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Sample records for gas numerical results

  1. Micronozzles: 3D numerical structural and gas dynamics modeling, fabrication, and preliminary experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Pyatishev, Evgenij N.; Lurie, Mihail S.; Korshunov, Andrey V.; Akulshin, Y. D.; Dolganov, A. G.; Sabadash, V. O.

    2001-02-01

    The tiny engines, founded on the principle of reactive thrust, are one of most perspective actuators developed by modern micromechanics. These engines can be applied for such apparent problems, as orientation and stabilization of small space objects, but also as local or distributed reactive thrust of new phylum of aerospace objects, for control of boundary layer of flying objects and in series of converting power devices of different purposes. Distinctive features of jet tiny engines are profitability (very large thrust-to-weight ratio) and high (milliseconds) response, which makes them to irreplaceable elements in control systems and, specially, in distributed power generations. These features are provided the minimum sizes, high pressure in working chambers and hypersonic velocity of propulsive jet. Topologically micronozzles are designed as the flat batch devices (3 layers as minimum). The lower and upper layers make flat walls of the nozzle and mainly influence on strength properties of the device. The mean layer reshapes geometry and determines gas dynamic characteristic of the nozzle. A special problem is the opening-up of the combustion-mixture, which is not esteemed in this work. It is necessary to allow for effect of considerable local stresses arising at the expense of static and dynamic loading at design of the jet tiny engines. Thermal gas dynamic processes in the chamber and nozzle determine the values and nature of these stresses, which are hardly studied for the microdevices. The priority is mathematical and experimental simulation of these processes. The most suitable object for initial phase of experimental simulation is the 'cold' engine. The demanded chamber static pressure is formed by external compressed air. In Laboratory of Microtechnology and MicroElectroMechanical Systems a number of such tiny engines with different shapes of the chamber's and the nozzles' surfaces were designed, made and tested. The engines were produced from photosensing

  2. Micronozzles: 3D numerical structural and gas dynamics modeling, fabrication, and preliminary experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Pyatishev, Evgenij N.; Lurie, Mihail S.; Korshunov, Andrey V.; Akulshin, Y. D.; Dolganov, A. G.; Sabadash, V. O.

    2000-02-01

    The tiny engines, founded on the principle of reactive thrust, are one of most perspective actuators developed by modern micromechanics. These engines can be applied for such apparent problems, as orientation and stabilization of small space objects, but also as local or distributed reactive thrust of new phylum of aerospace objects, for control of boundary layer of flying objects and in series of converting power devices of different purposes. Distinctive features of jet tiny engines are profitability (very large thrust-to-weight ratio) and high (milliseconds) response, which makes them to irreplaceable elements in control systems and, specially, in distributed power generations. These features are provided the minimum sizes, high pressure in working chambers and hypersonic velocity of propulsive jet. Topologically micronozzles are designed as the flat batch devices (3 layers as minimum). The lower and upper layers make flat walls of the nozzle and mainly influence on strength properties of the device. The mean layer reshapes geometry and determines gas dynamic characteristic of the nozzle. A special problem is the opening-up of the combustion-mixture, which is not esteemed in this work. It is necessary to allow for effect of considerable local stresses arising at the expense of static and dynamic loading at design of the jet tiny engines. Thermal gas dynamic processes in the chamber and nozzle determine the values and nature of these stresses, which are hardly studied for the microdevices. The priority is mathematical and experimental simulation of these processes. The most suitable object for initial phase of experimental simulation is the 'cold' engine. The demanded chamber static pressure is formed by external compressed air. In Laboratory of Microtechnology and MicroElectroMechanical Systems a number of such tiny engines with different shapes of the chamber's and the nozzles' surfaces were designed, made and tested. The engines were produced from photosensing

  3. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  4. Numerical study of a helicon gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, Oleg; Molvig, Kim

    2001-06-01

    Plasma sources based on the helicon gas discharge are widely used in industry [1] due to their high efficiency. We investigate performance of a particular helicon plasma sources designed for the VASIMR [2] plasma thruster. Specifically we are interested in the VX-10 configuration [3] operating with hydrogen or helium plasmas. Firstly, we use our zero-dimensional model to characterize plasma condition and composition [4]. Next we couple it to one-dimensional hybrid model [5] for a rarified gas flow in the system feeding pipe - quartz tube of the helicon. We perform numerical analysis of plasma source operation in different regimes. Results are compared and used to explain experimental data [3]. Finally, we'll discuss more detailed fully kinetic models for the gas and plasma species evolution in the helicon discharge with parameters typical to that of the VASIMR plasma thruster. [1] M.A. Lieberman and A.J.Lihtenberg, , 'Principles of plasma discharges and materials processing', Wiley, NY, 1994; [2] F.Chang-Diaz et al, Bull. APS 45 (7) 129, 2000; [3] J. Squire et al., Bull. APS 45 (7) 130, 2000; [4] O.Batishchev and Kim Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2000-3754, 2000; [5] O.Batishchev and Kim Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2001-0963, 2001.

  5. Numerical simulation of polariton Bose gas thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsev, P. F.; Kuznetsov, I. O.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the numerical simulation of the process a Bose gas thermalization and the formation of the condensate. Our approach is based on kinetic equations and “Fermi's golden rule” in the incoherent approximation. Direct summation of terms is performed using GPGPU OpenCL parallel code using AMD Radeon HD 7970.

  6. Numerical evaluation of gas core length in free surface vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofano, L.; Nobili, M.; Caruso, G.

    2014-11-01

    The formation and evolution of free surface vortices represent an important topic in many hydraulic intakes, since strong whirlpools introduce swirl flow at the intake, and could cause entrainment of floating matters and gas. In particular, gas entrainment phenomena are an important safety issue for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors, because the introduction of gas bubbles within the core causes dangerous reactivity fluctuation. In this paper, a numerical evaluation of the gas core length in free surface vortices is presented, according to two different approaches. In the first one, a prediction method, developed by the Japanese researcher Sakai and his team, has been applied. This method is based on the Burgers vortex model, and it is able to estimate the gas core length of a free surface vortex starting from two parameters calculated with single-phase CFD simulations. The two parameters are the circulation and the downward velocity gradient. The other approach consists in performing a two-phase CFD simulation of a free surface vortex, in order to numerically reproduce the gas- liquid interface deformation. Mapped convergent mesh is used to reduce numerical error and a VOF (Volume Of Fluid) method was selected to track the gas-liquid interface. Two different turbulence models have been tested and analyzed. Experimental measurements of free surface vortices gas core length have been executed, using optical methods, and numerical results have been compared with experimental measurements. The computational domain and the boundary conditions of the CFD simulations were set consistently with the experimental test conditions.

  7. Numerical simulation of synthesis gas incineration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, A. V.; Khaustov, S. A.; Tabakaev, R. B.; Belousova, Y. A.

    2016-04-01

    The authors have analysed the expediency of the suggested low-grade fuels application method. Thermal processing of solid raw materials in the gaseous fuel, called synthesis gas, is investigated. The technical challenges concerning the applicability of the existing gas equipment developed and extensively tested exclusively for natural gas were considered. For this purpose computer simulation of three-dimensional syngas-incinerating flame dynamics was performed by means of the ANSYS Multiphysics engineering software. The subjects of studying were: a three-dimensional aerodynamic flame structure, heat-release and temperature fields, a set of combustion properties: a flare range and the concentration distribution of burnout reagents. The obtained results were presented in the form of a time-averaged pathlines with color indexing. The obtained results can be used for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of complex multicomponent gas incineration singularities.

  8. Numerical analysis of a microwave torch with axial gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M.

    2013-07-15

    The characteristics of a microwave discharge in an argon jet injected axially into a coaxial channel with a shortened inner electrode are numerically analyzed using a self-consistent equilibrium gas-dynamic model. The specific features of the excitation and maintenance of the microwave discharge are determined, and the dependences of the discharge characteristics on the supplied electromagnetic power and gas flow rate are obtained. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

  9. Numerical results for the Ar and CF{sub 4} mixture gas in a dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma using a hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Bi Zhenhua; Dai Zhongling; Xu Xiang; Li Zhicheng; Wang Younian

    2009-04-15

    A one dimensional hybrid model has been proposed to study the Ar and CF{sub 4} mixture gas in a dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled plasma. To achieve the more precise spatiotemporal distributions of the electric field and ions flux, the ion momentum equations are adopted instead of the drift-diffusion model with the effective electric field approximation. By adjusting DF sources, the evolutions of ions densities, ion energy distributions, and ion angular distributions are obtained and the modulation effects are discussed. Finally, the comparison between the simulation and experimental result shows that the hybrid model could qualitatively describe the characteristic of the mixtures in less time, which will be more promising in two dimensional and three dimensional simulations.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Gas Leaking Diffusion from Storage Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongjun; Jing, Jiaqiang

    Over 80 percents of storage tank accidents are caused by gas leaking. Since traditional empirical calculation has great errors, present work aims to study the gas leaking diffusion under different wind conditions by numerical simulation method based on computational fluid dynamics theory. Then gas concentration distribution was obtained to determine the scope of the security zone. The results showed that gas diffused freely along the axis of leaking point without wind, giving rise to large range of hazardous area. However, wind plays the role of migrating and diluting the leaking gas. The larger is the wind speed, the smaller is the damage and the bigger is the security zone. Calculation method and results can provide some reference to establish and implement rescue program for accidents.

  11. Numerical analysis on nanoparticles-laden gas film thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiru; Diao, Dongfeng; Yang, Lei

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles can be taken as additives and added into various fluids to improve their lubricating performances. At present, researches in this area are mainly concentrated on the improvement effects of nanoparticles on the lubricating performances of liquid such as oil and water. Nanoparticles will also affect gas lubrication, but few related studies have been reported. Nanoparticles-laden gas film (NLGF) is formed when adding nanoparticles into gas bearing. Then, the lubricating performances of gas bearing including pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity will change. The variations of pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity in nanoparticles-laden gas film thrust bearing are investigated by numerical method. Taking account of the compressibility of gas and the interactions between gas and nanoparticles, a computational fluid dynamics model based on Navier-Stokes equations is applied to simulate the NLGF flow. The effects of inlet nanoparticles volume fraction and orifice radius on film pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of the NLGF are calculated. The numerical calculation results show that both of the film land pressure and the maximum film pressure both increase when the nanoparticles are added into gas bearing, and the film pressures increase with the rising of the inlet nanoparticles volume fraction. The nanoparticles have an enhancement effect on load-carrying capacity of the studied bearing, and the enhancement effect becomes greater as the film thickness decrease. Therefore, nanoparticles can effectively improve the lubricating performance of gas bearing. The proposed research provides a theoretical basis for the design of new-type nanoparticles-laden gas film bearings.

  12. Oil and gas shows numerous in Nama basin, southern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.; Swart, R.; Summons, R.

    1996-11-25

    No local sources of oil and gas are on production in southwestern Africa. The as yet undeveloped Kudu gas field off Namibia is the first major discovery, but there are numerous shows in the onshore Nama basin that suggest there could be significant accumulations of hydrocarbons present. The Nama basin occupies 350,000 sq km of southern Namibia, western Botswana, and northwestern South Africa and contains 10 km or more of Neoproterozoic and Cambrian sediment. National petroleum Corp. of Namibia recently embarked on an assessment of the prospectivity of the basin, and there the authors report some of the first results.

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  14. Numerical taxonomy on data: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Farach, M.

    1997-12-01

    The numerical taxonomy problems associated with most of the optimization criteria described above are NP - hard [3, 5, 1, 4]. In, the first positive result for numerical taxonomy was presented. They showed that if e is the distance to the closest tree metric under the L{sub {infinity}} norm. i.e., e = min{sub T} [L{sub {infinity}} (T-D)], then it is possible to construct a tree T such that L{sub {infinity}} (T-D) {le} 3e, that is, they gave a 3-approximation algorithm for this problem. We will refer to this algorithm as the Single Pivot (SP) heuristic.

  15. Numerical modeling and optimization of the Iguassu gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borman, V. D.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, V. N.; Tronin, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    The full procedure of the numerical calculation of the optimized parameters of the Iguassu gas centrifuge (GC) is under discussion. The procedure consists of a few steps. On the first step the problem of a hydrodynamical flow of the gas in the rotating rotor of the GC is solved numerically. On the second step the problem of diffusion of the binary mixture of isotopes is solved. The separation power of the gas centrifuge is calculated after that. On the last step the time consuming procedure of optimization of the GC is performed providing us the maximum of the separation power. The optimization is based on the BOBYQA method exploring the results of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamics and diffusion of the mixture of isotopes. Fast convergence of calculations is achieved due to exploring of a direct solver at the solution of the hydrodynamical and diffusion parts of the problem. Optimized separative power and optimal internal parameters of the Iguassu GC with 1 m rotor were calculated using the developed approach. Optimization procedure converges in 45 iterations taking 811 minutes.

  16. Numerical simulation of turbulent gas flames in tubes.

    PubMed

    Salzano, E; Marra, F S; Russo, G; Lee, J H S

    2002-12-02

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an emerging technique to predict possible consequences of gas explosion and it is often considered a powerful and accurate tool to obtain detailed results. However, systematic analyses of the reliability of this approach to real-scale industrial configurations are still needed. Furthermore, few experimental data are available for comparison and validation. In this work, a set of well documented experimental data related to the flame acceleration obtained within obstacle-filled tubes filled with flammable gas-air mixtures, has been simulated. In these experiments, terminal steady flame speeds corresponding to different propagation regimes were observed, thus, allowing a clear and prompt characterisation of the numerical results with respect to numerical parameters, as grid definition, geometrical parameters, as blockage ratio and to mixture parameters, as mixture reactivity. The CFD code AutoReagas was used for the simulations. Numerical predictions were compared with available experimental data and some insights into the code accuracy were determined. Computational results are satisfactory for the relatively slower turbulent deflagration regimes and became fair when choking regime is observed, whereas transition to quasi-detonation or Chapman-Jogouet (CJ) were never predicted.

  17. Numerical simulations of catastrophic disruption: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.; Ryan, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to study high velocity two-body impacts. In this paper, a two-dimensional Largrangian finite difference hydro-code and a three-dimensional smooth particle hydro-code (SPH) are described and initial results reported. These codes can be, and have been, used to make specific predictions about particular objects in our solar system. But more significantly, they allow us to explore a broad range of collisional events. Certain parameters (size, time) can be studied only over a very restricted range within the laboratory; other parameters (initial spin, low gravity, exotic structure or composition) are difficult to study at all experimentally. The outcomes of numerical simulations lead to a more general and accurate understanding of impacts in their many forms.

  18. Application of Prim's invariant transformation for numerical investigations of inviscid-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlubnyi, V. V.

    Godunov's finite difference method is used to perform a numerical analysis of the equations of inviscid-gas motion using Prim's (1949) invariant transformations. It is demonstrated that these transformations can be used to validate the numerical results as well as to reduce the computation time in the numerical method used.

  19. Numerical results for axial flow compressor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaughan, F. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using Cornell's supercomputing facilities, an extensive study of the Moore-Greitzer model was carried out, which gives accurate and reliable information about compressor instability. The bifurcation analysis in the companion paper shows the dependence of the mode of compressor response on the shape of the rotating stall characteristic. The numerical results verify and extend this with a more accurate representation of the characteristic. The effect of the parameters on the shape of the rotating stall characteristic is investigated, and it is found that the parameters with the strongest effects are the inlet length, and the shape of the compressor pressure rise vs. mass flow diagram (i.e. tall diagrams vs. shallow diagrams). The effects of inlet guide vane loss on the characteristic are discussed.

  20. Anisotropic halo model: implementation and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgró, Mario A.; Paz, Dante J.; Merchán, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    In the present work, we extend the classic halo model for the large-scale matter distribution including a triaxial model for the halo profiles and their alignments. In particular, we derive general expressions for the halo-matter cross-correlation function. In addition, by numerical integration, we obtain instances of the cross-correlation function depending on the directions given by halo shape axes. These functions are called anisotropic cross-correlations. With the aim of comparing our theoretical results with the simulations, we compute averaged anisotropic correlations in cones with their symmetry axis along each shape direction of the centre halo. From these comparisons we characterize and quantify the alignment of dark matter haloes on the Λcold dark matter context by means of the presented anisotropic halo model. Since our model requires multidimensional integral computation we implement a Monte Carlo method on GPU hardware which allows us to increase the precision of the results and it improves the performance of the computation.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Micronozzles with Comparison to Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, B.; Chesta, E.; Gloth, O.; Brandt, R.; Schwane, R.; Perigo, D.; Smith, P.

    2004-10-01

    A numerical analysis of conical micronozzle flows has been conducted using the commercial software package CFD-RC FASTRAN [13]. The numerical results have been validated by comparison with direct thrust and mass flow measurements recently performed in ESTEC Propulsion Laboratory on Polyflex Space Ltd. 10mN Cold-Gas thrusters in the frame of ESA CryoSat mission. The flow is viscous dominated, with a throat Reynolds number of 5000, and the relatively large length of the nozzle causes boundary layer effects larger than usual for nozzles of this size. This paper discusses in detail the flow physics such as boundary layer growth and structure, and the effects of rarefaction. Furthermore a number of different domain sizes and exit boundary conditions are used to determine the optimum combination of computational time and accuracy.

  2. Numerical simulation of free surface incompressible liquid flows surrounded by compressible gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caboussat, A.; Picasso, M.; Rappaz, J.

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model for the three-dimensional simulation of liquid-gas flows with free surfaces is presented. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are assumed to hold in the liquid domain. In the gas domain, the velocity is disregarded, the pressure is supposed to be constant in each connected component of the gas domain and follows the ideal gas law. The gas pressure is imposed as a normal force on the liquid-gas interface. An implicit splitting scheme is used to decouple the physical phenomena. Given the gas pressure on the interface, the method described in [J. Comput Phys. 155 (1999) 439; Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 42(7) (2003) 697] is used to track the liquid domain and to compute the velocity and pressure fields in the liquid. Then the connected components of the gas domain are found using an original numbering algorithm. Finally, the gas pressure is updated from the ideal gas law in each connected component of gas. The implementation is validated in the frame of mould filling. Numerical results in two and three space dimensions show that the effect of pressure in the bubbles of gas trapped by the liquid cannot be neglected.

  3. Testing Numerical Dynamo Models Against Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissinger, C. J.; Fauve, S.; Dormy, E.

    2007-12-01

    Significant progress has been achieved over the past few years in describing the geomagnetic field using computer models for dynamo action. Such models are so far limited to parameter regimes which are very remote from actual values relevant to the Earth core or any liquid metal (the magnetic Prandtl number is always over estimated by a factor at least 104). While existing models successfully reproduce many of the magnetic observations, it is difficult to assert their validity. The recent success of an experimental homogeneous unconstrained dynamo (VKS) provides a new way to investigate dynamo action in turbulent conducting flows, but it also offers a chance to test the validity of exisiting numerical models. We use a code originaly written for the Geodynamo (Parody) and apply it to the experimental configuration. The direct comparison of simulations and experiments is of great interest to test the predictive value of numerical simulations for dynamo action. These turbulent simulations allow us to approach issues which are very relevant for geophysical dynamos, especially the competition between different magnetic modes and the dynamics of reversals.

  4. A novel gas-droplet numerical method for spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Jiang, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a non-iterative numerical technique for computing time-dependent gas-droplet flows. The method is a fully-interacting combination of Eulerian fluid and Lagrangian particle calculation. The interaction calculations between the two phases are formulated on a pressure-velocity coupling procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. This procedure eliminates the global iterations required in the conventional particle-source-in-cell (PSIC) procedure. Turbulent dispersion calculations are treated by a stochastic procedure. Numerical calculations and comparisons with available experimental data, as well as efficiency assessments are given for some sprays typical of spray combustion applications.

  5. A numerical simulation of flows around a deformable gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Minoru; Ishii, Ryuji; Morioka, Shigeki

    1991-12-01

    A numerical simulation of flows around a (deformable) gas bubble rising through an incompressible viscous fluid was carried out on a supercomputer Fujitsu VP2600 at Data Processing Center of Kyoto University. The solution algorithm is a modified Marker And Cell (MAC) method. For the grid generation, an orthogonal mapping proposed by Ryskin and Leal was applied. it is assumed that the shape of the bubble and the flow field are axisymmetric.

  6. Hot halo gas in numerical simulations of galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Manodeep

    Galaxy merger simulations have explored the behavior of gas within a galactic disk, yet the dynamics of hot gas within the galaxy halo has been neglected. We report on the results of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of colliding galaxies with hot halo gas. We explore a range of mass ratios, gas fractions and orbital configurations to constrain the shocks and the dynamics of the gas within the progenitor halos. We find that: (i) A strong shock is produced in the galaxy halos before the first passage, increasing the temperature of the gas by almost an order of magnitude to ˜ 10 6.3 K. (ii) The X-ray luminosity of the shock is strongly dependent on the gas fraction. It is ≳ 1039 erg/s for gas fractions larger than 10%. (iii) We find an analytic fit to the maximum X-ray luminosity of the shock as a function of merger parameters. This fit can be used in semi-analytic recipes for galaxy formation to estimate the total X-ray emission from shocks in merging galaxies. (iv) The hot diffuse gas in the simulation also produces X-ray luminosities as large as 1042 erg/s. This contributes to the total X-ray background in the Universe. (v) ˜ 10--20% of the initial gas mass is unbound from the galaxies for equal-mass mergers, while 3--5% of the gas mass is released for the 3:1 and 10:1 mergers. This unbound gas ends up far from the galaxy and can be a feasible mechanism for metal enrichment of the IGM. We use an analytical halo merger tree to estimate the fraction of gas mass lost over the history of the Universe.

  7. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  8. Numerical investigation of unsteady real gas flowfields with MHD effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munipalli, Ramakanth

    1998-12-01

    The design of ground based test facilities to simulate high temperature flight environments has received much attention in recent years. This dissertation deals with the numerical simulation of such facilities in order to assist their design and estimate their importance in modern aerodynamic research. The central problem addressed here is the simulation of a Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) based accelerator which can potentially improve the test Mach number range of conventional facilities while at the same time providing realistic gas chemistry at the appropriate flight conditions. The study uses two types of gas models: (a) an equilibrium model in which the flow is assumed to be in thermochemical equilibrium at all points and (b) a nonequilibrium model based on finite rate chemistry and two distinct flow temperatures. The latter is utilized to study accelerators based on nonequilibrium ionization. The effect of finite rate processes on MHD accelerators is studied. Equilibrium air models are used to validate nonequilibrium air calculations and to study the effect of adding seed material to increase electrical conductivity at relatively low temperatures. Some comparisons with experimental data are made to validate the basic gas models and numerical schemes. Simplified solutions to the Maxwell equations are used to simulate the electromagnetic field. Some general considerations in the design of seeded MHD accelerators are studied. Upwind based flux split schemes based on Roe's scheme are used to solve the flow equations. Steady and unsteady solutions are presented for a variety of MHD related problems.

  9. Numerical Study of Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustor Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song-Lin

    2002-01-01

    To further reduce pollutant emissions, such as CO, NO(x), UHCs, etc., in the next few decades, innovative concepts of gas turbine combustors must be developed. Several concepts, such as the LIPP (Lean- Premixed- Prevaporized), RQL (Rich-Burn Quick-Quench Lean-Burn), and LDI (Lean-Direct-Injection), have been under study for many years. To fully realize the potential of these concepts, several improvements, such as inlet geometry, air swirler, aerothermochemistry control, fuel preparation, fuel injection and injector design, etc., must be made, which can be studied through the experimental method and/or the numerical technique. The purpose of this proposal is to use the CFD technique to study, and hence, to guide the design process for low emission gas turbine combustors. A total of 13 technical papers have been (or will be) published.

  10. Microcomputer numerical analysis system for gas dynamics application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The original objective (scope) of the effort was to deliver a microcomputer version of the Continuum gas dynamic numerical analysis on existing NASA equipment. It became apparent during the course of the contract that the interests of NASA would be much better served by the delivery of a dedicated system designed and developed by Continuum, which would provide NASA with additional hardware ideally suited to the specific task at no increase in cost. Accordingly, the contract was modified to reflect this new development. The details of the modification and the delivered capability will be discussed in greater detail in the ensuing technical discussion.

  11. Preliminary numerical analysis of improved gas chromatograph model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for the gas chromatograph was developed which incorporates the heretofore neglected transport mechanisms of intraparticle diffusion and rates of adsorption. Because a closed-form analytical solution to the model does not appear realizable, techniques for the numerical solution of the model equations are being investigated. Criteria were developed for using a finite terminal boundary condition in place of an infinite boundary condition used in analytical solution techniques. The class of weighted residual methods known as orthogonal collocation is presently being investigated and appears promising.

  12. Boundary Conditions for Numerical Calculation of Gas Exchange in Piston Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, Yu. A.; Zenkin, V. A.; Khmelev, R. N.

    2017-07-01

    An estimation of the efficiency of the technique of setting boundary conditions with the use of gas-dynamical functions to numerically calculate the intake and exhaust processes in piston engines is made. Mathematical models have been developed for different engines, and joint calculations of nonstationary gas flow and of the process proceeding in the cylinder have been carried out. A comparison of the obtained results with experimental data has been made, and the adequacy of the mathematical description has been confirmed.

  13. Numerical simulation of landfill gas pressure distribution in landfills.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yonghui; Xiong, Hao

    2013-11-01

    Landfill gas emissions are recognized as one of the three major concerns in municipal solid waste landfills. There are many factors that affect the generation of landfill gas when the landfill is capped. In this article, a model has been developed based on the theory of porous media flow. The model could predict the pressure distribution of landfill gas in landfill, coupling the effect of landfill settlement. According to the simulation analysis of landfill, it was found that: (a) the landfill gas pressure would reach a peak after 1.5 years, then begin to decline, and the rate of decay would slow down after 10 years; (b) the influence radius of the gas wells is limited; (c) the peak value of landfill gas pressure is larger, it appears later and the rate of decay is slower when the landfill settlement is considered in the model; (d) the calculation of excess gas pressure in landfill under different negative pressures of the extraction well is compared between this model and another model, and the results show that the relative pressure distribution form and range are almost the same.

  14. Numerical Investigation of Hot Gas Ingestion by STOVL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1998-01-01

    This report compiles the various research activities conducted under the auspices of the NASA Grant NAG3-1026, "Numerical Investigation of Hot Gas Ingestion by STOVL Aircraft" during the period of April 1989 to April 1994. The effort involved the development of multigrid based algorithms and computer programs for the calculation of the flow and temperature fields generated by Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft, while hovering in ground proximity. Of particular importance has been the interaction of the exhaust jets with the head wind which gives rise to the hot gas ingestion process. The objective of new STOVL designs to reduce the temperature of the gases ingested into the engine. The present work describes a solution algorithm for the multi-dimensional elliptic partial-differential equations governing fluid flow and heat transfer in general curvilinear coordinates. The solution algorithm is based on the multigrid technique which obtains rapid convergence of the iterative numerical procedure for the discrete equations. Initial efforts were concerned with the solution of the Cartesian form of the equations. This algorithm was applied to a simulated STOVL configuration in rectangular coordinates. In the next phase of the work, a computer code for general curvilinear coordinates was constructed. This was applied to model STOVL geometries on curvilinear grids. The code was also validated in model problems. In all these efforts, the standard k-Epsilon model was used.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Dispersion from Urban Greenhouse Gas Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottrott, Anders; Tan, Sze; He, Yonggang; Winkler, Renato

    2017-04-01

    Cities are characterized by complex topography, inhomogeneous turbulence, and variable pollutant source distributions. These features create a scale separation between local sources and urban scale emissions estimates known as the Grey-Zone. Modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques provide a quasi-deterministic, physically based toolset to bridge the scale separation gap between source level dynamics, local measurements, and urban scale emissions inventories. CFD has the capability to represent complex building topography and capture detailed 3D turbulence fields in the urban boundary layer. This presentation discusses the application of OpenFOAM to urban CFD simulations of natural gas leaks in cities. OpenFOAM is an open source software for advanced numerical simulation of engineering and environmental fluid flows. When combined with free or low cost computer aided drawing and GIS, OpenFOAM generates a detailed, 3D representation of urban wind fields. OpenFOAM was applied to model scalar emissions from various components of the natural gas distribution system, to study the impact of urban meteorology on mobile greenhouse gas measurements. The numerical experiments demonstrate that CH4 concentration profiles are highly sensitive to the relative location of emission sources and buildings. Sources separated by distances of 5-10 meters showed significant differences in vertical dispersion of plumes, due to building wake effects. The OpenFOAM flow fields were combined with an inverse, stochastic dispersion model to quantify and visualize the sensitivity of point sensors to upwind sources in various built environments. The Boussinesq approximation was applied to investigate the effects of canopy layer temperature gradients and convection on sensor footprints.

  16. A numerical study of gas transport in human lung models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Long; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2005-04-01

    Stable Xenon (Xe) gas has been used as an imaging agent for decades in its radioactive form, is chemically inert, and has been used as a ventilation tracer in its non radioactive form during computerized tomography (CT) imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using hyperpolarized Helium (He) gas and Xe has also emerged as a powerful tool to study regional lung structure and function. However, the present state of knowledge regarding intra-bronchial Xe and He transport properties is incomplete. As the use of these gases rapidly advances, it has become critically important to understand the nature of their transport properties and to, in the process, better understand the role of gas density in general in determining regional distribution of respiratory gases. In this paper, we applied the custom developed characteristic-Galerkin finite element method, which solves the three-dimensional (3D) incompressible variable-density Navier-Stokes equations, to study the transport of Xe and He in the CT-based human lung geometries, especially emulating the washin and washout processes. The realistic lung geometries are segmented and reconstructed from CT images as part of an effort to build a normative atlas (NIH HL-064368) documenting airway geometry over 4 decades of age in healthy and disease-state adult humans. The simulation results show that the gas transport process depends on the gas density and the body posture. The implications of these results on the difference between washin and washout time constants are discussed.

  17. Numerical Study of Transmission Loss Through a Slow Gas Layer Adjacent to a Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Beck, Benjamin S.; Slagle, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic numerical investigation of the sound transmission loss through a multilayer system consisting of a bagged gas and lightweight panel. The goal of the study is to better understand the effect of the gas on transmission loss and determine whether a gas with a slow speed of sound is beneficial for noise control applications. As part of the study, the density and speed of sound of the gas are varied independently to assess the impact of each on transmission loss. Results show that near grazing incidence the plane wave transmission loss through the multilayer system is more sensitive to the speed of sound than the density of the gas. In addition, it was found that a slow wave speed in the bagged gas provides more low-frequency transmission loss benefit than a fast wave speed. At low angles of incidence, close to the plate normal, the benefit is due to the reduction of the characteristic impedance of the gas. At high angles of incidence, the benefit is attributed to the fact that the incident waves at the air/gas interface are bent towards the surface normal. Since transmission loss is angle dependent, refraction in the slow gas layer results in a significant improvement in the transmission loss at high angles of incidence.

  18. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzocri, D.; Rabiti, C.; Luzzi, L.; Barani, T.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pastore, G.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a new numerical algorithm (called PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the equation for intra-granular fission gas release in nuclear fuel. The work was carried out in collaboration with Politecnico di Milano and Institute for Transuranium Elements. The PolyPole-1 algorithms is being implemented in INL's fuels code BISON code as part of BISON's fission gas release model. The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this work, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, with the addition of polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of the PolyPole-1 solution is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work.

  19. Study on Applicability of Numerical Simulation to Evaluation of Gas Entrainment From Free Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kei Ito; Takaaki Sakai; Hiroyuki Ohshima

    2006-07-01

    An onset condition of gas entrainment (GE) due to free surface vortex has been studied to establish a design of fast breeder reactor with higher coolant velocity than conventional designs, because the GE might cause the reactor operation instability and therefore should be avoided. The onset condition of the GE has been investigated experimentally and theoretically, however, dependency of the vortex type GE on local geometry configuration of each experimental system and local velocity distribution has prevented researchers from formulating the universal onset condition of the vortex type GE. A real scale test is considered as an accurate method to evaluate the occurrence of the vortex type GE, but the real scale test is generally expensive and not useful in the design study of large and complicated FBR systems, because frequent displacement of inner equipments accompanied by the design change is difficult in the real scale test. Numerical simulation seems to be promising method as an alternative to the real scale test. In this research, to evaluate the applicability of the numerical simulation to the design work, numerical simulations were conducted on the basic experimental system of the vortex type GE. This basic experiment consisted of rectangular flow channel and two important equipments for vortex type GE in the channel, i.e. vortex generation and suction equipments. Generated vortex grew rapidly interacting with the suction flow and the grown vortex formed a free surface dent (gas core). When the tip of the gas core or the bubbles detached from the tip of the gas core reached the suction mouth, the gas was entrained to the suction tube. The results of numerical simulation under the experimental conditions were compared to the experiment in terms of velocity distributions and free surface shape. As a result, the numerical simulation showed qualitatively good agreement with experimental data. The numerical simulation results were similar to the experimental

  20. Numerical investigations of flow structure in gas turbine shroud gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasilczuk, F.; Flaszyński, P.; Doerffer, P.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of the flow in the labyrinth sealing of an axial gas turbine was investigated by means of numerical simulations. Additionally, the flow structure for two- and three-dimensional axisymmetric models was compared. The porous disc as a model for the pressure drop relevant to the obtained in the cascade was proposed and tested. Several flow structure features existing in the sealing cavities are investigated: vortical structure and separation bubble on the rib and the correlation between the pressure drop and the clearance size. The carried out investigations indicate that the innovation aimed at decreasing the leakage flow through implementation of the flow control devices is possible. Furthermore the comparison between 2D and 3D models shows good agreement, thus application of less demanding 2D model introduces negligible differences. It is shown that the proposed porous disc model applied to mimic pressure drop in cascade can be effectively used for rotor blade sealing simulations.

  1. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocri, D.; Rabiti, C.; Luzzi, L.; Barani, T.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pastore, G.

    2016-09-01

    The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this paper, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, combined with polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of PolyPole-1 is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work.

  2. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  3. Impact of numerical integration on gas curtain simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.; Kamm, J.

    2000-11-01

    In recent years, we have presented a less than glowing experimental comparison of hydrodynamic codes with the gas curtain experiment (e.g., Kamm et al. 1999a). Here, we discuss the manner in which the details of the hydrodynamic integration techniques may conspire to produce poor results. This also includes some progress in improving the results and agreement with experimental results. Because our comparison was conducted on the details of the experimental images (i.e., their detailed structural information), our results do not conflict with previously published results of good agreement with Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities based on the integral scale of mixing. New experimental and analysis techniques are also discussed.

  4. Role of numerical scheme choice on the results of mathematical modeling of combustion and detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovenko, I. S.; Kiverin, A. D.; Pinevich, S. G.; Ivanov, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    The present study discusses capabilities of dissipation-free CABARET numerical method application to unsteady reactive gasdynamic flows modeling. In framework of present research the method was adopted for reactive flows governed by real gas equation of state and applied for several typical problems of unsteady gas dynamics and combustion modeling such as ignition and detonation initiation by localized energy sources. Solutions were thoroughly analyzed and compared with that derived by using of the modified Euler-Lagrange method of “coarse” particles. Obtained results allowed us to distinguish range of phenomena where artificial effects of numerical approach may counterfeit their physical nature and to develop guidelines for numerical approach selection appropriate for unsteady reactive gasdynamic flows numerical modeling.

  5. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi

    The central theme of this dissertation is to explore the impact of neutral depletion and coupling between plasma and neutral gas in weakly ionized unmagnetized plasma. Since there have been few systematic studies of the mechanism which leads to non-uniform neutral distribution in processing plasmas, this work investigated the spatial profiles of neutral temperature and pressure experimentally, and the mechanism of resulting neutral depletion by simulation. The experimental work is comprised of neutral temperature measurements using high resolution atomic spectroscopy and molecular spectroscopy, and neutral pressure measurements considering thermal transpiration. When thermal transpiration effects are used to correct the gas pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile is also obtained from the measured neutral gas temperature and the corrected pressure measurements. The results show that neutral gas temperature rises close to ˜ 900 [K], and the neutral gas density at the center of plasma chamber has a significant (factor of 2-4x) decrease in the presence of a plasma discharge. In numerical work, neutral and ion transport phenomena were simulated by a hybrid-type direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of one dimensional (1D) electrostatic plasma to identify the mechanism of the neutral gas density depletion in Ar/N2 mixtures. The simulation reveals that the neutral depletion is the result of the interplay between plasma and neutral gas, and a parametric study indicates that neutral depletion occurs mainly due to gas heating and pressure balance for the typical condition of plasma processing. In high density plasma sources (Te ≈ 2-5 eV, ne ≈ 1011-1012 cm-3) where the plasma pressure becomes comparable to neutral pressure, total pressure (neutral pressure and plasma pressure) is conserved before and after the discharge. Therefore

  6. A review of measurements and numerical studies for the effect of wall roughness on the gas-particle flow behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lixing

    2014-04-01

    In earlier studies of gas-particle flows the effect of wall roughness was not taken into account. The present author and his colleagues did detailed PDPA measurements and numerical studies for the effect of wall roughness on the gas-particle flow behavior. This paper gives a review of our studies, showing the following results. The PDPA measurements of backward-facing step gas-particle flows shows that as the wall roughness increases, the longitudinal and transverse particle fluctuation velocities increase. The numerical simulation of swirling gas-particle flows shows that the simulation results accounting for the wall roughness agree well with the measurement results. The numerical simulation of gas-particle channel flows indicates the increase of particle fluctuation velocity with increasing wall roughness.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Inclusion Behavior in Gas-Stirred Ladles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2013-06-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-population balance model (CFD-PBM) coupled model has been proposed to investigate the bubbly plume flow and inclusion behavior including growth, size distribution, and removal in gas-stirred ladles, and some new and important phenomena and mechanisms were presented. For the bubbly plume flow, a modified k- ɛ model with extra source terms to account for the bubble-induced turbulence was adopted to model the turbulence, and the bubble turbulent dispersion force was taken into account to predict gas volume fraction distribution in the turbulent gas-stirred system. For inclusion behavior, the phenomena of inclusions turbulent random motion, bubbles wake, and slag eye forming on the molten steel surface were considered. In addition, the multiple mechanisms both that promote inclusion growth due to inclusion-inclusion collision caused by turbulent random motion, shear rate in turbulent eddy, and difference inclusion Stokes velocities, and the mechanisms that promote inclusion removal due to bubble-inclusion turbulence random collision, bubble-inclusion turbulent shear collision, bubble-inclusion buoyancy collision, inclusion own floatation near slag-metal interface, bubble wake capture, and wall adhesion were investigated. The importance of different mechanisms and total inclusion removal ratio under different conditions, and the distribution of inclusion number densities in ladle, were discussed and clarified. The results show that at a low gas flow rate, the inclusion growth is mainly attributed to both turbulent shear collision and Stokes collision, which is notably affected by the Stokes collision efficiency, and the inclusion removal is mainly attributed to the bubble-inclusion buoyancy collision and inclusion own floatation near slag-metal interface. At a higher gas flow rate, the inclusions appear as turbulence random motion in bubbly plume zone, and both the inclusion-inclusion and inclusion-bubble turbulent random collisions become

  8. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  9. Experimental and numerical analyses of finned cross flow heat exchangers efficiency under non-uniform gas inlet flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Tomasz; Składzień, Jan; Widziewicz, Katarzyna

    2010-10-01

    The work deals with experimental and numerical thermodynamic analyses of cross-flow finned tube heat exchangers of the gas-liquid type. The aim of the work is to determine an impact of the gas non-uniform inlet on the heat exchangers performance. The measurements have been carried out on a special testing rig and own numerical code has been used for numerical simulations. Analysis of the experimental and numerical results has shown that the range of the non-uniform air inlet to the considered heat exchangers may be significant and it can significantly affect the heat exchanger efficiency.

  10. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modelling and state-space analysis.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, Per; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Landfill gas (CO2 and CH4) concentrations and fluxes in soil adjacent to an old, unlined Danish municipal landfill measured over a 48-hour period during the passage of a low-pressure weather system were used to identify processes governing gas fluxes and concentrations. Two different approaches were applied: (I) State-space analysis was used to identify relations between gas flux and short-term (hourly) variations in atmospheric pressure. (II) A numerical gas transport model was fitted to the data and used to quantify short-term impacts of variations in atmospheric pressure, volumetric soil-water content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas permeability whereas variations in CH4 oxidation rate and molecular coefficients had less influence. Fluxes appeared to be most sensitive to atmospheric pressure at intermediate distances from the landfill edge. Also overall CH4 fluxes out of the soil over longer periods (years) were largest during periods with rapidly decreasing atmospheric pressures resulting in emission of large amounts of CH4 during short periods of time. This effect, however, was less significant for the CO2 fluxes.

  11. Numerical Investigation of PLIF Gas Seeding for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johanson, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of gas-seeding strategies required for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in a Mach 10 air flow were performed. The work was performed to understand and quantify adverse effects associated with gas seeding and to compare different flow rates and different types of seed gas. The gas was injected through a slot near the leading edge of a flat plate wedge model used in NASA Langley Research Center's 31- Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Nitric oxide, krypton, and iodine gases were simulated at various injection rates. Simulation results showing the deflection of the velocity field for each of the cases are presented. Streamwise distributions of velocity and concentration boundary layer thicknesses as well as vertical distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass distributions are presented for each of the cases. Relative merits of the different seeding strategies are discussed.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Debris Cloud Propagation inside Gas-Filled Pressure Vessels under Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, F. F.; Pang, B. J.; Guan, G. S.

    2009-03-01

    In the paper SPH methods in AUTODYN-2D is used to investigate the characteristics of debris clouds propagation inside the gas-filled pressure vessels for hypervelocity impact on the pressure vessels. The effect of equation of state on debris cloud has been investigated. The numerical simulation performed to analyze the effect of the gas pressure and the impact condition on the propagation of the debris clouds. The result shows that the increase of gas pressure can reduce the damage of the debris clouds' impact on the back wall of vessels when the pressure value is in a certain range. The smaller projectile lead the axial velocity of the debris cloud to stronger deceleration and the debris cloud deceleration is increasing with increased impact velocity. The time of venting begins to occur is related to the "vacuum column" at the direction of impact-axial. The paper studied the effect of impact velocities on gas shock wave.

  13. Preliminary Results of Solid Gas Generator Micropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wilhelmus A.; Reed, Brian D.; Brenizer, Marshall

    1999-01-01

    A decomposing solid thruster concept, which creates a more benign thermal and chemical environment than solid propellant combustion, while maintaining, performance similar to solid combustion, is described. A Micro-Electro-Mechanical (MEMS) thruster concept with diode laser and fiber-optic initiation is proposed, and thruster components fabricated with MEMS technology are presented. A high nitrogen content solid gas generator compound is evaluated and tested in a conventional axisymmetric thrust chamber with nozzle throat area ratio of 100. Results show incomplete decomposition of this compound in both low pressure (1 kPa) and high pressure (1 MPa) environments, with decomposition of up to 80% of the original mass. Chamber pressures of 1.1 MPa were obtained, with maximum calculated thrust of approximately 2.7 N. Resistively heated wires and resistively heated walls were used to initiate decomposition. Initiation tests using available lasers were unsuccessful, but infrared spectra of the compound show that the laser initiation tests used inappropriate wavelengths for optimal propellant absorption. Optimal wavelengths for laser ignition were identified. Data presented are from tests currently in progress. Alternative solid gas generator compounds are being evaluated for future tests.

  14. Numerical results for extended field method applications. [thin plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, B. K.; Chander, S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical results obtained when a new method of analysis, called the extended field method, was applied to several thin plate problems including one with non-rectangular geometry, and one problem involving both beams and a plate. The numerical results show that the quality of the single plate solutions was satisfactory for all cases except those involving a freely deflecting plate corner. The results for the beam and plate structure were satisfactory even though the structure had a freely deflecting corner.

  15. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  16. Numerical simulation of gas discharge CO II lasers with conic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, Ravil S.; Safiullin, Rafail K.

    2006-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation for fast-axial-flow gas discharge CO II lasers are presented. Quasi-one-dimensional consideration of the processes for powefil CO II lasers with conic discharge tubes shows that laser operation may be more effective in the case of tubes which are narrowed down fiom anode to cathode provided that gas flow is directed towards the cathode. On the contrary, when tube is narrowed down from cathode to anode, no any advantage in the laser operation may be received. The calculated quantities are in satisfactory agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  18. Numerical simulation study on gas solid two-phase flow in pre-calciner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhijuan; Lu, Jidong; Huang, Lai; Wang, Shijie

    2006-06-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of DD (dual combustion and denitratior process) pre-calciner for cement production was conducted in this paper. In Euler coordinate system, the fluid phase is expressed with RNG k- ɛ two-equation model and the solid phase is expressed with particle stochastic trajectory model in Lagrange coordinate system. Four mixture fractions are deduced in this article to simulate the gas compositions. The results of numerical simulation predicted the burn-out ratio of coal and the decomposition ratio of limestone particles along with particle trajectories. It also supplied theoretical foundation for industrial analysis of the coupling relation between coal combustion and calcium carbonate decomposition.

  19. Numerical calculations of gaseous reacting flows in a model of gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanjun; Tang, Ming; Zhu, Huiling; Sun, Huixian

    1991-02-01

    The numerical calculations of gaseous reaction flows in a model of gas-turbine combustors are described. The profiles of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic patterns in a 3D combustor model are obtained by solving the governing differential transport equations. The well-established numerical prediction algorithm SIMPLE; a modified turbulence model, and a turbulent diffusion flame model are adopted in the computations. The beta-function is selected as the probability density function. The effect of the combustion process on flow patterns is investigated. The calculated results are verified by experiments, and are in good agreement.

  20. Numerical analysis of the non-contacting gas face seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasiak, S.

    2017-08-01

    The non-contacting gas face seals are used in high-performance devices where the main requirements are safety and reliability. Compliance with these requirements is made possible by careful research and analysis of physical processes related to, inter alia, fluid flow through the radial gap and ring oscillations susceptible to being housed in the enclosure under the influence of rotor kinematic forces. Elaborating and developing mathematical models describing these phenomena allows for more and more accurate analysis results. The paper presents results of studies on stationary ring oscillations made of different types of materials. The presented results of the research allow to determine which of the materials used causes the greatest amplitude of the vibration of the system fluid film-working rings.

  1. Numerical simulations of combustion instabilities in gas turbine combustors, with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Grant Douglas

    Recent advances in technology have opened up a potential market for small gas turbine power systems in the 50--100 MW range. In an effort to improve their systems, the gas-turbine industry is interested in understanding and controlling combustion instabilities as well as reducing pollutant production. To understand the dynamics inherent in a combustion system, information about the flow field behavior is required. Because of a scarcity of available experimental or numerical results for full-scale gas-turbine combustors, we decided to use numerical simulations to provide the required information about the flow field dynamics. The ability of the numerical simulations to reproduce unstable behavior in combustion environments will be presented. The investigation of the flow field dynamics has been conducted for three test cases; a planar heat source in a tube, premixed flow in a dump combustor, and premixed and diffusion flames in a full-scale gas turbine combustor. The numerically determined unsteady acoustic modes will be shown to compare well with theory and experiments. An investigation of the local heat release response to an unsteady flow field is conducted for incorporation into an approximate analysis method. The results of including a Helmholtz resonator in a dump combustor as a passive control mechanism will be presented. The production of NOx and CO will be compared between stable and unstable flow configurations. The pollutant results indicate that for the planar flame in a tube and the dump combustor, the NOx levels at the exit plane are reduced when the system is unstable.

  2. Numerical study of contributions of shock wave and gas penetration toward induced rock damage during blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, M.; Fakhimi, A.

    2015-06-01

    The authors present an improved version of continuum analysis 2D, a hybrid two-dimensional finite element-discrete element-smoothed particle program for modeling rock blasting. A modified formula governing the interaction of smoothed particles with discrete elements is presented, along with the results of numerical simulations involving detonations within jointed rock. PETN was modeled as the explosive, and Barre granite as the rock specimen. The borehole was simulated both with and without a thin copper lining. The purpose of the copper lining is to prevent gas from penetrating into the induced cracks within the rock, so that the shock wave's contribution toward rock damage can be separated from that of the gas penetration. The results suggest that majority of the cracks are formed due to the shock wave propagating within the rock, whereas the gas penetration mostly separates the already-formed rock fragments and pushes them apart.

  3. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well.

  4. Numerical simulation of gas-dynamic, thermal processes and evaluation of the stress-strain state in the modeling compressor of the gas-distributing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakov, A. F.; Modorskii, V. Ya.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical modeling of gas-dynamic processes occurring in the flow path, thermal analysis and evaluation of the stress-strain state of a three-stage design of the compressor gas pumping unit. Physical and mathematical models of the processes developed. Numerical simulation was carried out in the engineering software ANSYS 13. The problem is solved in a coupled statement, in which the results of the gas-dynamic calculation transferred as boundary conditions for the evaluation of the thermal and stress-strain state of a three-stage design of the compressor gas pumping unit. The basic parameters, which affect the stress-strain state of the housing and changing gaps of labyrinth seals in construction. The method of analysis of the pumped gas flow influence on the strain of construction was developed.

  5. Macroscopic analysis of gas-jet wiping: Numerical simulation and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacanette, Delphine; Gosset, Anne; Vincent, Stéphane; Buchlin, Jean-Marie; Arquis, Éric

    2006-04-01

    Coating techniques are frequently used in industrial processes such as paper manufacturing, wire sleeving, and in the iron and steel industry. Depending on the application considered, the thickness of the resulting substrate is controlled by mechanical (scraper), electromagnetic (if the entrained fluid is appropriated), or hydrodynamic (gas-jet wiping) operations. This paper deals with the latter process, referred to as gas-jet wiping, in which a turbulent slot jet is used to wipe the coating film dragged by a moving substrate. This mechanism relies on the gas-jet-liquid film interaction taking place on the moving surface. The aim of this study is to compare the results obtained by a lubrication one-dimensional model, numerical volume of fluid-large eddy simulation (VOF-LES) modeling and an experimental approach. The investigation emphasizes the effect of the controlling wiping parameters, i.e., the pressure gradient and shear stress distributions induced by the jet, on the shape of the liquid film. Those profiles obtained experimentally and numerically for a jet impinging on a dry fixed surface are compared. The effect of the substrate motion and the presence of the dragged liquid film on these actuators are analyzed through numerical simulations. Good agreement is found between the film thickness profile in the wiping zone obtained from the VOF-LES simulations and with the analytical model, provided that a good model for the wiping actuators is used. The effect of the gas-jet nozzle to substrate standoff distance on the final coating thickness is analyzed; the experimental and predicted values are compared for a wide set of conditions. Finally, the occurrence of the splashing phenomenon, which is characterized by the ejection of droplets from the runback film flow at jet impingement, thus limiting the wiping process, is investigated through experiments and numerical simulations.

  6. Mass transfer in thin films under counter-current gas: experiments and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Lavalle, Gianluca; Schmidt, Patrick; Ausner, Ilja; Wehrli, Marc; O Naraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    Mass transfer in liquid-gas stratified flows is strongly affected by the waviness of the interface. For reactive flows, the chemical reactions occurring at the liquid-gas interface also influence the mass transfer rate. This is encountered in several technological applications, such as absorption units for carbon capture. We investigate the absorption rate of carbon dioxide in a liquid solution. The experimental set-up consists of a vertical channel where a falling film is sheared by a counter-current gas flow. We measure the absorption occurring at different flow conditions, by changing the liquid solution, the liquid flow rate and the gas composition. With the aim to support the experimental results with numerical simulations, we implement in our level-set flow solver a novel module for mass transfer taking into account a variant of the ghost-fluid formalism. We firstly validate the pure mass transfer case with and without hydrodynamics by comparing the species concentration in the bulk flow to the analytical solution. In a final stage, we analyse the absorption rate in reactive flows, and try to reproduce the experimental results by means of numerical simulations to explore the active role of the waves at the interface.

