably phased out of production in the coming years. Identifying possible replacements with the adequate characteristics requires an intense R&D activity, which was recently started, in collaborations with various experiments. Possible new gases have been proposed and are thoroughly investigated. Some tests on one of the most promising candidate—HFO-1234ze, an allotropic form of tetrafluoropropane—have already been reported. Here an innovative approach, based on the use of Helium, to solve the problem related to the high operating voltage needed to operate the chambers with HFO-1234ze based gas mixtures, is discussed and the first results are shown.

  15. Mesh Dependency of Turbulent Reacting Large-Eddy Simulations of a Gas Turbine Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, Guillaume; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Gicquel, Laurent Y. M.; Poinsot, Thierry J.

    Convergence of reacting LES predictions for an aeronautical gas turbine combustion chamber is analysed in terms of mesh resolution. To do so three fully unstructured meshes containing respectively 1.2, 10.6 and 43.9 million tetrahedra are used to compute this fully turbulent reacting flow. Resolution criteria obtained from the mean velocity and reacting fields depict different convergence behaviors. Reacting fields and more specifically combustion regimes are seen to be slightly grid dependent while maintaining mean global combustion quantities.

  16. Hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics of subscale, plug-nozzle rocket calorimeter chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.; Roncace, Elizabeth A.

    1993-07-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics for a liquid-hydrogen-cooled, subscale, plug-nozzle rocket test apparatus. This apparatus has been used since 1975 to evaluate rocket engine advanced cooling concepts and fabrication techniques, to screen candidate combustion chamber liner materials, and to provide data for model development. In order to obtain the data, a water-cooled calorimeter chamber having the same geometric configuration as the plug-nozzle test apparatus was tested. It also used the same two showerhead injector types that were used on the test apparatus: one having a Rigimesh faceplate and the other having a platelet faceplate. The tests were conducted using liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as the propellants over a mixture ratio range of 5.8 to 6.3 at a nominal chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia). The two injectors showed similar performance characteristics with the Rigimesh faceplate having a slightly higher average characteristic-exhaust-velocity efficiency of 96 percent versus 94.4 percent for the platelet faceplate. The throat heat flux was 54 MW/m(sup 2) (33 Btu/in.(sup 2)-sec) at the nominal operating condition, which was a chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia), a hot-gas-side wall temperature of 730 K (1314 R), and a mixture ratio of 6.0. The chamber throat region correlation coefficient C(sub g) for a Nusselt number correlation of the form Nu =C(sub g)Re(sup 0.8)Pr(sup 0.3) averaged 0.023 for the Rigimesh faceplate and 0.026 for the platelet faceplate.

  17. Hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics of subscale, plug-nozzle rocket calorimeter chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.; Roncace, Elizabeth A.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics for a liquid-hydrogen-cooled, subscale, plug-nozzle rocket test apparatus. This apparatus has been used since 1975 to evaluate rocket engine advanced cooling concepts and fabrication techniques, to screen candidate combustion chamber liner materials, and to provide data for model development. In order to obtain the data, a water-cooled calorimeter chamber having the same geometric configuration as the plug-nozzle test apparatus was tested. It also used the same two showerhead injector types that were used on the test apparatus: one having a Rigimesh faceplate and the other having a platelet faceplate. The tests were conducted using liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as the propellants over a mixture ratio range of 5.8 to 6.3 at a nominal chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia). The two injectors showed similar performance characteristics with the Rigimesh faceplate having a slightly higher average characteristic-exhaust-velocity efficiency of 96 percent versus 94.4 percent for the platelet faceplate. The throat heat flux was 54 MW/m(sup 2) (33 Btu/in.(sup 2)-sec) at the nominal operating condition, which was a chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia), a hot-gas-side wall temperature of 730 K (1314 R), and a mixture ratio of 6.0. The chamber throat region correlation coefficient C(sub g) for a Nusselt number correlation of the form Nu =C(sub g)Re(sup 0.8)Pr(sup 0.3) averaged 0.023 for the Rigimesh faceplate and 0.026 for the platelet faceplate.

  18. Comparative evaluation of gas-turbine engine combustion chamber starting and stalling characteristics for mechanical and air-injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyatlov, I. N.

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of propellant atomization with and without air injection in the combustion chamber nozzle of a gas turbine engine is studied. Test show that the startup and burning performance of these combustion chambers can be improved by using an injection during the mechanical propellant atomization process. It is shown that the operational range of combustion chambers can be extended to poorer propellant mixtures by combined air injection mechanical atomization of the propellant.

  19. Monitoring Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers With A Raspberry Pi Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, Crystal

    2016-03-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is the first of three liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) that are central to the short-baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. These chambers consist of thousands of stainless steel or beryllium-copper sense wires that detect ionization electrons produced when neutrinos interact with liquid argon nuclei inside the detector. The wires are several hundred microns in diameter to several meters in length. The construction of such LAr TPCs often takes place in an assembly hall, which is different from the detector hall where the experiment will operate, as was the case with MicroBooNE. Since in situ access to the chamber and its wires in the beamline enclosure can be limited, we investigate the possibility of using a Raspberry Pi single-board computer connected to a low-cost camera installed inside the cryostat as a cost-efficient way to verify the integrity of the wires after transport. We also highlight other benefits of this monitoring device implemented in MicroBooNE, including detector hall surveillance and verification of the status of LED indicators on detector electronics. The author would like to thank Dr. Matthew Toups for his encouragement and guidance on this research project.

  20. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  1. Monitoring soil greenhouse gas emissions from managed grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Pinés, Eugenio; Lu, Haiyan; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Grasslands in Central Europe are of enormous social, ecological and economical importance. They are intensively managed, but the influence of different common practices (i.e. fertilization, harvesting) on the total greenhouse gas budget of grasslands is not fully understood, yet. In addition, it is unknown how these ecosystems will react due to climate change. Increasing temperatures and changing precipitation will likely have an effect on productivity of grasslands and on bio-geo-chemical processes responsible for emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). In the frame of the TERENO Project (www.tereno.net), a long-term observatory has been implemented in the Ammer catchment, southern Germany. Acting as an in situ global change experiment, 36 big lysimeters (1 m2 section, 150 cm height) have been translocated along an altitudinal gradient, including three sites ranging from 600 to 860 meters above sea level. In addition, two treatments have been considered, corresponding to different management intensities. The overall aim of the pre-alpine TERENO observatory is improving our understanding of the consequences of climate change and management on productivity, greenhouse gas balance, soil nutritional status, nutrient leaching and hydrology of grasslands. Two of the sites are equipped with a fully automated measurement system in order to continuously and accurately monitor the soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange. Thus, a stainless steel chamber (1 m2 section, 80 cm height) is controlled by a robotized system. The chamber is hanging on a metal structure which can move both vertically and horizontally, so that the chamber is able to be set onto each of the lysimeters placed on the field. Furthermore, the headspace of the chamber is connected with a gas tube to a Quantum Cascade Laser, which continuously measures CO2, CH4, N2O and H2O mixing ratios. The chamber acts as a static chamber and sets for 15 minutes onto each lysimeter

  2. Internal Blast II: Gas-Mixing Effect in Large Scale (62 cubic meter) Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, Richard; Sandusky, Harold

    2009-06-01

    The previous paper described how incomplete mixing of detonation product gases with the existing atmosphere could theoretically reduce internal blast quasi-static pressure by a factor of two, without considering fuel-air reactions (1). Extent of gas mixing was inferred in small-scale experiments by measuring pressure and temperature at two locations within a 3-liter chamber; unmixed product gases and atmosphere will be hot and cold, respectively. In this paper the study is extended to large scale, with 1 kg pentolite charges in a 62 cubic meter chamber. Fine-wire thermocouples are fast enough for the expanded time scale of events in the larger chamber, about 5 - 10 ms thermocouple response time compared to about 100 ms rise time to peak pressure, and showed significant unmixed regions of gas. Losses in peak quasi-static pressures of up to 11 percent can be attributed to this mixing effect for pentolite charges in the simple geometries tested. --footnote-- (1) Granholm, R.H. and Sandusky, H.W., ``Factors Affecting Internal Blast,'' Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, Proceedings of the 15th A.P.S. Topical Conference on, June 2007.

  3. Magmatic gas scrubbing: Implications for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Gerlach, T.M.; Reed, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the abundance of SO2(g) in magmatic gases, precursory increases in magmatic SO2(g) are not always observed prior to volcanic eruption, probably because many terrestrial volcanoes contain abundant groundwater or surface water that scrubs magmatic gases until a dry pathway to the atmosphere is established. To better understand scrubbing and its implications for volcano monitoring, we model thermochemically the reaction of magmatic gases with water. First, we inject a 915??C magmatic gas from Merapi volcano into 25??C air-saturated water (ASW) over a wide range of gas/water mass ratios from 0.0002 to 100 and at a total pressure of 0.1 MPa. Then we model closed-system cooling of the magmatic gas, magmatic gas-ASW mixing at 5.0 MPa, runs with varied temperature and composition of the ASW, a case with a wide range of magmatic-gas compositions, and a reaction of a magmatic gas-ASW mixture with rock. The modeling predicts gas and water compositions, and, in one case, alteration assemblages for a wide range of scrubbing conditions; these results can be compared directly with samples from degassing volcanoes. The modeling suggests that CO2(g) is the main species to monitor when scrubbing exists; another candidate is H2S(g), but it can be affected by reactions with aqueous ferrous iron. In contrast, scrubbing by water will prevent significant SO2(g) and most HCl(g) emissions until dry pathways are established, except for moderate HCl(g) degassing from pH 100 t/d (tons per day) of SO2(g) in addition to CO2(g) and H2S(g) should be taken as a criterion of magma intrusion. Finally, the modeling suggests that the interpretation of gas-ratio data requires a case-by-case evaluation since ratio changes can often be produced by several mechanisms; nevertheless, several gas ratios may provide useful indices for monitoring the drying out of gas pathways. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sloan W; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  5. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sloan W; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome.

  6. OTP for belhaven flammable gas monitor at 241-T-104

    SciTech Connect

    Zuroff, W.F.

    1996-03-08

    This Operational Test Procedure tests the operability of the Safety Class 3 flammable gas monitoring system with equipment shutdown capability. This test includes the flammable gas monitor, heat trace system, pneumatic system, and the interface with existing equipment.

  7. Optimization of PECVD Chamber Cleans Through Fundamental Studies of Electronegative Fluorinated Gas Discharges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langan, John

    1996-10-01

    The predominance of multi-level metalization schemes in advanced integrated circuit manufacturing has greatly increased the importance of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and in turn in-situ plasma chamber cleaning. In order to maintain the highest throughput for these processes the clean step must be as short as possible. In addition, there is an increasing desire to minimize the fluorinated gas usage during the clean, while maximizing its efficiency, not only to achieve lower costs, but also because many of the gases used in this process are global warming compounds. We have studied the fundamental properties of discharges of NF_3, CF_4, and C_2F6 under conditions relevant to chamber cleaning in the GEC rf reference cell. Using electrical impedance analysis and optical emission spectroscopy we have determined that the electronegative nature of these discharges defines the optimal processing conditions by controlling the power coupling efficiency and mechanisms of power dissipation in the discharge. Examples will be presented where strategies identified by these studies have been used to optimize actual manufacturing chamber clean processes. (This work was performed in collaboration with Mark Sobolewski, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Brian Felker, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.)

  8. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  9. Effects of a temporary HDPE cover on landfill gas emissions: multiyear evaluation with the static chamber approach at an Italian landfill.

    PubMed

    Capaccioni, Bruno; Caramiello, Cristina; Tatàno, Fabio; Viscione, Alessandro

    2011-05-01

    According to the European Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC and the related Italian Legislation ("D. Lgs. No. 36/2003"), monitoring and control procedures of landfill gas emissions, migration and external dispersions are clearly requested. These procedures could be particularly interesting in the operational circumstance of implementing a temporary cover, as for instance permitted by the Italian legislation over worked-out landfill sections, awaiting the evaluation of expected waste settlements. A possible quantitative approach for field measurement and consequential evaluation of landfill CO(2), CH(4) emission rates in pairs consists of the static, non-stationary accumulation chamber technique. At the Italian level, a significant and recent situation of periodical landfill gas emission monitoring is represented by the sanitary landfill for non-hazardous waste of the "Fano" town district, where monitoring campaigns with the static chamber have been annually conducted during the last 5 years (2005-2009). For the entire multiyear monitoring period, the resulting CO(2), CH(4) emission rates varied on the whole up to about 13,100g CO(2) m(-2)d(-1) and 3800 g CH(4) m(-2)d(-1), respectively. The elaboration of these landfill gas emission data collected at the "Fano" case-study site during the monitoring campaigns, presented and discussed in the paper, gives rise to a certain scientific evidence of the possible negative effects derivable from the implementation of a temporary HDPE cover over a worked-out landfill section, notably: the lateral migration and concentration of landfill gas emissions through adjacent, active landfill sections when hydraulically connected; and consequently, the increase of landfill gas flux velocities throughout the reduced overall soil cover surface, giving rise to a flowing through of CH(4) emissions without a significant oxidation. Thus, these circumstances are expected to cause a certain increase of the overall GHG emissions from the given

  10. A new multi-strip ionization chamber used as online beam monitor for heavy ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiguo; Mao, Ruishi; Duan, Limin; She, Qianshun; Hu, Zhengguo; Li, He; Lu, Ziwei; Zhao, Qiecheng; Yang, Herun; Su, Hong; Lu, Chengui; Hu, Rongjiang; Zhang, Junwei

    2013-11-01

    A multi-strip ionization chamber has been built for precise and fast monitoring of the carbon beam spatial distribution at Heavy Ion Researched Facility of Lanzhou Cooling Storing Ring (HIRFL-CSR). All the detector's anode, cathode and sealed windows are made by 2 μm aluminized Mylar film in order to minimize the beam lateral deflection. The sensitive area of the detector is (100×100) mm2, with the anode segmented in 100 strips, and specialized front-end electronics has been developed for simplifying the data acquisition and quick feedback of the relevant parameters to beam control system. It can complete one single beam profile in 200 μs.

  11. A Ground Deformation Monitoring Approach to Understanding Magma Chamber Systems and Eruptive Cycles of Mount Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, S.; Clarke, A.

    2005-05-01

    Mount Cameroon is a 13,400ft basanite volcano on the passive margin of West Africa. It has erupted seven times in the past century making it one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. Most recently Mount Cameroon erupted in 1999 and 2000 first issuing strombolian explosions from vents near the summit, and later erupting effusively from a fissure running southwest from the summit (Suh et al., 2003). Prior to 2004, the only monitoring equipment on Mount Cameroon was a small seismometer network installed following the 1982 eruption. By 1999 only a single seismometer in the network was functional. Seismic activity did not rise above background levels until the few days immediately preceding the eruption. In an effort to raise awareness of the volcano's condition and provide a more efficient warning of impending eruptions we have begun constructing a ground deformation network on Mount Cameroon. The new network currently consists of two Applied Geomechanics 711-2A(4X) biaxial tiltmeters capable of resolving 0.1 microradians of tilt. One station is located approximately 500 m from the 2000 summit vent, and the other is approximately 1km away from the central fissure approximately 5km southwest of the 2000 summit vent. Three primary processes could precede eruptions at Mt. Cameroon, offering the opportunity for detection and prediction by our network. These processes are magma chamber pressurization, magma ascent via a central conduit, and/or propagation of magma along the central fissure. Magma chamber location, if a significant chamber exists, is poorly constrained, however, previous petrologic studies on Mount Cameroon (Suh et al., 2003; Fitton et al., 1983) suggest Mount Cameroon magmas originate at a depth less than 40km. Published seismic data (Ambeh, 1989) contains evidence of magmatic activity and possible chambers at depths ranging from 10km to 70km. Preliminary calculations using a simple Mogi model suggest deformation caused by pressurization of a large

  12. Restoring contaminated wires, removing gas contaminants, and aging studies of drift tube chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    The original muon detection system of the Fermilab D0 colliding beam experiment contained 12,000 drift cells 10 cm×5 cm in cross-section and up to 580 cm in length. The gas mixture used was Ar/CF 4/CO 2 (90:6:4). There was one recycling gas system for all the chambers. During the first year of operation, it was discovered that inefficient cells, all in regions of high radiation, had a contaminating shell of crud coating their wires. The source of the contaminant was outgassing of the cathode pads, which were made from a laminate of fiberglass and epoxy/polyester resin, with a copper cladding on one surface. The vapor formed a brittle sheath on the wires, but only in regions of high current discharge due to radiation from the accelerator and colliding beams. A method for cleaning wires in place was devised. By heating the wire quickly to a temperature close to the melting temperature of gold, the sheath was ripped to shreds and blown away. The procedure for "zapping" wires and for removing the contaminating vapor is presented. The upgraded D0 experiment now uses Iarocci-type mini-drift tubes for the forward muon system. The results of aging tests for these chambers are also presented.

  13. Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

    2013-03-05

    Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

  14. Evaluation of resistive-plate-chamber-based TOF-PET applied to in-beam particle therapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Espallardo, I.; Diblen, F.; Rohling, H.; Solevi, P.; Gillam, J.; Watts, D.; España, S.; Vandenberghe, S.; Fiedler, F.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-05-01

    Particle therapy is a highly conformal radiotherapy technique which reduces the dose deposited to the surrounding normal tissues. In order to fully exploit its advantages, treatment monitoring is necessary to minimize uncertainties related to the dose delivery. Up to now, the only clinically feasible technique for the monitoring of therapeutic irradiation with particle beams is Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we have compared a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-based PET scanner with a scintillation-crystal-based PET scanner for this application. In general, the main advantages of the RPC-PET system are its excellent timing resolution, low cost, and the possibility of building large area systems. We simulated a partial-ring scanner based on an RPC prototype under construction within the Fondazione per Adroterapia Oncologica (TERA). For comparison with the crystal-based PET scanner we have chosen the geometry of a commercially available PET scanner, the Philips Gemini TF. The coincidence time resolution used in the simulations takes into account the current achievable values as well as expected improvements of both technologies. Several scenarios (including patient data) have been simulated to evaluate the performance of different scanners. Initial results have shown that the low sensitivity of the RPC hampers its application to hadron-beam monitoring, which has an intrinsically low positron yield compared to diagnostic PET. In addition, for in-beam PET there is a further data loss due to the partial ring configuration. In order to improve the performance of the RPC-based scanner, an improved version of the RPC detector (modifying the thickness of the gas and glass layers), providing a larger sensitivity, has been simulated and compared with an axially extended version of the crystal-based device. The improved version of the RPC shows better performance than the prototype, but the extended version of the crystal-based PET outperforms all other options.

  15. Feasibility study of monitoring of plasma etching chamber conditions using superimposed high-frequency signals on rf power transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasashima, Y.; Uesugi, F.

    2015-10-01

    An in situ monitoring system that can detect changes in the conditions of a plasma etching chamber has been developed. In the system, low-intensity high-frequency signals are superimposed on the rf power transmission line used for generating plasma. The system measures reflected high-frequency signals and detects the change in their frequency characteristics. The results indicate that the system detects the changes in the conditions in etching chambers caused by the changes in the electrode gap and the inner wall condition and demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. The system can easily be retrofitted to mass-production equipment and it can be used with or without plasma discharge. Therefore, our system is suitable for in situ monitoring of mass-production plasma etching chambers. The system is expected to contribute to development of predictive maintenance, which monitors films deposited on the inner wall of the chamber and prevents equipment faults caused by misalignment of chamber parts in mass-production equipment.

  16. Air Monitoring for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Adams, Frederick W.; Naylor, Guy; Haskell, William; Floyd, David; Curley, Charles; Follistein, Duke W.

    2004-01-01

    The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and quantify various hazardous gases. Traditionally these systems are designed for leak detection of the cryogenic gases used for the propulsion of the Shuttle and other vehicles. Mass spectrometers are the basis of these systems, which provide excellent quantitation, sensitivity, selectivity, response times and detection limits. A Table lists common gases monitored for aerospace applications. The first five gases, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are historically the focus of the HGDL.

  17. Inherently safe passive gas monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Bellamy, John Stephen; Shuler, James M.; Shull, Davis J.; Leduc, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Generally, the present disclosure is directed to gas monitoring systems that use inductive power transfer to safely power an electrically passive device included within a nuclear material storage container. In particular, the electrically passive device can include an inductive power receiver for receiving inductive power transfer through a wall of the nuclear material storage container. The power received by the inductive power receiver can be used to power one or more sensors included in the device. Thus, the device is not required to include active power generation components such as, for example, a battery, that increase the risk of a spark igniting flammable gases within the container.

  18. The N.A.C.A. Combustion Chamber Gas-sampling Valve and Some Preliminary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Buckley, E C

    1933-01-01

    A gas sampling valve of the inertia-operated type was designed for procuring samples of the gases in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines at identical points in successive cycles so that the analysis of the gas samples thus procured may aid in the study of the process of combustion. The operation of the valve is described. The valve was used to investigate the CO2 content of gases taken from the quiescent combustion chamber of a high speed compression-ignition engine when operating with two different multiple-orifice fuel injection nozzles. An analysis of the gas samples thus obtained shows that the state of quiescence in the combustion chamber is maintained during the combustion of the fuel.

  19. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  20. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  1. Effect of nitrous oxide on gas bubble volume in the anterior chamber.

    PubMed

    Wolf, G L; Capuano, C; Hartung, J

    1985-03-01

    Nitrous oxide is often used as anesthesia during ophthalmic surgery that requires intraocular injection of sulfur hexafluoride gas or air. Ventilation with N2O is known to increase intraocular pressure in the presence of intraocular bubbles, but little is known about the effect of N2O on intraocular bubble volume. Accordingly, we have compared the effect of N2O:O2 ventilation (66% N2O, balance O2) with that of air ventilation and oxygen ventilation on intraocular bubbles of SF6 or air. Aspiration of anterior chamber gas after 180 minutes of N2O:O2 ventilation in cats showed an increase in bubble volume of more than threefold when the original intraocular bubble was SF6 and an increase of more than twofold when the original intraocular bubble was air. In contrast, during air ventilation, intraocular SF6 bubble volume increased by 50%, and intraocular air bubble volume increased by only 7.5%. During O2 ventilation, intraocular SF6 bubble volume increased by 35%, and intraocular air bubble volume decreased by 13%. Our results indicate that N2O is contraindicated when gas is injected into the closed eye.

  2. Study of deposit associated with discharge in micro-pixel gas chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Y.; Ochi, A.; Moriya, K.; Matsuda, S.; Yoshida, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-02-01

    We found some deposits associated with discharge on dielectric (polyimide) substrates in "Micro-Pixel Gas Chambers" ( μ-PIC) operating with Ar/C2H6 90/10. Secondary electron images taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that they were a conductive material. Auger electron spectroscopy clearly showed that their main component was carbon (98%). Their origin was clarified using spark tests in which a single pixel was sparked a specific number of times. Secondary electron images clearly showed that discharge occurred in the narrow gaps between the electrodes. With a Ar/C2H6 50/50 gas mixture, the amount of carbon deposited depended on the number of sparks. The drop in the applied voltage after the test depended on the number of sparks. With pure N2 gas, no deposits were clearly found, however, a decrease in the applied voltage after the tests was observed. This can be attributed to carbonization of the polyimide surface. Although the SEM images did not show clear proof of this, this carbonization could contribute much less than the ethane dissociation.

  3. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  4. Gamma-ray astronomy using a high pressure gas scintillation drift chamber with a waveshifting fiber readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, J.; Edberg, T. K.; Parsons, A.; Sadoulet, B.; Weiss, S.; Smith, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a balloon-borne hard X-ray telescope called SIGHT (Scintillation Imaging Gas-filled Hard X-ray Telescope). SIGHT is a high sensitivity, good energy resolution instrument that images in the 30 to 300 keV region. We discuss the development of a large area, 20 atmosphere, position sensitive xenon gas scintillation drift chamber which is the gamma-ray detector at the heart of the telescope package. Results of the development of the novel waveshifting fiber readout for this chamber are presented.

  5. Radon exhalation rates from building materials using electret ion chamber radon monitors in accumulators.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Stieff, Frederick

    2009-08-01

    An electret ion chamber (EIC) radon monitor in a sealed accumulator measures the integrated average radon concentration at the end of the accumulation duration. Theoretical equations have been derived to relate such radon concentrations (Bq m(-3) ) to the radon emanation rate (Bq d(-1)) from building materials enclosed in the accumulator. As an illustration, a 4-L sealable glass jar has been used as an accumulator to calculate the radon emanation rate from different granite samples. The radon emanation rate was converted into radon flux (Bq mm(-2) d(-1)) by dividing the emanation rate by surface area of the sample. Fluxes measured on typical, commercially available granites ranged from 20-30 Bq m(-2) d(-1). These results are similar to the results reported in the literature. The lower limit of detection for a 2-d measurement works out to be 7 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Equations derived can also be used for other sealable accumulators and other integrating detectors, such as alpha track detectors.

  6. Real-time monitoring of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene in a photoreaction chamber with a tunable mid-infrared laser and ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Sydoryk, Ihor; Lim, Alan; McIntyre, Thomas J; Tulip, John; Jäger, Wolfgang; McDonald, Karen

    2011-02-01

    We describe the implementation of a mid-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor with a photoreaction chamber, used for reproducing chemical transformations of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) gases that may occur in the atmosphere. The system performance was assessed in the presence of photoreaction products including aerosol particles. A mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-tunable from 9.41-9.88 μm (1012-1063 cm(-1))-was used to monitor gas phase concentrations of BTX simultaneously and in real time during chemical processing of these compounds with hydroxyl radicals in a photoreaction chamber. Results are compared to concurrent measurements using ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV DOAS). The EC-QCL based system provides quantitation limits of approximately 200, 200, and 600 parts in 10(9) (ppb) for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene, respectively, which represents a significant improvement over our previous work with this laser system. Correspondingly, we observe the best agreement between the EC-QCL measurements and the UV DOAS measurements with benzene, followed by toluene, then p-xylene. Although BTX gas-detection limits are not as low for the EC-QCL system as for UV DOAS, an unidentified by-product of the photoreactions was observed with the EC-QCL, but not with the UV DOAS system.

  7. Real-time monitoring of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene in a photoreaction chamber with a tunable mid-infrared laser and ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Sydoryk, Ihor; Lim, Alan; McIntyre, Thomas J; Tulip, John; Jäger, Wolfgang; McDonald, Karen

    2011-02-01

    We describe the implementation of a mid-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor with a photoreaction chamber, used for reproducing chemical transformations of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) gases that may occur in the atmosphere. The system performance was assessed in the presence of photoreaction products including aerosol particles. A mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-tunable from 9.41-9.88 μm (1012-1063 cm(-1))-was used to monitor gas phase concentrations of BTX simultaneously and in real time during chemical processing of these compounds with hydroxyl radicals in a photoreaction chamber. Results are compared to concurrent measurements using ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV DOAS). The EC-QCL based system provides quantitation limits of approximately 200, 200, and 600 parts in 10(9) (ppb) for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene, respectively, which represents a significant improvement over our previous work with this laser system. Correspondingly, we observe the best agreement between the EC-QCL measurements and the UV DOAS measurements with benzene, followed by toluene, then p-xylene. Although BTX gas-detection limits are not as low for the EC-QCL system as for UV DOAS, an unidentified by-product of the photoreactions was observed with the EC-QCL, but not with the UV DOAS system. PMID:21283225

  8. Investigation of chamber methods and a micrometeorological mass balance method for quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from animal manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyu-Hyun

    Various measurement methods to quantify greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from manure storage or treatment facilities have been used. However, it is difficult to directly compare emission data measured with different methods, which causes uncertainties in national GHG inventories. In the micrometeorological mass balance (MMB) method, a gas flux consists of a horizontal mean flux (MF) and horizontal turbulent flux (TF) terms. In Chapter 2, methane (GH4 ) TF measurements obtained using a sonic anemometer and a tunable diode laser trace gas analyzer are presented. Contrary to previous studies in wind tunnels and flat-level field conditions, an overestimation of only 0.5% was observed by only considering the MF term. This means the MMB method without consideration of TF is suitable in complex field conditions with uneven topography, and farm buildings. In Chapter 3, the MMB method was compared to a floating chamber method. Of these, the floating chamber method has been extensively used for CH4 flux quantification. The MMB method, although providing advantages such as spatial integration of fluxes, requires fast response trace gas analyzers which are not widely available. The mean ratio of CH4 flux measured with the floating chamber method to that measured using the MMB method was 1.25, ranging from 1.07 to 1.83. Flux overestimation by the floating chamber could have been caused by location of the chamber and potential disturbances by the chamber. Frequent changes of the chamber location, use of several chambers, and/or avoiding chamber placement on 'hot spots' are recommended to decrease flux overestimation. In Chapter 4, CH4 fluxes measured with a mega chamber and eight small chambers during the in-vessel composting phase showed similar temporal variation, while nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes were, significantly lower for the small chambers. The ratios of CH4 fluxes measured with a mega chamber to eight small chambers during the in-vessel composting phase were 0.72 and 1

  9. Method of monitoring photoactive organic molecules in-situ during gas-phase deposition of the photoactive organic molecules

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Vartanian, Garen; Rolin, Cedric

    2015-06-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring of gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in real time while depositing a film of the photoactive organic molecules on a substrate in a processing chamber for depositing the film includes irradiating the gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in the processing chamber with a radiation from a radiation source in-situ while depositing the film of the one or more organic materials and measuring the intensity of the resulting photoluminescence emission from the organic material. One or more processing parameters associated with the deposition process can be determined from the photoluminescence intensity data in real time providing useful feedback on the deposition process.

  10. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  11. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  12. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  13. Development and application of noninvasive technology for study of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.; Abramchuk, T. V.; Shipigusev, V. A.; Andreeva, T. P.; Gumerov, A. R.; Ilyin, A. N.; Gubaidullin, I. T.

    2015-05-01

    The paper formulates the issue of development of experimental base with noninvasive optical-electronic tools for control of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine. The design and specifications of a pilot sample of optronic system are explained; this noninvasive system was created in the framework of project of development of main critical technologies for designing of aviation gas turbine engine PD-14. The testbench run data are presented.

  14. Measurements of Gas-Wall Partitioning of Oxidized Species in Environmental Smog Chambers and Teflon Sampling Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Pagonis, D.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental "smog" chambers have played an integral role in atmospheric aerosol research for decades. Recently, many works have demonstrated that the loss of gas-phase material to fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) chamber walls can have significant effects on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield results. The effects of gas-wall partitioning on highly oxidized species is still controversial, however. In this work we performed a series of experiments examining the losses of oxidized gas-phase compounds that were generated in-situ­ in an environmental chamber. The loss of species to the walls was measured using three chemical ionization mass spectrometry techniques: proton-transfer-reaction (PTR), nitrate (NO3-) ion, and iodide (I-). Many oxidized species have wall loss timescales ranging between 15 to 45 minutes and scale according to the molecule's estimated saturation concentration c* and functional groups. By comparing results of the different techniques, and in particular by the use of the "wall-less" NO3- source, we find that measuring species with high chamber wall-loss rates is complicated by the use of a standard ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region, as well as long Teflon sampling lines, which can be important sinks for gas-phase species. This effect is observed even for semi-volatile species and could have significant effects on ambient sampling techniques that make highly time-resolved measurements using long sampling lines, such as eddy covariance measurements.

  15. Air Monitoring for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Naylor, Guy; Haskell, William; Floyd, David; Curley, Charles; Griffin, Timothy P.; Adams, Frederick; Follistein, Duke

    2003-01-01

    The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and quantify various hazardous gases. Traditionally these systems are designed for leak detection of the cryogenic gases used for the propulsion of the Shuttle and other vehicles. Mass spectrometers are the basis of these systems, which provide excellent quantitation, sensitivity, selectivity, response and limits of detection. Unfortunately, these systems are large, heavy and expensive. This feature limits the ability to perform gas analysis in certain applications. Smaller and lighter mass spectrometer systems could be used in many more applications primarily due to the portability of the system. Such applications would include air analysis in confined spaces, in-situ environmental analysis and emergency response. In general, system cost is lowered as size is reduced. With a low cost air analysis system, several systems could be utilized for monitoring large areas. These networked systems could be deployed at job-sites for worker safety, throughout a community for pollution warnings, or dispersed in a battlefield for early warning of chemical or biological threats. Presented will be information on the first prototype of this type of system. Included will be field trial data, with this prototype performing air analysis autonomously from an aircraft.

  16. Wellhead monitors automate Lake Maracaibo gas lift

    SciTech Connect

    Adjunta, J.C. ); Majek, A. )

    1994-11-28

    High-performance personal computer (PC) and intelligent remote terminal unit (IRTU) technology have optimized the remote control of gas lift injection and surveillance of over 1,000 offshore production wells at Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela. In its 3-year program, Maraven expects a 27,000 b/d increase in oil production by reducing deferred production and optimizing gas lift injection by as much as 20%. In addition, real time data on well performance will enhance production management as well as allocation of operational and maintenance resources. The remote control system consists of a solar-powered wellhead monitor (WHM) installed on each well platform. At each flow gathering station within a 2-mile range of a family of wells, a host terminal unit polls and stores the well data with low power, 250-mw radios. From a remote location, 60 miles onshore, an operator interface polls the host units for real time data with 5-watt radios operating in the 900-megahertz band. The paper describes the design, optimization, telemetry management, and selection of a single vendor for this system. The economic impact of this system to Maraven is also discussed.

  17. Sensitivity of laser flare photometry compared to slit-lamp cell evaluation in monitoring anterior chamber inflammation in uveitis.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Ottavio; Papadia, Marina; Herbort, Carl P

    2010-10-01

    To study the sensitivity of laser flare photometry (LFP) in monitoring anterior chamber inflammation by correlating LFP measurements with slit-lamp evaluation of aqueous cells in HLA-B27-related uveitis in a prospective trial. Slit-lamp cell evaluation was correlated with LFP-measured flare in a masked fashion in HLA-B27-related uveitis patients receiving standard topical therapy. At the time of 50 and 90% LFP flare reduction, the corresponding reduction of cells was recorded and statistically compared using the sign test. Forty-three episodes (in 43 patients) of acute anterior HLA-B27-related uveitis were included. LFP flare reduction and slit-lamp cell reduction were strongly correlated. LFP was significantly more sensitive for both 50% (P = 0.001) and 90% (P = 0.02) LFP flare reduction in assessing the decrease of anterior chamber inflammation. LFP was superior to slit-lamp cell evaluation in monitoring anterior chamber inflammation in uveitis. Flare, becoming a quantitative parameter when measured by LFP, rather than cells, should be considered the gold standard to measure anterior chamber inflammation in uveitis.

  18. A gas-tight Cu Kα x-ray transparent reaction chamber for high-temperature x-ray diffraction analyses of halide gas/solid reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Sandhage, Kenneth H.

    2009-11-01

    An externally heated, x-ray transparent reaction chamber has been developed to enable the dynamic high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis of a gas/solid [TiF4(g)/SiO2(s)] reaction involving a halide gas reactant formed at elevated temperatures (up to 350 °C) from a condensed source (TiF4 powder) sealed within the chamber. The reaction chamber possessed x-ray transparent windows comprised of a thin (13 μm) internal layer of Al foil and a thicker (125 μm) external Kapton film. After sealing the SiO2 specimens (diatom frustules or Stöber spheres) above TiF4 powder within the reaction chamber, the chamber was heated to a temperature in the range of 160-350 °C to allow for internal generation of TiF4(g). The TiF4(g) underwent a metathetic reaction with the SiO2 specimen to yield a TiOF2(s) product. HTXRD analysis, using Cu Kα x rays passed through the Kapton/Al windows of the chamber, was used to track the extent of SiO2 consumption and/or TiOF2 formation with time. The Al foil inner layer of the windows protected the Kapton film from chemical attack by TiF4(g), whereas the thicker, more transparent Kapton film provided the mechanical strength needed to contain this gas. By selecting an appropriate combination of x-ray transparent materials to endow such composite windows with the required thermal, chemical, and mechanical performance, this inexpensive reaction chamber design may be applied to the HTXRD analyses of a variety of gas/solid reactions.

  19. Off-site air monitoring following methyl bromide chamber and building fumigations and evaluation of the ISCST air dispersion model

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, T.; Swgawa, R.; Wofford, P.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Pesticide Regulation`s preliminary risk characterization of methyl bromide indicated an inadequate margin of safety for several exposure scenarios. Characterization of the air concentrations associated with common methyl bromide use patterns was necessary to determine specific scenarios that result in an unacceptable margin of safety. Field monitoring data were used in conjunction with the Industrial Source Complex, Short Tenn (ISCST) air dispersion model to characterize air concentrations associated with various types of methyl bromide applications. Chamber and building fumigations were monitored and modelled. For each fumigation the emission rates, chamber or building specifications and on-site meteorological data were input into the ISCST model. The model predicted concentrations were compared to measured air concentrations. The concentrations predicted by the ISCST model reflect both the pattern and magnitude of the measured concentrations. Required buffer zones were calculated using the ISCST output.

  20. The most recent international intercomparisons of radon and thoron monitors with the NIRS radon and thoron chambers.

    PubMed

    Janik, M; Yonehara, H

    2015-06-01

    The fifth international intercomparison for radon and fourth for thoron monitors were conducted at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan) with the radon and thoron chambers. The tests were made under two different exposures to radon and two exposures (in two rounds due to limited space in the thoron chamber) to thoron. In these most recent intercomparisons, two new graphical methods recommended by the ISO standard, Mandel's h statistic and the Youden plot, were implemented to evaluate the consistency between laboratories and within laboratories.The presented data indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement as expressed by the percentage difference parameter has been stable since the first international intercomparison for passive monitors carried out in 2007, and it amounted to around 50 for 10 % of the difference from the reference value. The thoron exercise showed that further development and additional studies to improve its measuring methods and reliability are needed.

  1. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Van Auwegem, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Ferrini, M.; Muhammad, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Tytgat, M.

    2016-09-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO2 and CF3I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  2. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  3. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  4. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (μ-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this μ-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the μ-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  5. 30 CFR 70.1900 - Exhaust Gas Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. In addition, copies... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exhaust Gas Monitoring. 70.1900 Section 70.1900... MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel Exhaust Gas Monitoring § 70.1900 Exhaust...

  6. 30 CFR 70.1900 - Exhaust Gas Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. In addition, copies... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exhaust Gas Monitoring. 70.1900 Section 70.1900... MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES DIESEL EXHAUST GAS MONITORING § 70.1900 Exhaust...

  7. 30 CFR 70.1900 - Exhaust Gas Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exhaust Gas Monitoring. 70.1900 Section 70.1900 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES DIESEL EXHAUST GAS MONITORING § 70.1900 Exhaust...

  8. 30 CFR 70.1900 - Exhaust Gas Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust Gas Monitoring. 70.1900 Section 70.1900 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES DIESEL EXHAUST GAS MONITORING § 70.1900 Exhaust...

  9. 30 CFR 70.1900 - Exhaust Gas Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exhaust Gas Monitoring. 70.1900 Section 70.1900 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel Exhaust Gas Monitoring § 70.1900 Exhaust...

  10. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, C.; Boissonnat, G.; Brusasco, C.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Marchand, B.; Mertens, T.; de Neuter, S.; Peronnel, J.

    2014-02-01

    Every radiotherapy center has to be equipped with real-time beam monitoring devices. In 2008, we developed an ionization chamber in collaboration with the IBA (Ion Beam Applications) company. This monitoring device called IC2/3 was developed to be used in IBA universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Here we present the characterization of the IC2/3 monitor in the energy and flux ranges used in protontherapy. The equipment has been tested with an IBA cyclotron able to deliver proton beams from 70 to 230 MeV. This beam monitoring device has been validated and is now installed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen protontherapy center (WPE, Germany). The results obtained in both terms of spatial resolution and dose measurements are at least equal to the initial specifications needed for PBS purposes. The detector measures the dose with a relative uncertainty lower than 1% in the range from 0.5 Gy/min to 8 Gy/min while the spatial resolution is better than 250 μm. The technology has been patented and five IC2/3 chambers were delivered to IBA. Nowadays, IBA produces the IC2/3 beam monitoring device as a part of its Proteus 235 product.

  11. Compact integrated X-ray intensity and beam position monitor based on rare gas scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Revesz, Peter; Ruff, Jacob; Dale, Darren; Krawczyk, Thomas

    2013-05-15

    We have created and tested a compact integrated X-ray beam intensity and position monitor using Ar-gas scintillation. The light generated inside the device's cavity is detected by diametrically opposed PIN diodes located above and below the beam. The intensity is derived from the sum of the top and bottom signals, while the beam position is calculated from the difference-over-sum of the two signals. The device was tested at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source with both 17 keV and 59 keV x-rays. For intensity monitoring, the Ar-scintillation monitor performance is comparable to standard ion chambers in terms of precision. As an X-ray beam position monitor the new device response is linear with vertical beam position over a 2 mm span with a precision of 2 {mu}m.

  12. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2013-08-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor suspended in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with two banks of black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 °C to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with NMHCs < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cmchamber are determined and included in the Master Chemical Mechanism to evaluate and model propene-NOx-air irradiation experiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed SOA yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our GIG-CAS smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase mechanisms and aerosol chemistry.

  13. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cm-3. The photolysis rate of NO2 is adjustable between 0 and 0.49 min-1. At 298 K under dry conditions, the average wall loss rates of NO, NO2 and O3 were measured to be 1.41 × 10-4 min-1, 1.39 × 10-4 min-1 and 1.31 × 10-4 min-1, respectively, and the particle number wall loss rate was measured to be 0.17 h-1. Auxiliary mechanisms of this chamber are determined and included in the Master Chemical Mechanism to evaluate and model propene-NOx-air irradiation experiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high-quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy Sciences (GIG-CAS), smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase chemistry and secondary aerosol formation.

  14. Reply to comment on ‘Proton beam monitor chamber calibration’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomà, Carles; Lorentini, Stefano; Meer, David; Safai, Sairos

    2016-09-01

    This reply shows that the discrepancy of about 3% between Faraday cup dosimetry and reference dosimetry using a cylindrical ionization chamber found in Gomà (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) seems to be due to an overestimation of the beam quality correction factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398 for the cylindrical chamber used, rather than to ‘unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry’, as suggested by Palmans and Vatnitsky (2016 Phys. Med. Biol. 61 6585-93). Furthermore, this work shows that a good agreement between reference dosimetry and Faraday cup dosimetry is possible, provided accurate beam quality correction factors for proton beams are used. The review on W air values presented by Palmans and Vatnitsky is believed to be inaccurate, as it is based on the imprecise assumption of ionization chamber perturbation correction factors in proton beams being equal to unity.

  15. Reply to comment on ‘Proton beam monitor chamber calibration’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomà, Carles; Lorentini, Stefano; Meer, David; Safai, Sairos

    2016-09-01

    This reply shows that the discrepancy of about 3% between Faraday cup dosimetry and reference dosimetry using a cylindrical ionization chamber found in Gomà (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961–71) seems to be due to an overestimation of the beam quality correction factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398 for the cylindrical chamber used, rather than to ‘unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry’, as suggested by Palmans and Vatnitsky (2016 Phys. Med. Biol. 61 6585–93). Furthermore, this work shows that a good agreement between reference dosimetry and Faraday cup dosimetry is possible, provided accurate beam quality correction factors for proton beams are used. The review on W air values presented by Palmans and Vatnitsky is believed to be inaccurate, as it is based on the imprecise assumption of ionization chamber perturbation correction factors in proton beams being equal to unity.

  16. Colorimetric blood-gas monitoring sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Keith J.; Seifert, George P.

    1993-05-01

    Colorimetric fiber optic sensors have been developed for measuring the pH and pCO2 of blood. These sensors are fabricated using a single 125 micrometers diameter optical fiber. Located at the distal end of the fiber is a capsule that contains a pH sensitive dye. The pCO2 sensor is fabricated from a pH sensor with the addition of a salt, bicarbonate, and the encapsulation with an ion impermeable gas permeable membrane. The distal end of the capsule is terminated with a reflective surface. The reflective surface can either be a polished metallic surface or, in this case, a TiO2 impregnated epoxy. The disposable sensor mates with an optical connector that contains two optical fibers of the same size as the disposable sensor. The two fibers within the optical cable provide a light path for both the antegrade and retrograde optical signals. These fibers are terminated at either the LED source or the detector. A prototype sensor assembly that incorporates the measurement of three physiological parameters (pH, pCO2, and sO2) has been demonstrated to fit within a standard 20 gauge arterial catheter, typically used for radial artery blood pressure monitoring, without significant damping of the blood pressure waveform. The pH sensor has a range of 6.9 - 7.8 with a precision of 0.01 pH units and the pCO2 sensor has a range of 15 - 95 mm Hg with a precision of 3 mm Hg. The long term drift pH drift is less than 0.01 pH unit per 8 hours and the pCO2 drift is less than 1 mm Hg per 8 hours. Sensor performance in the canine has demonstrated that the pH sensor is accurate to within +/- 0.03 pH units and the pCO2 sensor is accurate to within +/- 3 mm Hg when compared to a typical blood gas analyzer.

  17. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  18. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  19. The carrier gas pressure effect in a laminar flow diffusion chamber, homogeneous nucleation of n-butanol in helium.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jiri; Kulmala, Markku; Viisanen, Yrjö; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2006-06-14

    Homogeneous nucleation rate isotherms of n-butanol+helium were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at total pressures ranging from 50 to 210 kPa to investigate the effect of carrier gas pressure on nucleation. Nucleation temperatures ranged from 265 to 280 K and the measured nucleation rates were between 10(2) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The measured nucleation rates decreased as a function of increasing pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at pressures below 100 kPa. This negative carrier gas effect was also temperature dependent. At nucleation temperature of 280 K and at the same saturation ratio, the maximum deviation between nucleation rates measured at 50 and 210 kPa was about three orders of magnitude. At nucleation temperature of 265 K, the effect was negligible. Qualitatively the results resemble those measured in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Also the slopes of the isothermal nucleation rates as a function of saturation ratio were different as a function of total pressure, 50 kPa isotherms yielded the steepest slopes, and 210 kPa isotherms the shallowest slopes. Several sources of inaccuracies were considered in the interpretation of the results: uncertainties in the transport properties, nonideal behavior of the vapor-carrier gas mixture, and shortcomings of the used mathematical model. Operation characteristics of the laminar flow diffusion chamber at both under-and over-pressure were determined to verify a correct and stable operation of the device. We conclude that a negative carrier gas pressure effect is seen in the laminar flow diffusion chamber and it cannot be totally explained with the aforementioned reasons.

  20. The carrier gas pressure effect in a laminar flow diffusion chamber, homogeneous nucleation of n-butanol in helium.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jiri; Kulmala, Markku; Viisanen, Yrjö; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2006-06-14

    Homogeneous nucleation rate isotherms of n-butanol+helium were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at total pressures ranging from 50 to 210 kPa to investigate the effect of carrier gas pressure on nucleation. Nucleation temperatures ranged from 265 to 280 K and the measured nucleation rates were between 10(2) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The measured nucleation rates decreased as a function of increasing pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at pressures below 100 kPa. This negative carrier gas effect was also temperature dependent. At nucleation temperature of 280 K and at the same saturation ratio, the maximum deviation between nucleation rates measured at 50 and 210 kPa was about three orders of magnitude. At nucleation temperature of 265 K, the effect was negligible. Qualitatively the results resemble those measured in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Also the slopes of the isothermal nucleation rates as a function of saturation ratio were different as a function of total pressure, 50 kPa isotherms yielded the steepest slopes, and 210 kPa isotherms the shallowest slopes. Several sources of inaccuracies were considered in the interpretation of the results: uncertainties in the transport properties, nonideal behavior of the vapor-carrier gas mixture, and shortcomings of the used mathematical model. Operation characteristics of the laminar flow diffusion chamber at both under-and over-pressure were determined to verify a correct and stable operation of the device. We conclude that a negative carrier gas pressure effect is seen in the laminar flow diffusion chamber and it cannot be totally explained with the aforementioned reasons. PMID:16784271

  1. Modeling SOA formation from alkanes and alkenes in chamber experiments: effect of gas/wall partitioning of organic vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphanie La, Yuyi; Camredon, Marie; Ziemann, Paul; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Hodzic, Alma; Aumont, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation products of Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) are expected to be the major precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Laboratory experiments were conducted this last decade in the Riverside APRC chamber to study IVOC oxidative mechanisms and SOA formation processes for a large set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons (Ziemann, 2011). This dataset are used here to assess the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) (Aumont et al., 2005). The simulated SOA yields agree with the general trends observed in the chamber experiments. They are (i) increasing with the increasing carbon number; (ii) decreasing with increasing methyl branch number; and (iii) increasing for cyclic compounds compared to their corresponding linear analogues. However, simulated SOA yields are systematically overestimated regardless of the precursors, suggesting missing processes in the model. In this study, we assess whether gas-to-wall partitioning of organic vapors can explain these model/observation mismatches (Matsunaga and Ziemann, 2010). First results show that GECKO-A outputs better match the observations when wall uptake of organic vapors is taken into account. Effects of gas/wall partitioning on SOA yields and composition will be presented. Preliminary results suggest that wall uptake is a major process influencing SOA production in the Teflon chambers. References Aumont, B., Szopa, S., Madronich, S.: Modelling the evolution of organic carbon during its gas-phase tropospheric oxidation: development of an explicit model based on a self generating approach. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 5, 2497-2517 (2005). P. J. Ziemann: Effects of molecular structure on the chemistry of aerosol formation from the OH-radical-initiated oxidation of alkanes and alkenes, Int. Rev.Phys.Chem., 30:2, 161-195 (2011). Matsunaga, A., Ziemann, P. J.: Gas-wall partitioning of organic compounds in a Teflon film

  2. Low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber and a search for a high-efficiency secondary-electron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.; Sbarra, C.

    1994-11-01

    The test beam performance of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a thick CsI secondary-electron emitting surface as the source of primary ionization is presented. A study of the secondary-electron yield of CsI and KCl coated surfaces are discussed, as well as a promising new technique, CsI-treated CVD diamond films.

  3. New Hadron Monitor By Using A Gas-Filled RF Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Fasce, Giorgio; Flanagan, Gene; Johnson, Rolland; Tollestrup, Alvin; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-05-01

    It is trend to build an intense neutrino beam facility for the fundamental physics research, e.g. LBNF at Fermilab, T2K at KEK, and CNGS at CERN. They have investigated a hadron monitor to diagnose the primary/secondary beam quality. The existing hadron monitor based on an ionization chamber is not robust in the high-radiation environment vicinity of MW-class secondary particle production targets. We propose a gas-filled RF resonator to use as the hadron monitor since it is simple and hence radiation robust in this environment. When charged particles pass through the resonator they produce ionized plasma via the Coulomb interaction with the inert gas. The beam-induced plasma changes the permittivity of inert gas. As a result, a resonant frequency in the resonator shifts with the amount of ionized electrons. The radiation sensitivity is adjustable by the inert gas pressure and the RF amplitude. The hadron profile will be reconstructed with a tomography technique in the hodoscope which consists of X, Y, and theta layers by using a strip-shaped gas resonator. The sensitivity and possible system design will be shown in this presentation.

  4. Operating Experience Review of the INL HTE Gas Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; K. G. DeWall

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored at hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. Some simple statistics are given for the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  5. Burning carbon monoxide in the settling chamber of a hotshot wind tunnel for obtaining the CO2 test gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumskii, V. V.; Yaroslavtsev, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    A method of formation and heating of CO2 as a test gas in the settling chamber of a hotshot wind tunnel is considered. To form and heat CO2, the chamber is filled with a source gas mixture of CO, O2, and CO2, and after initiation, these substances participate in an exothermic chemical reaction in accordance with the formula CO + 0.5 O2 + xCO2 = (1 + x)CO2. A stoichiometric ratio of the concentrations of carbon monoxide CO and oxygen is used. Variation of the number of moles x of ballast CO2 in the left part of the chemical formula allows changing the temperature of the resultant test gas in a wide range. Experiments in the IT-302M hotshot wind tunnel carried out at ITAM SB RAS have shown that a pressure increase during an isochoric process in the settling chamber due to the joint effect of heat released in the reaction CO + 0.5 O2 and an electric charge provides the completeness of CO combustion almost equal to unity. The time of reaction completion at its initiation by an electric arc is no more than several milliseconds.

  6. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  7. A telescope with microstrip gas chambers for the detection of charged products in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Abbondanno, U.; Andreano, A.; Bassini, R.; Bonutti, F.; Bruno, M.; Casini, G.; D'Agostino, M.; Manzin, G.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Mastinu, P. F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moroni, A.; Squarcini, M.; Tonetto, F.; Vannini, G.; Vannucci, L.

    1997-02-01

    Prototypes of a ΔE-E telescope, designed to detect and identify with low-energy threshold both light charged particles and heavy fragments, are described. They are based on a gas drift chamber which conveys primary ionization electrons on gas microstrip devices where multiplication occurs and the energy loss signals are generated. Silicon detectors or CsI(T1) crystals operate as residual energy detectors. The prototypes were tested both with a source and heavy ion beams. Performances, mainly related to energy resolution, charge identification and angle resolution, are reported.

  8. Stove with multiple chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Black, A.

    1987-04-21

    A stove is described for burning a solid fuel such as wood. The wall means defines a main air inlet, a combustion gas outlet, and four chambers through which gas passes sequentially from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet. The chambers comprises a pre-heat plenum chamber into which the main air inlet opens. A main combustion chamber contains solid fuel to be burned into which gas passes from the pre-heat plenum chamber, a second combustion chamber which is downstream of the main combustion chamber with respect to the flow of gas from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet, and a third combustion chamber from which the combustion gas outlet opens. The stove also comprises a plate having a restricted opening for providing communication between the second and third combustion chambers. And a catalytic converter comprises a body of solid material formed with passageways, the body of solid material being fitted in the restricted opening so that gas passes from the second combustion chamber to the third combustion chamber by way of the passageways in the body.

  9. Chamber leakage effects on measured gas concentrations during contained demilitarization tests at NTS X-Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher R. Shadix; Joel Lipkin

    1999-11-01

    A series of contained explosive detonation and propellant burn experiments was conducted during 1996 and 1997 using a specially constructed, large, underground chamber located in the X-tunnel complex at Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  10. Deposition and characterization of alumina-titania coating by multi-chamber gas-dynamic sprayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, M.; Prozorova, M.; Arseenko, M.; Tyurin, Yu.; Kolisnichenko, O.; Vasilik, N.; Sirota, V.; Pavlenko, I.

    In this paper, alumina-titania coatings have been formed on aluminium substrate by multi-chamber detonation sprayer. The coatings were investigated using SEM, EDS, XRD and Vickers microhardness tester. The results show that the alumina-titania coatings consist of both fully melted regions and partially melted regions, and the fully melted region has a lamellar-like structure. The multi-chamber detonation sprayer produced the dense layers of coating with a high hardness.

  11. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  12. Stand-alone sensors monitor for combustible gas leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Elizabeth Gas Co., a gas distribution company in New Jersey, has added a network of combustible gas sensors to a computer system already in place for continuous monitoring of gas leaks. The computer center at the company's Erie St. facility controls all dispatching, which includes routing gas through the system and controlling gas pressure. The system uses redundant Hewlett-Packard A900 central processing units (CPU), 6 monitors, including a Mitsubishi 35-in. color monitor, and Fisher control software. The company's primary tank farm, which contains over a million gallons of propane and LNG, is located near several chemical plants, an oil refinery and a residential neighborhood. To monitor for combustible leaks at the site, the company installed 49 stand-alone combustible gas sensors manufactured by Mine Safety Appliances Co. (MSA) of Pittsburgh, Pa. The sensors are designed to measure the concentrations of propane and LNG and trigger alarms at 20% of the lower explosive limit (LEL). The sensors are diffusion types that sample ambient air rather than drawing in samples through a pump. Using the principle of catalytic oxidation, the sensors produce a signal proportional to the concentration of combustible gas in the atmosphere. If gas is detected above 20% of the LEL, a relay driver signal is sent into a remote annunciator panel which contains LED alarm displays for each sensor. The remote annunciator panel also houses a 24 VDC power supply.

  13. Experimental observations of non-equilibrium gas-particle partitioning of PAHs in an outdoor smog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, D.L.; Kamens, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    To study non-equilibrium gas-particle partitioning of various PAHs, three specially designed smog chamber experiments were conducted (October 1993, January 1994, and February 1994). Automobile diesel exhaust was injected for five minutes into a 190 m{sup 3} Teflon film chamber and allowed to age during the night at temperatures below 15 C. A large denuder system was utilized during the injection period in order to remove PAH vapors from the injection stream. Thus, PAH-laden particles were observed to off-gas in the near absence of vapor phase PAHs during the initial stages of the 8-hour experiments. The large denuder was designed as a parallel plate system, made of activated charcoal impregnated filters. It was characterized to remove greater than 90% of PAH vapors from the diesel injection system. During the experiments, air samples were collected in the chamber at 20-minute intervals for the first 2 hours, and hourly thereafter. The sampling system consisted of an XAD-4 coated annular denuder, followed by a quartz-fiber filter, which is then followed by a second annular denuder. Sample extracts were analyzed on Hewlett-Packard GC/MS. Results from these experiments are compared to output from a radial diffusion computer model, detailed in another paper (``Modeling the Mass Transfer of Semi-Volatile Organics in Combustion Aerosols`` by Jay R. Odum and Richard M. Kamens).

  14. Constraining Gas Diffusivity-Soil Water Content Relationships in Forest Soils Using Surface Chamber Fluxes and Depth Profiles of Multiple Trace Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, J. E.; Kaiser, K.; Seybold, E. C.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Forest soils are sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere and can act as either sources or sinks of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), depending on redox conditions and other factors. Soil moisture is an important control on microbial activity, redox conditions and gas diffusivity. Direct chamber measurements of soil-air CO2 fluxes are facilitated by the availability of sensitive, portable infrared sensors; however, corresponding CH4 and N2O fluxes typically require the collection of time-course physical samples from the chamber with subsequent analyses by gas chromatography (GC). Vertical profiles of soil gas concentrations may also be used to derive CH4 and N2O fluxes by the gradient method; this method requires much less time and many fewer GC samples than the direct chamber method, but requires that effective soil gas diffusivities are known. In practice, soil gas diffusivity is often difficult to accurately estimate using a modeling approach. In our study, we apply both the chamber and gradient methods to estimate soil trace gas fluxes across a complex Rocky Mountain forested watershed in central Montana. We combine chamber flux measurements of CO2 (by infrared sensor) and CH4 and N2O (by GC) with co-located soil gas profiles to determine effective diffusivity in soil for each gas simultaneously, over-determining the diffusion equations and providing constraints on both the chamber and gradient methodologies. We then relate these soil gas diffusivities to soil type and volumetric water content in an effort to arrive at empirical parameterizations that may be used to estimate gas diffusivities across the watershed, thereby facilitating more accurate, frequent and widespread gradient-based measurements of trace gas fluxes across our study system. Our empirical approach to constraining soil gas diffusivity is well suited for trace gas flux studies over complex landscapes in general.

  15. On the calibration of a radon exhalation monitor based on the electrostatic collection method and accumulation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    The radon exhalation rate can be obtained quickly and easily from the evolution of radon concentration over time in the accumulation chamber. Radon monitoring based on the electrostatic collection method is not interfered with by (220)Rn. In this paper, we propose that the difference between radon and (218)Po concentrations in the measurement cell of this kind of radon exhalation monitor is the main system error, and it changes with time and different effective decay constants. Based on the results of simulation experiments, we propose that the calibration factor obtained from the suitable experiment cannot completely correct the system error, even if it is useful to reduce the measurement error. The better way for reducing measurement error is to use the new measurement model which we have proposed in recent years.

  16. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Saucedo, Victor M.

    2005-02-22

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  17. Project W-030 flammable gas verification monitoring test

    SciTech Connect

    BARKER, S.A.

    1999-02-24

    This document describes the verification monitoring campaign used to document the ability of the new ventilation system to mitigate flammable gas accumulation under steady state tank conditions. This document reports the results of the monitoring campaign. The ventilation system configuration, process data, and data analysis are presented.

  18. Evaluation of radioisotope tracer and activation analysis techniques for contamination monitoring in space environment simulation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smathers, J. B.; Kuykendall, W. E., Jr.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Marshall, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotope measurement techniques and neutron activation analysis are evaluated for use in identifying and locating contamination sources in space environment simulation chambers. The alpha range method allows the determination of total contaminant concentration in vapor state and condensate state. A Cf-252 neutron activation analysis system for detecting oils and greases tagged with stable elements is described. While neutron activation analysis of tagged contaminants offers specificity, an on-site system is extremely costly to implement and provides only marginal detection sensitivity under even the most favorable conditions.

  19. Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1995-01-19

    Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document.

  20. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on mixtures of aerosols in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Jang, Myoseon; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of a set of diverse SOCs on two and three component mixtures of aerosols from different sources was studied using smog chamber experimental data. A set of SOCs of different compound types was introduced into a system containing a mixture of aerosols from two or more sources. Gas and particle samples were taken using a filter-filter-denuder sampling system, and a partitioning coefficient Kp was estimated using Kp = Cp/(CgTSP). Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer and a light scattering detector. Gas and particle samples were analyzed using GCMS. The aerosol composition in the chamber was tracked chemically using a combination of signature compounds and the organic matter mass fraction (f(om)) of the individual aerosol sources. The physical nature of the aerosol mixture in the chamber was determined using particle size distributions, and an aggregate Kp was estimated from theoretically calculated Kp on the individual sources. Model fits for Kp showed that when the mixture involved primary sources of aerosol, the aggregate Kp of the mixture could be successfully modeled as an external mixture of the Kp on the individual aerosols. There were significant differences observed for some SOCs between modeling the system as an external and as an internal mixture. However, when one of the aerosol sources was secondary, the aggregate model Kp required incorporation of the secondary aerosol products on the preexisting aerosol for adequate model fits. Modeling such a system as an external mixture grossly overpredicted the Kp of alkanes in the mixture. Indirect evidence of heterogeneous, acid-catalyzed reactions in the particle phase was also seen, leading to a significant increase in the polarity of the resulting aerosol mix and a resulting decrease in the observed Kp of alkanes in the chamber. The model was partly consistent with this decrease but could not completely explain the reduction in Kp because of

  1. A near-infrared acetylene detection system based on a 1.534 μm tunable diode laser and a miniature gas chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qixin; Zheng, Chuantao; Liu, Huifang; Li, Bin; Wang, Yiding; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-03-01

    A near-infrared (NIR) dual-channel differential acetylene (C2H2) detection system was experimentally demonstrated based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) technique. A distributed feedback (DFB) laser modulated by a self-developed driver around 1.534 μm is used as light source. A miniature gas chamber with 15 cm path length is adopted as absorption pool, and an orthogonal lock-in amplifier is developed to extract the second harmonic (2f) signal. Sufficient standard C2H2 samples with different concentrations were prepared, and detailed measurements were carried out to study the detection performance. A good linear relationship is observed between the amplitude of the 2f signal and C2H2 concentration within the range of 200-10,000 ppm, and the relative measurement error is less than 5% within the whole range. A long-term monitoring lasting for 20 h on a 1000 ppm C2H2 sample was carried out, and the maximum concentration fluctuation is less than 2%. Due to the capability of using long-distance and low-loss optical fiber, the gas-cell can be placed in the filed for remote monitoring, which enables the system to have good prospects in industrial field.

  2. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca F.; Johnson, Darren J.; Neubauer, Scott C.; Raynie, Richard C.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 yr-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 yr-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 yr-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 yr-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  3. On-line ultrasonic gas entrainment monitor

    DOEpatents

    Day, Clifford K.; Pedersen, Herbert N.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus employing ultrasonic energy for detecting and measuring the quantity of gas bubbles present in liquids being transported through pipes. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned along the longitudinal axis of a fluid duct, oriented to transmit acoustic energy radially of the duct around the circumference of the enclosure walls. The back-reflected energy is received centrally of the duct and interpreted as a measure of gas entrainment. One specific embodiment employs a conical reflector to direct the transmitted acoustic energy radially of the duct and redirect the reflected energy back to the transducer for reception. A modified embodiment employs a cylindrical ultrasonic transducer for this purpose.

  4. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  5. New mud gas monitoring system aboard D/V Chikyu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yusuke; Inagaki, Fumio; Eguchi, Nobuhisa; Igarashi, Chiaki

    2013-04-01

    Mud gas logging has been commonly used in oil industry and continental scientific drilling to detect mainly hydrocarbon gases from the reservoir formation. Quick analysis of the gas provides almost real-time information which is critical to evaluate the formation and, in particular, safety of drilling operation. Furthermore, mud gas monitoring complements the lack of core or fluid samples particularly in a deep hole, and strengthen interpretations of geophysical logs. In scientific ocean drilling, on the other hand, mud gas monitoring was unavailable in riserless drilling through the history of DSDP and ODP, until riser drilling was first carried out in 2009 by D/V Chikyu. In IODP Exp 319, GFZ installed the same system with that used in continental drilling aboard Chikyu. High methane concentrations are clearly correlated with increased wood content in the cuttings. The system installation was, however, temporary and gas separator was moved during the expedition for a technical reason. In 2011, new mud gas monitoring system was installed aboard Chikyu and was used for the first time in Exp 337. The gas separator was placed on a newly branched bypass mud flow line, and the gas sample was sent to analysis unit equipped with methane carbon isotope analyzer in addition to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph. The data from the analytical instruments is converted to depth profiles by calculating the lag effects due to mud circulation. Exp 337 was carried out from July 26 to Sep 30, 2011, at offshore Shimokita peninsula, northeast Japan, targeting deep sub-seafloor biosphere in and around coal bed. Data from the hole C0020A, which was drilled to 2466 mbsf with riser drilling, provided insights into bio-geochemical process through the depth of the hole. In this presentation, we show the design of Chikyu's new mud gas monitoring system, with preliminary data from Exp 337.

  6. Operating experience review of an INL gas monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; DeWall, K. G.; Herring, J. S.

    2015-03-12

    This article describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored in the lab room are hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and both actual and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. In addition, some simple calculations are given to estimate the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  7. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  8. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  9. Comparison of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Measurements of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Smog Chamber Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, P. L.; Hunter, J. F.; Daumit, K. E.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Cross, E. S.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal vaporization-electron impact ionization (TV-EI) mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for understanding the chemistry of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and atmospheric aging. The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and recently developed Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are two instruments that utilize the same TV-EI technique. The ACSM trades the particle sizing capability, sensitivity, speed, and resolution of the AMS for simplicity, affordability, and ease of operation - enabling stand-alone continuous sampling for extended periods of time. Here we present results of an intercomparison between a high-resolution AMS and an ACSM. Three well-studied SOA formation chamber experiments were conducted: isoprene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, m-xylene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, and α-pinene ozonolysis under low NOx conditions. Comparisons between time-series and mass spectra from these experiments, along with positive matrix factorization analysis results demonstrate that the ACSM, while it does not provide the same level of detail as an AMS, is a suitable tool for exploring the chemistry of SOA formation in chamber studies.

  10. Pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Steveninck, William

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to +/- 3 center-dot 10(sup - 16) A over the environmental range of temperature (- 40 to + 40 C). Using a single 10(sup 11) Omega feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 center-dot 10(sup - 15) A to 3 center-dot 10(sup - 11) A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 mu R h(sup - 1)), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically approximately 27 pA at 1 mR h(sup - 1). A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale(sup TM) Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards.

  11. Combination of two Gas Electron Multipliers and a Micromegas as gain elements for a time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiola, S.; Ehlers, R. J.; Gu, S.; Harris, J. W.; Majka, R.; Mulligan, J. D.; Oliver, M.; Schambach, J.; Smirnov, N.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the properties of a novel combination of two Gas Electron Multipliers with a Micromegas for use as amplification devices in high-rate gaseous time projection chambers. The goal of this design is to minimize the buildup of space charge in the drift volume of such detectors in order to eliminate the standard gating grid and its resultant dead time, while preserving good tracking and particle identification performance. To characterize this micro-pattern gas detector configuration, we measured the positive ion back-flow and energy resolution at various element gains and electric fields, using a variety of gases, and additionally studied crosstalk effects and discharge rates. At a gain of 2000, this configuration achieves an ion back-flow below 0.4% and an energy resolution better than σ / E = 12 % for 55Fe X-rays.

  12. Gas dynamics and radiative heat transfer in IFE chambers with emphasis on the HYLIFE-II design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantzen, Caron Ann

    Gas dynamics in a heavy-ion inertial-fusion energy power plant have been modeled using the two-dimensional code, TSUNAMI. After fusion, approximately 2/3 of the yield energy will be given off as 14 Mev neutrons and the remaining third partitioned between target x-rays and debris energy. The chamber dynamic events which follow the fusion event occur over three distinct time periods, permitting separation of the underlying phenomena. Simulations of the HYLIFE-II reactor design were then run and results compared using both ideal-gas and partialionization equations of state. Results from a cylindrically symmetric simulation indicate that an initial, low density, burst of high-energy particles enters the final focus section of the heavy ion driver within 120mus of the blast and a second, larger, density rise occurs approximately 100mus later. Uncertainty in IFE target design motivated a parametric study of the x-ray to debris kinetic energy. Increasing this ratio lead to more jet ablation by target x-rays and, therefore, higher chamber densities. Chamber averaged temperature remained high, around 2.1 eV. Therefore, a subsequent study considered secondary radiation emitted by this hot vapor. The photon transport equation was applied in a finite difference model to both the target and ablation regions. Result indicated that radiation from the expanding target debris supplies 15MJ of energy to the liquid jets within the first 12mus of target ignition and becomes negligible beyond that time. In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target chamber using thick-liquid protection, placing liquid surfaces close to the fusion target helps reduce pumping cost and final-focus stand-off distance. An additional issue then becomes the impulse load delivered to protective jets by target debris and x-ray ablated material since this pressure load provides the most important boundary condition for the subsequent liquid hydraulic response, pocket disruption, droplet generation, and pocket

  13. Microfluidic chambers for monitoring leukocyte trafficking and humanized nano-proresolving medicines interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Caroline N.; Dalli, Jesmond; Dimisko, Laurie; Wong, Elisabeth; Serhan, Charles N.; Irimia, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Leukocyte trafficking plays a critical role in determining the progress and resolution of inflammation. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the role of leukocyte activation in inflammation, dissecting the interactions between different leukocyte subpopulations during trafficking is hampered by the complexity of in vivo conditions and the lack of detail of current in vitro assays. To measure the effects of the interactions between neutrophils and monocytes migrating in response to various chemoattractants, at single-cell resolution, we developed a microfluidic platform that replicates critical features of focal inflammation sites. We integrated an elastase assay into the focal chemotactic chambers (FCCs) of our device that enabled us to distinguish between phlogistic and nonphlogistic cell recruitment. We found that lipoxin A4 and resolvin D1, in solution or incorporated into nano–proresolving medicines, reduced neutrophil and monocyte trafficking toward leukotriene B4. Lipoxin A4 also reduced the elastase release from homogenous and heterogenous mixtures of neutrophils and monocytes. Surprisingly, the effect of resolvin D1 on heterogenous mixtures was antisynergistic, resulting in a transient spike in elastase activity, which was quickly terminated, and the degraded elastin removed by the leukocytes inside the FCCs. Therefore, the microfluidic assay provides a robust platform for measuring the effect of leukocyte interactions during trafficking and for characterizing the effects of inflammation mediators. PMID:23185003

  14. Microfluidic chambers for monitoring leukocyte trafficking and humanized nano-proresolving medicines interactions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Caroline N; Dalli, Jesmond; Dimisko, Laurie; Wong, Elisabeth; Serhan, Charles N; Irimia, Daniel

    2012-12-11

    Leukocyte trafficking plays a critical role in determining the progress and resolution of inflammation. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the role of leukocyte activation in inflammation, dissecting the interactions between different leukocyte subpopulations during trafficking is hampered by the complexity of in vivo conditions and the lack of detail of current in vitro assays. To measure the effects of the interactions between neutrophils and monocytes migrating in response to various chemoattractants, at single-cell resolution, we developed a microfluidic platform that replicates critical features of focal inflammation sites. We integrated an elastase assay into the focal chemotactic chambers (FCCs) of our device that enabled us to distinguish between phlogistic and nonphlogistic cell recruitment. We found that lipoxin A(4) and resolvin D1, in solution or incorporated into nano-proresolving medicines, reduced neutrophil and monocyte trafficking toward leukotriene B(4). Lipoxin A(4) also reduced the elastase release from homogenous and heterogenous mixtures of neutrophils and monocytes. Surprisingly, the effect of resolvin D1 on heterogenous mixtures was antisynergistic, resulting in a transient spike in elastase activity, which was quickly terminated, and the degraded elastin removed by the leukocytes inside the FCCs. Therefore, the microfluidic assay provides a robust platform for measuring the effect of leukocyte interactions during trafficking and for characterizing the effects of inflammation mediators.

  15. Automated chamber technique for gaseous flux measurements: Evaluation of a photoacoustic infrared spectrometer-trace gas analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamulki, S.; Jarvis, S. C.

    1999-03-01

    Experiments were made in order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a photoacoustic infrared trace gas analyzer (TGA) in conjunction with an automatic opening and closing chamber system developed for near-continuous (2 min intervals) soil gaseous flux measurements. Humidity interference tests on N2O, CH4, and CO2 concentrations measured by the TGA were carried out, and the results showed a linear interference, with correction factors of 3 × 10-5x, 1.9 × 10-3x and 4.4 × 10-3x(x = H2O vapor ppm), respectively. CO2 interference on N2O and CH4 signals were also linear, with average correction factors of 2.8 × 10-4x and 6 × 10-5 x (x = CO2 ppm), respectively. Laboratory intercomparisons between the TGA and GC measurements of N2O and CH4 standards showed good agreement (R2 > 0.993), indicating the accuracy of the TGA for measurement of these gases at concentrations up to 100 and 40 ppm N2O and CH4, respectively. The relatively rapid measurement time for up to five gases simultaneously in 2 min, linearity, and ease of operation of the TGA represent major advantages compared to gas chromatography (GC). The automated chamber system provides a continuous measurement of fluxes with minimum disturbance to the soil environment enclosed by the chamber and provides the means, for example, of quantifying diurnal variability. In situ measurements of N2O-N and CH4-C fluxes with a sensitivity <10 g ha-1 d-1 (11.6 ng m-2 s-1), as well as of CO2 and water vapor (H2O), can be measured by the TGA when used with the automated system, and fluxes at background levels (i.e., from unfertilized soils) can be determined.

  16. A smog chamber comparison of a microfluidic derivatization measurement of gas-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal with other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, X.; Lewis, A. C.; Richard, A.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Adams, T. J.; Ball, S. M.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Monks, P. S.; Peppe, S.; Ródenas García, M.; Sánchez, P.; Muñoz, A.

    2013-06-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatization technique has been developed to measure part per billion volume (ppbV) mixing ratios of gaseous glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY), and the method compared with other techniques in a smog chamber experiment. The method uses o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) as a derivatization reagent and a microfabricated planar glass micro-reactor comprising an inlet, gas and fluid splitting and combining channels, mixing junctions, and a heated capillary reaction microchannel. The enhanced phase contact area-to-volume ratio and the high heat transfer rate in the micro-reactor result in a fast and highly efficient derivatization reaction, generating an effluent stream ready for direct introduction to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). A linear response for GLY was observed over a calibration range 0.7 to 400 ppbV, and for MGLY of 1.2 to 300 ppbV, when derivatized under optimal reaction conditions. The method detection limits (MDLs) were 80 pptV and 200 pptV for GLY and MGLY respectively, calculated as 3 times the standard deviation of the S/N of the blank sample chromatograms. These MDLs are below or close to typical concentrations in clean ambient air. The feasibility of the technique was assessed by applying the methodology under controlled conditions to quantify of α-dicarbonyls formed during the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a large scale outdoor atmospheric simulation chamber (EUPHORE). Good general agreement was seen between microfluidic measurements and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR), Broad Band Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS) and a detailed photochemical chamber box modelling calculation for both GLY and MGLY. Less good agreement was found with Proton-Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) derivatization methods for MGLY measurement.

  17. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  18. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  19. Coke battery with 51-m{sup 3} furnace chambers and lateral supply of mixed gas

    SciTech Connect

    V.I. Rudyka; N.Y. Chebotarev; O.N. Surenskii; V.V. Derevich

    2009-07-15

    The basic approaches employed in the construction of coke battery 11A at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat are outlined. This battery includes 51.0-m{sup 3} furnaces and a dust-free coke-supply system designed by Giprokoks with lateral gas supply; it is heated exclusively by low-calorific mixed gas consisting of blast-furnace gas with added coke-oven gas. The 82 furnaces in the coke battery are divided into two blocks of 41. The gross coke output of the battery (6% moisture content) is 1140000 t/yr.

  20. Use of UAVs for greenhouse gas monitoring at hotspot emissions zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Allen, G.; Mead, M. I.; Hollingsworth, P.; Kabbabe, K.; Roberts, G.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring greenhouse gas emissions from individual localised sources, or "hotspots", is important for both compliance monitoring and validating the techniques used to compile national emission inventories. Frequently ground based techniques are used, such as flux chamber measurements, which suffer from issues regarding sample representativeness, and tracer release methods, which for area sources rely heavily on release site configuration. Obtaining vertically resolved data can enable the use of a mass balance method to calculate greenhouse gas fluxes. This has been achieved using remote sensing techniques, but this usually requires the deployment of expensive, bulky instrumentation. Here we evaluate the suitability of using UAVs, in conjunction with emerging miniaturised sensor technology, as a highly manoeuvrable, low cost alternative for measuring hotspot greenhouse gas emissions. We describe a case study performed at a UK landfill site, where greenhouse gas measurements made on board a fixed wing UAV were used to estimate the bulk CH4 emission rate. Details of the mass balance technique employed, along with the key uncertainties associated with it, are discussed. This work is part of an ongoing study at the University of Manchester into the application of UAVs in atmospheric research, with the rapid advancement in miniaturised sensor technology providing new opportunities for integrating trace gas measurement with existing lightweight UAVs.

  1. Biological monitoring of isocyanates and related amines. IV. 2,4- and 2,6-toluenediamine in hydrolysed plasma and urine after test-chamber exposure of humans to 2,4- and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate.