  7. Direct numerical simulation methods of hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer in thermally perfect gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, WenLi; Cao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature effects alter the physical and transport properties of air such as vibrational excitation in a thermally perfect gas, and this factor should be considered in order to compute the flow field correctly. Herein, for the thermally perfect gas, a simple method of direct numerical simulation on flat-plat boundary layer is put forward, using the equivalent specific heat ratio instead of constant specific heat ratio in the N-S equations and flux splitting form of a calorically perfect gas. The results calculated by the new method are consistent with that by solving the N-S equations of a thermally perfect gas directly. The mean flow has the similarity, and consistent to the corresponding Blasius solution, which confirms that satisfactory results can be obtained basing on the Blasius solution as the mean flow directly in stability analysis. The amplitude growth curve of small disturbance is introduced at the inlet by using direct numerical simulation, which is consistent with that obtained by linear stability theory. It verified that the equation established and the simulation method is correct.

  8. Application of the results of experimental and numerical turbulent flow researches based on pressure pulsations analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalnogov, Vladislav N.; Fedorov, Ruslan V.; Khakhalev, Yuri A.; Khakhaleva, Larisa V.; Chukalin, Andrei V.

    2017-07-01

    The numerical investigation of the turbulent flow with the impacts, based on a modified Prandtl mixing-length model with using of the analysis of pulsations of pressure, calculation of structure and a friction factor of a turbulent flow is made. These results under the study allowed us to propose a new design of a cooled turbine blade and gas turbine mobile. The turbine blade comprises a combined cooling and cylindrical cavity on the blade surface, and on the inner surfaces of the cooling channels too damping cavity located on the guide vanes of the compressor of a gas turbine engine, increase the supply of gas-dynamic stability of the compressor of a gas turbine engine, reduce the resistance of the guide blades, and increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  9. Numerical solution of Space Shuttle Orbiter flow field including real gas effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, D. K.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The hypersonic, laminar flow around the Space Shuttle Orbiter has been computed for both an ideal gas (gamma = 1.2) and equilibrium air using a real-gas, parabolized Navier-Stokes code. This code employs a generalized coordinate transformation; hence, it places no restrictions on the orientation of the solution surfaces. The initial solution in the nose region was computed using a 3-D, real-gas, time-dependent Navier-Stokes code. The thermodynamic and transport properties of equilibrium air were obtained from either approximate curve fits or a table look-up procedure. Numerical results are presented for flight conditions corresponding to the STS-3 trajectory. The computed surface pressures and convective heating rates are compared with data from the STS-3 flight.

  10. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  11. Examination of optimal separator shape of polymer electrolyte fuel cell with numerical analysis including the effect of gas flow through gas diffusion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Gen; Matsukuma, Yosuke; Minemoto, Masaki

    This work concentrates on the effects of channel depth and separator shape on cell output performance, current density distribution and gas flow condition in various conditions with PEFC numerical analysis model including gas flow through GDL. When GDL effective porosity was small, the effect of gas flow through GDL which was changed by channel depth on cell output performance became large. However, current density distribution was ununiform. As GDL permeability became larger, cell output density increased, but current density and gas flow rate distribution were ununiform. From the results of changing the gas flow rate, it was found that the ratio of the minimum gas flow rate to the inlet flow rate depended on channel depth. Furthermore, the optimal separator, which increased output density and made the current density distribution and gas flow rate distribution uniform, was examined. It was also found that cell performance had possible to be developed by improving the turning point of the serpentine separator.

  12. Numerical analysis of supersonic gas-dynamic characteristic in laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shaogang; Jun, Hu; Lei, Luo; Yao, Zhenqiang

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the processing parameters on the dynamic characteristic of supersonic impinging jet in laser cutting is studied numerically. The numerical modeling of a supersonic jet impinging on a plate with a hole is presented to analyze the gas jet-workpiece interaction. The model is able to make quantitative predictions of the effect of the standoff distance and exit Mach number on the mass flow rate and the axial thrust. The numerical results show that the suitable cutting range is slightly different for different exit Mach number, but the optimal cutting parameter for certain exit total pressure is nearly changeless. So the better cut quality and capacity can be obtained mainly by setting the suitable standoff distance for a certain nozzle pressure.

  13. Numerical simulation of interactions between pulsed laser and soild targets in an ambient gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterkin, , Jr.

    1998-10-01

    When a GW/cm^2 repetitively pulsed laser strikes a solid target that is immersed in a gas at 1 atm, numerous interesting plasma phenomena are observed. To help us understand these observations, we perform time-dependent numerical simulations of the propagation and partial absorption via inverse bremsstrahlung of a pulsed CO2 laser beam through He and N, and the interaction with a solid copper target aligned at various angles with respect to the incident laser beam. For this numerical study, we use the general-purpose 2 1/2-dimensional finite-volume MHD code uc(mach2.) The early portion of the laser pulses is deposited into the solid target and produces a jet of target material that is almost aligned with the target normal. Most of the subsequent laser energy is deposited into the ambient gas at the critical surface. For a repetitive pulsed laser, we observe a series of laser supported detonation (LSD) waves each of which originates at the instantaneous location of the critical surface. The space- and time-dependent electron number density defines this surface. For the numerical code to reproduce accurately the relevant physics, the overall energy budget must be computed accurately. The solid ejecta interacts with the LSD waves in a complex fashion, allowing the spontaneous generation of a magnetic field via the grad(P) term of a generalized Ohm's law. We illustrate the dynamics with graphical results from uc(mach2) simulations.

  14. A parallel hybrid numerical algorithm for simulating gas flow and gas discharge of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K.-M.; Hu, M.-H.; Hung, C.-T.; Wu, J.-S.; Hwang, F.-N.; Chen, Y.-S.; Cheng, G.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a hybrid numerical algorithm which couples weakly with the gas flow model (GFM) and the plasma fluid model (PFM) for simulating an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) and its acceleration by two approaches is presented. The weak coupling between gas flow and discharge is introduced by transferring between the results obtained from the steady-state solution of the GFM and cycle-averaged solution of the PFM respectively. Approaches of reducing the overall runtime include parallel computing of the GFM and the PFM solvers, and employing a temporal multi-scale method (TMSM) for PFM. Parallel computing of both solvers is realized using the domain decomposition method with the message passing interface (MPI) on distributed-memory machines. The TMSM considers only chemical reactions by ignoring the transport terms when integrating temporally the continuity equations of heavy species at each time step, and then the transport terms are restored only at an interval of time marching steps. The total reduction of runtime is 47% by applying the TMSM to the APPJ example presented in this study. Application of the proposed hybrid algorithm is demonstrated by simulating a parallel-plate helium APPJ impinging onto a substrate, which the cycle-averaged properties of the 200th cycle are presented. The distribution patterns of species densities are strongly correlated by the background gas flow pattern, which shows that consideration of gas flow in APPJ simulations is critical.

  15. Evaluation of gas production potential from gas hydrate deposits in National Petroleum Reserve Alaska using numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nandanwar, Manish S.; Anderson, Brian J.; Ajayi, Taiwo; Collett, Timothy S.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.

    2016-01-01

    An evaluation of the gas production potential of Sunlight Peak gas hydrate accumulation in the eastern portion of the National Petroleum Reserve Alaska (NPRA) of Alaska North Slope (ANS) is conducted using numerical simulations, as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gas hydrate Life Cycle Assessment program. A field scale reservoir model for Sunlight Peak is developed using Advanced Processes & Thermal Reservoir Simulator (STARS) that approximates the production design and response of this gas hydrate field. The reservoir characterization is based on available structural maps and the seismic-derived hydrate saturation map of the study region. A 3D reservoir model, with heterogeneous distribution of the reservoir properties (such as porosity, permeability and vertical hydrate saturation), is developed by correlating the data from the Mount Elbert well logs. Production simulations showed that the Sunlight Peak prospect has the potential of producing 1.53 × 109 ST m3 of gas in 30 years by depressurization with a peak production rate of around 19.4 × 104 ST m3/day through a single horizontal well. To determine the effect of uncertainty in reservoir properties on the gas production, an uncertainty analysis is carried out. It is observed that for the range of data considered, the overall cumulative production from the Sunlight Peak will always be within the range of ±4.6% error from the overall mean value of 1.43 × 109 ST m3. A sensitivity analysis study showed that the proximity of the reservoir from the base of permafrost and the base of hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) has significant effect on gas production rates. The gas production rates decrease with the increase in the depth of the permafrost and the depth of BHSZ. From the overall analysis of the results it is concluded that Sunlight Peak gas hydrate accumulation behaves differently than other Class III reservoirs (Class III reservoirs are composed of a single layer of hydrate with no

  16. Analytical expression for gas-particle equilibration time scale and its numerical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, Tatu; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2016-05-01

    We have derived a time scale τeq that describes the characteristic time for a single compound i with a saturation vapour concentration Ceff,i to reach thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas and particle phases. The equilibration process was assumed to take place via gas-phase diffusion and absorption into a liquid-like phase present in the particles. It was further shown that τeq combines two previously derived and often applied time scales τa and τs that account for the changes in the gas and particle phase concentrations of i resulting from the equilibration, respectively. The validity of τeq was tested by comparing its predictions against results from a numerical model that explicitly simulates the transfer of i between the gas and particle phases. By conducting a large number of simulations where the values of the key input parameters were varied randomly, it was found out that τeq yields highly accurate results when i is a semi-volatile compound in the sense that the ratio of total (gas and particle phases) concentration of i to the saturation vapour concentration of i, μ, is below unity. On the other hand, the comparison of analytical and numerical time scales revealed that using τa or τs alone to calculate the equilibration time scale may lead to considerable errors. It was further shown that τeq tends to overpredict the equilibration time when i behaves as a non-volatile compound in a sense that μ > 1. Despite its simplicity, the time scale derived here has useful applications. First, it can be used to assess if semi-volatile compounds reach thermodynamic equilibrium during dynamic experiments that involve changes in the compound volatility. Second, the time scale can be used in modeling of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to check whether SOA forming compounds equilibrate over a certain time interval.

  17. Karhula hot gas cleanup test results

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Isaksson, J.

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a practical hot gas filter design that meets the performance and operational requirements of pressurized fluidized bed combustion--bubbling bed, circulating bed and second generation--applications. The Westinghouse hot gas candle filter system is currently installed in the Ahlstrom Pyropower 10 MW (thermal) pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB) test facility located in Karhula, Finland. The overall objective of the testing is to evaluate the filter design and operating reliability for selection and implementation into the Midwest Power DMEC-1 PCFB 150 MW(e) repowering project (Clean Coal III Selection). During 1,026 hours of operation represented by Test Segment 2 and current testing in Test Segment 3, the filter unit and test facility has performed very well and operated without major equipment failures. The filter has demonstrated stable pressure drop and has operated without candle failure. Tables summarize the filter operating parameters during these tests.

  18. Gas turbine cycle design methodology: A comparison of parameter variation with numerical optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzke, J.

    1999-01-01

    In gas turbine performance simulations often the following question arises: what is the best thermodynamic cycle design point? This is an optimization task which can be attacked in two ways. One can do a series of parameter variations and pick from the resulting graphs the best solution or one can employ numerical optimization algorithms that produce a single cycle that fulfills all constraints. The conventional parameter study builds strongly on the engineering judgment and gives useful information over a range of parameter selections. However, when values for more than a few variables have to be determined while several constraints are existing, then numerical optimization routines can help to find the mathematical optimum faster and more accurately. Sometimes even an outstanding solution is found which was overlooked while doing a preliminary parameter study. For any simulation task a sophisticated graphical user interface is of great benefit. This is especially true for automated numerical optimizations. It is quite helpful to see on the screen of a PC how the variables are changing and which constraints are limiting the design. A quick and clear graphical representation of trade studies is also of great advantage. The paper describes how numerical optimization and parameter studies are implemented in a Windows-based PC program. As an example, the cycle selection of a derivative turbofan engine with a given core shows the merits of numerical optimization. The parameter variation is best suited for presenting the sensitivity of the result in the neighborhood of the optimum cycle design point.

  19. Martian Winter Hemisphere Noncondensable Atmospheric Gas Abundance Enhancement: Numerical Simulations And Investigation Of Dynamical Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jim; Nelli, S.; Sprague, A.; Boynton, W.; Kerry, K.; Janes, D.; Metzger, A.

    2006-09-01

    The enhancement at winter polar latitudes of noncondensable gases in Mars’ atmosphere is investigated with a global-scale numerical model. Mars Odyssey gamma ray spectrometer observations indicate a six-fold increase in noncondensable column-integrated gas relative abundance at high southern latitudes during early southern winter, and a three-fold increase at high northern latitudes during early northern winter [Sprague et al., 2006, JGR-Planets, accepted]. The enhancement arises from the condensation of the primary atmospheric gas, CO2, which falls as `snow’ to the surface (or directly condenses there) and forms the seasonal polar cap. The condensing CO2 "leaves behind” in the atmosphere noncondensable gases such as nitrogen and argon. Atmospheric simulations qualitatively reproduce the nocondensable gas enhancement, but at a magnitude of only one-half that observed. The simulated noncondensable gas enhancement magnitude is governed by the seasonal timing and magnitude of horizontal mixing of the enhanced high latitude gas with less enhanced gas from lower latititudes. This horizontal mixing is produced to a large extent by traveling baroclinic eddies, which become established at and engender the time of the enhancement maxima. The north polar vs. south polar relative enhancement magnitude differences arise from the differences in column CO2 mass abundance (surface pressure) between the high-topography south pole and the low-topography north pole. Maximum absolute column abundances (g cm-2) of noncondensable gas occurring at the two poles are of approximately equal magnitude. Model results and sensitivity study results will be presented. This effort makes use of the transport of truly passive tracers in the martian atmosphere to understand atmospheric dynamical processes and model fidelity. This work has been supported in part by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program (NAG5-12123). We acknowledge the efforts of the entire MRO GRS team.

  20. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  1. Numerical simulation of ultrasonic wave transmission experiments in rocks of shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Yao, Guanghua; Zhu, Honglin; Tan, Yanhu; Xu, Fenglin

    2017-01-01

    Shale gas reservoirs have risen in importance in China's new power source exploration and development program. The investigation of the propagation of ultrasonic waves in shale forms the basis for the full waveform application of acoustic logging data to the exploration of shale gas. Using acoustic wave theory, initial conditions, vibration source conditions, and stability conditions are developed in combination with experimental background of ultrasonic wave transmission. With improved boundary conditions, we performed numerical simulations of the ultrasound transmission experiments in shale using the high-order staggered-grid finite difference method (second-order in the time domain and fourth-order in the space domain). With programs developed within MatLab, the results obtained from numerical simulations agree well with experimental results based on physical models. In addition, using snapshots of the wave field that give a microscopic perspective, the propagation laws for ultrasonic waves can be analyzed. Using this method, human error is avoided, transmission experiments costs can be reduced and efficiency improved. This method extends the scope of experimental investigations regarding the transmission of ultrasonic waves in a shale gas reservoir with increasing stratification, and thus has great theoretical value and practical significance.

  2. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  3. Path Integrals and Exotic Options:. Methods and Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormetti, G.; Montagna, G.; Moreni, N.; Nicrosini, O.

    2005-09-01

    In the framework of Black-Scholes-Merton model of financial derivatives, a path integral approach to option pricing is presented. A general formula to price path dependent options on multidimensional and correlated underlying assets is obtained and implemented by means of various flexible and efficient algorithms. As an example, we detail the case of Asian call options. The numerical results are compared with those obtained with other procedures used in quantitative finance and found to be in good agreement. In particular, when pricing at the money (ATM) and out of the money (OTM) options, path integral exhibits competitive performances.

  4. Numerical simulation of gas hydrate exploitation from subsea reservoirs in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2017-04-01

    Natural gas (methane) is the most environmental friendly source of fossil energy. When coal is replace by natural gas in power production the emission of carbon dioxide is reduced by 50 %. The vast amount of methane assumed in gas hydrate deposits can help to overcome a shortage of fossil energy resources in the future. To increase their potential for energy applications new technological approaches are being discussed and developed worldwide. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e. g. depressurization and/or carbon dioxide injection) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR - Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs«. In order to simulate the exploitation of hydrate-bearing sediments in the subsea, an in-house simulation model HyReS which is implemented in the general-purpose software COMSOL Multiphysics is used. This tool turned out to be especially suited for the flexible implementation of non-standard correlations concerning heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate kinetics, and other relevant model data. Partially based on the simulation results, the development of a technical concept and its evaluation are the subject of ongoing investigations, whereby geological and ecological criteria are to be considered. The results illustrate the processes and effects occurring during the gas production from a subsea gas hydrate deposit by depressurization. The simulation results from a case study for a deposit located in the Black Sea reveal that the production of natural gas by simple depressurization is possible but with quite low rates. It can be shown that the hydrate decomposition and thus the gas production strongly depend on the geophysical properties of the reservoir, the mass and heat transport within the reservoir, and

  5. Numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection into liquid metal coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, E. V.; Lobanov, P. D.; Pribaturin, N. A.; Mosunova, N. A.; Chuhno, V. I.; Kutlimetov, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Presented paper contains results of a numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection in water and liquid metal which have been performed at the Institute of Thermophysics Russian Academy of Science (IT RAS). Obtained experimental data are very important to predict processes that take place in the BREST-type reactor during the hypothetical accident with damage of the steam generator tubes, and may be used as a benchmark to validate thermo-hydraulic codes. Detailed description of models to simulate transport of gas phase in a vertical liquid column is presented in a current paper. Two-fluid model with closing relation for wall friction and interface friction coefficients was used to simulate processes which take place in a liquid during injection of gaseous phase. It has being shown that proposed models allow obtaining a good agreement between experimental data and calculation results.

  6. Numerical Model of Hydrate Formation and Dissociation With Free Gas Flow for a Global Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B.; Juanes, R.

    2009-12-01

    Methane hydrates hold great potential as an energy resource but also pose the threat, if they dissociate, of contributing to the greenhouse effect. In order to evaluate the risks and opportunities they present, we have developed a numerical model of hydrate formation and dissociation. This one-dimensional, continuum model is simple enough to be applied globally to estimate the total inventory of hydrate and trapped gas, yet captures multiphase flow effects not accounted for in previous inventory estimates. Preliminary results compare behavior regimes in typical active and passive continental margins, including fracture-dominated gas invasion, slow capillary invasion, and dynamic steady states. These results identify the key parameters that need to be estimated at a global scale in order to model the formation of current hydrate accumulations and their response to production and climate change.

  7. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, g.; Anghaie, S.

    1995-09-01

    This paper proposes a computational model for analysis of flow and heat transfer in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The formulation of the problem is based on using the axisymmetric, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations. A hybrid implicit-explicit method based on finite volume approach is used to numerically solve the governing equations. A fast converging scheme is developed to accelerate the Gauss-Siedel iterative method for problems involving the wall heat flux boundary condition. Several cases are simulated and results of temperature and pressure distribution in the core are presented. Results of a parametric analysis for the assessment of the impact of power density on the convective heat transfer rate and wall temperature are discussed. A comparative analysis is conducted to identify the Nusselt number correlation that best fits the physical conditions of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  8. Modeling extracellular electrical stimulation: II. Computational validation and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Bahman; Meffin, Hamish; Dokos, Socrates; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2012-12-01

    The validity of approximate equations describing the membrane potential under extracellular electrical stimulation (Meffin et al 2012 J. Neural Eng. 9 065005) is investigated through finite element analysis in this paper. To this end, the finite element method is used to simulate a cylindrical neurite under extracellular stimulation. Laplace's equations with appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically in three dimensions and the results are compared to the approximate analytic solutions. Simulation results are in agreement with the approximate analytic expressions for longitudinal and transverse modes of stimulation. The range of validity of the equations describing the membrane potential for different values of stimulation and neurite parameters are presented as well. The results indicate that the analytic approach can be used to model extracellular electrical stimulation for realistic physiological parameters with a high level of accuracy.

  9. Development and elaboration of numerical method for simulating gas-liquid-solid three-phase flows based on particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Mamori, Hiroya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    A numerical method for simulating gas-liquid-solid three-phase flows based on the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) approach was developed in this study. Computational instability often occurs in multiphase flow simulations if the deformations of the free surfaces between different phases are large, among other reasons. To avoid this instability, this paper proposes an improved coupling procedure between different phases in which the physical quantities of particles in different phases are calculated independently. We performed numerical tests on two illustrative problems: a dam-break problem and a solid-sphere impingement problem. The former problem is a gas-liquid two-phase problem, and the latter is a gas-liquid-solid three-phase problem. The computational results agree reasonably well with the experimental results. Thus, we confirmed that the proposed MPS method reproduces the interaction between different phases without inducing numerical instability.

  10. Numerical models of starburst galaxies: Galactic winds and entrained gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan

    My three-dimensional hydro-dynamical simulations of starbursts examine the formation of starburst-driven superbubbles over a range of driving luminosities and mass loadings that determine superbubble growth and wind velocity; floors of both 10 and 10. 4 K are considered. From this I determine the relationshipbetween the velocity of a galactic wind and the characteristics of the starburst. I find a threshold for the formation of a wind, above which the wind speed is not affected by grid resolution or the temperature floor of the radiative cooling employed. Optically bright filaments form at the edge of merging superbubbles, or where a cold dense cloud has been disrupted by the wind. Filaments formed by merging superbubbles will persist and grow to >400 pc in length if anchored to and fed from a star forming complex. For galaxies viewed edge on I use total emission from the superbubble to infer the wind velocity and starburst properties such as thermalization efficiency and mass loading factor. Using synthetic absorption profiles I probe different temperature regimes and measure the velocity of the cold, warm and hot gas phases. I find that the cold and warm gas entrained in the wind move at a much lower velocity than the hot gas, with some of the cold gas in the filaments hardly moving with respect to the galaxy. The absorption profiles show that the velocity of the hot galactic outflow does not depend on the star formation rate (SFR), but the velocity of the warm gas does. The velocity of the warm gas scales as SFR. delta untilthe wind velocity reaches 80 % of the analytic terminal wind speed. The value of delta depends on the atomic ionization with a lower value for low ionization, and a higher value for higher ionization.

  11. Numerical modeling of fracking fluid and methane migration through fault zones in shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherdangkoo, Reza; Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operation in shale gas reservoir has gained growing interest over the last few years. Groundwater contamination is one of the most important environmental concerns that have emerged surrounding shale gas development (Reagan et al., 2015). The potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing could be studied through the possible pathways for subsurface migration of contaminants towards overlying aquifers (Kissinger et al., 2013; Myers, 2012). The intent of this study is to investigate, by means of numerical simulation, two failure scenarios which are based on the presence of a fault zone that penetrates the full thickness of overburden and connect shale gas reservoir to aquifer. Scenario 1 addresses the potential transport of fracturing fluid from the shale into the subsurface. This scenario was modeled with COMSOL Multiphysics software. Scenario 2 deals with the leakage of methane from the reservoir into the overburden. The numerical modeling of this scenario was implemented in DuMux (free and open-source software), discrete fracture model (DFM) simulator (Tatomir, 2012). The modeling results are used to evaluate the influence of several important parameters (reservoir pressure, aquifer-reservoir separation thickness, fault zone inclination, porosity, permeability, etc.) that could affect the fluid transport through the fault zone. Furthermore, we determined the main transport mechanisms and circumstances in which would allow frack fluid or methane migrate through the fault zone into geological layers. The results show that presence of a conductive fault could reduce the contaminant travel time and a significant contaminant leakage, under certain hydraulic conditions, is most likely to occur. Bibliography Kissinger, A., Helmig, R., Ebigbo, A., Class, H., Lange, T., Sauter, M., Heitfeld, M., Klünker, J., Jahnke, W., 2013. Hydraulic fracturing in unconventional gas reservoirs: risks in the geological system, part 2. Environ Earth Sci 70, 3855

  12. Numerical simulation of the gas-liquid interaction of a liquid jet in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peibo; Wang, Zhenguo; Sun, Mingbo; Wang, Hongbo

    2017-05-01

    The gas-liquid interaction process of a liquid jet in supersonic crossflow with a Mach number of 1.94 was investigated numerically using the Eulerian-Lagrangian method. The KH (Kelvin-Helmholtz) breakup model was used to calculate the droplet stripping process, and the secondary breakup process was simulated by the competition of RT (Rayleigh-Taylor) breakup model and TAB (Taylor Analogy Breakup) model. A correction of drag coefficient was proposed by considering the compressible effects and the deformation of droplets. The location and velocity models of child droplets after breakup were improved according to droplet deformation. It was found that the calculated spray features, including spray penetration, droplet size distribution and droplet velocity profile agree reasonably well with the experiment. Numerical results revealed that the streamlines of air flow could intersect with the trajectory of droplets and are deflected towards the near-wall region after they enter into spray zone around the central plane. The analysis of gas-liquid relative velocity and droplet deformation suggested that the breakup of droplets mainly occurs around the front region of the spray where gathered a large number of droplets with different sizes. The liquid trailing phenomenon of jet spray which has been discovered by the previous experiment was successfully captured, and a reasonable explanation was given based on the analysis of gas-liquid interaction process.

  13. Synthetic jet parameter identification and numerical results validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, Danilo; Rimasauskiene, Ruta; Matejka, Milan; Kurowski, Marcin; Wandowski, Tomasz; Malinowski, Paweł; Doerffer, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    The design of a synthetic jet requires a careful identification of the components' parameters, in order to be able to perform accurate numerical simulations, this identification must be done by mean of a series of measurements that, due to the small dimensions of the components, are required to be non-contact techniques. The activities described in this paper have been performed in the frame of the STA-DY-WI-CO project, whose purpose is the design of a synthetic jet and demonstrate its effectiveness and efficiency for a real application. To measure the energy saving, due to the synthetic jet effects on the separation, the increased performances of the profile must be compared to the energy absorbed by the actuator and the weight of the system. In design phase a series of actuators has being considered as well as a series of cavity layout, in order to obtain the most effective, efficient and durable package. The modal characteristics of piezoelectric component was assessed by means of tests performed with a 3D scanning laser vibrometer, measuring the frequency response to voltage excitation. Analyzed the effects of the parameters, and chosen components and layout, the system can be dimensioned by means of numeric simulations. The outcome of the simulation is the effect of the synthetic jet, in an assumed flow, for the selected profile. The numerical results on the field of the separated flow with recirculating area were validated by means of tests performed in an Eiffel type wind tunnel. The last test performed on the synthetic jet aims to understand the acoustic impact, noise measurements were performed to have full analysis and synthesis.

  14. Gas stripping and mixing in galaxy clusters: a numerical comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Steffen; Springel, Volker

    2012-11-01

    The ambient hot intrahalo gas in clusters of galaxies is constantly fed and stirred by infalling galaxies, a process that can be studied in detail with cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. However, different numerical methods yield discrepant predictions for crucial hydrodynamical processes, leading for example to different entropy profiles in clusters of galaxies. In particular, the widely used Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) scheme is suspected to strongly damp fluid instabilities and turbulence, which are both crucial to establish the thermodynamic structure of clusters. In this study, we test to which extent our recently developed Voronoi particle hydrodynamics (VPH) scheme yields different results for the stripping of gas out of infalling galaxies and for the bulk gas properties of cluster. We consider both the evolution of isolated galaxy models that are exposed to a stream of intracluster medium or are dropped into cluster models, as well as non-radiative cosmological simulations of cluster formation. We also compare our particle-based method with results obtained with a fundamentally different discretization approach as implemented in the moving-mesh code AREPO. We find that VPH leads to noticeably faster stripping of gas out of galaxies than SPH, in better agreement with the mesh-code than with SPH. We show that despite the fact that VPH in its present form is not as accurate as the moving mesh code in our investigated cases, its improved accuracy of gradient estimates makes VPH an attractive alternative to SPH.

  15. Numerical modelling of the gas detonation process of sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep P.; Popli, Madhur; Jenkouk, Vahid; Markert, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Gas detonation forming is an unconventional technique, which has the potential to form complex geometries, including sharp angles and undercuts in a very short process time. To date, most of the numerical studies on detonation forming neglect the highly dynamic pressure profile of the detonation obtained from experiments. In the present work, it is emphasised that the consideration of the actual detonation pressure as measured in the experiment is crucial. The thickness distribution and radial strain are studied using a strain-rate dependent Johnson-Cook material model. The obtained results vary significantly with change in loading rate. Moreover, the model is capable of predicting extremely sharp edges.

  16. A high-resolution numerical technique for inviscid gas-dynamic problems with weak solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    The shock resolution of Harten's (1982) second-order explicit method for one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws is investigated for a two-dimensional gas-dynamic problem. The possible extension to a high resolution implicit method for both one- and two-dimensional problems is also investigated. Applications of Harten's method to the quasi-one-dimensional nozzle problem with two nozzle shapes (divergent and convergent-divergent) and the two-dimensional shock-reflection problem resulted in high shock resolution steady-state numerical solutions.

  17. Microconfined equiviscous droplet deformation: Comparison of experimental and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vananroye, Anja; Janssen, Pieter J. A.; Anderson, Patrick D.; Van Puyvelde, Peter; Moldenaers, Paula

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of confined droplets in shear flow is investigated using computational and experimental techniques for a viscosity ratio of unity. Numerical calculations, using a boundary integral method (BIM) in which the Green's functions are modified to include wall effects, are quantitatively compared with the results of confined droplet experiments performed in a counter-rotating parallel plate device. For a viscosity ratio of unity, it is experimentally seen that confinement induces a sigmoidal droplet shape during shear flow. Contrary to other models, this modified BIM model is capable of predicting the correct droplet shape during startup and steady state. The model also predicts an increase in droplet deformation and more orientation toward the flow direction with increasing degree of confinement, which is all experimentally confirmed. For highly confined droplets, oscillatory behavior is seen upon startup of flow, characterized by an overshoot in droplet length followed by droplet retraction. Finally, in the case of a viscosity ratio of unity, a minor effect of confinement on the critical capillary number is observed both numerically and experimentally.

  18. Numerical simulation of the processes in fast flow gas discharge CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, Ravil S.; Safioulline, Rafail K.

    2004-05-01

    In the report the results of numerical simulation of the processes in discharge chambers (DC) of fast flow CO2 lasers, are presented. The investigations for longitudinal glow discharge (quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional flow) using four- and six-temperature models, were performed. Distributions of gas dynamic quantities, densities of charged particles, electric field strength, as well as vibrational temperatures of CO2, N2 and CO species, within the DC were calculated. Quasi-one-dimensional consideration of processes for powerful CO2 lasers with conic discharge tubes has shown that narrowed along the gas flow tubes must be more effective for laser operation than cylindrical ones. The calculated quantities are in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  20. Approximate and exact numerical integration of the gas dynamic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, T. S.; Sirovich, L.

    1979-01-01

    A highly accurate approximation and a rapidly convergent numerical procedure are developed for two dimensional steady supersonic flow over an airfoil. Examples are given for a symmetric airfoil over a range of Mach numbers. Several interesting features are found in the calculation of the tail shock and the flow behind the airfoil.

  1. Characterizing the accumulation and distribution of gas hydrate in marine sediments using numerical models and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimblett, Jillian Nicole

    Despite the increasing availability of geophysical, geochemical, geotechnical, and biological data that characterize in situ properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the fundamental physical processes associated with gas hydrate formation, accumulation, distribution and dissociation in porous marine sediments remain poorly understood. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal accumulation of gas hydrate in marine sediments through (1) a numerical model that explores the impact of hydraulic parameters on permeability evolution during hydrate formation; and (2) tomographic analysis of multichannel seismic data that constrain the local concentration of gas hydrate. The results constrain the hydraulic parameters pertinent to the hydrodynamics of gas hydrate reservoirs and provide insight about the physical and elastic properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments relevant for estimating hydrate concentration in porous assemblages.

  2. Numerical analysis on gas-surface interaction by molecular dynamics method. I - Simulation with Lennard-Jones molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Matsui, Jun; Ohashi, Hideo

    1992-07-01

    Rarefied gas flows in various situations are calculated successfully by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. In the simulation, the Maxwell model, where a gas molecule reflects diffusely with the probability alpha and reflects specularly with the probability 1 - alpha, is widely used for boundary conditions on solid surfaces. However, the value of alpha is determined empirically and varies greatly with conditions such as degree of contamination and temperature of the surface. Rational prediction of the value and analysis of the interaction between gas and solid surface are required. In this paper, the behavior of a gas molecule with collides onto the solid surface is simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The numerical results reveal that the scattering behavior of the gas molecule is neither specular, diffuse, nor Maxwell-type reflection, and that the sticking probability is affected by the initial gas velocity and the potential well depth.

  3. Numerical analysis of heat transfer in the exhaust gas flow in a diesel power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, C. H. G.; Maia, C. B.; Sodré, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a numerical study of heat transfer in the exhaust duct of a diesel power generator. The analysis was performed using two different approaches: the Finite Difference Method (FDM) and the Finite Volume Method (FVM), this last one by means of a commercial computer software, ANSYS CFX®. In FDM, the energy conservation equation was solved taking into account the estimated velocity profile for fully developed turbulent flow inside a tube and literature correlations for heat transfer. In FVM, the mass conservation, momentum, energy and transport equations were solved for turbulent quantities by the K-ω SST model. In both methods, variable properties were considered for the exhaust gas composed by six species: CO2, H2O, H2, O2, CO and N2. The entry conditions for the numerical simulations were given by experimental data available. The results were evaluated for the engine operating under loads of 0, 10, 20, and 37.5 kW. Test mesh and convergence were performed to determine the numerical error and uncertainty of the simulations. The results showed a trend of increasing temperature gradient with load increase. The general behaviour of the velocity and temperature profiles obtained by the numerical models were similar, with some divergence arising due to the assumptions made for the resolution of the models.

  4. Numerical simulation of a solitonic gas in KdV and KdV-BBM equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutykh, Denys; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2014-08-01

    The collective behaviour of soliton ensembles (i.e. the solitonic gas) is studied using the methods of the direct numerical simulation. Traditionally this problem was addressed in the context of integrable models such as the celebrated KdV equation. We extend this analysis to non-integrable KdV-BBM type models. Some high resolution numerical results are presented in both integrable and nonintegrable cases. Moreover, the free surface elevation probability distribution is shown to be quasi-stationary. Finally, we employ the asymptotic methods along with the Monte Carlo simulations in order to study quantitatively the dependence of some important statistical characteristics (such as the kurtosis and skewness) on the Stokes-Ursell number (which measures the relative importance of nonlinear effects compared to the dispersion) and also on the magnitude of the BBM term.

  5. Experimental and numerical analysis of natural bio and syngas swirl flames in a model gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, S.; Benim, A. C.; Fischer, S.; Joos, F.; Kluβ, D.; Wiedermann, A.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent reacting flows in a generic swirl gas turbine combustor model are investigated both numerically and experimentally. In the investigation, an emphasis is placed upon the external flue gas recirculation, which is a promising technology for increasing the efficiency of the carbon capture and storage process, which, however, can change the combustion behaviour significantly. A further emphasis is placed upon the investigation of alternative fuels such as biogas and syngas in comparison to the conventional natural gas. Flames are also investigated numerically using the open source CFD software OpenFOAM. In the numerical simulations, a laminar flamelet model based on mixture fraction and reaction progress variable is adopted. As turbulence model, the SST model is used within a URANS concept. Computational results are compared with the experimental data, where a fair agreement is observed.

  6. Test 6, Test 7, and Gas Standard Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Horacio, III

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows results of analyses on odor, toxic off gassing and gas standards. The topics include: 1) Statistical Analysis Definitions; 2) Odor Analysis Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 6; 3) Toxic Off gassing Analysis Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 7; and 4) Gas Standard Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 7;

  7. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Results of LIPS-200 Lifetime Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Tianping; Geng, Hai; Jia, Yanhui; Meng, Wei; Wu, Xianming; Sun, Anbang

    2016-06-01

    Accelerator grid structural and electron backstreaming failures are the most important factors affecting the ion thruster's lifetime. During the thruster's operation, Charge Exchange Xenon (CEX) ions are generated from collisions between plasma and neutral atoms. Those CEX ions grid's barrel and wall frequently, which cause the failures of the grid system. In order to validate whether the 20 cm Lanzhou Ion Propulsion System (LIPS-200) satisfies China's communication satellite platform's application requirement for North-South Station Keeping (NSSK), this study analyzed the measured depth of the pit/groove on the accelerator grid's wall and aperture diameter's variation and estimated the operating lifetime of the ion thruster. Different from the previous method, in this paper, the experimental results after the 5500 h of accumulated operation of the LIPS-200 ion thruster are presented firstly. Then, based on these results, theoretical analysis and numerical calculations were firstly performed to predict the on-orbit lifetime of LIPS-200. The results obtained were more accurate to calculate the reliability and analyze the failure modes of the ion thruster. The results indicated that the predicted lifetime of LIPS-200's was about 13218.1 h which could satisfy the required lifetime requirement of 11000 h very well.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Modelling of CO2 Atmospheric Dispersion in Hazardous Gas Emission Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, A.; sainz Gracia, A. S.; Grandia, F.; Bruno, J.

    2015-12-01

    Under stable atmospheric conditions and/or in presence of topographic depressions, CO2 concentrations can reach high values resulting in lethal effect to living organisms. The distribution of denser than air gases released from the underground is governed by gravity, turbulence and dispersion. Once emitted, the gas distribution is initially driven by buoyancy and a gas cloud accumulates on the ground (gravitational phase); with time the density gradient becomes less important due to dispersion or mixing and gas distribution is mainly governed by wind and atmospheric turbulence (passive dispersion phase). Natural analogues provide evidences of the impact of CO2 leakage. Dangerous CO2 concentration in atmosphere related to underground emission have been occasionally reported although the conditions favouring the persistence of such a concentration are barely studied.In this work, the dynamics of CO2 in the atmosphere after ground emission is assessed to quantify their potential risk. Two approaches have been followed: (1) direct measurement of air concentration in a natural emission site, where formation of a "CO2 lake" is common and (2) numerical atmospheric modelling. Two sites with different morphology were studied: (a) the Cañada Real site, a flat terrain in the Volcanic Field of Campo de Calatrava (Spain); (b) the Solforata di Pomezia site, a rough terrain in the Alban Hills Volcanic Region (Italy). The comparison between field data and model calculations reveal that numerical dispersion models are capable of predicting the formation of CO2 accumulation over the ground as a consequence of underground gas emission. Therefore, atmospheric modelling could be included as a valuable methodology in the risk assessment of leakage in natural degassing systems and in CCS projects. Conclusions from this work provide clues on whether leakage may be a real risk for humans and under which conditions this risk needs to be included in the risk assessment.

  9. Numerical study of liquid-gas flow on complex boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Simulation techniques for liquid-gas flows near solid boundaries tend to fall two categories, either focusing on accurate treatment of the phase interface away from wall, or focusing on detailed modeling of contact line dynamics. In order to fill the gap between these two categories and to simulate liquid-gas flows in large scale engineering devices with complex boundaries, we develop a conservative, robust, and efficient framework for handling moving contact lines. This approach combines a conservative level set method to capture the interface, an immersed boundary method to represent the curved boundary, and a macroscopic moving contact line model. The performance of the proposed approach is assessed through several simulations. A drop spreading on a flat plate and a circular cylinder validate the equilibrium contact angle. The migration of a drop on an inclined plane is employed to validate the contact line dynamics. The framework is then applied to perform a 3D simulation of the migration of a drop through porous media, which consists of irregular placed cylinders. The conservation error is shown to remain small for all the simulations.

  10. Numeric Design and Performance Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell -- Gas Turbine Hybrids on Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovakimyan, Gevorg

    The aircraft industry benefits greatly from small improvements in aircraft component design. One possible area of improvement is in the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Modern aircraft APUs are gas turbines located in the tail section of the aircraft that generate additional power when needed. Unfortunately the efficiency of modern aircraft APUs is low. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrids are one possible alternative for replacing modern gas turbine APUs. This thesis investigates the feasibility of replacing conventional gas turbine APUs with SOFC/GT APUs on aircraft. An SOFC/GT design algorithm was created in order to determine the specifications of an SOFC/GT APU. The design algorithm is comprised of several integrated modules which together model the characteristics of each component of the SOFC/GT system. Given certain overall inputs, through numerical analysis, the algorithm produces an SOFC/GT APU, optimized for specific power and efficiency, capable of performing to the required specifications. The SOFC/GT design is then input into a previously developed quasi-dynamic SOFC/GT model to determine its load following capabilities over an aircraft flight cycle. Finally an aircraft range study is conducted to determine the feasibility of the SOFC/GT APU as a replacement for the conventional gas turbine APU. The design results show that SOFC/GT APUs have lower specific power than GT systems, but have much higher efficiencies. Moreover, the dynamic simulation results show that SOFC/GT APUs are capable of following modern flight loads. Finally, the range study determined that SOFC/GT APUs are more attractive over conventional APUs for longer range aircraft.

  11. Numerical investigation of gas-particle interaction in polydisperse volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcano, Susanna; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Bonaventura, Luca; Neri, Augusto

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the problem of underexpanded jet decompression when the injected fluid is a mixture of a gaseous phase and different classes of solid particles. The underexpanded multiphase jet problem is representative of phenomena that can be observed in the first stages of explosive volcanic eruptions. Whereas the case of homogeneous jets has been studied deeply in the literature, both experimentally, theoretically and numerically, the case of multiphase gas--particle jets still presents some open issues. It has been proven theoretically and experimentally that vents with supersonic or sonic velocity and gas pressure greater than the atmospheric one result in a rapid expansion and acceleration of the fluid to high Mach number. A series of expansion waves form and are reflected as compression waves at the flow boundary. The compression waves coealesce to form a standing normal shock wave (Mach disk), across which the fluid is rapidly compressed and decelerated to subsonic speeds. When solid particles are added to the gas flow, new phenomena associated to kinetic and thermal non-equilibrium between gas and particulate phases arise. Such effects are controlled by drag and heat exchange terms in the momentum and energy equations. In the present work we carry out two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations with the multiphase flow model PDAC (Neri et al., J. Geophys. Res, 2003; Carcano et al., Geosci. Mod. Dev., 2013), to identify and quantify non-equilibrium effects related to the interaction between the jet decompression structure and solid particles. We quantify, on a theoretical basis, the expected non-equilibrium effects between the gas and the solid phase in terms of the particle Stokes numer (St), i.e. the ratio between the particle relaxation time and a characteristic time scale of the jet (taken as the formation time of the Mach disk shock), for two sample grain-size distributions of natural events (Mount St. Helens, 1980; Vesuvius, aD 79). The Stokes

  12. Acoustic Velocity Log Numerical Simulation and Saturation Estimation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir in Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  13. Acoustic velocity log numerical simulation and saturation estimation of gas hydrate reservoir in Shenhu area, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method.

  14. Numerical analysis of excimer laser-induced breakdown of Kr gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamam, Kholoud A.; Elsayed, Khaled A.; Gamal, Yosr E. E.

    2017-03-01

    The present paper displays a numerical study on the role of electron dynamics in relation to the dependence of the threshold intensity on the pressure in the breakdown of gases by laser radiation. The analysis aimed to find out the origin of the steep slope observed in the measurements of threshold intensity against gas pressure in the breakdown of Kr induced by an excimer laser source (Opt. Commun. 13:66-68, 1). The experiment was carried out using wavelength 248 nm and pulse width of 18 ns for a gas pressure range 4.5-300 torr. The investigation centered on an adaptation of our previously developed electron cascade model given in Evans and Gamal (J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 13:1447-1458, 2). This model solves numerically a time-dependent energy equation simultaneously with a set of rate equations that describe the change of the population of the formed excited states. The modifications introduced into the model the realistic structure of the krypton gas atom as well as electron diffusion as a loss process to inspect the experimentally tested low-pressure regime. A computer program is undertaken to determine the breakdown threshold intensity as a function of gas pressure. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the calculated thresholds and measured ones, corresponding to the examined pressure range. This agreement validates the applicability of the model. The relationship between the role of the physical mechanisms and gas pressure is studied by analyzing the EEDF and its parameters at selected pressure values that cover the experimentally tested range. The result of this study clarified that electron diffusion out of the focal region is responsible for the steep slope of the threshold intensities for pressures <75 torr. For higher pressures (75-300 torr), collisional excitation of ground-state atoms followed by their ionization via multiphoton and collisional processes acts to convert the Kr gas in the interaction region into the state of breakdown. Investigation of

  15. Numerical simulation of gas flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical analysis is used to identify the physical phenomena associated with barometrically driven gas (air and water vapor) flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Results from simple finite difference simulations indicate that for a fractured rock scenario, the maximum velocity of air out of an uncased 10 cm borehole is 0.002 m s{sub {minus}1}. An equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was incorporated into a multiphase, multicomponent simulator to test more complex conceptual models. Results indicate that for a typical June day, a diurnal pressure wave propagates about 160 m into the surrounding Tiva Canyon hydrogeologic unit. Dry air that enters the formation evaporates water around the borehole which reduces capillary pressure. Multiphase countercurrent flow develops in the vicinity of the hole; the gas phase flows into the formation while the liquid phase flows toward the borehole. The effect occurs within 0.5 m of the borehole. The amount of water vapor leaving the formation during 1 day is 900 cm{sup 3}. This is less than 0.1% of the total recharge into the formation, suggesting that the barometric effect may be insignificant in drying the unsaturated zone. However, gas phase velocities out of the borehole (3 m s{sup {minus}1}), indicating that observed flow rates from wells along the east flank of Yucca Mountain were able to be simulated with a barometric model.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, J.; Kubata, J.; Betak, V.; Hybl, R.

    2013-04-01

    New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl) for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW) is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel) was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified) on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  17. Numerical method for gas dynamics combining characteristic and conservation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    An efficient implicit numerical method that solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates by the finite-volume technique is presented. An intrinsically dissipative difference scheme and a fully implicit treatment of boundary conditions, based on characteristic and conservation concepts, are used to improve stability and accuracy. Efficiency is achieved by using a diagonal form of the implicit algorithm and spatially varying time-steps. Comparisons of various schemes and methods are presented for one- and two-dimensional flows, including transonic separated flow past a thick circular-arc airfoil in a channel. The new method is equal to or better than a version of MacCormack's hybrid method in accuracy and it converges to a steady state up to an order of magnitude faster.

  18. Numerical method for gas dynamics combining characteristic and conservation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    An efficient implicit numerical method that solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates by the finite-volume technique is presented. An intrinsically dissipative difference scheme and a fully implicit treatment of boundary conditions, based on characteristic and conservation concepts, are used to improve stability and accuracy. Efficiency is achieved by using a diagonal form of the implicit algorithm and spatially varying time-steps. Comparisons of various schemes and methods are presented for one- and two-dimensional flows, including transonic separated flow past a thick circular-arc airfoil in a channel. The new method is equal to or better than a version of MacCormack's hybrid method in accuracy and it converges to a steady state up to an order of magnitude faster.

  19. Numerical modeling of experimental observations on gas formation and multi-phase flow of carbon dioxide in subsurface formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, R.; Dash, Z.; Sakaki, T.; Plampin, M. R.; Lassen, R. N.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2011-12-01

    One of the concerns related to geologic CO2 sequestration is potential leakage of CO2 and its subsequent migration to shallow groundwater resources leading to geochemical impacts. Developing approaches to monitor CO2 migration in shallow aquifer and mitigate leakage impacts will require improving our understanding of gas phase formation and multi-phase flow subsequent to CO2 leakage in shallow aquifers. We are utilizing an integrated approach combining laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to characterize the multi-phase flow of CO2 in shallow aquifers. The laboratory experiments involve a series of highly controlled experiments in which CO2 dissolved water is injected in homogeneous and heterogeneous soil columns and tanks. The experimental results are used to study the effects of soil properties, temperature, pressure gradients and heterogeneities on gas formation and migration. We utilize the Finite Element Heat and Mass (FEHM) simulator (Zyvoloski et al, 2010) to numerically model the experimental results. The numerical models capture the physics of CO2 exsolution, multi-phase fluid flow as well as sand heterogeneity. Experimental observations of pressure, temperature and gas saturations are used to develop and constrain conceptual models for CO2 gas-phase formation and multi-phase CO2 flow in porous media. This talk will provide details of development of conceptual models based on experimental observation, development of numerical models for laboratory experiments and modelling results.

  20. Instability of gas-surrounded Rayleigh viscous jets: Weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luo; Yang, Li-jun; Ye, Han-yu

    2017-07-01

    The instability of gas-surrounded Rayleigh viscous jets is investigated analytically and numerically in this paper. Theoretical analysis is based on a second-order perturbation expansion for capillary jets with surface disturbances, while the axisymmetric two-dimensional, two-phase simulation is conducted by applying the Gerris code for jets subjected to velocity disturbances. The relation between the initial surface and velocity disturbance amplitude was obtained according to the derivation of Moallemi et al. ["Breakup of capillary jets with different disturbances," Phys. Fluids 28, 012101 (2016)], and the breakup lengths resulting from these two disturbances agree well. Analytical and numerical breakup profiles also coincide satisfactorily, except in the vicinity of the breakup point, which shrinks forcefully. The effects of various parameters (i.e., oscillation frequency, Reynolds number, Weber number, and gas-to-liquid density ratio) have also been examined by comparing spatial growth rate, second-order disturbance amplitude, breakup length, and the breakup profiles at low frequency, where obvious satellite droplets form, versus different parameters. In addition, the competition between Rayleigh instability and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability has been examined using an energy approach.

  1. Numerical simulation of rarefied gas flow through a slit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Jeng, Duen-Ren; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Chung, Chan-Hong

    1990-01-01

    Two different approaches, the finite-difference method coupled with the discrete-ordinate method (FDDO), and the direct-simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, are used in the analysis of the flow of a rarefied gas from one reservoir to another through a two-dimensional slit. The cases considered are for hard vacuum downstream pressure, finite pressure ratios, and isobaric pressure with thermal diffusion, which are not well established in spite of the simplicity of the flow field. In the FDDO analysis, by employing the discrete-ordinate method, the Boltzmann equation simplified by a model collision integral is transformed to a set of partial differential equations which are continuous in physical space but are point functions in molecular velocity space. The set of partial differential equations are solved by means of a finite-difference approximation. In the DSMC analysis, three kinds of collision sampling techniques, the time counter (TC) method, the null collision (NC) method, and the no time counter (NTC) method, are used.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  3. Numerical investigation of multiphase flow in flue gas desulphurization system with rotary jet stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Runkun; Wang, Hongxing; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Wang, Chao

    There exits multiphase flow of oxygenized air, lime slurry and limestone particles in power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. A rotary jet stirring device (RJSD) is installed in the slurry pond at the bottom center of absorption tank to get an appropriate mixing flow field so far as possible to get off sulfur dioxide. By employing the standard k-ε turbulence model and the Eulerian multiphase model, numerical investigations for liquid-solid and liquid-solid-gas flow field are presented to discuss the distribution of flow hydrodynamic parameters under a certain operational condition, respectively. In liquid-solid flow, limestone particle concentration shows a decreasing trend with the increase of the rotation angular velocity. The core jet length of the rotary mixer tend to be much longer with the increase of jet velocity under the surrounding pressure, but the dispersed slurry velocity tends to reduce after an initial increasing during the starting period due to the inadequate mixing process. This phenomenon shows that the stirring down-stream is more important than the advection stream in liquid-solid condition. Compared to the liquid-solid condition, the distribution of the air volume of fraction in gas-liquid-solid flow is getting uniform because of the participation of the solid phase, and the down-stream plays an important role in air lateral distribution. The concentration of the limestone particle in liquid-solid condition is higher than in the multiphase flow field. The reason is that the particle distributing velocity near the tank wall is lower and the vertical velocity is higher than in the liquid-solid condition when the jet down-stream velocity is equal. The numerical results could be a useful exploration for an attempt usage of rotary jet device in FGD system.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of the roll motion behavior of a floating liquefied natural gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, WenHua; Yang, JianMin; Hu, ZhiQiang; Xiao, LongFei; Peng, Tao

    2013-03-01

    The present paper does an experimental and numerical investigation of the hydrodynamic interaction and the response of a single point turret-moored Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG) system, which is a new type of floating LNG (Liquid Natural Gas) platform that consists of a ship-type FPSO hull equipped with LNG storage tanks and liquefaction plants. In particular, this study focuses on the investigation of the roll response of FLNG hull in free-decay motions, white noise waves and also in irregular waves. Model tests of the FLNG system in 60%H filling condition excited by both white noise waves and irregular waves combined with steady wind and current have been carried out. Response Amplitude Operators (RAOs) and time histories of the responses are obtained for sway, roll and yaw motions. Obvious Low Frequency (LF) components of the roll motions are observed, which may be out of expectation. To facilitate the physical understanding of this phenomenon, we filter the roll motions at the period of 30 s into two parts: the Wave Frequency (WF) motions and the Low Frequency (LF) motions respectively. The results indicate that the LF motions are closely related to the sway and yaw motions. Possible reasons for the presence of the LF motions of roll have been discussed in detail, through the comparison with the sway and yaw motions. As for the numerical part, the simulation of the modeled case is conducted with the help of the software SESAM®. A good agreement between experiments and calculations is reported within the scope of trends. However, the numerical simulations should be further improved for the prediction of the FLNG system in the heading sea.