    PubMed

    Brorson, T; Skarping, G; Sangö, C

    1991-01-01

    Two men were exposed to toluene diisocyanate (TDI) atmospheres at three different air concentrations (ca. 25, 50 and 70 micrograms/m3). The TDI atmospheres were generated by a gas-phase permeation method, and the exposures were performed in an 8-m3 stainless-steel test chamber. The effective exposure period was 4 h. The isomeric composition of the air in the test chamber was 30% 2,4-TDI and 70% 2,6-TDI. The concentration of TDI in air of the test chamber was determined by an HPLC method using the 9-(N-methyl-amino-methyl)-anthracene reagent and by a continuous-monitoring filter-tape instrument. Following the hydrolysis of plasma and urine, the related amines, 2,4-toluenediamine (2,4-TDA) and 2,6-toluenediamine (2,6-TDA), were determined as pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) derivatives by capillary gas chromatography using selected ion monitoring (SIM) in the electron-impact mode. In plasma, 2,4- and 2,6-TDA showed a rapid-phase elimination half-time of ca. 2-5 h, and that for the slow phase was greater than 6 days. A connection was observed between concentrations of 2,4- and 2,6-TDI in air and the levels of 2,4- and 2,6-TDA in plasma. The cumulated amount of 2,4-TDA excreted in the urine over 24 h was ca. 15%-19% of the estimated inhaled dose of 2,4-TDI, and that of 2,6-TDA was ca. 17%-23% of the inhaled dose of 2,6-TDI. A connection was found between the cumulated (24-h) urinary excretion of 2,4- and 2,6-TDA and the air concentration of 2,4- and 2,6-TDI in the test chamber.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1660449

  2. Headspace stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of the diluted vapor phase of cigarette smoke delivered to an in vitro cell exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Morin, André; Waldron, Karen C

    2011-01-14

    Advanced smoke generation systems, such as the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine used in combination with the BAT exposure chamber, allow for the generation, dilution and delivery of fresh cigarette smoke to cell or tissue cultures for in vitro cell culture analyses. Recently, our group confirmed that the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) is a reliable tool to generate and deliver repeatable and reproducible exposure concentrations of whole smoke to in vitro cultures. However, the relationship between dose and diluted smoke components found within the exposure chamber has not been characterized. The current study focused on the development of a headspace stir bar sorptive extraction (HSSE) method to chemically characterize some of the vapor phase components of cigarette smoke generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) and collected within a cell culture exposure chamber. The method was based on passive sampling within the chamber by HSSE using a Twister™ stir bar. Following exposure, sorbed analytes were recovered using a thermal desorption unit and a cooled injection system coupled to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry for identification and quantification. Using the HSSE method, sixteen compounds were identified. The desorption parameters were assessed using ten reference compounds and the following conditions led to the maximal response: desorption temperature of 200°C for 2 min with cryofocussing temperature of -75°C. During transfer of the stir bars to the thermal desorption system, significant losses of analytes were observed as a function of time; therefore, the exposure-to-desorption time interval was kept at the minimum of 10±0.5 min. Repeatability of the HSSE method was assessed by monitoring five reference compounds present in the vapor phase (10.1-12.9% RSD) and n-butyl acetate, the internal standard (18.5% RSD). The smoke dilution precision was found to be 17.2, 6.2 and 11.7% RSD for exposure concentrations of 1, 2 and 5% (v/v) cigarette vapor phase in air

  3. Software to Control and Monitor Gas Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Curley, Charles; Gore, Eric; Floyd, David; Lucas, Damion

    2012-01-01

    This software package interfaces with various gas stream devices such as pressure transducers, flow meters, flow controllers, valves, and analyzers such as a mass spectrometer. The software provides excellent user interfacing with various windows that provide time-domain graphs, valve state buttons, priority- colored messages, and warning icons. The user can configure the software to save as much or as little data as needed to a comma-delimited file. The software also includes an intuitive scripting language for automated processing. The configuration allows for the assignment of measured values or calibration so that raw signals can be viewed as usable pressures, flows, or concentrations in real time. The software is based on those used in two safety systems for shuttle processing and one volcanic gas analysis system. Mass analyzers typically have very unique applications and vary from job to job. As such, software available on the market is usually inadequate or targeted on a specific application (such as EPA methods). The goal was to develop powerful software that could be used with prototype systems. The key problem was to generalize the software to be easily and quickly reconfigurable. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the prior art consists of two primary methods. The first method was to utilize Lab- VIEW and a commercial data acquisition system. This method required rewriting code for each different application and only provided raw data. To obtain data in engineering units, manual calculations were required. The second method was to utilize one of the embedded computer systems developed for another system. This second method had the benefit of providing data in engineering units, but was limited in the number of control parameters.

  4. A smog chamber comparison of a microfluidic derivatisation measurement of gas-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal with other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, xiaobing; Lewis, Alastair; Rickard, Andrew R.; Baeza-Romero, Maria Teresa; Adams, Thomas J.; Ball, Stephen M.; Goodall, Iain C. A.; Monks, Paul S.; Peppe, Salvatore; Ródenas García, Milagros; Sánchez, Pilar; Muñoz, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatisation technique has been developed to measure part per billion (ppbV) mixing ratios of gaseous glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY), and the method is compared with other techniques in a smog chamber experiment. The method uses o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) as a derivatisation reagent and a microfabricated planar glass micro-reactor comprising an inlet, gas and fluid splitting and combining channels, mixing junctions, and a heated capillary reaction microchannel. The enhanced phase contact area-to-volume ratio and the high heat transfer rate in the micro-reactor result in a fast and highly efficient derivatisation reaction, generating an effluent stream ready for direct introduction to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). A linear response for GLY was observed over a calibration range 0.7 to 400 ppbV, and for MGLY of 1.2 to 300 ppbV, when derivatised under optimal reaction conditions. The analytical performance shows good accuracy (6.6 % for GLY and 7.5 % for MGLY), suitable precision (< 12.0 %) and method detection limits (MDLs) (75 pptV for GLY and 185 pptV for MGLY) with a time resolution of 30 minutes. These MDLs are below or close to typical concentrations of these compounds observed in ambient air. The microfluidic derivatisation technique would be appropriate for ambient α-dicarbonyl measurements in a range of field environments based on its performance in a large-scale outdoor atmospheric simulation chamber (EUPHORE). The feasibility of the technique was assessed by applying the methodology to quantify of α-dicarbonyls formed during the photo-oxidation of isoprene in the EUPHORE chamber. Good correlations were found between microfluidic measurements and Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (FTIR) with the correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.84, Broad Band Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS) (r2 = 0.75), solid phase micro extraction (SPME) (r2 = 0.89), and a

  5. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition chamber and process with multiple gas inlets

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Povolny, Henry S.

    2004-06-29

    A thin film deposition method uses a vacuum confinement cup that employs a dense hot filament and multiple gas inlets. At least one reactant gas is introduced into the confinement cup both near and spaced apart from the heated filament. An electrode inside the confinement cup is used to generate plasma for film deposition. The method is used to deposit advanced thin films (such as silicon based thin films) at a high quality and at a high deposition rate.

  6. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  7. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  8. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca; Johnson, Darren; Neubauer, Scott C; Raynie, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per-area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 y-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 y-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 y-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 y-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  9. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  13. Remote Real-Time Monitoring of Subsurface Landfill Gas Migration

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Cormac; Doherty, Aiden R.; Beirne, Stephen; Collins, Fiachra; Foley, Colum; Healy, John; Kiernan, Breda M.; Lee, Hyowon; Maher, Damien; Orpen, Dylan; Phelan, Thomas; Qiu, Zhengwei; Zhang, Kirk; Gurrin, Cathal; Corcoran, Brian; O’Connor, Noel E.; Smeaton, Alan F.; Diamond, Dermot

    2011-01-01

    The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months. PMID:22163975

  14. Remote real-time monitoring of subsurface landfill gas migration.

    PubMed

    Fay, Cormac; Doherty, Aiden R; Beirne, Stephen; Collins, Fiachra; Foley, Colum; Healy, John; Kiernan, Breda M; Lee, Hyowon; Maher, Damien; Orpen, Dylan; Phelan, Thomas; Qiu, Zhengwei; Zhang, Kirk; Gurrin, Cathal; Corcoran, Brian; O'Connor, Noel E; Smeaton, Alan F; Diamond, Dermot

    2011-01-01

    The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months. PMID:22163975

  15. Consideration of real gas effects and condensation in a spray-combustion rocket-thrust-chamber design tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M.; Kniesner, B.; Knab, O.

    2011-10-01

    For the prediction of hot gas side heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers, Astrium Space Transportation (ST) uses the second generation multiphase Navier-Stokes solver Rocflam-II. To account for real-gas and condensation effects, pressure-dependent and even multiphase fluid data are included in the chemistry tables used by the code. Thus, the changing fluid properties near the two-phase region as well as transformation from gaseous to liquid and even solid state are reflected properly. Heat flux measurements for a dedicated subscale test campaign with strongly cooled walls show a clearly increasing heat load as soon as the combustion gases condense at the wall, due to the released latent heat of condensation. Corresponding coupled Rocflam-II/CFX simulations show a good quantitative agreement in heat flux for load cases with and without condensation, showing the ability of the code to correctly simulate flows in the real-gas and even inside the two-phase region.

  16. Silicon microring refractometric sensor for atmospheric CO(2) gas monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mi, Guangcan; Horvath, Cameron; Aktary, Mirwais; Van, Vien

    2016-01-25

    We report a silicon photonic refractometric CO(2) gas sensor operating at room temperature and capable of detecting CO(2) gas at atmospheric concentrations. The sensor uses a novel functional material layer based on a guanidine polymer derivative, which is shown to exhibit reversible refractive index change upon absorption and release of CO(2) gas molecules, and does not require the presence of humidity to operate. By functionalizing a silicon microring resonator with a thin layer of the polymer, we could detect CO(2) gas concentrations in the 0-500ppm range with a sensitivity of 6 × 10(-9) RIU/ppm and a detection limit of 20ppm. The microring transducer provides a potential integrated solution in the development of low-cost and compact CO(2) sensors that can be deployed as part of a sensor network for accurate environmental monitoring of greenhouse gases.

  17. A smog chamber comparison of a microfluidic derivatisation measurement of gas-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal with other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, X.; Lewis, A. C.; Rickard, A. R.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Adams, T. J.; Ball, S. M.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Monks, P. S.; Peppe, S.; Ródenas García, M.; Sánchez, P.; Muñoz, A.

    2014-02-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatisation technique has been developed to measure part per billion (ppbV) mixing ratios of gaseous glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY), and the method is compared with other techniques in a smog chamber experiment. The method uses o-(2, 3, 4, 5, 6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) as a derivatisation reagent and a microfabricated planar glass micro-reactor comprising an inlet, gas and fluid splitting and combining channels, mixing junctions, and a heated capillary reaction microchannel. The enhanced phase contact area-to-volume ratio and the high heat transfer rate in the micro-reactor resulted in a fast and highly efficient derivatisation reaction, generating an effluent stream ready for direct introduction to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). A linear response for GLY was observed over a calibration range 0.7 to 400 ppbV, and for MGLY of 1.2 to 300 ppbV, when derivatised under optimal reaction conditions. The analytical performance shows good accuracy (6.6% for GLY and 7.5% for MGLY), suitable precision (<12.0%) with method detection limits (MDLs) of 75 pptV for GLY and 185 pptV for MGLY, with a time resolution of 30 min. These MDLs are below or close to typical concentrations of these compounds observed in ambient air. The feasibility of the technique was assessed by applying the methodology to quantify α-dicarbonyls formed during the photo-oxidation of isoprene in the EUPHORE chamber. Good correlations were found between microfluidic measurements and Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (FTIR) with a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.84, Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS) (r2 = 0.75), solid phase micro extraction (SPME) (r2 = 0.89), and a photochemical chamber box modelling calculation (r2 = 0.79) for GLY measurements. For MGLY measurements, the microfluidic technique showed good agreement with BBCEAS (r2 = 0.87), SPME (r2 = 0.76), and the modeling simulation (r2 = 0.83), FTIR

  18. Characterization of SnO2 ceramic gas sensor for exhaust gas monitoring of SVE process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Won; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Young

    2004-03-01

    A Figaro-type gas sensor system was investigated for the monitoring of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the exhaust gas from a soil vapor extraction (SVE) process. Benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX), and their mixtures, were tested as representative contaminants. Reasonably good correlation factors >0.98 were obtained between the GC analyses and the sensor responses for each component, and for the total gas concentrations. Although the composition of the exhaust gas from SVE process, as well as the amount of each component, change with time, the sensor can be used to estimate the residual amount of contaminants by measuring the total concentrations in the exhaust gas. The sensor can be utilized as a valuable tool for the monitoring of SVE process by indicating when the operation to remediate a contaminated site should be stopped. The proposed ceramic gas sensor system may be a good alternative to existing methods, because it can satisfy the essential monitoring necessities of SVE processes, and has many advantages over other fully equipped instrumentation, as a cost-effective device, with long-term monitoring stability.

  19. New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Boyer, Brian D.; Hill, Thomas R.; Macarthur, Duncan W.; Marks, Thomas; Moss, Calvin E.; Sheppard, Gregory A.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2008-06-13

    The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

  20. Preliminary Design of the Gas Cherenkov Muon Monitors for LBNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Craig

    2011-10-01

    I am performing preliminary research for a future neutrino experiment at Fermilab called the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). More specifically, I am determining the best geometry for the gas Cherenkov muon monitors. The purpose of the monitors is to measure, at least indirectly, the energy spectrum of the muons in the beam. I use computer software to simulate a realistic muon beam going through the monitors. Muons in the particle beam that go through the monitors emit Cherenkov radiation, and this light is detected by PMTs. I then plot the number of photons detected as a function of the muon's energy that emitted the detected photons. My goal is to have a very narrow peak on this plot. This peak shifts depending on the simulated index of refraction. The best design for the monitors is an L-shaped pipe filled with Freon gas of adjustable density. It is the simplest and cheapest to build of all the designs I tried, and it can accurately recover the muon energy spectrum based solely on the total number of photons detected in each pulse: using simulation data from 5 indices of refraction, I can recover the muon energy spectrum (within the uncertainties) of a beam that has 5 discrete muon energies.

  1. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA. PMID:27587174

  2. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA.

  3. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Sylla, F.; Lambert, G.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 1019 cm-3 range well suited for LWFA.

  4. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

    2005-11-01

    The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

  5. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-10-01

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions in a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.

  6. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-08-15

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions inmore » a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Lastly, simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.« less

  7. A Modern Automatic Chamber Technique as a Powerful Tool for CH4 and CO2 Flux Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, M.; Christensen, T. R.; Lund, M.; Pirk, N.

    2014-12-01

    A number of similar systems were used for monitoring of CH4 and CO2 exchange by the automatic chamber method in a range of different ecosystems. The measurements were carried out in northern Sweden (mountain birch forest near Abisko, 68°N, 2004-2010), southern Sweden (forest bog near Hässleholm, 56°N, 2007-2014), northeastern Greenland (arctic fen in Zackenberg valley, 74°N, 2005-2014), southwestern Greenland (fen near Nuuk, 64°N, 2007-2014), central Svalbard (arctic fen near Longyearbyen, 78°N, 2011-2014). Those in total 37 seasons of measurements delivered not only a large amount of valuable flux data, including a few novel findings (Mastepanov et al., Nature, 2008; Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013), but also valuable experience with implementation of the automatic chamber technique using modern analytical instruments and computer technologies. A range of high resolution CH4 analysers (DLT-100, FMA, FGGA - Los Gatos Research), CO2 analyzers (EGM-4, SBA-4 - PP Systems; Li-820 - Li-Cor Biosciences), as well as Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer (Los Gatos Research) has shown to be suitable for precise measurements of fluxes, from as low as 0.1 mg CH4 m-1 d-1 (wintertime measurements at Zackenberg, unpublished) to as high as 2.4 g CH4 m-1 d-1 (autumn burst 2007 at Zackenberg, Mastepanov et al., Nature, 2008). Some of these instruments had to be customized to accommodate 24/7 operation in harsh arctic conditions. In this presentation we will explain some of these customizations. High frequency of concentration measurements (1 Hz in most cases) provides a unique opportunity for quality control of flux calculations; on the other hand, this enormous amount of data can be analyzed only using highly automated algorithms. A specialized software package was developed and improved through the years of measurements and data processing. This software automates the data flow from raw concentration data of different instruments and sensors and various status records

  8. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  9. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Lönn, G.; Schobesberger, S.; Dal Maso, M.; Trimborn, A.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-06-01

    High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night between spring and autumn in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C10H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and

  10. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Lönn, G.; Schobesberger, S.; Dal Maso, M.; Trimborn, A.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-02-01

    High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night during spring and summer in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C105H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and

  11. Gas chromatograph monitors for VCM, automatically alerts emergency team

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C.; Ormond, D.L.

    1986-09-01

    Delaware City, located on the Delaware River with a metropolitan population of around 100,000, has played host to numerous companies in the CPI. The community has witnessed the expansion to a current level of eleven plants and a large oil refinery. Identified by the DNREC as possibly the most serious of recent problems was the potential for release of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) gas. VCM is a recognized carcinogen and is considered a hazardous waste and a priority pollutant by the EPA. A Citizens' Advisory Committee recommended that a permanent air monitor for detection of VCM be strategically located in Delaware City. It needed to be capable of detecting VCM at 50 ppb and utilize a suitable alarm procedure to alert the public. The committee also recommended the use of a mobile monitor equipped to track a VCM release which could by-pass the Delaware City monitor and threaten nearby residents during certain wind conditions. A gas chromatography with photoionization detector (PID) was selected based on the required specifications and on commercial availability. The Delaware City firehouse was selected as the most publicly acceptable location with sufficient security and unobstructed sampling at an adequate height. The air in Delaware City has been monitored continuously since December 9, 1985. As of April, 1986, the instrument has completed, 30,000 combined sample and calibration runs. No unusual problems have been encountered with maintenance or with anomalous data. It has required only routine service, surpassing the manufacturer's guarantees for parts and service.

  12. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors

    PubMed Central

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel; Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO3 nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (~20 ppb) with short response (10–15 s) and recovery times (35–70 s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80–90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques. PMID:22790702

  13. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel; Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-08-13

    Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO(3) nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (∼20ppb) with short response (10-15s) and recovery times (35-70s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80-90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques. PMID:22790702

  14. An MLC-based version for the ecliptic method for the determination of backscatter into the beam monitor chambers in photon beams of medical accelerators.

    PubMed

    Nelli, Flavio Enrico

    2016-03-01

    A very simple method to measure the effect of the backscatter from secondary collimators into the beam monitor chambers in linear accelerators equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) is presented here. The backscatter to the monitor chambers from the upper jaws of the secondary collimator was measured on three beam-matched linacs by means of three methods: this new methodology, the ecliptic method, and assessing the variation of the beam-on time per monitor unit with dose rate feedback disabled. This new methodology was used to assess the backscatter characteristics of asymmetric over-traveling jaws. Excellent agreement between the backscatter values measured using the new methodology introduced here and the ones obtained using the other two methods was established. The experimental values reported here differ by less than 1% from published data. The sensitivity of this novel technique allowed differences in backscatter due to the same opening of the jaws, when placed at different positions on the beam path, to be resolved. The introduction of the ecliptic method has made the determination of the backscatter to the monitor chambers an easy procedure. The method presented here for machines equipped with MLCs makes the determination of backscatter to the beam monitor chambers even easier, and suitable to characterize linacs equipped with over-traveling asymmetric secondary collimators. This experimental procedure could be simply implemented to fully characterize the backscatter output factor constituent when detailed dosimetric modeling of the machine's head is required. The methodology proved to be uncomplicated, accurate and suitable for clinical or experimental environments. PMID:26671445

  15. Long-term monitoring of marine gas leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spickenbom, Kai; Faber, Eckhard; Poggenburg, Jürgen; Seeger, Christian; Furche, Markus

    2010-05-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations is one of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study. Although offshore operations are significantly more expensive than comparable onshore operations, the growing public resistance against onshore CCS projects makes sub-seabed storage a promising option. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is always the possibility of leakage from the reservoir. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. The basic design of the monitoring system builds on our experience in volcano monitoring. Early prototypes were composed of a raft floating on the surface of a mud volcano, carrying sensors for CO2 flux and concentration, data storage and transmission, and power supply by battery-buffered solar panels. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, connected by a flexible tube. This setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. A system for unattended long-term monitoring in a marine environment has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system consists of a funnel-shaped gas collector, a sensor head and pressure housings for electronics and power supply. Since this setup is inexpensive, it can be deployed in numbers to cover larger areas. By addition of multi-channel data loggers, data

  16. 78 FR 25392 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule: Revision to Best Available Monitoring Method Request Submission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    .... Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal Register GHG greenhouse gas GHGRP Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program CO... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 98 RIN 2060-AR74 Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule: Revision to Best Available Monitoring... Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule must submit requests for use of best available monitoring methods to...

  17. Long-term flow monitoring of submarine gas emanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spickenbom, K.; Faber, E.; Poggenburg, J.; Seeger, C.

    2009-04-01

    One of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study is the sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is the possibility of leaks from the reservoirs. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. Technically, however, these systems are not limited to CO2 but can be used for monitoring of any free gas emission (bubbles) on the seafloor. The basic design of the gas flow sensor system was derived from former prototypes developed for monitoring CO2 and CH4 on mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan. This design was composed of a raft floating on the surface above the gas vent to collect the bubbles. Sensors for CO2 flux and concentration and electronics for data storage and transmission were mounted on the raft, together with battery-buffered solar panels for power supply. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, which is then guided above water level through a flexible tube. Besides some technical problems (condensed water in the tube, movement of the buoys due to waves leading to biased measurement of flow rates), this setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. To allow unattended long-term monitoring in a submarine environment, such a system has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system

  18. Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring. A clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Paolillo, G; Tosoni, A; Mariani, M A; Venturino, M

    1994-01-01

    Miniaturized sensors, based upon the principles of optical fluorescence, can measure in vivo the pH, pCO2 value and pO2 value of blood. In this report we studied continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring in 27 patients undergoing cardiac surgery (no. 16 coronary artery by-pass grafting, no. 2 valvular surgery) and major vascular surgery (no. 9 abdominal aortic aneurysms). Total duration of continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring was 677 hours, with a ratio of 25.0 +/- 14.8 hours/patient (range 4-96 hours). The in vitro values of pH, pCO2 and pO2 were compared to simultaneous records from the fiberoptic sensor for each of the 283 arterial blood gas samples obtained, by means of linear regression and Bland-Altman method, in order to test the correlation and the agreement between the two methods of measuring. For pH average bias was -0.023 and intersensor precision was 0.028, with a strong correlation (R = 0.92; p < 0.001) and agreement. For pCO2 the average bias was 0.91 and the inter-sensor precision was 2.65, with a slight decrease in correlation (R = 0.89; p < 0.001) and agreement. For pO2 average bias was -2.69 and the intersensor precision was 12.16, with a strong correlation (R = 0.97; p < 0.001) and agreement. In addition, we tested the reliability of the system for values of pO2 above 100 mmHg and we found a strong correlation (R = 0.96; p20.001) and agreement even for these clinical conditions, largely out of physiologic parameters. This study demonstrates the feasibility and reliability of continuous intra-arterial three-component PB 3300 (Puritan Bennett) blood gas monitoring. PMID:7800182

  19. Experimental Study on Pressure Distribution in Upper Flow Path and Gas Blast Angle of Nozzle in Tandem-puffer Interrupting Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkai, Takeshi; Udagawa, Keisuke; Suzuki, Katsumi

    Pressure measurement with insulation tubes is successfully performed at the nozzle throat, in the upper flow path and in the thermal room for the two types of tandem-puffer (self-blast chamber) adopting different gas blast angle of nozzle. The pressure rise mechanism with auto-expansion effect of arc is discussed. The pressure rise in the upper flow path and the thermal chamber is driven by propagation of pressure wave from the arc to the thermal chamber. And several types of oscillation caused by rarefaction wave after the pressure wave and multi-reflection of the pressure wave are superposed on the pressure profile. Finally, an influence of the gas blast angle of the nozzle on cooling of stagnation point (thermal interruption capability) is explained based on the results of these measurement and 2-dimensional thermo-fluid analysis. A little larger gas blast angle of the nozzle leads to stronger gas flow to the stagnation point caused by a little larger resistance to the pressure wave and the gas flow.

  20. Time-of-flight ERD with a 200 mm2 Si3N4 window gas ionization chamber energy detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, Jaakko; Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Low energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection work has been carried out in Jyväskylä since 2009 using home made timing detectors, a silicon energy detector and a timestamping data acquisition setup forming a time-of-flight-energy telescope. In order to improve the mass resolution of the setup a new energy detector was designed to replace the silicon solid state detector, which suffered from radiation damage and had poor resolution for heavy recoils. In this paper the construction and operation of an isobutane filled gas ionization chamber with a 14 × 14 mm2 100 nm thick silicon nitride window are described. In addition to greatly improved energy resolution for heavy ions, the detector is also able to detect hydrogen recoils simultaneously in the energy range of 100-1000 keV. Additionally the detector has position sensitivity by means of timing measurement, which can be performed without compromising the performance of the detector in any other way. The achieved position sensitivity improves the depth resolution near the surface.

  1. Visualization of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) Fuel Liquid Length and Soot Formation in the Constant Volume Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimov, Ulugbek; Kim, Ki-Seong

    In this research, GTL spray combustion was visualized in an optically accessible quiescent constant-volume combustion chamber. The results were compared with the spray combustion of diesel fuel. Fast-speed photography with direct laser sheet illumination was used to determine the fuel liquid-phase length, and shadowgraph photography was used to determine the distribution of the sooting area in the fuel jet. The results showed that the fuel liquid-phase length of GTL fuel jets stabilized at about 20-22mm from the injector orifice and mainly depended on the ambient gas temperature and fuel volatility. GTL had a slightly shorter liquid length than that of the diesel fuel. This tendency was also maintained when multiple injection strategy was applied. The penetration of the tip of the liquid-phase fuel during pilot injection was a little shorter than the penetration during main injection. The liquid lengths during single and main injections were identical. In the case of soot formation, the results showed that soot formation was mainly affected by air-fuel mixing, and had very weak dependence on fuel volatility.

  2. Atmospheric degradation of lindane and 1,3-dichloroacetone in the gas phase. Studies at the EUPHORE simulation chamber.

    PubMed

    Vera, Teresa; Borrás, Esther; Chen, Jianmin; Coscollá, Clara; Daële, Véronique; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Ródenas, Milagros; Sidebottom, Howard; Sun, Xiaomin; Yusá, Vicent; Zhang, Xue; Muñoz, Amalia

    2015-11-01

    The gas-phase degradation of lindane (γ-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane) towards OH radical was investigated under atmospheric conditions at the large outdoor European simulation chamber (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. The rate coefficient for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with lindane was measured using a conventional relative rate technique leading to a value of kOH(lindane)=(6.4±1.6)×10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 300±5 K and atmospheric pressure. The results suggest that the tropospheric lifetime of lindane with respect to OH radicals is approximately 20 days. The product distribution studies on the OH-initiated oxidation of lindane provided evidence that the major initial carbon-containing oxidation product is pentachlorocyclohexanone. 1,3-Dichloroacetone was employed as a model compound for pentachlorocyclohexanone, and an investigation of its photolysis and reaction with OH radicals under atmospheric conditions was carried out. The data indicate that the atmospheric degradation of pentachlorocyclohexanone would be relatively rapid, and would not form persistent organic compounds. Theoretical study was also employed to calculate possible degradation pathways. Mechanism for reaction of lindane with OH radicals is proposed, and C-Cl bond cleavage is discussed. OH abstraction is considered to be a reasonable way for Cl to escape during degradation. The atmospheric implications of the use of lindane as an insecticide are discussed.

  3. Gas-exchange chamber analysis of elemental mercury deposition/emission to alluvium, ore, and mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-07-01

    Deposition of mercury (Hg) from the atmosphere is an important source of this contaminant to terrestrial ecosystems. Once deposited, all forms of Hg can be retained or emitted back to the atmosphere. Distinguishing between volatilization of geogenic or indigenous Hg and that deposited from the atmosphere is difficult. Field flux measurements in the general area of two industrial scale gold mining operations, showed local deposition of Hg emitted from point and nonpoint sources, and subsequent re-emission. The work presented in this paper investigated deposition/emission of elemental Hg to and from alluvium and two mine materials before, during, and after exposure to high air concentrations, for both wet and dry conditions, using a laboratory gas exchange chamber and a Hg permeation source. In general, results showed a range in mean elemental Hg deposition velocities ranging from 0.13 to 0.46 cm s(-1) that varied with material. A significant influence of atmospheric ozone (O3) on flux was observed that depended on the material and whether wet or dry. A synergistic relationship existed between O3 and light promoting Hg flux, and flux was also influenced by material grain size, chemistry, and primary mineralogy.

  4. Active Geophysical Monitoring in Oil and Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, A.; Calvert, R.

    2005-12-01

    Effective reservoir management is a Holy Grail of the oil and gas industry. Quest for new technologies is never ending but most often they increase effectiveness and decrease the costs. None of the newcomers proved to be a silver bullet in such a key metric of the industry as average oil recovery factor. This factor is still around 30 %, meaning that 70 % of hydrocarbon reserves are left in the ground in places where we already have expensive infrastructure (platforms, wells) to extract them. Main reason for this inefficiency is our inability to address realistic reservoir complexity. Most of the time we fail to properly characterize our reservoirs before production. As a matter of fact, one of the most important parameters -- permeability -- can not be mapped from remote geophysical methods. Therefore we always start production blind even though reservoir state before production is the simplest one. Once first oil is produced, we greatly complicate the things and quickly become unable to estimate the state and condition of the reservoir (fluid, pressures, faults etc) or oilfield hardware (wells, platforms, pumps) to make a sound next decision in the chain of reservoir management. Our modeling capabilities are such that if we know true state of the things - we can make incredibly accurate predictions and make extremely efficient decisions. Thus the bottleneck is our inability to properly describe the state of the reservoirs in real time. Industry is starting to recognize active monitoring as an answer to this critical issue. We will highlight industry strides in active geophysical monitoring from well to reservoir scale. It is worth noting that when one says ``monitoring" production technologists think of measuring pressures at the wellhead or at the pump, reservoir engineers think of measuring extracted volumes and pressures, while geophysicist may think of change in elastic properties. We prefer to think of monitoring as to measuring those parameters of the

  5. Calculation of gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber and in the air-gas channel of a gas-turbine unit by data of acceptance tests in accordance with ISO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, A. G.; Karpunin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a high accuracy method enabling performance of the calculation of real values of the initial temperature of a gas turbine unit (GTU), i.e., the gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber, in a situation where manufacturers do not disclose this information. The features of the definition of the initial temperature of the GTU according to ISO standards were analyzed. It is noted that the true temperatures for high-temperature GTUs is significantly higher than values determined according to ISO standards. A computational procedure for the determination of gas temperatures in the air-gas channel of the gas turbine and cooling air consumptions over blade rims is proposed. As starting equations, the heat balance equation and the flow mixing equation for the combustion chamber are assumed. Results of acceptance GTU tests according to ISO standards and statistical dependencies of required cooling air consumptions on the gas temperature and the blade metal are also used for calculations. An example of the calculation is given for one of the units. Using a developed computer program, the temperatures in the air-gas channel of certain GTUs are calculated, taking into account their design features. These calculations are performed on the previously published procedure for the detailed calculation of the cooled gas turbine subject to additional losses arising because of the presence of the cooling system. The accuracy of calculations by the computer program is confirmed by conducting verification calculations for the GTU of the Mitsubishi Comp. and comparing results with published data of the company. Calculation data for temperatures were compared with the experimental data and the characteristics of the GTU, and the error of the proposed method is estimated.

  6. Application of infrared spectroscopy to monitoring gas insulated high-voltage equipment: electrode material-dependent SF(6) decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kurte, R; Beyer, C; Heise, H M; Klockow, D

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride is a chemically inert gas which is used in gas insulated substations (GIS) and other high-voltage equipment, leading to a significant enhancement of apparatus lifetime and reductions in installation size and maintenance requirements compared to conventional air insulated substations. However, component failures due to aging of the gas through electrical discharges may occur, and on-site monitoring for risk assessment is needed. Infrared spectroscopy was used for the analysis of gaseous by-products generated from electrical discharges in sulfur hexafluoride gas. An infrared monitoring system was developed using a micro-cell coupled to an FTIR spectrometer by silver halide fibers. Partial least-squares calibration was applied by using a limited number of optimally selected spectral variables. Emphasis was placed on the determination of main decomposition products, such as SOF(2), SOF(4), and SO(2)F(2). Besides the different electrical conditions, the material of the plane counter electrode of the discharge chamber was also varied between silver, aluminum, copper, tungsten, or tungsten/copper alloy. For the spark experiments the point electrode was the same material as chosen for the plane electrode, whereas for partial discharges a stainless steel needle was employed. Complementary investigations on the chemical composition within the solid counter electrode material by secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) were also carried out. Under sparking conditions, the electrode material plays an important role in the decomposition rates of the gas-phase, but no relevant material dependence could be observed under partial discharge conditions. PMID:12185577

  7. Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liebowitz, B.

    1997-07-01

    Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

  8. Nuclear monitoring by nonradioactive noble gas sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The perceived importance of measuring the xenon and krypton isotopics of nuclear activities has increased substantially in recent years. We have performed a systems analysis and theoretical simulation of the production, atmospheric dispersion, and isotopic abundances of noble-gas fission products, addressing several questions of interest, including: the relative isotopic variation as a function of nuclear fuel composition, reactor operational history, reactor type, distance from stack, and ambient meteorological conditions. Of particular importance in this analysis was the question of back-calculating process parameters of interest given noble-gas isotopic data. An analysis of the effect of measurement uncertainties was also performed. The results of these analyses indicate that this monitoring concept should be experimentally feasible.

  9. Residual-gas-ionization beam profile monitors in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Fite, J.; Jao, S.; Trabocchi, C.

    2010-05-02

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) are in RHIC to measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings. These work by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last two years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  10. Laser Spectroscopy Based Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The timing was right in the “evolution” of low power tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) to design a spacecraft cabin air monitor around technology being developed at a small company funded by SBIR grants. NASA Centers had been monitoring their progress hoping that certain key gaps in the long term gas monitoring development roadmap could be filled by TDLS. The first iteration of a monitor for multiple gases called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM) which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, as well as temperature and pressure. In January 2013, the ISS Program being particularly interested in ammonia funded a technology demonstration of MGM. The project was a joint effort between Vista Photonics for the sensor, NASA-JSC for project management and laboratory calibration, and Nanoracks for the enclosure and payload certification/integration. Nanoracks was selected in order to use their new experimental infrastructure located in an EXPRESS rack in the JEM. The MGM enclosure has multiple power supply options including 5VDC USB interface to the Nanoracks Frame, 28VDC Express Rack power and internal rechargeable batteries. MGM was calibrated at NASA-JSC in July 2013, delivered to ISS on 37 Soyuz in November 2013 and was installed and activated in February 2014. MGM resided in the Nanoracks Frame making continuous measurements the majority of the time, but also spent a day in Node 3 on battery power, and a month in the US Lab Module on 28VDC power, as part of the demonstration. Data was downloaded via Nanoracks on roughly a weekly basis. Comparisons were made with data from the Major Constituents Analyzer (MCA) which draws and analyzes air from JEM and other modules several times per hour. A crewmember challenged the carbon dioxide channel by breathing into the intake upon startup, and challenged the ammonia channel later using a commercial ammonia inhalant. Many interesting phenomena in the cabin atmosphere were detected during the tech demo

  11. Simulating the Dissolution of Gas Hydrates at the Deep Sea Floor in a Pressure Chamber Under Controlled P/T and Shear Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, M.; Holscher, B.; Rehder, G.; Wallmann, K.; Steffen, H.; Gust, G.

    2003-04-01

    We report on the investigation of the dissolution kinetics of natural gas hydrates in a laboratory pressure chamber. The kinetics of gas hydrate dissociation, where gas hydrates are destabilised when temperature increases, pressure decreases, or chemical agents attack and destroy the hydrate matrix, have been intensively studied in the context of technical applications. However, the abundance and distribution of gas hydrates outcropping from the sea floor are limited by dissolution through contact with methane-undersaturated bottom water while the hydrate is still inside the hydrate stability field. This process has only recently been studied in an in situ experiment, which used a remotely operated vehicle to transfer synthetically generated gas hydrate to the seafloor and to observe its dissolution behavior (Rehder et al., subm.). The results imply that gas hydrate dissolution is diffusion controlled. Until now, there have been no attempts to investigate gas hydrate dissolution kinetics within the gas hydrate stability field under variable salinity, methane concentration, and bottom shear stress conditions. The newly designed deep sea simulation chamber (A-PROACH, adaptive pressure ocean analysis chamber), constructed by the Technical University Hamburg-Harburg, provides the opportunity to study gas hydrate dissolution under realistic conditions including stable pressure, temperature, and defined shear stress (Steffen et al., this volume). We equipped the pressure chamber with an underwater video camera and high precision conductivity, temperature, and pressure sensors using an integrated CTD-probe (Seabird). During gas hydrate dissolution, the release of hydrate leads to a salinity decrease in the surrounding sea water, which can be tracked real-time by the conductivity sensor. This set-up enables us to conduct first time-series experiments under various P/T conditions in order to calculate dissolution constants of natural gas hydrates. References: Rehder, G. et

  12. Continuous monitoring of a changing sample by multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Jose R.; Hall, Kirsten W.; Becker, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a study in which a continuously changed gaseous sample was monitored by multiplex gas chromatography (MGC), using the exponential dilution (ED) technique of Ritter and Adams (1976) to change the composition and concentration of a gaseous mixture in such a way as to imitate changes in the atmospheric gases sampled by a descending aircraft. A calibration of the MGC system was performed with four different rates of sample dilution, and the errors resulting from various degrees of change in the sample concentration were determined.

  13. TIGER TM : Intelligent continuous monitoring of gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, I.; Hibbert, J.; Milne, R.; Nicol, C.

    1998-07-01

    The field of condition monitoring has been an area of rapid growth, with many specialized techniques being developed to measure or predict the health of a particular item of plant. Much of the most recent work has gone into the diagnosis of problems on rotating machines through the application of vibration analysis techniques. These techniques though useful can have a number of limiting factors, such as the need to install specialized sensors and measurement equipment, or the limited scope of the type of data measured. It was recognized in 1992, that the surveillance and condition monitoring procedures available for critical plant, such as gas turbines, were not as comprehensive as they might be and that a novel approach was required to give the operator the necessary holistic view of the health of the plant. This would naturally provide an assessment of the maintenance practices required to yield the highest possible availability without the need to install extensive new instrumentation. From the above objective, the TIGER system was designed which utilizes available data from the gas turbine control system or additionally the plant DCS to measure the behavior of the gas turbine and its associated sub systems. These measured parameters are then compared with an internal model of the turbine system and used to diagnose incorrect responses and therefore the item that is at fault, allowing the operator to quickly restart the turbine after a trip or perform condition based maintenance at the next scheduled outage. This philosophy has been built into the TIGER system and the purpose of this paper is to illustrate its functionality and some of the innovative techniques used in the diagnosis of real gas turbine problems. This is achieved by discussing three case studies where TIGER was integral in returning the plant to operation more quickly than can normally be expected.

  14. Design and deployment of low-cost plastic optical fiber sensors for gas monitoring.

    PubMed

    Grassini, Sabrina; Ishtaiwi, Maen; Parvis, Marco; Vallan, Alberto

    2014-12-30

    This paper describes an approach to develop and deploy low-cost plastic optical fiber sensors suitable for measuring low concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere. The sensors are designed by depositing onto the exposed core of a plastic fiber thin films of sensitive compounds via either plasma sputtering or via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The interaction between the deposited layer and the gas alters the fiber's capability to transmit the light, so that the sensor can simply be realized with a few centimeters of fiber, an LED and a photodiode. Sensors arranged in this way exhibit several advantages in comparison to electrochemical and optical conventional sensors; in particular, they have an extremely low cost and can be easily designed to have an integral, i.e., cumulative, response. The paper describes the sensor design, the preparation procedure and two examples of sensor prototypes that exploit a cumulative response. One sensor is designed for monitoring indoor atmospheres for cultural heritage applications and the other for detecting the presence of particular gas species inside the RPC (resistive plate chamber) muon detector of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN in Geneva.

  15. Design and deployment of low-cost plastic optical fiber sensors for gas monitoring.

    PubMed

    Grassini, Sabrina; Ishtaiwi, Maen; Parvis, Marco; Vallan, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to develop and deploy low-cost plastic optical fiber sensors suitable for measuring low concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere. The sensors are designed by depositing onto the exposed core of a plastic fiber thin films of sensitive compounds via either plasma sputtering or via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The interaction between the deposited layer and the gas alters the fiber's capability to transmit the light, so that the sensor can simply be realized with a few centimeters of fiber, an LED and a photodiode. Sensors arranged in this way exhibit several advantages in comparison to electrochemical and optical conventional sensors; in particular, they have an extremely low cost and can be easily designed to have an integral, i.e., cumulative, response. The paper describes the sensor design, the preparation procedure and two examples of sensor prototypes that exploit a cumulative response. One sensor is designed for monitoring indoor atmospheres for cultural heritage applications and the other for detecting the presence of particular gas species inside the RPC (resistive plate chamber) muon detector of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN in Geneva. PMID:25558990

  16. Design and Deployment of Low-Cost Plastic Optical Fiber Sensors for Gas Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Grassini, Sabrina; Ishtaiwi, Maen; Parvis, Marco; Vallan, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to develop and deploy low-cost plastic optical fiber sensors suitable for measuring low concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere. The sensors are designed by depositing onto the exposed core of a plastic fiber thin films of sensitive compounds via either plasma sputtering or via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The interaction between the deposited layer and the gas alters the fiber's capability to transmit the light, so that the sensor can simply be realized with a few centimeters of fiber, an LED and a photodiode. Sensors arranged in this way exhibit several advantages in comparison to electrochemical and optical conventional sensors; in particular, they have an extremely low cost and can be easily designed to have an integral, i.e., cumulative, response. The paper describes the sensor design, the preparation procedure and two examples of sensor prototypes that exploit a cumulative response. One sensor is designed for monitoring indoor atmospheres for cultural heritage applications and the other for detecting the presence of particular gas species inside the RPC (resistive plate chamber) muon detector of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN in Geneva. PMID:25558990

  17. The role of nonlocal electron energy transport in the formation of spatial distributions of the two-chamber plasma density of ICP discharge at change of gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Serditov, Konstantin

    2012-10-01

    2D simulations of the two-chamber ICP source where power is supplied in the small discharge chamber and extends by electron thermal conductivity mechanism to the big diffusion chamber is performed. Depending on pressure two main scenarios of plasma density and its spatial distribution behavior were identified. The first case of higher pressure is characterized by localization of plasma in small driver chamber where power is deposed and corresponds to small thermal conductivity length compared with diffusion length. The second case of lower pressure represents diffusion chamber as a main source of plasma with maximum of electron density with greater thermal conductivity length compared with diffusion length. The differences in spatial distribution are caused by local or non-local behavior of energy transport in discharge volume due to the different characteristic scale of heat transfer with electronic conductivity. As a result changing of geometrics and gas pressure gives the possibility to set ratio between diffusion and thermal conductivity characteristic lengths. Thus, one can control heat input and, in turn, obtain several types of plasma profiles.

  18. Gas gain operations with single photon resolution using an integrating ionization chamber in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, R. H.; Sarvestani, A.; Besch, H. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Amenitsch, H.; Bernstorff, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. Initially, MicroCAT was thought of as a shielding grid (Frisch-grid) but later was used as an active electron amplification device that enables single X-ray photon resolution measurements at low fluxes even with integrating readout electronics. Moreover, the adjustable gas gain that continuously covers the entire range from pure ionization chamber mode up to high gas gains (30 000 and more) provides stable operation yielding a huge dynamic range of about 10 8 and more. First measurements on biological samples using small angle X-ray scattering techniques with synchrotron radiation will be presented.

  19. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  20. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  1. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  2. Condition Based Monitoring of Gas Turbine Combustion Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ulerich, Nancy; Kidane, Getnet; Spiegelberg, Christine; Tevs, Nikolai

    2012-09-30

    The objective of this program is to develop sensors that allow condition based monitoring of critical combustion parts of gas turbines. Siemens teamed with innovative, small companies that were developing sensor concepts that could monitor wearing and cracking of hot turbine parts. A magnetic crack monitoring sensor concept developed by JENTEK Sensors, Inc. was evaluated in laboratory tests. Designs for engine application were evaluated. The inability to develop a robust lead wire to transmit the signal long distances resulted in a discontinuation of this concept. An optical wear sensor concept proposed by K Sciences GP, LLC was tested in proof-of concept testing. The sensor concept depended, however, on optical fiber tips wearing with the loaded part. The fiber tip wear resulted in too much optical input variability; the sensor could not provide adequate stability for measurement. Siemens developed an alternative optical wear sensor approach that used a commercial PHILTEC, Inc. optical gap sensor with an optical spacer to remove fibers from the wearing surface. The gap sensor measured the length of the wearing spacer to follow loaded part wear. This optical wear sensor was developed to a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. It was validated in lab tests and installed on a floating transition seal in an F-Class gas turbine. Laboratory tests indicate that the concept can measure wear on loaded parts at temperatures up to 800{degrees}C with uncertainty of < 0.3 mm. Testing in an F-Class engine installation showed that the optical spacer wore with the wearing part. The electro-optics box located outside the engine enclosure survived the engine enclosure environment. The fiber optic cable and the optical spacer, however, both degraded after about 100 operating hours, impacting the signal analysis.

  3. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  4. Metal Oxide Semi-Conductor Gas Sensors in Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fine, George F.; Cavanagh, Leon M.; Afonja, Ayo; Binions, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors are utilised in a variety of different roles and industries. They are relatively inexpensive compared to other sensing technologies, robust, lightweight, long lasting and benefit from high material sensitivity and quick response times. They have been used extensively to measure and monitor trace amounts of environmentally important gases such as carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. In this review the nature of the gas response and how it is fundamentally linked to surface structure is explored. Synthetic routes to metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors are also discussed and related to their affect on surface structure. An overview of important contributions and recent advances are discussed for the use of metal oxide semiconductor sensors for the detection of a variety of gases—CO, NOx, NH3 and the particularly challenging case of CO2. Finally a description of recent advances in work completed at University College London is presented including the use of selective zeolites layers, new perovskite type materials and an innovative chemical vapour deposition approach to film deposition. PMID:22219672

  5. Utilizing In-Situ Static Chamber Measurements and UAV Imagery for Integrated Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimations: Assessing Environmental and Management Impacts on Agricultural Emissions for Two Paired-Watershed Sites in Vermont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, L.; Peterson, F. S.; Wyngaard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contribute to ~10-12% of global anthropogenic emissions. While agriculture is a major source of GHG emissions, there is also great potential for mitigation, as emissions can be reduced by utilizing specific field management and fertilization strategies. This study closely monitors hay and corn fields in Vermont in two paired-watershed sites. Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane emissions were measured weekly using static chambers and a Photoacoustic Gas Sensor (PAS) across both field management treatments: conventional and mitigation. Accurately quantifying emissions from agricultural landscapes is crucial to develop and implement optimal mitigation strategies, but quantifying landscape-wide emissions is challenging. In this study, we show that both field management treatments and environmental conditions (such as field flooding from rain events) significantly affect GHG emissions, and both can be highly spatially variable even on the field-scale. Monitoring this kind of complexity across a watershed is difficult, as most current emissions quantification techniques, such as static chambers, are localized, point specific and costly. Remote sensing provides an opportunity to monitor landscapes more efficiently and cost effectively. High resolution imagery from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) can also provide opportunities for more accurate watershed-wide estimates of GHG emission rates based on observable agricultural field conditions and management signals, such as field flooding, fertilizer application method, and cover cropping. Satellite imagery, and even the higher resolution aerial imagery used for agricultural monitoring, do not provide the spatial or temporal resolution needed to monitor the on-field complexities that affect GHG emissions. This study combines and compares environmental and management observations from UAV imagery and in-situ field GHG emissions measurements to determine the effectiveness of

  6. Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Shi, J.; Hickey, B.

    1997-07-01

    Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has signficant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected.

  7. Noble Gas Measurement and Analysis Technique for Monitoring Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, William S

    1999-09-01

    An environmental monitoring technique using analysis of stable noble gas isotopic ratios on-stack at a reprocessing facility was developed. This technique integrates existing technologies to strengthen safeguards at reprocessing facilities. The isotopic ratios are measured using a mass spectrometry system and are compared to a database of calculated isotopic ratios using a Bayesian data analysis method to determine specific fuel parameters (e.g., burnup, fuel type, fuel age, etc.). These inferred parameters can be used by investigators to verify operator declarations. A user-friendly software application (named NOVA) was developed for the application of this technique. NOVA included a Visual Basic user interface coupling a Bayesian data analysis procedure to a reactor physics database (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). The integrated system (mass spectrometry, reactor modeling, and data analysis) was validated using on-stack measurements during the reprocessing of target fuel from a U.S. production reactor and gas samples from the processing of EBR-II fast breeder reactor driver fuel. These measurements led to an inferred burnup that matched the declared burnup with sufficient accuracy and consistency for most safeguards applications. The NOVA code was also tested using numerous light water reactor measurements from the literature. NOVA was capable of accurately determining spent fuel type, burnup, and fuel age for these experimental results. Work should continue to demonstrate the robustness of this system for production, power, and research reactor fuels.

  8. Optical methods for monitoring harmful gas in animal facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shirui; Dong, Daming; Zheng, Wengang; Wang, Jihua

    2014-06-01

    Animal facilities produce large amounts of harmful gases such as ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and methane, many of which have a pungent odor. The harmful gases produced by animal housing not only affect the health of people and livestock but also pollute the air. The detection of the harmful gases can effectively improve efficiency of livestock production and reduce environmental pollution. More and more optical detection methods are applied to the detection of the harmful gases produced by animal housing. This summarizes optical detection methods for monitoring the harmful gases in animal housing recently, including nondispersive infrared gas analyzer, ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The basic principle and the characteristics of these methods are illustrated and the applications on the detection of harmful gases in animal housing are described. Meanwhile, the research of harmful gases monitoring for livestock production based on these methods were listed. The current situation and future development of the detection methods for harmful gases generated by animal housing were summarized by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  9. Aging in the large CDF axial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.; Ambrose, D.; Binkley, M.; Bromberg, C.; Burkett, K.; Kephart, R.; Madrak, R.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Roser, R.; Wagner, R.L. /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a large axial drift chamber in the Collider Detector at Fermilab operating with a gas mixture that is 50/50 argon/ethane with an admixture of 1.7% isopropanol. In its first two years of operation the COT showed unexpected aging with the worst parts of the chamber experiencing a gain loss of {approx}50% for an accumulated charge of {approx}35 mC/cm. By monitoring the pulse height of hits on good tracks, it was possible to determine the gain as a function of time and location in the chamber. In addition, the currents of the high voltage supplies gave another monitor of chamber gain and its dependence on the charge deposition rate. The aging was worse on the exhaust end of the chamber consistent with polymer buildup as the gas flows through the chamber. The distribution in azimuth suggests that aging is enhanced at lower temperatures, but other factors such as gas flow patterns may be involved. Elemental and molecular analysis of the sense wires found a coating that is mostly carbon and hydrogen with a small amount of oxygen; no silicon or other contaminants were identified. High resolution electron microscope pictures of the wire surface show that the coating is smooth with small sub-micron nodules. In the course of working with the chamber gas system, we discovered a small amount of O{sub 2} is enough to reverse the aging. Operating the chamber with {approx}100 ppm of O{sub 2} reversed almost two years of gain loss in less than 10 days while accumulating {le} 2 mC/cm.

  10. Quantification of Gas-Wall Partitioning in Teflon Environmental Chambers Using Rapid Bursts of Low-Volatility Oxidized Species Generated in Situ.

    PubMed

    Krechmer, Jordan E; Pagonis, Demetrios; Ziemann, Paul J; Jimenez, Jose L

    2016-06-01

    Partitioning of gas-phase organic compounds to the walls of Teflon environmental chambers is a recently reported phenomenon than can affect the yields of reaction products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) measured in laboratory experiments. Reported time scales for reaching gas-wall partitioning (GWP) equilibrium (τGWE) differ by up to 3 orders of magnitude, however, leading to predicted effects that vary from substantial to negligible. A new technique is demonstrated here in which semi- and low-volatility oxidized organic compounds (saturation concentration c* < 100 μg m(-3)) were photochemically generated in rapid bursts in situ in an 8 m(3) environmental chamber, and then their decay in the absence of aerosol was measured using a high-resolution chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) equipped with an "inlet-less" NO3(-) ion source. Measured τGWE were 7-13 min (rel. std. dev. 33%) for all compounds. The fraction of each compound that partitioned to the walls at equilibrium follows absorptive partitioning theory with an equivalent wall mass concentration in the range 0.3-10 mg m(-3). Measurements using a CIMS equipped with a standard ion-molecule reaction region showed large biases due to the contact of compounds with walls. On the basis of these results, a set of parameters is proposed for modeling GWP in chamber experiments. PMID:27138683

  11. Total introduction of microsamples in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry by high-temperature evaporation chamber with a sheathing gas stream.

    PubMed

    Grotti, Marco; Ardini, Francisco; Todolì, Josè Luis

    2013-03-12

    A systematic study on the high-temperature Torch Integrated Sample Introduction System (TISIS) for use in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been performed. The investigation included the optimization of the relevant parameters (chamber temperature, sheathing gas flow rate, nebulizer gas flow rate, sample uptake rate), the evaluation of its performance characteristics (sensitivity, limits of detection, stability, memory effects, use with the dynamic reaction cell) and representative applications to environmental, biological and clinical samples. Under the optimal conditions (T=150°C; nebulizer gas flow rate of 0.7Lmin(-1) along with sheathing gas flow rate of 0.35Lmin(-1) and a sample uptake rate of 20μLmin(-1)), the sensitivity was from 2 to 8 times higher than that measured using a conventional micronebulizer/mini-spray chamber system, due to the enhanced analyte mass transport toward the plasma and the solvent introduction in the vapour form. In addition, for several elements, TISIS provided lower limits of detection than the conventional system, even when the latter worked at 5-fold higher sample uptake rate. Short-term and long-term precision was better than 5%. Spectroscopic interferences arising from common matrices were efficiently removed by the dynamic reaction cell technique. The application of TISIS/ICP-MS to representative certified reference samples (spinach leaves, marine plankton, bone tissue, human blood) proved the suitability of this system for the accurate analysis of limited-size samples.

  12. Ethylene monitoring and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Richard, II, Roy V. (Inventor); Kane, James A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system that can accurately monitor and control low concentrations of ethylene gas includes a test chamber configured to receive sample gas potentially containing an ethylene concentration and ozone, a detector configured to receive light produced during a reaction between the ethylene and ozone and to produce signals related thereto, and a computer connected to the detector to process the signals to determine therefrom a value of the concentration of ethylene in the sample gas. The supply for the system can include a four way valve configured to receive pressurized gas at one input and a test chamber. A piston is journaled in the test chamber with a drive end disposed in a drive chamber and a reaction end defining with walls of the test chamber a variable volume reaction chamber. The drive end of the piston is pneumatically connected to two ports of the four way valve to provide motive force to the piston. A manifold is connected to the variable volume reaction chamber, and is configured to receive sample gasses from at least one of a plurality of ports connectable to degreening rooms and to supply the sample gas to the reactive chamber for reaction with ozone. The apparatus can be used to monitor and control the ethylene concentration in multiple degreening rooms.

  13. Ethylene monitoring and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Richard, II, Roy V. (Inventor); Kanc, James A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system that can accurately monitor and control low concentrations of ethylene gas includes a test chamber configured to receive sample gas potentially containing an ethylene concentration and ozone, a detector configured to receive light produced during a reaction between the ethylene and ozone and to produce signals related thereto, and a computer connected to the detector to process the signals to determine therefrom a value of the concentration of ethylene in the sample gas. The supply for the system can include a four way valve configured to receive pressurized gas at one input and a test chamber. A piston is journaled in the test chamber with a drive end disposed in a drive chamber and a reaction end defining with walls of the test chamber a variable volume reaction chamber. The drive end of the piston is pneumatically connected to two ports of the four way valve to provide motive force to the piston. A manifold is connected to the variable volume reaction chamber, and is configured to receive sample gasses from at least one of a plurality of ports connectable to degreening rooms and to supply the sample gas to the reactive chamber for reaction with ozone. The apparatus can be used to monitor and control the ethylene concentration in multiple degreening rooms.

  14. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  15. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  16. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  17. TH-E-BRE-09: TrueBeam Monte Carlo Absolute Dose Calculations Using Monitor Chamber Backscatter Simulations and Linac-Logged Target Current

    SciTech Connect

    A, Popescu I; Lobo, J; Sawkey, D; Svatos, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate and measure radiation backscattered into the monitor chamber of a TrueBeam linac; establish a rigorous framework for absolute dose calculations for TrueBeam Monte Carlo (MC) simulations through a novel approach, taking into account the backscattered radiation and the actual machine output during beam delivery; improve agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors. Methods: The ‘monitor backscatter factor’ is an essential ingredient of a well-established MC absolute dose formalism (the MC equivalent of the TG-51 protocol). This quantity was determined for the 6 MV, 6X FFF, and 10X FFF beams by two independent Methods: (1) MC simulations in the monitor chamber of the TrueBeam linac; (2) linac-generated beam record data for target current, logged for each beam delivery. Upper head MC simulations used a freelyavailable manufacturer-provided interface to a cloud-based platform, allowing use of the same head model as that used to generate the publicly-available TrueBeam phase spaces, without revealing the upper head design. The MC absolute dose formalism was expanded to allow direct use of target current data. Results: The relation between backscatter, number of electrons incident on the target for one monitor unit, and MC absolute dose was analyzed for open fields, as well as a jaw-tracking VMAT plan. The agreement between the two methods was better than 0.15%. It was demonstrated that the agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors improves across all field sizes when backscatter is taken into account. Conclusion: For the first time, simulated monitor chamber dose and measured target current for an actual TrueBeam linac were incorporated in the MC absolute dose formalism. In conjunction with the use of MC inputs generated from post-delivery trajectory-log files, the present method allows accurate MC dose calculations, without resorting to any of the simplifying assumptions previously made in the True

  18. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  19. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. 870.4330 Section 870.4330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood...

  20. NOVAC - A global network for volcanic gas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, B.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the global network, NOVAC (Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change), aiming at automatic gas emission monitoring at active volcanoes worldwide. Data from the network will primarily be used for volcanic risk assessment but also for geophysical research, studies of atmospheric change and ground validation of satellite instruments. A novel type of instrument, the Scanning miniaturized Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (mini-DOAS) instrument, is applied in the network to measure volcanic gas emissions by UV absorption spectroscopy. The instrument is set up 5-10 km downwind of the volcano under study and typically 2-4 instruments are deployed at each volcano in order to cover different wind directions and facilitate measurements of plume height and plume direction. Two different versions of the instrument have been developed. Version I was designed to be a robust and simple instrument for measurement of volcanic SO2 emissions at high time-resolution with minimal power consumption. Version II was designed to allow the best possible spectroscopy, and enhanced flexibility in regard to measurement geometry at the cost of larger complexity, power consumption and price. In the paper the project is described as well as the developed software, the hardware of the two instrument versions, measurement strategies, data communication and archiving routines. As of December 2008 a total of 46 instruments have been installed at 18 volcanoes worldwide. As a typical example the installation at Tungurahua Volcano in Ecuador is described, together with some results from the first 21 months of operation at this volcano.

  1. Design and characterization of a windowless resonant photoacoustic chamber equipped with resonance locking circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, György Z.; Bozóki, Zoltán; Miklós, András; Lörincz, András; Thöny, Andreas; Sigrist, Markus W.

    1991-03-01

    A novel design of a windowless resonant photoacoustic chamber with open acoustic filters and an electronic resonance locking circuitry is presented. The acoustic behavior of the cell and preliminary measurements on a certified gas mixture with a CO2 laser demonstrate the feasibility for trace gas monitoring.

  2. Results of vapor space monitoring of flammable gas Watch List tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1997-09-18

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization Systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, release rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  3. Optimization of a closed-loop gas system for the operation of Resistive Plate Chambers at the Large Hadron Collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capeans, M.; Glushkov, I.; Guida, R.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), thanks to their fast time resolution (˜1 ns), suitable space resolution (˜1 cm) and low production cost (˜50 €/m2), are widely employed for the muon trigger systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their large detector volume (they cover a surface of about 4000 m2 equivalent to 16 m3 of gas volume both in ATLAS and CMS) and the use of a relatively expensive Freon-based gas mixture make a closed-loop gas circulation unavoidable. It has been observed that the return gas of RPCs operated in conditions similar to the difficult experimental background foreseen at LHC contains a large amount of impurities potentially dangerous for long-term operation. Several gas-cleaning agents are currently in use in order to avoid accumulation of impurities in the closed-loop circuits. We present the results of a systematic study characterizing each of these cleaning agents. During the test, several RPCs were operated at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) in a high radiation environment in order to observe the production of typical impurities: mainly fluoride ions, molecules of the Freon group and hydrocarbons. The polluted return gas was sent to several cartridges, each containing a different cleaning agent. The effectiveness of each material was studied using gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry techniques. Results of this test have revealed an optimized configuration of filters that is now under long-term validation.Gas optimization studies are complemented with a finite element simulation of gas flow distribution in the RPCs, aiming at its eventual optimization in terms of distribution and flow rate.

  4. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  5. Hydrolysis and gas-particle partitioning of organic nitrates formed from the oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, J. K.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.

    2015-07-01

    Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates (ON) influences their role as sinks and sources of NOx and their effects on the formation of tropospheric ozone and organic aerosol (OA). Organic nitrates were formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments under varying conditions. A hydrolysis rate of 2 day-1 was found for particle-phase ONs at a relative humidity of 22 % or higher; no significant ON hydrolysis was observed at lower relative humidity. The ON gas-particle partitioning is dependent on total OA concentration and temperature, consistent with absorptive partitioning theory. In a volatility basis set the ON partitioning is consistent with mass fractions of [0 0.19 0.29 0.52] at saturations mass concentrations (C*) of [1 10 100 1000] μg m-3.

  6. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well. PMID:25144442

  7. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well.

  8. Comparative Toxicity of Fumigants and a Phosphine Synergist Using a Novel Containment Chamber for the Safe Generation of Concentrated Phosphine Gas

    PubMed Central

    Valmas, Nicholas; Ebert, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Background With the phasing out of ozone-depleting substances in accordance with the United Nations Montreal Protocol, phosphine remains as the only economically viable fumigant for widespread use. However the development of high-level resistance in several pest insects threatens the future usage of phosphine; yet research into phosphine resistance mechanisms has been limited due to the potential for human poisoning in enclosed laboratory environments. Principal Findings Here we describe a custom-designed chamber for safely containing phosphine gas generated from aluminium phosphide tablets. In an improvement on previous generation systems, this chamber can be completely sealed to control the escape of phosphine. The device has been utilised in a screening program with C. elegans that has identified a phosphine synergist, and quantified the efficacy of a new fumigant against that of phosphine. The phosphine-induced mortality at 20°C has been determined with an LC50 of 732 ppm. This result was contrasted with the efficacy of a potential new botanical pesticide dimethyl disulphide, which for a 24 hour exposure at 20°C is 600 times more potent than phosphine (LC50 1.24 ppm). We also found that co-administration of the glutathione depletor diethyl maleate (DEM) with a sublethal dose of phosphine (70 ppm, gas generation chamber. We have also identified a novel phosphine synergist, the glutathione depletor DEM, suggesting an effective pathway to be targeted in future synergist research; as well as quantifying the efficacy of a potential alternative to phosphine, dimethyl disulphide. PMID:17205134

  9. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  10. Drift Chamber Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walenta, A. H.; ćonka Nurdan, T.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a laboratory course held at ICFA 2002 Regional Instrumentation School in Morelia, Mexico. This course intends to introduce drift chambers, which play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. The experimental setup consists of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber, a plastic scintillator detector and a collimated 90Sr source. The measurements on the drift velocity of electrons, its change as a function of a drift field, gas gain and diffusion are performed at this laboratory course.

  11. Predictive emission monitoring successfully replaces CEMS in gas turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    As more and more regulations require enhanced monitoring of stack emissions, a number of industries are turning from conventional continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) to predictive emission monitoring systems (PEMS). PEMS typically cost less to install and operate than CEMS, and they frequently offer a number of additional advantages, including low maintenance and high reliability. The advantages of PEMS are discussed in this paper. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Long-term autonomous volcanic gas monitoring with Multi-GAS at Mount St. Helens, Washington, and Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Ketner, D. M.; Kern, C.; Lahusen, R. G.; Lockett, C.; Parker, T.; Paskievitch, J.; Pauk, B.; Rinehart, A.; Werner, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the USGS Volcano Hazards Program has worked to implement continuous real-time in situ volcanic gas monitoring at volcanoes in the Cascade Range and Alaska. The main goal of this ongoing effort is to better link the compositions of volcanic gases to other real-time monitoring data, such as seismicity and deformation, in order to improve baseline monitoring and early detection of volcanic unrest. Due to the remote and difficult-to-access nature of volcanic-gas monitoring sites in the Cascades and Alaska, we developed Multi-GAS instruments that can operate unattended for long periods of time with minimal direct maintenance from field personnel. Our Multi-GAS stations measure H2O, CO2, SO2, and H2S gas concentrations, are comprised entirely of commercial off-the-shelf components, and are powered by small solar energy systems. One notable feature of our Multi-GAS stations is that they include a unique capability to perform automated CO2, SO2, and H2S sensor verifications using portable gas standards while deployed in the field, thereby allowing for rigorous tracking of sensor performances. In addition, we have developed novel onboard data-processing routines that allow diagnostic and monitoring data - including gas ratios (e.g. CO2/SO2) - to be streamed in real time to internal observatory and public web pages without user input. Here we present over one year of continuous data from a permanent Multi-GAS station installed in August 2014 in the crater of Mount St. Helens, Washington, and several months of data from a station installed near the summit of Augustine Volcano, Alaska in June 2015. Data from the Mount St. Helens Multi-GAS station has been streaming to a public USGS site since early 2015, a first for a permanent Multi-GAS site. Neither station has detected significant changes in gas concentrations or compositions since they were installed, consistent with low levels of seismicity and deformation.

  13. Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-12-15

    -surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical subsurface gas sampling and

  14. Evaluation of Flammable Gas Monitoring and Ventilation System Alternatives for Double Contained Receiver Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    1999-10-19

    This study identifies possible flammable gas monitoring and ventilation system alternatives to ensure adequate removal of flammable gases from the Double-Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) primary tanks during temporary storage of small amounts of waste. The study evaluates and compares these alternatives to support closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ TF-96-04330).

  15. Portable Mass Spectrometer System for in-situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conejo, E.; Griffin, T. P.; Diaz, J. A.; Arkin, C. R.; Soto, C.; Naylor, G. R.; Curley, C.; Floyd, D.

    2005-01-01

    A system developed by NASA has been used for monitoring air quality around different locations. The system was designed for aircraft applications but has proven to be very useful as a portable gas analyzer. The system has been used to monitor air quality around volcanoes, cities, and the surrounding areas. The transport of the system has been via aircraft, car, and hand carried.

  16. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  17. Review of Monitoring Plans for Gas Bubble Disease Signs and Gas Supersaturation Levels on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Fidler, Larry; Elston, Ralph; Colt, John

    1994-07-01

    Montgomery Watson was retained by the Bonneville Power Administration to evaluate the monitoring program for gas bubble disease signs and dissolved gas supersaturation levels on the Columbia and Snake rivers. The results of this evaluation will provide the basis for improving protocols and procedures for future monitoring efforts. Key study team members were Dr. John Colt, Dr. Larry Fidler, and Dr. Ralph Elston. On the week of June 6 through 10, 1994 the study team visited eight monitoring sites (smolt, adult, and resident fish) on the Columbia and Snake rivers. Additional protocol evaluations were conducted at the Willard Field Station (National Biological Survey) and Pacific Northwest Laboratories at Richland (Battelle). On June 13 and 14, 1994, the study team visited the North Pacific Division office of the U.S. Corps of Engineers and the Fish Passage Center to collect additional information and data on the monitoring programs. Considering the speed at which the Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring Program was implemented this year, the Fish Passage Center and cooperating Federal, State, and Tribal Agencies have been doing an incredible job. Thirty-one specific recommendations are presented in this report and are summarized in Section 14.

  18. Ultrahigh sensitivity heavy noble gas detectors for long-term monitoring and for monitoring air. Technical status report

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, J.D.

    1999-01-31

    The primary objective of this research project is to develop heavy noble gas (krypton, xenon, and radon) detectors for (1) long-term monitoring of transuranic waste, spent fuel, and other uranium and thorium bearing wastes and (2) alpha particle air monitors that discriminate between radon emissions and other alpha emitters. A University of Cincinnati/Argonne National Laboratory (UC/ANL) Team was assembled to complete this detector development project. DOE needs that are addressed by this project include improved long-term monitoring capability and improved air monitoring capability during remedial activities. Successful development and implementation of the proposed detection systems could significantly improve current capabilities with relatively simple and inexpensive equipment.

  19. Laser erosion diagnostics of plasma facing materials with displacement sensors and their application to safeguard monitors to protect nuclear fusion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Koichi; Motokoshi, Shinji; Taniguchi, Seiji; Nakai, Mitsuo; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Mroz, Waldemar; Budner, Boguslaw; Korczyc, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Tungsten and SiC are candidates for the structural materials of the nuclear fusion reactor walls, while CVD poly-crystal diamond is candidate for the window material under the hazardous fusion stresses. We measured the surface endurance strength of such materials with commercial displacement sensors and our recent evaluation method. The pulsed high thermal input was put into the material surfaces by UV lasers, and the surface erosions were diagnosed. With the increase of the total number of the laser shots per position, the crater depth increased gradually. The 3D and 2D pictures of the craters were gathered and compared under various experimental conditions. For example, the maximum crater depths were plotted as a function of shot accumulated numbers, from which we evaluated the threshold thermal input for the surface erosions to be induced. The simple comparison-result showed that tungsten was stronger roughly two times than SiC. Then we proposed how to monitor the surface conditions of combined samples with such diamonds coated with thin tungsten layers, when we use such samples as parts of divertor inner walls, fusion chamber first walls, and various diagnostic windows. We investigated how we might be able to measure the inner surface erosions with the same kinds of displacement sensors. We found out the measurable maximum thickness of such diamond which is useful to monitor the erosion. Additionally we showed a new scheme of fusion reactor systems with injectors for anisotropic pellets and heating lasers under the probable use of W and/or SiC.

  20. Multi-disciplinary monitoring of the Hutubi underground natural gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.

    2015-12-01

    Underground natural Gas Storage (UGS) can balance the gas demand and supply through injecting gas into or withdraw gas from the subsurface rock formation. UGS has been wildly established all over the world to face the complicated international energy system. In 2013, the Hutubi underground natural gas storage was put into production, which was one of the largest UGS in China. In the Hutubi UGS, the pressurized natural gas is injected into and extracted from an obsolete gas reservoir during summer and winter time, respectively. The repeatable in and out going high pressure gas may change the stress state and material properties of the underground rock formation, which may in turn cause surface deformation and alter the seismic hazard in this region. To understand the physical process of the periodic loading and unloading, we established a multi-disciplinary monitoring system composed of a geodetic network, a seismic network, and an active source monitoring system. The position and level of 13 spots around and above the UGS area are measured every three to six months with Global Position System (GPS) and short base-line leveling. More than 30 portable broad band three component seismic stations were deployed in study area to continuously monitor the background and possible triggered seismicity. These seismic stations together with a 12000 in3 airgun source, are also used to monitor the seismic velocity change associated with the gas injection and extraction. Preliminary results indicate that seismic velocity change correlates well with the injection pressure; seismicity decays with the lapse time after the startup of Hutubi UGS; small but detectable surface deformation associated with the gas activities is observed.

  1. Portable Mass Spectrometer Applications for In Situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Diaz, J. Andres; Arkin, C. Richard; Conejo, Elian

    2005-01-01

    Primary Goal of this project is to (1) Design/build a flexible system to monitor air contamination (2) Learn requirements for operating system in low pressure and low temperature environments (3) Design/build system for integration into aircraft and automobiles Secondary Goals/Offshoots are (1) Fly aboard different aircraft (2)Hand-carry unit (3) Drive unit in automobiles.

  2. Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates formed from the oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Jeffrey K.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea

    2016-02-01

    Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates (ON) influences their role as sinks and sources of NOx and their effects on the formation of tropospheric ozone and organic aerosol (OA). In this work, organic nitrates were formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments under different conditions. Particle-phase ON hydrolysis rates, consistent with observed ON decay, exhibited a nonlinear dependence on relative humidity (RH): an ON decay rate of 2 day-1 was observed when the RH ranged between 20 and 60 %, and no significant ON decay was observed at RH lower than 20 %. In experiments when the highest observed RH exceeded the deliquescence RH of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol, the particle-phase ON decay rate was as high as 7 day-1 and more variable. The ON gas-particle partitioning was dependent on total OA concentration and temperature, consistent with absorptive partitioning theory. In a volatility basis set, the ON partitioning was consistent with mass fractions of [0 0.11 0.03 0.86] at saturation mass concentrations (C*) of [1 10 100 1000] µg m-3.

  3. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  4. Environmental Monitoring and the Gas Industry: Program Manager Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory D. Gillispie

    1997-12-01

    This document has been developed for the nontechnical gas industry manager who has the responsibility for the development of waste or potentially contaminated soil and groundwater data or must make decisions based on such data for the management or remediation of these materials. It explores the pse of common analytical chemistry instrumentation and associated techniques for identification of environmentally hazardous materials. Sufficient detail is given to familiarize the nontechnical reader with the principles behind the operation of each technique. The scope and realm of the techniques and their constituent variations are portrayed through a discussion of crucial details and, where appropriate, the depiction of real-life data. It is the author's intention to provide an easily understood handbook for gas industry management. Techniques which determine the presence, composition, and quantification of gas industry wastes are discussed. Greater focus is given to traditional techniques which have been the mainstay of modem analytical benchwork. However, with the continual advancement of instrumental principles and design, several techniques have been included which are likely to receive greater attention in fiture considerations for waste-related detection. Definitions and concepts inherent to a thorough understanding of the principles common to analytical chemistry are discussed. It is also crucial that gas industry managers understand the effects of the various actions which take place before, during, and after the actual sampling step. When a series of sample collection, storage, and transport activities occur, new or inexperienced project managers may overlook or misunderstand the importance of the sequence. Each step has an impact on the final results of the measurement process; errors in judgment or decision making can be costly. Specific techniques and methodologies for the collection, storage, and transport of environmental media samples are not described or

  5. An in situ method for real-time monitoring of soil gas diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biogeochemistry of soils. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and by this way fluxes can be calculated using by Fick's Law. The soil gas diffusion coefficient DS represents the proportional factor between the gas flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One common way to determine DS is taking core samples in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious and it can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence, uncertainty about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale, i.e. the real aeration status remains. We developed a method to measure and monitor DS in situ. The set-up consists of a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has seven sampling depths (from 0 to -43 cm of depth) and can be easily installed into vertical holes drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the DS depth distribution of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas-sampling-device/soil system the program COMSOL was used. We tested our new method both in the lab and in a field study and compared the results with a reference lab method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. Soil gas profiles could be measured with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. During the field study, there was an important rain event and we could monitor the decrease in soil gas diffusivity in the top soil due to water infiltration. The effect

  6. Capillary - Discharge Based Hand-Held Detector For Chemical Vapor Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang

    2005-05-31

    A handheld/portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring includes a housing and a discharge chamber that is established therein. The plasma discharge has a relatively small volume, e.g., in the micro-liter range. A first electrode and a second electrode are disposed within the discharge chamber and a discharge gap is established therebetween. A sample gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a sample gas to the discharge chamber. Also, a plasma gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a plasma gas thereto. Accordingly, the plasma gas can be used to maintain microplasma discharge between the electrodes and the sample gas can be introduced into the microplasma discharge. A spectrometer optically connected to the handheld/portable detector is used to measure the radiation emitted by the sample gas when subjected to the microplasma discharge.

  7. Analytical methods and monitoring system for E-beam flue gas treatment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licki, J.; Chmielewski, A. G.; Iller, E.; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.; Tokunaga, O.; Hashimoto, S.

    1998-06-01

    The results of reliable and precise measurement of gas composition in different key points of e-beam installation are necessary for its proper operation and control. Only the composition of flue gas coming into installation is adequate to composition of flue gas emitted from coal-fired boiler. At other points of e-b installation the gas composition is strongly modified by process conditions therefore specific measuring system (sampling and conditioning system and set of gas analyzers) for its determination are required. In the paper system for gas composition measurement at inlet and outlet of e-b installation are described. Process parameters are continuously monitoring by CEM system and occasionally by the grab sample system. Both system have been tested at pilot plant at EPS Kawȩczyn.

  8. Multigas Leakage Correction in Static Environmental Chambers Using Sulfur Hexafluoride and Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; von Fischer, Joseph C; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    In static environmental chamber experiments, the precision of gas flux measurements can be significantly improved by a thorough gas leakage correction to avoid under- or overestimation of biological activity such as respiration or photosynthesis. Especially in the case of small biological net gas exchange rates or gas accumulation phases during long environmental monitoring experiments, gas leakage fluxes could distort the analysis of the biogenic gas kinetics. Here we propose and demonstrate a general protocol for online correction of diffusion-driven gas leakage in plant chambers by simultaneous quantification of the inert tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and the investigated biogenic gases using enhanced Raman spectroscopy. By quantifying the leakage rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with SF6 in the test chamber, their effective diffusivity ratios of approximately 1.60, 1.96, and 5.65 were determined, each related to SF6. Because our experiments suggest that the effective diffusivity ratios are reproducible for an individual static environmental chamber, even under varying concentration gradients and slight changes of the chamber sealing, an experimental method to quantify gas leakage fluxes by using effective diffusivity ratios and SF6 leakage fluxes is proposed. The method is demonstrated by quantifying the CO2 net exchange rate of a plant-soil ecosystem (Mirabilis jalapa). By knowing the effective chamber diffusivity ratio CO2/SF6 and the measured SF6 leakage rate during the experiment, the leakage contribution to the total CO2 exchange rate could be calculated and the biological net CO2 concentration change within the chamber atmosphere determined. PMID:26492154

  9. Multigas Leakage Correction in Static Environmental Chambers Using Sulfur Hexafluoride and Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; von Fischer, Joseph C; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    In static environmental chamber experiments, the precision of gas flux measurements can be significantly improved by a thorough gas leakage correction to avoid under- or overestimation of biological activity such as respiration or photosynthesis. Especially in the case of small biological net gas exchange rates or gas accumulation phases during long environmental monitoring experiments, gas leakage fluxes could distort the analysis of the biogenic gas kinetics. Here we propose and demonstrate a general protocol for online correction of diffusion-driven gas leakage in plant chambers by simultaneous quantification of the inert tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and the investigated biogenic gases using enhanced Raman spectroscopy. By quantifying the leakage rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with SF6 in the test chamber, their effective diffusivity ratios of approximately 1.60, 1.96, and 5.65 were determined, each related to SF6. Because our experiments suggest that the effective diffusivity ratios are reproducible for an individual static environmental chamber, even under varying concentration gradients and slight changes of the chamber sealing, an experimental method to quantify gas leakage fluxes by using effective diffusivity ratios and SF6 leakage fluxes is proposed. The method is demonstrated by quantifying the CO2 net exchange rate of a plant-soil ecosystem (Mirabilis jalapa). By knowing the effective chamber diffusivity ratio CO2/SF6 and the measured SF6 leakage rate during the experiment, the leakage contribution to the total CO2 exchange rate could be calculated and the biological net CO2 concentration change within the chamber atmosphere determined.

  10. Method For Enhanced Gas Monitoring In High Density Flow Streams

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Mulderink, Kenneth A.; Marin, Ovidiu

    2005-09-13

    A method for conducting laser absorption measurements in high temperature process streams having high levels of particulate matter is disclosed. An impinger is positioned substantially parallel to a laser beam propagation path and at upstream position relative to the laser beam. Beam shielding pipes shield the beam from the surrounding environment. Measurement is conducted only in the gap between the two shielding pipes where the beam propagates through the process gas. The impinger facilitates reduced particle presence in the measurement beam, resulting in improved SNR (signal-to-noise) and improved sensitivity and dynamic range of the measurement.