  5. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

  6. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

  7. Numerical Results of 3-D Modeling of Moon Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod; Antipin, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    For the last time for the model of the Moon usually had been used the model of mega impact in which the forming of the Earth and its sputnik had been the consequence of the Earth's collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,2] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al26,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone and additionally change the content of Moon forming to silicates. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius of the Earth, the growing area of the future Earth's core can save also the silicate envelope fragments [3]. For understanding the further system Earth-Moon evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on its accumulation stage.In that paper we are modeling the changing of temperature,pressure,velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3d spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach.The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in velocity

  8. Numerical analysis of gas-dynamic instabilities during the laser drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. H.; O'Neill, W.; Tunna, L.; Sutcliffe, C. J.

    2006-08-01

    The use of high-pressure gas jets in the laser-drilling process has significant influence on the melt ejection mechanism. These jets are highly unstable and this directly relates to the gas pressure and the geometry of the hole being drilled. The evolution of gas-dynamic instabilities during the laser-drilling process was investigated numerically. A minimum length nozzle (MLN) with a 300 μm throat diameter was modelled at various gas pressures, with the gas jet impinging on a range of simulated holes with different aspect ratios. The simulations predict the formation of surface pressure fluctuations that have a broad spectrum due to both the turbulent nature of the jet and the blunt shock oscillation on the surface. The surface pressure variations and the blunt shock oscillation govern the gas dynamic conditions inside the hole, which strongly influence the melt ejection phenomena during the laser-drilling process.

  9. Macroscopic laws for immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Results From numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Daniel H.

    1990-06-01

    Flow through porous media may be described at either of two length scales. At the scale of a single pore, fluids flow according to the Navier-Stokes equations and the appropriate boundary conditions. At a larger, volume-averaged scale, the flow is usually thought to obey a linear Darcy law relating flow rates to pressure gradients and body forces via phenomenological permeability coefficients. Aside from the value of the permeability coefficient, the slow flow of a single fluid in a porous medium is well-understood within this framework. The situation is considerably different, however, for the simultaneous flow of two or more fluids: not only are the phenomenological coefficients poorly understood, but the form of the macroscopic laws themselves is subject to question. I describe a numerical study of immiscible two-phase flow in an idealized two-dimensional porous medium constructed at the pore scale. Results show that the macroscopic flow is a nonlinear function of the applied forces for sufficiently low levels of forcing, but linear thereafter. The crossover, which is not predicted by conventional models, occurs when viscous forces begin to dominate capillary forces; i.e., at a sufficiently high capillary number. In the linear regime, the flow may be described by the linear phenomenological law ui = ΣjLijfj, where the flow rate ui of the ith fluid is related to the force fj applied to the jth fluid by the matrix of phenomenological coefficients Lij which depends on the relative concentrations of the two fluids. The diagonal terms are proportional to quantities commonly referred to as "relative permeabilities." The cross terms represent viscous coupling between the two fluids; they are conventionally assumed to be negligible and require special experimental procedures to observe in a laboratory. In contrast, in this numerical study the cross terms are straightforward to measure and are found to be of significant size. The cross terms are additionally observed to

  10. Numerical study of the generation of runaway electrons in a gas diode with a hot channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, V. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    A new method for increasing the efficiency of runaway electron beam generation in atmospheric pressure gas media has been suggested and theoretically proved. The method consists of creating a hot region (e.g., a spark channel or a laser plume) with a decreased numerical density of gas molecules (N) near the cathode. In this method, the ratio E/N (E—electric field strength) is increased by decreasing N instead of increasing E, as has been done in the past. The numerical model that is used allows the simultaneous calculation of the formation of a subnanosecond gas discharge and the generation of runaway electrons in gas media. The calculations have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining current pulses of runaway electrons with amplitudes of hundred of amperes and durations of more than 100 ps. The influence of the hot channel geometry on the parameters of the generated beam has been investigated.

  11. Numerical study of the generation of runaway electrons in a gas diode with a hot channel

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenkov, V. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    A new method for increasing the efficiency of runaway electron beam generation in atmospheric pressure gas media has been suggested and theoretically proved. The method consists of creating a hot region (e.g., a spark channel or a laser plume) with a decreased numerical density of gas molecules (N) near the cathode. In this method, the ratio E/N (E—electric field strength) is increased by decreasing N instead of increasing E, as has been done in the past. The numerical model that is used allows the simultaneous calculation of the formation of a subnanosecond gas discharge and the generation of runaway electrons in gas media. The calculations have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining current pulses of runaway electrons with amplitudes of hundred of amperes and durations of more than 100 ps. The influence of the hot channel geometry on the parameters of the generated beam has been investigated.

  12. Experimental and numerical study of heavy gas dispersion in a ventilated room.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Laurent; Prévost, Corinne; Bouilloux, Laurent; Sestier-Carlin, Roger

    2008-04-01

    In order to better evaluate the consequences of an accidental release of heavy gas, such as uranium hexafluoride (UF(6)), in some installations in the nuclear fuel cycle, an experimental and numerical study was conducted by IRSN on heavy gas dispersion in a ventilated room. This study was based on about 20 injection configurations of a large quantity of a heavy tracer gas, sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)), inside two ventilated rooms of different sizes. Stratification of the tracer gas was detected in all the configurations studied, even at low concentrations. Numerical simulations performed with the multidimensional CFX code enabled the stratification and the concentration levels reached in the rooms to be predicted overall, and the higher the air flow rate, the more satisfactory the comparison between simulation and experiment.

  13. Busted Butte: Achieving the Objectives and Numerical Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Soll; M. Kearney; P. Stauffer; P. Tseng; H.J. Turin; Z. Lu

    2002-10-07

    The Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) at Busted Butte is a mesoscale field/laboratory/modeling investigation designed to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain. The UZTT test facility is located approximately 8 km southeast of the potential Yucca Mountain repository area. The UZTT was designed in two phases, to address five specific objectives in the UZ: the effect of heterogeneities, flow and transport (F&T) behavior at permeability contrast boundaries, migration of colloids , transport models of sorbing tracers, and scaling issues in moving from laboratory scale to field scale. Phase 1A was designed to assess the influence of permeability contrast boundaries in the hydrologic Calico Hills. Visualization of fluorescein movement , mineback rock analyses, and comparison with numerical models demonstrated that F&T are capillary dominated with permeability contrast boundaries distorting the capillary flow. Phase 1B was designed to assess the influence of fractures on F&T and colloid movement. The injector in Phase 1B was located at a fracture, while the collector, 30 cm below, was placed at what was assumed to be the same fracture. Numerical simulations of nonreactive (Br) and reactive (Li) tracers show the experimental data are best explained by a combination of molecular diffusion and advective flux. For Phase 2, a numerical model with homogeneous unit descriptions was able to qualitatively capture the general characteristics of the system. Numerical simulations and field observations revealed a capillary dominated flow field. Although the tracers showed heterogeneity in the test block, simulation using heterogeneous fields did not significantly improve the data fit over homogeneous field simulations. In terms of scaling, simulations of field tracer data indicate a hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude higher than measured in the laboratory. Simulations of Li, a weakly sorbing tracer

  14. Numerical Study on a High-Pressure Stage in Synthesis Gas Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liang; Wang, Tong; Gu, Chuangang

    Numerical study on the first stage of the high-pressure casing in an industrial synthesis gas (syngas) compressor is presented here. Detailed flow field comparisons are made between impeller/stage models. The stage model is composed of impeller, vaneless diffuser, bend and return channel, while the impeller model is composed only with impeller and vaneless diffuser. Compared to the results from stage model, the impeller model results indicate that the predicted aerodynamic performance is higher, and operating range is wider in both stall and choke side. Under the same inlet volume flow rate, the blade pressure coefficients, Mach number and flow angle in the blade passage for both models are nearly the same, suggesting that the flow field data in the rotating impeller is to some degree credible for stage performance prediction. However, as the impeller model neglects the matching effect with the downstream stationary parts, there needs some correction for stage working range with stable operation. Besides, the internal flow fields of stage using air and syngas mediums are compared respectively. Results indicate that the aerodynamic performance and operation range are different for both mediums because of different density and gas constant. For the flow field of the whole stage, large discrepancy occurs in the leading edge of the return channel under the same inlet volume flow rate. It suggests that the existing air model stage couldn't be directly used for the syngas compressor and needs redesigning.

  15. Numerical simulation of gas concentration and dioxin formation for MSW combustion in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model was employed to simulate the combustion process in a fixed porous bed of municipal solid waste (MSW). Mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations of the waste bed were set up to describe the incineration process. The rate of moisture evaporation, volatile matter devolatilization, char combustion, NOx production, and reduction and dioxin formation were calculated and established according to the local thermal conditions and waste property characteristics. Changes in the bed volume during incineration were calculated according to the reaction rate of the process. The simulation results were compared with experimental data, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed was reasonably simulated. The simulation results of weight loss and solid temperature in the bed agree with the experimental data, which shows that the waste combustion rate is nearly constant in the middle of the incineration process, and that moisture evaporation takes up most of the time for the overall incineration experiment. The emission of gas species from the bed surface is also agreeably simulated, with O2, CO2, and CO concentrations in flue gas agreeing with the experimental data. The simulation results benefit the understanding of the combustion process in the waste bed as well as the design of incinerator grates.

  16. Reservoir Characterization using geostatistical and numerical modeling in GIS with noble gas geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, D. A.; Swift, J. N.; Tan, S.; Darrah, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of precise geochemical analyses with quantitative engineering modeling into an interactive GIS system allows for a sophisticated and efficient method of reservoir engineering and characterization. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is utilized as an advanced technique for oil field reservoir analysis by combining field engineering and geological/geochemical spatial datasets with the available systematic modeling and mapping methods to integrate the information into a spatially correlated first-hand approach in defining surface and subsurface characteristics. Three key methods of analysis include: 1) Geostatistical modeling to create a static and volumetric 3-dimensional representation of the geological body, 2) Numerical modeling to develop a dynamic and interactive 2-dimensional model of fluid flow across the reservoir and 3) Noble gas geochemistry to further define the physical conditions, components and history of the geologic system. Results thus far include using engineering algorithms for interpolating electrical well log properties across the field (spontaneous potential, resistivity) yielding a highly accurate and high-resolution 3D model of rock properties. Results so far also include using numerical finite difference methods (crank-nicholson) to solve for equations describing the distribution of pressure across field yielding a 2D simulation model of fluid flow across reservoir. Ongoing noble gas geochemistry results will also include determination of the source, thermal maturity and the extent/style of fluid migration (connectivity, continuity and directionality). Future work will include developing an inverse engineering algorithm to model for permeability, porosity and water saturation.This combination of new and efficient technological and analytical capabilities is geared to provide a better understanding of the field geology and hydrocarbon dynamics system with applications to determine the presence of hydrocarbon pay zones (or

  17. Numerical analysis of the relaxation of particle and gas phases in dusty supersonic viscous flow

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, R.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the full dusty gas viscous flow equations is presented. In this method the terms representing drag force, work done by the particles passing through the gas, and heat transfer are evaluated using the trapezoidal rule. The differencing procedure for the remaining terms is similar to the MacCormack explicit predictor-corrector method (MacCormack and Baldwin, 1975). 18 references.

  18. Numerical, Laboratory And Field Studiesof Gas Production FromNatural Hydrate Accumulations in Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Kowalsky, Michael; Reagan, Matthew

    2006-10-17

    We discuss the range of activities at Lawrence BerkeleyNational Laboratory in support of gas production from natural hydrates.Investigations of production from the various classes of hydrate depositsby numerical simulation indicate their significant promise as potentialenergy sources. Laboratory studies are coordinated with the numericalstudies and are designed to address knowledge gaps that are important tothe prediction of gas production. Our involvement in field tests is alsobriefly discussed.

  19. Numerical scheme to complete a compressible gas flow in variable porosity media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, D.; Clain, S.; Buffard, T.

    2005-05-01

    We present an approximate Riemann solver coupled with a finite volume method to compute non conservative Euler equations in variable porosity media using ideal gas state law. The non conservative term is numerically taken into account from an original idea of LeRoux (1998) but here Riemann problems at each interface of the mesh are linearized using a VFRoe approach. The main goal is the resolution of the non conservative system even if the porosity is discontinuous. Stationary solutions are determined with continuous and discontinuous porosity in order to test the numerical scheme and computations of gas shock subsonic wave moving in a non continuous porosity medium are presented.

  20. Numerical and experimental investigation on the performance of lean burn catalytic combustion for gas turbine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Juan; Weng, Yi-wu; Zhu, Jun-qiang

    2015-04-01

    This manuscript presents our numerical and experimental results regarding the performance characteristics of lean burn catalytic combustion for gas turbine application. The reactant transport was assumed to be controlled by both bulk diffusion as well as surface kinetics, implemented by means of an approximate reaction rate equation and empirical coefficients to incorporate reaction mechanism. Experimental and numerical results were compared to examine the effects of methane mole fraction, inlet temperature, operating pressure, velocity and hydrogen species on combustion intensity. The results indicate that inlet temperature is the most significant parameter that impacts operation of the catalytic combustor and the most effective methods for improving the methane conversion are increasing the inlet temperature and increasing the methane mole fraction. Simulations from 1D heterogeneous plug flow model can capture the trend of catalytic combustion and describe the behavior of the catalytic monolith in detail. The addition of hydrogen will provide heat release by the exothermic combustion reaction so that the reactants reach a temperature at which methane oxidation can light-off.

  1. Numerical modeling of non-isothermal gas flow and NAPL vapor transport in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pártl, Ondřej; Beneš, Michal; Frolkovič, Peter; Illangasekare, Tissa; Smits, Kathleen

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for the description of non-isothermal compressible flow of gas mixtures in heterogeneous porous media and we derive an efficient semi-implicit time-stepping numerical scheme for the solution of the governing equations. We experimentally estimate the order of convergence of the scheme in spatial variables and we present several computational studies that demonstrate the ability of the numerical scheme.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Stratified Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Horizontal Circular Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Faccini, J.L.H.; Sampaio, P.A.B. de

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports numerical and experimental investigation of stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow in horizontal circular pipes. The Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) with the k-{omega} model for a fully developed stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow are solved by using the finite element method. A smooth and horizontal interface surface is assumed without considering the interfacial waves. The continuity of the shear stress across the interface is enforced with the continuity of the velocity being automatically satisfied by the variational formulation. For each given interface position and longitudinal pressure gradient, an inner iteration loop runs to solve the nonlinear equations. The Newton-Raphson scheme is used to solve the transcendental equations by an outer iteration to determine the interface position and pressure gradient for a given pair of volumetric flow rates. The interface position in a 51.2 mm ID circular pipe was measured experimentally by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The numerical results were also compared with experimental results in a 21 mm ID circular pipe reported by Masala [1]. The good agreement between the numerical and experimental results indicates that the k-{omega} model can be applied for the numerical simulation of stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow. (authors)

  3. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of gas dynamics effects on spray forming process

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, H.; Chyu, M.K.; Pien, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes three dimensional computational simulations of transport phenomena in a spray forming process. Major effort of this study has been focused on investigation of the effects of three-dimensional gas flow characteristics on the aluminum droplets deposition in an actual spray chamber. The preform shape resulted from the existing chamber condition is statistically modeled and compared with a two-dimensional simulation under similar conditions. The numerical procedure presented in this study is a fully interacting combination of Eulerian flow and Lagrangian droplet calculations combined with droplet turbulent dispersion and solidification models. It also includes a physical model of interaction between spray droplets and substrate. The rebound velocity of an impinging droplet is modeled based on the size, velocity, and solid fraction of the droplet. The present simulation suggests that three-dimensional modeling is critical to accurately simulate the transport phenomena in the present spray chamber.

  4. Numerical simulation of transient development and diminution of weld pool in gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuan Song; Yan, Fengjie

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the transient heat and fluid flow fields in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). The transient development and diminution of the weld pool at two periods after the arc ignites and extinguishes are analysed quantitatively. The data for the weld pool configurations under different welding conditions from the transient state to the quasi-steady state are obtained. The time for the weld pool shape to reach the quasi-steady state and the time for the weld pool to solidify completely are predicted. GTAW experiments show that the predictions of the weld pool shape based on the model are in agreement with the measured values. The numerical results of the dynamic development and diminution of weld pool configurations could be used to correlate the transient characteristics of weld pool behaviour with the occurrence of weld formation defects.

  5. Numerical simulations of high Knudsen number gas flows and microchannel electrokinetic liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang

    Low pressure and microchannel gas flows are characterized by high Knudsen numbers. Liquid flows in microchannels are characterized by non-conventional driving potentials like electrokinetic forces. The main thrust of the dissertation is to investigate these two different kinds of flows in gases and liquids respectively. High Knudsen number (Kn) gas flows were characterized by 'rarified' or 'microscale' behavior. Because of significant non-continuum effect, traditional CFD techniques are often inaccurate for analyzing high Kn number gas flows. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method offers an alternative to traditional CFD which retains its validity in slip and transition flow regimes. To validate the DSMC code, comparisons of simulation results with theoretical analysis and experimental data are made. The DSMC method was first applied to compute low pressure, high Kn flow fields in partially heated two dimensional channels. The effects of varying pressure, inlet flow and gas transport properties (Kn, Reynolds number, Re and the Prandtl number, Pr respectively) on the wall heat transfer (Nusselt number, Nu) were examined. The DSMC method was employed to explore mixing gas flows in two dimensional microchannels. Mixing of two gas streams (H2 and O2) was considered within a microchannel. The effect of the inlet-outlet pressure difference, the pressure ratio of the incoming streams and the accommodation coefficient of the solid wall on mixing length were all examined. Parallelization of a three-dimensional DSMC code was implemented using OpenMP procedure on a shared memory multi-processor computer. The parallel code was used to simulate 3D high Kn number Couette flow and the flow characteristics are found to be very different from their continuum counterparts. A mathematical model describing electrokinetically driven mass transport phenomena in microfabricated chip devices will also be presented. The model accounts for the principal physical phenomena affecting

  6. Numerical Results of Earth's Core Accumulation 3-D Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod

    2013-04-01

    For a long time as a most convenient had been the model of mega impact in which the early forming of the Earth's core and mantle had been the consequence of formed protoplanet collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,3] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius, the growing area of the future core can save also the silicate envelope fragments. All existing dynamical accumulation models are constructed by using a spherical-symmetrical model. Hence for understanding the further planet evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on the planet accumulation stage. In that paper we are modeling distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3D- spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach. The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in

  7. Numerical Simulations of Buoyancy Effects in low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satti, R. P.; Pasumarthi, K. S.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the computational analysis of buoyancy effects in the near field of an isothermal helium jet injected into quiescent ambient air environment. The transport equations of helium mass fraction coupled with the conservation equations of mixture mass and momentum were solved using a staggered grid finite volume method. Laminar, axisymmetric, unsteady flow conditions were considered for the analysis. An orthogonal system with non-uniform grids was used to capture the instability phenomena. Computations were performed for Earth gravity and during transition from Earth to different gravitational levels. The flow physics was described by simultaneous visualizations of velocity and concentration fields at Earth and microgravity conditions. Computed results were validated by comparing with experimental data substantiating that buoyancy induced global flow oscillations present in Earth gravity are absent in microgravity. The dependence of oscillation frequency and amplitude on gravitational forcing was presented to further quantify the buoyancy effects.

  8. Numerical analysis of flow in the hot gas manifold of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Singhal, A. K.; Przekwas, A. J.; Glynn, D. R.; Costes, N. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model and results of analyses carried out to characterize the flow through the two duct configuration of the Hot Gas Manifold of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Three dimensional computations have been performed for a half-scale air test model using a nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate system. The calculation domain is extended from the inlet of the turnaround duct to the exit of the transfer duct. Three test cases, one for laminar flow and two for turbulent flow, have been considered. For turbulent flows, constant eddy viscosity and the k-epsilon model of turbulence were employed. As expected, laminar flow calculation predicts much larger pressure drop than turbulent flow cases. The turbulent flow results are in good agreement with the available flow-visualization data. This study and experimental data indicate that the two-transfer duct design will significantly improve the flow distribution in the Hot Gas Manifold and thereby enhance the overall performance of the SSME.

  9. Numerical estimation of ultrasonic production of hydrogen: Effect of ideal and real gas based models.

    PubMed

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-01-01

    Based on two different assumptions regarding the equation describing the state of the gases within an acoustic cavitation bubble, this paper studies the sonochemical production of hydrogen, through two numerical models treating the evolution of a chemical mechanism within a single bubble saturated with oxygen during an oscillation cycle in water. The first approach is built on an ideal gas model, while the second one is founded on Van der Waals equation, and the main objective was to analyze the effect of the considered state equation on the ultrasonic hydrogen production retrieved by simulation under various operating conditions. The obtained results show that even when the second approach gives higher values of temperature, pressure and total free radicals production, yield of hydrogen does not follow the same trend. When comparing the results released by both models regarding hydrogen production, it was noticed that the ratio of the molar amount of hydrogen is frequency and acoustic amplitude dependent. The use of Van der Waals equation leads to higher quantities of hydrogen under low acoustic amplitude and high frequencies, while employing ideal gas law based model gains the upper hand regarding hydrogen production at low frequencies and high acoustic amplitudes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical calculations of high-altitude differential charging: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laframboise, J. G.; Godard, R.; Prokopenko, S. M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional simulation program was constructed in order to obtain theoretical predictions of floating potential distributions on geostationary spacecraft. The geometry was infinite-cylindrical with angle dependence. Effects of finite spacecraft length on sheath potential profiles can be included in an approximate way. The program can treat either steady-state conditions or slowly time-varying situations, involving external time scales much larger than particle transit times. Approximate, locally dependent expressions were used to provide space charge, density profiles, but numerical orbit-following is used to calculate surface currents. Ambient velocity distributions were assumed to be isotropic, beam-like, or some superposition of these.

  11. Numerical calculations of high-altitude differential charging: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laframboise, J. G.; Godard, R.; Prokopenko, S. M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional simulation program was constructed in order to obtain theoretical predictions of floating potential distributions on geostationary spacecraft. The geometry was infinite-cylindrical with angle dependence. Effects of finite spacecraft length on sheath potential profiles can be included in an approximate way. The program can treat either steady-state conditions or slowly time-varying situations, involving external time scales much larger than particle transit times. Approximate, locally dependent expressions were used to provide space charge, density profiles, but numerical orbit-following is used to calculate surface currents. Ambient velocity distributions were assumed to be isotropic, beam-like, or some superposition of these.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Dependence of Separative Power of the Gas Centrifuge on the Length of Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    Numerical modelling and optimization of the gas flow and isotope separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) for uranium enrichment have been performed for different lengths of the rotor. The calculations show that the specific separative power of the GC reduces with the length of the rotor. We show that the reduction of the specific separative power is connected with the growth of the pressure in the optimal regime and corresponding growth of temperature to prevent the working gas sublimation. The specific separative power remains constant with the growth of the rotor length provided that the temperature of the rotor is taken to be constant.

  13. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission: numerical simulation of dusty gas coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Combi, Michael; Rubin, Martin; Hansen, Kenneth; Gombosi, Tamas

    The Rosetta spacecraft is en route to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for a rendezvous, landing, and extensive orbital phase beginning in 2014. Having a limited amount of information regarding its coma, interpretation of measurements and safety consideration of the spacecraft will require modeling of the comet's environment. Such models should be able to simulate both the gas and dust phases of the coma as well as the interaction between them in a self-consistent manner. The relevant physical processes in the coma include photolytic reactions and interaction with the nucleus for the gas phase and drag by the gas, gravity of the nucleus, solar gravity and radiation pressure, and charging by the ambient plasma for the dust phase. Developing of such modeling capabilities will be able to link measurements obtained by different instruments onboard of spacecraft. Some examples of cometary comae simulations can be found in [1-3]. In this work we present our kinetic model of a dusty gas coma [4] with results of its application to the case of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko at conditions corresponding to some stages the during the Rosetta mission. Based on the surface properties and local production rates obtained by MIRO, RSI and VIRTIS the model will be able to propagate the injected gas and dust into the coma linking the measurements to those obtained by ALICE, MIDAS and ROSINA for the gas phase and COSIMA and GIADA for the dust phase of the coma. A simultaneous simulation of the major components of the multi-phase coma will allow us to link observations of the gas and dust phases. In this work we present results of a numerical study of neutral/ionized multispecies gaseous and electrically charged dust environment of the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko at a helio-centric distance of 1.3 AU. The simulation is performed in fully 3D geometry with a realistic nucleus model that describes its topological features and source distribution. Both, neutral and ionized components of the

  14. Numerical Studies of the Application of Shock Tube Technology for Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, R.; Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Parkot, D.; Varava, W.; Olivier, H.; Luo, X.

    2007-12-01

    A new method for a combustion-free spraying is studied fundamentally by modeling and simulation in comparison with first experiments. The article focuses on the numerical simulation of the gas-particle nozzle flow, which is generated by the shock reflection at the end wall section of a shock tube. To study the physical fundamentals of this process, at present only a single shot operation is considered. The particles are injected downstream of the nozzle throat into a supersonic nozzle flow. The measurements of the particle velocity made by a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) set up show that the maximum velocity amounts to 1220 m/s for stainless steel particles of 15 μm diameter. The CFD-Code (Fluent) is first verified by a comparison with available numerical and experimental data for gas and gas-particle flow fields in a long Laval-nozzle. The good agreement implied the great potential of the new dynamic process concept for cold-gas coating applications. Then the flow fields in the short Laval nozzle designed and realized by the Shock Wave Laboratory (SWL) are investigated. The gas flow for experimentally obtained stagnation conditions is simulated. The gas-particle flow without and with the influence of the particles on the gas flow is calculated by the Surface Engineering Institute (IOT) and compared with experiments. The influence of the injection parameters on the particle velocities is investigated, as well.

  15. LaRC results on nuclear pumped noble gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The recent experiment and theoretical results obtained for noble gas nuclear laser systems are presented. It is shown that the noble gas lasers are among the easiest systems to pump by nuclear excitation and as a result, all of the noble gases except He have lased under nuclear excitation. The noble gas systems are not ideal for high-power applications but they do give valuable insight into the operation and pumping mechanisms associated with nuclear lasers. At present, the Ar-Xe system is the best noble gas candidate for (U-235)F6 pumping. It appears that the quenching of Ar-Xe lasing is a result of the fluorine and not the uranium or fission fragments themselves. Thus, to achieve lasing with UF6, a fluorine compatible system must be found.

  16. Numerical Simulation Research of Gas Migration Laws on Real Underground Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S. Y.; Chen, X. X.; Dong, L. H.; Li, Z.

    In order to show gas migration process visually and research gas migration laws at different status when gas gushed from driving working face and then migrated along the roadway, we used FLUENT to research the characters of gas migration when wind velocities were 6m / s, 8m / s, 10m / s, and gas emission speeds were 10m / s, 30m / s and 50m / s on real atmospheric pressure, moisture content, viscosity coefficient of the mixed gas and other real roadway conditions. We derived the following results: Gas group gather together at the bottom of the roadway when it gush from driving working face by wind action, and then rise to the top gradually. Its volume increased while gas concentration came down in the process of migration. Attenuation degree of gas group diminished slower as the volume of gas group nun larger when the wind velocity is constant. Gas attenuation degree diminished slower as wind speed came down while gas emission volume is constant. Contrarily, wind speed is constant, the volume of gas emission became larger the maximum values of gas group became much more approximated to power function.

  17. Investigation of some numerical issues in a chemistry-transport model: Gas-phase simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Vivien; Pourchet, AdéLaïDe; QuéLo, Denis; Sportisse, Bruno

    2007-08-01

    Many numerical strategies have been specifically developed for chemistry-transport models. Since no exact solutions are available for 3-D real problems, there are only few insights to choose between alternative numerical schemes and approximations, or to estimate the performance discrepancy between two approaches. However it is possible to assess the importance of numerical approximations through the comparison of different strategies. We estimated the impact of several numerical schemes for advection, diffusion and stiff chemistry. We also addressed operator splitting with different methods and operator orders. The study is performed with a gas-phase Eulerian model from the modeling platform Polyphemus. It is applied to ozone forecasts mainly over Europe, with focus on a few key species: ozone, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and hydroxy radical. The outcome is a ranking of the most sensitive numerical choices. It stresses the prominent impact of the advection scheme and of the splitting time step.

  18. Equilibrium gas flow computations. II - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel; Liu, Yen

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, equilibrium gas laws. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for three-dimensional, time-varying grids. The approximations inherent in previous generalizations are discussed.

  19. Equilibrium gas flow computations. II - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel; Liu, Yen

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, equilibrium gas laws. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for three-dimensional, time-varying grids. The approximations inherent in previous generalizations are discussed.

  20. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Yonemura, Shigeru; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Miki, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-09

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Dense Gas-Solid Fluidized Beds: A Multiscale Modeling Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hoef, M. A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Deen, N. G.; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Gas-solid fluidized beds are widely applied in many chemical processes involving physical and/or chemical transformations, and for this reason they are the subject of intense research in chemical engineering science. Over the years, researchers have developed a large number of numerical models of gas-fluidized beds that describe gas-solid flow at different levels of detail. In this review, we discriminate these models on the basis of whether a Lagrangian or a Eulerian approach is used for the gas and/or particulate flow and subsequently classify them into five main categories, three of which we discuss in more detail. Specifically, these are resolved discrete particle models (also called direct numerical simulations), unresolved discrete particle models (also called discrete element models), and two-fluid models. For each of the levels of description, we give the general equations of motion and indicate how they can be solved numerically by finite-difference techniques, followed by some illustrative examples of a fluidized bed simulation. Finally, we address some of the challenges ahead in the multiscale modeling of gas-fluidized beds.

  2. The effect of thixotropy on a rising gas bubble: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghy, Kayvan; Vahabi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    The deformation of a single, two-dimensional, circular gas bubble rising in an otherwise stationary thixotropic liquid in a confined rectangular vessel is numerically studied using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method (SPH). The thixotropic liquid surrounding the bubble is assumed to obey the Moore model. The main objective of the work is to investigate the effect of the destruction-to-rebuild ratio (referred to by the thixotropy number in dimensionless form) in this model on the bubble's shape, velocity, and center-ofmass during its rise in the liquid. Based on the numerical results obtained in this work, it is found that the bubble moves faster in the Moore fluid as compared with its Newtonian counterpart. An increase in the thixotropy number is also shown to increase the bubble's speed at any given instant of time. The effect of thixotropy number is found to be noticeable only when it is large. For Moore fluid, a large thixotropy number means that the fluid is basically a shear-thinning fluid. Therefore, it is concluded that the shear-thinning behavior of the Moore model easily masks its thixotropic behavior in the bubble rise problem. The effect of thixotropy number is weakened when the Reynolds number is increased.

  3. Numerical Analysis of a Multi-Physics Model for Trace Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Brian

    Trace gas sensors are currently used in many applications from leak detection to national security and may some day help with disease diagnosis. These sensors are modelled by a coupled system of complex elliptic partial differential equations for pressure and temperature. Solutions are approximated using the finite element method which we will show admits a continuous and coercive variational problem with optimal H1 and L2 error estimates. Numerically, the finite element discretization yields a skew-Hermitian dominant matrix for which classical algebraic preconditioners quickly degrade. We develop a block preconditioner that requires scalar Helmholtz solutions to apply but gives a very low outer iteration count. To handle this, we explore three preconditoners for the resulting linear system. First we analyze the classical block Jacobi and block Gauss-Seidel preconditions before presenting a custom, physics based preconditioner. We also present analysis showing eigenvalues of the custom preconditioned system are mesh-dependent but with a small coefficient. Numerical experiments confirm our theoretical discussion.

  4. Suppression of cavitation inception by gas bubble injection: a numerical study focusing on bubble-bubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2007-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of cavitation and gas bubbles under negative pressure has been studied numerically to evaluate the effect of gas bubble injection into a liquid on the suppression of cavitation inception. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated by direct observation that cavitation occurs in liquid mercury when mechanical impacts are imposed, and this will cause cavitation damage in spallation neutron sources, in which liquid mercury is bombarded by a high-power proton beam. In the present paper, we describe numerical investigations of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles in liquid mercury using a multibubble model that takes into account the interaction of a cavitation bubble with preexisting gas bubbles through bubble-radiated pressure waves. The numerical results suggest that, if the mercury includes gas bubbles whose equilibrium radius is much larger than that of the cavitation bubble, the explosive expansion of the cavitation bubble (i.e., cavitation inception) is suppressed by the positive-pressure wave radiated by the injected bubbles, which decreases the magnitude of the negative pressure in the mercury.

  5. Network model to study physiological processes of hypobaric decompression sickness: New numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, Joaquín; López-González, Luis María

    2016-04-01

    We have studied decompression processes when pressure changes that take place, in blood and tissues using a technical numerical based in electrical analogy of the parameters that involved in the problem. The particular problem analyzed is the behavior dynamics of the extravascular bubbles formed in the intercellular cavities of a hypothetical tissue undergoing decompression. Numerical solutions are given for a system of equations to simulate gas exchanges of bubbles after decompression, with particular attention paid to the effect of bubble size, nitrogen tension, nitrogen diffusivity in the intercellular fluid and in the tissue cell layer in a radial direction, nitrogen solubility, ambient pressure and specific blood flow through the tissue over the different molar diffusion fluxes of nitrogen per time unit (through the bubble surface, between the intercellular fluid layer and blood and between the intercellular fluid layer and the tissue cell layer). The system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Network Simulation Method, where the electric analogy is applied to convert these equations into a network-electrical model, and a computer code (electric circuit simulator, Pspice). In this paper, numerical results new (together to a network model improved with interdisciplinary electrical analogies) are provided.

  6. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  7. 3D Numerical study on the hollow profile polymer extrusion forming based on the gas-assisted technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z.; Huang, X. Y.; Liu, H. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, gas-assisted extrusion method was introduced into the extrusion of the hollow profiles. To validate the feasibility of the new extrusion method, 3D numerical simulation of the hollow profiles based on gas-assisted technique was carried out by using the finite element method. The Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) mode was selected as the construction equation. In the simulations, the physical field distributions of four different extrusion modes were obtained and analyzed. Results showed that the extrudate effect of traditional no gas- assisted mode was poor because the extrudate swell phenomenon is obvious and the physical field values are larger. For the gas-assisted of the inner wall, the extrudate swell of the melt was more obvious than that of the traditional no gas-assisted mode on account of the no-slip boundary condition on the outer wall. For the gas-assisted of the outer wall, the dimple effect of the inner wall is more obvious owing to the no-slip boundary condition on the inner wall. However, the extrusion effect of the double walls gas-assisted mode is very good because of the full-slip effect on the both walls.

  8. Numerical modelling of methane oxidation efficiency and coupled water-gas-heat reactive transfer in a sloping landfill cover.

    PubMed

    Feng, S; Ng, C W W; Leung, A K; Liu, H W

    2017-10-01

    Microbial aerobic methane oxidation in unsaturated landfill cover involves coupled water, gas and heat reactive transfer. The coupled process is complex and its influence on methane oxidation efficiency is not clear, especially in steep covers where spatial variations of water, gas and heat are significant. In this study, two-dimensional finite element numerical simulations were carried out to evaluate the performance of unsaturated sloping cover. The numerical model was calibrated using a set of flume model test data, and was then subsequently used for parametric study. A new method that considers transient changes of methane concentration during the estimation of the methane oxidation efficiency was proposed and compared against existing methods. It was found that a steeper cover had a lower oxidation efficiency due to enhanced downslope water flow, during which desaturation of soil promoted gas transport and hence landfill gas emission. This effect was magnified as the cover angle and landfill gas generation rate at the bottom of the cover increased. Assuming the steady-state methane concentration in a cover would result in a non-conservative overestimation of oxidation efficiency, especially when a steep cover was subjected to rainfall infiltration. By considering the transient methane concentration, the newly-modified method can give a more accurate oxidation efficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Numerical study of droplet dynamics in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell gas channel using an embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarauta, Alex; Ryzhakov, Pavel; Secanell, Marc; Waghmare, Prashant R.; Pons-Prats, Jordi

    2016-08-01

    An embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for the simulation of droplet dynamics within a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) channel is presented. Air is modeled using an Eulerian formulation, whereas water is described with a Lagrangian framework. Using this framework, the gas-liquid interface can be accurately identified. The surface tension force is computed using the curvature defined by the boundary of the Lagrangian mesh. The method naturally accounts for material property changes across the interface and accurately represents the pressure discontinuity. A sessile drop in a horizontal surface, a sessile drop in an inclined plane and droplets in a PEFC channel are solved for as numerical examples and compared to experimental data. Numerical results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Numerical results are also compared to results obtained with the semi-analytical model previously developed by the authors in order to discuss the limitations of the semi-analytical approach.

  10. Numerical models, geochemistry and the zero-paradox noble-gas mantle.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Chris J; Van Keken, Peter E; Porcelli, Don; Hauri, Erik H

    2002-11-15

    Numerical models of whole-mantle convection demonstrate that degassing of the mantle is an inefficient process, resulting in ca. 50% of the (40)Ar being degassed from the mantle system. In this sense the numerical simulations are consistent with the (40)Ar mass balance between the atmosphere and mantle reservoir. These models, however, are unable to preserve the large-scale heterogeneity predicted by models invoking geochemical layering of the mantle system. We show that the three most important noble-gas constraints on the geochemically layered mantle are entirely dependent on the (3)He concentration of the convecting mantle derived from the (3)He flux into the oceans and the average ocean-crust generation rate. A factor of 3.5 increase in the convecting-mantle noble-gas concentration removes all requirements for: a (3)He flux into the upper mantle from a deeper high (3)He source; a boundary in the mantle capable of separating heat from helium; and a substantial deep-mantle reservoir to contain a hidden (40)Ar rich reservoir. We call this model concentration for the convecting mantle the 'zero-paradox' concentration. The time-integrated flux of (3)He into the oceans is a robust observation, but only representative of the ocean-floor activity over the last 1000 years. In contrast, ocean-floor generation occurs over tens of millions of years. We argue that combining these two observations to obtain the (3)He concentration of the mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is unsound. Other indicators of mantle (3)He concentration suggest that the real value may be at least a factor of two higher. As the zero-paradox concentration is approached, the noble-gas requirement for mantle layering is removed. We further consider the role that recycled material plays in ocean-island-basalt generation and show that a source with high (3)He and (3)He/(4)He must exist within the mantle. Nevertheless, only a small amount of this material is required to generate both the observed ocean

  11. Classical hydrodynamics on the sphere: Gas giant phenomenology and novel numerical methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhne, Gordan Robert

    1999-12-01

    A new body of numerical methodology for the solution of hydrodynamical problems on the sphere is developed and applied to the integration of the two-dimensional shallow-water and nondivergent barotropic vorticity equations. Various discretizations of these nonlinear dynamical systems are derived and compared on the basis of these novel techniques, which utilize Cartesian representations of the governing equations defined on local patches of a refined icosahedral. grid structure. This mesh is almost uniform on the sphere and is particularly well-suited to the incorporation of multigrid methods whose implementation I also describe. In their totality, the new numerical techniques deliver (in addition to a other potential advantages) a greater theoretical efficiency at high resolution than the spectral transform methodology which is currently prevalent in hydrodynamical applications in spherical geometry. Models derived on the basis of these techniques are shown to perform well in comparisons with previously published results in the field of atmospheric dynamics, both for simple, standard test cases, and for more challenging nonlinear analyses of polar vortex erosion. The new models have also been exercised in novel simulations of physical processes relating to the action of the nonlinear inverse energy cascade that controls the evolution of two-dimensional flows and which is fundamental to the understanding of the observed atmospheric states of the Gas Giant Planets. I also present and interpret a novel nondimensionalization of global barotropic and shallow water flows on the sphere and relate it to the potential vorticity (PV) mixing principle whereby zonal flows in the presence of background rotation tend to self-organize into stable ``PV staircase'' configurations with latitudinal regions of homogeneous PV separated by strong gradients. Analytical representations of the corresponding mean zonal velocity profiles are developed and shown to furnish good fits to

  12. Numerical simulation of high pressure release and dispersion of hydrogen into air with real gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksarfard, R.; Kameshki, M. R.; Paraschivoiu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen is a renewable and clean source of energy, and it is a good replacement for the current fossil fuels. Nevertheless, hydrogen should be stored in high-pressure reservoirs to have sufficient energy. An in-house code is developed to numerically simulate the release of hydrogen from a high-pressure tank into ambient air with more accuracy. Real gas models are used to simulate the flow since high-pressure hydrogen deviates from ideal gas law. Beattie-Bridgeman and Abel Noble equations are applied as real gas equation of state. A transport equation is added to the code to calculate the concentration of the hydrogen-air mixture after release. The uniqueness of the code is to simulate hydrogen in air release with the real gas model. Initial tank pressures of up to 70 MPa are simulated.

  13. Numerical simulation of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoir systems with turbulence and closure stress effects

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Although techniques for designing a fracture treatment are available, the intended results of these techniques are often not attained. The evaluation of fracturing treatments on low permeability gas wells is required to both optimize the fracturing design and form prediction calculations of a treatments effect. This study primarily investigates the effect of fracture height on the performance of vertically fractured wells. The effects of layered media, turbulance, and closure pressure are included in this work. Consider that a well, intercepted by a vertical fracture, is in the center of a squared drainage system with closed outer boundary. Any increase in well productivity will be determined by fracture parameters, which are: fracture length, height, fracture conductivity, and location of the fracture in the formaton. On the basis of the analysis of fluid flow in porous media, the problem solving technique used in this study is the numerical method. A three-dimensional finite difference fully implicit model was written for this. In addition, the Sparse Matrix technique was used as a solver. Furthermore, Slices Source Over Relaxation was used as an iterative method for solving routines. Presented here are the numerical results of the three-dimensional model for a well intercepting a vertical fracture wth finite conductivity. The results are presented in the general form of dimensionless variables. Type curves considering the effect of fracture height on well performance are included. In addition, type curves for turbulent flow in the fracture are also obtained. Finally, other important contributions of this work are the data showing the effect of layered formation on fractured well performance.

  14. Testing gravitational-wave searches with numerical relativity waveforms: results from the first Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylott, Benjamin; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Boyle, Michael; Brady, Patrick R.; Brown, Duncan A.; Brügmann, Bernd; Buchman, Luisa T.; Buonanno, Alessandra; Cadonati, Laura; Camp, Jordan; Campanelli, Manuela; Centrella, Joan; Chatterji, Shourov; Christensen, Nelson; Chu, Tony; Diener, Peter; Dorband, Nils; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Faber, Joshua; Fairhurst, Stephen; Farr, Benjamin; Fischetti, Sebastian; Guidi, Gianluca; Goggin, Lisa M.; Hannam, Mark; Herrmann, Frank; Hinder, Ian; Husa, Sascha; Kalogera, Vicky; Keppel, Drew; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Kelly, Bernard J.; Krishnan, Badri; Laguna, Pablo; Lousto, Carlos O.; Mandel, Ilya; Marronetti, Pedro; Matzner, Richard; McWilliams, Sean T.; Matthews, Keith D.; Mercer, R. Adam; Mohapatra, Satyanarayan R. P.; Mroué, Abdul H.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ochsner, Evan; Pan, Yi; Pekowsky, Larne; Pfeiffer, H. arald P.; Pollney, Denis; Pretorius, Frans; Raymond, Vivien; Reisswig, Christian; Rezzolla, Luciano; Rinne, Oliver; Robinson, Craig; Röver, Christian; Santamaría, Lucía; Sathyaprakash, Bangalore; Scheel, Mark A.; Schnetter, Erik; Seiler, Jennifer; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Shoemaker, Deirdre; Sperhake, Ulrich; Stroeer, Alexander; Sturani, Riccardo; Tichy, Wolfgang; Liu, Yuk Tung; van der Sluys, Marc; van Meter, James R.; Vaulin, Ruslan; Vecchio, Alberto; Veitch, John; Viceré, Andrea; Whelan, John T.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2009-08-01

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave data analysis communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the sensitivity of existing gravitational-wave search algorithms using numerically generated waveforms and to foster closer collaboration between the numerical relativity and data analysis communities. We describe the results of the first NINJA analysis which focused on gravitational waveforms from binary black hole coalescence. Ten numerical relativity groups contributed numerical data which were used to generate a set of gravitational-wave signals. These signals were injected into a simulated data set, designed to mimic the response of the initial LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. Nine groups analysed this data using search and parameter-estimation pipelines. Matched filter algorithms, un-modelled-burst searches and Bayesian parameter estimation and model-selection algorithms were applied to the data. We report the efficiency of these search methods in detecting the numerical waveforms and measuring their parameters. We describe preliminary comparisons between the different search methods and suggest improvements for future NINJA analyses.

  15. Non-equilibrium Numerical Analysis of Microwave-supported Detonation Threshold Propagating through Diatomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Microwave-supported Detonation (MSD), one type of Microwave-supported Plasma (MSP), is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for beam-powered space propulsion systems. In this study, I numerically simulate MSD waves propagating through a diatomic gas. In order to evaluate the threshold of beam intensity, I use the physical-fluid dynamics scheme, which has been developed for simulating unsteady and non-equilibrium LSD waves propagating through a hydrogen gas.

  16. Numerical simulation of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoir systems with turbulence and closure stress effects

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, A.M.; Crichlow, H.B.; Soliman, M.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A numerical technique for analyzing the behavior of a fractured gas reservoir system is presented. The reservoir is simulated by a fully implicit three-dimensional model that incorporates the effects of turbulent flow and closure stress in a finite conductivity fracture. The model utilizes the real gas pseudo-pressure, two-point upstream transmissibilities and a stable iterative process based on a sparse matrix approach to solving the equation systems. This paper presents a description of the model and applications to various reservoirs to illustrate the effects of fracture heights, turbulence and closure pressure on well performance. 16 refs.

  17. Numerical investigation of temporal changes in volcanic deformation caused by a gas slug ascent in the conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Ryohei; Nishimura, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Strombolian type eruptions are considered to be generated by a sudden release of a large gas slug that migrates upward in the conduit filled with a low viscous basaltic magma. We examine volcano deformations caused by such a gas slug to understand the Strombolian eruption mechanism from geodetic observation data. We model spatio-temporal pressure changes in the conduit by using a gas slug ascent model presented by James et al. (2008). As a gas slug ascends in the conduit, its volume expands because of depressurization. Hence, the magma head lifts up in the conduit and the upper part of the conduit wall is stressed. In the conduit, magma pressure increases with depth according to the bulk density of magma: the gas slug part with a low density is characterized by a small pressure gradient, while the other parts, consisting of melt, are characterized by a large pressure gradient. We numerically calculate volcano deformations caused by the spatio-temporal changes of magma pressure predicted from the basic equations representing gas slug locations in the conduit. Simulation results show that the radial and vertical displacements and tilt changes indicate volcano deformations that represent the inflation originating from the stress increase at the upper part of conduit. As the gas slug reaches the shallow part of conduit, the rate of inflation observed in the radial displacement decreases, the vertical displacement starts to move downward, and the tilt turns to show down toward the crater. These deflation signals are caused by a moving deflation source in the conduit that is formed beneath the gas slug. Since these predicted features are not observed in the tilt records associated with explosions at Stromboli volcano (Genco and Ripepe, 2010), it is necessary to modify the gas slug ascent model or to introduce other mechanisms to better understand the magma dynamics of Strombolian eruption.

  18. Numerical studies of depressurization-induced gas production from an interbedded marine turbidite gas hydrate reservoir model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myshakin, Evgeniy; Lin, Jeen-Shang; Uchida, Shun; Seol, Yongkoo; Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray

    2017-01-01

    The numerical simulation of thin hydrate-bearing sand layers interbedded with mud layers is investigated. In this model, the lowest hydrate layer occurs at the base of gas hydrate stability and overlies a thinly-interbedded saline aquifer. The predicted gas rates reach 6.25 MMscf/day (1.77 x 105 m3 /day) after 90 days of continuous depressurization with manageable water production. Development of horizontal dissociating interfaces between hydrate-bearing sand and mud layers is a primary determinant of reservoir performance. A set of simulations has been executed to assess uncertainty in in situ permeability and to determine the impact of the saline aquifer on productivity.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Response Characteristics of Audio-magnetotelluric for Gas Hydrate in the Qilian Mountain Permafrost, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Yu, Changqing; Pi, Jinyun

    2015-10-01

    Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) method is a kind of frequency-domain sounding technique, which can be applied to gas hydrate prospecting and assessments in the permafrost region due to its high frequency band. Based on the geological conditions of gas hydrate reservoir in the Qilian Mountain permafrost, by establishing high-resistance abnormal model for gas hydrate and carrying out numerical simulation using finite element method (FEM) and nonlinear conjugate gradient (NLCG) method, this paper analyzed the application range of AMT method and the best acquisition parameters setting scheme. When porosity of gas hydrate reservoir is less than 5%, gas hydrate saturation is greater than 70%, occurrence scale is less than 50 m, or bury depth is greater than 500 m, AMT technique cannot identify and delineate the favorable gas hydrate reservoir. Survey line should be more than twice the length of probable occurrence scale, while tripling the length will make the best result. The number of stations should be no less than 6, and 11 stations are optimal. At the high frequency section (10˜1000 Hz), there should be no less than 3 frequency points, 4 being the best number.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Flue Gas Purification during Hot Gas Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Thulfaut, C.; Renz, U.

    2002-09-19

    The aim of the actual investigations is to integrate the catalytic reduction of carbon monoxide and particularly nitric oxides into the hot gas filtration process with ceramic filter elements of fluidized bed combustors which mainly represent an important N2O-source. According to Klein (Klein 1994) worldwide approx. 260 coal-fired power plants with fluidized bed combustors in the power range > 50 MWel existed in 1994, to which approx. 1% of the global coal dissipation corresponds. These emitted dinitrogen oxide with 70 kt/a, however, 20% of the entire N2O amounts from stationary firing plants. After Kleins calculations an increase of coal-fired fluidized bed combustors only by 10% triples the N2O emission.

  1. Aeolian Simulations: A Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, O.; Burr, D. M.; Bridges, N. T.; Lyne, J. E.; Marshall, J. R.; Greeley, R.; White, B. R.; Hills, J.; Smith, K.; Prissel, T. C.; Aliaga-Caro, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Aeolian processes are a major geomorphic agent on solid planetary bodies with atmospheres (Earth, Mars, Venus, and Titan). This paper describes preliminary efforts to model aeolian saltation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and to compare the results with those obtained in wind tunnel testing conducted in the Planetary Aeolian Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center at ambient pressure. The end goal of the project is to develop an experimentally validated CFD approach for modeling aeolian sediment transport on Titan and other planetary bodies. The MARSWIT open-circuit tunnel in this work was specifically designed for atmospheric boundary layer studies. It is a variable-speed, continuous flow tunnel with a test section 1.0 m by 1.2 m in size; the tunnel is able to operate at pressures from 10 millibar to one atmosphere. Flow trips near the tunnel inlet ensure a fully developed, turbulent boundary layer in the test section. Wind speed and axial velocity profiles can be measured with a traversing pitot tube. In this study, sieved walnut shell particles (Greeley et al. 1976) with a density of ~1.1 g/cm3 were used to correlate the low gravity conditions and low sediment density on a body of interest to that of Earth. This sediment was placed in the tunnel, and the freestream airspeed raised to 5.4 m/s. A Phantom v12 camera imaged the resulting particle motion at 1000 frames per second, which was analyzed with ImageJ open-source software (Fig. 1). Airflow in the tunnel was modeled with FLUENT, a commercial CFD program. The turbulent scheme used in FLUENT to obtain closed-form solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations was a 1st Order, k-epsilon model. These methods produced computational velocity profiles that agree with experimental data to within 5-10%. Once modeling of the flow field had been achieved, a Euler-Lagrangian scheme was employed, treating the particles as spheres and tracking each particle at its center. The particles are assumed to interact with

  2. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  3. Sediment Pathways Across Trench Slopes: Results From Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. H.; Seeber, L.; McHugh, C. M.; Fujiwara, T.; Kanamatsu, T.; King, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Until the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake, the role of earthquakes as agents of sediment dispersal and deposition at erosional trenches was largely under-appreciated. A series of cruises carried out after the 2011 event has revealed a variety of unsuspected sediment transport mechanisms, such as tsunami-triggered sheet turbidites, suggesting that great earthquakes may in fact be important agents for dispersing sediments across trench slopes. To complement these observational data, we have modeled the pathways of sediments across the trench slope based on bathymetric grids. Our approach assumes that transport direction is controlled by slope azimuth only, and ignores obstacles smaller than 0.6-1 km; these constraints are meant to approximate the behavior of turbidites. Results indicate that (1) most pathways issued from the upper slope terminate near the top of the small frontal wedge, and thus do not reach the trench axis; (2) in turn, sediments transported to the trench axis are likely derived from the small frontal wedge or from the subducting Pacific plate. These results are consistent with the stratigraphy imaged in seismic profiles, which reveals that the slope apron does not extend as far as the frontal wedge, and that the thickness of sediments at the trench axis is similar to that of the incoming Pacific plate. We further applied this modeling technique to the Cascadia, Nankai, Middle-America, and Sumatra trenches. Where well-defined canyons carve the trench slopes, sediments from the upper slope may routinely reach the trench axis (e.g., off Costa Rica and Cascadia). In turn, slope basins that are isolated from the canyons drainage systems must mainly accumulate locally-derived sediments. Therefore, their turbiditic infill may be diagnostic of seismic activity only - and not from storm or flood activity. If correct, this would make isolated slope basins ideal targets for paleoseismological investigation.

  4. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  5. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  6. Numerical calculations of turbulent reacting flow in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study for confined, axisymmetrical, turbulent diffusion flames is presented. Local mean gas properties are predicted by solving the appropriate conservation equations in the finite difference form with the corresponding boundary conditions. The k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model is employed to describe the turbulent nature of the flow. A two-step kinetic model is assumed to govern the reaction mechanism. The finite reaction rate is the smaller of an Arrhenius type of reaction rate and a modified version of eddy-breakup model. Reasonable agreement is observed between calculations and measurements, but to obtain better agreement, more work is needed on improvements of the above mathematical models. However, the present numerical study offers an improvement in the analysis and design of the gas turbine combustors.

  7. Numerical approximation of boundary conditions with applications to inviscid equations of gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the state of the art of well-posedness and stability analysis of difference approximations for initial boundary value problems of the hyperbolic type is presented. The applicability of recent theoretical development to practical calculations for nonlinear gas dynamics is examined. The one dimensional inviscid gas dynamics equations in conservation law form are selected for numerical experiments. The class of implicit schemes developed from linear multistep methods in ordinary differential equations is chosen and the use of linear extrapolation as an explicit or implicit boundary scheme is emphasized. Specification of boundary data in the primitive variables and computation in terms of the conservative variables in the interior is discussed. Some numerical examples for the quasi-one-dimensional nozzle are given.

  8. Accumulation of errors in numerical simulations of chemically reacting gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Stamov, L. I.; Altoukhov, D. I.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate problems of numerical simulations precision and stochastic errors accumulation in solving problems of detonation or deflagration combustion of gas mixtures in rocket engines. Computational models for parallel computing on supercomputers incorporating CPU and GPU units were tested and verified. Investigation of the influence of computational grid size on simulation precision and computational speed was performed. Investigation of accumulation of errors for simulations implying different strategies of computation were performed.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Low Reynolds Number Particle-Laden Gas Jet by Vortex Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Tomomi; Yagami, Hisanori

    An air jet, which remains laminar and axisymmetric in the single-phase flow condition, is simulated numerically in the particle-laden condition. The vortex method for particle-laden gas jet proposed by the authors is employed for the simulation. An air issues with velocity U0 from a round nozzle into the air co-flowing with velocity Ua. The Reynolds number based on U0 and the nozzle diameter is 1333, the velocity ratio Ua/U0 is 0.4. Spherical glass particles with diameter 65μm are loaded at the mass loading ratio 0.025. The particle velocity at the nozzle exit is 0.68U0. The particles impose disturbances on the air and induce the three-dimensional flow, resulting in the transition from the axisymmetric flow to the non-axisymmetric one. As the particles make the air velocity fluctuation increase, the air momentum diffuses more in the radial direction, and accordingly the spread of the jet becomes larger. The abovementioned results agree well with the trend of the existing experiments. The proposed vortex method can successfully capture the flow transition caused by the particles laden on an axisymmetric air jet.

  10. Numerical investigation of the aerodynamics of the REX-Free Flyer in the rarefied gas regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizenkov, P.; Noeding, P.; Konopka, M.; Reimann, B.; Fasoulas, S.

    2016-11-01

    The REX-Free Flyer is a concept study by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in an effort to develop an orbital experimental platform to fill the gap between short duration experimental facilities and long-term missions at the International Space Station. The envisioned reusable vehicle shall enable day- and week-long experiments in high-quality weightlessness. The unique sharp-edged geometry promises improved aerodynamic properties. A soft and controlled re-entry shall guarantee a recovery of the experimental setup. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to simulate a Mach 20 nitrogen flow around a scaled-down model of REX in the rarefied gas regime. First, a brief overview of the implemented numerical and phenomenological models in the in-house code DSMC code PICLas is given. Simulation parameters ensuring physical results are presented. Consequently, the code is used to investigate the lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients at five different angles of attack: 0°, 14°, 28°, 40°, and 52°. Simulation results are compared to an approximate method, where acceptable agreement with a deviation of less than 44% can be found considering the underlying assumptions, and to dsmcFoam, where excellent agreement with a deviation of less than 3% between the different DSMC implementations is found. Furthermore, the complex three-dimensional flow environment is investigated and presented in detail for the 52° case.

  11. A high-order numerical method to study hypersonic boundary-layer instability including high-temperature gas effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2011-08-01

    Prediction of laminar-turbulent transition is a key factor in the design of the heat shield of vehicles (re-)entering a planetary atmosphere. To investigate the transition by means of numerical simulation, accurate and efficient computational methods are necessary. Here, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for a gas where properties such as specific heat, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and specific gas constant depend on one or two thermodynamic variables. Our approach models a mixture of perfect gases in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The gas properties are provided either by means of direct calls to a library based on statistical mechanics and kinetic theory or indirectly in the form of look-up tables. In the first part of the paper, our method of handling a high-temperature gas in thermochemical equilibrium is described and verified. In the second part, the method is applied to the investigation of linear and non-linear boundary-layer instability. We carry out numerical simulations for a laminar flat-plate boundary layer at Mach 10 with a small, convectively amplified perturbation for both Earth and Martian atmospheres. Amplification of the perturbations shows favorable agreement with results obtained from linear theory. The secondary instability of the boundary layer in the presence of a large-amplitude two-dimensional wave is investigated. We observe that the non-linear mechanism of fundamental resonance becomes active and leads to a strong increase in amplification of three-dimensional disturbance waves.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of biomass pyrolysis and combustion with gas phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, A.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Geurts, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present Direct Numerical Simulation of biomass pyrolysis and combustion in a turbulent channel flow. The model includes simplified models for biomass pyrolysis and char combustion along with a model for particle tracking. The gas phase is modelled as a mixture of reacting gas species. The gas-particle interactions for mass, momentum, and energy exchange are included by two-way coupling terms. The effect of two-way coupling on the conversion time of biomass particles is found noticeable for particle volume fractions > 10-5. We also observe that at constant volume fraction the effect of two-way coupling increases as the particle size is reduced, due to the higher total heat exchange area in case of smaller particles. The inclusion of gas phase homogeneous reactions in the DNS model decreases the biomass pyrolysis time due to higher gas temperatures. In contrast, including gas phase reactions increases the combustion time of biomass due to the lower concentration of oxygen at the particle surface.

  13. Verification of Numerical Weather Prediction Model Results for Energy Applications in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sīle, Tija; Cepite-Frisfelde, Daiga; Sennikovs, Juris; Bethers, Uldis

    2014-05-01

    A resolution to increase the production and consumption of renewable energy has been made by EU governments. Most of the renewable energy in Latvia is produced by Hydroelectric Power Plants (HPP), followed by bio-gas, wind power and bio-mass energy production. Wind and HPP power production is sensitive to meteorological conditions. Currently the basis of weather forecasting is Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. There are numerous methodologies concerning the evaluation of quality of NWP results (Wilks 2011) and their application can be conditional on the forecast end user. The goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of Weather Research and Forecast model (Skamarock 2008) implementation over the territory of Latvia, focusing on forecasting of wind speed and quantitative precipitation forecasts. The target spatial resolution is 3 km. Observational data from Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre are used. A number of standard verification metrics are calculated. The sensitivity to the model output interpretation (output spatial interpolation versus nearest gridpoint) is investigated. For the precipitation verification the dichotomous verification metrics are used. Sensitivity to different precipitation accumulation intervals is examined. Skamarock, William C. and Klemp, Joseph B. A time-split nonhydrostatic atmospheric model for weather research and forecasting applications. Journal of Computational Physics. 227, 2008, pp. 3465-3485. Wilks, Daniel S. Statistical Methods in the Atmospheric Sciences. Third Edition. Academic Press, 2011.

  14. Numerical Study on Characteristics of Real Gas Flow Through a Critical Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Junji; Matsuo, Shigeru; Mohammad, Mamun; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2012-03-01

    A critical nozzle is used to measure the mass flow rate of gas. It is well known that the coefficient of discharge of the flow in a critical nozzle is a single function of the Reynolds number. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the real gas effect on discharge coefficient and thermodynamics properties through a critical nozzle by using H2, N2, CH4 and CO2, with the help of a CFD method and to clarify the relationship between mass flow rate of real gas flows at the nozzle throat and Reynolds number numerically. Redlich-Kwong equation of state was employed to consider the force and volume effects of inter-molecules of these gases. Furthermore, conservative equation of vibration energy was applied to investigate the effect of relaxation phenomena involving molecular vibration.

  15. A Numerical Study on Gas Phase Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jae-Sang; Park, Sun-Kyu; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2008-08-01

    The high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray is used for a particulate deposition process in which micro-sized particles are propelled and heated in a supersonic combusting gas stream. It is characterized by high gas velocity and high density and is being used in an increasing variety of coating applications, such as ceramic and composite coatings, to improve wear and abrasion resistance. The particle temperature and velocity are two of the most important parameters in HVOF thermal spraying, which affect the quality of the coatings. To understand the particle dynamics, it is necessary to study, first, the thermal flow characteristics in the HVOF system. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed to predict the gas dynamic behaviors, and the effect of the geometrical parameter is studied to optimize the nozzle design.

  16. Preliminary results of numerical investigations at SECARB Cranfield, MS field test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Nicot, J.; Meckel, T. A.; Chang, K.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration partnership sponsored by DOE has chosen the Cranfield, MS field as a test site for its Phase II experiment. It will provide information on CO2 storage in oil and gas fields, in particular on storage permanence, storage capacity, and pressure buildup as well as on sweep efficiency. The 10,300 ft-deep reservoir produced 38 MMbbl of oil and 677 MMSCF of gas from the 1940's to the 1960's and is being retrofitted by Denbury Resources for tertiary recovery. CO2 injection started in July 2008 with a scheduled ramp up during the next few months. The Cranfield modeling team selected the northern section of the field for development of a numerical model using the multiphase-flow, compositional CMG-GEM software. Model structure was determined through interpretation of logs from old and recently-drilled wells and geophysical data. PETREL was used to upscale and export permeability and porosity data to the GEM model. Preliminary sensitivity analyses determined that relative permeability parameters and oil composition had the largest impact on CO2 behavior. The first modeling step consisted in history-matching the total oil, gas, and water production out of the reservoir starting from its natural state to determine the approximate current conditions of the reservoir. The fact that pressure recovered in the 40 year interval since end of initial production helps in constraining boundary conditions. In a second step, the modeling focused on understanding pressure evolution and CO2 transport in the reservoir. The presentation will introduce preliminary results of the simulations and confirm/explain discrepancies with field measurements.

  17. Massive black hole and gas dynamics in galaxy nuclei mergers - I. Numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Numerical effects are known to plague adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes when treating massive particles, e.g. representing massive black holes (MBHs). In an evolving background, they can experience strong, spurious perturbations and then follow unphysical orbits. We study by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a pair MBHs in the rapidly and violently evolving gaseous and stellar background that follows a galaxy major merger. We confirm that spurious numerical effects alter the MBH orbits in AMR simulations, and show that numerical issues are ultimately due to a drop in the spatial resolution during the simulation, drastically reducing the accuracy in the gravitational force computation. We therefore propose a new refinement criterion suited for massive particles, able to solve in a fast and precise way for their orbits in highly dynamical backgrounds. The new refinement criterion we designed enforces the region around each massive particle to remain at the maximum resolution allowed, independently upon the local gas density. Such maximally resolved regions then follow the MBHs along their orbits, and effectively avoids all spurious effects caused by resolution changes. Our suite of high-resolution, AMR hydrodynamic simulations, including different prescriptions for the sub-grid gas physics, shows that the new refinement implementation has the advantage of not altering the physical evolution of the MBHs, accounting for all the non-trivial physical processes taking place in violent dynamical scenarios, such as the final stages of a galaxy major merger.

  18. CO2 migration in the vadose zone: experimental and numerical modelling of controlled gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gasparini, andrea; credoz, anthony; grandia, fidel; garcia, david angel; bruno, jordi

    2014-05-01

    The mobility of CO2 in the vadose zone and its subsequent transfer to the atmosphere is a matter of concern in the risk assessment of the geological storage of CO2. In this study the experimental and modelling results of controlled CO2 injection are reported to better understanding of the physical processes affecting CO2 and transport in the vadose zone. CO2 was injected through 16 micro-injectors during 49 days of experiments in a 35 m3 experimental unit filled with sandy material, in the PISCO2 facilities at the ES.CO2 centre in Ponferrada (North Spain). Surface CO2 flux were monitored and mapped periodically to assess the evolution of CO2 migration through the soil and to the atmosphere. Numerical simulations were run to reproduce the experimental results, using TOUGH2 code with EOS7CA research module considering two phases (gas and liquid) and three components (H2O, CO2, air). Five numerical models were developed following step by step the injection procedure done at PISCO2. The reference case (Model A) simulates the injection into a homogeneous soil(homogeneous distribution of permeability and porosity in the near-surface area, 0.8 to 0.3 m deep from the atmosphere). In another model (Model B), four additional soil layers with four specific permeabilities and porosities were included to predict the effect of differential compaction on soil. To account for the effect of higher soil temperature, an isothermal simulation called Model C was also performed. Finally, the assessment of the rainfall effects (soil water saturation) on CO2 emission on surface was performed in models called Model D and E. The combined experimental and modelling approach shows that CO2 leakage in the vadose zone quickly comes out through preferential migration pathways and spots with the ranges of fluxes in the ground/surface interface from 2.5 to 600 g·m-2·day-1. This gas channelling is mainly related to soil compaction and climatic perturbation. This has significant implications to

  19. First Results From The Empire Nearby Galaxy Dense Gas Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, Frank

    2016-09-01

    I will present first results from our EMPIRE survey, a large program ( 500 hr) at the IRAM 30m telescope to map high critical density gas and shock tracers (e.g., HCN, HCO+, HNC, N2H+, etc.) as well as the optically thin 1-0 lines of 13CO and C18O for the first time systematically across 9 prominent, nearby Disk Galaxies."How is star formation regulated across disk galaxies" is the central question framing our science. Specifically, and building on a large suite of available ancillary data from the radio to the UV, we study, among other things, dense gas fractions and star formation efficiencies and how they vary with environment within and among nearby disk galaxies. Of particular interest is how our measurements compare to studies in the Milky Way, predicting a fairly constant star formation efficiency of the dense gas. Already in our first case study focusing on the prominent nearby spiral galaxy M51, we find signifycant variations of this quantity across the disk.In my talk, I will present results from a first series of studies about to me submitted addressing these questions with our EMPIRE and complementary, high-resolution ALMA data. In addition, I will present details of the survey and report on ongoing projects and future directions. I will place our work in context with other work, including studies of dense gas tracers in other galaxies and in particular the Milky Way.

  20. Numerical study of nonequilibrium gas flow in a microchannel with a ratchet surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lianhua; Guo, Zhaoli

    2017-02-01

    The nonequilibrium gas flow in a two-dimensional microchannel with a ratchet surface and a moving wall is investigated numerically with a kinetic method [Guo et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 033313 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.033313. The presence of periodic asymmetrical ratchet structures on the bottom wall of the channel and the temperature difference between the walls of the channel result in a thermally induced flow, and hence a tangential propelling force on the wall. Such thermally induced propelling mechanism can be utilized as a model heat engine. In this article, the relations between the propelling force and the top wall moving velocity are obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation with the Shakhov model deterministically in a wide range of Knudsen numbers. The flow fields at both the static wall state and the critical state at which the thermally induced force cancels the drag force due to the active motion of the top wall are analyzed. A counterintuitive relation between the flow direction and the shear force is observed in the highly rarefied condition. The output power and thermal efficiency of the system working as a model heat engine are analyzed based on the momentum and energy transfer between the walls. The effects of Knudsen number, temperature difference, and geometric configurations are investigated. Guidance for improving the mechanical performance is discussed.

  1. Numerical study of nonequilibrium gas flow in a microchannel with a ratchet surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lianhua; Guo, Zhaoli

    2017-02-01

    The nonequilibrium gas flow in a two-dimensional microchannel with a ratchet surface and a moving wall is investigated numerically with a kinetic method [Guo et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 033313 (2015)]PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.033313. The presence of periodic asymmetrical ratchet structures on the bottom wall of the channel and the temperature difference between the walls of the channel result in a thermally induced flow, and hence a tangential propelling force on the wall. Such thermally induced propelling mechanism can be utilized as a model heat engine. In this article, the relations between the propelling force and the top wall moving velocity are obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation with the Shakhov model deterministically in a wide range of Knudsen numbers. The flow fields at both the static wall state and the critical state at which the thermally induced force cancels the drag force due to the active motion of the top wall are analyzed. A counterintuitive relation between the flow direction and the shear force is observed in the highly rarefied condition. The output power and thermal efficiency of the system working as a model heat engine are analyzed based on the momentum and energy transfer between the walls. The effects of Knudsen number, temperature difference, and geometric configurations are investigated. Guidance for improving the mechanical performance is discussed.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  3. Numerical Investigation into the Performance of a Rarefaction Shock Wave Cutter for Offshore Oil-Gas Platform Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Glenn, L A; Antoun, T H; Lomov, I N

    2001-06-14

    The phase change in iron at 13 GPa results in the formation of rarefaction shock waves upon release. The interaction of multiple rarefaction shock waves induces high tensile stresses within a narrow zone, causing smooth spall. This effect can be exploited to sever cylindrical cross-section pipes, such as those supporting decommissioned offshore oil and gas platforms, using a minimal amount of explosive. Consequently, costs can be reduced and environmental impact minimized. They discuss the numerical techniques used to simulate rarefaction shock waves and the damage to steel resulting from the interaction of multiple rarefaction shock waves.

  4. Numerical Investigation into the Performance of a Rarefaction Shock Wave Cutter for Offshore Oil-Gas Platform Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. P.; Glenn, L. A.; Antoun, T. H.; Lomov, I. N.

    2002-07-01

    The phase change in iron at 13 GPa results in the formation of rarefaction shock waves (RSWs) upon release. The interaction of multiple RSWs induces high tensile stresses within a narrow zone, causing smooth spall. This effect can be exploited to sever cylindrical cross-section pipes, such as those supporting decommissioned offshore oil and gas platforms, using a minimal amount of explosive. Consequently, costs can be reduced and environmental impact minimized. We discuss numerical techniques used to simulate RSWs and the damage to steel resulting from the interaction of multiple RSWs.

  5. Numerical simulation of gas-phonon coupling in thermal transpiration flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaohui; Singh, Dhruv; Murthy, Jayathi; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2009-10-01

    Thermal transpiration is a rarefied gas flow driven by a wall temperature gradient and is a promising mechanism for gas pumping without moving parts, known as the Knudsen pump. Obtaining temperature measurements along capillary walls in a Knudsen pump is difficult due to extremely small length scales. Meanwhile, simplified analytical models are not applicable under the practical operating conditions of a thermal transpiration device, where the gas flow is in the transitional rarefied regime. Here, we present a coupled gas-phonon heat transfer and flow model to study a closed thermal transpiration system. Discretized Boltzmann equations are solved for molecular transport in the gas phase and phonon transport in the solid. The wall temperature distribution is the direct result of the interfacial coupling based on mass conservation and energy balance at gas-solid interfaces and is not specified a priori unlike in the previous modeling efforts. Capillary length scales of the order of phonon mean free path result in a smaller temperature gradient along the transpiration channel as compared to that predicted by the continuum solid-phase heat transfer. The effects of governing parameters such as thermal gradients, capillary geometry, gas and phonon Knudsen numbers and, gas-surface interaction parameters on the efficiency of thermal transpiration are investigated in light of the coupled model.

  6. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  7. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yuann, R Y; Schrock, V E; Chen, Xiang

    1995-09-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena.

  8. Numerical Simulation of the Twin-Wire Arc Spraying Process: Modeling the High Velocity Gas Flow Field Distribution and Droplets Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongxiong; Liang, Xiubing; Wei, Shicheng; Chen, Xi; Xu, Binshi

    2012-03-01

    During the twin-wire arc spraying, a high velocity gas stream is used to accelerate the arc-melting materials and propel the droplets toward the substrate surface. This study is aimed at investigating the gas flow formation and droplets transport processes using numerical simulation method. Results from the 3-D gas flow field model show that the distribution of the gas flow velocity on the twin-wire intersection plane is quite different from that on the twin-wire vertical plane. Based on the 3-D model, the convergence amplitude of the high velocity zone in the jet center is improved by modifying the gun head design. It is also observed that a flat substrate existed downstream from the gas nozzle exit results in decreasing close to zero in velocity of the gas jet near the substrate. In addition, the predicted droplet trajectories and velocity distributions exhibited good agreement with experimentally observations.

  9. Smoothed MHD equations for numerical simulations of ideal quasi-neutral gas dynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Mikhail V.; Elizarova, Tatiana G.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a mathematical model and related numerical method for numerical modeling of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) gas flows as an extension of previously known quasi-gasdynamic (QGD) equations. This approach is based on smoothing, or averaging of the original MHD equation system over a small time interval that leads to a new equation system, named quasi-MHD, or QMHD system. The QMHD equations are closely related to the original MHD system except for additional strongly non-linear dissipative τ-terms with a small parameter τ as a factor. The τ-terms depend on the solution itself and decrease in regions with the small space gradients of the solution. In this sense the QMHD system could be regarded as an approach with adaptive artificial dissipation. The QMHD is a generalization of regularized (or quasi-) gas dynamic equation system suggested in last three decades. In the QMHD numerical method the evolution of all physical variables is presented in a non-split divergence form. Divergence-free evolution of the magnetic field provides by using a constrained transport method based on Faraday's law of induction. Accuracy and convergence of the QMHD method is verified on a wide set of standard MHD tests including the 3D Orszag-Tang vortex flow.

  10. Aircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Borguet, Sebastien; Leonard, Olivier; Zhang, Xiaodong (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed.

  11. A Study of the Influence of Numerical Diffusion on Gas-Solid Flow Predictions in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandriz, Ronak; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an investigation is made of the influence of numerical diffusion on the accuracy of gas-solid flow predictions in fluidized beds. This is an important issue particularly in bubbling fluidized beds since numerical error greatly affects the dynamics of bubbles and their associated mixing process. A bed of coal (classified as Geldart A) is considered which becomes fluidized as the velocity of nitrogen stream into the reactor is gradually increased. The fluidization process is simulated using various numerical schemes as well as grid resolutions. Simulations involve Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow modeling approach and results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that higher order schemes equipped with flux limiter give favorable prediction of bubble and particle dynamics and hence, the mixing process within the reactor. The excessive numerical diffusion associated with lower order schemes results in unrealistic prediction of bubble shapes and bed height. Comparison is also made of computational efficiency of various schemes. It is shown that the Monotonized Central scheme with down wind factor results in the shortest simulation time because of its efficient parallelization on distributed memory platforms.

  12. Numerical Research of Steam and Gas Plant Efficiency of Triple Cycle for Extreme North Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, Nikolay; Tsibulskii, Svjatoslav; Matveev, Aleksandr; Masjuk, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The present work shows that temperature decrease of heat rejection in a cycle is necessary for energy efficiency of steam turbine plants. Minimum temperature of heat rejection at steam turbine plant work on water steam is 15°C. Steam turbine plant of triple cycle where lower cycle of steam turbine plant is organic Rankine cycle on low-boiling substance with heat rejection in air condenser, which safely allows rejecting heat at condensation temperatures below 0°C, has been offered. Mathematical model of steam and gas plant of triple cycle, which allows conducting complex researches with change of working body appearance and parameters defining thermodynamic efficiency of cycles, has been developed. On the basis of the model a program of parameters and index cycles design of steam and gas plants has been developed in a package of electron tables Excel. Numerical studies of models showed that energy efficiency of steam turbine plants of triple cycle strongly depend on low-boiling substance type in a lower cycle. Energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net 60% higher can be received for steam and gas plants on the basis of gas turbine plant NK-36ST on pentane and its condensation temperature below 0°C. It was stated that energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net linearly depends on condensation temperature of low-boiling substance type and temperature of gases leaving reco very boiler. Energy efficiency increases by 1% at 10% decrease of condensation temperature of pentane, and it increases by 0.88% at 15°C temperature decrease of gases leaving recovery boiler.

  13. Numerical simulations of CO2 -assisted gas production from hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhara, P.; Anderson, B. J.; Myshakin, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experimental studies over the last decade have reviewed the feasibility of using CO2 or CO2+N2 gas mixtures to recover CH4 gas from hydrates deposits. That technique would serve the dual purpose of CO2 sequestration and production of CH4 while maintaining the geo-mechanical stability of the reservoir. In order to analyze CH4 production process by means of CO2 or CO2+N2 injection into gas hydrate reservoirs, a new simulation tool, Mix3HydrateResSim (Mix3HRS)[1], was previously developed to account for the complex thermodynamics of multi-component hydrate phase and to predict the process of CH4 substitution by CO2 (and N2) in the hydrate lattice. In this work, Mix3HRS is used to simulate the CO2 injection into a Class 2 hydrate accumulation characterized by a mobile aqueous phase underneath a hydrate bearing sediment. That type of hydrate reservoir is broadly confirmed in permafrost and along seashore. The production technique implies a two-stage approach using a two-well design, one for an injector and one for a producer. First, the CO2 is injected into the mobile aqueous phase to convert it into immobile CO2 hydrate and to initiate CH4 release from gas hydrate across the hydrate-water boundary (generally designating the onset of a hydrate stability zone). Second, CH4 hydrate decomposition is induced by the depressurization method at a producer to estimate gas production potential over 30 years. The conversion of the free water phase into the CO2 hydrate significantly reduces competitive water production in the second stage, thereby improving the methane gas production. A base case using only the depressurization stage is conducted to compare with enhanced gas production predicted by the CO2-assisted technique. The approach also offers a possibility to permanently store carbon dioxide in the underground formation to greater extent comparing to a direct injection of CO2 into gas hydrate sediment. Numerical models are based on the hydrate formations at the

  14. Numerical simulation of the process of solid-particle acceleration by gas-jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kasimov, V.Z.; Khomenko, Y.P.

    1985-05-01

    Generalized experimental data on acceleration of spherical solid particles by a high-velocity jet of detonation products from a tubular explosive charge have been presented as has the numerical calculation of the flow in the vicinity of the detonation wave front. Recently, such explosive charges have found wide use in the development of explosive shock tubes which show high efficiency of conversion of explosive energy into gas-jet kinetic energy, and also in other equipment. In designing multistep projectile tubular charge systems, the problem arises of determining the initial particle position within the charge cavity which will ensure maximum final velocity at the permissible level of aerodynamic loading. In order to solve this problem, the authors present a numerical simulation of the process of particle acceleration by a high-velocity detonation-product jet.

  15. Numerical simulation of gas and particle flow field characteristics in HVOF guns

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Eidelman, S.; Lottati, I.

    1995-12-31

    The particle flow field characteristics in an HVOF gun are examined using numerical simulation techniques. The authors consider the particle injection, acceleration, convection heat transfer, and particle barrel interaction processes in a TAFA JP-5000 HVOF gun. Details of particle trajectories and temperature history as a function of particle size and other parameters are simulated and analyzed. A parameter study is conducted for different particle size, particle injection direction, and particle velocity. The number of distinct particle injection regimes was predicted and analyzed. Particle velocity and temperature at the exit of the barrel are listed. Using numerical simulation, the injection condition can be designed as a function of the set of flow parameters as well as particle properties, including particle size and material properties, to optimize the thermal spray process. A companion paper by the same authors in this proceedings presents a comprehensive analysis of the gas flow conditions for the HVOF gun.

  16. Numerical investigations of cold gas dynamic spray with a novel convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Quan; Tan, Zhihai

    2013-10-01

    Due to the disadvantages of conventional De-Laval nozzle for cold gas dynamic spray process, a novel structure of De-Laval nozzle was proposed in this paper. The numerical simulations of supersonic fluid flow within this nozzle have been conducted by commercial CFD software Fluent. The performance of particle acceleration within the nozzle have been comprehensively studied and compared with those of the conventional De-Laval nozzle. Furthermore, the relationships between the performance of particle acceleration and the locations of released particles are thoroughly studied for this new De-Laval nozzle and some useful conclusions have been drawn for the real application of CGDS with this kind of nozzle.

  17. Numerical modeling of gas migration at a proposed repository for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes at Oberbauenstock, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1990-03-01

    Hydrologic impacts of corrosive gas release from a hypothetical L/ILW nuclear waste repository at Oberbauenstock are explored by means of numerical simulation. A schematic two dimensional vertical section through the mountain is modeled with the simulator TOUGH, which describes two-phase flow of water and gas in porous and fractured media. Two reference cases are considered which represent the formations as a porous and as a fractured-porous (dual permeability) medium, respectively. Both cases predict similar and rather modest pressure increases, from ambient 10 bars to near 25 bars at the repository level. These results are to be considered preliminary because important parameters affecting two-phase flow, such as relative permeabilities of a fractured medium, are not well known at present. 24 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Element variations in rhyolitic magma resulting from gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlo, K.; Tuffen, H.; Smith, V. C.; Castro, J. M.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.; Geraki, K.

    2013-11-01

    Tuffisite veins are glass-filled fractures formed when magma fragments during degassing within the conduit. These veins form transient channels through which exsolved gases can escape from magma. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which chemical heterogeneity within the melt results from gas transport, and assess how this can be used to study magma degassing. Two tuffisite veins from contrasting rhyolitic eruptions at Torfajökull (Iceland) and Chaitén (Chile) were studied in detail. The tuffisite vein from Torfajökull is from a shallow dissected conduit (∼70 ka) that fed a degassed lava flow, while the sample from Chaitén was a bomb ejected during the waning phases of Plinian activity in May 2008. The results of detailed in situ chemical analyses (synchrotron XRF, FTIR, LA-ICP-MS) show that in both veins larger vesiculated fragments are enriched in volatile elements (Torfajökull: H, Li, Cl; Chaitén: Li, Cl, Cu, Zn, As, Sn, Sb) compared to the host, while the surrounding smaller particles are depleted in the Torfajökull vein (Li, Cl, Zn, Br, Rb, Pb), but enriched in the Chaitén vein (K, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Sb, Pb). The lifespans of both veins and the fluxes of gas and particles through them can be estimated using diffusion profiles and enrichment factors. The Torfajökull vein had a longer lifespan (∼a day) and low particle velocities (∼cm/s), while the Chaitén vein was shorter lived (<1 h) with a high gas velocity (∼m/s). These differences are consistent with the contrasting eruption mechanisms (effusive vs. explosive). The amount of magma that degassed through the Chaitén vein is more than ten times the volume of the vein itself, requiring the vein to tap into pre-exsolved gas pockets. This study highlights that tuffisite veins are highly efficient gas pathways and thereby impart chemical diversity in volatile elements on the melt.

  19. A Numerical Study of Spray Injected in a Gas Turbine Lean Pre-Mixed Pre-Vaporized Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoresano, Amedeo; Cameretti, Maria Cristina; Tuccillo, Raffaele

    2015-04-01

    The authors have performed a numerical study to investigate the spray evolution in a modern gas turbine combustor of the Lean Pre-Mixed Pre-vaporized type. The CFD tool is able to simulate the injection conditions, by isolating and studying some specific phenomena. The calculations have been performed by using a 3-D fluid dynamic code, the FLUENT flow solver, by choosing the injection models on the basis of a comparative analysis with some experimental data, in terms of droplet diameters, obtained by PDA technique. In a first phase of the investigation, the numerical simulation refers to non-evaporating flow conditions, in order to validate the estimation of the fundamental spray parameters. Next, the calculations employ boundary conditions close to those occurring in the actual combustor operation, in order to predict the fuel vapour distribution throughout the premixing chamber. The results obtained allow the authors to perform combustion simulation in the whole domain.

  20. The Herschel Inner Galaxy Gas Survey (HIGGS): Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher; Walker, C.; Kulesa, C.; Stark, A.; Smith, H.; Tolls, V.; White, G.; Israel, F.; Guesten, R.; Requenna-Torres, M.; Shaw, T.; Chen, S.; Schlawin, E.

    The Herschel Inner Galaxy Gas Survey (HIGGS) is a Herschel Open Time Key Programme to use the HIFI and PACS instruments to observe [CII], [NII], [OI], [OIII], and high-J CO emission lines in focused regions near the Galactic Center. By separating and evaluating the distinctly different roles of the central nuclear engine, the Galactic Bar, and dynamical stellar and interstellar feedback mechanisms, HIGGS will provide a high-resolution template for the physical processes in galactic nuclei throughout the local universe, in particular those engaged in starburst activity. We intend to present our early results along with a description of the data reduction and analysis tools that we have developed.

  1. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

    2012-06-01

    In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (5–40 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using

  3. Supersonic flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical solution for chemically reacting supersonic gas-particle flows in rocket nozzles and exhaust plumes was described. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled in that the effects of particle drag and heat transfer between the gas and particle phases are treated. Gas and particles exchange momentum via the drag exerted on the gas by the particles. Energy is exchanged between the phases via heat transfer (convection and/or radiation). Thermochemistry calculations (chemical equilibrium, frozen or chemical kinetics) were shown to be uncoupled from the flow solution and, as such, can be solved separately. The solution to the set of governing equations is obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form are shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The particle distribution is represented in the numerical solution by a finite distribution of particle sizes.

  4. Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chih-Yuan; Diaz, Manuel; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-01

    The ideal quantum gas dynamics as manifested by the semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) equilibrium distribution derived in Wu et al. (Wu et al. 2012 Proc. R. Soc. A 468, 1799–1823 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0673)) is numerically studied for particles of three statistics. This anisotropic ES equilibrium distribution was derived using the maximum entropy principle and conserves the mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the standard Fermi–Dirac or Bose–Einstein distribution. The present numerical method combines the discrete velocity (or momentum) ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock-capturing method in physical space. A decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. Computations of two-dimensional Riemann problems are presented, and various contours of the quantities unique to this ES model are illustrated. The main flow features, such as shock waves, expansion waves and slip lines and their complex nonlinear interactions, are depicted and found to be consistent with existing calculations for a classical gas. PMID:24399919

  5. Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chih-Yuan; Diaz, Manuel; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-08

    The ideal quantum gas dynamics as manifested by the semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) equilibrium distribution derived in Wu et al. (Wu et al. 2012 Proc. R. Soc. A468, 1799-1823 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0673)) is numerically studied for particles of three statistics. This anisotropic ES equilibrium distribution was derived using the maximum entropy principle and conserves the mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the standard Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein distribution. The present numerical method combines the discrete velocity (or momentum) ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock-capturing method in physical space. A decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. Computations of two-dimensional Riemann problems are presented, and various contours of the quantities unique to this ES model are illustrated. The main flow features, such as shock waves, expansion waves and slip lines and their complex nonlinear interactions, are depicted and found to be consistent with existing calculations for a classical gas.

  6. Optimization of gas path aerodynamics for PK-39 boiler of power generating unit No. 4 of Troitskaya SDPP using numerical simulation of gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, V. B.; Grigorev, I. V.; Fomenko, M. V.; Kaverin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Power generating unit no. 4 of Troitskaya State District Power Plant (SDPP) is incapable of operating with a nominal load of 278 MW because of high aerodynamic drag of the gas path. At present, the maximum load of the two-boiler single-turbine unit is 210 MW practically without a possibility of adjustment. The results of numerical simulation of the gas flow for the existing gas path from the electrostatic precipitator (EP) to the smoke exhausts (SEs) and two flue designs proposed for renovation of this section are presented. The results of simulation show that the existing flue section has high aerodynamic drag, which is explained by poor, as regards aerodynamics, design. The local loss coefficient, in terms of the dynamic pressure in the sucker pocket of the smoke exhaust is equal to 4.57. The local aerodynamic loss coefficient after renovation at the considered section according to the first version would make 1.48, and according to the second version 1.325, which would reduce losses at this section by more than a factor of three, and ensure the power unit operation with the rated load.

  7. Numerical computation and validation of two-phase flow downstream of a gas turbine combustor dome swirl cup

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K.; Burrus, D.L.; Lawson, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    The two-phase axisymmetric flow field downstream of the swirl cup of an advanced gas turbine combustor is studied numerically and validated against experimental Phase-Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) data. The swirl cup analyzed is that of a single annular GE/SNECMA CFM56 turbofan engine that is comprised of a pair of coaxial counterswirling air streams together with a fuel atomizer. The atomized fuel mixes with the swirling air stream, resulting in the establishment of a complex two-phase flow field within the swirl chamber. The analysis procedure involves the solution of the gas phase equations in an Eulerian frame of reference using the code CONCERT. CONCERT has been developed and used extensively in the past and represents a fully elliptic body-fitted computational fluid dynamics code to predict flow fields in practical full-scale combustors. The flow in this study is assumed to be nonreacting and isothermal. The liquid phase is simulated by using a droplet spray model and by treating the motion of the fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Extensive PDPA data for the CFM56 engine swirl cup have been obtained at atmospheric pressure by using water as the fuel (Wang et al., 1992a). The PDPA system makes pointwise measurements that are fundamentally Eulerian. Measurements have been made of the continuous gas phase velocity together with discrete phase attributes such as droplet size, droplet number count, and droplet velocity distribution at various axial stations downstream of the injector. Numerical calculations were performed under the exact inlet and boundary conditions as the experimental measurements. The computed gas phase velocity field showed good agreement with the test data.

  8. Numerical modeling of carrier gas flow in atomic layer deposition vacuum reactor: A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Chien Jen, Tien; Li, Tao; Yuan, Chris

    2014-01-15

    This paper characterizes the carrier gas flow in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) vacuum reactor by introducing Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to the ALD simulation through a comparative study of two LBM models. Numerical models of gas flow are constructed and implemented in two-dimensional geometry based on lattice Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (LBGK)-D2Q9 model and two-relaxation-time (TRT) model. Both incompressible and compressible scenarios are simulated and the two models are compared in the aspects of flow features, stability, and efficiency. Our simulation outcome reveals that, for our specific ALD vacuum reactor, TRT model generates better steady laminar flow features all over the domain with better stability and reliability than LBGK-D2Q9 model especially when considering the compressible effects of the gas flow. The LBM-TRT is verified indirectly by comparing the numerical result with conventional continuum-based computational fluid dynamics solvers, and it shows very good agreement with these conventional methods. The velocity field of carrier gas flow through ALD vacuum reactor was characterized by LBM-TRT model finally. The flow in ALD is in a laminar steady state with velocity concentrated at the corners and around the wafer. The effects of flow fields on precursor distributions, surface absorptions, and surface reactions are discussed in detail. Steady and evenly distributed velocity field contribute to higher precursor concentration near the wafer and relatively lower particle velocities help to achieve better surface adsorption and deposition. The ALD reactor geometry needs to be considered carefully if a steady and laminar flow field around the wafer and better surface deposition are desired.

  9. Results of the Purdue University GAS-1 payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R.

    1984-01-01

    The Purdue University GAS-1 payload was flown on STS-7. Results of the three experiments included in the payload are summarized. The experiments conducted were: (1) the detection of nuclear particles in near-Earth space environment, (2) an investigation of the effect of microgravity on the germination of sunflower seeds, and (3) an examination of the motion of mercury under low gravity conditions. Results of the payload experiments are discussed from an engineering design standpoint. Data were obtained from one of the experiments, but electrical and mechanical malfunctions prevented the operation of the other two. The thermal control design maintained the desired temperatures and the structure successfully supported all components. The microprocessor collected and stored temperature readings and other data during the flight. A series of recommendations based on these results are included herein.

  10. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  11. Some Numerical Results of Multipoints Bomndary Value Problems Arise in Environmental Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Daniel N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate two problems arise in pollutant transport in rivers, and we give some numerical results to approximate this solutions. We determined the approximate solutions using two numerical methods: 1. B-splines combined with Runge-Kutta methods, 2. BVP4C solver of MATLAB and then we compare the run-times.

  12. Interfacial instability in vertical counter-current gas-liquid film flow: theory, direct numerical simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Ausner, Ilja; Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of vertical counter-current gas-liquid flows are largely determined by interfacial instability, which gives rise to a multitude of complex wave patterns and internal flows. To study the genesis and evolution of the instability in detail, we employ theoretical stability analysis, experiment and a newly developed level set method based in-house solver to carry out direct numerical simulations. Crucial results of these simulations, such as growth rate and phase velocity of interfacial waves, are rigorously compared against linear and weakly nonlinear theory; thereby showing remarkable agreement. The analysis also reveals the spatio-temporal character of the waves, depicting regimes of absolute and convective instability. Complementing the benchmark set by (non-)linear theory, we perform film thickness measurements of a real gas-liquid system (air-silicone oil) by means of a non-intrusive light-induced fluorescence technique to further validate the solver regarding its capability of capturing interfacial dynamics accurately. These measurements are in good agreement with the results of the nonlinear direct numerical simulations with respect to wavelength and wave shape of the most unstable mode.

  13. Numerical and experimental study of gas flows in 2D and 3D microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaohui; Huang, Chihyung; Alexeenko, Alina; Sullivan, John

    2008-02-01

    In the experiments conducted at Purdue, the air flow in rectangular cross-section microchannels was investigated using pressure sensitive paint. The high resolution pressure measurements were obtained for inlet-to-outlet pressure ratios from 1.76 to 20 with the outlet Knudsen numbers in the range from 0.003 to 0.4 based on the hydraulic diameter of 151.7 µm and the length-to-height ratio of about 50. In the slip flow regime, the air flow was simulated by the 2D and 3D Navier-Stokes equations with no-slip and slip boundary conditions. For various pressure ratios, the entrance flow development, compressibility and rarefaction effects were observed in both experiments and numerical simulations. It was found that the accurate modeling of gas flows in finite-length channels requires the inlet and outlet reservoirs to be included in computations. Effects of entrance geometry on the friction factor were studied for 3D cases. In both experiments and numerical modeling, significant pressure drop was found starting at the inlet chamber. The numerical modeling also predicted an apparent temperature drop at the channel exit.

  14. Numerical simulation and field test study of desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment through flue gas.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jia-Jia; Pan, Liang-Ming; Chen, De-Qi; Dong, Yu-Quan; Wang, Cheng-Mu; Liu, Hang; Kang, Mei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at cost saving and pollution reduction, a novel desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment system (DWETS) for handling wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) wastewater of a coal-fired power plant was studied. The system's advantages include simple process, and less investment and space. The feasibility of this system has been proven and the appropriate position and number of nozzles, the spray droplet size and flue gas temperature limitation have been obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulation results show that a longer duct, smaller diameter and higher flue gas temperature could help to increase the evaporation rate. The optimal DWETS design of Shangdu plant is 100 μm droplet sprayed by two nozzles located at the long duct when the flue gas temperature is 130 °C. Field tests were carried out based on the simulation results. The effects of running DWETS on the downstream devices have been studied. The results show that DWETS has a positive impact on ash removal efficiency and does not have any negative impact on the electrostatic precipitator (ESP), flue gas heat exchanger and WFGD. The pH values of the slurry of WFGD slightly increase when the DWETS is running. The simulation and field test of the DWETS show that it is a feasible future technology for desulfurization wastewater treatment.

  15. Gas dynamic trap: experimental results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The gas dynamic trap (GDT) is a version of a magnetic mirror with a long mirror-to-mirror distance far exceeding the effective mean free path of ion scattering into the loss cone, with a large mirror ratio (R ˜ 100; R = Bmax/Bmin is the ratio of magnetic field inductions at the mirror and at the trap center) and with axial symmetry. Under these conditions, in contrast to a conventional magnetic mirror, the plasma confined in a GDT is isotropic and Maxwellian. The plasma loss rate through the ends is governed by a set of simple gas dynamic equations; hence, the name of the device. The plasma lifetime in a GDT is on the order of LR/VTi, where L is the mirror-to-mirror distance, and VTi is the ion thermal velocity. Thus, increasing both the length of the device and the mirror ratio can, in principle, make the plasma lifetime sufficient for fusion applications. This paper discusses plasma confinement and heating results from the Novosibirsk GDT facility and examines prospects for using GDTs to develop a high-flux volumetric neutron source for fusion material testing and for driving subcritical fission reactors.

  16. Results of testing various natural gas desulfurization adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelson, Gordon

    2004-06-01

    This article presents the results of testing many commercially available and some experimental sulfur adsorbents. The desired result of our testing was to find an effective method to reduce the quantity of sulfur in natural gas to less than 100 ppb volume (0.1 ppm volume). An amount of 100 ppb sulfur is the maximum limit permitted for Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The tested adsorbents include some that rely only on physical adsorption such as activated carbon, some that rely on chemisorption such as heated zinc oxide, and some that may use both processes. The testing was performed on an engineering scale with beds larger than those used for typical laboratory tests. All tests were done at about 3.45 barg (50 psig). The natural gas used for testing was from the local pipeline in Pittsburgh and averaged 6 ppm volume total sulfur. The primary sulfur species were dimethyl sulfide (DMS), isopropyl mercaptan, tertiary butyl mercaptan, and tetrahydrothiophene. Some tests required several months to achieve a sulfur breakthrough of the bed. It was found that DMS always came through a desulfurizer bed first, independent of adsorption process. Since the breakthrough of DMS always exceeds the 100 ppb SOFC sulfur limit before other sulfurs were detected, an index was created to rate the adsorbents in units of ppm DMS × absorbent bed volume. This index is useful for calculating the expected adsorbent bed lifetime before sulfur breakthrough when the inlet natural gas DMS content is known. The adsorbents that are included in these reports were obtained from suppliers in the United States, the Netherlands, Japan, and England. Three activated carbons from different suppliers were found to have identical performance in removing DMS. One of these activated carbons was operated at four different space velocities and again showed the same performance. When using activated carbon as the basis of comparison for other adsorbents, three high-performance adsorbents

  17. A Hydrodynamic Theory for Spatially Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Lasers. 2; Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jianzhong; Ning, C. Z.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present numerical results of the diffusion coefficients (DCs) in the coupled diffusion model derived in the preceding paper for a semiconductor quantum well. These include self and mutual DCs in the general two-component case, as well as density- and temperature-related DCs under the single-component approximation. The results are analyzed from the viewpoint of free Fermi gas theory with many-body effects incorporated. We discuss in detail the dependence of these DCs on densities and temperatures in order to identify different roles played by the free carrier contributions including carrier statistics and carrier-LO phonon scattering, and many-body corrections including bandgap renormalization and electron-hole (e-h) scattering. In the general two-component case, it is found that the self- and mutual- diffusion coefficients are determined mainly by the free carrier contributions, but with significant many-body corrections near the critical density. Carrier-LO phonon scattering is dominant at low density, but e-h scattering becomes important in determining their density dependence above the critical electron density. In the single-component case, it is found that many-body effects suppress the density coefficients but enhance the temperature coefficients. The modification is of the order of 10% and reaches a maximum of over 20% for the density coefficients. Overall, temperature elevation enhances the diffusive capability or DCs of carriers linearly, and such an enhancement grows with density. Finally, the complete dataset of various DCs as functions of carrier densities and temperatures provides necessary ingredients for future applications of the model to various spatially inhomogeneous optoelectronic devices.

  18. Gas generation results and venting study for transuranic waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanjian, A.R.; Arnold, P.M.; Simmons, W.C.; D'Amico, E.L.

    1985-09-23

    Sixteen waste drums, containing six categories of plutonium-contaminated waste, were monitored for venting and gas generation for six months. The venting devices tested appeared adequate to relieve pressure and prevent hydrogen accumulation. Most of the gas generation, primarily H2 and CO2, was due to radiolytic decomposition of the hydrogenous wastes. Comparison of the gas yields with those obtained previously in laboratory tests showed very reasonable agreement with few exceptions.

  19. Numerical research of parameters of interaction of the gas flow with rotary valve of the gas pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, A. V.; Karelin, D. L.; Muljukin, V. L.

    2016-11-01

    Conducted numerical research of static characteristics of the rotary gate valve at different angles of its deviation. for this purpose were set different values of pressure differential on the valve depending on which, was determined the mass flow and torque on valve axes. The mathematical model is provided by continuity equations, average on Reynolds, Navier-Stokes and energy, the equation of the perfect gas, the equations of two-layer k-e of model of turbulence. When calculating the current near walls are used Wolfstein's model and the hybrid wall functions of Reichardt for the speed and temperature. The task is solved in three-dimensional statement with use of conditions of symmetry. The structure of the current is analyzed: zones of acceleration and flow separation, whirlwinds, etc. Noted growth of hydraulic resistance of the valve with reduction of slope angle of the valve and with the increase in mass flow. Established increase of torque with reduction of the deviation angle of the valve and with increase in the mass expense.

  20. Numerical results using the conforming VEM for the convection-diffusion-reaction equation with variable coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Cangiani, Andrea; Sutton, Oliver

    2014-10-02

    This document presents the results of a set of preliminary numerical experiments using several possible conforming virtual element approximations of the convection-reaction-diffusion equation with variable coefficients.