  11. Applications of optical measurement technology in pollution gas monitoring at thermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Yu, Dahai; Ye, Huajun; Yang, Jianhu; Ke, Liang; Han, Shuanglai; Gu, Haitao; Chen, Yingbin

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the work of using advanced optical measurement techniques to implement stack gas emission monitoring and process control. A system is designed to conduct online measurement of SO2/NOX and mercury emission from stacks and slipping NH3 of de-nitrification process. The system is consisted of SO2/NOX monitoring subsystem, mercury monitoring subsystem, and NH3 monitoring subsystem. The SO2/NOX monitoring subsystem is developed based on the ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV-DOAS) technique. By using this technique, a linearity error less than +/-1% F.S. is achieved, and the measurement errors resulting from optical path contamination and light fluctuation are removed. Moreover, this subsystem employs in situ extraction and hot-wet line sampling technique to significantly reduce SO2 loss due to condensation and protect gas pipeline from corrosion. The mercury monitoring subsystem is used to measure the concentration of element mercury (Hg0), oxidized mercury (Hg2+), and total gaseous mercury (HgT) in the flue gas exhaust. The measurement of Hg with a low detection limit (0.1μg/m3) and a high sensitivity is realized by using cold vapor atom fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS) technique. This subsystem is also equipped with an inertial separation type sampling technique to prevent gas pipeline from being clogged and to reduce speciation mercury measurement error. The NH3 monitoring subsystem is developed to measure the concentration of slipping NH3 and then to help improving the efficiency of de-nitrification. The NH3 concentration as low as 0.1ppm is able to be measured by using the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) and the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) techniques. The problem of trace NH3 sampling loss is solved by applying heating the gas pipelines when the measurement is running.

  12. Application of Condition-Based Monitoring Techniques for Remote Monitoring of a Simulated Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, David A; Henkel, James J; Whitaker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents research into the adaptation of monitoring techniques from maintainability and reliability (M&R) engineering for remote unattended monitoring of gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) for international safeguards. Two categories of techniques are discussed: the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for diagnostic monitoring, and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC or, more commonly, particle filtering ) for prognostic monitoring. Development and testing of the application of condition-based monitoring (CBM) techniques was performed on the Oak Ridge Mock Feed and Withdrawal (F&W) facility as a proof of principle. CBM techniques have been extensively developed for M&R assessment of physical processes, such as manufacturing and power plants. These techniques are normally used to locate and diagnose the effects of mechanical degradation of equipment to aid in planning of maintenance and repair cycles. In a safeguards environment, however, the goal is not to identify mechanical deterioration, but to detect and diagnose (and potentially predict) attempts to circumvent normal, declared facility operations, such as through protracted diversion of enriched material. The CBM techniques are first explained from the traditional perspective of maintenance and reliability engineering. The adaptation of CBM techniques to inspector monitoring is then discussed, focusing on the unique challenges of decision-based effects rather than equipment degradation effects. These techniques are then applied to the Oak Ridge Mock F&W facility a water-based physical simulation of a material feed and withdrawal process used at enrichment plants that is used to develop and test online monitoring techniques for fully information-driven safeguards of GCEPs. Advantages and limitations of the CBM approach to online monitoring are discussed, as well as the potential challenges of adapting CBM concepts to safeguards applications.

  13. Sensor-based analyzer for continuous emission monitoring in gas pipeline applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, P.F.; Sheridan, D.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Banchieri, A.J.

    1998-04-01

    Continuous emissions monitoring of gas turbine engines in pipeline service have typically been monitored using either laboratory derived instruments (CEMS), or predicted using data from low cost sensors on the engines and algorithms generated by mapping engine performance (PEMS). A new cost-effective system developed under a program sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (Chicago) combines the advantages of both systems to monitor engine emissions in gas transmission service. This hybrid system is a sensor-based analyzer that uses a sensor array, including a newly developed NO{sub x} sensor, to directly monitor NO{sub x}, CO, and O{sub 2} emissions at the stack. The gases are measured hot and wet. The new systems were installed and tested on a gas-fired Rolls Royce Spey turbine engine and on Ingersoll-Rand KVG-410 and Cooper GMVH-10 reciprocating engines in gas transmission service. These systems passed the Relative Accuracy Test (Part B) required under US EPA regulations (40 CFR 60).

  14. Laboratory Connections--Gas Monitoring Transducers Part III: Combustible Gas Sensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Michael H.; Dahman, Doug

    1989-01-01

    Describes an interface that uses semiconductor metal oxides to detect low gas concentrations. Notes the detector has long life, high stability, good reproducibility, low cost, and is able to convert the gas concentration to an electrical signal with a simple circuit. Theory, schematic, and applications are provided. (MVL)

  15. Prediction of back-scatter radiations to a beam monitor chamber of medical linear accelerators by use of the digitized target-current-pulse analysis method.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Naoki; Kato, Hideki; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Kawano, Makoto; Nishii, Yoshio; Nakamura, Masaru; Mukouyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In small-field irradiation, the back-scattered radiation (BSR) affects the counts measured with a beam monitor chamber (BMC). In general, the effect of the BSR depends on the opened-jaw size. The effect is significantly large in small-field irradiation. Our purpose in this study was to predict the effect of BSR on LINAC output accurately with an improved target-current-pulse (TCP) technique. The pulse signals were measured with a system consisting of a personal computer and a digitizer. The pulse signals were analyzed with in-house software. The measured parameters were the number of pulses, the change in the waveform and the integrated signal values of the TCPs. The TCPs were measured for various field sizes with four linear accelerators. For comparison, Yu's method in which a universal counter was used was re-examined. The results showed that the variance of the measurements by the new method was reduced to approximately 1/10 of the variance by the previous method. There was no significant variation in the number of pulses due to a change in the field size in the Varian Clinac series. However, a change in the integrated signal value was observed. This tendency was different from the result of other investigations in the past. Our prediction method is able to define the cutoff voltage for the TCP acquired by digitizer. This functionality provides the capability of clearly classifying TCPs into signals and noise. In conclusion, our TCP analysis method can predict the effect of BSR on the BMC even for small-field irradiations.

  16. Chamber propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, B.

    1991-01-16

    Propagation of a heavy ion beam to the target appears possible under conditions thought to be realizable by several reactor designs. Beam quality at the lens is believed to provide adequate intensity at the target -- but the beam must pass through chamber debris and its self fields along the way. This paper reviews present consensus on propagation modes and presents recent results on the effects of photoionization of the beam ions by thermal x-rays from the heated target. Ballistic propagation through very low densities is a conservative mode. The more-speculative self-pinched mode, at 1 to 10 Torr, offers reactor advantages and is being re-examined by others. 13 refs.

  17. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  18. Diffuse gas emissions at the Ukinrek Maars, Alaska: Implications for magmatic degassing and volcanic monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; McGimsey, R.G.; Hunt, A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse CO2 efflux near the Ukinrek Maars, two small volcanic craters that formed in 1977 in a remote part of the Alaska Peninsula, was investigated using accumulation chamber measurements. High CO2 efflux, in many places exceeding 1000 g m-2 d-1, was found in conspicuous zones of plant damage or kill that cover 30,000-50,000 m2 in area. Total diffuse CO2 emission was estimated at 21-44 t d-1. Gas vents 3-km away at The Gas Rocks produce 0.5 t d-1 of CO2 that probably derives from the Ukinrek Maars basalt based on similar ??13C values (???-6???), 3He/4He ratios (5.9-7.2 RA), and CO2/3He ratios (1-2 ?? 109) in the two areas. A lower 3He/4He ratio (2.7 RA) and much higher CO2/3He ratio (9 ?? 1010) in gas from the nearest arc-front volcanic center (Mount Peulik/Ugashik) provide a useful comparison. The large diffuse CO2 emission at Ukinrek has important implications for magmatic degassing, subsurface gas transport, and local toxicity hazards. Gas-water-rock interactions play a major role in the location, magnitude and chemistry of the emissions.

  19. Quantitative analysis of deuterium in zircaloy using double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) and helium gas plasma without a sample chamber.

    PubMed

    Suyanto, H; Lie, Z S; Niki, H; Kagawa, K; Fukumoto, K; Rinda, Hedwig; Abdulmadjid, S N; Marpaung, A M; Pardede, M; Suliyanti, M M; Hidayah, A N; Jobiliong, E; Lie, T J; Tjia, M O; Kurniawan, K H

    2012-03-01

    A crucial safety measure to be strictly observed in the operation of heavy-water nuclear power plants is the mandatory regular inspection of the concentration of deuterium penetrated into the zircaloy fuel vessels. The existing standard method requires a tedious, destructive, and costly sample preparation process involving the removal of the remaining fuel in the vessel and melting away part of the zircaloy pipe. An alternative method of orthogonal dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) is proposed by employing flowing atmospheric helium gas without the use of a sample chamber. The special setup of ps and ns laser systems, operated for the separate ablation of the sample target and the generation of helium gas plasma, respectively, with properly controlled relative timing, has succeeded in producing the desired sharp D I 656.10 nm emission line with effective suppression of the interfering H I 656.28 nm emission by operating the ps ablation laser at very low output energy of 26 mJ and 1 μs ahead of the helium plasma generation. Under this optimal experimental condition, a linear calibration line is attained with practically zero intercept and a 20 μg/g detection limit for D analysis of zircaloy sample while creating a crater only 10 μm in diameter. Therefore, this method promises its potential application for the practical, in situ, and virtually nondestructive quantitative microarea analysis of D, thereby supporting the more-efficient operation and maintenance of heavy-water nuclear power plants. Furthermore, it will also meet the anticipated needs of future nuclear fusion power plants, as well as other important fields of application in the foreseeable future.

  20. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guangwen; Shen, Yu; Hao, Xiaowei; Yuan, Zongming; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications. PMID:26393596

  1. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangwen; Shen, Yu; Hao, Xiaowei; Yuan, Zongming; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-09-18

    Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications.

  2. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  3. High-Resolution Gas Metering and Nonintrusive Appliance Load Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    This thesis deals with design and implementation of a high-resolution metering system for residential natural gas meters. Detailed experimental measurements are performed on the meter to characterize and understand its measurement properties. Results from these experiments are used to develop a simple, fast and accurate technique to non-intrusively monitor the gas consumption of individual appliances in homes by resolving small amounts of gas usage. The technique is applied on an existing meter retrofitted with a module that includes a high-resolution encoder to collect gas flow data and a microprocessor to analyze and identify appliance load profiles. This approach provides a number of appealing features including low cost, easy installation and integration with automated meter reading (AMR) systems. The application of this method to residential gas meters currently deployed is also given. This is done by performing a load simulation on realistic gas loads with the aim of identifying the necessary parameters that minimize the cost and complexity of the mechanical encoder module. The primary benefits of the system are efficiency analysis, appliance health monitoring and real-time customer feedback of gas usage. Additional benefits of include the ability to detect very small leaks and theft. This system has the potential for wide scale market adoption.

  4. Novel method for online monitoring of dissolved N2O concentrations through a gas stripping device.

    PubMed

    Mampaey, Kris E; van Dongen, Udo G J M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment plants are currently measured by online gas phase analysis or grab sampling from the liquid phase. In this study, a novel method is presented to monitor the liquid phase N2O concentration for aerated as well as non-aerated conditions/reactors, following variations both in time and in space. The monitoring method consists of a gas stripping device, of which the measurement principle is based on a continuous flow of reactor liquid through a stripping flask and subsequent analysis of the N2O concentration in the stripped gas phase. The method was theoretically and experimentally evaluated for its fit for use in the wastewater treatment context. Besides, the influence of design and operating variables on the performance of the gas stripping device was addressed. This method can easily be integrated with online off-gas measurements and allows to better investigate the origin of the gas emissions from the treatment plant. Liquid phase measurements of N2O are of use in mitigation of these emissions. The method can also be applied to measure other dissolved gasses, such as methane, being another important greenhouse gas.

  5. Novel method for online monitoring of dissolved N2O concentrations through a gas stripping device.

    PubMed

    Mampaey, Kris E; van Dongen, Udo G J M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment plants are currently measured by online gas phase analysis or grab sampling from the liquid phase. In this study, a novel method is presented to monitor the liquid phase N2O concentration for aerated as well as non-aerated conditions/reactors, following variations both in time and in space. The monitoring method consists of a gas stripping device, of which the measurement principle is based on a continuous flow of reactor liquid through a stripping flask and subsequent analysis of the N2O concentration in the stripped gas phase. The method was theoretically and experimentally evaluated for its fit for use in the wastewater treatment context. Besides, the influence of design and operating variables on the performance of the gas stripping device was addressed. This method can easily be integrated with online off-gas measurements and allows to better investigate the origin of the gas emissions from the treatment plant. Liquid phase measurements of N2O are of use in mitigation of these emissions. The method can also be applied to measure other dissolved gasses, such as methane, being another important greenhouse gas. PMID:25573615

  6. Viability of modelling gas transport in shallow injection-monitoring experiment field at Maguelone, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirat, Farzad; Perroud, Hervé; Lofi, Johanna; Denchik, Nataliya; Lods, Gérard; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Sharma, Prabhakar; Pezard, Philippe; Niemi, Auli

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TOUGH2/EOS7CA model is used to simulate the shallow injection-monitoring experiment carried out at Maguelone, France, during 2012 and 2013. The possibility of CO2 leakage from storage reservoir to upper layers is one of the issues that need to be addressed in CCS projects. Developing reliable monitoring techniques to detect and characterize CO2 leakage is necessary for the safety of CO2 storage in reservoir formations. To test and cross-validate different monitoring techniques, a series of shallow gas injection-monitoring experiments (SIMEx) has been carried out at the Maguelone. The experimental site is documented in Lofi et al [2013]. At the site, a series of nitrogen and one CO2 injection experiment have been carried out during 2012-2013 and different monitoring techniques have been applied. The purpose of modelling is to acquire understanding of the system performance as well as to further develop and validate modelling approaches for gas transport in the shallow subsurface, against the well-controlled data sets. The preliminary simulation of the experiment including the simulation for the Nitrogen injection test in 2012 was presented in Basirat et al [2013]. In this work, the simulations represent the gaseous CO2 distribution and dissolved CO2 within range obtained by monitoring approaches. The Multiphase modelling in combination with geophysical monitoring can be used for process understanding of gas phase migration- and mass transfer processes resulting from gaseous CO2 injection. Basirat, F., A. Niemi, H. Perroud, J. Lofi, N. Denchik, G. Lods, P. Pezard, P. Sharma, and F. Fagerlund (2013), Modeling Gas Transport in the Shallow Subsurface in Maguelone Field Experiment, Energy Procedia, 40, 337-345. Lofi, J., P. Pezard, F. Bouchette, O. Raynal, P. Sabatier, N. Denchik, A. Levannier, L. Dezileau, and R. Certain (2013), Integrated Onshore-Offshore Investigation of a Mediterranean Layered Coastal Aquifer, Groundwater, 51(4), 550-561.

  7. Performance in real condition of photonic crystal sensor based NO2 gas monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmat, M.; Maulina, W.; Rustami, E.; Azis, M.; Budiarti, D. R.; Seminar, K. B.; Yuwono, A. S.; Alatas, H.

    2013-11-01

    In this report we discuss the performance in real condition of an optical based real-time NO2 gas monitoring system. For detecting the gas concentration in the ambient air we have developed an optical sensor based on one-dimensional photonic crystal with two defects that allows the existence of photonic pass band inside the associated photonic band gap. To measure the gas concentration, we dissolve the corresponding NO2 gas into a specific Griess Saltzman reagent solution. The change of gas concentration in the related dissolved-solution can be inspected by the photonic pass band peak variation. It is observed that the wavelength of the photonic pass band peak of the fabricated photonic crystal is nearly coincide with the wavelength of the associated solution highest absorbance. The laboratory test shows that the device works properly, whereas the field measurement test demonstrates accurate results with validation error of 1.56%.

  8. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  9. All-in-one: a versatile gas sensor based on fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy for monitoring postharvest fruit conservation and ripening.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Rahal, Leila; Suckert, Renè J; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2016-03-21

    In today's fruit conservation rooms the ripening of harvested fruit is delayed by precise management of the interior oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. Ethylene (C2H4), a natural plant hormone, is commonly used to trigger fruit ripening shortly before entering the market. Monitoring of these critical process gases, also of the increasingly favored cooling agent ammonia (NH3), is a crucial task in modern postharvest fruit management. The goal of this work was to develop and characterize a gas sensor setup based on fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy for fast (time resolution of a few minutes) and non-destructive process gas monitoring throughout the complete postharvest production chain encompassing storage and transport in fruit conservation chambers as well as commercial fruit ripening in industrial ripening rooms. Exploiting a micro-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for analyte gas confinement and sensitivity enhancement, the sensor features simultaneous quantification of O2, CO2, NH3 and C2H4 without cross-sensitivity in just one single measurement. Laboratory measurements of typical fruit conservation gas mixtures showed that the sensor is capable of quantifying O2 and CO2 concentration levels with accuracy of 3% or less with respect to reference concentrations. The sensor detected ammonia concentrations, relevant for chemical alarm purposes. Due to the high spectral resolution of the gas sensor, ethylene could be quantified simultaneously with O2 and CO2 in a multi-component mixture. These results indicate that fiber enhanced Raman sensors have a potential to become universally usable on-site gas sensors for controlled atmosphere applications in postharvest fruit management.

  10. All-in-one: a versatile gas sensor based on fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy for monitoring postharvest fruit conservation and ripening.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Rahal, Leila; Suckert, Renè J; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2016-03-21

    In today's fruit conservation rooms the ripening of harvested fruit is delayed by precise management of the interior oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. Ethylene (C2H4), a natural plant hormone, is commonly used to trigger fruit ripening shortly before entering the market. Monitoring of these critical process gases, also of the increasingly favored cooling agent ammonia (NH3), is a crucial task in modern postharvest fruit management. The goal of this work was to develop and characterize a gas sensor setup based on fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy for fast (time resolution of a few minutes) and non-destructive process gas monitoring throughout the complete postharvest production chain encompassing storage and transport in fruit conservation chambers as well as commercial fruit ripening in industrial ripening rooms. Exploiting a micro-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for analyte gas confinement and sensitivity enhancement, the sensor features simultaneous quantification of O2, CO2, NH3 and C2H4 without cross-sensitivity in just one single measurement. Laboratory measurements of typical fruit conservation gas mixtures showed that the sensor is capable of quantifying O2 and CO2 concentration levels with accuracy of 3% or less with respect to reference concentrations. The sensor detected ammonia concentrations, relevant for chemical alarm purposes. Due to the high spectral resolution of the gas sensor, ethylene could be quantified simultaneously with O2 and CO2 in a multi-component mixture. These results indicate that fiber enhanced Raman sensors have a potential to become universally usable on-site gas sensors for controlled atmosphere applications in postharvest fruit management. PMID:26882863

  11. A Three Dimensional Beam Profile Monitor Based on Residual Gas Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.A.; Shapira, D.

    1998-11-04

    A three-dimensional beam profile monitor based on tracking the ionization of the residual gas molecules in the evacuated beam pipe is described. Tracking in position and time of the ions and electrons produced in the ionization enables simultaneous position sampling in three dimensions. Special features which make it possible to sample very low beam currents were employed.

  12. 40 CFR 60.107a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas combustion devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...” type measurement) following the “Gas Processors Association Standard 2377-86, Test for Hydrogen Sulfide... heating capacity of less than 100 MMBtu and is equipped with low-NOX burners (LNB) or ultra low-NOX burners (ULNB) is not subject to the monitoring requirements in paragraphs (c)(1) through (5) of...

  13. Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, M.B.; Nakagawa, S.; Moridis, G.J.

    2009-11-01

    In this work we begin to examine the feasibility of using time-lapse seismic methods-specifically the vertical seismic profiling (VSP) method-for monitoring changes in hydrate accumulations that are predicted to occur during production of natural gas.

  14. 40 CFR 60.107a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas combustion devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... produced in process units that are intolerant to sulfur contamination, such as fuel gas streams produced in... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES... monitoring and recording the concentration (dry basis, 0 percent excess air) of SO2 emissions into...

  15. 40 CFR 60.107a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas combustion devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... produced in process units that are intolerant to sulfur contamination, such as fuel gas streams produced in... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES... monitoring and recording the concentration (dry basis, 0 percent excess air) of SO2 emissions into...

  16. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  17. Design layout for gas monitoring system II (GMS-2) computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, V.; Philipp, B.L.; Manke, M.P.

    1995-08-02

    This document provides a general overview of the computer systems software that perform the data acquisition and control for the 241-SY-101 Gas Monitoring System II (GMS-2). It outlines the system layout, and contains descriptions of components and the functions they perform. The GMS-2 system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company

  18. Effect of headspace mixing in static chambers and sampling protocol on calculated CH4 fluxes from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juszczak, R.; Pihlatie, M.; Christiansen, J. R.; Giebels, M.; Schreiber, P.; Aaltonen, H.; Korhonen, J.; Rasilo, T.; Chojnicki, B. H.; Urbaniak, M.

    2009-04-01

    Closed static chambers are often used for greenhouse gas flux measurements from soils. The type of chamber, chamber handling and sampling protocol can influence the measurements. In most cases the calculated fluxes are suspected to be underestimated mainly because of reduction of gas diffusion from the soil to chamber headspace due to changed trace gas concentration gradient. Thus, fans are often applied to obtain better mixing of the air inside the chamber headspace and in turn reduce the negative effect of decreased concentration gradient. The open question is, however, to which extent the fluxes are changed by fans and whether they still remain underestimated or may even be overestimated? On the other hand, different sampling protocols are used assuming that they do not affect the flux measurements. To test different types of static chambers and different sampling procedures applied for measurement of greenhouse gas (CH4 and N2O) fluxes a chamber calibration campaign was organized at Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland during August-October 2008. The main aim of the campaign was to quantitatively assess the uncertaintities and errors related to static chamber measurements. During this campaign static chambers were tested for 5 different CH4 and N2O flux levels with 3 different soil conditions (moisture and porosity) in a calibration tank described by Pumpanen et al. (2004). Among the different experiments, several special tests were carried out with the closed static chambers. Here, results of two special tests are presented to document whether 1) the air mixing inside the chamber headspace, 2) different sampling procedures influence the CH4 fluxes, and 3) how different calculation methods lead to varying results. Two static chambers of different volumes (65.5 and 195 liters) but with the same circular shape and surface area were connected to a LOS GATOS fats methane analyzer. The CH4 concentration inside the chamber headspace was monitored

  19. Ocean observatory networks monitor gas hydrates systems - Updates from Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwath, M.; Kelley, D. S.; Moran, K.; Philip, B. T.; Roemer, M.; Riedel, M.; Solomon, E. A.; Spence, G.; Heesemann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor observatories have been installed at the Cascadia margin with a long-term (>20 year) lifespan. These observatories consist of a variety of node locations cabled back to shore for continuous power and communication to instruments via high bandwidth internet access. Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) maintains two hydrate sites at Barkley Canyon and Clayoquot Slope off Vancouver Island, and the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Cabled Array connects to Hydrate Ridge off the Oregon coast. Together, these installations comprise a diverse suite of different experiments. For example, a seafloor crawler, operated by Jacobs University in Bremen, travels around the Barkley hydrate mounds on a daily basis and carries out a suite of measurements such as determining the rate of change of the benthic community composition. Another example is from several years of hourly sonar data showing gas bubbles rising from the seafloor near the Bullseye Vent with varying intensities, allowing statistically sound correlations with other seafloor parameters such as ground shaking, temperature and pressure variations and currents, where tidal pressure appearing as the main driver. The Southern Hydrate Ridge is now equipped with the world's first long-term seafloor mass spectrometer, co-located with a camera and lights, hydrophone, current meters, pressure sensor, autonomous dissolved oxygen and fluid samplers, and is surrounded by a seismometer array for local seismicity. In the future, long-term data will be continuously captured and made available throughout the year covering the full range of variations of the dynamic hydrate system, and expect additional experiments to be connected to the observatories from the broader research community.

  20. Designing optimal greenhouse gas monitoring networks for Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziehn, T.; Law, R. M.; Rayner, P. J.; Roff, G.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric transport inversion is commonly used to infer greenhouse gas (GHG) flux estimates from concentration measurements. The optimal location of ground-based observing stations that supply these measurements can be determined by network design. Here, we use a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) in reverse mode together with a Bayesian inverse modelling framework to derive optimal GHG observing networks for Australia. This extends the network design for carbon dioxide (CO2) performed by Ziehn et al. (2014) to also minimise the uncertainty on the flux estimates for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), both individually and in a combined network using multiple objectives. Optimal networks are generated by adding up to five new stations to the base network, which is defined as two existing stations, Cape Grim and Gunn Point, in southern and northern Australia respectively. The individual networks for CO2, CH4 and N2O and the combined observing network show large similarities because the flux uncertainties for each GHG are dominated by regions of biologically productive land. There is little penalty, in terms of flux uncertainty reduction, for the combined network compared to individually designed networks. The location of the stations in the combined network is sensitive to variations in the assumed data uncertainty across locations. A simple assessment of economic costs has been included in our network design approach, considering both establishment and maintenance costs. Our results suggest that, while site logistics change the optimal network, there is only a small impact on the flux uncertainty reductions achieved with increasing network size.

  1. Monitoring for Methane Gas in Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah, 1995-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, Andrew L.; Stolp, Bernard J.; Johnson, Kevin K.; Hunt, Gilbert L.

    2006-01-01

    The release of methane gas from coal beds creates the potential for it to move into near-surface environments through natural and human-made pathways. To help ensure the safety of communities and determine the potential effects of development of coal-bed resources, methane gas concentrations in soils and ground water in Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah, were monitored from 1995 to 2003. A total of 420 samples were collected, which contained an average methane concentration of 2,740 parts per million by volume (ppmv) and a median concentration of less than 10 ppmv. On the basis of spatial and temporal methane concentration data collected during the monitoring period, there does not appear to be an obvious, widespread, or consistent migration of methane gas to the near-surface environment.

  2. Estimates of in situ gas hydrate concentration from resistivity monitoring of gas hydrate bearing sediments during temperature equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, M.; Long, P.E.; Collett, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 at southern Hydrate Ridge off Oregon we have monitored changes in sediment electrical resistivity during controlled gas hydrate dissociation experiments. Two cores were used, each filled with gas hydrate bearing sediments (predominantly mud/silty mud). One core was from Site 1249 (1249F-9H3), 42.1 m below seafloor (mbsf) and the other from Site 1248 (1248C-4X1), 28.8 mbsf. At Site 1247, a third experiment was conducted on a core without gas hydrate (1247B-2H1, 3.6 mbsf). First, the cores were imaged using an infra-red (IR) camera upon recovery to map the gas hydrate occurrence through dissociation cooling. Over a period of several hours, successive runs on the multi-sensor track (includes sensors for P-wave velocity, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and gamma-ray density) were carried out complemented by X-ray imaging on core 1249F-9H3. After complete equilibration to room temperature (17-18??C) and complete gas hydrate dissociation, the final measurement of electrical resistivity was used to calculate pore-water resistivity and salinities. The calculated pore-water freshening after dissociation is equivalent to a gas hydrate concentration in situ of 35-70% along core 1249F-9H3 and 20-35% for core 1248C-4X1 assuming seawater salinity of in situ pore fluid. Detailed analysis of the IR scan, X-ray images and split-core photographs showed the hydrate mainly occurred disseminated throughout the core. Additionally, in core 1249F-9H3, a single hydrate filled vein, approximately 10 cm long and dipping at about 65??, was identified. Analyses of the logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity data revealed a structural dip of 40-80?? in the interval between 40 and 44 mbsf. We further analyzed all resistivity data measured on the recovered core during Leg 204. Generally poor data quality due to gas cracks allowed analyses to be carried out only at selected intervals at Sites 1244, 1245, 1246, 1247, 1248, 1249, and 1252. With a few

  3. Exhaust gas monitoring based on absorption spectroscopy in the process industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Shu, Xiao-wen; Kan, Rui-feng; Cui, Yi-ben; He, Ying; Xu, Zhen-yu; Geng, Hui; Liu, Jian-guo

    2009-07-01

    This non-invasive gas monitor for exhaust gas monitoring must has high reliability and requires little maintenance. Monitor for in-situ measurements using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) in the near infrared, can meet these requirements. TDLAS has evolved over the past decade from a laboratory especially to an accepted, robust and reliable technology for trace gas sensing. With the features of tunability and narrow linewidth of the distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser and by precisely tuning the laser output wavelength to a single isolated absorption line of the gas, TDLAS technique can be utilized to measure gas concentration with high sensitivity. Typical applications for monitoring of H2S, NH3, HC1 and HF are described here together by wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic(WMS-2F) detection. This paper will illustrate the problems related to on-line applications, in particular, the overfall effects, automatic light intensity correction, temperature correction, which impacted on absorption coefficient and give details of how effect of automatic correction is necessary. The system mainly includes optics and electronics, optical system mainly composed of fiber, fiber coupler and beam expander, the electron part has been placed in safe analysis room not together with the optical part. Laser merely passes through one-meter-long pipes by the fiber coupling technology, so the system itself has anti-explosion. The results of the system are also presented in the end, the system's response time is only 0.5s, and can be achieved below 1×10-5 the detection limit at the volume fraction, it can entirely replace the traditional methods of detection exhaust gas in the process industry.

  4. Design and Fabrication of A Modern Radon-Tight Chamber for Radon Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhalemi, Ahmed; Jaafar, M. S.

    2010-07-01

    A modern radon-tight chamber (RTC) has been designed and fabricated to meet the request and requirements for both the Professional Continuous Radon Monitor (PCRM), and the RAD7 radon detector. The chamber is cubic shaped, made of Perspex with a volume of about 0.125 m3. The RTC was also equipped with a thermometer and a humidity sensor. A pair of gloves was attached on one side of the chamber's lateral opening for operating the PCRM. In addition, a fan was installed to circulate the air, and to distribute the radon gas to ensure homogeneity after the air inside the chamber is evacuated with nitrogen gas. At the end of the monitoring period, the results of the concentration of the radon emanated from a sample placed inside the chamber will then be available in any of three forms: numerical display on the control panel of the radon detector, printed report on the accessory printer, or transferred into a file on a personal computer via the RS-232 Serial port without disturbing the radon concentration inside the chamber. Computer software is provided by the manufacturer for this purpose. The result of analysis was presented in a one-way ANOVA that indicated that the radon concentration means are not difference for the three different positions of the PCRM (P > 0.05). Thus, this RTC can be used to measure the radon concentration and its progeny; in addition, it can be used for research and useful studies on radon exhalation from building materials.

  5. Vapor concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  6. Ground gas monitoring: implications for hydraulic fracturing and CO2 storage.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Christopher J; Hall, Jean A; Martin, John P; Manning, David A C

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) between the geosphere and atmosphere is essential for the management of anthropogenic emissions. Human activities such as carbon capture and storage and hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") affect the natural system and pose risks to future global warming and to human health and safety if not engineered to a high standard. In this paper an innovative approach of expressing ground gas compositions is presented, using data derived from regulatory monitoring of boreholes in the unsaturated zone at infrequent intervals (typically 3 months) with data from a high frequency monitoring instrument deployed over periods of weeks. Similar highly variable trends are observed for time scales ranging from decades to hourly for boreholes located close to sanitary landfill sites. Additionally, high frequency monitoring data confirm the effect of meteorological controls on ground gas emissions; the maximum observed CH4 and CO2 concentrations in a borehole monitored over two weeks were 40.1% v/v and 8.5% v/v respectively, but for 70% of the monitoring period only air was present. There is a clear weakness in current point monitoring strategies that may miss emission events and this needs to be considered along with obtaining baseline data prior to starting any engineering activity.

  7. Ground gas monitoring: implications for hydraulic fracturing and CO2 storage.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Christopher J; Hall, Jean A; Martin, John P; Manning, David A C

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) between the geosphere and atmosphere is essential for the management of anthropogenic emissions. Human activities such as carbon capture and storage and hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") affect the natural system and pose risks to future global warming and to human health and safety if not engineered to a high standard. In this paper an innovative approach of expressing ground gas compositions is presented, using data derived from regulatory monitoring of boreholes in the unsaturated zone at infrequent intervals (typically 3 months) with data from a high frequency monitoring instrument deployed over periods of weeks. Similar highly variable trends are observed for time scales ranging from decades to hourly for boreholes located close to sanitary landfill sites. Additionally, high frequency monitoring data confirm the effect of meteorological controls on ground gas emissions; the maximum observed CH4 and CO2 concentrations in a borehole monitored over two weeks were 40.1% v/v and 8.5% v/v respectively, but for 70% of the monitoring period only air was present. There is a clear weakness in current point monitoring strategies that may miss emission events and this needs to be considered along with obtaining baseline data prior to starting any engineering activity. PMID:25363162

  8. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2005-12-01

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was

  9. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  10. Application of thoron interference as a tool for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron with a pulse ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R M; Sumesh, C G; Vinod Kumar, A; Puranik, V D

    2013-07-01

    Pulse ionisation chamber (PIC)-based monitors measuring radioactive gas radon ((222)Rn) without energy discrimination will have interference due to thoron ((220)Rn) present in the atmosphere. A technique has been developed to use this property of interference for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron gas. These monitors work on the principle of counting of gross alphas emitted from radon and its progeny. A theoretical model has been developed for the variation of thoron sensitivity with respect to the flow rate of gas through the monitor. The thoron sensitivity of the monitor is found to vary with the flow rate of gas through the monitor. Using this sensitivity, the sampling procedure has been developed and verified for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron. The PIC-measured radon and thoron concentration using this procedure agrees well with those measured by using standard radon and thoron discriminating monitor.

  11. Gas Bubble Disease Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids : Annual Report 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Hans, Karen M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3).

  12. Promoted-Combustion Chamber with Induction Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Erin; Hagood, Richard; Lowery, Freida; Herald, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    prevent heating of the base of the chamber during use. A sapphire cylinder protects the coil against slag generated during an experiment. The induction coil is energized by a 6-kW water-cooled power supply operating at a frequency of 400 kHz. The induction coil is part of a parallel-tuned circuit, the tuning of which is used to adjust the coupling of power to the specimen. The chamber is mounted on a test stand along with pumps, valves, and plumbing for transferring pressurized gas into and out of the chamber. In addition to multiple video cameras aimed through the windows encircling the chamber, the chamber is instrumented with gauges for monitoring the progress of an experiment. One of the gauges is a dual-frequency infrared temperature transducer aimed at the specimen through one window. Chamber operation is achieved via a console that contains a computer running apparatus-specific software, a video recorder, and real-time video monitors. For safety, a blast wall separates the console from the test stand.

  13. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Atwater, H.F.; Coop, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Integrated gas analyzer for complete monitoring of turbine engine test cells.

    PubMed

    Markham, James R; Bush, Patrick M; Bonzani, Peter J; Scire, James J; Zaccardi, Vincent A; Jalbert, Paul A; Bryant, M Denise; Gardner, Donald G

    2004-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is proving to be reliable and economical for the quantification of many gas-phase species during testing and development of gas turbine engines in ground-based facilities such as sea-level test cells and altitude test cells. FT-IR measurement applications include engine-generated exhaust gases, facility air provided as input to engines, and ambient air in and around test cells. Potentially, the traditionally used assembly of many gas-specific single gas analyzers will be eliminated. However, the quest for a single instrument capable of complete gas-phase monitoring at turbine engine test cells has previously suffered since the FT-IR method cannot measure infrared-inactive oxygen molecules, a key operational gas to both air-breathing propulsion systems and test cell personnel. To further the quest, the FT-IR sensor used for the measurements presented in this article was modified by integration of a miniature, solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. Embedded in the FT-IR unit at a location near the long-effective-optical-path-length gas sampling cell, the amperometric oxygen sensor provides simultaneous, complementary information to the wealth of spectroscopic data provided by the FT-IR method.

  15. Online drilling mud gas monitoring and sampling during drilling the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, Thomas; Almqvist, Bjarne; Klonowska, Iwona; Lorenz, Henning

    2015-04-01

    The COSC project (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) drilled a 2496 m deep hole in Åre (Sweden) to deliver insights into mid-Palaeozoic mountain building processes from continent-continent collision, to improve our understanding of the hydrogeological-hydrochemical state and geothermal gradient of the mountain belt and to study the deep biosphere in the metamorphic rocks and crystalline basement. COSC was the first slimhole drilling project where online gasmonitoring of drilling mud was conducted during continuous wireline coring. Gas was continuously extracted at the surface from the circulating drilling mud with a gas-water separator, pumped in a nearby laboratory container and analysed in real-time with a quadrupole mass spectrometer for argon, methane, helium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and krypton. Gas samples were taken from the gas line for laboratory studies on chemical composition of hydrocarbons, noble gas isotopes and stable isotopes. Every drill core created a gas peak identified in the drilling mud ~20-30 min after core arrival at the surface. With known core depth and surface arrival time, these gas peaks could be attributed to depth. As a result, nearly complete gas depth profiles at three meter intervals were obtained from 662 m (installation of the gas-water separator) to 2490 m depth. Maximum concentrations of non-atmospheric gasses in drilling mud were ~200 ppmv helium, ~300 ppmv methane and ~2 vol-% hydrogen. Helium peaks between ~900 m and 1000 m and correlates with enhanced concentrations of methane. Methane and hydrogen exhibit maximum concentrations below 1630 m depth where helium concentrations remain low. Integration of the drilling mud gas monitoring dataset with data from geophysical downhole logging and core analysis is ongoing to help clarifying provenances and origin of gasses.

  16. Continued Development of Compact Multi-gas Monitor for Life Support Systems Control in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado-Alonso, Jesús; Phillips, Straun; Chullen, Cinda; Quinn, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Miniature optic gas sensors (MOGS) based on luminescent materials have shown great potential as alternatives to Near-Infrared-based gas sensor systems for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS). The unique capability of MOGS for carbon dioxide and oxygen monitoring under wet conditions has been reported, as has the fast recovery of MOGS humidity sensors after long periods of being wet. Lower volume and power requirements are also potential advantages of MOGS over both traditional and advanced Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR) gas sensors, which have shown so far longer life than luminescent sensors. This paper presents the most recent results in the development and analytical validation of a compact multi-gas sensor unit based on luminescent sensors for the PLSS. Results of extensive testing are presented, including studies conducted at Intelligent Optical Systems laboratories, a United Technology Corporation Aerospace Systems (UTAS) laboratory, and a Johnson Space Center laboratory. The potential of this sensor technology for gas monitoring in PLSSs and other life support systems and the advantages and limitations found through detailed sensor validation are discussed.

  17. Measuring volcanic gases at Taal Volcano Main Crater for monitoring volcanic activity and possible gas hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpa, M.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Reniva, P.; Bariso, E.; Padilla, G.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Barrancos, J.; Calvo, D.; Nolasco, D.; Padron, E.; Garduque, R.; Villacorte, E.; Fajiculay, E.; Perez, N.; Solidum, R.

    2012-12-01

    Taal is an active volcano located in southwest Luzon, Philippines. It consists of mainly tuff cones which have formed an island at the center of a 30 km wide Taal Caldera. Most historical eruptions, since 1572 on Taal Volcano Island, have been characterized as hydromagmatic eruptions. Taal Main Crater, produced during the 1911 eruption, is the largest crater in the island currently filled by a 1.2 km wide, 85 m deep acidic lake. The latest historical eruption occurred in 1965-1977. Monitoring of CO2 emissions from the Main Crater Lake (MCL) and fumarolic areas within the Main Crater started in 2008 with a collaborative project between ITER and PHIVOLCS. Measurements were done by accumulation chamber method using a Westsystem portable diffuse fluxmeter. Baseline total diffuse CO2 emissions of less than 1000 t/d were established for the MCL from 3 campaign-type surveys between April, 2008 to March, 2010 when seismicity was within background levels. In May, 2010, anomalous seismic activity from the volcano started and the total CO2 emission from the MCL increased to 2716±54 t/d as measured in August, 2010. The CO2 emission from the lake was highest last March, 2011 at 4670±159 t/d when the volcano was still showing signs of unrest. Because CO2 emissions increased significantly (more than 3 times the baseline value) at this time, this activity may be interpreted as magmatic and not purely hydrothermal. Most likely deep magma intrusions occurred but did not progress further to shallower depths and no eruption occurred. No large increase in lake water temperature near the surface (average for the whole lake area) during the period when CO2 was above background, it remained at 30-34°C and a few degrees lower than average ambient temperature. Total CO2 emissions from the MCL have decreased to within baseline values since October, 2011. Concentrations of CO2, SO2 and H2S in air in the fumarolic area within the Main Crater also increased in March, 2011. The measurements

  18. Residual Gas X-ray Beam Position Monitor Development for PETRA III

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Hahn, U.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Degenhardt, M.

    2007-01-19

    The development effort is driven by the need for a new type of x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM), which will detect the centre of gravity of the undulator beam. XBPMs based on the ionization of a residual gas are considered being the candidate for this future ''white'' undulator beam XBPMs. A number of residual gas XBPM prototypes for the PETRA III storage ring were developed and tested. Tests were performed at DESY and the ESRF, resolution of beam position up to 5 {mu}m is reported. The further development of the RGXBPMs will be focused on improvements of resolution, readout speed and reliability.

  19. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  20. Optical Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B,; Johnson, Michael D.; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    There are a variety of both portable and fixed gas monitors onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Devices range from rack-mounted mass spectrometers to hand-held electrochemical sensors. An optical Multi-Gas Monitor has been developed as an ISS Technology Demonstration to evaluate long-term continuous measurement of 4 gases. Based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy, this technology offers unprecedented selectivity, concentration range, precision, and calibration stability. The monitor utilizes the combination of high performance laser absorption spectroscopy with a rugged optical path length enhancement cell that is nearly impossible to misalign. The enhancement cell serves simultaneously as the measurement sampling cell for multiple laser channels operating within a common measurement volume. Four laser diode based detection channels allow quantitative determination of ISS cabin concentrations of water vapor (humidity), carbon dioxide, ammonia and oxygen. Each channel utilizes a separate vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) at a different wavelength. In addition to measuring major air constituents in their relevant ranges, the multiple gas monitor provides real time quantitative gaseous ammonia measurements between 5 and 20,000 parts-per-million (ppm). A small ventilation fan draws air with no pumps or valves into the enclosure in which analysis occurs. Power draw is only about 3 W from USB sources when installed in Nanoracks or when connected to 28V source from any EXPRESS rack interface. Internal battery power can run the sensor for over 20 hours during portable operation. The sensor is controlled digitally with an FPGA/microcontroller architecture that stores data internally while displaying running average measurements on an LCD screen and interfacing with the rack or laptop via USB. Design, construction and certification of the Multi-Gas Monitor were a joint effort between Vista Photonics, Nanoracks and NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC

  1. Laser Spectroscopy Multi-Gas Monitor: Results of Technology Demonstration on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) is an up and coming trace and major gas monitoring technology with unmatched selectivity, range and stability. The technology demonstration of the 4 gas Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM), reported at the 2014 ICES conference, operated continuously on the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly a year. The MGM is designed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor in ambient cabin air in a low power, relatively compact device. While on board, the MGM experienced a number of challenges, unplanned and planned, including a test of the ammonia channel using a commercial medical ammonia inhalant. Data from the unit was downlinked once per week and compared with other analytical resources on board, notably the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA), a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. MGM spent the majority of the time installed in the Nanoracks Frame 2 payload facility in front breathing mode (sampling the ambient environment of the Japanese Experiment Module), but was also used to analyze recirculated rack air. The capability of the MGM to be operated in portable mode (via internal rechargeable lithium ion polymer batteries or by plugging into any Express Rack 28VDC connector) was a part of the usability demonstration. Results to date show unprecedented stability and accuracy of the MGM vs. the MCA for oxygen and carbon dioxide. The ammonia challenge (approx. 75 ppm) was successful as well, showing very rapid response time in both directions. Work on an expansion of capability in a next generation MGM has just begun. Combustion products and hydrazine are being added to the measurable target analytes. An 8 to 10 gas monitor (aka Gas Tricorder 1.0) is envisioned for use on ISS, Orion and Exploration missions.

  2. Optical Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Johnson, Michael D.; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs a suite of portable and permanently located gas monitors to insure crew health and safety. These sensors are tasked with functions ranging from fixed mass spectrometer based major constituents analysis to portable electrochemical sensor based combustion product monitoring. An all optical multigas sensor is being developed that can provide the specificity of a mass spectrometer with the portability of an electrochemical cell. The technology, developed under the Small Business Innovation Research program, allows for an architecture that is rugged, compact and low power. A four gas version called the Multi-Gas Monitor was launched to ISS in November 2013 aboard Soyuz and activated in February 2014. The portable instrument is comprised of a major constituents analyzer (water vapor, carbon dioxide, oxygen) and high dynamic range real-time ammonia sensor. All species are sensed inside the same enhanced path length optical cell with a separate vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) targeted at each species. The prototype is controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The optical and electronic approaches are designed for scalability and future versions could add three important acid gases and carbon monoxide combustion product gases to the four species already sensed. Results obtained to date from the technology demonstration on ISS are presented and discussed.

  3. Methods to produce calibration mixtures for anesthetic gas monitors and how to perform volumetric calculations on anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P L; Nielsen, J; Kann, T

    1992-10-01

    A simple procedure for making calibration mixtures of oxygen and the anesthetic gases isoflurane, enflurane, and halothane is described. One to ten grams of the anesthetic substance is evaporated in a closed, 11,361-cc glass bottle filled with oxygen gas at atmospheric pressure. The carefully mixed gas is used to calibrate anesthetic gas monitors. By comparison of calculated and measured volumetric results it is shown that at atmospheric conditions the volumetric behavior of anesthetic gas mixtures can be described with reasonable accuracy using the ideal gas law. A procedure is described for calculating the deviation from ideal gas behavior in cases in which this is needed. PMID:1453187

  4. Air Monitoring System in Elders' Apartment with QCM Type Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Masashi; Ito, Tsukasa; Shiratori, Seimei

    The gas monitoring system for elders' apartment using QCM sensors was newly developed. The QCM sensors for sulfide gas and ammonia gas were used for this system. The system for bodily wastes was fabricated and applied to nursing care system in elders' apartment. This system is composed by the sensor unit, communication unit and data server. Care person can see whether the linen should be changed or not without seeing over each room. The QCM sensors have some problems such as the interference of humidity and temperature, therefore these influences were dissolved using humidity sensor and temperature sensor as feedback source. The sensors were placed in several points of elders' apartment for 2 weeks. This system can be used in elders' apartment successfully.

  5. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Luciano B.; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Edouard, Nadège; van Dooren, Hendrik Jan C.; Tinôco, Ilda de Fátima F.; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR) sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo-Acoustic Spectroscope (PAS) Gas Monitor and an Open-Path laser (OP-laser). First, calibrations for the NDIR sensors were obtained in the laboratory. Then, the NDIR sensors were placed in a dairy cow barn for comparison with the PAS and OP-laser methods. The main conclusions were: (a) in order to represent the overall barn CO2 concentration of the dairy cow barn, the number of NDIR sensors to be accounted for average concentration calculation was dependent on barn length and on barn area occupation; and (b) the NDIR CO2 sensors are suitable for multi-point monitoring of CO2 concentrations in NV livestock barns, being a feasible alternative for the PAS and the OP-laser methods to monitor single-point or averaged spatial CO2 concentrations in livestock barns. PMID:25985166

  6. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  7. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  8. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in COAL IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-09-30

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, has been re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for Coal IGCC powerplants. The new program has been re-titled as ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants'' to better match the new scope. This technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished in the reporting period April 1, 2004 to August 31, 2004 on the revised Re-Directed and De-Scoped program activity. The program Tasks are: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: This first materials task has been refocused to address Coal IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials use in gas turbines and remains in the program. This task will screen material performance and quantify the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in Coal IGCC applications. The materials of interest will include those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: This second task develops and demonstrates new sensor technologies to determine the in-service health of advanced technology Coal IGCC powerplants, and remains in the program with a reduced scope. Its focus is now on only two critical sensor need areas for advanced Coal IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor for detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation, and a Fuel Heating Value Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware.

  9. Open-chamber combustion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D. P.; Meyer, R. C.

    1994-04-01

    The test program was undertaken to research trade-offs between engine design and operational parameters on open-chamber, premixed spark-ignited gas engines, with a primary focus on combustion effects. This included combustion chamber designs which are conceptually diametrically opposed -- a high squish design typical of diesel engines and a virtually quiescent design. The reader should note that these data are somewhat abstract compared to conventional engines, because the Labeco test engine has exceptionally high friction and the lean-burn data were run unboosted.

  10. Downhole monitoring of biogenic gas production at the Maguelone shallow injection experimental site (Languedoc coastline, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghafour, H.; Brondolo, F.; Denchik, N.; Pezard, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The controllability of CO2 geological storage can ensure the integrity of storage operations, requiring a precise monitoring of reservoir fluids and properties during injection and over time. In this context, deep saline aquifers offer a large capacity of storing CO2, but the accessibility to long term behavior studies remains limited until now. The Maguelone shallow experimental site located near Montpellier (Languedoc, France) provides such an opportunity for the understanding and accuracy of hydrogeophysical monitoring methods. The geology, petrophysic and hydrology of this site have been studied in details in previous studies, revealing the presence of a thin saline aquifer at 13-16 m depth surrounded by clay-rich materials. The site as a whole provides a natural laboratory to study CO2 injection at field scale, shallow depth, hence reasonable costs. The monitoring setup is composed of a series of hydrogeophysical and geochemical methods offering measurements of fluid pore pressure, electrical resistivity, acoustic velocities as well as pH and fluid properties and chemistry. To assess the response of the reservoir during CO2 injection, all measurements need to be compared to a representative baseline. Long after a series of gas injection experiments at Maguelone, fluctuations overtime of reservoir fluids and properties (such as pore fluid pH) were discovered at steady state, demonstrating the natural variability of the site in terms of biogenic gas (H2S, CH4, CO2) production and transfer. For this, a new resistivity baseline had to be constructed for all observatories. From this, the downhole gas saturation was determined versus depth and time from time-lapse resistivity logs analysed on the basis of other logs and laboratory measurements. The Waxman and Smits model (1968) for electrical properties of sand-clay formations was modified to estimate the gas saturation in 4D, to account for surface conductivity and pore connectivity. High frequency logging and

  11. One year continuous soil gas monitoring above an EGR test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furche, Markus; Schlömer, Stefan; Faber, Eckhard; Dumke, Ingolf

    2010-05-01

    Setup and first results of an ongoing research activity are presented, which is funded by the German Geotechnologien program within in the joint project CLEAN (CO2 Large Scale Enhanced Gas Recovery in the Altmark Natural Gas Field). The task is to establish several soil gas monitoring stations above a partly exhausted gas field in the Altmark which will be used for an enhanced gas recovery (EGR) test by injecting CO2 into the reservoir. The aim is to optimize the monitoring technique including automatic data transfer and data exploitation and to understand mechanisms of natural variations of soil gas concentrations in the specific area. Furthermore the suitability of these measurements as a contribution to leakage detection shall be evaluated. A network of 13 gauging stations for the measurement of CO2 is working continuously for about one year. They are spread over an area of 8 x 3 km and are situated in direct vicinity of existing deep boreholes as the most likely locations for possible leakage. In addition one station is placed far outside the gasfield as a reference point. The technique applied to measure soil gas concentrations uses a gas stream circulating in a tube going down a shallow borehole where the circulating gas is in contact with the soil gas phase via a gas permeable membrane. Above surface, moisture is removed from the gas stream before it reaches several gas sensors for CO2. Besides these, several other parameters are determined as well, e.g. soil moisture and soil temperature, water level, gas flow and gas moisture. In addition a meteorological station gives information about precipitation, air humidity, temperature and pressure, global radiation, wind direction and velocity in the area. Data are continuously collected by dataloggers at each station (5 minutes interval), transferred via GSM routers to the BGR server in Hannover and are stored in a specially designed database. The database does not only contain the measurements but also

  12. On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

    2010-04-22

    IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  13. Modelling of the space-to-drift-time relationship of the ATLAS monitored drift-tube chambers in the presence of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Khartchenko, D.; Kortner, O.; Kotov, S.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, R.; Staude, A.; Valderanis, Ch.

    2007-03-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses tracking chambers consisting of up to 5 m long drift tubes filled with Ar:CO2(93:7) at 3 bar. The chambers are run in a average toroidal magnetic field of 0.4 T created by 8 air core coils. They provide a track-point accuracy of 40 μm if the space-to-drift-time relationship r(t) is known with 20 μm accuracy. The magnetic field B influences the electron drift inside the tubes: the maximum drift time tmax=700 ns increases by ≈70 ns/T2B2. B varies by up to ±0.4 T along the tubes of the chambers mounted near the magnet coils which translates into a variation of tmax of up to 45 ns. The dependence of r(t) on B must be taken into account. Test-beam measurements show that the electron drift in case of B≠0 can be modelled with the required accuracy by a Langevin equation with a friction term which is slightly non-linear in the drift velocity.

  14. Monitoring induced seismicity from underground gas storage: first steps in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, Marco; Priolo, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    The supply of natural gas and its storage are focal points of the Italian politics of energy production and will have increasing importance in the coming years. About a dozen reservoirs are currently in use and fifteen are in development or awaiting approval. Some of these are found in the vicinity of geological structures that are seismically active. The assessment of seismic hazard (both for natural background and induced seismicity) for a geological gas storage facility has a number of unconventional aspects that must be recognized and traced in a clear, ordered way and using guidelines and rules that leave less room as possible for interpretation by the individual applicant / verification body. Similarly, for control and monitoring there are not clearly defined procedures or standard instrumentation, let alone tools for analysing and processing data. Finally, governmental organizations in charge of permission grants and operative control tend to have appropriate scientific knowledge only in certain areas and not in others (e.g. the seismic one), and the establishment of an independent multidisciplinary inspection body appears desirable. The project StoHaz (https://sites.google.com/site/s2stohaz/home) aims to initiate a series of actions to overcome these deficiencies and allow to define procedures and standards for the seismic hazard assessment and control of the activities of natural gas storage in underground reservoirs. OGS will take advantage of the experience gained with the design, installation and maintenance of the seismic network monitoring the Collalto reservoir, at the moment the only example in Italy of a public research institution monitoring independently the activities of a private gas storage company.

  15. Results of a Long-Term Demonstration of an Optical Multi-Gas Monitor on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Previously at SAMAP we reported on the development of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) based instruments for measuring small gas molecules in real time. TDLS technology has matured rapidly over the last 5 years as a result of advances in low power diode lasers as well as better detection schemes. In collaboration with two small businesses Vista Photonics, Inc. and Nanoracks LLC, NASA developed a 4 gas TDLS based monitor for an experimental demonstration of the technology on the International Space Station (ISS). Vista invented and constructed the core TDLS sensor. Nanoracks designed and built the enclosure, and certified the integrated monitor as a payload. The device, which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, is called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM). MGM measures the 4 gases every few seconds and records a 30 second moving average of the concentrations. The relatively small unit draws only 2.5W. MGM was calibrated at NASA-Johnson Space Center in July 2013 and launched to ISS on a Soyuz vehicle in November 2013. Installation and activation of MGM occurred in February 2014, and the unit has been operating nearly continuously ever since in the Japanese Experiment Module. Data is downlinked from ISS about once per week. Oxygen and carbon dioxide data is compared with that from the central Major Constituents Analyzer. Water vapor data is compared with dew point measurements made by sensors in the Columbus module. The ammonia channel was tested by the crew using a commercial ammonia inhalant. MGM is remarkably stable to date. Results of 18 months of operation are presented and future applications including combustion product monitoring are discussed.

  16. Characterizing Reservoir Properties Using Monitoring Gas Pressure Data after CO2-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Hou, Z.; Lin, G.; Fang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluate the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties of permeability, porosity and entry pressure using CO2 monitoring data such as spatiotemporal distributions of gas pressure. The injection reservoir was set to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface so that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain five homogenous layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 pressure monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various monitoring locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  17. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOEpatents

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  18. Bird interactions with offshore oil and gas platforms: review of impacts and monitoring techniques.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Robert A; Allard, Karel A; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of oil and gas platforms are currently operating in offshore waters globally, and this industry is expected to expand in coming decades. Although the potential environmental impacts of offshore oil and gas activities are widely recognized, there is limited understanding of their impacts on migratory and resident birds. A literature review identified 24 studies and reports of bird-platform interactions, most being qualitative and half having been peer-reviewed. The most frequently observed effect, for seabirds and landbirds, is attraction and sometimes collisions associated with lights and flares; episodic events have caused the deaths of hundreds or even thousands of birds. Though typically unpredictable, anecdotally, it is known that poor weather, such as fog, precipitation and low cloud cover, can exacerbate the effect of nocturnal attraction to lights, especially when coincidental with bird migrations. Other effects include provision of foraging and roosting opportunities, increased exposure to oil and hazardous environments, increased exposure to predators, or repulsion from feeding sites. Current approaches to monitoring birds at offshore platforms have focused on observer-based methods which can offer species-level bird identification, quantify seasonal patterns of relative abundance and distribution, and document avian mortality events and underlying factors. Observer-based monitoring is time-intensive, limited in spatial and temporal coverage, and suffers without clear protocols and when not conducted by trained, independent observers. These difficulties are exacerbated because deleterious bird-platform interaction is episodic and likely requires the coincidence of multiple factors (e.g., darkness, cloud, fog, rain conditions, occurrence of birds in vicinity). Collectively, these considerations suggest a need to implement supplemental systems for monitoring bird activities around offshore platforms. Instrument-based approaches, such as radar

  19. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, C.L.

    1980-10-14

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  20. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic flow aerodynamic window

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Clark L.

    1982-01-01

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window, whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  1. A Robust Infrastructure Design for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, James R; Rowe, Nathan C; Garner, James R

    2012-01-01

    An online enrichment monitor (OLEM) is being developed to continuously measure the relative isotopic composition of UF6 in the unit header pipes of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP). From a safeguards perspective, OLEM will provide early detection of a facility being misused for production of highly enriched uranium. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and if coupled with load cell monitoring can provide isotope mass balance verification. The OLEM design includes power and network connections for continuous monitoring of the UF6 enrichment and state of health of the instrument. Monitoring the enrichment on all header pipes at a typical GCEP could require OLEM detectors on each of the product, tails, and feed header pipes. If there are eight process units, up to 24 detectors may be required at a modern GCEP. Distant locations, harsh industrial environments, and safeguards continuity of knowledge requirements all place certain demands on the network robustness and power reliability. This paper describes the infrastructure and architecture of an OLEM system based on OLEM collection nodes on the unit header pipes and power and network support nodes for groupings of the collection nodes. A redundant, self-healing communications network, distributed backup power, and a secure communications methodology. Two candidate technologies being considered for secure communications are the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture cross-platform, service-oriented architecture model for process control communications and the emerging IAEA Real-time And INtegrated STream-Oriented Remote Monitoring (RAINSTORM) framework to provide the common secure communication infrastructure for remote, unattended monitoring systems. The proposed infrastructure design offers modular, commercial components, plug-and-play extensibility for GCEP deployments, and is intended to meet the guidelines and requirements for unattended

  2. Electrothermal Vaporization Sample Introduction for Spaceflight Water Quality Monitoring via Gas Chromatography-Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, William T; Gazda, Daniel B; Limero, Thomas F; Minton, John M; Macatangay, Ariel V; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-06-16

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension in mission duration up to one year, an enhanced, real-time method for environmental monitoring is necessary. The station air is currently monitored for trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) via the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), while water is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. As mission scenarios extend beyond low Earth orbit, a convergence in analytical instrumentation to analyze both air and water samples is highly desirable. Since the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for air samples and many of the targets in air are also common to water, this platform is a logical starting point for developing a multimatrix monitor. Here, we report on the interfacing of an electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction unit with a ground-based AQM for monitoring target analytes in water. The results show that each of the compounds tested from water have similar GC-DMS parameters as the compounds tested in air. Moreover, the ETV enabled AQM detection of dimethlsilanediol (DMSD), a compound whose analysis had proven challenging using other sample introduction methods. Analysis of authentic ISS water samples using the ETV-AQM showed that DMSD could be successfully quantified, while the concentrations obtained for the other compounds also agreed well with laboratory results.

  3. Design and performance of the KSC Biomass Production Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Ralph P.; Knott, William M.; Sager, John C.; Hilding, Suzanne E.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System program has instituted the Kennedy Space Center 'breadboard' project of which the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) presently discussed is a part. The BPC is based on a modified hypobaric test vessel; its design parameters and operational parameters have been chosen in order to meet a wide range of plant-growing objectives aboard future spacecraft on long-duration missions. A control and data acquisition subsystem is used to maintain a common link between the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system, the illumination system, the gas-circulation system, and the nutrient delivery and monitoring subsystems.

  4. Introducing equipment and plutonium glove box modifications for monitoring gas generation over plutonium oxide materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, D. D.; Berg, J. M.; Carrillo, A. G.; Montoya, A. R.; Morris, J. S.; Veirs, D. K.; Martinez, M. A.; Worl, L. A.; Harradine, D. M.; Hill, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    DOE is embarking on a program to store large quantities of Pu-bearing materials for up to fifty years. Materials for long-term storage are metals and oxides that are stabilized and packaged according to the DOE storage standard. Experience with PuO, materials has shown that gases generated by catalytic and/or radiolytic processes may accumulate. Of concern are the generation of H, gas from adsorbed water and the generation of HCI or CI, gases from the radiolysis of chloride-containing salts. We have designed instrumented storage containers that mimic the inner storage can specified in the standard. The containers and surveillance equipment are interfaced with a plutonium glovebox and are designed to allow the gas composition and pressure to be monitored over time. The surveillance activities and glovebox interfaces include Raman fiber optic probes, a gas analysis sampling port, corrosion monitors, and pressure and temperature feedthrus. Data collection for these containers is automated in order to reduce worker exposure. The equipment design and glovebox modifications are presented.

  5. Physics Simulation Software for Autonomous Propellant Loading and Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regalado Reyes, Bjorn Constant

    2015-01-01

    1. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing a mobile launching system with autonomous propellant loading capabilities for liquid-fueled rockets. An autonomous system will be responsible for monitoring and controlling the storage, loading and transferring of cryogenic propellants. The Physics Simulation Software will reproduce the sensor data seen during the delivery of cryogenic fluids including valve positions, pressures, temperatures and flow rates. The simulator will provide insight into the functionality of the propellant systems and demonstrate the effects of potential faults. This will provide verification of the communications protocols and the autonomous system control. 2. The High Pressure Gas Facility (HPGF) stores and distributes hydrogen, nitrogen, helium and high pressure air. The hydrogen and nitrogen are stored in cryogenic liquid state. The cryogenic fluids pose several hazards to operators and the storage and transfer equipment. Constant monitoring of pressures, temperatures and flow rates are required in order to maintain the safety of personnel and equipment during the handling and storage of these commodities. The Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring software will be responsible for constantly observing and recording sensor data, identifying and predicting faults and relaying hazard and operational information to the operators.

  6. Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

    2007-01-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at

  7. Application of an equilibrium-based model for diffusion barrier charcoal canisters in a small volume non-steady state radon chamber.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, A L; Thompson, K H; Kearfott, K J

    2011-02-01

    Radon in indoor air is often measured using activated charcoal in canisters. These are generally calibrated using large, humidity- and temperature-controlled radon chambers capable of maintaining a constant radon concentration over several days. Reliable and reproducible chambers are expensive and may be difficult to create and maintain. This study characterizes a small radon chamber in which Rn gas is allowed to build up over a period of several days for use in charcoal canister calibration and educational demonstrations, as well as various radon experiments using charcoal canisters. Predictive models have been developed that accurately describe radon gas kinetics in the charcoal canisters. Three models are available for kinetics in the small chamber with and without radon-adsorbing charcoal canisters. Presented here are both theoretical and semi-empirical applications of this equilibrium-based model of radon adsorption as applied to canisters in the small chamber. Several charcoal canister experiments in the small chamber with an equilibrium-based model of radon adsorption applied are reported. Results show that it is necessary to include a continuous radon monitor in the chamber during canister exposures, as the radon removal rate is highly variable. Furthermore, the presence of the canisters significantly decreases the amount of radon in the small chamber, especially when several canisters are present. It was found that canister response in the small chamber is largely consistent with the equilibrium-based model for both applications, with average errors of 1% for the theoretical application and -4% for the semi-empirical approach.

  8. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions.

    PubMed

    Timkovsky, J; Gankema, P; Pierik, R; Holzinger, R

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants, or to study the photochemistry of real plant emissions under polluted conditions without exposing the plants to pollutants. The main analytical tool is a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) which allows online monitoring of biogenic emissions and chemical degradation products. The identification of BVOCs and their oxidation products is aided by cryogenic trapping and subsequent in situ gas chromatographic analysis.

  9. Effect of 220Rn gas concentration distribution on its transmission from a delay chamber: evolving a CFD-based uniformity index.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, T K; Joshi, M; Sahoo, B K; Kanse, S D; Sapra, B K

    2016-03-01

    (220)Rn mitigation can be achieved by delay chamber technique, which relies on the advantage of its short half-life. However, flow rate as well as inlet-outlet position for the delay chamber can have a significant impact on (220)Rn concentration distribution patterns and hence transmission factor. In the present study, computational fluid dynamics simulations to estimate the concentration distribution has been carried out in a chamber of 0.5 m(3) for the combination of six different inlet-outlet positions and five different flow rates. Subsequently, the transmission factor (TF) for the chamber was evaluated and found to be highly dependent on the flow rate and inlet-outlet positions. For ease of scale up, the dependency of TF on the flow rate and the inlet-outlet positions is best summarised by relative transmission factor (RTF), which is the ratio of the TFs for the case of inlet and outlet on different faces to that on the same face.

  10. Plant growth chamber M design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Crop production is just one of the many processes involved in establishing long term survival of man in space. The benefits of integrating higher plants into the overall plan was recognized early by NASA through the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. The first step is to design, construct, and operate a sealed (gas, liquid, and solid) plant growth chamber. A 3.6 m diameter by 6.7 m high closed cylinder (previously used as a hypobaric vessel during the Mercury program) is being modified for this purpose. The chamber is mounted on legs with the central axis vertical. Entrance to the chamber is through an airlock. This chamber will be devoted entirely to higher plant experimentation. Any waste treatment, food processing or product storage studies will be carried on outside of this chamber. Its primary purpose is to provide input and output data on solids, liquids, and gases for single crop species and multiple species production using different nutrient delivery systems.

  11. Application of geoelectric methods for man-caused gas deposit mapping and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakymchuk, M. A.; Levashov, S. P.; Korchagin, I. N.; Syniuk, B. B.

    2009-04-01

    anomaly total area made S=20.7 hectares on 07.10.08, and S=19.7 hectares on 13.10.08 and S=10.5 hectares on 08.11.08. The anomaly intensity has decreased, some local extremum has appeared. All this testifies that there is an intensive degassing process of cross-section upper part through producing wells and the drilled degassing wells. Exclusively important feature of the FSPEF-VERS technology is an operationability(!) the of practical problems solving. For an emergency situation on gas field an operationability of technology has crucial importance. For one day of works only the field staff management has received considerable volume of operative information, allowing in quite proved manner to estimate as accident scales and it possible reasons, and so those threats, which this accident can represent for nearby located settlements. So, the imposing of a sketch-map of distribution of a "man-caused" gas deposit on a map of wells location has shown that this deposit does not extend over field border and, hence, does not represent essential threat for nearby settlements. Technology operationability in a whole and practical experience of repeated measurements testifies about possibility of the FSPEF-VERS methods using for operative carrying out of monitoring character survey. Such monitoring survey can be spent on a field after degassing wells drilling to check the process of gas pump-down from a "man-caused" deposit. Geoelectric researches on an emergency site of field on 08.11.08 and the received thus results practically show efficiency and working capacity of the FSPEF-VERS technology in a monitoring mode. The performed experimental works have shown, that process of gas pump-down from a "man-caused" deposit can be traced in time by the FSPEF-VERS technology. It is expedient to locate the additional degassing wells for definitive elimination of accident consequences with taking into account the data of monitoring works by FSPEF-VERS methods. The experiment results testify of

  12. Automated Resistivity Monitoring of Free Phase Gas Dynamics in a Northern Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, N.; Slater, L. D.; Sharma, S.; Lewis, E.; Comas, X.; Schafer, K. V.; Reeve, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Peatlands are sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide, yet release large amounts of methane to the atmosphere. The net effect of this interchange is not well understood. Some conceptual models indicate steady diffusion and ebullition of methane from shallow peat dominates atmospheric fluxes, while others suggest episodic ebullition events from deep peat dominate methane emissions. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of various geophysical techniques to monitor changes in free phase gas content in peat. To better understand the mechanisms of free phase gas production in peat, we have established an autonomous DC resistivity monitoring system as part of the second year of a multi-scale, multi-method study within Caribou Bog, an ombotrophic patterned peatland located in Maine. DC resistivity is a readily automated imaging method, well suited for long-term studies of free phase gas dynamics below ground. Assuming negligible variation in fluid conductivity, changes in resistivity can be attributed to increases or decreases in gas content. Our system gathers data at approximately 4-hour intervals on a grid of 72 electrodes at 1.5 m separations and covering an area of 336 m^2. Full reciprocal datasets are also recorded for error analysis. Four vertical electrode arrays were installed from zero to 6 m depth within the grid and sampled multiple times daily over a period of 2 weeks using a Wenner configuration for validation of inversion results. To help identify forcing mechanisms on gas release, temperature, pressure, and pore fluid specific conductance are continuously recorded from sensors at various depths within the study area. Using a differencing inversion scheme, we identified small but significant changes in resistivity over time in response to gas build up, redistribution and release. These changes were particularly notable in the upper peat, where our models show localized shifts in resistivity of over 25% within one day. In addition, vertical radar profiles

  13. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  14. Application network for monitoring of green house gas emission from lithosphere in Khibina territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavin, Alex; Nivin, Valentin; Litvinov, Artur; Chesalova, Elena; Baskov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The aim of project is to estimate the contribution of lithospheric flue gas emission of gases CH4, CO2, H2 in the general composition of atmospheric pollution of Arctic zone. The main task is organization of the ecological monitoring in the area of exploitation of large apatite and rare earth ore deposit from Khibine massive on the base of modern WSN (wireless sensor network) technologies. Application network consist from sensors of gas H2, CH4, CO2, complex autonomous equipment for measurement temperature, pressure, humidity and network of telecommunications (used ZigBee protocol). Our project offer technical decisions for experimentally-methodical monitoring network on the base of WSN and the high-sensitive sensors of hydrogen and methane, software and electronic equipment with a transmitter network. This work is the first project in Russia. The advantages of this technology is autonomous work (to several months and more), high-frequency programmable measurement of gas sensor, low cost (on one node of network), possibility to connect to one node of supervision a several types of sensors. And as a result is complex monitoring of environment. It has long been known that the pollution in Arctic Khibine and Lovosero region contains unusually high levels of hydrocarbon gases (HCG) [Petersilie,1964]. The presence of these gases has a number of practical implications and it is therefore important to understand their source and distribution. Among alkaline intrusive complexes with high (for magmatic rocks) concentrations of hydrocarbon and hydrogen- hydrocarbon gases occluded as fluid inclusions in minerals. The Khibina and Lovozero massives are well known, as region of spontaneous emissions of these gases from lithosphere [Khitarov et al., 1979; Ikorskii et al., 1992; Beeskow 2007; Nivin 2005, 2009]. The presence of the HCG, however, raises a number of questions and possibilities. It is unclear how homogeneously the HCG are distributed through the complex? What is the

  15. Wearable autonomous microsystem with electrochemical gas sensor array for real-time health and safety monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Mu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Xiaowen; Guo, Min; Jin, Rong; Zeng, Xiangqun; Mason, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high demand for a wearable autonomous multi-analyte gas sensor system for real-time environmental monitoring. This paper presents a system level solution through synergistic integration of sensors, electronics, and data analysis algorithms. Electrochemical sensors featuring ionic liquids were chosen to provide low-power room-temperature operation, rapid response, high sensitivity, good selectivity, and a long operating life with low maintenance. The system utilizes a multi-mode electrochemical instrumentation circuit that combines all signal condition functions within a single microelectronics chip to minimize system cost, size and power consumption. Embedded sensor array signal processing algorithms enable gas classification and concentration estimation within a real-world mixture of analytes. System design and integration methodologies are described, and preliminary results are shown for a first generation SO(2) sensor and a thumb-drive sized prototype system.

  16. [Calibration of a room air gas monitor with certified reference gases].

    PubMed

    Krueger, W A; Trick, M; Schroeder, T H; Unertl, K E

    2003-12-01

    Photo-acoustic infrared spectrometry is considered to be the gold standard for on-line measurement of anesthetic waste gas in room air. For maintenance of the precision of the measurements, the manufacturer recommends calibration of the gas monitor monitor every 3-12 months. We investigated whether the use of reference gases with analysis certificate could serve as a feasible alternative to commercial recalibration. We connected a multi-gas monitor type1302 (Bruel & Kjaer, Naerum, Denmark) to compressed air bottles containing reference gases with analysis certificate. Using a T-piece with a flow-meter, we avoided the entry of room air during the calibration phase. Highly purified nitrogen was used for zero calibration. The reference concentrations for desflurane, enflurane, halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane ranged from 41.6-51.1 ml/m(3) (ppm) in synthetic air. Since there is an overlap of the infrared absorption spectra of volatile anesthetics with alcohol used in operating rooms, we performed a cross-compensation with iso-propanol (107.0 ppm). A two-point calibration was performed for N(2)O (96.2 and 979.0 ppm), followed by cross-compensation with CO(2). Nafion tubes were used in order to avoid erroneous measurements due to molecular relaxation phenomena. The deviation of the measurement values ranged initially from 0-2.0% and increased to up to 4.9% after 18 months. For N(2)O, the corresponding values were 4.2% and 2.7%, respectively. Thus, our calibration procedure using certified reference gases yielded precise measurements with low deterioration over 18 months. It seems to be advantageous that the precision can be determined whenever deemed necessary. This allows for an individual decision, when the gas monitor needs to be calibrated again. The costs for reference gases and working time as well as logistic aspects such as storage and expiration dates must be individually balanced against the costs for commercial recalibration. PMID:14691626

  17. On-line combustion monitoring on dry low NOx industrial gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, S.; James, S.; Goy, C.; Colechin, M. J. F.

    2003-07-01

    To reduce the NOx emissions levels produced by industrial gas turbines most manufacturers have adopted a lean premixed approach to combustion. Such combustion systems are susceptible to combustion-driven oscillations, and much of the installed modern gas turbines continue to suffer from reduced reliability due to instability-related problems. The market conditions which now exist under the New Electricity Trading Arrangements provide a strong driver for power producers to improve the reliability and availability of their generating units. With respect to low-emission gas turbines, such improvements can best be achieved through a combination of sophisticated monitoring, combustion optimization and, where appropriate, plant modifications to reduce component failure rates. On-line combustion monitoring (OLCM) provides a vital contribution to each of these by providing the operator with increased confidence in the health of the combustion system and also by warning of the onset of combustion component deterioration which could cause significant downstream damage. The OLCM systems installed on Powergen's combined cycle gas turbine plant utilize high-temperature dynamic pressure transducers mounted close to the combustor to enable measurement of the fluctuating pressures experienced within the combustion system. Following overhaul, a reference data set is determined over a range of operating conditions. Real-time averaged frequency spectra are then compared to the reference data set to enable identification of abnormalities. Variations in the signal may occur due to changes in ambient conditions, fuel composition, operating conditions, and the onset of component damage. The systems on Powergen's plant have been used successfully to detect each of the above, examples of which are presented here.

  18. GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

    2004-11-01

    The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically and thermally

  19. Automatic Web-Based, Radio-Network System To Monitor And Control Equipment For Investigating Gas Flux At Water - Air Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Wik, M.; Beckman, P.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). Robust measurements of natural GHG emissions are vital for evaluating regional to global carbon budgets and for assessing climate feedbacks on natural emissions to improve climate models. Diffusive and ebullitive (bubble) transport are two major pathways of gas release from surface waters. To capture the high temporal variability of these fluxes in a well-defined footprint, we designed and built an inexpensive automatic device that includes an easily mobile diffusive flux chamber and a bubble counter, all in one. Besides a function of automatically collecting gas samples for subsequent various analyses in the laboratory, this device utilizes low cost CO2 sensor (SenseAir, Sweden) and CH4 sensor (Figaro, Japan) to measure GHG fluxes. To measure the spatial variability of emissions, each of the devices is equipped with an XBee module to enable a local radio communication DigiMesh network for time synchronization and data readout at a server-controller station on the lakeshore. Software of this server-controller is operated on a low cost Raspberry Pi computer which has a 3G connection for remote monitoring - controlling functions from anywhere in the world. From field studies in Abisko, Sweden in summer 2014 and 2015, the system has resulted in measurements of GHG fluxes comparable to manual methods. In addition, the deployments have shown the advantage of a low cost automatic network system to study GHG fluxes on lakes in remote locations.

  20. Ion-stimulated gas desorption yields of electropolished, chemically etched, and coated (Au, Ag, Pd, TiZrV) stainless steel vacuum chambers and St707 getter strips irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, E.; Hansen, J.; Küchler, D.; Malabaila, M.; Taborelli, M.

    2005-05-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to measure molecular desorption yields for 4.2 MeV/u lead ions impacting under grazing incidence on different accelerator-type vacuum chambers. Desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, and CO2, which are of fundamental interest for future accelerator applications, are reported for different stainless steel surface treatments. In order to study the effect of the surface oxide layer on the gas desorption, gold-, silver-, palladium-, and getter-coated 316 LN stainless steel chambers and similarly prepared samples were tested for desorption at LINAC 3 and analyzed for chemical composition by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The large effective desorption yield of 2×104 molecules /Pb53+ ion, previously measured for uncoated, vacuum fired stainless steel, was reduced after noble-metal coating by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, pressure rise measurements, the effectiveness of beam scrubbing with lead ions, and the consequence of a subsequent venting on the desorption yields of a beam-scrubbed vacuum chamber are described. Practical consequences for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring are discussed.

  1. Continuous emission monitoring technologies applicable to the natural gas transmission industry. Topical report, September 1993-September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    All major sources of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions must obtain operating permits under Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Each permit application must contain a plan for monitoring emissions that will demonstrate the source`s compliance with its permitted emission limits. Several established methods for demonstrating compliance are available, including the use of continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems--sampling and analytical equipment that allows gaseous emissions to be measured directly and continuously. In response to pending regulations, the Gas Research Institute recently sponsored a study on the types of CEM systems currently available to the natural gas industry for continuously monitoring NOx and CO emissions. The report describes various advantages and disadvantages of using particular types of continuous monitoring equipment for reciprocating engines and gas turbines.

  2. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  3. Acoustic monitoring of gas emissions from the seafloor. Part I: quantifying the volumetric flow of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Isabelle; Scalabrin, Carla; Berger, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Three decades of continuous ocean exploration have led us to identify subsurface fluid related processes as a key phenomenon in marine earth science research. The number of seep areas located on the seafloor has been constantly increasing with the use of multi-scale imagery techniques. Due to recent advances in transducer technology and computer processing, multibeam echosounders are now commonly used to detect submarine gas seeps escaping from the seafloor into the water column. A growing number of en- route surveys shows that sites of gas emissions escaping from the seafloor are much more numerous than previously thought. Estimating the temporal variability of the gas flow rate and volumes escaping from the seafloor has thus become a challenge of relevant interest which could be addressed by sea-floor continuous acoustic monitoring. Here, we investigate the feasibility of estimating the volumetric flow rates of gas emissions from horizontal backscattered acoustic signals. Different models based on the acoustic backscattering theory of bubbles are presented. The forward volume backscattering strength and the inversion volumetric flow rate solutions were validated with acoustic measurements from artificial gas flow rates generated in controlled sea-water tank experiments. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to investigate the behavior of the 120-kHz forward solution with respect to model input parameters (horizontal distance between transducer and bubble stream, bubble size distribution and ascent rate). The most sensitive parameter was found to be the distance of the bubble stream which can affect the volume backscattering strength by 20 dB within the horizontal range of 0-200 m. Results were used to derive the detection probability of a bubble stream for a given volume backscattering strength threshold according to different bubble flow rates and horizontal distance.