  1. Numerical Computation of Flame Spread over a Thin Solid in Forced Concurrent Flow with Gas-phase Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Ching-Biau; T'ien, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Excerpts from a paper describing the numerical examination of concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid in purely forced flow with gas-phase radiation are presented. The computational model solves the two-dimensional, elliptic, steady, and laminar conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species. Gas-phase combustion is modeled via a one-step, second order finite rate Arrhenius reaction. Gas-phase radiation considering gray non-scattering medium is solved by a S-N discrete ordinates method. A simplified solid phase treatment assumes a zeroth order pyrolysis relation and includes radiative interaction between the surface and the gas phase.

  2. Electric analogue for the dynamics of decompression sickness bubbles: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, Joaquín; Hernández-González, A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the development of the first decompression tables in 1908 by Boycott, Damant and Haldane, considerable research and effort have been expended in the development of safer and more rapid decompression procedures and tables. The models for gas exchange have been principally empirical and provide "safe" decompression only over a limited range of depth and bottom times. In this work a numerical method based on an electrical analogy is used to solve the system of equations simulating the growth and decay dynamics of decompression bubbles. The numerical procedure employed, which satisfies the conservation law for the flux variable and the uniqueness law for voltages, also permits the direct visualisation of the evolution of the local and/or integrated transport variables at any point or section of the medium.

  3. Comprehensive Numerical Modeling of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Water Resource Recovery Facilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Bowen, James D; Kinnear, David

    2015-11-01

    A numerical model was developed to comprehensively predict greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from water resource recovery facilities. An existing activated sludge model was extended to include a nitrifier-denitrification process and carbon dioxide (CO₂) as a state variable. The bioreactor model was coupled to a process-based digester model and an empirical model of indirect CO₂emissions. Direct emissions were approximately 90% of total GHG emissions for a plantwide simulation using the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger process. Biogenic CO₂, nitrous oxide (N₂O), and methane (CH₄) represented 10, 43, and 34% of total emissions. Simulating a dissolved oxygen controlled closed-loop system reduced both sensitivity and uncertainty of GHG emissions. Nitrous oxide emissions were much more sensitive under different design and operating conditions compared to CH₄and CO₂, indicating a significant mitigation potential. An uncertainty analysis found that the uncertainty in GHGs emissions estimates could be significant. Nitrous oxide emissions dominated in both magnitude and uncertainty.

  4. Numerical simulation of ultrasound-induced dynamics of a gas bubble neighboring a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation erosion has been a technical issue in ultrasonic cleaning under which cavitation bubbles appear near target surfaces to be cleaned. In the present study, we numerically study the interaction of ultrasonic standing waves with a gas bubble in the neighborhood of a rigid wall. We solve multicomponent Euler equations that ignore surface tension and phase change at interfaces, by the finite-volume WENO scheme with interface capturing. The pressure amplitude of the ultrasound is set at several atmospheres and the ultrasound wavelength is tuned to obtain the situation near resonance. In the simulation, we observe jetting flow toward the rigid wall at violent bubble collapse that may explain cavitation erosion in ultrasonic cleaning.

  5. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued on the study of coal permeability and gas desorption. This quarter, most of the effort involved identifying problems with the microbalance and then getting it repaired. Measurement of the amount of gas adsorbed with the microbalance involved corrections for the buoyancy change with pressure and several experiments with helium were made to determine this correction.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics based on the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht Yonkofski, C. M.; Horner, J.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after a thorough quality check. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This study uses numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the CH4/CO2/N2 guest molecule exchange process that occurred at Ignik Sikumi #1. Simulations were further informed by experimental observations. The goal of the scoping experiments was to understand kinetic exchange rates and develop parameters for use in Iġnik Sikumi history match simulations. The experimental procedure involves two main stages: 1) the formation of CH4 hydrate in a consolidated sand column at 750 psi and 2°C and 2) flow-through of a 77.5/22.5 N2/CO2 molar ratio gas mixture across the column. Experiments were run both above and below the hydrate stability zone in order to observe exchange behavior across varying conditions. The numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was then used to match experimental results, specifically fitting kinetic behavior. Once this behavior is understood, it can be applied to field scale models based on Ignik Sikumi #1.

  7. Fast and accurate numerical method for predicting gas chromatography retention time.

    PubMed

    Claumann, Carlos Alberto; Wüst Zibetti, André; Bolzan, Ariovaldo; Machado, Ricardo A F; Pinto, Leonel Teixeira

    2015-08-07

    Predictive modeling for gas chromatography compound retention depends on the retention factor (ki) and on the flow of the mobile phase. Thus, different approaches for determining an analyte ki in column chromatography have been developed. The main one is based on the thermodynamic properties of the component and on the characteristics of the stationary phase. These models can be used to estimate the parameters and to optimize the programming of temperatures, in gas chromatography, for the separation of compounds. Different authors have proposed the use of numerical methods for solving these models, but these methods demand greater computational time. Hence, a new method for solving the predictive modeling of analyte retention time is presented. This algorithm is an alternative to traditional methods because it transforms its attainments into root determination problems within defined intervals. The proposed approach allows for tr calculation, with accuracy determined by the user of the methods, and significant reductions in computational time; it can also be used to evaluate the performance of other prediction methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Supersonic Virtual Valve Design for Numerical Simulation of a Large-Bore Natural Gas Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G.-H.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Mitchell, C.

    2007-10-01

    In many applications of supersonic injection devices, three-dimensional computation that can model a complex supersonic jet has become critical. However, in spite of its increasing necessity, it is computationally costly to capture the details of supersonic structures in intricate three-dimensional geometries with moving boundaries. In large-bore stationary natural gas fueled engine research, one of the most promising mixing enhancement technologies currently used for natural gas engines is high-pressure fuel injection. Consequently, this creates considerable interest in three-dimensional computational simulations that can examine the entire injection and mixing process in engines using high-pressure injection and can determine the impact of injector design on engine performance. However, the cost of three-dimensional engine simulations-including a moving piston and the kinetics of combustion and pollutant production quickly becomes considerable in terms of simulation time requirements. One limiting factor is the modeling of the small length scales of the poppet valve flow. Such length scales can be three orders of magnitude smaller than cylinder length scales. The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a methodology for the design of a simple geometry supersonic virtual valve that can be substituted in three-dimensional numerical models for the complex shrouded poppet valve injection system actually installed in the engine to be simulated.

  9. Numerical studies of the behavior of ionized residual gas in an energy recovering linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula; Meseck, Atoosa

    2015-04-01

    Next generation light sources such as energy recovering linacs (ERLs) are highly sensitive to instabilities due to ionized residual gas, which must be mitigated for successful operation. Vacuum pumps are insufficient for removal of the ions, as the ions are trapped by the beam's electrical potential. Two effective measures are (i) introducing clearing gaps in the bunch train, and (ii) installing clearing electrodes which pull out the trapped ions from the electrical potential of the beam. In this paper, we present numerical studies on the behavior of ion clouds that interact with bunch trains in an ERL taking into account the effects of the clearing gaps and clearing electrodes. We present simulations with different compositions of the residual gas. Simulations are done using the MOEVE PIC Tracking software package developed at Rostock University, which has been upgraded to include the behavior of ion clouds in the environment of additional electromagnetic fields, such as generated by clearing electrodes. The simulations use the parameters of the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (bERLinPro) to allow for the deduction of appropriate measures for bERLinPro 's design and operation.

  10. 3-D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problems with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronov, I.D.; Voronin, B.L.; Butnev, O.I.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the work performed is to develop a 3D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problem with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS), satisfying the condition of numerical result independence from the number of processors involved. Two basically different approaches to the structure of massive parallel computations have been developed. The first approach uses the 3D data matrix decomposition reconstructed at temporal cycle and is a development of parallelization algorithms for multiprocessor CS with shareable memory. The second approach is based on using a 3D data matrix decomposition not reconstructed during a temporal cycle. The program was developed on 8-processor CS MP-3 made in VNIIEF and was adapted to a massive parallel CS Meiko-2 in LLNL by joint efforts of VNIIEF and LLNL staffs. A large number of numerical experiments has been carried out with different number of processors up to 256 and the efficiency of parallelization has been evaluated in dependence on processor number and their parameters.

  11. Analytic and numeric Green's functions for a two-dimensional electron gas in an orthogonal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cresti, Alessandro . E-mail: cresti@df.unipi.it; Grosso, Giuseppe . E-mail: grosso@df.unipi.it; Parravicini, Giuseppe Pastori . E-mail: pastori@fisicavolta.unipv.it

    2006-05-15

    We have derived closed analytic expressions for the Green's function of an electron in a two-dimensional electron gas threaded by a uniform perpendicular magnetic field, also in the presence of a uniform electric field and of a parabolic spatial confinement. A workable and powerful numerical procedure for the calculation of the Green's functions for a large infinitely extended quantum wire is considered exploiting a lattice model for the wire, the tight-binding representation for the corresponding matrix Green's function, and the Peierls phase factor in the Hamiltonian hopping matrix element to account for the magnetic field. The numerical evaluation of the Green's function has been performed by means of the decimation-renormalization method, and quite satisfactorily compared with the analytic results worked out in this paper. As an example of the versatility of the numerical and analytic tools here presented, the peculiar semilocal character of the magnetic Green's function is studied in detail because of its basic importance in determining magneto-transport properties in mesoscopic systems.

  12. Numerical simulation of sealing effect of gas hydrate for CO2 leakage in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Yu, T.; Oyama, H.; Yoshida, T.; Nakashima, T.; Kamada, K.

    2015-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide capture and storage in subsea geological structure is regarded as one of the promising mitigation technologies against the global warming, there is a risk of CO2 leakage and it is required to develop numerical models to predict how the CO2 migrate in the marine sediments. It is said that there are CO2-trap mechanisms in the geological formations, such as capillary trap, dissolution trap, and mineral trap. In this study, we focus on another trap mechanism: namely, hydrate trap. If the water is deep in the ocean, say more than 250 m, CO2 hydrate forms near the sea floor, at which temperature and pressure conditions can stabilise CO2 hydrate. To predict the gas productivity, it is important to know permeability damage in hydrate bearing sediments. Although hydrate saturation is the same, the permeability is different depending on its spatial distribution within the pore of sand sediment. Here, to know where hydrate is formed in the pore of porous media, we propose a numerical model for estimating the microscopic distribution of CO2 hydrate in sand sediment using a classical nucleation theory and the phase-field model.

  13. Direct numerical simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a dense gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giauque, A.; Corre, C.; Menghetti, M.

    2017-03-01

    A study of turbulence in BZT dense gas flows is performed using DNS. It is shown that for a large but realistic intensity, the turbulence in dense gas flows behaves in a highly compressible manner when the average thermodynamic state lies within the inversion region in which the gas fundamental derivative is negative. A close similarity is observed in the evolution of the kinetic energy when the initial turbulent Mach number and the Taylor Reynolds number are matched regardless of the Equation of State (EoS) considered. A large turbulent Mach number is yet more easily attained in dense gas flows lying in the inversion region because of the low speed of sound associated with it. In this case the turbulence shows a highly compressible evolution with periodic exchanges between the internal and kinetic energies. In order to assess the capabilities of currently available Large Eddy Simulation (LES) subgrid-scale models, a-posteriori tests are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model. Coherently with the hypothesis it relies on, the model perfectly captures the evolution of the kinetic energy when the turbulent Mach number is low enough. When using the perfect gas EoS at a higher turbulent Mach number the agreement is reasonable. Yet, when the average thermodynamic state lies within the inversion region and when using the thermal and caloric Martin&Hou EoS, the model is not able to capture the correct evolution of the kinetic energy. The results presented in this study call for a specific research effort directed towards the assessment and possibly the development of advanced subgrid-scale models for LES of turbulent dense gas flows.

  14. Numerical Simulation on Flow and Heat Transfer Performance of Air-cooler for a Natural Gas Storage Compressor Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biyuan; Zhang, Feng; Ma, Zenghui; Zheng, Zilong; Feng, Jianmei

    2017-08-01

    Heat transfer efficiency has been a key issue for large size air coolers with the noise reducers used in natural gas storage compressor unit, especially operated in summer with cooling air at a high temperature. The 3-D numerical simulation model of the whole air cooler was established to study the flow field characteristic with different inlet and outlet structures by CFD software. The system pressure loss distributions were calculated. The relationship was obtained among heat exchange efficiency, resistance loss, and the structure of air cooler, the results presented some methods to improve cooling air flow rate and heat exchange efficiency. Based on the results, some effective measures were proposed to improve heat exchanger efficiency and were implemented in the actual operation unit.

  15. Numerical Investigation into the Performance of a Rarefaction Shock Wave Cutter for Offshore Oil-Gas Platform Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Joseph; Glenn, Lewis; Antoun, Tarabay; Lomov, Ilya

    2001-06-01

    The phase change in iron at 13 GPa results in the formation of rarefaction shock waves upon release. The interaction of multiple rarefaction shock waves induces high tensile stresses within a narrow zone, causing smooth spall. This effect can be exploited to sever cylindrical cross-section pipes, such as those supporting decommissioned offshore oil and gas platforms, using a minimal amount of explosive. Consequently, costs can be reduced and environmental impact minimized. We discuss the numerical techniques used to simulate rarefaction shock waves and the damage to steel resulting from the interaction of multiple rarefaction shock waves. Finally, we present a series of simulations investigating the performance of such a device under a range of conditions.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Arc-Melt Interaction in Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Liu, Lichao; Motoyama, Yuichi

    2017-04-01

    The present work develops a multi-region dynamic coupling model for fluid flow, heat transfer and arc-melt interaction in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using the dynamic mesh technique. The arc-weld pool unified model is developed on basis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and the interface is tracked using the dynamic mesh method. The numerical model for arc is firstly validated by comparing the calculated temperature profiles and essential results with the former experimental data. For weld pool convection solution, the drag, Marangoni, buoyancy and electromagnetic forces are separately validated, and then taken into account. Moreover, the model considering interface deformation is adopted in a stationary TIG welding process with SUS304 stainless steel and the effect of interface deformation is investigated. The depression of weld pool center and the lifting of pool periphery are both predicted. The results show that the weld pool shape calculated with considering the interface deformation is more accurate.

  17. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    During this quarter, work was continued on measuring the methane sorption capacity of dispersed organic matter in gas shales and maceral concentrates derived from a Kentucky coal. Although previous results have demonstrated that the microbalance technique is successful in generating sorption isotherm curves, the accuracy of the technique has not been well established. The only previous test that allowed a comparison between gravimetric data and volumetric data showed a significant discrepancy with the gravimetric data indicating a considerably greater sorption quantities than the volumetric data. During the present quarter we took advantage of an opportunity to join in a round-robin analysis of sorption capacity of carbonatious shales. A suite of four samples was sent to six laboratories with each lab measuring sorption capacity for methane and reporting the results to a central lab which would compile all of the data for comparitive purposes. Of course, none of the other laboratories were using the gravimetric approach for measuring methane sorption capacity. So this provides a unique opportunity to test the accuracy of our methods.

  18. Comparison of results of experimental research with numerical calculations of a model one-sided seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimiak, Damian; Krzyślak, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents the results of experimental and numerical research of a model segment of a labyrinth seal for a different wear level. The analysis covers the extent of leakage and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers and the planes upstream and downstream of the segment. The measurement data have been compared with the results of numerical calculations obtained using commercial software. Based on the flow conditions occurring in the area subjected to calculations, the size of the mesh defined by parameter y+ has been analyzed and the selection of the turbulence model has been described. The numerical calculations were based on the measurable thermodynamic parameters in the seal segments of steam turbines. The work contains a comparison of the mass flow and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers obtained during the measurement and calculated numerically in a model segment of the seal of different level of wear.

  19. Forebody and base region real gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. II - Equilibrium reactive gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    The factored-implicit, gas-dynamic algorithm has been adapted to the numerical simulation of equilibrium reactive flows. Changes required in the perfect gas version of the algorithm are developed, and the method of coupling gas-dynamic and chemistry variables is discussed. A flow-field solution that approximates a Jovian entry case was obtained by this method and compared with the same solution obtained by HYVIS, a computer program much used for the study of planetary entry. Comparison of surface pressure distribution and stagnation line shock-layer profiles indicates that the two solutions agree well.

  20. Validation and Analysis of Numerical Results for a Two-Pass Trapezoidal Channel With Different Cooling Configurations of Trailing Edge.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Waseem; El-Gabry, Lamyaa; Shevchuk, Igor V; Fransson, Torsten H

    2013-01-01

    High inlet temperatures in a gas turbine lead to an increase in the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine. This results in the requirement of cooling of gas turbine blades/vanes. Internal cooling of the gas turbine blade/vanes with the help of two-pass channels is one of the effective methods to reduce the metal temperatures. In particular, the trailing edge of a turbine vane is a critical area, where effective cooling is required. The trailing edge can be modeled as a trapezoidal channel. This paper describes the numerical validation of the heat transfer and pressure drop in a trapezoidal channel with and without orthogonal ribs at the bottom surface. A new concept of ribbed trailing edge has been introduced in this paper which presents a numerical study of several trailing edge cooling configurations based on the placement of ribs at different walls. The baseline geometries are two-pass trapezoidal channels with and without orthogonal ribs at the bottom surface of the channel. Ribs induce secondary flow which results in enhancement of heat transfer; therefore, for enhancement of heat transfer at the trailing edge, ribs are placed at the trailing edge surface in three different configurations: first without ribs at the bottom surface, then ribs at the trailing edge surface in-line with the ribs at the bottom surface, and finally staggered ribs. Heat transfer and pressure drop is calculated at Reynolds number equal to 9400 for all configurations. Different turbulent models are used for the validation of the numerical results. For the smooth channel low-Re k-ɛ model, realizable k-ɛ model, the RNG k-ω model, low-Re k-ω model, and SST k-ω models are compared, whereas for ribbed channel, low-Re k-ɛ model and SST k-ω models are compared. The results show that the low-Re k-ɛ model, which predicts the heat transfer in outlet pass of the smooth channels with difference of +7%, underpredicts the heat transfer by -17% in case of ribbed channel compared to

  1. Gas transport by thermal transpiration in micro-channels -- A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Hudson, M.L.; Potter, D.L.; Bartel, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    A reliable micro gas pump is an essential element to the development of many micro-systems for chemical gas analyses. At Sandia, the authors are exploring a different pumping mechanism, gas transport by thermal transpiration. Thermal transpiration refers to the rarefied gas dynamics developed in a micro-channel with a longitudinal temperature gradient. To investigate the potential of thermal transpiration for gas pumping in micro-systems, the authors have performed simulations and model analysis to design micro-devices and to assess their design performance before the fabrication process. The effort is to apply ICARUS (a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code developed at Sandia) to characterize the fluid transport and evaluate the design performance. The design being considered has two plenums at different temperatures (hot and cold) separated by a micro-channel of 0.1 micron wide and 1 micron long. The temperature difference between the two plenums is 30 kelvin. ICARUS results, a quasi-steady analysis, predicts a net flow through the micro-channel with a velocity magnitude of about 0.4 m/s due to temperature gradient at the wall (thermal creep flow) at the early time. Later as the pressure builds up in the hot plenum, flow is reversed. Eventually when the system reaches steady state equilibrium, the net flow becomes zero. The thermal creep effect is compensated by the thermo-molecular pressure effect. This result demonstrates that it is important to include the thermo-molecular pressure effect when designing a pumping mechanism based on thermal transpiration. The DSMC technique can model this complex thermal transpiration problem.

  2. Exact and numerical results for a dimerized coupled spin- 1/2 chain

    PubMed

    Martins; Nienhuis

    2000-12-04

    We establish exact results for coupled spin-1/2 chains for special values of the four-spin interaction V and dimerization parameter delta. The first exact result is at delta = 1/2 and V = -2. Because we find a very small but finite gap in this dimerized chain, this can serve as a very strong test case for numerical and approximate analytical techniques. The second result is for the homogeneous chain with V = -4 and gives evidence that the system has a spontaneously dimerized ground state. Numerical diagonalization and bosonization techniques indicate that the interplay between dimerization and interaction could result in gapless phases in the regime 0

  3. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Tsay, F.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of sorption capacity of coals by microbalance in a high pressure environment requires that corrections be made for the buoyancy of the gas that is displaced by the solid coal. As the pressure increases, the gas density increases, requiring that a correction factor be applied to the weight of the sample as measured by microbalance. A brief report summarizing this correction is attached as Appendix A.

  4. Healthy Efficient New Gas Homes (HENGH) Pilot Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Maddalena, Randy L; Stratton, Chris; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Singer, Brett C.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2016-05-01

    The Healthy Efficient New Gas Homes (HENGH) is a field study that will collect data on ventilation systems and indoor air quality (IAQ) in new California homes that were built to 2008 Title 24 standards. A pilot test was performed to help inform the most time and cost effective approaches to measuring IAQ in the 100 test homes that will be recruited for this study. Two occupied, single-family detached homes built to 2008 Title 24 participated in the pilot test. One of the test homes uses exhaust-only ventilation provided by a continuous exhaust fan in the laundry room. The other home uses supply air for ventilation. Measurements of IAQ were collected for two weeks. Time-resolved concentrations of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde were measured. Measurements of IAQ also included time-integrated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), volatile aldehydes, and NO2. Three perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) were used to estimate the dilution rate of an indoor emitted air contaminant in the two pilot test homes. Diagnostic tests were performed to measure envelope air leakage, duct leakage, and airflow of range hood, exhaust fans, and clothes dryer vent when accessible. Occupant activities, such as cooking, use of range hood and exhaust fans, were monitored using various data loggers. This document describes results of the pilot test.

  5. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-09

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  6. OH as a Probe of the Milky Way's Hidden Gas - First Results From SPLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Joanne

    2015-08-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that "standard" radio line tracers of the interstellar medium fail to account for a substantial fraction of the neutral gas in star-forming galaxies. This transition-state gas bridges the regimes that can be effectively traced by CO and HI, representing an intermediate stage in the evolutionary sequence linking atomic gas and star-forming molecular clouds. The 18 cm ground state transitions of OH are a promising probe of this material. I will present first results from SPLASH - the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl - a sensitive, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of the Southern Galactic Plane and Galactic Centre in all four ground-state transitions of OH. The survey is a deep census of 1612, 1665, 1667 and 1720 MHz OH absorption and emission from the Galactic molecular ISM, as well as an unbiased search for maser sources in these transitions. Key early results include the detection of a rich and complex distribution of diffuse, optically thin OH with strongly non-thermal excitation temperatures, and the detection of numerous new maser sources from both evolved stars and young star-forming regions. I will outline future plans for comprehensive comparisons with HI and CO which aim to utilise OH as a probe of the transition-state ISM Galactic scales.

  7. Comparison of experimental results with numerical simulations for pulsed thermographic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripragash, Letchuman; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2017-02-01

    This paper examines pulse thermographic nondestructive evaluation of flat bottom holes of isotropic materials. Different combinations of defect diameters and depths are considered. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) method is used to analyze these results. In addition, a new normalization procedure is used to remove the dependence of thermographic results on the material properties and instrumentation settings during these experiments. Hence the normalized results depend only on the geometry of the specimen and the defects. These thermographic NDE procedures were also simulated using finite element technique for a variety of defect configurations. The data obtained from numerical simulations were also processed using the normalization scheme. Excellent agreement was seen between the results obtained from experiments and numerical simulations. Therefore, the scheme is extended to introduce a correlation technique by which numerical simulations are used to quantify the defect parameters.

  8. Numerical Prediction of Non-Reacting and Reacting Flow in a Model Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, reacting and non-reacting flow characteristics of a model gas turbine combustor operating on air/methane are simulated via an unstructured and massively parallel Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. This serves to demonstrate the capabilities of the code for design and analysis of real combustor engines. The effects of some design features of combustors are examined. In addition, the computed results are validated against experimental data.

  9. Numerical investigations of cooling holes system role in the protection of the walls of a gas turbine combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Sik Ali, Ahlem; Kriaa, Wassim; Mhiri, Hatem; Bournot, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Numerical simulations in a gas turbine Swirl stabilized combustor were conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a cooling system in the protection of combustor walls. The studied combustion chamber has a high degree of geometrical complexity related to the injection system as well as the cooling system based on a big distribution of small holes (about 3,390 holes) bored on the flame tube walls. Two cases were considered respectively the flame tube without and with its cooling system. The calculations were carried out using the industrial CFD code FLUENT 6.2. The various simulations made it possible to highlight the role of cooling holes in the protection of the flame tube walls against the high temperatures of the combustion products. In fact, the comparison between the results of the two studied cases demonstrated that the walls temperature can be reduced by about 800°C by the mean of cooling holes technique.

  10. Norm preserving stochastic field equation for an ideal Bose gas in a trap: numerical implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Sigmund; Strunz, Walter T.

    2010-12-01

    Stochastic field equations represent a powerful tool to describe the thermal state of a trapped Bose gas. Often, such approaches are confronted with the old problem of an ultraviolet catastrophe, which demands a cutoff at high energies. In Heller and Strunz (2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 081001) we introduce a quantum stochastic field equation, avoiding the cutoff problem through a fully quantum approach based on the Glauber-Sudarshan P-function. For a close link to actual experimental setups, the theory is formulated for a fixed particle number and thus based on the canonical ensemble. In this work the derivation and the non-trivial numerical implementation of the equation is explained in detail. We present applications for finite Bose gases trapped in a variety of potentials and show results for ground state occupation numbers and their equilibrium fluctuations. Moreover, we investigate spatial coherence properties by studying correlation functions of various orders.

  11. Study of Convection Heat Transfer in a Very High Temperature Reactor Flow Channel: Numerical and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Valentin, Francisco I.; Artoun, Narbeh; Anderson, Ryan; Kawaji, Masahiro; McEligot, Donald M.

    2016-12-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) are one of the Generation IV gas-cooled reactor models proposed for implementation in next generation nuclear power plants. A high temperature/pressure test facility for forced and natural circulation experiments has been constructed. This test facility consists of a single flow channel in a 2.7 m (9’) long graphite column equipped with four 2.3kW heaters. Extensive 3D numerical modeling provides a detailed analysis of the thermal-hydraulic behavior under steady-state, transient, and accident scenarios. In addition, forced/mixed convection experiments with air, nitrogen and helium were conducted for inlet Reynolds numbers from 500 to 70,000. Our numerical results were validated with forced convection data displaying maximum percentage errors under 15%, using commercial finite element package, COMSOL Multiphysics. Based on this agreement, important information can be extracted from the model, with regards to the modified radial velocity and property gas profiles. Our work also examines flow laminarization for a full range of Reynolds numbers including laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and its impact on heat transfer under various scenarios to examine the thermal-hydraulic phenomena that could occur during both normal operation and accident conditions.

  12. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110m wide and 50m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  13. Numerical simulation of the helium gas spin-up channel performance of the relativity gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.; Edgell, Josephine; Zhang, Burt X.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of the spin-up system efficiency on each geometrical parameter of the spin-up channel and the exhaust passage of the Gravity Probe-B (GPB) is individually investigated. The spin-up model is coded into a computer program which simulates the spin-up process. Numerical results reveal optimal combinations of the geometrical parameters for the ultimate spin-up performance. Comparisons are also made between the numerical results and experimental data. The experimental leakage rate can only be reached when the gap between the channel lip and the rotor surface increases beyond physical limit. The computed rotating frequency is roughly twice as high as the measured ones although the spin-up torques fairly match.

  14. Numerical simulation of the helium gas spin-up channel performance of the relativity gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.; Edgell, Josephine; Zhang, Burt X.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of the spin-up system efficiency on each geometrical parameter of the spin-up channel and the exhaust passage of the Gravity Probe-B (GPB) is individually investigated. The spin-up model is coded into a computer program which simulates the spin-up process. Numerical results reveal optimal combinations of the geometrical parameters for the ultimate spin-up performance. Comparisons are also made between the numerical results and experimental data. The experimental leakage rate can only be reached when the gap between the channel lip and the rotor surface increases beyond physical limit. The computed rotating frequency is roughly twice as high as the measured ones although the spin-up torques fairly match.

  15. Numerical simulation of infrared radiation absorption for diagnostics of gas-aerosol medium by remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Egorov, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.; Shefer, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Calculated absorption spectra of the mixture of gases (H2O, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, and SO2) and aerosol (soot and Al2O3), contained in the exhausts of aircraft and rocket engines are demonstrated. Based on the model of gas-aerosol medium, a numerical study of the spectral dependence of the absorptance for different ratios of gas and aerosol components was carried out. The influence of microphysical and optical properties of the components of the mixture on the spectral features of absorption of gas-aerosol medium was established.

  16. Open Source Tools for Numerical Simulation of Urban Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottrott, A.; Tan, S. M.; He, Y.

    2016-12-01

    There is a global movement toward urbanization. Approximately 7% of the global population lives in just 28 megacities, occupying less than 0.1% of the total land area used by human activity worldwide. These cities contribute a significant fraction of the global budget of anthropogenic primary pollutants and greenhouse gasses. The 27 largest cities consume 9.9%, 9.3%, 6.7% and 3.0% of global gasoline, electricity, energy and water use, respectively. This impact motivates novel approaches to quantify and mitigate the growing contribution of megacity emissions to global climate change. Cities are characterized by complex topography, inhomogeneous turbulence, and variable pollutant source distributions. These features create a scale separation between local sources and urban scale emissions estimates known as the Grey-Zone. Modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques provide a quasi-deterministic, physically based toolset to bridge the scale separation gap between source level dynamics, local measurements, and urban scale emissions inventories. CFD has the capability to represent complex building topography and capture detailed 3D turbulence fields in the urban boundary layer. This presentation discusses the application of OpenFOAM to urban CFD simulations of natural gas leaks in cities. OpenFOAM is an open source software for advanced numerical simulation of engineering and environmental fluid flows. When combined with free or low cost computer aided drawing and GIS, OpenFOAM generates a detailed, 3D representation of urban wind fields. OpenFOAM was applied to model methane (CH4) emissions from various components of the natural gas distribution system, to investigate the impact of urban meteorology on mobile CH4 measurements. The numerical experiments demonstrate that CH4 concentration profiles are highly sensitive to the relative location of emission sources and buildings. Sources separated by distances of 5-10 meters showed significant differences in

  17. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  18. Fast methods to numerically integrate the Reynolds equation for gas fluid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1992-01-01

    The alternating direction implicit (ADI) method is adopted, modified, and applied to the Reynolds equation for thin, gas fluid films. An efficient code is developed to predict both the steady-state and dynamic performance of an aerodynamic journal bearing. An alternative approach is shown for hybrid journal gas bearings by using Liebmann's iterative solution (LIS) for elliptic partial differential equations. The results are compared with known design criteria from experimental data. The developed methods show good accuracy and very short computer running time in comparison with methods based on an inverting of a matrix. The computer codes need a small amount of memory and can be run on either personal computers or on mainframe systems.

  19. A numerical analysis of a stationary gas tungsten welding arc considering various electrode angles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Na, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    The influences of parameters such as electrode angle, welding current and arc length on the gas tungsten arc welding process using Ar shielding gas were studied assuming the current density distribution along the cathode surface. Its distribution was assumed to have a Gaussian form, which is characterized by the maximum current density at the electrode tip or the distribution parameter. For determining these two values according to the electrode angle and welding current, the temperature distributions of a 60-deg angle electrode were calculated for 100, 200 and 300 A welding currents and compared with the experimental measurements obtained by previous research. Using these assumed current density distributions as the boundary condition for the current continuity equation, the heat flux and current density on the base plate were calculated for various influencing parameters and compared with the experimental results obtained under the same welding conditions. Furthermore, other transporting phenomena acting on the anode plate, such as arc pressure and shear stress, were calculated.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Reactive Multiphase Flow for FCC and Hot Gas Desulfurization Circulating Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Aubrey L.

    2005-07-01

    This work was carried out to understand the behavior of the solid and gas phases in a CFB riser. Only the riser is modeled as a straight pipe. A model with linear algebraic approximation to solids viscosity of the form, {musubs} = 5.34{epsisubs}, ({espisubs} is the solids volume fraction) with an appropriate boundary condition at the wall obtained by approximate momentum balance solution at the wall to acount for the solids recirculation is tested against experimental results. The work done was to predict the flow patterns in the CFB risers from available experimental data, including data from a 7.5-cm-ID CFB riser at the Illinois Institute of Technology and data from a 20.0-cm-ID CFB riser at the Particulate Solid Research, Inc., facility. This research aims at modeling the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas using zinc oxide as the sorbent in a circulating fluidized bed and in the process indentifying the parameters that affect the performance of the sulfidation reactor. Two different gas-solid reaction models, the unreacted shrinking core (USC) and the grain model were applied to take into account chemical reaction resistances. Also two different approaches were used to affect the hydrodynamics of the process streams. The first model takes into account the effect of micro-scale particle clustering by adjusting the gas-particle drag law and the second one assumes a turbulent core with pseudo-steady state boundary condition at the wall. A comparison is made with experimental results.

  1. Numerical study of gas-liquid flow morphology in a vertical flowmeter nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartushinsky, Alexander; Balakin, Boris V.; Kutsenko, Kirill V.; Kosinski, Pawel

    2017-07-01

    Industrial multiphase flow measurement systems often contain meters based on Venturi principle. Those instruments deal with the differential pressure measurements whose accurate interpretation is possible when the flow morphology is known a-priori. The present paper reports the results of CFD-modelling of a gas-liquid flow through a vertical nozzle accompanied by a blind-T flow conditioner. The model is used for evaluation of the flow morphology in case the volume fractions of both phases are comparable. The model demonstrates high non-uniformities of the flow field after the blind-T, which indicates that this type of flow conditioners may lead to inaccurate results.

  2. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  3. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  4. Results of Laboratory and Industrial Tests of Periodic-Type Gas Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, I. N.; P‧yanykh, K. E.; Antoshchuk, T. A.; Lysenko, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Results of laboratory and industrial tests of periodic-type gas generators burning various solid biofuels have been presented. The tests were carried out with the aim of obtaining producer gas which could totally or partly replace natural gas in power equipment burning gaseous fuel. The energy and environmental characteristics of a boiler unit burning a mixture of producer gas and natural gas have been assessed.

  5. A numerical study on the effect of hydrogen/reformate gas addition on flame temperature and NO formation in strained methane/air diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Neill, W. Stuart

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effects of hydrogen/reformate gas addition on flame temperature and NO formation in strained methane/air diffusion flames by numerical simulation. The results reveal that flame temperature changes due to the combined effects of adiabatic temperature, fuel Lewis number and radiation heat loss, when hydrogen/reformate gas is added to the fuel of a methane/air diffusion flame. The effect of Lewis number causes the flame temperature to increase much faster than the corresponding adiabatic equilibrium temperature when hydrogen is added, and results in a qualitatively different variation from the adiabatic equilibrium temperature as reformate gas is added. At some conditions, the addition of hydrogen results in a super-adiabatic flame temperature. The addition of hydrogen/reformate gas causes NO formation to change because of the variations in flame temperature, structure and NO formation mechanism, and the effect becomes more significant with increasing strain rate. The addition of a small amount of hydrogen or reformate gas has little effect on NO formation at low strain rates, and results in an increase in NO formation at moderate or high strain rates. However, the addition of a large amount of hydrogen increases NO formation at all strain rates, except near pure hydrogen condition. Conversely, the addition of a large amount of reformate gas results in a reduction in NO formation. (author)

  6. Numerical investigation of enhanced dilution zone mixing in a reverse flow gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, D. S.; Smith, C. E.

    1995-04-01

    An advanced method for dilution zone mixing in a reverse flow gas turbine combustor was numerically investigated. For long mixing lengths associated with reverse flow combustors (X/H greater than 2.0), pattern factor was found to be mainly driven by nozzle-to-nozzle fuel flow and/or circumferential airflow variations; conventional radially injected dilution jets could not effectively mix out circumferential nonuniformities. To enhance circumferential mixing, dilution jets were angled to produce a high circumferential (swirl) velocity component. The jets on the outer liner were angled in one direction while the jets on the inner liner were angled in the opposite direction, thus enhancing turbulent shear at the expense of jet penetration. Three-dimensional CFD calculations were performed on a three-nozzle (90 deg) sector, with different fuel flow from each nozzle (90, 100, and 110% of design fuel flow). The computations showed that the optimum configuration of angled jets reduced the pattern factor by 60% compared to an existing conventional dilution hole configuration. The radial average temperature profile was adequately controlled by the inner-to-outer liner dilution flow split.

  7. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  8. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  9. Numerical studies of gas production from several CH4 hydrate zones at the Mallik site, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Dallimore, S.R.; Satoh, T.; Hancock, S.; Weatherill, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mallik site represents an onshore permafrost-associated gas hydrate accumulation in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. A gas hydrate research well was drilled at the site in 1998. The objective of this study is the analysis of various gas production scenarios from five methane hydrate-bearing zones at the Mallik site. In Zone #1, numerical simulations using the EOSHYDR2 model indicated that gas production from hydrates at the Mallik site was possible by depressurizing a thin free gas zone at the base of the hydrate stability field. Horizontal wells appeared to have a slight advantage over vertical wells, while multiwell systems involving a combination of depressurization and thermal stimulation offered superior performance, especially when a hot noncondensible gas was injected. Zone #2, which involved a gas hydrate layer with an underlying aquifer, could yield significant amounts of gas originating entirely from gas hydrates, the volumes of which increased with the production rate. However, large amounts of water were also produced. Zones #3, #4 and #5 were lithologically isolated gas hydrate-bearing deposits with no underlying zones of mobile gas or water. In these zones, thermal stimulation by circulating hot water in the well was used to induce dissociation. Sensitivity studies indicated that the methane release from the hydrate accumulations increased with the gas hydrate saturation, the initial formation temperature, the temperature of the circulating water in the well, and the formation thermal conductivity. Methane production appears to be less sensitive to the specific heat of the rock and of the hydrate, and to the permeability of the formation. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Mode analysis for a microwave driven plasma discharge: A comparison between analytical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Zimmermanns, Marc; Rolfes, Ilona; Eremin, Denis; Ruhr-University Bochum, Theoretical Electrical Engineering Team; Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute of Microwave Systems Team

    2015-09-01

    The market shows in recent years a growing demand for bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Therefore, fast and efficient sterilization processes as well as barrier coatings to decrease gas permeation are required. A specialized microwave plasma source - referred to as the plasmaline - has been developed to allow for depositing thin films of e.g. silicon oxid on the inner surface of such PET bottles. The plasmaline is a coaxial waveguide combined with a gas-inlet which is inserted into the empty bottle and initiates a reactive plasma. To optimize and control the different surface processes, it is essential to fully understand the microwave power coupling to the plasma and the related heating of electrons inside the bottle and thus the electromagnetic wave propagation along the plasmaline. In this contribution, we present a detailed dispersion analysis based on a numerical approach. We study how modes of guided waves are propagating under different conditions, if at all. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the framework of the collaborative research centre TRR87.

  11. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undesirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  12. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1986-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undersirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  13. Numerical simulations of dynamical gluinos in SU (3) Yang-Mills theory: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feo, Alessandra; Kirchner, Robert; Luckmann, Silke; Montvay, István; Münster, Gernot; DESY-Münster Collaboration

    In a numerical Monte Carlo simulation of SU(3) Yang-Mills theory with dynamical gluinos we have investigated the behaviour of the expectation value of the scalar and pseudoscalar gluino condensates in order to determine the phase structure. Preliminary results are presented as a function of the hopping parameter.

  14. Numerical and Analytical Simulation of the Structure of a Supersonic Gas Flow in a Variable-Section Channel with Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a periodic supply of power pulses to the gas flow in a variable-section channel on the formation of shock structures in this flow was investigated. Parameters of the power supply providing different regimes of flow in the indicated channel and criteria of these regimes were determined on the basis of the solution of the problem of a powerful explosion with the use of the similarity theory and the homochronicity number. The results of the numerical simulation of the flow in the variable-section channel with power supply in the quasi-one-dimensional approximation and of the flows in cylindrical and plane channels were compared. The applicability of the analytical dependences obtained was substantiated by the results of the numerical solution of the quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional Euler equations for the flow of an ideal gas in the indicated channels.

  15. Investigating the Fate of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid in Shale Gas Formations Through Two-Phase Numerical Modelling of Fluid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.; Bandilla, K.

    2015-12-01

    The process of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas formations typically involves the injection of large quantities of water-based fluid (2×107L typical) into the shale formations in order to fracture the rock. A large proportion of the fracturing fluids injected into shale gas wells during hydraulic fracturing does not return out of the well once production begins. The percentage of water returning varies within and between different shale plays, but is generally around 30%. The large proportion of the fluid that does not return raises the possibility that it could migrate out of the target shale formation and potentially toward aquifers and the surface through pathways such as the created hydraulic fractures, faults and adjacent wells. A leading hypothesis for the fate of the remaining fracturing fluid is that it is spontaneously imbibed from the hydraulic fractures into the shale rock matrix due to the low water saturation and very high capillary pressure in the shale. The imbibition hypothesis is assessed using numerical modeling of the two-phase flow of fracturing fluid and gas in the shale during injection. The model incorporates relevant two-phase physical phenomena such as capillarity and relative permeability, including hysteretic behavior in both. Modeling scenarios for fracturing fluid injection were assessed under varying conditions for shale reservoir parameters and spatial heterogeneities in permeability and wettability. The results showed that the unaccounted fracturing fluid may plausibly be imbibed into the shale matrix under certain conditions, and that significant small-scale spatial heterogeneity in the shale permeability likely plays an important role in imbibing the fracturing fluid.

  16. Numerical simulation of transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Lombard, C. K.; Nagaraj, N.; Bershader, D.

    1985-01-01

    Time-dependent upwind high resolution schemes for solving the Euler equations were developed and applied to simulate 1-D and 2-D transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube. Using obstacles of different geometries, a series of calculations were carried out to investigate the transient complex shock-wave diffraction phenomena. Shock-wave and objects interactions with shock Mach-number Ms ranging from 2 to 20 were considered. Comparison with analytical and available experimental results indicate good agreement. Display of detailed flow structures including multiple Mach shocks, slip surfaces, and vortex are also given.

  17. Numerical Studies of Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Resulting from Inductive Transients Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sovinec, Carl R.

    2005-08-29

    This report describes results from numerical studies of transients in magnetically confined plasmas. The work has been performed by University of Wisconsin graduate students James Reynolds and Giovanni Cone and by the Principal Investigator through support from contract DE-FG02-02ER54687, a Junior Faculty in Plasma Science award from the DOE Office of Science. Results from the computations have added significantly to our knowledge of magnetized plasma relaxation in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and spheromak. In particular, they have distinguished relaxation activity expected in sustained configurations from transient effects that can persist over a significant fraction of the plasma discharge. We have also developed the numerical capability for studying electrostatic current injection in the spherical torus (ST). These configurations are being investigated as plasma confinement schemes in the international effort to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for environmentally benign energy production. Our numerical computations have been performed with the NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) using local computing resources and massively parallel computing hardware at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. Direct comparisons of simulation results for the spheromak with laboratory measurements verify the effectiveness of our numerical approach. The comparisons have been published in refereed journal articles by this group and by collaborators at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (see Section 4). In addition to the technical products, this grant has supported the graduate education of the two participating students for three years.

  18. Finite difference model for aquifer simulation in two dimensions with results of numerical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trescott, Peter C.; Pinder, George Francis; Larson, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The model will simulate ground-water flow in an artesian aquifer, a water-table aquifer, or a combined artesian and water-table aquifer. The aquifer may be heterogeneous and anisotropic and have irregular boundaries. The source term in the flow equation may include well discharge, constant recharge, leakage from confining beds in which the effects of storage are considered, and evapotranspiration as a linear function of depth to water. The theoretical development includes presentation of the appropriate flow equations and derivation of the finite-difference approximations (written for a variable grid). The documentation emphasizes the numerical techniques that can be used for solving the simultaneous equations and describes the results of numerical experiments using these techniques. Of the three numerical techniques available in the model, the strongly implicit procedure, in general, requires less computer time and has fewer numerical difficulties than do the iterative alternating direction implicit procedure and line successive overrelaxation (which includes a two-dimensional correction procedure to accelerate convergence). The documentation includes a flow chart, program listing, an example simulation, and sections on designing an aquifer model and requirements for data input. It illustrates how model results can be presented on the line printer and pen plotters with a program that utilizes the graphical display software available from the Geological Survey Computer Center Division. In addition the model includes options for reading input data from a disk and writing intermediate results on a disk.

  19. Numerical modeling of the simulated gas hydrate production test at Mallik 2L-38 in the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS - Applying the "foamy oil" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Sven; Thaler, Jan; Klump, Jens; Schicks, Judith; Uddin, Mafiz

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam. These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. We performed an experiment similar to the field-test conditions of the production test in the Mallik gas hydrate field (Mallik 2L-38) in the Beaufort Mackenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic. The aim of this experiment was to study the transport behavior of fluids in gas hydrate reservoirs during depressurization (see also Heeschen et al. and Priegnitz et al., this volume). The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, to validate the models through history matching, and to feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the one observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. They suggest that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. Our results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models of gas flow in water. References Uddin M., Wright J.F. and Coombe D

  20. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  1. Spray formation in a quasiplanar gas-liquid mixing layer at moderate density ratios: A numerical closeup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yue; Fuster, Daniel; Zaleski, Stéphane; Tryggvason, Grétar

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional development of instabilities and the subsequent spray formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer are important fundamental problems in the area of multiphase flows. It is highly desirable to visualize this detailed atomization process and to analyze the instabilities and mechanisms involved, and massive numerical simulations are required, in addition to experiment. Rapid development of numerical methods and computer technology in the past decade now allows large-scale three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of atomization to be performed. Nevertheless, the fundamental question, whether all the physical scales involved in the primary breakup process are faithfully resolved, has eluded researchers until now. In the present study, we conduct direct numerical simulations of spray formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer with state-of-the-art computational resources (using up to 4 ×109 cells and 16 384 cores), in order to obtain a high-fidelity numerical closeup of the detailed mechanisms of spray formation. We also aim to examine whether present computational resources are sufficient for a fully resolved direct numerical simulation of atomization.

  2. Exploring vortex dynamics in the presence of dissipation: Analytical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Carretero-González, R.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Proukakis, N. P.; Spirn, D.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the dynamical properties of vortices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of phenomenological dissipation, used as a basic model for the effect of finite temperatures. In the context of this so-called dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii model, we derive analytical results for the motion of single vortices and, importantly, for vortex dipoles, which have become very relevant experimentally. Our analytical results are shown to compare favorably to the full numerical solution of the dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation where appropriate. We also present results on the stability of vortices and vortex dipoles, revealing good agreement between numerical and analytical results for the internal excitation eigenfrequencies, which extends even beyond the regime of validity of this equation for cold atoms.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Gas Dynamics in the Keyhole During Laser Metal Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenner, Felix; Brock, Christian; Gürtler, Franz-Josef; Klämpfl, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    The keyhole is the crucial factor for an appropriate weld seam in laser metal welding. The stability of the keyhole is governed by multiple hydrodynamic effects such as melt flow, evaporation on the keyhole front, gas dynamics inside the evolving vapor plume and the resulting pressures from all these phenomena. Due to their elusive nature the measurement of pressures inside the keyhole is still an unresolved task. Here we show a quantification of the density of the metal vapor and the pressure inside the keyhole through measuring the keyhole opening geometry, the evaporation rate and the flow velocity inside the vapor plume. Furthermore, a comparison to a simulation model is shown. Our results are in accordance with theoretical approaches. In the future this results can support an increase of process understanding which eventually leads to a better control of the process in industry.

  4. Numerical Analysis of an Impinging Jet Reactor for the CVD and Gas-Phase Nucleation of Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  5. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of co/counter-current vertical gas-Liquid annular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhaoui, Asma; Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    We carry out three-dimensional numerical simulations of co/counter current Gas-Liquid annular flows using the parallel code, BLUE, based on a projection method for the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations and a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-Set method for the interface advection. Gas-Liquid annular flows and falling films in a pipe are present in a broad range of industrial processes. This configuration consists of an important multiphase flow regime where the liquid occupies the area adjacent to the internal circumference of the pipe and the gas flows in the pipe core. Experimentally, four distinctive flow regimes were identified ('dual-wave', 'thick ripple', 'disturbance wave' and 'regular wave' regimes), that we attempt to simulate. In order to visualize these different regimes, various liquid (water) and gas (air) flow-rates are investigated. EPSRC UK Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  6. Improving the trust in results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Cappello, Franck; Constantinescu, Emil; Hovland, Paul; Peterka, Tom; Phillips, Carolyn; Snir, Marc; Wild, Stefan

    2015-04-30

    This white paper investigates several key aspects of the trust that a user can give to the results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics. In this document, the notion of trust is related to the integrity of numerical simulations and data analytics applications. This white paper complements the DOE ASCR report on Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity by (1) exploring the sources of trust loss; (2) reviewing the definitions of trust in several areas; (3) providing numerous cases of result alteration, some of them leading to catastrophic failures; (4) examining the current notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics; (5) providing a gap analysis; and (6) suggesting two important research directions and their respective research topics. To simplify the presentation without loss of generality, we consider that trust in results can be lost (or the results’ integrity impaired) because of any form of corruption happening during the execution of the numerical simulation or the data analytics application. In general, the sources of such corruption are threefold: errors, bugs, and attacks. Current applications are already using techniques to deal with different types of corruption. However, not all potential corruptions are covered by these techniques. We firmly believe that the current level of trust that a user has in the results is at least partially founded on ignorance of this issue or the hope that no undetected corruptions will occur during the execution. This white paper explores the notion of trust and suggests recommendations for developing a more scientifically grounded notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics. We first formulate the problem and show that it goes beyond previous questions regarding the quality of results such as V&V, uncertainly quantification, and data assimilation. We then explore the complexity of this difficult problem, and we sketch complementary general

  7. Why different gas flux velocity parameterizations result in so similar flux results in the North Atlantic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Wróbel, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is a crucial region for both ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. Most of ocean deep waters are produced in the basin making it a large CO2 sink. The region, close to the major oceanographic centres has been well covered with cruises. This is why we have performed a study of net CO2 flux dependence upon the choice of gas transfer velocity k parameterization for this very region: the North Atlantic including European Arctic Seas. The study has been a part of a ESA funded OceanFlux GHG Evolution project and, at the same time, a PhD thesis (of I.W) funded by Centre of Polar Studies "POLAR-KNOW" (a project of the Polish Ministry of Science). Early results have been presented last year at EGU 2015 as a PICO presentation EGU2015-11206-1. We have used FluxEngine, a tool created within an earlier ESA funded project (OceanFlux Greenhouse Gases) to calculate the North Atlantic and global fluxes with different gas transfer velocity formulas. During the processing of the data, we have noticed that the North Atlantic results for different k formulas are more similar (in the sense of relative error) that global ones. This was true both for parameterizations using the same power of wind speed and when comparing wind squared and wind cubed parameterizations. This result was interesting because North Atlantic winds are stronger than the global average ones. Was the flux result similarity caused by the fact that the parameterizations were tuned to the North Atlantic area where many of the early cruises measuring CO2 fugacities were performed? A closer look at the parameterizations and their history showed that not all of them were based on North Atlantic data. Some of them were tuned to the South Ocean with even stronger winds while some were based on global budgets of 14C. However we have found two reasons, not reported before in the literature, for North Atlantic fluxes being more similar than global ones for different gas transfer velocity parametrizations

  8. Results of Numerical Modeling and Experimental Activities in Preparation of the Maxus-5 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassano, Edmondo; Castagnolo, Dario; Albano, Floriana; Fortezza, Raimondo

    2002-01-01

    The present paper describes numerical and experimental research activities carried out at MARS center for the preparation of an experiment on the Marangoni migration of a dissolving drop, composed by a liquid binary mixture having a miscibility gap. The paper integrates the results already presented in the previous congress, the emphasis is set on the determination of the parameters to be used for the MAXUS 5 sounding rocket mission, which is scheduled for spring 2003. Level set technique has been used for the calculation of the non-steady thermo-solutal capillary flow evolution in a bounded medium.Migration velocities and volume variation are calculated for different Marangoni numbers. The results of the numerical simulations provide the determination of drop radii and temperature gradients to be used during 12 minutes of low gravity, as provided by a MAXUS rocket. Experimental results provide accurate information on the refraction index gradient variation, due to the improvement of the interpretation of the fringe pattern. These results have allowed us to determine the optical parameters that optimize the Wollaston interferometer features. Comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement.