  4. Monitoring and modeling wetland chloride concentrations in relationship to oil and gas development.

    PubMed

    Post van der Burg, Max; Tangen, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Extraction of oil and gas via unconventional methods is becoming an important aspect of energy production worldwide. Studying the effects of this development in countries where these technologies are being widely used may provide other countries, where development may be proposed, with some insight in terms of concerns associated with development. A fairly recent expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America provides such an opportunity. Rapid increases in energy development in North America have caught the attention of managers and scientists as a potential stressor for wildlife and their habitats. Of particular concern in the Northern Great Plains of the U.S. is the potential for chloride-rich produced water associated with unconventional oil and gas development to alter the water chemistry of wetlands. We describe a landscape scale modeling approach designed to examine the relationship between potential chloride contamination in wetlands and patterns of oil and gas development. We used a spatial Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to assess multiple models explaining chloride concentrations in wetlands. These models included effects related to oil and gas wells (e.g. age of wells, number of wells) and surficial geology (e.g. glacial till, outwash). We found that the model containing the number of wells and the surficial geology surrounding a wetland best explained variation in chloride concentrations. Our spatial predictions showed regions of localized high chloride concentrations. Given the spatiotemporal variability of regional wetland water chemistry, we do not regard our results as predictions of contamination, but rather as a way to identify locations that may require more intensive sampling or further investigation. We suggest that an approach like the one outlined here could easily be extended to more of an adaptive monitoring approach to answer questions about chloride contamination risk that are of interest to managers. PMID

  5. Compact Laser-Based Sensors for Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Jeffries, Jay B.

    2003-01-01

    Research is reported on the development of sensors for gas turbine combustor applications that measure real-time gas temperature using near-infrared water vapor absorption and concentration in the combustor exhaust of trace quantities of pollutant NO and CO using mid-infrared absorption. Gas temperature is extracted from the relative absorption strength of two near-infrared transitions of water vapor. From a survey of the water vapor absorption spectrum, two overtone transitions near 1800 nm were selected that can be rapidly scanned in wavelength by injection current tuning a single DFB diode laser. From the ratio of the absorbances on these selected transitions, a path-integrated gas temperature can be extracted in near-real time. Demonstration measurements with this new temperature sensor showed that combustor instabilities could be identified in the power spectrum of the temperature versus time record. These results suggest that this strategy is extremely promising for gas turbine combustor control applications. Measurements of the concentration of NO and CO in the combustor exhaust are demonstrated with mid-infrared transitions using thermo-electrically cooled, quantum cascade lasers operating near 5.26 and 4.62 microns respectively. Measurements of NO are performed in an insulated exhaust duct of a C2H4-air flame at temperatures of approximately 600 K. CO measurements are performed above a rich H2-air flame seeded with CO2 and cooled with excess N2 to 1150 K. Using a balanced ratiometric detection technique a sensitivity of 0.36 ppm-m was achieved for NO and 0.21 ppm-m for CO. Comparisons between measured and predicted water-vapor and CO2 interference are discussed. The mid-infrared laser quantum cascade laser technology is in its infancy; however, these measurements demonstrate the potential for pollutant monitoring in exhaust gases with mid-IR laser absorption.

  6. Barometric gas transport along faults and its application to nuclear test-ban monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C. R.; Heinle, R. A.; Hudson, G. B.; Nitao, J. J.; Zucca, J. J.

    1997-06-01

    Underground nuclear explosions produce a unique but evanescent set of radionuclide gases that potentially can be used in the context of an on-site, test-ban monitoring program to differentiate them from other detected events such as earthquakes or mining activity. In Part I of this report we describe an experiment to evaluate the upward transport of gases from an underground explosion using two gas tracers with very different diffusivities that were released in a 400- m-deep, chemical explosive detonation. The less diffusive (more massive) tracer was detected on a nearby geologic fault 50 days following the detonation while the more diffusive tracer was-- detected 375 days after release. Computer simulations indicate that the arrival time and the chromatographic behavior of transport are characteristic of barometrically induced flow in a fractured, porous matrix regime. For a hypothetical 1-kiloton fission explosion subject to the same weather and gas transport conditions of the chemical explosion, simulations predict the delectability of argon-37 after 80 days in spite of depletion by radioactive decay. Largely because of the earlier arrival of xenon-133, owing to its lower binary gas diffusivity, the exceedingly short lived isotope should also be detectable-arriving about 30 days earlier than argon. in Part II we consider that our prediction of the delectability of argon and xenon is based upon the small volume (0.00001 M3) sampling technique of the NPE tracer-gas sampling study while actual sampling for radionuclides would involve drawing much larger volume (possibly 0.1- 1 M3) gas samples from the near-surface.

  7. Monitoring and modeling wetland chloride concentrations in relationship to oil and gas development.

    PubMed

    Post van der Burg, Max; Tangen, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Extraction of oil and gas via unconventional methods is becoming an important aspect of energy production worldwide. Studying the effects of this development in countries where these technologies are being widely used may provide other countries, where development may be proposed, with some insight in terms of concerns associated with development. A fairly recent expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America provides such an opportunity. Rapid increases in energy development in North America have caught the attention of managers and scientists as a potential stressor for wildlife and their habitats. Of particular concern in the Northern Great Plains of the U.S. is the potential for chloride-rich produced water associated with unconventional oil and gas development to alter the water chemistry of wetlands. We describe a landscape scale modeling approach designed to examine the relationship between potential chloride contamination in wetlands and patterns of oil and gas development. We used a spatial Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to assess multiple models explaining chloride concentrations in wetlands. These models included effects related to oil and gas wells (e.g. age of wells, number of wells) and surficial geology (e.g. glacial till, outwash). We found that the model containing the number of wells and the surficial geology surrounding a wetland best explained variation in chloride concentrations. Our spatial predictions showed regions of localized high chloride concentrations. Given the spatiotemporal variability of regional wetland water chemistry, we do not regard our results as predictions of contamination, but rather as a way to identify locations that may require more intensive sampling or further investigation. We suggest that an approach like the one outlined here could easily be extended to more of an adaptive monitoring approach to answer questions about chloride contamination risk that are of interest to managers.

  8. Monitoring and modeling wetland chloride concentrations in relationship to oil and gas development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Post van der Burg, Max; Tangen, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Extraction of oil and gas via unconventional methods is becoming an important aspect of energy production worldwide. Studying the effects of this development in countries where these technologies are being widely used may provide other countries, where development may be proposed, with some insight in terms of concerns associated with development. A fairly recent expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America provides such an opportunity. Rapid increases in energy development in North America have caught the attention of managers and scientists as a potential stressor for wildlife and their habitats. Of particular concern in the Northern Great Plains of the U.S. is the potential for chloride-rich produced water associated with unconventional oil and gas development to alter the water chemistry of wetlands. We describe a landscape scale modeling approach designed to examine the relationship between potential chloride contamination in wetlands and patterns of oil and gas development. We used a spatial Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to assess multiple models explaining chloride concentrations in wetlands. These models included effects related to oil and gas wells (e.g. age of wells, number of wells) and surficial geology (e.g. glacial till, outwash). We found that the model containing the number of wells and the surficial geology surrounding a wetland best explained variation in chloride concentrations. Our spatial predictions showed regions of localized high chloride concentrations. Given the spatiotemporal variability of regional wetland water chemistry, we do not regard our results as predictions of contamination, but rather as a way to identify locations that may require more intensive sampling or further investigation. We suggest that an approach like the one outlined here could easily be extended to more of an adaptive monitoring approach to answer questions about chloride contamination risk that are of interest to managers.

  9. Future Issues and Approaches to Health Monitoring and Failure Prevention for Oil-Free Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Recent technology advances in foil air bearings, high temperature solid lubricants and computer based modeling has enabled the development of small Oil-Free gas turbines. These turbomachines are currently commercialized as small (<100 kW) microturbine generators and larger machines are being developed. Based upon these successes and the high potential payoffs offered by Oil-Free systems, NASA, industry, and other government entities are anticipating Oil-Free gas turbine propulsion systems to proliferate future markets. Since an Oil-Free engine has no oil system, traditional approaches to health monitoring and diagnostics, such as chip detection, oil analysis, and possibly vibration signature analyses (e.g., ball pass frequency) will be unavailable. As such, new approaches will need to be considered. These could include shaft orbit analyses, foil bearing temperature measurements, embedded wear sensors and start-up/coast down speed analysis. In addition, novel, as yet undeveloped techniques may emerge based upon concurrent developments in MEMS technology. This paper introduces Oil-Free technology, reviews the current state of the art and potential for future turbomachinery applications and discusses possible approaches to health monitoring, diagnostics and failure prevention.

  10. Gas-Monitor Detector for Intense and Pulsed VUV/EUV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Feldhaus, J.; Gerth, Ch.; Gottwald, A.; Hahn, U.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Steeg, B.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.

    2004-05-01

    In the framework of current developments of new powerful VUV and EUV radiation sources, like VUV free-electron-lasers or EUV plasma sources for 13-nm lithography, we developed a gas-monitor detector in order to measure the photon flux of highly intense and extremely pulsed VUV and EUV radiation in absolute terms. The device is based on atomic photoionization of a rare gas at low particle density. Therefore, it is free of degradation and almost transparent, which allows the detector to be used as a continuously working beam-intensity monitor. The extended dynamic range of the detector allowed its calibration with relative standard uncertainties of 4% in the Radiometry Laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron-storage ring BESSY II in Berlin using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation at low photon intensities and its utilization for absolute photon flux measurements of high power sources. In the present contribution, we describe the design of the detector and its application for the characterization of VUV free-electron-laser radiation at the TESLA test facility in Hamburg. By first pulse resolved measurements, a peak power of more than 100 MW at a wavelength of 87 nm was detected.

  11. Response of CO2 Concentration in Andisol to Rainfall Events by Using Buried Tubing Gas Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Toshifumi; Tokida, Takeshi; Imoto, Hiromi; Nishimura, Taku; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    For the purpose of continuous soil CO2 gas monitoring, gas permeable resins were evaluated. Among polytetrafluoroethylen (PTFE), polyfluoroethylene propylene (PFEP) and silicone, the silicone rubber tube had highest permeability for oxygen gas. Buried Tubing Gas Monitoring System (BT-GMS) consisting of silicone rubber tube connected to a Non-diffuse infrared (NDIR) -CO2 gas and galvanic cell O2 gas sensors were constructed, and buried into an Andisol upland field at a depth of 20cm. Thermo-couples and EC-5 soil moisture sensors were inserted into 10 and 20cm deep layers. Soil CO2 gas concentration, temperature and moisture were continuously monitored for 5 months. Soil CO2 concentration was sensitive to rainfall events and soil moisture change. Responses were keen during summer until early autumn when soil temperature was higher than 20°C. Then, when soil temperature got lower the response tended to be dull. This suggested quick CO2 gas concentration change following a rainfall event was mostly due to enhancement in soil respiration with soil moisture rise.

  12. Gas monitoring during the CO2 back production field test at the Ketzin pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szizybalski, Alexandra; Zimmer, Martin; Kujawa, Christian; Erzinger, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    fluids before the injection of CO2 showed that CH4, CO2, H2 and N2 are present in the original formation fluid (0.17 mg/l, 0.08 mg/l, 0.14 mg/l, 17.9 mg/l fluid; Morozova et al., 2010). The observed N2 concentrations in the back-produced gas may, therefore, result from the field tests and from injection management or from the original formation fluid. Results of the isotopic measurements are in preparation. Morozova, D., Wandrey, M., Alawi, M., Zimmer, M., Vieth, A., Zettlitzer, M., Wuerdemann, H. (2010): Monitoring of the microbial community composition in saline aquifers during CO2 storage by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Volume 4, Pages 981-989. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2009.11.014.

  13. Assessment of a continuous blood gas monitoring system in animals during circulatory stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The study was aimed to determine the measurement accuracy of The CDI™ blood parameter monitoring system 500 (Terumo Cardiovascular Systems Corporation, Ann Arbor MI) in the real-time continuous measurement of arterial blood gases under different cardiocirculatory stress conditions Methods Inotropic stimulation (Dobutamine 2.5 and 5 μg/kg/min), vasoconstriction (Arginine-vasopressin 4, 8 and 16 IU/h), hemorrhage (-10%, -20%, -35%, and -50% of the theoretical volemia), and volume resuscitation were induced in ten swine (57.4 ± 10.7 Kg).Intermittent blood gas assessments were carried out using a routine gas analyzer at any experimental phase and compared with values obtained at the same time settings during continuous monitoring with CDI™ 500 system. The Bland-Altman analysis was employed. Results Bias and precision for pO2 were - 0.06 kPa and 0.22 kPa, respectively (r2 = 0.96); pCO2 - 0.02 kPa and 0.15 kPa, respectively; pH -0.001 and 0.01 units, respectively ( r2 = 0.96). The analysis showed very good agreement for SO2 (bias 0.04,precision 0.33, r2 = 0.95), Base excess (bias 0.04,precision 0.28, r2 = 0.98), HCO3 (bias 0.05,precision 0.62, r2 = 0.92),hemoglobin (bias 0.02,precision 0.23, r2 = 0.96) and K+ (bias 0.02, precision 0.27, r2 = 0.93). The sensor was reliable throughout the experiment during hemodynamic variations. Conclusions Continuous blood gas analysis with the CDI™ 500 system was reliable and it might represent a new useful tool to accurately and timely monitor gas exchange in critically ill patients. Nonetheless, our findings need to be confirmed by larger studies to prove its reliability in the clinical setting. PMID:21223536

  14. In situ gas concentrations in the Kumano forearc basin from drilling mud gas monitoring and sonic velocity data (IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Doan, M.-L.; Schleicher, A. M.; Horiguchi, K.; Eguchi, N.; Erzinger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Conventional IODP shipboard methods of gas investigations comprise gas sampling from core voids and headspace gas sampling followed by shipboard gas analysis. These methods possibly underestimate the in situ gas concentration due to core degassing during retrieval and handling on deck. In few cases, a Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) was used in the past to overcome this problem, providing gas concentrations one or two order of magnitude higher than headspace gas analysis from corresponding depths. Here, we describe two new techniques applied during IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009 riser drilling in the Kumano forearc basin to estimate in situ gas concentrations without drill core recovery. During riser drilling of site C0009 between 703 to 1594 mbsf, gas was continuously extracted from returing drilling mud and analysed in real-time (drill mud gas monitoring). This method results in information on the gas composition and gas concentration at depth. The chemical (C1-C3) and isotope (δ13C, H/D) composition of hydrocarbons, the only formation-derived gases identified in drill mud, demonstrate a microbial hydrocarbon gas source mixing with small but increasing amounts of thermogenic gas at greater depth. Methane content in drilling mud semi-quantitatively correlates with visible allochtonous material (wood, lignite) in drilling cuttings. In situ gas concentration determination from drill mud gas monitoring based on the assumption that gas is either liberated from the rock into the drilling mud during drilling and ascent with the mud column or remains in the pore space of the drilling cuttings. Drilling mud gas data were calibrated with a defined amount of C2H2 (175 l [STP]) from a carbide test and result in methane concentrations reaching up to 24 lgas/lsediment, in good agreement with findings from other IODP Legs using the PCS. Hydrocarbon gas concentrations in drilling cuttings from C0009 are significantly lower, indicating cuttings outgassing during ascent of the

  15. Long-range open-path greenhouse gas monitoring using mid-infrared laser dispersion spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghestani, Nart; Brownsword, Richard; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and sensitive methods of monitoring greenhouse gas (GHG) emission over large areas has become a pressing need to deliver improved estimates of both human-made and natural GHG budgets. These needs relate to a variety of sectors including environmental monitoring, energy, oil and gas industry, waste management, biogenic emission characterization, and leak detection. To address the needs, long-distance open-path laser spectroscopy methods offer significant advantages in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity, compactness and cost effectiveness. Path-integrated mixing ratio measurements stemming from long open-path laser spectrometers can provide emission mapping when combined with meteorological data and/or through tomographic approaches. Laser absorption spectroscopy is the predominant method of detecting gasses over long integrated path lengths. The development of dispersion spectrometers measuring tiny refractive index changes, rather than optical power transmission, may offer a set of specific advantages1. These include greater immunity to laser power fluctuations, greater dynamic range due to the linearity of dispersion, and ideally a zero baseline signal easing quantitative retrievals of path integrated mixing ratios. Chirped laser dispersion spectrometers (CLaDS) developed for the monitoring of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide will be presented. Using quantum cascade laser as the source, a minimalistic and compact system operating at 7.8 μm has been developed and demonstrated for the monitoring of atmospheric methane over a 90 meter open path2. Through full instrument modelling and error propagation analysis, precision of 3 ppm.m.Hz-0.5 has been established (one sigma precision for atmospheric methane normalized over a 1 m path and 1 s measurement duration). The system was fully functional in the rain, sleet, and moderate fog. The physical model and system concept of CLaDS can be adapted to any greenhouse gas species. Currently we are

  16. Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids, 1994-1995 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hans, Karen M.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes laboratory and field monitoring studies of gas bubble trauma (GBT) in migrating juvenile salmonids in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The first chapter describes laboratory studies of the progression of GBT signs leading to mortality and the use of the signs for GBT assessment. The progression and severity of GBT signs in juvenile salmonids exposed to different levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) and temperatures was assessed and quantified. Next, the prevalence, severity, and individual variation of GBT signs was evaluated to attempt to relate them to mortality. Finally, methods for gill examination in fish exposed to high TDG were developed and evaluated. Primary findings were: (1) no single sign of GBT was clearly correlated with mortality, but many GBT signs progressively worsened; (2) both prevalence and severity of GBT signs in several tissues is necessary; (3) bubbles in the lateral line were the earliest sign of GBT, showed progressive worsening, and had low individual variation but may develop poorly during chronic exposures; (4) fin bubbles had high prevalence, progressively worsened, and may be a persistent sign of GBT; and (5) gill bubbles appear to be the proximate cause of death but may only be relevant at high TDG levels and are difficult to examine. Chapter Two describes monitoring results of juvenile salmonids for signs of GBT. Emigrating fish were collected and examined for bubbles in fins and lateral lines. Preliminary findings were: (1) few fish had signs of GBT, but prevalence and severity appeared to increase as fish migrated downstream; (2) there was no apparent correlation between GBT signs in the fins, lateral line, or gills; (3) prevalence and severity of GBT was suggestive of long-term, non-lethal exposure to relatively low level gas supersaturated water; and (4) it appeared that GBT was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids. 24 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Design and Performance of a Gas Chromatograph for Automatic Monitoring of Pollutants in Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalobos, R.; Stevens, D.; LeBlanc, R.; Braun, L.

    1971-01-01

    In recent years, interest in air pollution constituents has focused on carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as prime components of polluted air. Instrumental methods have been developed, and commercial instruments for continuous monitoring of these components have been available for a number of years. For the measurement of carbon monoxide, non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy has been the accepted tool, in spite of its marginal sensitivity at low parts-per-million levels. For continuously monitoring total hydrocarbons, the hydrogen flame ionization analyzer has been widely accepted as the preferred method. The inadequacy of this latter method became evident when it was concluded that methane is non-reactive and cannot be considered a contaminant even though present at over 1 ppm in the earth's atmosphere. Hence, the need for measuring methane separately became apparent as a means of measuring the reactive and potentially harmful non-methane hydrocarbons fraction. A gas chromatographic method for the measurement of methane and total hydrocarbons which met these requirements has been developed. In this technique, methane was separated on conventional gas chromatographic columns and detected by a hydrogen flame ionization detector (FID) while the total hydrocarbons were obtained by introducing a second sample directly into the FID without separating the various components. The reactive, or non-methane hydrocarbons, were determined by difference. Carbon monoxide was also measured after converting to methane over a heated catalyst to render it detectable by the FID. The development of this method made it possible to perform these measurements with a sensitivity of as much as 1 ppm full scale and a minimum detectability of 20 ppb. Incorporating this technique, criteria were developed by APCO for a second generation continuous automatic instrument for atmospheric monitoring stations.

  18. Environmental monitoring and bactericidal efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas in a dental office.

    PubMed

    Kuroyama, Iwao; Osato, Shigeo; Nakajima, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryoichi; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-09-01

    We monitored the quantity of airborne microorganisms at 11 points (points A to K) in a dental office on a routine day of use, and tested the bactericidal efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) gas in the dental operatory after consulting hours. Fallen airborne microorganisms were collected under air-conditioning (AC) in the dental office, and under four conditions in the operatory. Specimens of the microbes were cultivated on nutrient and Sabouraud agar media (NAM and SAM). Many colonies were observed at the entrance hall and on the cabinet in a disinfection room in the NAM and SAM tests, respectively, while no colony was observed at the foot position of the operating table and treatment bed, and above the head position of the operating room in the NAM and SAM tests, respectively. In the bactericidal efficacy test using ClO₂ gas, the dental operatory could be kept clean by the use of 4 mg/L-ClO₂ gas in addition to the use of an AC with a plasma filter and the HEPA filter. PMID:20938095

  19. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Sobrado, J. M. Martín-Soler, J.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2014-03-15

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup −6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  20. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  1. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated. PMID:24689624

  2. An atmospheric exposure chamber for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. M.; Weiss, H. S.; Pitt, J. F.; Grimard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a long-term environmental exposure chamber for small animals. This chamber is capable of producing hypoxic, normoxic and hyperoxic atmospheres which are closely regulated. The chamber, which is of the recycling type, is fashioned after clear plastic germ-free isolators. Oxygen concentration is set and controlled by a paramagnetic O2 analyzer and a 3-way solenoid valve. In this way either O2 or N2 may be provided to the system by way of negative O2 feedback. Relative humidity is maintained at 40-50 percent by a refrigeration type dryer. Carbon dioxide is absorbed by indicating soda lime. A diaphragm pump continuously circulates chamber gas at a high enough flow rate to prevent buildup of CO2 and humidity. This chamber has been used for numerous studies which involve prolonged exposure of small animals to various O2 concentrations.

  3. An Integrated Architecture for On-Board Aircraft Engine Performance Trend Monitoring and Gas Path Fault Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft engine performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics are closely related technologies that assist operators in managing the health of their gas turbine engine assets. Trend monitoring is the process of monitoring the gradual performance change that an aircraft engine will naturally incur over time due to turbomachinery deterioration, while gas path diagnostics is the process of detecting and isolating the occurrence of any faults impacting engine flow-path performance. Today, performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostic functions are performed by a combination of on-board and off-board strategies. On-board engine control computers contain logic that monitors for anomalous engine operation in real-time. Off-board ground stations are used to conduct fleet-wide engine trend monitoring and fault diagnostics based on data collected from each engine each flight. Continuing advances in avionics are enabling the migration of portions of the ground-based functionality on-board, giving rise to more sophisticated on-board engine health management capabilities. This paper reviews the conventional engine performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostic architecture commonly applied today, and presents a proposed enhanced on-board architecture for future applications. The enhanced architecture gains real-time access to an expanded quantity of engine parameters, and provides advanced on-board model-based estimation capabilities. The benefits of the enhanced architecture include the real-time continuous monitoring of engine health, the early diagnosis of fault conditions, and the estimation of unmeasured engine performance parameters. A future vision to advance the enhanced architecture is also presented and discussed

  4. Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Penza, M; Rossi, R; Alvisi, M; Serra, E

    2010-03-12

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150 degrees C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5 nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO(2), CH(4), H(2), NH(3), CO and NO(2) has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO(2) presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO(2) gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO(2) concentrations of 3.3 ppm and 330 ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO(2) gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3 ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150 degrees C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 microm and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5-35 nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5-50 nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array

  5. Advanced Small Rocket Chambers. Basic Program and Option 2: Fundamental Processes and Material Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jassowski, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Propellants, chamber materials, and processes for fabrication of small high performance radiation cooled liquid rocket engines were evaluated to determine candidates for eventual demonstration in flight-type thrusters. Both storable and cryogenic propellant systems were considered. The storable propellant systems chosen for further study were nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer with either hydrazine or monomethylhydrazine as fuel. The cryogenic propellants chosen were oxygen with either hydrogen or methane as fuel. Chamber material candidates were chemical vapor deposition (CVD) rhenium protected from oxidation by CVD iridium for the chamber hot section, and film cooled wrought platinum-rhodium or regeneratively cooled stainless steel for the front end section exposed to partially reacted propellants. Laser diagnostics of the combustion products near the hot chamber surface and measurements at the surface layer were performed in a collaborative program at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA. The Material Sample Test Apparatus, a laboratory system to simulate the combustion environment in terms of gas and material temperature, composition, and pressure up to 6 Atm, was developed for these studies. Rocket engine simulator studies were conducted to evaluate the materials under simulated combustor flow conditions, in the diagnostic test chamber. These tests used the exhaust species measurement system, a device developed to monitor optically species composition and concentration in the chamber and exhaust by emission and absorption measurements.

  6. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  7. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  8. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Tang, X. D.

    2007-08-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. × 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  9. A stream-based methane monitoring approach for evaluating groundwater impacts associated with unconventional gas development.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Stolp, Bert J; Kimball, Briant A; Susong, David D; Marston, Thomas M; Gardner, Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Gaining streams can provide an integrated signal of relatively large groundwater capture areas. In contrast to the point-specific nature of monitoring wells, gaining streams coalesce multiple flow paths. Impacts on groundwater quality from unconventional gas development may be evaluated at the watershed scale by the sampling of dissolved methane (CH4 ) along such streams. This paper describes a method for using stream CH4 concentrations, along with measurements of groundwater inflow and gas transfer velocity interpreted by 1-D stream transport modeling, to determine groundwater methane fluxes. While dissolved ionic tracers remain in the stream for long distances, the persistence of methane is not well documented. To test this method and evaluate CH4 persistence in a stream, a combined bromide (Br) and CH4 tracer injection was conducted on Nine-Mile Creek, a gaining stream in a gas development area in central Utah. A 35% gain in streamflow was determined from dilution of the Br tracer. The injected CH4 resulted in a fivefold increase in stream CH4 immediately below the injection site. CH4 and δ(13) CCH4 sampling showed it was not immediately lost to the atmosphere, but remained in the stream for more than 2000 m. A 1-D stream transport model simulating the decline in CH4 yielded an apparent gas transfer velocity of 4.5 m/d, describing the rate of loss to the atmosphere (possibly including some microbial consumption). The transport model was then calibrated to background stream CH4 in Nine-Mile Creek (prior to CH4 injection) in order to evaluate groundwater CH4 contributions. The total estimated CH4 load discharging to the stream along the study reach was 190 g/d, although using geochemical fingerprinting to determine its source was beyond the scope of the current study. This demonstrates the utility of stream-gas sampling as a reconnaissance tool for evaluating both natural and anthropogenic CH4 leakage from gas reservoirs into groundwater and surface water.

  10. Regularities of heat transfer in the gas layers of a steam boiler furnace flame. Part II. Gas layer radiation laws and the procedure for calculating heat transfer in furnaces, fire boxes, and combustion chambers developed on the basis of these laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    The article presents the results stemming from the scientific discovery of laws relating to radiation from the gas layers generated during flame combustion of fuel and when electric arc burns in electric-arc steel-melting furnaces. The procedure for calculating heat transfer in electric-arc and torch furnaces, fire-boxes, and combustion chambers elaborated on the basis of this discovery is described.

  11. Effects of water vapor in high vacuum chamber on the properties of HfO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Bo; He, Hongbo; Shao, Jianda

    2007-08-01

    The influence of water vapor content in high vacuum chamber during the coating process on physical properties of HfO2 films was investigated. Coatings were deposited on BK7 substrates by electron beam evaporation and photoelectric maximum control method. An in situ residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to monitor the residual gas composition in the vacuum chamber. The optical properties, microstructure, absorption and laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the samples were characterized by Lambda 900 spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface thermal lensing (STL) technique and 1064-nm Q-switched pulsed laser at a pulse duration of 12 ns respectively. It was found that a cold trap is an effective equipment to suppress water vapor in the vacuum chamber during the pumping process, and the coatings deposited in the vacuum atmosphere with relatively low water vapor composition show higher refractive index and smaller grain size. Meanwhile, the higher LIDT value is corresponding to lower absorbance.

  12. Performance of NIRS Thoron Chamber System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yosuke

    2008-08-01

    In order to carry out thoron sensitivity test for passive radon detectors, a thoron chamber system has been set up at NIRS, Japan. The thoron chamber system consists of four components: the exposure, monitoring, calibration, and humidity control systems, which was mounted in this study due to humidity dependence on the thoron concentration emanated from lantern mantles as the thoron source. The thoron concentration in the thoron chamber is controlled by humidity passed through the thoron source and the weight of the lantern mantle.

  13. Quality assurance procedures for environmental control and monitoring in plant growth facilities. Report of the North Central Regional 101 Committee on Growth Chamber Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    This report includes procedures for ensuring the quality of the environment provided for plant growth in controlled environment facilities. Biologists and engineers may use these procedures for ensuring quality control during experiments or for ensuring quality control in the design of plant growth facilities. Environmental monitoring prior to and during experiments is included in these procedures. Specific recommendations cover control, acquisition, and calibration for sensor types for the separate parameters of radiation (light), temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, and air movement.

  14. Designing an Active Target Test Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, James; Tan Ahn Collaboration, Dr.; Nicolas Dixneuf Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The development of instrumentation in nuclear physics is crucial for advancing our ability to measure the properties of exotic nuclei. One limitation of the use of exotic nuclei in experiment is their very low production intensities. Recently, detectors, called active-target dectectors, have been developed to address this issue. Active-target detectors use a gas medium to image charged-particle tracks that are emitted in nuclear reactions. Last semester, I designed a vacuum chamber to be used in developing Micro-Pattern Gas detectors that will upgrade the capabilities of an active-target detector called the Prototype AT-TPC. With the exterior of the chamber complete, I have now been using an electric field modeling program, Garfield, developed by CERN to design a field cage to be placed within the vacuum chamber. The field cage will be a box-like apparatus consisting of two parallel metal plates connected with a resistor chain and attached to wires wrapped between them. The cage will provide a uniform electric field within the chamber to drift electrons from nuclear reactions down to the detector in the bottom of the chamber. These signals are then amplified by a proportional counter, and the data is sent to a computer. For the long term, we would like to incorporate a Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors in the interior of the chamber and eventually use the AT-TPC to examine various nuclei. Dr. Ahn is my advising professor.

  15. Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim

    1998-12-01

    Select portions of the Clearwater and North Fork of the Clearwater rivers were electroshocked to estimate the incidence of gas bubble trauma (GBT) occurring in resident fish populations for the spring and summer months of 1998. The study area was divided into four sections and sampled weekly during periods of spill and non-spill from Dworshak Dam. Five thousand five hundred and forty one fish, representing 22 different species, were captured and examined for GBT. Two fish were detected with signs of GBT; exhibiting the lowest incidence of GBT in the last four years (0.04%). Reduced discharge and lower levels of total dissolved gases may have resulted in lower incidence of GBT in the 1998 monitoring period.

  16. Long-term monitoring of soil gas radon and permeability at two reference sites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Falcomer, Renato; Ly, Jim; Wierdsma, Jessica; Bergman, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    The long-term monitoring of soil radon variations was conducted at two reference sites in Ottawa. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a single soil radon survey could provide a representative soil radon characteristic of the site. Results showed that during the normal field survey period from June to September in Canada, a single field survey with multiple measurements of soil gas radon concentrations at a depth of 80 cm can characterise the soil radon level of a site within a deviation of +/-30%. Direct in situ soil permeability measurements exhibited, however, large variations even within an area of only 10 x 10 m(2). Considering such large variations and the weight of the equipment, soil permeability can be determined by direct measurements whenever possible or by other qualitative evaluation methods for sites that are hard to access with heavy equipment.

  17. Recent Developments in Monitoring of Gas and Ash in Volcanic Plumes by Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, S. R.

    2007-05-01

    Since the 1970s, a growing list of methods for the remote detection and measurement of the composition and dynamics of volcanic plumes has been available for volcanologists and atmospheric scientists. During the last decade of intensive volcanic activity in Ecuador, the use of spectroscopic techniques like COSPEC, DOAS or FTIR has become an important tool in routine volcano monitoring which has resulted in a better understanding of source and path processes related to volcanogenic gas and ash emissions with increasing spatial-temporal resolution capabilities. The most important developments achieved with these techniques include the incorporation of radiative transfer and diffusion modelling in automatic data processing routines. In addition, work is being done to identify and quantitatively estimate the presence of ash by means of UV spectroscopy. The use of these methods allowed us to follow the degassing process of Tungurahua volcano with unprecedented detail. A brief description of these improvements and their results are presented.

  18. Testing the noble gas paleothermometer with a yearlong study of groundwater noble gases in an instrumented monitoring well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Chris M.; Castro, M. Clara; Lohmann, Kyger C.; Sun, Tie

    2012-04-01

    We report the results of a yearlong noble gas study conducted in 2008-2009 together with continuous physical and chemical measurements collected in a monitoring well in an aquifer in southern Michigan. Conditions near the water table are correlated with noble gas concentrations, corresponding noble gas temperatures (NGTs), and precipitation events. This yearlong study is the first noble gas field test that has employed natural recharge and in situ monitored conditions, with minimal disturbance of the unsaturated zone. This detailed study demonstrates that significant changes in conditions near the water table can occur over a year that can greatly affect NGTs. Results show that precipitation events are detected within hours at the water table, but a lag in pressure response argues for a long time constant for gas transport within the unsaturated zone. There is strong evidence for the depletion of oxygen near the water table, which affects the noble gas air-saturated water component. During reducing conditions there is evidence for significant noble gas degassing. Rain from the passage of Hurricane Ike caused a significant shift in stable isotope ratios and injection of a large quantity of excess air and likely led to a much more oxygen-rich environment in the soil gas. Although individual models can account for NGTs over portions of the record, no single NGT model can account for all features observed over the entire study. It is likely that the NGT temperature proxy must be viewed as an average of recharge conditions over several years.

  19. Expected trace gas and aerosol retrieval accuracy of the Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Liu, X.; Lee, K. H.; Chance, K.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The predicted accuracy of the trace gases and aerosol retrievals from the geostationary environment monitoring spectrometer (GEMS) was investigated. The GEMS is one of the first sensors to monitor NO2, SO2, HCHO, O3, and aerosols onboard geostationary earth orbit (GEO) over Asia. Since the GEMS is not launched yet, the simulated measurements and its precision were used in this study. The random and systematic component of the measurement error was estimated based on the instrument design. The atmospheric profiles were obtained from Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) simulations and surface reflectances were obtained from climatology of OMI Lambertian equivalent reflectance. The uncertainties of the GEMS trace gas and aerosol products were estimated based on the OE method using the atmospheric profile and surface reflectance. Most of the estimated uncertainties of NO2, HCHO, stratospheric and total O3 products satisfied the user's requirements with sufficient margin. However, about 26% of the estimated uncertainties of SO2 and about 30% of the estimated uncertainties of tropospheric O3 do not meet the required precision. Particularly the estimated uncertainty of SO2 is high in winter, when the emission is strong in East Asia. Further efforts are necessary in order to improve the retrieval accuracy of SO2 and tropospheric O3 in order to reach the scientific goal of GEMS. Random measurement error of GEMS was important for the NO2, SO2, and HCHO retrieval, while both the random and systematic measurement errors were important for the O3 retrievals. The degree of freedom for signal of tropospheric O3 was 0.8 ± 0.2 and that for stratospheric O3 was 2.9 ± 0.5. The estimated uncertainties of the aerosol retrieval from GEMS measurements were predicted to be lower than the required precision for the SZA range of the trace gas retrievals.

  20. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  1. Cost-effective monitoring for a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system: a simplified modeling and gas sensor test.

    PubMed

    Yang, J W; Cho, H J; Choi, G Y; Lee, S H

    2001-07-01

    In order to establish cost-effective monitoring strategies for soil vapor extraction (SVE), a simplified model for multi-component mass transfer of a complex liquid mixture in porous media and gas sensor are proposed and experimentally evaluated. The basic task for the cost-effective monitoring of SVE is to decide how to predict the performances of venting systems in terms of the contaminant vapor removal rate and the time required to accomplish the clean-up specification. The method includes classifying of individual components of a complex mixture on the basis of gas chromatographic (GC) profile and treating each resulting group as a pseudo-single compound. BTEX components of gasoline were selected for model input and the remainders were divided into 4 groups based on their GC retention times. The model proposed in this study is capable of predicting with accuracy volatilization behaviors of gasoline components in soil and the gas sensor (FIGARO TGS 823) was tested by GC-FID to toluene and TPH-GRO(Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Gasoline Range Organics) gas samples. A VOC gas sensor was developed which recognizes TPH-GRO concentrations between 250 and 50 ppm. The developed gas sensor test and proposed model can be used as a valuable tool for the cost-effective monitoring for SVE systems. PMID:11516014

  2. Redox change during magma ascent; Observation from three volcanoes and implication for gas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Yves; Oppenheimer, Clive; Schipper, Ian C.; Hartley, Magaret; Scaillet, Bruno; Gaillard, Fabrice; Peters, Nial; Kyle, Phil

    2015-04-01

    The oxidation state of volcanic gases dictates their speciation and hence their reactivity in the atmosphere. It has become increasingly recognized that the oxidation state of a magma can be strongly affected by degassing. The oxidation state of gases will equally be impacted and the composition of gases emitted by volcanoes will therefore be function of the magma degassing history. This presentation will show results from three volcanoes where the oxidation state of the magma has been tracked during degassing. At Erebus and Laki we used Fe X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) on extensive suites of melt inclusions and glasses, while at Surtsey we used S-Kα peak shifts measurements by electron microprobe (EPMA) on melt inclusions, embayment and glasses. At all three locations we found that a strong reduction of both Fe and S is associated with magma ascent. At Erebus this reduction is greatest, corresponding to a fall in magmatic fO2 of more than two log units. We propose that sulfur degassing can explain the observed evolution of the redox state with ascent and show that forward modeling using initial melt composition can successfully predict the composition of the gas phase measured at the surface. We suggest that the redox state of volcanic gases (expressed in term of redox couples: H2O/H2, SO2/H2S and CO2/CO) can be used to monitor the depth of gas-melt segregation at active volcanoes.

  3. Development and testing of a prototype modular tritium and carbon-14 gas environmental monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.; Dean, J.; Perrie, L.; Sephton, J.; Parisot, M.

    2015-03-15

    Increasing quantities of radioactive waste are being placed into storage facilities. Many of the waste products contain organic materials which may undergo degradation leading to the release of tritium and carbon-14 species into waste containers and potentially into the environment. Monitoring for radioactive gas releases are required for environmental regulatory compliance and for radiation protection of facility workers. Research is currently being undertaken at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) as part of a European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) project MetroRWM to adapt and automate existing environmental sampling techniques for tritium and carbon-14 species. An innovative modular system is being developed which will lead to the introduction of an on-site small scale system capable of gas collection, liquid scintillation sample preparation and measurement. This paper outlines the evaluation of a liquid scintillation system that has been performed to date using active solutions of spiked trapping medium of similar activity concentrations to those anticipated in a waste repository. This system will operate using pre-set conditions for quench and luminescence derived from these and subsequent trials, unlike most other counters for which corrections for these phenomena are applied post measurement. (authors)

  4. External cavity tunable quantum cascade lasers and their applications to trace gas monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Since the first quantum cascade laser (QCL) was demonstrated approximately 16 years ago, we have witnessed an explosion of interesting developments in QCL technology and QCL-based trace gas sensors. QCLs operate in the mid-IR region (3-24 μm) and can directly access the rotational vibrational bands of most molecular species and, therefore, are ideally suited for trace gas detection with high specificity and sensitivity. These sensors have applications in a wide range of fields, including environmental monitoring, atmospheric chemistry, medical diagnostics, homeland security, detection of explosive compounds, and industrial process control, to name a few. Tunable external cavity (EC)-QCLs in particular offer narrow linewidths, wide ranges of tunability, and stable power outputs, which open up new possibilities for sensor development. These features allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple species and the study of large molecules, free radicals, ions, and reaction kinetics. In this article, we review the current status of EC-QCLs and sensor developments based on them and speculate on possible future developments.

  5. Mobile monitoring of fugitive methane emissions from natural gas consumer industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Albertson, J. D.; Gaylord, A.; von Fischer, J.; Rudek, J.; Thoma, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas is used as a feedstock for major industrial processes, such as ammonia and fertilizer production. However, fugitive methane emissions from many major end-use sectors of the natural gas supply chain have not been quantified yet. This presentation introduces new tools for estimating emission rates from mobile methane measurements, and examines results from recent field measurements conducted downwind of several industrial plants using a specialized vehicle equipped with fast response methane sensor. Using these data along with local meteorological data measured by a 3-D sonic anemometer, a Bayesian approach is applied to probabilistically infer methane emission rates based on a modified Gaussian dispersion model. Source rates are updated recursively with repeated traversals of the downwind methane plume when the vehicle was circling around the targeted facilities. Data from controlled tracer release experiments are presented and used to validate the approach. With access via public roads, this mobile monitoring method is able to quickly assess the emission strength of facilities along the sensor path. This work is developing the capacity for efficient regional coverage of potential methane emission rates in support of leak detection and mitigation efforts.

  6. Characterization of a Small Form Factor Multipole RGA for Process Chamber Monitoring and for Reduction in Time to Complete Routine Preventive Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ron; Winningham, Brannon; Schuur, John

    2008-11-03

    A small form-factor, multipole Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used to study steady state and post-PM conditions in an Axcelis GSD ion implanter. The RGA properties and specifications are discussed and data is presented to illustrate N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O pump-down curve characteristics. Baseline performance is compared to performance following invasive activities to determine applicability for eliminating explicit He leak checking requirements and for the determination of how quickly a machine may be returned to production. The target ion implanter was an Axcelis GSD/200E.

  7. Characterization of a Small Form Factor Multipole RGA for Process Chamber Monitoring and for Reduction in Time to Complete Routine Preventive Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ron; Winningham, Brannon; Schuur, John

    2008-11-01

    A small form-factor, multipole Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used to study steady state and post-PM conditions in an Axcelis GSD ion implanter. The RGA properties and specifications are discussed and data is presented to illustrate N2, O2, and H2O pump-down curve characteristics. Baseline performance is compared to performance following invasive activities to determine applicability for eliminating explicit He leak checking requirements and for the determination of how quickly a machine may be returned to production. The target ion implanter was an Axcelis GSD/200E.

  8. Self-tuning method for monitoring the density of a gas vapor component using a tunable laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla; Berzins, Leon; Galkowski, Joseph; Seng, Rita

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a vapor density monitor and laser atomic absorption spectroscopy method for highly accurate, continuous monitoring of vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures and constituent distributions. The vapor density monitor employs a diode laser, preferably of an external cavity design. By using a diode laser, the vapor density monitor is significantly less expensive and more reliable than prior art vapor density monitoring devices. In addition, the compact size of diode lasers enables the vapor density monitor to be portable. According to the method of the present invention, the density of a component of a gas vapor is calculated by tuning the diode laser to a frequency at which the amount of light absorbed by the component is at a minimum or a maximum within about 50 MHz of that frequency. Laser light from the diode laser is then transmitted at the determined frequency across a predetermined pathlength of the gas vapor. By comparing the amount of light transmitted by the diode laser to the amount of light transmitted after the laser light passes through the gas vapor, the density of the component can be determined using Beer's law.

  9. Self-tuning method for monitoring the density of a gas vapor component using a tunable laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, K.; Berzins, L.; Galkowski, J.; Seng, R.

    1996-08-27

    The present invention relates to a vapor density monitor and laser atomic absorption spectroscopy method for highly accurate, continuous monitoring of vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures and constituent distributions. The vapor density monitor employs a diode laser, preferably of an external cavity design. By using a diode laser, the vapor density monitor is significantly less expensive and more reliable than prior art vapor density monitoring devices. In addition, the compact size of diode lasers enables the vapor density monitor to be portable. According to the method of the present invention, the density of a component of a gas vapor is calculated by tuning the diode laser to a frequency at which the amount of light absorbed by the component is at a minimum or a maximum within about 50 MHz of that frequency. Laser light from the diode laser is then transmitted at the determined frequency across a predetermined pathlength of the gas vapor. By comparing the amount of light transmitted by the diode laser to the amount of light transmitted after the laser light passes through the gas vapor, the density of the component can be determined using Beer`s law. 6 figs.

  10. Hierarchical Leak Detection and Localization Method in Natural Gas Pipeline Monitoring Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiangwen; Yu, Yang; Wu, Yinfeng; Feng, Renjian; Yu, Ning

    2012-01-01

    In light of the problems of low recognition efficiency, high false rates and poor localization accuracy in traditional pipeline security detection technology, this paper proposes a type of hierarchical leak detection and localization method for use in natural gas pipeline monitoring sensor networks. In the signal preprocessing phase, original monitoring signals are dealt with by wavelet transform technology to extract the single mode signals as well as characteristic parameters. In the initial recognition phase, a multi-classifier model based on SVM is constructed and characteristic parameters are sent as input vectors to the multi-classifier for initial recognition. In the final decision phase, an improved evidence combination rule is designed to integrate initial recognition results for final decisions. Furthermore, a weighted average localization algorithm based on time difference of arrival is introduced for determining the leak point’s position. Experimental results illustrate that this hierarchical pipeline leak detection and localization method could effectively improve the accuracy of the leak point localization and reduce the undetected rate as well as false alarm rate. PMID:22368464

  11. Tunable Diode Laser Sensors to Monitor Temperature and Gas Composition in High-Temperature Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Ronald; Whitty, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) when combined with carbon capture and storage can be one of the cleanest methods of extracting energy from coal. Control of coal and biomass gasification processes to accommodate the changing character of input-fuel streams is required for practical implementation of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technologies. Therefore a fast time-response sensor is needed for real-time monitoring of the composition and ideally the heating value of the synthesis gas (here called syngas) as it exits the gasifier. The goal of this project was the design, construction, and demonstration an in situ laserabsorption sensor to monitor multiple species in the syngas output from practical-scale coal gasifiers. This project investigated the hypothesis of using laser absorption sensing in particulateladen syngas. Absorption transitions were selected with design rules to optimize signal strength while minimizing interference from other species. Successful in situ measurements in the dusty, high-pressure syngas flow were enabled by Stanford’s normalized and scanned wavelength modulation strategy. A prototype sensor for CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O was refined with experiments conducted in the laboratory at Stanford University, a pilot-scale at the University of Utah, and an engineering-scale gasifier at DoE’s National Center for Carbon Capture with the demonstration of a prototype sensor with technical readiness level 6 in the 2014 measurement campaign.

  12. Monitoring the convergence and the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities by echometric techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Denzau, H.; Erhardt, S.; Wierczeyco, E.

    1988-01-01

    To demonstrate the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities and to monitor cavity convergence, a fully computerized echometric sonar technique was developed in the early eighties. Cavity surveys made by this technique at regular intervals in accordance with requirements imposed by mining authorities are necessary to monitor the stability of cavities as well as to predict cavity life and the effect of cavity convergence on the surface. Unlike conventional methods determining overall cavity closure, the new echometric sonar method allows the calculation of convergence as a function of depth by an intercomparison of data from different surveys. The first operation in the interpretation process is a numerical comparison of the data of vertical and horizontal cross-sections of two successive surveys. This operation will identify changes in the shape of a cavity which may occur if the cavity is leached in a steep-sloped salt dome. Following a verification of the computerized interpretation of the data, the volume of fall is calculated and cross-checked against the volume of rock deposited on the bottom of the cavity.

  13. Real-time sensing and monitoring in robotic gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Gao, J. Q.; Hu, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    A real-time monitoring system is developed for detecting abnormal conditions in robotic gas metal arc welding. The butt-joint test pieces with simulated large gaps are used to intentionally introduce step disturbance of welding conditions. During the welding process, the welding voltage and current signals are sampled and processed on-line to extract the characteristic information reflecting the process quality. After the first statistical processing, it is found that seven statistical parameters (the mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding voltage; the mean, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding current) show variations during the step disturbance. Through the second statistical processing of the means of the welding voltage for subgroups of continuous measurement, the statistical control chart is obtained, and an SPC (statistical process control)-based on-line identifying method is developed. Ten robotic welding experiments are conducted to verify the real-time monitoring system. It is found that the correct identification rates for normal and abnormal welding conditions are 100% and 95%, respectively.

  14. Real time air monitoring of hydrogen chloride and chlorine gas during a chemical fire.

    PubMed

    Karellas, N S; Chen, Q F; De Brou, G B; Milburn, R K

    2003-08-15

    On 9 August 2000 a fire started at a facility that manufactures pool chemicals in Guelph, Ontario. A mobile trace atmospheric gas analyzer (TAGA) unit was summoned to provide on-site air monitoring operated by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment (OMOE). The responsibility of the TAGA unit was to monitor in real time the airborne contaminants released through the combustion of pool chemicals. This was accomplished by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source with the newest TAGA (model IIe): a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer which allows for the direct sampling and real time analysis of air for a wide range of toxics at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. The ionization mechanism under negative APCI conditions is dominated by charge transfer reactions, yielding parent ions which are selected in Q1, dissociated in Q2 and the resultant daughter ions are identified in Q3. By monitoring specific parent/daughter (P/D) ion pairs, the TAGA IIe was able to simultaneously measure, in real time, levels of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine (Cl2) present in the air. The response of the TAGA IIe was characterized by multi-point calibration curves which were linear up to 250 microg/m3 for HCl and up to 600 microg/m3 for Cl2. The average detection limit (DL) for this application was 0.50 microg/m3 for both HCl and Cl2. On-site measurements of HCl and Cl2 were made at several locations upwind and downwind of the fire site over a period of 3 days. The data collected by the TAGA unit was used by the local officials for a real time assessment of the airborne levels of HCl and Cl2.

  15. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be substantially underestimated owing to deposition of SOA-forming compounds to chamber walls. We present here an experimental protocol to constrain the nature of wall deposition of organic vapors in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. The dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αw,i), which can be correlated through its volatility (Ci*) with the number of carbons (nC) and oxygens (nO) in the molecule. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is approached by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and chamber walls. Gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is established relatively rapidly in the presence of perfect accommodation of organic vapors onto particles or when a sufficiently large concentration of suspended particles is present. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will be dominant for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber walls even with perfect particle accommodation.

  16. Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

  17. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  18. Sealed Plant-Growth Chamber For Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher S.; Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory chamber for growing plants used to measure photosynthesis and respiration in simulated microgravity. Holds plant specimens while rotated on clinostat, see article, "Clinostat Delivers Power To Plant-Growth Cabinets" (KSC-11537). Provides way of comparing gas-exchange rates of plants rotated horizontally on clinostat with those of stationary or vertically rotated plants. Gas extracted for analysis without stopping clinostat. Chamber includes potlike base and cylindrical cover, both made of transparent acrylic pipe. Gasket forms seal between cover and bottom plate of base. Cover bolted to pot baseplate, which in turn bolted to clinostat.

  19. Application network for monitoring of green house gas emission from lithosphere in Khibina territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavin, Alex; Nivin, Valentin; Litvinov, Artur; Chesalova, Elena; Baskov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The aim of project is to estimate the contribution of lithospheric flue gas emission of gases CH4, CO2, H2 in the general composition of atmospheric pollution of Arctic zone. The main task is organization of the ecological monitoring in the area of exploitation of large apatite and rare earth ore deposit from Khibine massive on the base of modern WSN (wireless sensor network) technologies. Application network consist from sensors of gas H2, CH4, CO2, complex autonomous equipment for measurement temperature, pressure, humidity and network of telecommunications (used ZigBee protocol). Our project offer technical decisions for experimentally-methodical monitoring network on the base of WSN and the high-sensitive sensors of hydrogen and methane, software and electronic equipment with a transmitter network. This work is the first project in Russia. The advantages of this technology is autonomous work (to several months and more), high-frequency programmable measurement of gas sensor, low cost (on one node of network), possibility to connect to one node of supervision a several types of sensors. And as a result is complex monitoring of environment. It has long been known that the pollution in Arctic Khibine and Lovosero region contains unusually high levels of hydrocarbon gases (HCG) [Petersilie,1964]. The presence of these gases has a number of practical implications and it is therefore important to understand their source and distribution. Among alkaline intrusive complexes with high (for magmatic rocks) concentrations of hydrocarbon and hydrogen- hydrocarbon gases occluded as fluid inclusions in minerals. The Khibina and Lovozero massives are well known, as region of spontaneous emissions of these gases from lithosphere [Khitarov et al., 1979; Ikorskii et al., 1992; Beeskow 2007; Nivin 2005, 2009]. The presence of the HCG, however, raises a number of questions and possibilities. It is unclear how homogeneously the HCG are distributed through the complex? What is the

  20. Outgassing measurement of the aluminum alloy UHV chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Itoh, T.; Komaki, S.; Narushima, K.; Ishimaru, H.

    1986-01-01

    A large vacuum chamber (580 mm diameter) was fabricated from an aluminum alloy surface treated by a special process normally used on small chambers. The chamber was tested unbaked and baked at various temperatures, pressures, and holding periods. The chamber was filled with N2 gas, and the outgassing rate was measured after one hour. Then the ultimate pressure was measured. Outgassing rates for baked and unbaked groups were compared. It is concluded that the same surface treatment technique can be used on both large and small chambers produced by the same special extrusion process.

  1. Gas and plasma dynamics of RF discharge jet of low pressure in a vacuum chamber with flat electrodes and inside tube, influence of RF discharge on the steel surface parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristoliubova, V. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Shaekhov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Researches results of the characteristics of the RF discharge jet of low pressure and the discharge influence on the surface modification of high speed and structural steels are introduced in the article. Gas dynamics, power and energy parameters of the RF low pressure discharge flow in the discharge chamber and the electrode gap are studied in the presence of the materials. Plasma flow rate, discharge power, the concentration of electrons, the density of RF power, the ion current density, and the energy of the ions bombarding the surface materials are considered for the definition of basic properties crucial for the process of surface modification of materials as they were put in the plasma jet. The influence of the workpiece and effect of products complex configuration on the RF discharge jet of low pressure is defined. The correlation of the input parameters of the plasma unit on the characteristics of the discharge is established.

  2. Silicone Tubes - Simple and Effective Tools for Gas Extraction and Monitoring in the Course of Hydrate Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Zimmer, M.

    2015-12-01

    The in situ dissociation of gas hydrate is prerequisite for the commercial recovery of natural gas from hydrate deposits. We examined different methods such as depressurization, thermal stimulation and distortion of the chemical equilibrium by carbon dioxide sequestration for methane gas production from hydrates within our Large Scale reservoir simulator LARS in a pilot plant scale. Within this setup, thin-walled (0.8 mm) silicon tubes are utilized for in situ gas capture. They function as membranes for the extraction of methane gas, leaving sediment and brine behind. The gas capture via silicone tube membranes is, due to their robust nature, reliably applicable in remote and rough areas. First tests show that, driven by the transmembrane pressure difference, the methane flux through these membranes is about 1 mL per minute per cm² membrane surface at a reservoir pressure of about 20 MPa. This is in good agreement with values reported in the literature [e.g. 2]. The operation of the membranes as a simple capture tool for the released methane from a hydrate deposit is therefore considered as feasible. Furthermore, silicone tube membranes are suitable for the quantification of free and dissolved gas volumes. For the monitoring of spatial and temporal gas distribution, LARS has been equipped with several silicone membranes at various locations. They have been utilized to monitor the progress of hydrate formation and decomposition and show that inhomogeneous gas distributions within the reservoir are detectable and terminable. The quantification of carbon dioxide/methane gas ratios during exchange experiments, however, is due to differences in water solubility and permeation rates of the gas species challenging. The study assesses the capability and limits of silicone tubes as membranes for gas extraction and as a tool to monitor gas distribution and composition in the course of hydrate dissociation experiments. [1] Merkel, T.C.; Bodnar, V.I.; Nagai, K.; Freeman, B

  3. Field Test Report: NETL Portable Raman Gas Composition Monitor - Initial Industrial tests at NETL and General Electric (GE)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Buric; Jessica, Mullen; Steven, Woodruff; Ben, Chorpening

    2012-02-24

    NETL has developed new technology which enables the use of Raman spectroscopy in the real-time measurement of gas mixtures. This technology uses a hollow reflective metal-lined capillary waveguide as a gas sampling cell which contains the sample gas, and efficiently collects optical Raman scattering from the gas sample, for measurement with a miniature spectrometer. The result is an optical Raman “fingerprint” for each gas which is tens or hundreds of times larger than that which can be collected with conventional free-space optics. In this manner, the new technology exhibits a combination of measurement speed and accuracy which is unprecedented for spontaneous Raman measurements of gases. This makes the system especially well-suited to gas turbine engine control based on a-priori measurement of incoming fuel composition. The system has been developed to produce a measurement of all of the common components of natural gas, including the lesser nitrogen, oxygen, carbon-dioxide, and carbon monoxide diluents to better than 1% concentration accuracy each second. The objective of this task under CRADA 10-N100 was to evaluate the capability of a laser Raman capillary gas sensor for combustion fuels. A portable version of the Raman gas sensor, constructed at NETL, was used for field-trials conducted in a cooperative research effort at a GE facility. Testing under the CRADA was performed in 5 parts. Parts 1-4 were successful in testing of the Raman Gas Composition Monitor with bottled calibration gases, and in continuous monitoring of several gas streams at low pressure, in comparison with an online mass spectrometer. In part 5, the Raman Gas Composition Monitor was moved outdoors for testing with high pressure gas supplies. Some difficulties were encountered during industrial testing including the condensation of heavy hydrocarbons inside the sample cell (in part 5), communication with the GE data collection system, as well as some drift in the optical noise

  4. Overview of microseismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing for unconventional oil and gas plays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemeta, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The exponential growth of unconventional resources for oil and gas production has been driven by the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. These drilling and completion methods increase the contact area of the low permeability and porosity hydrocarbon bearing formations and allow for economic production in what was previously considered uncommercial rock. These new resource plays have sparked an enormous interest in microseismic monitoring of hydraulic fracture treatments. As a hydraulic fracture is pumped, microseismic events are emitted in a volume of rock surrounding the stimulated fracture. The goal of the monitoring is to identify and locate the microseismic events to a high degree of precision and to map the position of the induced hydraulic fracture in time and space. The microseismic events are very small, typically having a moment-magnitude range of -4 to 0. The microseismic data are collected using a variety of seismic array designs and instrumentation, including borehole, shallow borehole, near-surface and surface arrays, using either of three-component clamped 15 Hz borehole sondes to simple vertical 10 Hz geophones for surface monitoring. The collection and processing of these data is currently under rapid technical development. Each monitoring method has technical challenges which include accurate velocity modeling, correct seismic phase identification and signal to noise issues. The microseismic locations are used to guide hydrocarbon exploration and production companies in crucial reservoir development decisions such as the direction to drill the horizontal well bores and the appropriate inter-well spacing between horizontal wells to optimally drain the resource. The fracture mapping is also used to guide fracture and reservoir engineers in designing and calibrating the fluid volumes and types, injection rates and pressures for the hydraulic fracture treatments. The microseismic data can be located and mapped in near real-time during

  5. Performance of a transpiration-regenerative cooled rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valler, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of a liquid rocket engine thrust chamber which is gas transpiration cooled in the high heat flux convergent portion of the chamber and water jacket cooled (simulated regenerative) in the barrel and divergent sections of the chamber are described. The engine burns LOX-hydrogen propellants at a chamber pressure of 600 psia. Various transpiration coolant flow rates were tested with resultant local hot gas wall temperatures in the 800 F to 1400 F range. The feasibility of transpiration cooling with hydrogen and helium, and the use of photo-etched copper platelets for heat transfer and coolant metering was successfully demonstrated.

  6. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  7. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  8. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  9. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  10. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  12. Investigating 14CO2 chamber methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N. R.; Risk, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The radiogenic isotope of carbon (14C) is an exceptionally useful tool in studying soil respired CO2, providing information about soil turnover rates, depths of production and the biological sources of production through partitioning. Unfortunately, little work has been done to thoroughly investigate the possibility of inherent biases in the current measurement techniques for 14CO2, caused by disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime, because of high costs and sampling logistics. Our aim in this study is to investigate the degree of bias present in the current sampling methodologies using a numerical model and laboratory calibration device. Four chamber techniques were tested numerically with varying fraction modern of production, δ13C of production, collar lengths, flux rates and diffusivities. Two of the chambers were then tested on the lab calibration device. One of these chambers, Iso-FD, has recently been tested for its use as a 13CO2 chamber and it does not induce gas transport fractionation biases present in other 13CO2 sampling methodologies. We then implemented it in the field to test its application as a 14CO2 chamber because of its excellent performance as a 13CO2chamber. Presented here are the results from the numerical modeling experiment, the laboratory calibration experiment and preliminary field results from the Iso-FD chamber.

  13. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-11-17

    Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

  14. Evaluation and Application of a Solid Adsorbent Method for Monitoring Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Gas Operations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. R.; Helmig, D.; Thompson, C. R.; Wang, W.; Terrell, R. M.; Lewis, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Residential communities are being increasingly impacted by emissions from oil and gas development and this has driven the need for simple, effective, and low-cost methods for air quality monitoring. Primary emissions from oil and gas production consist of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) ranging from the short chain alkanes and alkenes to aromatic and semi-volatile species; many of these are a concern from both an air quality and public health viewpoint, as they can lead to local ozone pollution and increased risk of cancer or respiratory illness. The fate of hydrocarbons once in the atmosphere is ultimately oxidation through to CO2 and water, adding to the greenhouse gas burden. Measurement techniques that are capable of identifying and quantifying the full range of primary emissions of concern are required to assess community exposure to air toxics and to better inform residents, as well as local and state legislators. Here, we present evaluation of a low-cost air monitoring technique using stainless steel diffusion cartridges containing multiple solid adsorbents. Over the course of a three-month period in summer of 2014, cartridges were deployed at five monitoring sites located around Boulder County in the Northern Colorado Front Range, and exposed to ambient air for periods of up to four days along with concurrent sampling using stainless steel SUMMA canisters. Samples collected with both methods were subsequently analyzed for VOCs by GC-FID and the results were compared to determine the accuracy and precision of the diffusion cartridge method. Results of this evaluation show that the diffusion cartridge method has the potential to be a simple and low-cost solution for widespread exposure monitoring in communities near oil and gas development regions. Such measurements may also provide supporting evidence on wider effects on greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas development operations.

  15. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  20. Regional trace gas monitoring simplified - A linear retrieval scheme for carbon monoxide from hyperspectral soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N.; Huang, A.; Weisz, E.; Annegarn, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Fast Linear Inversion Trace gas System (FLITS) is designed to retrieve tropospheric total column trace gas densities [molec.cm-2] from space-borne hyperspectral infrared soundings. The objective to develop a new retrieval scheme was motivated by the need for near real-time air quality monitoring at high spatial resolution. We present a case study of FLITS carbon monoxide (CO) retrievals from daytime (descending orbit) Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) measurements that have a 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution and 12 km footprint at nadir. The standard Level 2 IASI CO retrieval product (COL2) is available in near real-time but is spatially averaged over 2 x 2 pixels, or 50 x 50 km, and thus more suitable for global analysis. The study region is Southern Africa (south of the equator) for the period 28-31 August 2008. An atmospheric background estimate is obtained from a chemical transport model, emissivity from regional measurements and surface temperature (ST) from space-borne retrievals. The CO background error is set to 10%. FLITS retrieves CO by assuming a simple linear relationship between the IASI measurements and background estimate of the atmosphere and surface parameters. This differs from the COL2 algorithm that treats CO retrieval as a moderately non-linear problem. When compared to COL2, the FLITS retrievals display similar trends in distribution and transport of CO over time with the advantage of an improved spatial resolution (single-pixel). The value of the averaging kernel (A) is consistently above 0.5 and indicates that FLITS retrievals have a stable dependence on the measurement. This stability is achieved through careful channel selection in the strongest CO absorption lines (2050-2225 cm-1) and joint retrieval with skin temperature (IASI sensitivity to CO is highly correlated with ST), thus no spatial averaging is necessary. We conclude that the simplicity and stability of FLITS make it useful first as a research tool, i.e. the

  1. Monitoring of a gas reservoir in Western Siberia through SqueeSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucci, Alessio; Ferretti, Alessandro; Fokker, Peter A.; Jager, Johan; Lou, Sten

    2014-05-01

    The success of surface movement monitoring using InSAR is critically dependent on the coherence of the radar signal though time and over space. As a result, rural areas are more difficult to monitor with this technology than are areas with a lot of infrastructure. The development of advanced algorithms exploiting distributed scatterers, such as SqueeSAR, has improved these possibilities considerably. However, in rural areas covered with varying quantities of snow and ice, it had not yet been possible to demonstrate the applicability of the technology. We performed a study to assess the applicability of InSAR for assessing land movement is Western Siberia, where we chose the area of the Yuznho Russkoye field for a detailed analysis, after a screening using data that involved a number of fields in the vicinity of the Yuznho Russkoye Field. A first evaluation with C-band data ranging from 2004 - 2010 was unsuccessful due to the small number of images. Therefore we investigated the applicability of X-band data. 75 images were available spanning a period spanning May 2012 until July 2013. Within the summer periods when there was no snow coverage, the X-band data showed good coherence. The subsidence during a summer season, however, was not sufficient to make a quantitative comparison between geomechanical predictions and geodetic observations. Including the winter season in the analysis, however, destroyed the coherence and no subsidence signal could be derived. Quite unexpectedly, however, by cutting out the winter season and using the two disconnected summer seasons simultaneously, the coherence re-appeared and a subsidence estimate was established covering the full period. This way, the temporal surface movement could be established as a function of the position in the field. The spatial subsidence distribution was subsequently compared with the expected pattern expected from the location of producing wells and was found to be show a good correlation. Subsidence was

  2. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  3. Long term monitoring of methane in the atmosphere by multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Jose R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Phillips, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Methane is of interest in the study of the Earth's atmosphere because of its implication in the future global warming of the surface. This warming is produced by the absorption of infrared energy by trace gases. It has been estimated that in the next 40 to 50 years, methane could contribute 20 to 25 pct. as much atmospheric warming as that expected from carbon dioxide increases. Studies to examine sources, sinks, and cycles of methane will require analytical methods capable of continuous unattended measurement with temporal resolution of an hour or less for weeks at a time. Gas chromatography (GC) is one of the most practical methods available to conduct the analysis of air, but limitations in this technique still exist which can be alleviated with multiplex GC (MGC). MGC is a technique where many samples are pseudo-randomly introduced to the chromatograph without regard to the length of time required for an analysis. The resulting data must then be reduced using computational methods such as cross correlation. In the technique reported, a tube packed with silver oxide was used at the inlet of the GC column to create concentration pulses of methane in a sample stream of air. By using only one carrier, i.e., ambient air, an effective and accurate method to monitor the variations in concentration of methane in the atmosphere over long periods of time was developed. Methane in ambient air was monitored for an eight day period and an interesting temporal variability was found. This work has shown the utility of a relatively simple MGC for the analysis of a real environmental sample.

  4. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  5. Formation and migration of Natural Gases: gas composition and isotopes as monitors between source, reservoir and seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoell, M.; Etiope, G.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gases form in tight source rocks at temperatures between 120ºC up to 200ºC over a time of 40 to 50my depending on the heating rate of the gas kitchen. Inferring from pyrolysis experiments, gases after primary migration, a pressure driven process, are rich in C2+ hydrocarbons (C2 to C5). This is consistent with gas compositions of oil-associated gases such as in the Bakken Shale which occur in immediate vicinity of the source with little migration distances. However, migration of gases along porous rocks over long distances (up to 200km in the case of the Troll field offshore Norway) changes the gas composition drastically as C2+ hydrocarbons tend to be retained/sequestered during migration of gas as case histories from Virginia and the North Sea will demonstrate. Similar "molecular fractionation" is observed between reservoirs and surface seeps. In contrast to gas composition, stable isotopes in gases are, in general, not affected by the migration process suggesting that gas migration is a steady state process. Changes in isotopic composition, from source to reservoir to surface seeps, is often the result of mixing of gases of different origins. Examples from various gas provinces will support this notion. Natural gas basins provide little opportunity of tracking and identifying gas phase separation. Future research on experimental phase separation and monitoring of gas composition and gas ratio changes e.g. various C2+ compound ratios over C1 or isomer ratios such as iso/n ratios in butane and pentane may be an avenue to develop tracers for phase separation that could possibly be applied to natural systems of retrograde natural condensate fields.

  6. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to monitor detergents removal from a membrane protein sample.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Han, Fang; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2009-12-01

    In membrane protein biochemical and structural studies, detergents are used to mimic membrane environment and maintain functional, stable conformation of membrane proteins in the absence of lipid bilayers. However, detergent concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent is usually unknown. Here, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) method was developed to quantify four detergents which are frequently used in membrane protein structural studies. To remove excessive detergents, a filtered centrifugation using Centricon tubes was applied. A membrane protein Ig-Beta fragment in four different detergent micelles was exemplified. Detergent concentrations in the upper and lower fraction of the Centricon tube were measured after each round of centrifugation. The results were very consistent to basic properties of detergent micelles in aqueous solvents. Therefore, coupling of GC-MS-SIM and detergent removal by Centricon tubes, detergents concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent could be controlled, which will expedite membrane protein structural and biochemical studies.

  7. Computer monitoring, capture and analysis of gas/liquid chromatograph traces.

    PubMed

    Bulleid, N; Schofield, J

    1986-12-01

    The work described here is effectively the computerization of a gas/liquid chromatograph of the pen recorder type using a BBC microcomputer. The output from the g.l.c. can be captured by the computer in accordance with a series of parameters. The sampling rate can be altered, as can an averaging facility to reduce noise, and a threshold level to eliminate the storage of irrelevant and space-consuming data. The unprocessed readings are initially stored on the computer's floppy disk, then later retrieved and cut into smaller sections to allow maximum resolution for on-screen analysis. In the main analysis stage of the system all processing is shown graphically on the computer monitor at all stages. The principal steps in analysis involve the mathematical modelling and elimination of the solvent peak, the fixing of the retention time for each subsequent peak and its disentangling from any following peaks, and finally the calculation of the area under each individual peak. Several alternative methods are made available for disentangling peaks, which can be tried successively on a single peak then each printed out with comments for comparison later. All readings and results in table form and screen dumps of all trace images are available via a dot matrix printer.

  8. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Gianfranco; Collodi, Giovanni; Gelpi, Leonardo; Fusco, Rosanna; Ricci, Giuseppe; Manes, Antonio; Passafiume, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant’s critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks) gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events. PMID:26805832

  9. Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian David; Erpenbeck, Heather H; Miller, Karen A; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Reimold, Benjamin A; Ward, Steven L; Howell, John

    2010-09-13

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

  10. A Greenhouse-Gas Information System: Monitoring and Validating Emissions Reporting and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jonietz, Karl K.; Dimotakis, Paul E.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2011-09-26

    This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS.

  11. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Manes, Gianfranco; Collodi, Giovanni; Gelpi, Leonardo; Fusco, Rosanna; Ricci, Giuseppe; Manes, Antonio; Passafiume, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant's critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks) gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events. PMID:26805832

  12. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Dissipation within a Euthanasia Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Amparan, Ashlee A; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 euthanasia is used widely for small laboratory animals, such as rodents. A common necessity in many animal research facilities is to euthanize mice in sequential batches. We assessed the effects of several variables on the time it took for CO2 to dissipate within a chamber. Using standard euthanasia time, changes in flow rate were compared between a slow 15% fill rate for 7 min, and a slow 15% followed by a rapid 50% filling for a total of 5 min. Additional variables assessed included the effects of opening the lid after the completion of chamber filling, turning the chamber over after completion of filling, and the use and removal of a cage from within the chamber. For all trials, CO2 levels in the chambers peaked between 50% and 80%. After the gas was turned off, the concentration of CO2 dropped to below 10% CO2 within 2 min, except when the lid was left on the chamber, where concentration levels remained above 10% after 20 min. CO2 dissipation was significantly faster when the chamber was turned upside down after filling. Significant interaction effects occurred among the factors of cage presence within the chamber, flow rate, and chamber position. Only leaving the lid on the chamber had any practical implication for delaying CO2 dissipation. We recommend that users allow 2 min for CO2 to clear from the chamber before subsequent euthanasia procedures, unless the chamber is manipulated to increase the dissipation rate. PMID:25199098

  13. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be underestimated, owing to deposition of SOA-forming vapors to the chamber wall. We present here an experimental protocol and a model framework to constrain the vapor-wall interactions in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is exhibited by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. By optimizing the model output to the observed vapor decay profiles, we identified that the dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αwi), which can be correlated through its volatility with the number of carbons and oxygens in the molecule. By doing so, the wall-induced deposition rate of intermediate/semi-volatile organic vapors can be reasonably predicted based on their molecular constituency. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and the chamber wall. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will dominate wall deposition for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For compounds characterized by relatively large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber wall even with perfect particle accommodation.

  14. A Portable Gas Sensor System for Environmental Monitoring and Malodours Control: Data Assessment of an Experimental Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penza, Michele; Suriano, Domenico; Cassano, Gennaro; Rossi, Riccardo; Alvisi, Marco; Pfister, Valerio; Trizio, Livia; Brattoli, Magda; Amodio, Martino; De Gennaro, Gianluigi

    2011-09-01

    A portable sensor-system based on solid-state gas sensors has been designed and implemented as proof-of-concept for environmental air-monitoring applications, malodours olfactometric control and landfill gas monitoring. Commercial gas sensors and nanotechnology sensors are arranged in a configuration of array for multisensing and multiparameter devices. Wireless sensors at low-cost are integrated to implement a portable and mobile node, that can be used as early-detection system in a distributed sensor network. Real-time and continuous monitoring of hazardous air-contaminants (NO2, CO, PAH, BTEX, etc.) has been performed in field measurements by comparison of chemical analyzers from environmental protection governmental agency (ARPA-Puglia). In addition, experimental campaigns of the integrated portable sensor-system have been realized for assessment of malodours emitted from an urban waste site. The results demonstrate that the sensor-system has a potential capacity for real-time measurements of air-pollutants, malodours from waste site, and control of landfill gas.

  15. Characterisation of an electronic radon gas personal dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Gründel, M; Postendörfer, J

    2003-01-01

    The monitoring of radon exposure at workplaces is of great importance. Up to now passive measurement systems have been used for the registration of radon gas. Recently an electronic radon gas personal dosemeter came onto the market as an active measurement system for the registration of radon exposure (DOSEman; Sarad GmbH, Dresden, Germany). In this personal monitor, the radon gas diffuses through a membrane into a measurement chamber. A silicon detector system records spectroscopically the alpha decays of the radon gas and of the short-lived progeny 218Po and 214Po gathered onto the detector by an electrical field. In this work the calibration was tested and a proficiency test of this equipment was made. The diffusion behaviour of the radon gas into the measurement chamber, susceptibility to thoron, efficiency, influence of humidity, accuracy and the detection limit were checked. PMID:14756187

  16. Determination of mercury in organic solvents and gas condensates by μflow-injection — inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a modified total consumption micronebulizer fitted with single pass spray chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyssiere, Brice; Ordóñez, Yoana Nuevo; Lienemann, Charles-Philippe; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Łobiński, Ryszard

    2006-09-01

    A high-throughput flow-injection — inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) analytical method was developed for the determination of mercury in gas condensates and carbon-rich solvents. The sample (undiluted or diluted 10-fold) was introduced via a modified total consumption micronebulizer working at a flow rate of 30 μl min - 1 and fitted with a singlepass spray chamber. This low flow rate and the addition of oxygen (70 ml min - 1 ) assured the plasma stability and reduced the carbon build-up on the interface and on ion lenses. A limit of detection of 0.5 ng g - 1 (2.5 μl sample) was obtained owing to the reduction of dead volume and sample dispersion (peak-width was 3 s at half-height) in the liquid pass of the nebulizer. The elimination of the memory effect reduced the washout time down to 30 s which resulted in a throughput of ca. 60 h - 1 . The method was validated by the analysis of 3 gas condensates by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry.

  17. Tritium monitor calibration at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bjork, C.J.; Aikin, D.J.; Houlton, T.W.

    1997-08-01

    Tritium in air is monitored at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with air breathing instruments based on ionization chambers. Stack emissions are continuously monitored from sample tubes which each connect to a Tritium bubble which differentially collects HTO and HT. A set of glass vials of glycol capture the HTO. The HT is oxidized with a palladium catalyst and the resultant HTO is captured in a second set of vials of glycol. The glycol is counted with a liquid scintillation counter. All calibrations are performed with tritium containing gas. The Radiation Instrumentation and Calibration (RIC) Team has constructed and maintains two closed loop gas handling systems based on femto TECH model U24 tritium ion chamber monitors: a fixed system housed in a fume hood and a portable system mounted on two two wheeled hand trucks. The U24 monitors are calibrated against tritium in nitrogen gas standards. They are used as standard transfer instruments to calibrate other ion chamber monitors with tritium in nitrogen, diluted with air. The gas handling systems include a circulation pump which permits a closed circulation loop to be established among the U24 monitor and typically two to four other monitors of a given model during calibration. Fixed and portable monitors can be calibrated. The stack bubblers are calibrated in the field by: blending a known concentration of tritium in air within the known volume of the two portable carts, coupled into a common loop; releasing that gas mixture into a ventilation intake to the stack; collecting oxidized tritium in the bubbler; counting the glycol; and using the stack and bubbler flow rates, computing the bubbler`s efficiency. Gas calibration has become a convenient and quality tool in maintaining the tritium monitors at LANL.

  18. Testing The Noble Gas Paleothermometer With A Year-long Study Of Groundwater Noble Gases In An Instrumented Monitoring Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M. C.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.; Sun, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a year-long noble gas study conducted in 2008 and early 2009, together with a wealth of continuous physical and chemical measurements collected in an instrumented monitoring well in the unconfined Glacial Drift aquifer in southern Michigan. Physical and chemical parameters at or near the water table are correlated with noble gas concentrations, corresponding noble gas temperatures (NGTs) and precipitation events. This year-long study is the first noble gas field test that has employed natural recharge, in situ monitored conditions, with minimal disturbance of the unsaturated zone. This study is unprecedented and demonstrates that there can be significant changes in physical and chemical conditions near the water table, over the space of a year, that can have profound effects on noble gas concentrations and hence, NGTs. The year-long record of conditions in the monitoring well show broad seasonal variations in pH, salinity, water temperature and water table depth. Results show that although precipitation events are detected within hours at the water table, there are significant pressure differences that persist for days at the water table, which argues for a very long time constant for gas transport within the unsaturated zone. There is strong evidence for the depletion of oxygen near the water table, which affects the noble gas air saturated water (ASW) component. When strongly reducing conditions prevail, as indicated by ORP, there is evidence for significant noble gas degassing. A major recharge event during the passage of the remnants of Hurricane Ike in the late summer 2008 caused a significant shift in H and O isotope ratios and it injected a large quantity of excess air into the groundwater. Hurricane Ike also appears to have caused a long-term change in the soil gas composition in the unsaturated zone, likely leading to a much more oxygen rich environment. Although individual competing NGT models can account for noble gas

  19. New drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.R.; Hanson, G.G.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.

    1984-10-01

    The design of the new cylindrical drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider is described. Prototype tests to determine the working parameters of the chamber and to study possible gas mixtures are discussed.

  20. BOREAS TGB-1 NSA SF6 Chamber Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, Patrick; Varner, Ruth K.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-1 team made several chamber and tower measurements of trace gases at sites in the BOREAS NSA. This data set contains sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) dark chamber flux measurements at the NSA-OJP and NSA-YJP sites from 16-May through 13-Sep-1994. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from dark chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.