  9. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Atomic Gas Dominated Regions - Results from the HERACLES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruba, Andreas; Leroy, A. K.; Walter, F.; HERACLES Team

    2012-01-01

    We perform a sensitive search for faint CO emission and study how it is related to star formation in HI-dominated regions of 45 nearby spiral and dwarf galaxies using observations of CO (HERACLES), HI (THINGS), IR & Halpha (SINGS/LVL), and UV (GALEX NGS). Constraining the molecular gas content in HI-dominated regions is a crucial measurement to distinguish the role of atomic and molecular gas in the star formation process. We apply a novel technique, leveraging HI velocity fields from THINGS and wide area coverage of HERACLES to stack CO spectra and significantly increase the sensitivity. For spiral galaxies, CO (and thus H2) is linearly related to tracers of star formation (IR, Halpha, FUV) and does not depend on gas density. Meanwhile, the H2-to-HI ratio varies by several orders of magnitude with radius and total gas surface density and thus sensitively regulates the supply of star-forming molecular gas. For dwarf galaxies, we determine sensitive upper limits on the CO luminosity both near star-forming peaks and the entire galaxy and find CO emission to be faint both in an absolute sense and normalized by B-band luminosity and star formation rate (SFR). The ratio SFR/CO increases by more than an order of magnitude toward low metallicities which likely indicates a dramatic increase in the CO-to-H2 conversion factor.

  10. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  11. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  12. Numerical investigation of the Arctic ice-ocean boundary layer and implications for air-sea gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Arash; Loose, Brice; Nguyen, An T.; Cole, Sylvia T.

    2017-01-01

    In ice-covered regions it is challenging to determine constituent budgets - for heat and momentum, but also for biologically and climatically active gases like carbon dioxide and methane. The harsh environment and relative data scarcity make it difficult to characterize even the physical properties of the ocean surface. Here, we sought to evaluate if numerical model output helps us to better estimate the physical forcing that drives the air-sea gas exchange rate (k) in sea ice zones. We used the budget of radioactive 222Rn in the mixed layer to illustrate the effect that sea ice forcing has on gas budgets and air-sea gas exchange. Appropriate constraint of the 222Rn budget requires estimates of sea ice velocity, concentration, mixed-layer depth, and water velocities, as well as their evolution in time and space along the Lagrangian drift track of a mixed-layer water parcel. We used 36, 9 and 2 km horizontal resolution of regional Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) configuration with fine vertical spacing to evaluate the capability of the model to reproduce these parameters. We then compared the model results to existing field data including satellite, moorings and ice-tethered profilers. We found that mode sea ice coverage agrees with satellite-derived observation 88 to 98 % of the time when averaged over the Beaufort Gyre, and model sea ice speeds have 82 % correlation with observations. The model demonstrated the capacity to capture the broad trends in the mixed layer, although with a significant bias. Model water velocities showed only 29 % correlation with point-wise in situ data. This correlation remained low in all three model resolution simulations and we argued that is largely due to the quality of the input atmospheric forcing. Overall, we found that even the coarse-resolution model can make a modest contribution to gas exchange parameterization, by resolving the time variation of parameters that drive the 222Rn budget

  13. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID

  14. Impulse propagation over a complex site: a comparison of experimental results and numerical predictions.

    PubMed

    Dragna, Didier; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poisson, Franck

    2014-03-01

    Results from outdoor acoustic measurements performed in a railway site near Reims in France in May 2010 are compared to those obtained from a finite-difference time-domain solver of the linearized Euler equations. During the experiments, the ground profile and the different ground surface impedances were determined. Meteorological measurements were also performed to deduce mean vertical profiles of wind and temperature. An alarm pistol was used as a source of impulse signals and three microphones were located along a propagation path. The various measured parameters are introduced as input data into the numerical solver. In the frequency domain, the numerical results are in good accordance with the measurements up to a frequency of 2 kHz. In the time domain, except a time shift, the predicted waveforms match the measured waveforms with a close agreement.

  15. Photon splitting in strong magnetic fields: Asymptotic approximation formulas versus accurate numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, C.; Wunner, G.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a numerical calculation of the photon splitting rate below the electron-pair creation threshold (ω<=2m) in magnetic fields B>~Bcr=m2/e=4.414×109 T. Our results confirm asymptotic approximations derived in the low-field (B>Bcr) limit, and allow interpolating between the two asymptotic regions. Our expression for the photon splitting rate is a simplified version of a formula given by Mentzel, Berg, and Wunner. We also point out that, although the analytical formula is correct, the splitting rates calculated there are wrong due to an error in the numerical calculations.

  16. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Eventually, the weight stabilized and the measurements commenced. Helium pressure was increased slowly and carefully, first to 15 psig then to 28 psig. The readout for the balance unit continued to exhibit unexplained fluctuation and output. Buoyancy of the empty pan was measured at pressures ranging up to 800 psig measured at approximately 100 psig increments. The balance weighing unit exhibited a progressive increase in weight with increasing pressure demonstrating that the displacement volume of the tare weight side of the balance was greater than the displacement volume of the weighing pan side of the balance. Therefore, the increased gas pressure produced a greater buoyancy of the tare side, producing a net increase in weight. The carefully collected data showed a linear change in weight with pressure (see accompanying diagram). A schematic diagram of the new configuration of the sorption apparatus is depicted in the accompanying figure.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Gas Flow During Arcing Process for 252 kV Puffer Circuit Breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junhui; Wang, Xiaohua; Ma, Zhiying; Rong, Mingzhe; Yan, Jing

    2011-12-01

    A numerical simulation model for 252 kV puffer circuit breaker is constructed, by using a proven commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, PHOENICS. The model takes into account the moving parts in the circuit breaker, turbulence enhanced momentum and energy transport, radiation transport. The arcing process in a SF6 puffer circuit breaker with two hollow contacts is simulated under different conditions, and the simulation results are verified with experimental results. Through simulation, the pressure, temperature and velocity in the arc quenching chamber can be obtained. The simulation model is also capable of predicting the influence of design parameters variations on breaker performance, and can thus help to reduce the number of short-circuit tests during the design stage.

  18. Forecasting Energy Market Contracts by Ambit Processes: Empirical Study and Numerical Results

    PubMed Central

    Di Persio, Luca; Marchesan, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we exploit the theory of ambit processes to develop a model which is able to effectively forecast prices of forward contracts written on the Italian energy market. Both short-term and medium-term scenarios are considered and proper calibration procedures as well as related numerical results are provided showing a high grade of accuracy in the obtained approximations when compared with empirical time series of interest. PMID:27437500

  19. Landau-Zener transitions in a dissipative environment: numerically exact results.

    PubMed

    Nalbach, P; Thorwart, M

    2009-11-27

    We study Landau-Zener transitions in a dissipative environment by means of the numerically exact quasiadiabatic propagator path integral. It allows to cover the full range of the involved parameters. We discover a nonmonotonic dependence of the transition probability on the sweep velocity which is explained in terms of a simple phenomenological model. This feature, not captured by perturbative approaches, results from a nontrivial competition between relaxation and the external sweep.

  20. Parametric Evaluation of Absorption Losses and Comparison of Numerical Results to Boeing 707 Aircraft Experimental HIRF Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaygorsky, J.; Amburgey, C.; Elliott, J. R.; Fisher, R.; Perala, R. A.

    A broadband (100 MHz-1.2 GHz) plane wave electric field source was used to evaluate electric field penetration inside a simplified Boeing 707 aircraft model with a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method using EMA3D. The role of absorption losses inside the simplified aircraft was investigated. It was found that, in this frequency range, none of the cavities inside the Boeing 707 model are truly reverberant when frequency stirring is applied, and a purely statistical electromagnetics approach cannot be used to predict or analyze the field penetration or shielding effectiveness (SE). Thus it was our goal to attempt to understand the nature of losses in such a quasi-statistical environment by adding various numbers of absorbing objects inside the simplified aircraft and evaluating the SE, decay-time constant τ, and quality factor Q. We then compare our numerical results with experimental results obtained by D. Mark Johnson et al. on a decommissioned Boeing 707 aircraft.

  1. A method for data handling numerical results in parallel OpenFOAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, Alin; Muntean, Sebastian

    2015-12-31

    Parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations produce vast amount of numerical result data. This paper introduces a method for reducing the size of the data by replaying the interprocessor traffic. The results are recovered only in certain regions of interest configured by the user. A known test case is used for several mesh partitioning scenarios using the OpenFOAM toolkit{sup ®}[1]. The space savings obtained with classic algorithms remain constant for more than 60 Gb of floating point data. Our method is most efficient on large simulation meshes and is much better suited for compressing large scale simulation results than the regular algorithms.

  2. Acoustic Characterization of Fluorinert FC-43 Liquid with Helium Gas Bubbles: Numerical Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Vanhille, Christian; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we define the acoustic characteristics of a biphasic fluid consisting of static helium gas bubbles in liquid Fluorinert FC-43 and study the propagation of ultrasound of finite amplitudes in this medium. Very low sound speed and high sound attenuation are found, in addition to a particularly high acoustic nonlinear parameter. This result suggests the possibility of using this medium as a nonlinear enhancer in various applications. In particular, parametric generation of low ultrasonic frequencies is studied in a resonator cavity as a function of driving pressure showing high conversion efficiency. This work suggests that this medium couldmore » be used for applications such as parametric arrays, nondestructive testing, diagnostic medicine, sonochemistry, underwater acoustics, and ultrasonic imaging and to boost the shock formation in fluids.« less

  3. Numerical computation of multishocked, three-dimensional supersonic flow fields with real gas effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Reinhardt, W. A.; Warming, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented which is capable of determining the supersonic flow field surrounding three-dimensional wing-body configurations such as a delta-wing space shuttle. The governing equations in conservation-law form are solved by a finite difference method using a second-order noncentered algorithm between the body and the outermost shock wave, which is treated as a sharp discontinuity. Secondary shocks which form between these boundaries are captured automatically, and the intersection of these shocks with the bow shock posed no difficulty. Resulting flow fields about typical blunt nose shuttle-like configurations at angle of attack are presented. The differences between perfect and real gas effects for high Mach number flows are shown.

  4. Experimental results and numerical modeling of a high-performance large-scale cryopump. I. Test particle Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Xueli; Day, Christian; Haas, Horst; Varoutis, Stylianos

    2011-07-15

    For the torus of the nuclear fusion project ITER (originally the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, but also Latin: the way), eight high-performance large-scale customized cryopumps must be designed and manufactured to accommodate the very high pumping speeds and throughputs of the fusion exhaust gas needed to maintain the plasma under stable vacuum conditions and comply with other criteria which cannot be met by standard commercial vacuum pumps. Under an earlier research and development program, a model pump of reduced scale based on active cryosorption on charcoal-coated panels at 4.5 K was manufactured and tested systematically. The present article focuses on the simulation of the true three-dimensional complex geometry of the model pump by the newly developed ProVac3D Monte Carlo code. It is shown for gas throughputs of up to 1000 sccm ({approx}1.69 Pa m{sup 3}/s at T = 0 deg. C) in the free molecular regime that the numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the pumping speeds measured. Meanwhile, the capture coefficient associated with the virtual region around the cryogenic panels and shields which holds for higher throughputs is calculated using this generic approach. This means that the test particle Monte Carlo simulations in free molecular flow can be used not only for the optimization of the pumping system but also for the supply of the input parameters necessary for the future direct simulation Monte Carlo in the full flow regime.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Subsurface Transport and Groundwater Impacts from Hydraulic Fracturing of Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. T.; Moridis, G. J.; Keen, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown tremendously over the last decade, and concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways that could connect the stimulated reservoir to shallower groundwater aquifers. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a deeper tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying groundwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, assuming that the formation of a connecting pathway has already occurred. We focus on two general transport scenarios: 1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and 2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. The simulations explore a range of permeabilities and geometries over time scales, and evaluate the mechanisms and factors that could lead to the escape of gas or reservoir fluid and the contamination of groundwater resources. We also examine the effects of overpressured reservoirs, and explore long-term transport processes as part of a continuing study. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Gas production from the reservoir via a horizontal well is likely to mitigate release through the reduction of available free gas and the lowering of reservoir pressure. We also find that fractured tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of large volumes of migrating gas, and incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  6. Numerical results of the shape optimization problem for the insulation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salač, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The contribution deals with the numerical results for the shape optimization problem of the system mould, glass piece, plunger, insulation barrier and plunger cavity used in glass forming industry, which was formulated in details at AMEE'15. We used the software FreeFem++ to compute the numerical example for the real vase made from lead crystal glassware of the height 267 [mm] and of the mass 1, 55 [kg]. The plunger and the mould were made from steal, the insulation barrier was made from Murpec with the coefficient of thermal conductivity k = 2, 5 [W/m.K] and the coefficient of heat-transfer between the mould and the environment was chosen to be α = 14 [W/m2.K]. The cooling was implemented by the volume V = 10 [l/min] of water with the temperature 15°C at the entrance and the temperature 100°C at the exit. The results of the numerical optimization to required target temperature 800°C of the outward plunger surface together with the distribution of temperatures on the interface between the plunger and heat source before and after the optimization process are presented.

  7. Comparison of numerical and experimental results of the flow in the U9 Kaplan turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, O.; Mulu, B.; Nilsson, H.; Cervantes, M.

    2010-08-01

    The present work compares simulations made using the OpenFOAM CFD code with experimental measurements of the flow in the U9 Kaplan turbine model. Comparisons of the velocity profiles in the spiral casing and in the draft tube are presented. The U9 Kaplan turbine prototype located in Porjus and its model, located in Älvkarleby, Sweden, have curved inlet pipes that lead the flow to the spiral casing. Nowadays, this curved pipe and its effect on the flow in the turbine is not taken into account when numerical simulations are performed at design stage. To study the impact of the inlet pipe curvature on the flow in the turbine, and to get a better overview of the flow of the whole system, measurements were made on the 1:3.1 model of the U9 turbine. Previously published measurements were taken at the inlet of the spiral casing and just before the guide vanes, using the laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) technique. In the draft tube, a number of velocity profiles were measured using the LDA techniques. The present work extends the experimental investigation with a horizontal section at the inlet of the draft tube. The experimental results are used to specify the inlet boundary condition for the numerical simulations in the draft tube, and to validate the computational results in both the spiral casing and the draft tube. The numerical simulations were realized using the standard k-e model and a block-structured hexahedral wall function mesh.

  8. Formation of surfactant-laden drops: comparison of experimental and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, Nina; Kahouadji, Lyes; Simmons, Mark; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar; Juric, Damir; Chergui, Jalel; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-11-01

    Drop formation is ubiquitous in many industrial processes, with surfactants being commonly used to stabilise drops. Thus, understanding the regularities of drop formation and accompanying processes, such as formation of satellite droplets in the presence of surfactant is of high importance. Here we present the results of a comparative experimental and numerical study on formation of surfactant-laden drops over a range of flow rates and surfactant concentrations. The precise parameters of the surface tension isotherm for surfactants used in the experimental study are implemented in the numerical code enabling quantitative comparison between the two approaches. It is shown that the effect of surfactant depends not only on concentration, but also on the value of critical micellar concentration (cmc). The transition to the regime where satellite droplets are no longer released was observed when the flow rate exceeded a threshold value depending on surfactant concentration and cmc value. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  9. Analysis and design of numerical schemes for gas dynamics. 2: Artificial diffusion and discrete shock structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1994-01-01

    The effect of artificial diffusion on discrete shock structures is examined for a family of schemes which includes scalar diffusion, convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) schemes, and upwind schemes with characteristics splitting. The analysis leads to conditions on the diffusive flux such that stationary discrete shocks can contain a single interior point. The simplest formulation which meets these conditions is a CUSP scheme in which the coefficients of the pressure differences is fully determined by the coefficient of convective diffusion. It is also shown how both the characteristic and CUSP schemes can be modified to preserve constant stagnation enthalpy in steady flow, leading to four variants, the E and H-characteristic schemes, and the E and H-CUSP schemes. Numerical results are presented which confirm the properties of these schemes.

  10. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wojcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-09

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm{sup 2}, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between

  11. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm2, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between the

  12. Evaluation of backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) model to estimate gas emissions from complex sources based on numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianshu; Ren, Manyan

    2013-03-01

    The focus of the paper is application of an inverse-dispersion technique based on a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) model in order to calculate gas-emission rates from industrial complexes. While the bLS technique is attractive for these types of sources, the bLS calculation must assume a spatial configuration for the source. Therefore, results are presented herein of numerical simulations designed to study the sensitivity of emissions calculations to the assumption of source configuration for complex industrial sources. We discuss how measurement fetch, concentration sensor height, and optical path length influence the accuracy of emission estimation. Through simulations, we identify an improved sensor configuration in order to reduce emission-calculation errors caused by an incorrect source-configuration assumption. It is concluded that, with respect to our defined source, the optimal measurement fetch may be between 200 m and 300 m; also, the ideal measurement height is probably between 2.0 m and 2.5 m. With choices within these two ranges, a path length of about 200 m is adequate, and greater path lengths, above 200 m, result in no substantial improvement in emission calculations.

  13. Hydrogen Gas Driven Permeation through Asymmetric Membranes in Diffusion Limited and Surface Limited Regimes: Interplay between Analytical and Numerical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarev, A.; Bacherov, A.

    Validity of analytical solutions for the gas driven permeation of H in the Diffusion Limited Regime (DLR) and Surface Limited Regime (SLR) is analyzed by comparison with numerical calculations. Margins for analytical formulas have been established in terms of the permeation factors W = KLSp1/2/D on the inlet (W1) and outlet (W2) sides of the membrane. The DLR analytical formula gives perfect result (error less than 0.5%) if both W2 ≥ 104 and W1 ≥ 102 conditions are satisfied simultaneously. Decrease of both margins by two orders of magnitude leads to 10% error. The SLR analytical formula gives a very good result (error less than 0.5%) if both W1 ≤ 10-2 and W2W1 ≤ 10-3 conditions are satisfied simultaneously. Increase of both margins by two orders of magnitude leads to 10% error. It has been shown that the inlet side and the outlet side conditions are different in their importance for validity of the analytical formulas. In DLR the condition is softer on the inlet side and more rigid on the outlet side, while in SLR the condition is softer on the outlet side and more rigid on the inlet side.

  14. Model of stacked long Josephson junctions: Parallel algorithm and numerical results in case of weak coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Bashashin, M. V.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Atanasova, P. Kh.; Volokhova, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a model of system of long Josephson junctions (LJJ) with inductive and capacitive coupling. Corresponding system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by means of the standard three-point finite-difference approximation in the spatial coordinate and utilizing the Runge-Kutta method for solution of the resulting Cauchy problem. A parallel algorithm is developed and implemented on a basis of the MPI (Message Passing Interface) technology. Effect of the coupling between the JJs on the properties of LJJ system is demonstrated. Numerical results are discussed from the viewpoint of effectiveness of parallel implementation.

  15. The Andreev states of a superconducting quantum dot: mean field versus exact numerical results.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodero, A; Yeyati, A Levy

    2012-09-26

    We analyze the spectral density of a single level quantum dot coupled to superconducting leads focusing on the Andreev states appearing within the superconducting gap. We use two complementary approaches: the numerical renormalization group and the Hartree-Fock approximation. Our results show the existence of up to four bound states within the gap when the ground state is a spin doublet (π phase). Furthermore the results demonstrate the reliability of the mean field description within this phase. This is understood from a complete correspondence that can be established between the exact and the mean field quasiparticle excitation spectrum within the gap.

  16. Experimental and numerical test of the micrometeorological mass difference technique for the measurement of trace gas emissions from small plots.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Vincenzo; Alterio, Giovanni; Peressotti, Alessandro

    2004-05-01

    the experimental and numerical results, the MMD apparatus in our present configuration is suitable to be used for the monitoring of trace gas emissions of experimental plots. Advantages and limits of the present approach are discussed.

  17. Electrostatic modes in dense dusty plasmas with high fugacity: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. N.

    2000-08-01

    The existence of ultra low-frequency wave modes in dusty plasmas has been investigated over a wide range of dust fugacity [defined by f≡4πnd0λD2R, where nd0 is the dust number density, λD is the plasma Debye length, and R is the grain size (radius)] and the grain charging frequency (ω1) by numerically solving the dispersion relation obtained from the kinetic (Vlasov) theory. A detailed comparison between the numerical and the analytical results applicable for the tenuous (low fugacity, f≪1), the dilute (medium fugacity, f˜1), and the dense (high fugacity, f≫1) regimes has been carried out. In the long wavelength limit and for frequencies ω≪ω1, the dispersion curves obtained from the numerical solutions of the real as well as the complex (kinetic) dispersion relations agree, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with the analytical expressions derived from the fluid and the kinetic theories, and are thus identified with the ultra low-frequency electrostatic dust modes, namely, the dust-acoustic wave (DAW), the dust charge-density wave (DCDW) and the dust-Coulomb wave (DCW) discussed earlier [N. N. Rao, Phys. Plasmas 6, 4414 (1999); 7, 795 (2000)]. In particular, the analytical scaling between the phase speeds of the DCWs and the DAWs predicted from theoretical considerations, namely, (ω/k)DCW=(ω/k)DAW/√fδ (where δ is the ratio of the charging frequencies) is in excellent agreement with the numerical results. A simple physical picture of the DCWs has been proposed by defining an effective pressure called "Coulomb pressure" as PC≡nd0qd02/R, where qd0 is the grain surface charge. Accordingly, the DCW dispersion relation is given, in the lowest order, by (ω/k)DCW=√PC/ρdδ , where ρd≡nd0md is the dust mass density. Thus, the DCWs which are driven by the Coulomb pressure can be considered as the electrostatic analogue of the hydromagnetic (Alfvén or magnetoacoustic) waves which are driven by the magnetic field pressure. For the frequency

  18. Numerical solution of moving boundary problem for deposition process in solid fuel gas generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokhov, V. M.; Dorofeenko, S. O.; Sharov, M. S.; Toktaliev, P. D.

    2016-11-01

    Moving boundary problem in application to process of depositions formation in gas generator are considered. Gas generator, as a part of fuel preparation system of high-speed vehicle, convert solid fuel into multicomponent multiphase mixture, which further burned down in combustion chamber. Mathematical model of two-phase “gas-solid particles” flow, including Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flow in gas generator and mass, impulse conservations laws for elementary depositions layer are proposed. Verification of proposed mathematical model for depositions mass in gas generator conditions is done. Further possible improvements of proposed model, based on more detail accounting of particle-wall interaction and wall's surface adhesion properties are analyzed.

  19. Some analytical and numerical approaches to understanding trap counts resulting from pest insect immigration.

    PubMed

    Bearup, Daniel; Petrovskaya, Natalia; Petrovskii, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring of pest insects is an important part of the integrated pest management. It aims to provide information about pest insect abundance at a given location. This includes data collection, usually using traps, and their subsequent analysis and/or interpretation. However, interpretation of trap count (number of insects caught over a fixed time) remains a challenging problem. First, an increase in either the population density or insects activity can result in a similar increase in the number of insects trapped (the so called "activity-density" problem). Second, a genuine increase of the local population density can be attributed to qualitatively different ecological mechanisms such as multiplication or immigration. Identification of the true factor causing an increase in trap count is important as different mechanisms require different control strategies. In this paper, we consider a mean-field mathematical model of insect trapping based on the diffusion equation. Although the diffusion equation is a well-studied model, its analytical solution in closed form is actually available only for a few special cases, whilst in a more general case the problem has to be solved numerically. We choose finite differences as the baseline numerical method and show that numerical solution of the problem, especially in the realistic 2D case, is not at all straightforward as it requires a sufficiently accurate approximation of the diffusion fluxes. Once the numerical method is justified and tested, we apply it to the corresponding boundary problem where different types of boundary forcing describe different scenarios of pest insect immigration and reveal the corresponding patterns in the trap count growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds - Experimental and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccanti, Giovanni; Bruscaglioni, Piero; Gurioli, Massimo; Sansoni, Paola

    1993-03-01

    The experimental results of laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds are presented. Measurements were carried out on laboratory-scaled cloud models by using a picosecond laser and a streak-camera system. The turbid structures simulating clouds were suspensions of polystyrene spheres in water. The geometrical situation was similar to that of an actual lidar sounding a cloud 1000 m distant and with a thickness of 300 m. Measurements were repeated for different concentrations and different sizes of spheres. The results show how the effect of multiple scattering depends on the scattering coefficient and on the phase function of the diffusers. The depolarization introduced by multiple scattering was also investigated. The results were also compared with numerical results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Substantially good agreement between numerical and experimental results was found. The measurements showed the adequacy of modern electro-optical systems to study the features of multiple-scattering effects on lidar echoes from atmosphere or ocean by means of experiments on well-controlled laboratory-scaled models. This adequacy provides the possibility of studying the influence of different effects in the laboratory in well-controlled situations.

  1. Laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds: experimental and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Zaccanti, G; Bruscaglioni, P; Gurioli, M; Sansoni, P

    1993-03-20

    The experimental results of laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds are presented. Measurements were carried out on laboratory-scaled cloud models by using a picosecond laser and a streak-camera system. The turbid structures simulating clouds were suspensions of polystyrene spheres in water. The geometrical situation was similar to that of an actual lidar sounding a cloud 1000 m distant and with a thickness of 300 m. Measurements were repeated for different concentrations and different sizes of spheres. The results show how the effect of multiple scattering depends on the scattering coefficient and on the phase function of the diffusers. The depolarization introduced by multiple scattering was also investigated. The results were also compared with numerical results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Substantially good agreement between numerical and experimental results was found. The measurements showed the adequacy of modern electro-optical systems to study the features of multiple-scattering effects on lidar echoes from atmosphere or ocean by means of experiments on well-controlled laboratory-scaled models. This adequacy provides the possibility of studying the influence of different effects in the laboratory in well-controlled situations.

  2. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  3. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigations of the geometry influence on gas accumulation using a V-shaped forest model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudour, Bruno; Chetehouna, Khaled; Conan, Boris; Aubrun, Sandrine; Kaiss, Ahmed; Garo, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Accumulation of gas inside a valley exposed to crosswind is experimented in this paper to extrapolate it to a case of a forest fire approaching a thalweg. Experimentations were done inside a wind tunnel using a 1/400 forest model configured as a valley with two different internal angles. The forest was modelled by mesh cylinders so that a parallel is possible with a real forest thanks to similitude laws. Gas emission was ensured by 400 tubes introduced inside the cylinders and supplied with ethane which acted as a tracer. The 400 tubes were divided into four independent parts of 100 tubes, inside and outside the valley, to be able to study independently the influence of the different zones of the forest model on the gas accumulation. We focused on the measurements of velocity by Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and concentration with a Flame Ionization Detector (FID) to visualise the flow and quantify the accumulation of ethane. Analysing velocity, turbulence and concentration, a stagnation point was observed in the thalweg for the flattest valley and a recirculation zone for the deepest one where gas accumulation reached up to four times the concentration measured outside the valley due to airflow. The study of the influence of the different emission zones showed that gas accumulation mainly comes from the zones inside the valley. All these data permitted us to validate a numerical modelling which will enable us to study more cases, varying above all gas density but also choosing more valley angles and configurations. Another interest of the numerical model is the possibility of adding a thermal model.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Enhanced Nitrogen Dissolution During Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A

    2001-08-17

    Nitrogen concentrations far in excess of Sieverts' Law calculations and as high as 0.2 wt.% have been obtained in steel welds during arc welding. Such high concentrations of nitrogen in the weld metal can originate from a variety of sources, depending on the welding operation in question. One such mechanism involves the interaction between the surrounding atmosphere, which is about 80% nitrogen, and the plasma phase above the weld pool. Impingement of the surrounding atmosphere into the arc column, which is primarily composed of an inert shielding gas, can be due, in part, to insufficient shielding of the weld metal. In other cases, nitrogen can be purposefully added to the shielding gas to enhance the microstructural evolution of the weld metal. The mechanisms responsible for enhanced nitrogen concentrations are of significant interest. In both arc melting and welding operations, a plasma phase exists above the liquid metal. This plasma phase, which is composed of a number of different species not normally observed in gas-metal systems, significantly alters the nitrogen absorption reaction in liquid iron and steel. Monatomic nitrogen (N) is considered to be the species responsible for the observed enhancements in the nitrogen concentration. This role for monatomic nitrogen is based on its significantly higher solubility in iron with partial pressures many orders of magnitude less than that for diatomic nitrogen. It has also been proposed that the total amount of nitrogen present in the liquid metal is the balance of two independent processes. Monatomic nitrogen is absorbed through the interface between the arc and the liquid metal. Once a saturation level is reached at any location on the metal surface, nitrogen is then expelled from the surface of the liquid metal. This expulsion of nitrogen from the weld pool surface occurs via a desorption reaction, in which bubbles form at the surface and other heterogeneous nucleation sites in the liquid melt. These bubbles

  6. Flow and transport in highly heterogeneous formations: 3. Numerical simulations and comparison with theoretical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, I.; Fiori, A.; Dagan, G.

    2003-09-01

    In parts 1 [, 2003] and 2 [, 2003] a multi-indicator model of heterogeneous formations is devised in order to solve flow and transport in highly heterogeneous formations. The isotropic medium is made up from circular (2-D) or spherical (3-D) inclusions of different conductivities K, submerged in a matrix of effective conductivity. This structure is different from the multi-Gaussian one, even for equal log conductivity distribution and integral scale. A snapshot of a two-dimensional plume in a highly heterogeneous medium of lognormal conductivity distribution shows that the model leads to a complex transport picture. The present study was limited, however, to investigating the statistical moments of ergodic plumes. Two approximate semianalytical solutions, based on a self-consistent model (SC) and on a first-order perturbation in the log conductivity variance (FO), are used in parts 1 and 2 in order to compute the statistical moments of flow and transport variables for a lognormal conductivity pdf. In this paper an efficient and accurate numerical procedure, based on the analytic-element method [, 1989], is used in order to validate the approximate results. The solution satisfies exactly the continuity equation and at high-accuracy the continuity of heads at inclusion boundaries. The dimensionless dependent variables depend on two parameters: the volume fraction n of inclusions in the medium and the log conductivity variance σY2. For inclusions of uniform radius, the largest n was 0.9 (2-D) and 0.7 (3-D), whereas the largest σY2 was equal to 10. The SC approximation underestimates the longitudinal Eulerian velocity variance for increasing n and increasing σY2 in 2-D and, to a lesser extent, in 3-D, as compared to numerical results. The FO approximation overestimates these variances, and these effects are larger in the transverse direction. The longitudinal velocity pdf is highly skewed and negative velocities are present at high σY2, especially in 2-D. The main

  7. Numerical computation of the effective-one-body potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2016-03-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two nonspinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: a (v ) , d ¯ (v ) , q (v ) . By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (nonspinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 92, 084021 (2015).] recently obtained new expressions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential q (v ) by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine q (v ) for inverse binary separations in the range 1 /1200 ≤v ≲1 /6 . Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for q (v ) . We also obtain d ¯ (v ) in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of ≳10-8 . We find that our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for d ¯(v ) in the strong field.

  8. Numerical computation of the EOB potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2015-12-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two non-spinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: $a(v), \\bar{d}(v), q(v)$. By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (non-spinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [\\prd{\\bf92}, 084021 (2015)] recently obtained new expressions for $\\bar{d}(v)$ and $q(v)$ in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential $q(v)$ by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine $q(v)$ for inverse binary separations in the range $1/1200 \\le v \\lesssim 1/6$. Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for $q(v)$. We also obtain $\\bar{d}(v)$ in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of $\\gtrsim 10^{-8}$. We find to our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for $\\bar{d}(v)$ and $q(v)$ in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for $\\bar{d}(v)$ in the strong field.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Exhaust Gas Cooling in Channels with Periodic Elbows for Application in Compact Heat Recovery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, Sergio; Cotton, James S.; Robinson, Anthony J.

    2012-11-01

    Miniature and Micro devices represent the new frontier for advanced heat and mass transfer technology. Due to the small length scales, the use of CFD is very useful for designing and optimizing microfluidic devices since experimentation and visualization at these scales can be difficult. In this work a high temperature air microfluidic cooling strategy for applications such as compact waste heat recovery, exhaust gas recirculation and fuel cell thermal management is proposed. Initially, the application of a simple straight microchannel is considered. In an effort to partially compensate for the poor thermal properties of air, right-angle bends are introduced in order to induce Dean vortices which periodically restart the thermal boundary layer development, thus improving the heat transfer and fluid mixing. Numerical simulations in the range of 100 <= ReDh <= 1000 have been carried out for channels of square cross-section. Channel wall lengths of 1.0 mm are investigated for elbow spacings of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm. High temperature air (300°C) at atmospheric inlet pressure is the working fluid. The results indicate that the elbows substantially improve the local and average heat transfer in the channels while increasing the pressure drop. Design considerations are discussed which take into account the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the channels.

  10. Numerical Solution of the Flow of a Perfect Gas Over A Circular Cylinder at Infinite Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Frank M.

    1959-01-01

    A solution for the two-dimensional flow of an inviscid perfect gas over a circular cylinder at infinite Mach number is obtained by numerical methods of analysis. Nonisentropic conditions of curved shock waves and vorticity are included in the solution. The analysis is divided into two distinct regions, the subsonic region which is analyzed by the relaxation method of Southwell and the supersonic region which was treated by the method of characteristics. Both these methods of analysis are inapplicable on the sonic line which is therefore considered separately. The shapes of the sonic line and the shock wave are obtained by iteration techniques. The striking result of the solution is the strong curvature of the sonic line and of the other lines of constant Mach number. Because of this the influence of the supersonic flow on the sonic line is negligible. On comparison with Newtonian flow methods, it is found that the approximate methods show a larger variation of surface pressure than is given by the present solution.

  11. Velocity distribution of meteoroids colliding with planets and satellites. II. Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholshevnikov, K. V.; Shor, V. A.

    In the first part of the paper we proposed algorithm for describing velocity distribution of meteoroids colliding with planets and satellites. In the present part we show numerical characteristics of the distribution function. Namely, for each of terrestrial planets and their satellites we consider a swarm of encountering particles of asteroidal origin. They form a field of relative collisional velocities v. We consider momenta k (mathematical expectation of vk), k = -1, 1, 2, 3, 4. The data are calculated under two different assumptions: taking into account gravitation of target body or without it. The main results are presented in a series of tables each containing five numbers and several useful functions of them.

  12. Propagation of CMEs in the interplanetary medium: Numerical and analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Esparza, J. A.; Cantó, J.; González, R. F.; Lara, A.; Raga, A. C.

    2003-08-01

    We study the propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMES) from near the Sun to 1 AU by comparing results from two different models: a 1-D, hydrodynamic, single-fluid, numerical model (González-Esparza et al., 2003a) and an analytical model to study the dynamical evolution of supersonic velocity's fluctuations at the base of the solar wind applied to the propagation of CMES (Cantó et al., 2002). Both models predict that a fast CME moves initially in the inner heliosphere with a quasi-constant velocity (which has an intermediate value between the initial CME velocity and the ambient solar wind velocity ahead) until a 'critical distance' at which the CME velocity begins to decelerate approaching to the ambient solar wind velocity. This critical distance depends on the characteristics of the CME (initial velocity, density and temperature) as well as of the ambient solar wind. Given typical parameters based on observations, this critical distance can vary from 0.3 to beyond 1 AU from the Sun. These results explain the radial evolution of the velocity of fast CMEs in the inner heliosphere inferred from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations (Manoharan et al., 2001, 2003, Tokumaru et al., 2003). On the other hand, the numerical results show that a fast CME and its associated interplanetary (IP) shock follow different heliocentric evolutions: the IP shock always propagates faster than its CME driver and the latter begins to decelerate well before the shock.

  13. Deposition By Turbidity Currents In Intraslope Diapiric Minibasins: Results Of 1-D Experiments And Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, M.; Toniolo, H.; Parker, G.

    2001-12-01

    The slope of the continental margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico is riddled with small basins resulting from salt tectonics. Each such minibasin is the result of local subsidence due to salt withdrawal, and is isolated from neighboring basins by ridges formed due to compensational uplift. The minibasins are gradually filled by turbidity currents, which are active at low sea stand. Experiments in a 1-D minibasin reveal that a turbidity current flowing into a deep minibasin must undergo a hydraulic jump and form a muddy pond. This pond may not spill out of the basin even with continuous inflow. The reason for this is the detrainment of water across the settling interface that forms at the top of the muddy pond. Results of both experiments and numerical modeling of the flow and the evolution of the deposit are presented. The numerical model is the first of its kind to capture both the hydraulic jump and the effect of detrainment in ponded turbidity currents.

  14. Theoretical and numerical results on effects of attenuation on correlation functions of ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2013-09-01

    We study analytically and numerically effects of attenuation on cross-correlation functions of ambient noise in a 2-D model with different attenuation constants between and outside a pair of stations. The attenuation is accounted for by quality factor Q(ω) and complex phase velocity. The analytical results are derived for isotropic far-field source distribution assuming the Fresnel approximation and mild attenuation. More general situations including cases with non-isotropic source distributions are examined with numerical simulations. The results show that homogeneous attenuation in the interstation regions produces symmetric amplitude decay of the causal and anticausal parts of the noise cross-correlation function. The attenuation between the receivers and far-field sources generates symmetric exponential amplitude decay and may also cause asymmetric reduction of the causal/anticausal parts that increases with frequency. This frequency dependence can be used to distinguish asymmetric amplitudes due to attenuation from frequency-independent asymmetry in noise correlations generated by non-isotropic source distribution. The attenuations both between and outside station pairs also produce phase shifts that could affect measurements of group and phase velocities. In terms of noise cross-spectra, the interstation attenuation is governed by Struve functions while the attenuation between the far-field sources and receivers is associated with exponential decay and the imaginary part of complex Bessel function. These results are fundamentally different from previous studies of attenuated coherency that append the Bessel function with an exponential decay that depends on the interstation distance.

  15. A discontinuous Galerkin numerical model for the simulation of multiphase gas-particle flows in explosive volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcano, Susanna; Bonaventura, Luca

    2014-05-01

    During explosive volcanic eruptions a mixture of gases, magma fragments, crystals and eroded rocks is injected in the atmosphere at high velocity, pressure and temperature. In the proximity of the volcanic vent, the erupted underexpanded multiphase mixture can manifest the features of supersonic flows, while the subsequent column behaviour is controlled by the (subsonic) turbulent mixing and mass and thermal exchange between the gas-particle mixture and the atmosphere. One of the main difficulties of the numerical simulation of explosive volcanic eruptions is therefore the need of modeling a multiphase process where different fluid dynamic regimes coexist and develop on on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. From a computational point of view, this requires robust numerical techniques able to resolve supersonic regimes and to capture flow discontinuities (shock waves), as well as to reduce, where needed, the so-called numerical diffusion (while increasing the numerical accuracy) in order to simulate gas-particle non-equilibrium phenomena. Several examples of numerical approximation of multiphase gas-particle equations based on finite volume approach have been proposed in the literature, able to simulate the multiphase mixture up to second-order accuracy in space and time. However, achieving higher order of accuracy in the finite volume framework implies an increasing computational cost related to the extension of the computational stencil, in particular when a parallel implementation has to be employed. In this work, a mixture of gas and solid particles is described with a set of coupled partial differential equations for the mass, momentum and energy of each phase. Solid particles and the gas phase are considered as non-equilibrium interpenetrating continua, following an Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Each phase is compressible and inviscid. The gas and particles dynamics are coupled through the drag term in the momentum equations and the heat exchange term

  16. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  17. A gas-kinetic numerical method for compressible two-phase fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikov, Alexei Dmitrievich

    The kinetic theory based gas-dynamical computational method, due to (Prendergast and Xu, 1993: Xu and Prendergast, 1994) is generalized to two-phase flow computations. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic model is generalized to the case of two different mass species; collisional parameters are matched in a way to provide local conservation of macroscopic parameters such as individual number densities, total momentum and total energy. A two-fluid dynamics is derived from a Chapman- Enskog procedure, and includes calculable transport coefficients in Navier-Stokes flow regimes. The resulting system of fluid equations contains inhomogeneous terms accounting for momentum and energy exchange between the species. The method has been tested on simple problems involving shock propagation through density inhomogeneities and instabilities at material interfaces. Good agreement with previous computations and analytical predictions was obtained. We have applied the method to shock passage through array of density inhomogeneities in form of cylindrical bubbles of heavy material embedded in a light material. Strong compressible turbulence in form of vortices, sound waves and reflected shocks was observed. In the present applications the materials are treated as ideal gases. The model can be modified to include effects of intermolecular potential interaction, dissociation, and ionization. The code is limited so far to two spatial dimensions, but it can be easily extended to three spatial dimensions.

  18. Numerical analysis of spin-orbit-coupled one-dimensional Fermi gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the density-matrix renormalization group and the infinite time-evolving block decimation methods we study the interacting spin-orbit-coupled 1D Fermi gas in a transverse magnetic field. We find that the system with an attractive interaction can have a polarized insulator phase, a superconducting (SC) phase, a Luther-Emery (LE) phase, and a band insulator phase as we vary the chemical potential and the strength of the magnetic field. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the triplet pairing order at zero momentum in both the SC and the LE phase, which leads to an algebraically decaying correlation with the same exponent as that of the singlet pairing one. In contrast to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase found in the spin imbalanced system without SOC, pairings at finite momentum in these two phases have larger exponents hence do not dictate the long-range behavior. We also test for the presence of Majorana fermions in this system. Unlike results from the mean-field study, we do not find positive evidence of Majorana fermions.

  19. Swinging Atwood Machine: Experimental and numerical results, and a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, O.; Pérez, J. P.; Ramis, J. P.; Simó, C.; Simon, S.; Weil, J. A.

    2010-06-01

    A Swinging Atwood Machine ( SAM) is built and some experimental results concerning its dynamic behaviour are presented. Experiments clearly show that pulleys play a role in the motion of the pendulum, since they can rotate and have non-negligible radii and masses. Equations of motion must therefore take into account the moment of inertia of the pulleys, as well as the winding of the rope around them. Their influence is compared to previous studies. A preliminary discussion of the role of dissipation is included. The theoretical behaviour of the system with pulleys is illustrated numerically, and the relevance of different parameters is highlighted. Finally, the integrability of the dynamic system is studied, the main result being that the machine with pulleys is non-integrable. The status of the results on integrability of the pulley-less machine is also recalled.

  20. Parameter sampling capabilities of sequential and simultaneous data assimilation: II. Statistical analysis of numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Kristian; Mannseth, Trond

    2014-11-01

    We assess and compare parameter sampling capabilities of one sequential and one simultaneous Bayesian, ensemble-based, joint state-parameter (JS) estimation method. In the companion paper, part I (Fossum and Mannseth 2014 Inverse Problems 30 114002), analytical investigations lead us to propose three claims, essentially stating that the sequential method can be expected to outperform the simultaneous method for weakly nonlinear forward models. Here, we assess the reliability and robustness of these claims through statistical analysis of results from a range of numerical experiments. Samples generated by the two approximate JS methods are compared to samples from the posterior distribution generated by a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, using four approximate measures of distance between probability distributions. Forward-model nonlinearity is assessed from a stochastic nonlinearity measure allowing for sufficiently large model dimensions. Both toy models (with low computational complexity, and where the nonlinearity is fairly easy to control) and two-phase porous-media flow models (corresponding to down-scaled versions of problems to which the JS methods have been frequently applied recently) are considered in the numerical experiments. Results from the statistical analysis show strong support of all three claims stated in part I.

  1. Noninvasive assessment of mitral inertness: clinical results with numerical model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial forces (Mdv/dt) are a significant component of transmitral flow, but cannot be measured with Doppler echo. We validated a method of estimating Mdv/dt. Ten patients had a dual sensor transmitral (TM) catheter placed during cardiac surgery. Doppler and 2D echo was performed while acquiring LA and LV pressures. Mdv/dt was determined from the Bernoulli equation using Doppler velocities and TM gradients. Results were compared with numerical modeling. TM gradients (range: 1.04-14.24 mmHg) consisted of 74.0 +/- 11.0% inertial forcers (range: 0.6-12.9 mmHg). Multivariate analysis predicted Mdv/dt = -4.171(S/D (RATIO)) + 0.063(LAvolume-max) + 5. Using this equation, a strong relationship was obtained for the clinical dataset (y=0.98x - 0.045, r=0.90) and the results of numerical modeling (y=0.96x - 0.16, r=0.84). TM gradients are mainly inertial and, as validated by modeling, can be estimated with echocardiography.

  2. Noninvasive assessment of mitral inertness: clinical results with numerical model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial forces (Mdv/dt) are a significant component of transmitral flow, but cannot be measured with Doppler echo. We validated a method of estimating Mdv/dt. Ten patients had a dual sensor transmitral (TM) catheter placed during cardiac surgery. Doppler and 2D echo was performed while acquiring LA and LV pressures. Mdv/dt was determined from the Bernoulli equation using Doppler velocities and TM gradients. Results were compared with numerical modeling. TM gradients (range: 1.04-14.24 mmHg) consisted of 74.0 +/- 11.0% inertial forcers (range: 0.6-12.9 mmHg). Multivariate analysis predicted Mdv/dt = -4.171(S/D (RATIO)) + 0.063(LAvolume-max) + 5. Using this equation, a strong relationship was obtained for the clinical dataset (y=0.98x - 0.045, r=0.90) and the results of numerical modeling (y=0.96x - 0.16, r=0.84). TM gradients are mainly inertial and, as validated by modeling, can be estimated with echocardiography.

  3. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    DOE PAGES

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; ...

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on twomore » general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.« less

  4. Numerical and experimental study on shear coaxial injectors with hot hydrogen-rich gas/oxygen-rich gas and GH2/GO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ping; Li, Mao; Cai, Guo-Biao

    2013-04-01

    The influences of the shear coaxial injector parameters on the combustion performance and the heat load of a combustor are studied numerically and experimentally. The injector parameters, including the ratio of the oxidizer pressure drop to the combustor pressure (DP), the velocity ratio of fuel to oxidizer (RV), the thickness (WO), and the recess (HO) of the oxidizer injector post tip, the temperature of the hydrogen-rich gas (TH) and the oxygen-rich gas (TO), are integrated by the orthogonal experimental design method to investigate the performance of the shear coaxial injector. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen at ambient temperature (GH2/GO2), and the hot hydrogen-rich gas/oxygen-rich gas are used here. The length of the combustion (LC), the average temperatures of the combustor wall (TW), and the faceplate (TF) are selected as the indicators. The tendencies of the influences of injector parameters on the combustion performance and the heat load of the combustor for the GH2/GO2 case are similar to those in the hot propellants case. However, the combustion performance in the hot propellant case is better than that in the GH2/GO2 case, and the heat load of the combustor is also larger than that in the latter case.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of Particle Behaviour in a Gas-Solid Three Dimensional Plane Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, N. A.; Tang, J. C. K.; Hawkes, E. R.; Yeoh, G. H.; Grout, Ray W.; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Talei, M.; Taylor, R. A.; Bolla, M.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a three-dimensional (3D), non-reacting, temporally evolving planar jet laden with mono-dispersed solid particles in the two-way coupling (TWC) regime are performed. Three different particles Stokes numbers (St = 0.1, 1, 10) have been considered. This has been achieved by varying the particle diameter while keeping the particle mass loading (fm = 1) and the jet Reynolds number (Rejet = 2000) unchanged. The objective is to study the effect of the particle Stokes number TWC regime on the temporal development of the planar jet. Two-way coupled momentum and heat transfer has been studied by investigating mean relative velocity and temperature. Results indicate that the relative parameters are more pronounced on the edges of the jet and decrease in time in general. At the center of the jet however, the mean value first increases and then decreases again. Additionally, lighter particles spread farther than heavier particles from the center of the jet. Furthermore, the heavier particles delay the development of the jet due to TWC effects.

  6. Long-Term Creep Behavior of the Intervertebral Disk: Comparison between Bioreactor Data and Numerical Results.

    PubMed

    Castro, A P G; Paul, C P L; Detiger, S E L; Smit, T H; van Royen, B J; Pimenta Claro, J C; Mullender, M G; Alves, J L

    2014-01-01

    The loaded disk culture system is an intervertebral disk (IVD)-oriented bioreactor developed by the VU Medical Center (VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), which has the capacity of maintaining up to 12 IVDs in culture, for approximately 3 weeks after extraction. Using this system, eight goat IVDs were provided with the essential nutrients and submitted to compression tests without losing their biomechanical and physiological properties, for 22 days. Based on previous reports (Paul et al., 2012, 2013; Detiger et al., 2013), four of these IVDs were kept in physiological condition (control) and the other four were previously injected with chondroitinase ABC (CABC), in order to promote degenerative disk disease (DDD). The loading profile intercalated 16 h of activity loading with 8 h of loading recovery to express the standard circadian variations. The displacement behavior of these eight IVDs along the first 2 days of the experiment was numerically reproduced, using an IVD osmo-poro-hyper-viscoelastic and fiber-reinforced finite element (FE) model. The simulations were run on a custom FE solver (Castro et al., 2014). The analysis of the experimental results allowed concluding that the effect of the CABC injection was only significant in two of the four IVDs. The four control IVDs showed no signs of degeneration, as expected. In what concerns to the numerical simulations, the IVD FE model was able to reproduce the generic behavior of the two groups of goat IVDs (control and injected). However, some discrepancies were still noticed on the comparison between the injected IVDs and the numerical simulations, namely on the recovery periods. This may be justified by the complexity of the pathways for DDD, associated with the multiplicity of physiological responses to each direct or indirect stimulus. Nevertheless, one could conclude that ligaments, muscles, and IVD covering membranes could be added to the FE model, in order to improve its accuracy and properly

  7. Re-Computation of Numerical Results Contained in NACA Report No. 496

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III

    2015-01-01

    An extensive examination of NACA Report No. 496 (NACA 496), "General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter," by Theodore Theodorsen, is described. The examination included checking equations and solution methods and re-computing interim quantities and all numerical examples in NACA 496. The checks revealed that NACA 496 contains computational shortcuts (time- and effort-saving devices for engineers of the time) and clever artifices (employed in its solution methods), but, unfortunately, also contains numerous tripping points (aspects of NACA 496 that have the potential to cause confusion) and some errors. The re-computations were performed employing the methods and procedures described in NACA 496, but using modern computational tools. With some exceptions, the magnitudes and trends of the original results were in fair-to-very-good agreement with the re-computed results. The exceptions included what are speculated to be computational errors in the original in some instances and transcription errors in the original in others. Independent flutter calculations were performed and, in all cases, including those where the original and re-computed results differed significantly, were in excellent agreement with the re-computed results. Appendix A contains NACA 496; Appendix B contains a Matlab(Reistered) program that performs the re-computation of results; Appendix C presents three alternate solution methods, with examples, for the two-degree-of-freedom solution method of NACA 496; Appendix D contains the three-degree-of-freedom solution method (outlined in NACA 496 but never implemented), with examples.

  8. Strain Localization of Elastic-Damaging Frictional-Cohesive Materials: Analytical Results and Numerical Verification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Ying; Cervera, Miguel

    2017-04-20

    Damage-induced strain softening is of vital importance for the modeling of localized failure in frictional-cohesive materials. This paper addresses strain localization of damaging solids and the resulting consistent frictional-cohesive crack models. As a supplement to the framework recently established for stress-based continuum material models in rate form (Wu and Cervera 2015, 2016), several classical strain-based damage models, expressed usually in total and secant format, are considered. Upon strain localization of such damaging solids, Maxwell's kinematics of a strong (or regularized) discontinuity has to be reproduced by the inelastic damage strains, which are defined by a bounded characteristic tensor and an unbounded scalar related to the damage variable. This kinematic constraint yields a set of nonlinear equations from which the discontinuity orientation and damage-type localized cohesive relations can be derived. It is found that for the "Simó and Ju 1987" isotropic damage model, the localization angles and the resulting cohesive model heavily depend on lateral deformations usually ignored in classical crack models for quasi-brittle solids. To remedy this inconsistency, a modified damage model is proposed. Its strain localization analysis naturally results in a consistent frictional-cohesive crack model of damage type, which can be regularized as a classical smeared crack model. The analytical results are numerically verified by the recently-proposed mixed stabilized finite element method, regarding a singly-perforated plate under uniaxial tension. Remarkably, for all of the damage models discussed in this work, the numerically-obtained localization angles agree almost exactly with the closed-form results. This agreement, on the one hand, consolidates the strain localization analysis based on Maxwell's kinematics and, on the other hand, illustrates versatility of the mixed stabilized finite element method.

  9. Strain Localization of Elastic-Damaging Frictional-Cohesive Materials: Analytical Results and Numerical Verification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-Ying; Cervera, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Damage-induced strain softening is of vital importance for the modeling of localized failure in frictional-cohesive materials. This paper addresses strain localization of damaging solids and the resulting consistent frictional-cohesive crack models. As a supplement to the framework recently established for stress-based continuum material models in rate form (Wu and Cervera 2015, 2016), several classical strain-based damage models, expressed usually in total and secant format, are considered. Upon strain localization of such damaging solids, Maxwell’s kinematics of a strong (or regularized) discontinuity has to be reproduced by the inelastic damage strains, which are defined by a bounded characteristic tensor and an unbounded scalar related to the damage variable. This kinematic constraint yields a set of nonlinear equations from which the discontinuity orientation and damage-type localized cohesive relations can be derived. It is found that for the “Simó and Ju 1987” isotropic damage model, the localization angles and the resulting cohesive model heavily depend on lateral deformations usually ignored in classical crack models for quasi-brittle solids. To remedy this inconsistency, a modified damage model is proposed. Its strain localization analysis naturally results in a consistent frictional-cohesive crack model of damage type, which can be regularized as a classical smeared crack model. The analytical results are numerically verified by the recently-proposed mixed stabilized finite element method, regarding a singly-perforated plate under uniaxial tension. Remarkably, for all of the damage models discussed in this work, the numerically-obtained localization angles agree almost exactly with the closed-form results. This agreement, on the one hand, consolidates the strain localization analysis based on Maxwell’s kinematics and, on the other hand, illustrates versatility of the mixed stabilized finite element method. PMID:28772794

  10. Introducing "É VIVO! Virtual Eruptions on a Supercomputer". A DVD aimed at sharing results from numerical simulations of explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Todesco, M.; Neri, A.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Tola, E.; Rocco, G.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new DVD of the INGV outreach series, aimed at illustrating our research work on pyroclastic flow modeling. Pyroclastic flows (or pyroclastic density currents) are hot, devastating clouds of gas and ashes, generated during explosive eruptions. Understanding their dynamics and impact is crucial for a proper hazard assessment. We employ a 3D numerical model which describes the main features of the multi-phase and multi-component process, from the generation of the flows to their propagation along complex terrains. Our numerical results can be translated into color animations, which describe the temporal evolution of flow variables such as temperature or ash concentration. The animations provide a detailed and effective description of the natural phenomenon which can be used to present this geological process to a general public and to improve the hazard perception in volcanic areas. In our DVD, the computer animations are introduced and commented by professionals and researchers who deals at various levels with the study of pyroclastic flows and their impact. Their comments are taken as short interviews, mounted in a short video (about 10 minutes), which describes the natural process, as well as the model and its applications to some explosive volcanoes like Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei, Mt. St. Helens and Soufriere Hills (Montserrat). The ensemble of different voices and faces provides a direct sense of the multi-disciplinary effort involved in the assessment of pyroclastic flow hazard. The video also introduces the people who address this complex problem, and the personal involvement beyond the scientific results. The full, uncommented animations of the pyroclastic flow propagation on the different volcanic settings are also provided in the DVD, that is meant to be a general, flexible outreach tool.

  11. Numerical Study on the Effect of Substrate Angle on Particle Impact Velocity and Normal Velocity Component in Cold Gas Dynamic Spraying Based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Li, Wen-Ya; Xu, Bao-Peng

    2010-12-01

    Numerical study was conducted to investigate the effect of substrate angle on particle impact velocity and normal velocity component in cold gas dynamic spraying by using three-dimensional models based on computational fluid dynamics. It was found that the substrate angle has significant effect on particle impact velocity and normal velocity component. With increasing the substrate angle, the bow shock strength becomes increasingly weak, which results in a gradual rise in particle impact velocity. The distribution of the impact velocity presents a linearly increase along the substrate centerline due to the existence of the substrate angle and the growth rate rises gradually with increasing the substrate angle. Furthermore, the normal velocity component reduces steeply with the increase in substrate angle, which may result in a sharp decrease in deposition efficiency. In addition, the study on the influence of procedure parameters showed that gas pressure, temperature, type, and particle size also play an important role in particle acceleration.

  12. Numerical study of threshold intensity dependence on gas pressure in the breakdown of molecular hydrogen induced by excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Nassef, O. Aied

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, a numerical analysis is performed to investigate the threshold intensity dependence on gas pressure in laser spark ignition of the H2 plasma. The analysis considered the experimental measurements that were carried out by Yagi and Huo [Appl. Opt. 35, 3183 (1996)]. In their experiment, H2 in a pressure range of 150-3000 Torr is irradiated by a focused excimer laser source using a 96 cm lens at a wavelength of 248 nm and a pulse duration of 20 ns. The study, based on a modified electron cascade model [K. A. Hamam et al., J. Mod. Phys. 4, 311 (2013)], solves numerically a time-dependent energy equation for the distribution of the electron energy as well as a set of rate equations that describe the change in the formed excited molecule population. This model enabled the determination of the threshold intensity as a function of gas pressure. The validity of the model was tested by comparing the calculated thresholds with the experimentally measured ones. Moreover, the calculation of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters justified the role of the electron gain and loss processes in controlling the value of threshold intensity in relation to the gas pressure. The effect of loss processes on the threshold intensity is also presented.

  13. Carbon fiber composites inspection and defect characterization using active infrared thermography: numerical simulations and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Henrique; Zhang, Hai; Figueiredo, Alisson; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Guimarares, Gilmar; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Composite materials are widely used in the aeronautic industry. One of the reasons is because they have strength and stiffness comparable to metals, with the added advantage of significant weight reduction. Infrared thermography (IT) is a safe nondestructive testing technique that has a fast inspection rate. In active IT, an external heat source is used to stimulate the material being inspected in order to generate a thermal contrast between the feature of interest and the background. In this paper, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers are inspected using IT. More specifically, carbon/PEEK (polyether ether ketone) laminates with square Kapton inserts of different sizes and at different depths are tested with three different IT techniques: pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and line scan thermography. The finite element method is used to simulate the pulsed thermography experiment. Numerical results displayed a very good agreement with experimental results.

  14. Evaluation of dense gas dispersion test results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheesley, D.

    1997-03-01

    A national Spill Test Facility (STF) program dedicated to public safety in the use and transport of fuels and other chemicals was established by Congress. The program is charged with developing technology for spill prediction, prevention, and mitigation. The Spill Test Facility, located northeast of Mercury, Nevada, is to be used for research leading to the development of tools for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment in response to accidental spills of hazardous materials. Public laws, including the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, also require that the Secretary of Energy make the STF and STF test data available to industry, academia, and other government agencies. The objective of this subtask is to produce a data base allowing the chemical and fuel accident responder to access emergency management information quickly and efficiently. The work has involved (1) archiving spill test facility results from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (LGFSTF) at the Nevada National Test Site, (2) updating the data base on spill control technology documents and data, and (3) transferring this information to the public.

  15. A theory of scintillation for two-component power law irregularity spectra: Overview and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Rino, Charles L.

    2016-06-01

    We extend the power law phase screen theory for ionospheric scintillation to account for the case where the refractive index irregularities follow a two-component inverse power law spectrum. The two-component model includes, as special cases, an unmodified power law and a modified power law with spectral break that may assume the role of an outer scale, intermediate break scale, or inner scale. As such, it provides a framework for investigating the effects of a spectral break on the scintillation statistics. Using this spectral model, we solve the fourth moment equation governing intensity variations following propagation through two-dimensional field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere. A specific normalization is invoked that exploits self-similar properties of the structure to achieve a universal scaling, such that different combinations of perturbation strength, propagation distance, and frequency produce the same results. The numerical algorithm is validated using new theoretical predictions for the behavior of the scintillation index and intensity correlation length under strong scatter conditions. A series of numerical experiments are conducted to investigate the morphologies of the intensity spectrum, scintillation index, and intensity correlation length as functions of the spectral indices and strength of scatter; retrieve phase screen parameters from intensity scintillation observations; explore the relative contributions to the scintillation due to large- and small-scale ionospheric structures; and quantify the conditions under which a general spectral break will influence the scintillation statistics.

  16. Asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey; Cerfon, Antoine; Parra, Felix

    2012-10-01

    We have recently presented a new asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria that generalizes the classic Greene-Johnson expansion [1] to allow for 3D equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis [2]. Our expansion achieves the two goals of reducing the complexity of the three-dimensional MHD equilibrium equations and of describing equilibria in modern stellarator experiments. The end result of our analysis is a set of two coupled partial differential equations for the plasma pressure and the toroidal vector potential which fully determine the stellarator equilibrium. Both equations are advection equations in which the toroidal angle plays the role of time. We show that the method of characteristics, following magnetic field lines, is a convenient way of solving these equations, avoiding the difficulties associated with the periodicity of the solution in the toroidal angle. By combining the method of characteristics with Green's function integrals for the evaluation of the magnetic field due to the plasma current, we obtain an efficient numerical solver for our expansion. Numerical equilibria thus calculated will be given.[4pt] [1] J.M. Greene and J.L. Johnson, Phys. Fluids 4, 875 (1961)[0pt] [2] A.J. Cerfon, J.P. Freidberg, and F.I. Parra, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 16 GP9.00081 (2011)

  17. Numerical simulation of the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock based on digital core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xin; Zou, Changchun; Li, Zhenhua; Meng, Xiaohong; Qi, Xinghua

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock by applying the finite element method to digital cores which are built based on an advanced Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and a combination workflow. Study shows that the shale gas reservoir rock has strong anisotropic electrical conductivity because the conductivity is significantly different in both horizontal and vertical directions. The Archie formula is not suitable for application in shale reservoirs. The formation resistivity decreases in two cases; namely (a) with the increase of clay mineral content and the cation exchange capacity of clay, and (b) with the increase of pyrite content. The formation resistivity is not sensitive to the solid organic matter but to the clay and gas in the pores.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations of high temperature gas heat transfer and flow in a VHTR reactor core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin Rodriguez, Francisco Ivan

    High pressure/high temperature forced and natural convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. VHTRs are designed with the capability to withstand accidents by preventing nuclear fuel meltdown, using passive safety mechanisms; a product of advanced reactor designs including the implementation of inert gases like helium as coolants. The present experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced and natural circulation experiments. This work examines fundamental aspects of high temperature gas heat transfer applied to VHTR operational and accident scenarios. Two different types of experiments, forced convection and natural circulation, were conducted under high pressure and high temperature conditions using three different gases: air, nitrogen and helium. The experimental data were analyzed to obtain heat transfer coefficient data in the form of Nusselt numbers as a function of Reynolds, Grashof and Prandtl numbers. This work also examines the flow laminarization phenomenon (turbulent flows displaying much lower heat transfer parameters than expected due to intense heating conditions) in detail for a full range of Reynolds numbers including: laminar, transition and turbulent flows under forced convection and its impact on heat transfer. This phenomenon could give rise to deterioration in convection heat transfer and occurrence of hot spots in the reactor core. Forced and mixed convection data analyzed indicated the occurrence of flow laminarization phenomenon due to the buoyancy and acceleration effects induced by strong heating. Turbulence parameters were also measured using a hot wire anemometer in forced convection experiments to confirm the existence of the flow laminarization phenomenon. In particular, these results demonstrated the influence of pressure on delayed transition between laminar and turbulent flow. The heat

  19. Gas Properties and Implications for Galactic Star Formation in Numerical Models of the Turbulent, Multiphase Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Hiroshi; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2009-03-01

    Using numerical simulations of galactic disks that resolve scales from ~1 to several hundred pc, we investigate dynamical properties of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in which turbulence is driven by feedback from star formation. We focus on effects of H II regions by implementing a recipe for intense heating confined within dense, self-gravitating regions. Our models are two dimensional, representing radial-vertical slices through the disk, and include sheared background rotation of the gas, vertical stratification, heating and cooling to yield temperatures T ~ 10 - 104 K, and conduction that resolves thermal instabilities on our numerical grid. Each simulation evolves to reach a quasi-steady state, for which we analyze the time-averaged properties of the gas. In our suite of models, three parameters (the gas surface density Σ, the stellar volume density ρ*, and the local angular rotation rate Ω) are separately controlled in order to explore environmental dependences. Among other statistical measures, we evaluate turbulent amplitudes, virial ratios, Toomre Q parameters including turbulence, and the mass fractions at different densities. We find that the dense gas (n>100 cm-3) has turbulence levels similar to those observed in giant molecular clouds and virial ratios ~1-2. Our models show that the Toomre Q parameter in the dense gas evolves to values near unity; this demonstrates self-regulation via turbulent feedback. We also test how the surface star formation rate ΣSFR depends on Σ, ρ*, and Ω. Under the assumption that the star formation rate (SFR) is proportional to the amount of gas at densities above a threshold n th divided by the free-fall time at that threshold, we find that ΣSFR vprop Σ1+p with 1 + p~ 1.2-1.4 when n th = 102 or 103 cm-3, consistent with observed Kennicutt-Schmidt relations. Estimates of SFRs based on large-scale properties (the orbital time, the Jeans time, or the free-fall time at the mean density within a scale height

  20. Effect of carrier gas properties on aerosol distribution in a CT-based human airway numerical model

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2012-01-01

    The effect of carrier gas properties on particle transport in the human lung is investigated numerically in an imaging based airway model. The airway model consists of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT)-based upper and intra-thoracic central airways. The large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted for simulation of transitional and turbulent flows. The image-registration-derived boundary condition is employed to match regional ventilation of the whole lung. Four different carrier gases of helium (He), a helium-oxygen mixture (He-O2), air, and a xenon-oxygen mixture (Xe-O2) are considered. A steady inspiratory flow rate of 342 ml/s is imposed at the mouthpiece inlet to mimic aerosol delivery on inspiration, resulting in the Reynolds number at the trachea of Ret ≈ 190, 460, 1300, and 2800 for the respective gases of He, He-O2, air and Xe-O2. Thus, the flow for the He case is laminar, transitional for He-O2, and turbulent for air and Xe-O2. The instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields and the laminar/transitional/turbulent characteristics resulting from the four gases are discussed. With increasing Ret, the high-speed jet formed at the glottal constriction is more dispersed around the peripheral region of the jet and its length becomes shorter. In the laminar flow the distribution of 2.5-µm particles in the central airways depends on the particle release location at the mouthpiece inlet, whereas in the turbulent flow the particles are well mixed before reaching the first bifurcation and their distribution is strongly correlated with regional ventilation. PMID:22246469

  1. Effect of carrier gas properties on aerosol distribution in a CT-based human airway numerical model.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2012-07-01

    The effect of carrier gas properties on particle transport in the human lung is investigated numerically in an imaging based airway model. The airway model consists of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT)-based upper and intra-thoracic central airways. The large-eddy simulation technique is adopted for simulation of transitional and turbulent flows. The image-registration-derived boundary condition is employed to match regional ventilation of the whole lung. Four different carrier gases of helium (He), a helium-oxygen mixture (He-O(2)), air, and a xenon-oxygen mixture (Xe-O(2)) are considered. A steady inspiratory flow rate of 342 mL/s is imposed at the mouthpiece inlet to mimic aerosol delivery on inspiration, resulting in the Reynolds number at the trachea of Re( t ) ≈ 190, 460, 1300, and 2800 for the respective gases of He, He-O(2), air, and Xe-O(2). Thus, the flow for the He case is laminar, transitional for He-O(2), and turbulent for air and Xe-O(2). The instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields and the laminar/transitional/turbulent characteristics resulting from the four gases are discussed. With increasing Re( t ), the high-speed jet formed at the glottal constriction is more dispersed around the peripheral region of the jet and its length becomes shorter. In the laminar flow the distribution of 2.5-μm particles in the central airways depends on the particle release location at the mouthpiece inlet, whereas in the turbulent flow the particles are well mixed before reaching the first bifurcation and their distribution is strongly correlated with regional ventilation.

  2. An Introduction to Thermodynamic Performance Analysis of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Cycles Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    This document is intended as an introduction to the analysis of gas turbine engine cycles using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code. It is assumed that the analyst has a firm understanding of fluid flow, gas dynamics, thermodynamics, and turbomachinery theory. The purpose of this paper is to provide for the novice the information necessary to begin cycle analysis using NPSS. This paper and the annotated example serve as a starting point and by no means cover the entire range of information and experience necessary for engine performance simulation. NPSS syntax is presented but for a more detailed explanation of the code the user is referred to the NPSS User Guide and Reference document (ref. 1).

  3. Features of the accretion in the EX Hydrae system: Results of numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, P. B.; Zhilkin, A. G.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Semena, A. N.; Revnivtsev, M. G.

    2017-07-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model in the axisymmetric approximation that describes the flow structure in the magnetosphere of the white dwarf in the EX Hya system has been developed. Results of simulations show that the accretion in EX Hya proceeds via accretion columns, which are not closed and have curtain-like shapes. The thickness of the accretion curtains depends only weakly on the thickness of the accretion disk. This thickness developed in the simulations does not agree with observations. It is concluded that the main reason for the formation of thick accretion curtains in the model is the assumption that the magnetic field penetrates fully into the plasma of the disk. An analysis based on simple estimates shows that a diamagnetic disk that fully or partially shields the magnetic field of the star may be a more attractive explanation for the observed features of the accretion in EX Hya.

  4. Convergence of infinite dimensional sampled LQR problems - Theory and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.; Wang, C.

    1989-01-01

    A theory is developed for the convergence of the closed-loop solution to infinite-dimensional discrete-time linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) problems on the infinite time interval to the solution of a corresponding continuous-time LQR problem as the length of the sampling interval tends toward zero. Convergence of solutions to the operator algebraic Riccati equation and corresponding optimal feedback control gains is guaranteed under appropriate uniform stabilizability and detectability conditions and consistent sampling. Also presented are numerical results involving the optimal LQ control of a heat or diffusion equation, a hereditary or delay differential equation, and a hybrid system of ordinary and partial differential equations describing the transverse vibration of a cantilevered Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic beam with tip mass.

  5. Ultimate tensile strength of embedded I-sections: a comparison of experimental and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heristchian, Mahmoud; Pourakbar, Pouyan; Imeni, Saeed; Ramezani, M. Reza Adib

    2014-12-01

    Exposed baseplates together with anchor bolts are the customary method of connection of steel structures to the concrete footings. Post-Kobe studies revealed that the embedded column bases respond better to the earthquake uplift forces. The embedded column bases also, offer higher freedom in achieving the required strength, rigidity and ductility. The paper presents the results of the pullout failure of three embedded IPE140 sections, tested under different conditions. The numerical models are then, generated in Abaqus 6.10-1 software. It is concluded that, the steel profiles could be directly anchored in concrete without using anchor bolts as practiced in the exposed conventional column bases. Such embedded column bases can develop the required resistance against pullout forces at lower constructional costs.

  6. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices - How numerical implementation affects the results

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed. PMID:26679833

  7. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices--How numerical implementation affects the results.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed.

  8. Interacting steps with finite-range interactions: Analytical approximation and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Diego Felipe; Téllez, Gabriel; González, Diego Luis; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-05-01

    We calculate an analytical expression for the terrace-width distribution P(s) for an interacting step system with nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions. Our model is derived by mapping the step system onto a statistically equivalent one-dimensional system of classical particles. The validity of the model is tested with several numerical simulations and experimental results. We explore the effect of the range of interactions q on the functional form of the terrace-width distribution and pair correlation functions. For physically plausible interactions, we find modest changes when next-nearest neighbor interactions are included and generally negligible changes when more distant interactions are allowed. We discuss methods for extracting from simulated experimental data the characteristic scale-setting terms in assumed potential forms.

  9. Numerical simulation and experimental results of filament wound CFRP tubes tested under biaxial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, A.; Giannuzzi, M.; Marchetti, M.; Miliozzi, A.

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of angle ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites when subjected to uniaxial and biaxial stresses is presented. Three classes of interwoven pattern filament wound cylindrical specimens are studied in order to compare the influence of angle on the mechanical behavior of the laminate. Three dimensional finite element and thin shell analyses were first applied to the problem in order to predict global elastic behavior of specimens subjected to uniaxial loads. Different failure criteria were then adopted to investigate specimens' failure and experimental tests were carried out for a comparison with numerical results. Biaxial stress conditions were produced by applying combinations of internal pressure and axial tensile and compressive loads to the specimens.

  10. Convergence of infinite dimensional sampled LQR problems - Theory and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.; Wang, C.

    1989-01-01

    A theory is developed for the convergence of the closed-loop solution to infinite-dimensional discrete-time linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) problems on the infinite time interval to the solution of a corresponding continuous-time LQR problem as the length of the sampling interval tends toward zero. Convergence of solutions to the operator algebraic Riccati equation and corresponding optimal feedback control gains is guaranteed under appropriate uniform stabilizability and detectability conditions and consistent sampling. Also presented are numerical results involving the optimal LQ control of a heat or diffusion equation, a hereditary or delay differential equation, and a hybrid system of ordinary and partial differential equations describing the transverse vibration of a cantilevered Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic beam with tip mass.

  11. Dynamics of Tachyon Fields and Inflation - Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results with Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M.; Dimitrijević, D. D.; Djordjević, G. S.; Stojanović, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n), and tensor-scalar ratio (r) for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V(x)˜ x^{-4}, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X_0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X_0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered.

  12. Experimental and numerical results for CO2 concentration and temperature profiles in an occupied room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, Aline; Junghans, Lars; Wang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, a recognition of the scope of the negative environmental impact of existing buildings has spurred academic and industrial interest in transforming existing building design practices and disciplinary knowledge. For example, buildings alone consume 72% of the electricity produced annually in the United States; this share is expected to rise to 75% by 2025 (EPA, 2009). Significant reductions in overall building energy consumption can be achieved using green building methods such as natural ventilation. An office was instrumented on campus to acquire CO2 concentrations and temperature profiles at multiple locations while a single occupant was present. Using openFOAM, numerical calculations were performed to allow for comparisons of the CO2 concentration and temperature profiles for different ventilation strategies. Ultimately, these results will be the inputs into a real time feedback control system that can adjust actuators for indoor ventilation and utilize green design strategies. Funded by UM Office of Vice President for Research.

  13. Lateral and axial resolutions of an angle-deviation microscope for different numerical apertures: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Lai, Chin-Fa; Tan, Chen-Tai; Lin, Yi-Zhi

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the lateral and axial resolutions of a transmission laser-scanning angle-deviation microscope (TADM) with different numerical aperture (NA) values. The TADM is based on geometric optics and surface plasmon resonance principles. The surface height is proportional to the phase difference between two marginal rays of the test beam, which is passed through the test medium. We used common-path heterodyne interferometry to measure the phase difference in real time, and used a personal computer to calculate and plot the surface profile. The experimental results showed that the best lateral and axial resolutions for NA = 0.41 were 0.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively, and the lateral resolution breaks through the diffraction limits.

  14. A Numerical and Experimental Study of a Shock-Accelerated Heavy Gas Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Zoldi, Cindy Anne

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis we study the evolution of an SF6 gas cylinder surrounded by air when accelerated by a planar Mach 1.2 shock wave. Vorticity generated by the interaction of the shock wave's pressure gradient with the density gradient at the air/SF6 interface drives the evolution of the cylinder into a vortex pair

  15. Numerical studies of rock-gas flow in Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.; Amter, S.; Lu, Ning

    1992-02-01

    A computer model (TGIF -- Thermal Gradient Induced Flow) of two-dimensional, steady-state rock-gas flow driven by temperature and humidity differences is described. The model solves for the ``fresh-water head,`` a concept that has been used in models of variable-density water flow but has not previously been applied to gas flow. With this approach, the model can accurately simulate the flows driven by small differences in temperature. The unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are being studied as a potential site for a repository for high-level nuclear waste. Using the TGIF model, preliminary calculations of rock-gas flow in Yucca Mountain are made for four east-west cross-sections through the mountain. Calculations are made for three repository temperatures and for several assumptions about a possible semi-confining layer above the repository. The gas-flow simulations are then used to calculate travel-time distributions for air and for radioactive carbon-14 dioxide from the repository to the ground surface.

  16. Effects of boundary conditions and partial drainage on cyclic simple shear test results - a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Popescu, Radu; Prevost, Jean H.

    2004-08-01

    Owing to imperfect boundary conditions in laboratory soil tests and the possibility of water diffusion inside the soil specimen in undrained tests, the assumption of uniform stress/strain over the sample is not valid. This study presents a qualitative assessment of the effects of non-uniformities in stresses and strains, as well as effects of water diffusion within the soil sample on the global results of undrained cyclic simple shear tests. The possible implications of those phenomena on the results of liquefaction strength assessment are also discussed. A state-of-the-art finite element code for transient analysis of multi-phase systems is used to compare results of the so-called element tests (numerical constitutive experiments assuming uniform stress/strain/pore pressure distribution throughout the sample) with results of actual simulations of undrained cyclic simple shear tests using a finite element mesh and realistic boundary conditions. The finite element simulations are performed under various conditions, covering the entire range of practical situations: (1) perfectly drained soil specimen with constant volume, (2) perfectly undrained specimen, and (3) undrained test with possibility of water diffusion within the sample. The results presented here are restricted to strain-driven tests performed for a loose uniform fine sand with relative density Dr=40%. Effects of system compliance in undrained laboratory simple shear tests are not investigated here. Copyright

  17. Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: results of Australian field trial.

    PubMed

    Dever, Stuart A; Swarbrick, Gareth E; Stuetz, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    A field scale trial was undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia (2004-2008), to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions from low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The objective of the trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a passive landfill gas drainage and biofiltration system at treating landfill gas under field conditions, and to identify and evaluate the factors that affect the behaviour and performance of the system. The trial results showed that passively aerated biofilters operating in a temperate climate can effectively oxidise methane in landfill gas, and demonstrated that maximum methane oxidation efficiencies greater than 90% and average oxidation efficiencies greater than 50% were achieved over the 4 years of operation. The trial results also showed that landfill gas loading was the primary factor that determined the behaviour and performance of the passively aerated biofilters. The landfill gas loading rate was found to control the diffusion of atmospheric oxygen into the biofilter media, limiting the microbial methane oxidation process. The temperature and moisture conditions within the biofilter were found to be affected by local climatic conditions and were also found to affect the behaviour and performance of the biofilter, but to a lesser degree than the landfill gas loading.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of gas-solid-liquid flows with capillary effects: An application to liquid bridge forces between spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaosong; Sakai, Mikio

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a numerical method is developed to perform the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of gas-solid-liquid flows involving capillary effects. The volume-of-fluid method employed to track the free surface and the immersed boundary method is adopted for the fluid-particle coupling in three-phase flows. This numerical method is able to fully resolve the hydrodynamic force and capillary force as well as the particle motions arising from complicated gas-solid-liquid interactions. We present its application to liquid bridges among spherical particles in this paper. By using the DNS method, we obtain the static bridge force as a function of the liquid volume, contact angle, and separation distance. The results from the DNS are compared with theoretical equations and other solutions to examine its validity and suitability for modeling capillary bridges. Particularly, the nontrivial liquid bridges formed in triangular and tetrahedral particle clusters are calculated and some preliminary results are reported. We also perform dynamic simulations of liquid bridge ruptures subject to axial stretching and particle motions driven by liquid bridge action, for which accurate predictions are obtained with respect to the critical rupture distance and the equilibrium particle position, respectively. As shown through the simulations, the strength of the present method is the ability to predict the liquid bridge problem under general conditions, from which models of liquid bridge actions may be constructed without limitations. Therefore, it is believed that this DNS method can be a useful tool to improve the understanding and modeling of liquid bridges formed in complex gas-solid-liquid flows.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of gas-solid-liquid flows with capillary effects: An application to liquid bridge forces between spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaosong; Sakai, Mikio

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a numerical method is developed to perform the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of gas-solid-liquid flows involving capillary effects. The volume-of-fluid method employed to track the free surface and the immersed boundary method is adopted for the fluid-particle coupling in three-phase flows. This numerical method is able to fully resolve the hydrodynamic force and capillary force as well as the particle motions arising from complicated gas-solid-liquid interactions. We present its application to liquid bridges among spherical particles in this paper. By using the DNS method, we obtain the static bridge force as a function of the liquid volume, contact angle, and separation distance. The results from the DNS are compared with theoretical equations and other solutions to examine its validity and suitability for modeling capillary bridges. Particularly, the nontrivial liquid bridges formed in triangular and tetrahedral particle clusters are calculated and some preliminary results are reported. We also perform dynamic simulations of liquid bridge ruptures subject to axial stretching and particle motions driven by liquid bridge action, for which accurate predictions are obtained with respect to the critical rupture distance and the equilibrium particle position, respectively. As shown through the simulations, the strength of the present method is the ability to predict the liquid bridge problem under general conditions, from which models of liquid bridge actions may be constructed without limitations. Therefore, it is believed that this DNS method can be a useful tool to improve the understanding and modeling of liquid bridges formed in complex gas-solid-liquid flows.

  20. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  1. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  2. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h(exp -1) Mpc having cell size 0.31 h(exp -1) Mpc is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 1.05, omega(sub b) = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10(exp -3) of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having L(sub x) is greater than 10(exp 43) ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h(exp -1) Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright

  3. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h(exp -1) Mpc having cell size 0.31 h(exp -1) Mpc is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 1.05, omega(sub b) = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10(exp -3) of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having L(sub x) is greater than 10(exp 43) ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h(exp -1) Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright

  4. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-06-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h-1 Mpc having cell size 0.31 h-1 Mpc is followed in a simulation with 2703 = 107.3 cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma8 = 1.05, omegab = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10-3 of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having Lx is greater than 1043 ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma8 = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h-1 Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma8 = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright clusters is moderate in this redshift range, showing a broad peak near z = 0

  5. Numerical study of the spontaneous nucleation of self-rotational moist gas in a converging-diverging nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qing-Fen; Hu, Da-Peng; Jiang, Jing-Zhi; Qiu, Zhong-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation is the primary way of droplet formation in the supersonic gas separation technology, and the converging-diverging nozzle is the condensation and separation unit of supersonic gas separation devices. A three-dimensional geometrical model for the generation of self-rotational transonic gas flow is set up, based on which, the spontaneous nucleation of self-rotational transonic moist gas in the converging-diverging nozzle is carried out using an Eulerian multi-fluid model. The simulated results of the main flow and nucleation parameters indicate that the spontaneous nucleation can occur in the diverging part of the nozzle. However, different from the nucleation flow without self-rotation, the distributions of these parameters are unsymmetrical about the nozzle axis due to the irregular flow form caused by the self-rotation of gas flow. The nucleation region is located on the position where gas flows with intense rotation and the self-rotation impacts much on the nucleation process. Stronger rotation delays the onset of spontaneous nucleation and yields lower nucleation rate and narrow nucleation region. In addition, influences of other factors such as inlet total pressure p 0, inlet total temperature T 0, the nozzle-expanding ratio Ȧ and the inlet relative humidity ф 0 on the nucleation of self-rotational moist gas flow in the nozzle are also discussed.

  6. Comparison of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two different blood gas analyzers and a core laboratory analyzer.

    PubMed

    Uyanik, Metin; Sertoglu, Erdim; Kayadibi, Huseyin; Tapan, Serkan; Serdar, Muhittin A; Bilgi, Cumhur; Kurt, Ismail

    2015-04-01

    Blood gas analyzers (BGAs) are important in assessing and monitoring critically ill patients. However, the random use of BGAs to measure blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites increases the variability in test results. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the correlation of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two BGAs and a core laboratory analyzer. A total of 40 arterial blood gas samples were analyzed with two BGAs [(Nova Stat Profile Critical Care Xpress (Nova Biomedical, Waltham, MA, USA) and Siemens Rapidlab 1265 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA)) and a core laboratory analyzer [Olympus AU 2700 autoanalyzer (Beckman-Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA)]. The results of pH, pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂, sodium (Na⁺), potassium (K⁺), calcium (Ca⁺²), chloride (Cl⁻), glucose, and lactate were compared by Passing-Bablok regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. The present study showed that there was negligible variability of blood gases (pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂), K⁺ and lactate values between the blood gas and core laboratory analyzers. However, the differences in pH were modest, while Na⁺, Cl⁻, Ca²⁺ and glucose showed poor correlation according to the concordance correlation coefficient. BGAs and core laboratory autoanalyzer demonstrated variable performances and not all tests met minimum performance goals. It is important that clinicians and laboratories are aware of the limitations of their assays.

  7. Numerical Simulation of DC Casting; Interpreting the Results of a Thermo-Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boender, Wim; Burghardt, André; van Klaveren, Erik Paul; Rabenberg, Jan

    A few problems impede the efficiency of DC casting. Cold cracking, which occurs when thermally induced stresses locally exceed the tensile strength, is one of these problems. Especially, hard alloys like AA2000 and AA7000 alloys are prone to cold cracking. To gain insight into the mechanical behaviour of an ingot during casting, Corus RD&T developed a thermo-mechanical model. This numerical model simulates the evolution of temperatures, stresses, and strains inside the ingot as a result of the casting parameters, the cooling conditions, and the alloy's properties. A triaxial state of stress is shown to develop almost everywhere in the solid ingot. Interpreting these results, two approaches are reciprocally used to estimate the likelihood that a cold crack will form. In one approach, the principal stresses are assessed, yielding insight into the locations and directions of cracks. The other approach is based on energy, i.e. on the fracture toughness KIc. It provides insight into possible ways to avoid cold cracks, e.g. by pointing out that internal defects, like inclusions or pores, should be smaller than the critical crack length. The findings will be illustrated with results for the DC casting of an Al-4.5% Cu alloy.

  8. Comparison Between Numerical and Experimental Results on Mechanical Stirrer and Bubbling in a Cylindrical Tank - 13047

    SciTech Connect

    Lima da Silva, M.; Sauvage, E.; Brun, P.; Gagnoud, A.; Fautrelle, Y.; Riva, R.

    2013-07-01

    The process of vitrification in a cold crucible heated by direct induction is used in the fusion of oxides. Its feature is the production of high-purity materials. The high-level of purity of the molten is achieved because this melting technique excludes the contamination of the charge by the crucible. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the hydrodynamic of the vitrification process by direct induction, with the focus in the effects associated with the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and bubbling. Considering the complexity of the analyzed system and the goal of the present work, we simplified the system by not taking into account the thermal and electromagnetic phenomena. Based in the concept of hydraulic similitude, we performed an experimental study and a numerical modeling of the simplified model. The results of these two studies were compared and showed a good agreement. The results presented in this paper in conjunction with the previous work contribute to a better understanding of the hydrodynamics effects resulting from the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and air bubbling in the cold crucible heated by direct induction. Further works will take into account thermal and electromagnetic phenomena in the presence of mechanical stirrer and air bubbling. (authors)

  9. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

  10. Numerical Simulations of STOVL Hot Gas Ingestion in Ground Proximity Using a Multigrid Solution Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Gang

    2003-01-01

    A multi grid solution procedure for the numerical simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometries has been developed. A Full Multigrid-Full Approximation Scheme (FMG-FAS) is incorporated into the continuity and momentum equations, while the scalars are decoupled from the multi grid V-cycle. A standard kappa-Epsilon turbulence model with wall functions has been used to close the governing equations. The numerical solution is accomplished by solving for the Cartesian velocity components either with a traditional grid staggering arrangement or with a multiple velocity grid staggering arrangement. The two solution methodologies are evaluated for relative computational efficiency. The solution procedure with traditional staggering arrangement is subsequently applied to calculate the flow and temperature fields around a model Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft hovering in ground proximity.

  11. A Numerical Study of Factors Affecting Fracture-Fluid Cleanup and Produced Gas/Water in Marcellus Shale: Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Seales, Maxian B.; Dilmore, Robert; Ertekin, Turgay; ...

    2017-04-01

    Horizontal wells combined with successful multistage-hydraulic-fracture treatments are currently the most-established method for effectively stimulating and enabling economic development of gas-bearing organic-rich shale formations. Fracture cleanup in the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) is critical to stimulation effectiveness and long-term well performance. But, fluid cleanup is often hampered by formation damage, and post-fracture well performance frequently falls to less than expectations. A systematic study of the factors that hinder fracture-fluid cleanup in shale formations can help optimize fracture treatments and better quantify long-term volumes of produced water and gas. Fracture-fluid cleanup is a complex process influenced by mutliphase flow through porousmore » media (relative permeability hysteresis, capillary pressure), reservoir-rock and -fluid properties, fracture-fluid properties, proppant placement, fracture-treatment parameters, and subsequent flowback and field operations. Changing SRV and fracture conductivity as production progresses further adds to the complexity of this problem. Numerical simulation is the best and most-practical approach to investigate such a complicated blend of mechanisms, parameters, their interactions, and subsequent effect on fracture-fluid cleanup and well deliverability. Here, a 3D, two-phase, dual-porosity model was used to investigate the effect of mutliphase flow, proppant crushing, proppant diagenesis, shut-in time, reservoir-rock compaction, gas slippage, and gas desorption on fracture-fluid cleanup and well performance in Marcellus Shale. Our findings have shed light on the factors that substantially constrain efficient fracture-fluid cleanup in gas shales, and we have provided guidelines for improved fracture-treatment designs and water management.« less

  12. Clean Sampling of an Englacial Conduit at Blood Falls, Antarctica - Some Experimental and Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Julia; Francke, Gero; Feldmann, Marco; Espe, Clemens; Heinen, Dirk; Digel, Ilya; Clemens, Joachim; Schüller, Kai; Mikucki, Jill; Tulaczyk, Slawek M.; Pettit, Erin; Berry Lyons, W.; Dachwald, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    results of its deployment at Blood Falls. In contrast to conventional melting-probe applications, which can only melt vertically, the IceMole realized an oblique melting path to penetrate the englacial conduit. Experimental and numerical results on melting at oblique angles are rare. Besides reporting on the IceMole technology and the field deployment itself, we will compare and discuss the observed melting behavior with re-analysis results in the context of a recently developed numerical model. Finally, we will present our first steps in utilizing the model to infer on the ambient cryo-environment.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of liquefied natural gas (LNG) pool spreading and vaporization on water.

    PubMed

    Gopalaswami, Nirupama; Kakosimos, Konstantinos; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yi; Mentzer, R; Mannan, M Sam

    2017-07-15

    The investigation of pool spreading and vaporization phenomenon is an essential part of consequence analysis to determine the severity of LNG spills on water. In this study, release of LNG on water during marine operations is studied through experimental and numerical methods The study involves emulation of an LNG leak from transfer arms during side by side loading operations. The experimental part involves flow of LNG in a narrow trench filled with water and subsequent measurement of pool spreading and vaporization parameters. The numerical part involves CFD simulation using a three dimensional hybrid homogenous Eulerian multiphase solver to model the pool spreading and vaporization phenomenon. In this method, LNG is modeled as dispersed phase droplets which can interact with continuous phases - water and air through interphase models. The numerical study also employs a novel user-defined routine for capturing the LNG vaporization process. The CFD solver was capable of capturing the salient features of LNG pool spreading and vaporization phenomena. It was observed from experiment and CFD simulation that wind influenced both pool spreading and vaporization phenomenon through entrainment and convection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigations of internal heat transfer in an innovative trailing edge blade cooling system: stationary and rotation effects, part 2: numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniaiche, Ahmed; Ghenaiet, Adel; Carcasci, Carlo; Facchini, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical validation of the aero-thermal study of a 30:1 scaled model reproducing an innovative trailing edge with one row of enlarged pedestals under stationary and rotating conditions. A CFD analysis was performed by means of commercial ANSYS-Fluent modeling the isothermal air flow and using k- ω SST turbulence model and an isothermal air flow for both static and rotating conditions (Ro up to 0.23). The used numerical model is validated first by comparing the numerical velocity profiles distribution results to those obtained experimentally by means of PIV technique for Re = 20,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. The second validation is based on the comparison of the numerical results of the 2D HTC maps over the heated plate to those of TLC experimental data, for a smooth surface for a Reynolds number = 20,000 and 40,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. Two-tip conditions were considered: open tip and closed tip conditions. Results of the average Nusselt number inside the pedestal ducts region are presented too. The obtained results help to predict the flow field visualization and the evaluation of the aero-thermal performance of the studied blade cooling system during the design step.

  15. Numerical results on the contribution of an earthworm hole to infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzotti, Dario; Barontini, Stefano; Casali, Federico; Comincini, Mattia; Peli, Marco; Ranzi, Roberto; Rizzo, Gabriele; Tomirotti, Massimo; Vitale, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    On 9 March 2016 the WormEx I experiment was launched at the experimental site of Cividate Camuno (274ma.s.l., Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps), aiming at contributing to understand how the soil-fauna digging activity affects soil-water flow. Particularly the experiment investigates the effects of earthworms holes on the soil-water constitutive laws, in the uppermost layers of a shallow anthropized soil. In this framework a set of simulations of the water flow in presence of an earthworm hole was preliminarily performed. The FV-FD numerical code AdHydra was used to solve the Richards equation in an axis-symmetric 2D domain around a vertical earthworm hole. The hole was represented both as a void cylinder and as a virtual porous domain with typical constitutive laws of a Δ-soil. The hypothesis of Poiseuille flow and the Jourin-Borelli law applied to determine its conductivity and soil-water retention relationship. Different scenarios of hole depth and infiltration rate were explored. As a result a meaningful change in the downflow condition was observed when burrows intersect a layered soil, both in saturated and partially unsaturated soils, in case a perched water table onsets at the interface between an upper and more conductive soil layer and a lower and less conductive one. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the streamflow generation processes and soil-water movement in shallow layered soils.

  16. Newest Results from the Investigation of Polymer-Induced Drag Reduction through Direct Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Costas D.; Beris, Antony N.; Sureshkumar, R.; Handler, Robert A.

    1998-11-01

    This work continues our attempts to elucidate theoretically the mechanism of polymer-induced drag reduction through direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow, using an independently evaluated rheological model for the polymer stress. Using appropriate scaling to accommodate effects due to viscoelasticity reveals that there exists a great consistency in the results for different combinations of the polymer concentration and chain extension. This helps demonstrate that our obervations are applicable to very dilute systems, currently not possible to simulate. It also reinforces the hypothesis that one of the prerequisites for the phenomenon of drag reduction is sufficiently enhanced extensional viscosity, corresponding to the level of intensity and duration of extensional rates typically encountered during the turbulent flow. Moreover, these results motivate a study of the turbulence structure at larger Reynolds numbers and for different periodic computational cell sizes. In addition, the Reynolds stress budgets demonstrate that flow elasticity adversely affects the activities represented by the pressure-strain correlations, leading to a redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy amongst all directions. Finally, we discuss the influence of viscoelasticity in reducing the production of streamwise vorticity.

  17. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  18. A simplified method for numerical simulation of gas grilling of non-intact beef steaks to elimate Escherichia coli O157:H7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this work was to develop a numerical simulation method to study gas grilling of non-intact beef steaks (NIBS) and evaluate the effectiveness of grilling on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7. A numerical analysis program was developed to determine the effective heat transfer ...

  19. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  20. Gas Evolution Dynamics in Godunov-Type Schemes and Analysis of Numerical Shock Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are going to study the gas evolution dynamics of the exact and approximate Riemann solvers, e.g., the Flux Vector Splitting (FVS) and the Flux Difference Splitting (FDS) schemes. Since the FVS scheme and the Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS) scheme have the same physical mechanism and similar flux function, based on the analysis of the discretized KFVS scheme the weakness and advantage of the FVS scheme are closely observed. The subtle dissipative mechanism of the Godunov method in the 2D case is also analyzed, and the physical reason for shock instability, i.e., carbuncle phenomena and odd-even decoupling, is presented.

  1. Numerical modeling of two-phase behavior in the PEFC gas diffusion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha Pa223876; Kang, Qinjun; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L

    2009-01-01

    A critical performance limitation in the polymer electrolye fuel cell (PEFC) is attributed to the mass transport loss originating from suboptimal liquid water transport and flooding phenomena. Liquid water can block the porous pathways in the fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the catalyst layer (CL), thus hindering oxygen transport from the flow field to the electrochemically actives sites in the catalyst layer. In this paper, the study of the two phase behavior and the durability implications due to the wetting characteristics in the carbon paper GDL are presented using a pore-scale modeling framework.

  2. A numerical study of the hot gas environment around a STOVL aircraft in ground proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoverbeke, Thomas J.; Holdeman, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The development of Short Takeoff Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft has historically been an empirical- and experience-based technology. In this study, a 3-D turbulent flow CFD code was used to calculate the hot gas environment around an STOVL aircraft operating in ground proximity. Preliminary calculations are reported for a typical STOVL aircraft configuration to identify key features of the flow field, and to demonstrate and assess the capability of current 3-D CFD codes to calculate the temperature of the gases ingested at the engine inlet as a function of flow and geometric conditions.

  3. Test Results From a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) located at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a closed cycle system incorporating a turboaltemator, recuperator, and gas cooler connected by gas ducts to an external gas heater. For this series of tests, the BPCU was modified by replacing the gas heater with the Direct Drive Gas heater or DOG. The DOG uses electric resistance heaters to simulate a fast spectrum nuclear reactor similar to those proposed for space power applications. The combined system thermal transient behavior was the focus of these tests. The BPCU was operated at various steady state points. At each point it was subjected to transient changes involving shaft rotational speed or DOG electrical input. This paper outlines the changes made to the test unit and describes the testing that took place along with the test results.

  4. Numerical investigation of methane and formation fluid leakage along the casing of a decommissioned shale gas well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowamooz, A.; Lemieux, J.-M.; Molson, J.; Therrien, R.

    2015-06-01

    Methane and brine leakage rates and associated time scales along the cemented casing of a hypothetical decommissioned shale gas well have been assessed with a multiphase flow and multicomponent numerical model. The conceptual model used for the simulations assumes that the target shale formation is 200 m thick, overlain by a 750 m thick caprock, which is in turn overlain by a 50 m thick surficial sand aquifer, the 1000 m geological sequence being intersected by a fully penetrating borehole. This succession of geological units is representative of the region targeted for shale gas exploration in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Québec, Canada). The simulations aimed at assessing the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine leakage at the base of a surficial aquifer. The leakage of fluids can subsequently lead to the contamination of groundwater resources and/or, in the case of methane migration to ground surface, to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. The minimum reported surface casing vent flow (measured at ground level) for shale gas wells in Quebec (0.01 m3/d) is used as a reference to evaluate the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine migration. The simulations suggest that an adequately cemented borehole (with a casing annulus permeability kc≤ 1 mD) can prevent methane and brine leakage over a time scale of up to 100 years. However, a poorly cemented borehole (kc≥ 10 mD) could yield methane leakage rates at the base of an aquifer ranging from 0.04 m3/d to more than 100 m3/d, depending on the permeability of the target shale gas formation after abandonment and on the quantity of mobile gas in the formation. These values are compatible with surface casing vent flows reported for shale gas wells in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada). The simulated travel time of methane from the target shale formation to the surficial aquifer is between a few months and 30 years, depending on cementation quality and

  5. Numerical simulation of dense gas flows on unstructured grids with an implicit high resolution upwind Euler solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, P.; Rebay, S.

    2004-11-01

    The study of the dense gas flows which occur in many technological applications demands for fluid dynamic simulation tools incorporating complex thermodynamic models that are not usually available in commercial software. Moreover, the software mentioned can be used to study very interesting phenomena that usually go under the name of non-classical gasdynamics, which are theoretically predicted for high molecular weight fluids in the superheated region, close to saturation. This paper presents the numerical methods and models implemented in a computer code named zFlow which is capable of simulating inviscid dense gas flows in complex geometries. A detailed description of the space discretization method used to approximate the Euler equations on unstructured grids and for general equations of state, and a summary of the thermodynamic functions required by the mentioned formulation are also given. The performance of the code is demonstrated by presenting two applications, the calculation of the transonic flow around an airfoil computed with both the ideal gas and a complex equation of state and the simulation of the non-classical phenomena occurring in a supersonic flow between two staggered sinusoidal blades. Non-classical effects are simulated in a supersonic flow of a siloxane using a Peng-Robinson-type equation of state. Siloxanes are a class of substances used as working fluids in organic Rankine cycles turbines.

  6. Numerical study of cavitation and pinning effects due to gas injection through a bed of particles: application to a radial-flow moving-bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinay, Guillaume; Vasquez, Felaurys; Richard, Florence; Applied Mechanics Team

    2016-11-01

    In the petroleum and chemical industries, radial-flow moving-bed reactors are used to carry out chemical reactions such as catalytic reforming. Radial-flow reactors provide high capacity without increased pressure drop or greatly increased vessel dimensions. This is done by holding the catalyst in a basket forming an annular bed, and causing the gas to flow radially between the outer annulus and the central tube. Catalyst enter the top of the reactor, move through the vessel by gravity to the bottom where it is removed and then regenerated. Within the catalytic bed, the combined effects of particles motion and radial injection of the gas may lead to cavitation and pinning phenomenon that may clearly damage the reactor. We study both cavitation and pinning effects using an in-house numerical software, named PeliGRIFF (www.peligriff.com/), designed to simulate particulate flows at different scales; from the particle scale, where fluid/particle interactions are directly solved, to the particles suspension scale where the fluid/solid interactions are modeled. In the past, theoretical and experimental studies have already been conducted in order to understand the way cavitation and pinning occur. Here, we performed simulations involving a few thousands of particles aiming at reproducing experimental experiments. We will present comparisons between our numerical results and experimental results in terms of pressure drop, velocity, porosity.

  7. Numerical Solutions for Supersonic Flow of an Ideal Gas Around Blunt Two-Dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Franklyn B.

    1961-01-01

    The method described is an inverse one; the shock shape is chosen and the solution proceeds downstream to a body. Bodies blunter than circular cylinders are readily accessible, and any adiabatic index can be chosen. The lower limit to the free-stream Mach number available in any case is determined by the extent of the subsonic field, which in turn depends upon the body shape. Some discussion of the stability of the numerical processes is given. A set of solutions for flows about circular cylinders at several Mach numbers and several values of the adiabatic index is included.

  8. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulation of Gas-particulate Flow around Breathing Human and Particulate Inhalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Okubo, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Toshiaki

    2006-05-01

    It is important to predict the environment around the breathing human because inhalation of virus (avian influenza, SARS) is recently severe worldwide problem, and air pollution caused by diesel emission particle (DEP) and asbestos attract a great deal of attention. In the present study, three-dimensional numerical simulation was carried out to predict unsteady flows around a breathing human and how suspended particulate matter (SPM, diameter˜1 μm) reaches the human nose in inhalation and exhalation. In the calculation, we find out smaller breathing angle and the closer distance between the human nose and pollutant region are effective in the inhalation of SPM.

  9. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Cold Spray Gas Dynamic Effects for Polymer Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhulaifi, Abdulaziz S.; Buck, Gregory A.; Arbegast, William J.

    2012-09-01

    Low melting temperature materials such as polymers are known to be difficult to deposit using traditional cold spray techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were created for various nozzle geometries and flow conditions. A schlieren optical system was used to visualize the density gradients and flow characteristics in the free jet impingement region. Based on the CFD models, it was determined that a diffuser placed into the carrier gas flow near the nozzle exit not only leads to lower particle impact velocity required for polymer deposition, but also provides for appropriate application of compression heating of the particles to produce the conditions necessary at impact for successful coating adhesion of these materials. Experiments subsequently confirmed the successful deposition of polyethylene powder onto a 7075-T6 aluminum substrate. Using air as the carrier gas, polyethylene particles of 53-75 μm diameter and 0.94 g/cm3 density, were cold spray deposited onto the aluminum substrate, with a critical impact velocity of 191 m/s. No apparent melting of the polymer particles was observed. Refinements to these concepts are currently under investigation and a patent disclosure for the idea is pending.

  10. Numerical study on the deformation of soil stratum and vertical wells with gas hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xudong; Zhang, Xuhui; Lu, Xiaobing; Wei, Wei; Shi, Yaohong

    2016-10-01

    Gas hydrate (GH) dissociates owing to thermal injection or pressure reduction from the well in gas/oil or GH exploitation. GH dissociation leads to, for example, decreases in soil strength, engineering failures such as wellbore instabilities, and marine landslides. The FLAC3D software was used to analyze the deformation of the soil stratum and vertical wells with GH dissociation. The effects of Young's modulus, internal friction angle, cohesion of the GH layer after dissociation, and the thickness of the GH layer on the deformation of soils were studied. It is shown that the maximum displacement in the whole soil stratum occurs at the interface between the GH layer and the overlayer. The deformation of the soil stratum and wells increases with decreases in the modulus, internal friction angle, and cohesion after GH dissociation. The increase in thickness of the GH layer enlarges the deformation of the soil stratum and wells with GH dissociation. The hydrostatic pressure increases the settlement of the soil stratum, while constraining horizontal displacement. The interaction between two wells becomes significant when the affected zone around each well exceeds half the length of the GH dissociation zone.

  11. Tsunami Hazards along the Eastern Australian Coast from Potential Earthquakes: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Ding, R. W.; Yuen, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Australia is surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean and, thus, may suffer from tsunamis due to its proximity to the subduction earthquakes around the boundary of Australian Plate. Potential tsunami risks along the eastern coast, where more and more people currently live, are numerically investigated through a scenario-based method to provide an estimation of the tsunami hazard in this region. We have chosen and calculated the tsunami waves generated at the New Hebrides Trench and the Puysegur Trench, and we further investigated the relevant tsunami hazards along the eastern coast and their sensitivities to various sea floor frictions and earthquake parameters (i.e. the strike, the dip and the slip angles and the earthquake magnitude/rupture length). The results indicate that the Puysegur trench possesses a seismic threat causing wave amplitudes over 1.5 m along the coast of Tasmania, Victoria, and New South Wales, and even reaching over 2.6 m at the regions close to Sydney, Maria Island, and Gabo Island for a certain worse case, while the cities along the coast of Queensland are potentially less vulnerable than those on the southeastern Australian coast.

  12. Convection in a rotating magnetic system and taylor's constraint part II, numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, P. H.; Soward, A. M.

    1991-11-01

    Results are presented of a numerical study of marginal convection of electrically conducting fluid, permeated by a strong azimuthal magnetic field, contained in a circular cylinder rotating rapidly about its vertical axis of symmetry. To this basic state is added a geostrophic flow UG(s), constant on geostrophic cylinders radius s. Its magnitude is fixed by requiring that the Lorentz forces induced by the convecting mode satisfy Taylor's condition. The nonlinear mathematical problem describing the system was developed in an earlier paper (Skinner and Soward, 1988) and the predictions made there are confirmed here. In particular, for small values of the Roberts number q which measures the ratio of the thermal to magnetic diffusivities, two distinct regions can be recognised within the fluid with the outer region moving rapidly compared to the inner. Otherwise, conditions for the onset of instability via the Taylor state (UG0) do not differ significantly from those appropriate to the static (UG = 0) basic state. The possible disruption of the Taylor states by shear flow instabilities is discussed briefly.

  13. A Numerical Model to Explain Experimental Results of Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Unsaturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovesecchi, Gianluigi; Coppa, P.; Potenza, M.

    2017-05-01

    Effective thermal conductivity measurements on unsaturated soils by means of the probe method (thermal conductivity probe, TCP) often present a nonlinear trend of Δ T versus ln (τ ). Three different slopes are present in the plots, while a homogeneous material should present only one. Being soils composite structures made of different phases (solid earth, liquid water and air), a possible explanation is the presence of phenomena other than pure conduction, such as water evaporation and vapor migration through the soil structure. A numerical model based on finite differences has been developed to simulate these phenomena. The model takes into account several factors including heat conduction, heat storage due to thermal capacity, water evaporation and water diffusion through a porous medium. Results show that two of the three slopes can be successfully simulated by the model, confirming the interpretation of the phenomena. However, the third slope from the experimental data is lower than the model's slope, likely indicating the presence of other phenomena not yet taken into account, such as capillarity.

  14. Numerical Results for a Polytropic Cosmology Interpreted as a Dust Universe Producing Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, J.; Cervantes-Cota, J.; Chauvet, P.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. A nivel cosmol6gico pensamos que se ha estado prodticiendo radiaci6n gravitacional en cantidades considerables dentro de las galaxias. Si los eventos prodnctores de radiaci6n gravitatoria han venido ocurriendo desde Ia epoca de Ia formaci6n de las galaxias, cuando menos, sus efectos cosmol6gicos pueden ser tomados en cuenta con simplicidad y elegancia al representar la producci6n de radiaci6n y, por consiguiente, su interacci6n con materia ordinaria fenomenol6gicamente a trave's de una ecuaci6n de estado politr6pica, como lo hemos mostrado en otros trabajos. Presentamos en este articulo resultados nunericos de este modelo. ABSTRACT A common believe in cosmology is that gravitational radiation in considerable quantities is being produced within the galaxies. Ifgravitational radiation production has been running since the galaxy formation epoch, at least, its cosmological effects can be assesed with simplicity and elegance by representing the production of radiation and, therefore, its interaction with ordinary matter phenomenologically through a polytropic equation of state as shown already elsewhere. We present in this paper the numerical results of such a model. K words: COSMOLOGY - GRAVITATION

  15. Thermodiffusion in concentrated ferrofluids: Experimental and numerical results on magnetic thermodiffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, Lisa Lange, Adrian; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-02-15

    Ferrofluids consist of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a carrier liquid. Their strong thermodiffusive behaviour, characterised by the Soret coefficient, coupled with the dependency of the fluid's parameters on magnetic fields is dealt with in this work. It is known from former experimental investigations on the one hand that the Soret coefficient itself is magnetic field dependent and on the other hand that the accuracy of the coefficient's experimental determination highly depends on the volume concentration of the fluid. The thermally driven separation of particles and carrier liquid is carried out with a concentrated ferrofluid (φ = 0.087) in a horizontal thermodiffusion cell and is compared to equally detected former measurement data. The temperature gradient (1 K/mm) is applied perpendicular to the separation layer. The magnetic field is either applied parallel or perpendicular to the temperature difference. For three different magnetic field strengths (40 kA/m, 100 kA/m, 320 kA/m) the diffusive separation is detected. It reveals a sign change of the Soret coefficient with rising field strength for both field directions which stands for a change in the direction of motion of the particles. This behaviour contradicts former experimental results with a dilute magnetic fluid, in which a change in the coefficient's sign could only be detected for the parallel setup. An anisotropic behaviour in the current data is measured referring to the intensity of the separation being more intense in the perpendicular position of the magnetic field: S{sub T‖} = −0.152 K{sup −1} and S{sub T⊥} = −0.257 K{sup −1} at H = 320 kA/m. The ferrofluiddynamics-theory (FFD-theory) describes the thermodiffusive processes thermodynamically and a numerical simulation of the fluid's separation depending on the two transport parameters ξ{sub ‖} and ξ{sub ⊥} used within the FFD-theory can be implemented. In the case of a parallel aligned magnetic field, the parameter can

  16. Numerical simulation of a low-emission gas turbine combustor using KIVA-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. L.; Chen, R.; Cline, M. C.; Nguyen, H. L.; Micklow, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A modified version of the KIVA-II code was used to obtain a multidimensional numerical solution for the turbulent two-phase chemically reacting flows inside a staged turbine combustor (STC). The STC under consideration is equipped with an advanced airblast fuel nozzle and encompasses a fuel nozzle (FN), a rich-burn (RB) zone, a converging connecting pipe, a quick-quench (QQ) zone, a diverging connecting pipe, and a lean-combustion (LC) zone. The STC was divided into two subsystems, namely, FN/RB zone and QQ/LC zones, and the numerical solutions were obtained separately for each subsystem. Preliminary data characterize the major features of the flow and temperature fields inside the STC. Information on velocity, temperature, and some critical species in the FN/RB zone is presented. In the QQ/LC zones, formation of the co- and counter-rotating bulk flow and the sandwiched-ring-shaped temperature field can be clearly seen. The calculations of the mass-weighted standard deviation and the pattern factor of temperature indicated that the mixing performance of the STC is very promising.

  17. Numerical results on noise-induced dynamics in the subthreshold regime for thermoacoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Kabiraj, Lipika

    2017-03-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a serious issue in practical combustion systems. Such systems are inherently noisy, and hence the influence of noise on the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability is an aspect of practical importance. The present work is motivated by a recent report on the experimental observation of coherence resonance, or noise-induced coherence with a resonance-like dependence on the noise intensity as the system approaches the stability margin, for a prototypical premixed laminar flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Phys. Rev. E, 4 (2015)). We numerically investigate representative thermoacoustic models for such noise-induced dynamics. Similar to the experiments, we study variation in system dynamics in response to variations in the noise intensity and in a critical control parameter as the systems approach their stability margins. The qualitative match identified between experimental results and observations in the representative models investigated here confirms that coherence resonance is a feature of thermoacoustic systems. We also extend the experimental results, which were limited to the case of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, to the case of supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We identify that the phenomenon has qualitative differences for the systems undergoing transition via subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Two important practical implications are associated with the findings. Firstly, the increase in noise-induced coherence as the system approaches the onset of thermoacoustic instability can be considered as a precursor to the instability. Secondly, the dependence of noise-induced dynamics on the bifurcation type can be utilised to distinguish between subcritical and supercritical bifurcation prior to the onset of the instability.

  18. Numerical and experimental results on the spectral wave transfer in finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassai, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Determination of the form of the one-dimensional surface gravity wave spectrum in water of finite depth is important for many scientific and engineering applications. Spectral parameters of deep water and intermediate depth waves serve as input data for the design of all coastal structures and for the description of many coastal processes. Moreover, the wave spectra are given as an input for the response and seakeeping calculations of high speed vessels in extreme sea conditions and for reliable calculations of the amount of energy to be extracted by wave energy converters (WEC). Available data on finite depth spectral form is generally extrapolated from parametric forms applicable in deep water (e.g., JONSWAP) [Hasselmann et al., 1973; Mitsuyasu et al., 1980; Kahma, 1981; Donelan et al., 1992; Zakharov, 2005). The present paper gives a contribution in this field through the validation of the offshore energy spectra transfer from given spectral forms through the measurement of inshore wave heights and spectra. The wave spectra on deep water were recorded offshore Ponza by the Wave Measurement Network (Piscopia et al.,2002). The field regressions between the spectral parameters, fp and the nondimensional energy with the fetch length were evaluated for fetch-limited sea conditions. These regressions gave the values of the spectral parameters for the site of interest. The offshore wave spectra were transfered from the measurement station offshore Ponza to a site located offshore the Gulf of Salerno. The offshore local wave spectra so obtained were transfered on the coastline with the TMA model (Bouws et al., 1985). Finally the numerical results, in terms of significant wave heights, were compared with the wave data recorded by a meteo-oceanographic station owned by Naples Hydrographic Office on the coastline of Salerno in 9m depth. Some considerations about the wave energy to be potentially extracted by Wave Energy Converters were done and the results were discussed.

  19. Numerical evaluation of static-chamber measurements of soil-atmospheric gas exchange--Identification of physical processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.; Striegl, Robert G.; Russell, Thomas F.; Hutchinson, Gordon L.; Livingston, Gerald P.

    1996-01-01

    The exchange of gases between soil and atmosphere is an important process that affects atmospheric chemistry and therefore climate. The static-chamber method is the most commonly used technique for estimating the rate of that exchange. We examined the method under hypothetical field conditions where diffusion was the only mechanism for gas transport and the atmosphere outside the chamber was maintained at a fixed concentration. Analytical and numerical solutions to the soil gas diffusion equation in one and three dimensions demonstrated that gas flux density to a static chamber deployed on the soil surface was less in magnitude than the ambient exchange rate in the absence of the chamber. This discrepancy, which increased with chamber deployment time and air-filled porosity of soil, is attributed to two physical factors: distortion of the soil gas concentration gradient (the magnitude was decreased in the vertical component and increased in the radial component) and the slow transport rate of diffusion relative to mixing within the chamber. Instantaneous flux density to a chamber decreased continuously with time; steepest decreases occurred so quickly following deployment and in response to such slight changes in mean chamber headspace concentration that they would likely go undetected by most field procedures. Adverse influences of these factors were reduced by mixing the chamber headspace, minimizing deployment time, maximizing the height and radius of the chamber, and pushing the rim of the chamber into the soil. Nonlinear models were superior to a linear regression model for estimating flux densities from mean headspace concentrations, suggesting that linearity of headspace concentration with time was not necessarily a good indicator of measurement accuracy.

  20. The lambda-scheme. [for numerical integration of Euler equation of compressible gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1979-01-01

    A method for integrating the Euler equations of gas dynamics for compressible flows in any hyperbolic case is presented. This method is applied to the Mach number distribution over a stretch of an infinite duct having a variable cross section, and to the distribution in a channel opening into a vacuum with the Mach number equalling 1.04. An example of the ability of this method to handle two-dimensional unsteady flows is shown using the steady shock-and-isobars pattern reached asymptotically about an ablated blunt body with a free stream Mach number equalling 12. A final example is presented where the technique is applied to a three-dimensional steady supersonic flow, with a Mach number of 2 and an angle of attack of 5 deg.

  1. Numerical Methodology for Coupled Time-Accurate Simulations of Primary and Secondary Flowpaths in Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Athavale, M. M.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    Detailed information of the flow-fields in the secondary flowpaths and their interaction with the primary flows in gas turbine engines is necessary for successful designs with optimized secondary flow streams. Present work is focused on the development of a simulation methodology for coupled time-accurate solutions of the two flowpaths. The secondary flowstream is treated using SCISEAL, an unstructured adaptive Cartesian grid code developed for secondary flows and seals, while the mainpath flow is solved using TURBO, a density based code with capability of resolving rotor-stator interaction in multi-stage machines. An interface is being tested that links the two codes at the rim seal to allow data exchange between the two codes for parallel, coupled execution. A description of the coupling methodology and the current status of the interface development is presented. Representative steady-state solutions of the secondary flow in the UTRC HP Rig disc cavity are also presented.

  2. Numerical investigation of beam halo from beam gas scattering in KEK-ATF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Bambade, P.; Kubo, K.; Okugi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Zhou, D.

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate the final focus schemes of the Future Linear Collider (FLC), the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) at KEK is devoted to focus the beam to a RMS size of a few tens of nanometers (nm) vertically and to provide stability at the nm level at the virtual Interaction Point (IP). However, the loss of halo particles upstream will introduce background to the diagnostic instrument measuring the ultra-small beam, using a laser interferometer monitor. To help the realization of the above goals and beam operation, understanding and mitigation of beam halo are crucial. In this paper, we present the systematical simulation of beam halo formation from beam gas Coulomb scattering (BGS) in the ATF damping ring. The behavior of beam halo with various machine parameters is also discussed.

  3. Results of vapor space monitoring of flammable gas Watch List tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1997-09-18

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization Systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, release rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  4. Results of Vapor Space Monitoring of Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    2000-09-27

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, released rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  5. Effects of heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and biomass on biodegradation rate calculations - Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations were used to examine the effects of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and intrinsic biodegradation rate on the accuracy of contaminant plume-scale biodegradation rates obtained from field data. The simulations were based on a steady-state BTEX contaminant plume-scale biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions, with the electron acceptor in excess. Biomass was either uniform or correlated with K to model spatially variable intrinsic biodegradation rates. A hydraulic conductivity data set from an alluvial aquifer was used to generate three sets of 10 realizations with different degrees of heterogeneity, and contaminant transport with biodegradation was simulated with BIOMOC. Biodegradation rates were calculated from the steady-state contaminant plumes using decreases in concentration with distance downgradient and a single flow velocity estimate, as is commonly done in site characterization to support the interpretation of natural attenuation. The observed rates were found to underestimate the actual rate specified in the heterogeneous model in all cases. The discrepancy between the observed rate and the 'true' rate depended on the ground water flow velocity estimate, and increased with increasing heterogeneity in the aquifer. For a lognormal K distribution with variance of 0.46, the estimate was no more than a factor of 1.4 slower than the true rate. For aquifer with 20% silt/clay lenses, the rate estimate was as much as nine times slower than the true rate. Homogeneous-permeability, uniform-degradation rate simulations were used to generate predictions of remediation time with the rates estimated from heterogeneous models. The homogeneous models were generally overestimated the extent of remediation or underestimated remediation time, due to delayed degradation of contaminants in the low-K areas. Results suggest that aquifer characterization for natural attenuation at contaminated sites should include assessment of the presence

  6. Recombination in liquid filled ionisation chambers with multiple charge carrier species: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Gómez, F.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid-filled ionisation chambers (LICs) are used in radiotherapy for dosimetry and quality assurance. Volume recombination can be quite important in LICs for moderate dose rates, causing non-linearities in the dose rate response of these detectors, and needs to be corrected for. This effect is usually described with Greening and Boag models for continuous and pulsed radiation respectively. Such models assume that the charge is carried by two different species, positive and negative ions, each of those species with a given mobility. However, LICs operating in non-ultrapure mode can contain different types of electronegative impurities with different mobilities, thus increasing the number of different charge carriers. If this is the case, Greening and Boag models can be no longer valid and need to be reformulated. In this work we present a theoretical and numerical study of volume recombination in parallel-plate LICs with multiple charge carrier species, extending Boag and Greening models. Results from a recent publication that reported three different mobilities in an isooctane-filled LIC have been used to study the effect of extra carrier species on recombination. We have found that in pulsed beams the inclusion of extra mobilities does not affect volume recombination much, a behaviour that was expected because Boag formula for charge collection efficiency does not depend on the mobilities of the charge carriers if the Debye relationship between mobilities and recombination constant holds. This is not the case in continuous radiation, where the presence of extra charge carrier species significantly affects the amount of volume recombination.

  7. Numerical simulations of flue gas flow in a first stage filter with top inlet - Modifications of the inlet chamber inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Martin; Matas, Richard; Sedláček, Jan

    2017-09-01

    This paper is focused on flue gas flow simulations in a first stage filter with top inlet that is used in a cogeneration power plant. CFD simulations were done with emphasize on the influence of inlet chamber on the flue gas distribution and filtering process. The flow has to be turned at right direction in a quite small space. To achieve this change, distribution walls with flaps and duct inserts are used in the inlet chamber. The results showed that the main influence on the velocity distribution inside the filter have the inserts in the chamber.

  8. Surfactant control of gas transfer velocity along an offshore coastal transect: results from a laboratory gas exchange tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; Schneider-Zapp, K.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the physical and biogeochemical controls of air-sea gas exchange is necessary for establishing biogeochemical models for predicting regional- and global-scale trace gas fluxes and feedbacks. To this end we report the results of experiments designed to constrain the effect of surfactants in the sea surface microlayer (SML) on the gas transfer velocity (kw; cm h-1), seasonally (2012-2013) along a 20 km coastal transect (North East UK). We measured total surfactant activity (SA), chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and chlorophyll a (Chl a) in the SML and in sub-surface water (SSW) and we evaluated corresponding kw values using a custom-designed air-sea gas exchange tank. Temporal SA variability exceeded its spatial variability. Overall, SA varied 5-fold between all samples (0.08 to 0.38 mg L-1 T-X-100), being highest in the SML during summer. SML SA enrichment factors (EFs) relative to SSW were ˜ 1.0 to 1.9, except for two values (0.75; 0.89: February 2013). The range in corresponding k660 (kw for CO2 in seawater at 20 °C) was 6.8 to 22.0 cm h-1. The film factor R660 (the ratio of k660 for seawater to k660 for "clean", i.e. surfactant-free, laboratory water) was strongly correlated with SML SA (r ≥ 0.70, p ≤ 0.002, each n = 16). High SML SA typically corresponded to k660 suppressions ˜ 14 to 51 % relative to clean laboratory water, highlighting strong spatiotemporal gradients in gas exchange due to varying surfactant in these coastal waters. Such variability should be taken account of when evaluating marine trace gas sources and sinks. Total CDOM absorbance (250 to 450 nm), the CDOM spectral slope ratio (SR = S275 - 295/S350 - 400), the 250 : 365 nm CDOM absorption ratio (E2 : E3), and Chl a all indicated spatial and temporal signals in the quantity and composition of organic matter in the SML and SSW. This prompts us to hypothesise that spatiotemporal variation in R660 and its relationship with SA is a consequence of compositional

  9. Comparison of the Results of Modeling the Flame Propagation in a Hybrid Gas Suspension with Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement‧ev, A. A.; Moiseeva, K. M.; Krainov, Y. Yu.; Paleev, D. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    This article considers the laminary combustion of a hybrid gas suspension consisting of a gaseous combustible, an oxidizer, and an inert gas, as well as particles capable of interacting with the gas-phase oxidizer. The mathematical model takes into account the thermal expansion of the gas and its related relative motion of particles. The problem has been solved numerically in dimensionless variables. The dependences of the steady velocity of the flame front on the initial concentration of the combustible in the gas phase at various values of the parameters of the dispersed phase are presented. A comparison has been made between experimental and calculated data for a gas suspension consisting of a gaseous oxidizer, an inert gas, and reactive particles.

  10. Numerical 3D model of viscous turbulent flow in one stage gas turbine and its experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodubtsev, Y. V.; Gogolev, I. G.; Solodov, V. G.

    2005-06-01

    The paper describes 3D numerical Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model and approximate sector approach for viscous turbulent flow through flow path of one stage axial supercharge gas turbine of marine diesel engine. Computational data are tested by comparison with experimental data. The back step flow path opening and tip clearance jet are taken into account. This approach could be applied for variety of turbine theory and design tasks: for offer optimal design in order to minimize kinetic energy stage losses; for solution of partial supply problem; for analysis of flow pattern in near extraction stages; for estimation of rotational frequency variable forces on blades; for sector vane adjustment (with thin leading edges mainly), for direct flow modeling in the turbine etc. The development of this work could be seen in the direction of unsteady stage model application.

  11. Numerical analysis of flow non-uniformity in the hot gas manifold of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoenes, J.; Robertson, S. J.; Ratliff, A. W.; Anderson, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional viscous flow in a conceptual hot gas manifold (HGM) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (SSME HPFTP) was numerically analyzed. A finite difference scheme was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. The exact geometry of the SSME HGM was modeled using boundary fitted curvilinear coordinates and the General Interpolants Method (GIM) code. Slight compressibility of the subsonic flow was modeled using a linearized equation of state with artificial compressibility. A time relaxation method was used to obtain a steady state solution. The feasibility and potential usefulness of computational methods in assisting the design of SSME components which involves the flow of fluids within complex geometrical shapes is demonstrated.

  12. Modeling the Fracturing of Rock by Fluid Injection - Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions are mechanically fundamental to many earth processes, including fault zones and hydrothermal/volcanic systems, and to future green energy solutions such as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Modeling these processes is challenging because of the strong coupling between rock fracture evolution and the consequent large changes in the hydraulic properties of the system. In this talk, we present results of a numerical model that includes poro-elastic plastic rheology (with hardening, softening, and damage), and coupled to a non-linear diffusion model for fluid pressure propagation and two-phase fluid flow. Our plane strain model is based on the poro- elastic plastic behavior of porous rock and is advanced with hardening, softening and damage using the Mohr- Coulomb failure criteria. The effective stress model of Biot (1944) is used for coupling the pore pressure and the rock behavior. Frictional hardening and cohesion softening are introduced following Vermeer and de Borst (1984) with the angle of internal friction and the cohesion as functions of the principal strain rates. The scalar damage coefficient is assumed to be a linear function of the hardening parameter. Fluid injection is modeled as a two phase mixture of water and air using the Richards equation. The theoretical model is solved using finite differences on a staggered grid. The model is benchmarked with experiments on the laboratory scale in which fluid is injected from below in a critically-stressed, dry sandstone (Stanchits et al. 2011). We simulate three experiments, a) the failure a dry specimen due to biaxial compressive loading, b) the propagation a of low pressure fluid front induced from the bottom in a critically stressed specimen, and c) the failure of a critically stressed specimen due to a high pressure fluid intrusion. Comparison of model results with the fluid injection experiments shows that the model captures most of the experimental

  13. Water-waves on linear shear currents. A comparison of experimental and numerical results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bruno; Seez, William; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of water waves can be described for uniformly sheared current conditions. Indeed, some mathematical simplifications remain applicable in the study of waves whether there is no current or a linearly sheared current. However, the widespread use of mathematical wave theories including shear has rarely been backed by experimental studies of such flows. New experimental and numerical methods were both recently developed to study wave current interactions for constant vorticity. On one hand, the numerical code can simulate, in two dimensions, arbitrary non-linear waves. On the other hand, the experimental methods can be used to generate waves with various shear conditions. Taking advantage of the simplicity of the experimental protocol and versatility of the numerical code, comparisons between experimental and numerical data are discussed and compared with linear theory for validation of the methods. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N° ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  14. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Ultrasound in Liquids with Gas Bubble Agglomerates: Examples of Bubbly-Liquid-Type Acoustic Metamaterials (BLAMMs).

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian

    2017-01-17

    This work deals with a theoretical analysis about the possibility of using linear and nonlinear acoustic properties to modify ultrasound by adding gas bubbles of determined sizes in a liquid. We use a two-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the effect that one and several monodisperse bubble populations confined in restricted areas of a liquid have on ultrasound by calculating their nonlinear interaction. The filtering of an input ultrasonic pulse performed by a net of bubbly-liquid cells is analyzed. The generation of a low-frequency component from a single cell impinged by a two-frequency harmonic wave is also studied. These effects rely on the particular dispersive character of attenuation and nonlinearity of such bubbly fluids, which can be extremely high near bubble resonance. They allow us to observe how gas bubbles can change acoustic signals. Variations of the bubbly medium parameters induce alterations of the effects undergone by ultrasound. Results suggest that acoustic signals can be manipulated by bubbles. This capacity to achieve the modification and control of sound with oscillating gas bubbles introduces the concept of bubbly-liquid-based acoustic metamaterials (BLAMMs).

  15. A numerical theory of lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods in the computation of solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, A.B.H.

    1990-09-24

    A numerical theory for the massively parallel lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods for computing solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems is introduced. The convergence theory is based on consistency and stability arguments that are supported by the discrete Chapman-Enskog expansion (for consistency) and conditions of monotonicity (in establishing stability). The theory is applied to four lattice methods: Two of the methods are for some two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations. One of the methods is for the one-dimensional lattice method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. And one of the methods is for a two-dimensional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation. Convergence is formally proven in the L{sub 1}-norm for the first three methods, revealing that they are second-order, conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Computational results which support the theory for lattice methods are presented. In addition, a domain decomposition strategy using mesh refinement techniques is presented for lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods. The strategy allows concentration of computational resources on regions of high activity. Computational evidence is reported for the strategy applied to the lattice gas method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. 72 refs., 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  16. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Ultrasound in Liquids with Gas Bubble Agglomerates: Examples of Bubbly-Liquid-Type Acoustic Metamaterials (BLAMMs)

    PubMed Central

    Vanhille, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with a theoretical analysis about the possibility of using linear and nonlinear acoustic properties to modify ultrasound by adding gas bubbles of determined sizes in a liquid. We use a two-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the effect that one and several monodisperse bubble populations confined in restricted areas of a liquid have on ultrasound by calculating their nonlinear interaction. The filtering of an input ultrasonic pulse performed by a net of bubbly-liquid cells is analyzed. The generation of a low-frequency component from a single cell impinged by a two-frequency harmonic wave is also studied. These effects rely on the particular dispersive character of attenuation and nonlinearity of such bubbly fluids, which can be extremely high near bubble resonance. They allow us to observe how gas bubbles can change acoustic signals. Variations of the bubbly medium parameters induce alterations of the effects undergone by ultrasound. Results suggest that acoustic signals can be manipulated by bubbles. This capacity to achieve the modification and control of sound with oscillating gas bubbles introduces the concept of bubbly-liquid-based acoustic metamaterials (BLAMMs). PMID:28106748

  17. [CFD numerical simulation onto the gas-liquid two-phase flow behavior during vehicle refueling process].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Jin-Hui; Zhu, Ling; Shang, Chao

    2011-12-01

    With the gradual improvement of environmental regulations, more and more attentions are attracted to the vapor emissions during the process of vehicle refueling. Research onto the vehicle refueling process by means of numerical simulation has been executed abroad since 1990s, while as it has never been involved so far domestically. Through reasonable simplification about the physical system of "Nozzle + filler pipe + gasoline storage tank + vent pipe" for vehicle refueling, and by means of volume of fluid (VOF) model for gas-liquid two-phase flow and Re-Normalization Group kappa-epsilon turbulence flow model provided in commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software Fluent, this paper determined the proper mesh discretization scheme and applied the proper boundary conditions based on the Gambit software, then established the reasonable numerical simulation model for the gas-liquid two-phase flow during the refueling process. Through discussing the influence of refueling velocity on the static pressure of vent space in gasoline tank, the back-flowing phenomenon has been revealed in this paper. It has been demonstrated that, the more the flow rate and the refueling velocity of refueling nozzle is, the higher the gross static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank. In the meanwhile, the variation of static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank can be categorized into three obvious stages. When the refueling flow rate becomes higher, the back-flowing phenomenon of liquid gasoline can sometimes be induced in the head section of filler pipe, thus making the gasoline nozzle pre-shut-off. Totally speaking, the theoretical work accomplished in this paper laid some solid foundation for self-researching and self-developing the technology and apparatus for the vehicle refueling and refueling emissions control domestically.

  18. Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.C.; Drahovzal, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    A recent gas discovery in the Rome Trough suggests the need to re-evaluate the deep Cambrian potential of eastern Kentucky. A new phase of Cambrian exploration began in mid-1994 with a new pool discovery by the Carson Associates No. 1 Kazee well in Elliott County, Ky. This well blew out and initially flowed 11 MMcfd of gas from the upper Conasauga Group/Rome Formation at 6,258 to 6,270 feet. After this discovery, a second exploratory well (the Blue Ridge No. 1Greene) was drilled on a separate structure in Elliott County in late 1995. The Blue Ridge well was temporarily abandoned, but had shows of gas and condensate. In early 1996, Carson Associates offset their initial discovery well with the No. 33 Lawson Heirs well. This activity follows a frustrating exploration history in the Rome Trough that is marked by numerous gas and oil shows, but rare commercial production. Only three single-well pools have produced commercial gas from the trough, including the recent Kazee well. Stratigraphic units below the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in the Rome Trough are dramatically thicker than their equivalents on the shelf to the north. The interval in the trough is thought to include rocks as old as Early Cambrian, consisting of a basal sandstone, equivalents of the Shady/Tomstown Dolomite, the Rome Formation, and the Conasauga Formation. Sandstones and fractured shales have been responsible for most of the production to date, but dolostone intervals may also have potential. Limited seismic data indicate possible fan-delta and basin-floor fan deposits that may have reservoir potential.

  19. Neutron detection with noble gas scintillation: a review of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Coplan, Michael; Miller, Eric C.; Thompson, Alan K.; Kowler, Alex; Vest, Rob; Yue, Andrew; Koeth, Tim; Al-Sheikhly, Mohammad; Clark, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Thermal neutron detection is of vital importance to many disciplines, including neutron scattering, workplace monitoring, and homeland protection. We survey recent results from our collaboration which couple low-pressure noble gas scintillation with novel approaches to neutron absorbing materials and geometries to achieve potentially advantageous detector concepts. Noble gas scintillators were used for neutron detection as early as the late 1950's. Modern use of noble gas scintillation includes liquid and solid forms of argon and xenon in the dark matter and neutron physics experiments and commercially available high pressure applications have achieved high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. Little attention has been paid to the overlap between low pressure noble gas scintillation and thermal neutron detection, for which there are many potential benefits.

  20. The CO Transition from Diffuse Molecular Gas to Dense Clouds: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Johnathan S.; Federman, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The atomic to molecular transitions occurring in diffuse interstellar gas surrounding molecular clouds are affected by the local physical conditions (density and temperature) and the radiation field penetrating the material. The material is closely connected to CO-dark gas, which is not associated with emission from H I at 21 cm or from CO at 2.6 mm. Using optical observations of CH, CH+ and CN absorption from McDonald Observatory and the European Southern Observatory in conjunction with UV observations of CO and H2 absorption from FUSE, we explore the changing environment between diffuse and dense gas, emphasizing trends in column density, excitation temperature, gas density, and velocity structure. This presentation will focus on the completed analysis involving H2 and on the preliminary results of CO for our sample.

  1. Comparison of simulation and experimental results for a gas puff nozzle on Ambiorix

    SciTech Connect

    Barnier, J-N.; Chevalier, J-M.; Dubroca, B.

    1997-05-05

    One of source term of Z-Pinch experiments is the gas puff density profile. In order to characterize the gas jet, an experiment based on interferometry has been performed. The first study was a point measurement (a section density profile) which led us to develop a global and instantaneous interferometry imaging method. In order to optimise the nozzle, we simulated the experiment with a flow calculation code (ARES). In this paper, the experimental results are compared with simulations. The different gas properties (He, Ne, Ar) and the flow duration lead us to take care, on the one hand, of the gas viscosity, and on the other, of modifying the code for an instationary flow.

  2. Numerical simulations of gas mixing effect in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions code nam-ecris is used to simulate the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma sustained in a mixture of Kr with O2 , N2 , Ar, Ne, and He. The model assumes that ions are electrostatically confined in the ECR zone by a dip in the plasma potential. A gain in the extracted krypton ion currents is seen for the highest charge states; the gain is maximized when oxygen is used as a mixing gas. The special feature of oxygen is that most of the singly charged oxygen ions are produced after the dissociative ionization of oxygen molecules with a large kinetic energy release of around 5 eV per ion. The increased loss rate of energetic lowly charged ions of the mixing element requires a building up of the retarding potential barrier close to the ECR surface to equilibrate electron and ion losses out of the plasma. In the mixed plasmas, the barrier value is large (˜1 V ) compared to pure Kr plasma (˜0.01 V ), with longer confinement times of krypton ions and with much higher ion temperatures. The temperature of the krypton ions is increased because of extra heating by the energetic oxygen ions and a longer time of ion confinement. In calculations, a drop of the highly charged ion currents of lighter elements is observed when adding small fluxes of krypton into the source. This drop is caused by the accumulation of the krypton ions inside plasma, which decreases the electron and ion confinement times.

  3. Long term result of silicone oil versus gas tamponade in the treatment of traumatic macular holes

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraba, Hammouda H; Ellakwa, Amin F; Ghali, Ali A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effectiveness of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with either silicone oil or gas tamponade for the treatment of traumatic macular holes. Methods A retrospective comparative study included 22 patients who were operated on by PPV for repair of traumatic macular holes with either silicone oil tamponade (nine patients) or perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas tamponade (13 patients). Results Twenty-two cases were reviewed to assess the anatomical and visual outcomes of surgery with silicone oil tamponade in nine cases (40.9%) vs 14% C3F8 gas tamponade in 13 cases (59.1%). The age of the silicone oil-treated patients ranged from 10 to 40 years (mean 27.4 ± 11.3 years), while that of the gas-treated patients ranged from 19 to 35 years (mean 26.54 ± 5.68 years). Female patients accounted for 33.3% of the silicone oil group and 30.77% of the gas-treated group. The minimal follow-up time for the silicone oil-treated group was 13 months, with a maximum of 18 months after silicone oil removal. The minimal follow-up time for the gas-treated group was 12 months and the maximum was 24 months. The rate of hole closure after the primary operation with oil tamponade was significantly lower than that with gas tamponade (66.67% vs 92.3%; P = 0.022). With re-operations, the final rate of hole closure was higher in the gas group (100%) than in the silicone oil group (77.8%). The final postoperative decimal visual acuity for the gas group was significantly better than for the oil group (0.433 vs 0.245; P = 0.047). Conclusions C3F8 gas was a more effective tamponade than silicone oil in achieving initial closure of traumatic macular holes. Eyes receiving an oil tamponade required significantly more re-operations to achieve hole closure than did eyes undergoing a gas tamponade. Final visual acuity was better for gas-treated eyes than for silicone oil-treated eyes. PMID:22259236

  4. A Finite-Difference Numerical Method for Onsager's Pancake Approximation for Fluid Flow in a Gas Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    de Stadler, M; Chand, K

    2007-11-12

    Gas centrifuges exhibit very complex flows. Within the centrifuge there is a rarefied region, a transition region, and a region with an extreme density gradient. The flow moves at hypersonic speeds and shock waves are present. However, the flow is subsonic in the axisymmetric plane. The analysis may be simplified by treating the flow as a perturbation of wheel flow. Wheel flow implies that the fluid is moving as a solid body. With the very large pressure gradient, the majority of the fluid is located very close to the rotor wall and moves at an azimuthal velocity proportional to its distance from the rotor wall; there is no slipping in the azimuthal plane. The fluid can be modeled as incompressible and subsonic in the axisymmetric plane. By treating the centrifuge as long, end effects can be appropriately modeled without performing a detailed boundary layer analysis. Onsager's pancake approximation is used to construct a simulation to model fluid flow in a gas centrifuge. The governing 6th order partial differential equation is broken down into an equivalent coupled system of three equations and then solved numerically. In addition to a discussion on the baseline solution, known problems and future work possibilities are presented.

  5. Heat and fluid flow in complex joints during gas metal arc welding—Part I: Numerical model of fillet welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Kim, C.-H.; DebRoy, T.

    2004-05-01

    Gas metal arc (GMA) fillet welding is one of the most important processes for metal joining because of its high productivity and amiability to automation. This welding process is characterized by the complicated V-shaped joint geometry, a deformable weld pool surface, and the additions of hot metal droplets. In the present work, a three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to examine the temperature profiles, velocity fields, weld pool shape and size, and the nature of the solidified weld bead geometry during GMA fillet welding. The model solved the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy using a boundary fitted curvilinear coordinate system. Apart from the direct transport of heat from the welding arc, additional heat from the metal droplets was modeled considering a volumetric heat source. The deformation of the weld pool surface was calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. Part I of this article is focused on the details of the numerical model such as coordinate transformation and calculation of volumetric heat source and free surface profile. An application of the model to GMA fillet welding of mild steel is described in an accompanying article (W. Zhang, C.-H. Kim and T. DebRoy, J. Appl Phys. 95, 5220 (2004)).

  6. Study of Convection Heat Transfer in a Very High Temperature Reactor Flow Channel: Numerical and Experimental Results

    DOE PAGES

    Valentin, Francisco I.; Artoun, Narbeh; Anderson, Ryan; ...

    2016-12-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) are one of the Generation IV gas-cooled reactor models proposed for implementation in next generation nuclear power plants. A high temperature/pressure test facility for forced and natural circulation experiments has been constructed. This test facility consists of a single flow channel in a 2.7 m (9’) long graphite column equipped with four 2.3kW heaters. Extensive 3D numerical modeling provides a detailed analysis of the thermal-hydraulic behavior under steady-state, transient, and accident scenarios. In addition, forced/mixed convection experiments with air, nitrogen and helium were conducted for inlet Reynolds numbers from 500 to 70,000. Our numerical resultsmore » were validated with forced convection data displaying maximum percentage errors under 15%, using commercial finite element package, COMSOL Multiphysics. Based on this agreement, important information can be extracted from the model, with regards to the modified radial velocity and property gas profiles. Our work also examines flow laminarization for a full range of Reynolds numbers including laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and its impact on heat transfer under various scenarios to examine the thermal-hydraulic phenomena that could occur during both normal operation and accident conditions.« less

  7. Chaotic structures of nonlinear magnetic fields. I - Theory. II - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Nam C.; Parks, George K.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the evolutionary properties of nonlinear magnetic fields in flowing MHD plasmas is presented to illustrate that nonlinear magnetic fields may involve chaotic dynamics. It is shown how a suitable transformation of the coupled equations leads to Duffing's form, suggesting that the behavior of the general solution can also be chaotic. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear magnetic field equations that have been cast in the form of Duffing's equation are presented.

  8. Chaotic structures of nonlinear magnetic fields. I - Theory. II - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Nam C.; Parks, George K.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the evolutionary properties of nonlinear magnetic fields in flowing MHD plasmas is presented to illustrate that nonlinear magnetic fields may involve chaotic dynamics. It is shown how a suitable transformation of the coupled equations leads to Duffing's form, suggesting that the behavior of the general solution can also be chaotic. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear magnetic field equations that have been cast in the form of Duffing's equation are presented.

  9. Field test results of the physical solvent N-Formyl morpholine for gas treating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is developing gas processing technology that will reduce gas processing costs for current production and allow subquality gas to be economically produced that would have been otherwise, not produced. The experimental program has primarily focused on the evaluation of N-Formyl Morpholine (NFM) as a physical solvent for the cost-effective upgrading of subquality natural gas to pipeline quality. The selection of NFM for this program was based on previous work conducted by IGT in the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide from coal gasifier effluents. That work showed that the use of NFM resulted in a significant cost advantage over 107 other solvents for that application. The project approach for the development of NFM process has been divided into following main categories: obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium, physical properties and additional published literature data; obtain mass-transfer coefficients using 2 inch absorber/stripper apparatus and calculate equation of state parameters and binary interaction parameters using VLE data; develop a gas processing model using Aspen Plus simulation program and evaluate economic advantages of the NFM process compared to commercial physical solvent; and design a pilot plant skid mounted field test unit and conduct field test experiments.

  10. Numerical modeling of landfill gas and heat transport in the deformable MSW landfill body. Part 1. Development of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyi, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    The article is devoted to studying the parameters of wells that are used as part of vertical gas extraction systems for degassing landfills. To this end, approaches to modeling the main processes occurring in the landfill's porous medium are considered. The considered approaches served as a basis for elaborating a thermophysical gas and heat transport model that takes into account variation in the hydrodynamic properties of wastes resulting from their secondary settlement. The adequacy of the results obtained using the developed model is confirmed by the data of classic works. The effect the secondary settlement of wastes has on the distribution of pressure and temperature in the landfill body is determined. It is shown that compaction of wastes due to their secondary settlement results in a growth of pressure by 40% on the average.

  11. Dynamics of kinetic energy transfer in homogeneous bidisperse gas-solid flow using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2015-11-01

    While considerable insight has been gained into the dynamics of energy transfer in monodisperse gas-solid flows, much less is known about polydisperse systems where particles have a size distribution. For instance, the conservation of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer (ITKET) principle for monodisperse gas-solid flow (Xu and Subramaniam, Phys. Fluids, 2007) states that the power provided by the mean pressure gradient to sustain a mean slip velocity between the fluid phase and solid phase is equal to the mixture ITKET of the suspension, which is then partitioned into sources of velocity fluctuations in the gas and solid phases. As a first step towards understanding the dynamics of energy transfer in polydisperse suspensions, we analyze the extension of this conservation principle to a bidisperse suspension. Here the mixture ITKET is partitioned into sources of velocity fluctuations of the fluid phase as well as the large and small particle size classes. PR-DNS results of homogeneous bidisperse gas-solid flow are then used to verify this extended conservation principle. With these insights we can begin to answer interesting questions such as the role of energy transfer in promoting segregation or mixing of particle sizes.

  12. Numerical study of an ArH2 gas mixture flowing inside and outside a dc plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichert, P.; Imbert, M.; Coddet, C.

    1998-12-01

    The flow of gas mixtures in a dc plasma torch is studied using the CFD PHOENICS (CFD PHOENICS, Berkeley, CA) code. In the model, the cold gas mixture (300 K), initially constituted of 85 vol% Ar and 15 vol% H, is introduced into a power input zone where it takes energy and is ejected in the surrounding atmosphere at constant pressure (105 Pa). The flow is assumed to be in chemical equilibrium. Equations of mass, momentum, and energy are discretized using a control-volume method. The turbulent flow is modeled by a k-ɛ two-equations model for the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. Finally, the algebraic coupling equations set is solved by means of the SIMPLEST algorithm, implemented into the CFD code, using a hybrid interpolation scheme. Results concern the effect of the torch power on the ArH2 flow. The phenomenon is analyzed through the evolution of velocity and temperature inside and outside the torch. From these calculations, the effect of ambient gas entrainment by the jet is emphasized and a comparison of the level of entrained gas is made with experimental data.

  13. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation and gas-phase transport using M{sup 2}NOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.

    1995-03-01

    The multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal simulator M{sup 2}NOTS was tested against several one-dimensional experiments. The experiments represented a through-flow limiting condition of soil venting in which air flows through the contaminated region. Predictions using M{sup 2}NOTS of changing in situ compositions and effluent concentrations for toluene and o-xylene mixtures were compared to the observed results. Results showed that M{sup 2}NOTS was able to capture the salient trends and features of multicomponent through-flow venting processes.

  14. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  15. Experimental and numerical results on a shear layer excited by a sound pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of a sound in a jet was investigated. It is verified that the far-field acoustic power increased with flow velocity for the lower and medium frequency range. Experimentally, an attenuation at higher frequencies is also observed. This increase is found numerically to be due primarily to the interactions between the mean vorticity and the fluctuation velocities. Spectral decomposition of the real time data indicates that the power increase occurs in the low and middle frequency range, where the local instability waves have the largest spatial growth rate. The connection between this amplification and the local instability waves is discussed.

  16. NOx results from two combustors tested on medium BTU coal gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherlock, T. P.; Carl, D. E.; Vermes, G.; Schwab, J.; Notardonato, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of tests of two combustor configurations using coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are reported. The trials were run with a ceramic-lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannular swirl burner (MASB) using a range of temperatures and pressures representative of industrial turbine inlet conditions. A lean mixture was examined at 104, 197, and 254 Btu/Scf, yielding NO(x) emissions of 5, 20, and 70 ppmv, respectively. The MASB was employed only with a gas rated at 220-270 Btu/Scf, producing 80 ppmv NO(x) at rated engine conditions. The results are concluded to be transferrable to current machines. Further tests on the effects of gas composition, the scaling of combustors to utility size, and the development of improved wall cooling techniques and variable geometry are indicated.

  17. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a Westinghouse Model 51 steam generator. Volume 2. Appendix A, numerical results. Interim report. [CALIPSOS code numerical data

    SciTech Connect

    Fanselau, R.W.; Thakkar, J.G.; Hiestand, J.W.; Cassell, D.

    1981-03-01

    The Comparative Thermal-Hydraulic Evaluation of Steam Generators program represents an analytical investigation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of four PWR steam generators. The analytical tool utilized in this investigation is the CALIPSOS code, a three-dimensional flow distribution code. This report presents the steady state thermal-hydraulic characteristics on the secondary side of a Westinghouse Model 51 steam generator. Details of the CALIPSOS model with accompanying assumptions, operating parameters, and transport correlations are identified. Comprehensive graphical and numerical results are presented to facilitate the desired comparison with other steam generators analyzed by the same flow distribution code.

  18. The Fate and Environmental Consequences of Reduced gas Mixtures Resulting from Magmatic Intrusion into Carbonaceous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Marecal, Virginie; Pirre, Michel; Arndt, Nicolas; Ganino, Clément; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2010-05-01

    Recent developments on the impacts of Large Igneous Provinces on climate changes and extinction rates emphasize the fundamental role of country rocks in gas emissions. Contact metamorphism of country rocks intruded by sills and dikes of mafic melts can be particularly important due to their long exposure to high temperatures. When the host rocks are composed of carbonates, sulphates, salts, or organic-compounds such as bituminous shales or coals, their heating can inject into the atmosphere a quantity of volatiles that greatly exceeds the amount delivered by purely magmatic degassing. We focus here on the interaction between magma and carbonaceous rocks. Recent studies have estimated the gas released by contact metamorphism of bituminous shales in the Karoo Province; we calculate the composition of the volcanic gases which results on this interaction, taking into account the magmatic contribution too. We then present an evaluation of the fate of such gases during their diffusion in the atmosphere. The modelling of the composition of the modified volcanic gases is based on gas-melt thermodynamic calculations that take into account S-H-O-C gaseous species at temperatures and pressures in equilibrium with basaltic liquids. We simulate the incorporation into the gas-melt system of organic compounds as CH or CH2, depending on the maturity of the carbonaceous rocks (coal or oil). Addition of C and H has a dramatic effect on the amount and the redox state of the gas in equilibrium with the basalt. With the incorporation of only 0.2 wt% CH, the gas composition changes from CO2-H2O dominated (typical of basaltic gases on Earth), to CO-H2 dominated (a strongly reduced mixture, which resembles Martian volcanic gases). Addition of more than 0.2 wt% CH can trigger graphite saturation, such as reported in few locations where carbonaceous rocks have been ingested by basalts. In the famous Disko Island location, for example, we calculate that an incorporation of 1 wt% CH led to

  19. Estimation of geopotential from satellite-to-satellite range rate data: Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thobe, Glenn E.; Bose, Sam C.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for high-resolution geopotential field estimation by recovering the harmonic coefficients from satellite-to-satellite range rate data is presented and tested against both a controlled analytical simulation of a one-day satellite mission (maximum degree and order 8) and then against a Cowell method simulation of a 32-day mission (maximum degree and order 180). Innovations include: (1) a new frequency-domain observation equation based on kinetic energy perturbations which avoids much of the complication of the usual Keplerian element perturbation approaches; (2) a new method for computing the normalized inclination functions which unlike previous methods is both efficient and numerically stable even for large harmonic degrees and orders; (3) the application of a mass storage FFT to the entire mission range rate history; (4) the exploitation of newly discovered symmetries in the block diagonal observation matrix which reduce each block to the product of (a) a real diagonal matrix factor, (b) a real trapezoidal factor with half the number of rows as before, and (c) a complex diagonal factor; (5) a block-by-block least-squares solution of the observation equation by means of a custom-designed Givens orthogonal rotation method which is both numerically stable and tailored to the trapezoidal matrix structure for fast execution.

  20. Kinetic features revealed by top-hat electrostatic analysers: numerical simulations and instrument response results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Rossana; Marcucci, Maria Federica; Brienza, Daniele; Bruno, Roberto; Consolini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Denise; Valentini, Franceso; Servidio, Sergio; Stabile, Sara; Pezzi, Oreste; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Lavraud, Benoit; De Keyser, Johan; Retinò, Alessandro; Fazakerley, Andrew; Wicks, Robert; Vaivads, Andris; Salatti, Mario; Veltri, Pierliugi

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission devoted to study energization, acceleration and heating of turbulent space plasmas, and designed to perform field and particle measurements at kinetic scales in different near-Earth regions and in the solar wind. Solar Orbiter (SolO), together with Solar Probe Plus, will provide the first comprehensive remote and in situ measurements which are critical to establish the fundamental physical links between the Sun's dynamic atmosphere and the turbulent solar wind. The fundamental process of turbulent dissipation is mediated by physical mechanism that occur at a variety of temporal and spatial scales, and most efficiently at the kinetics scales. Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations of solar-wind turbulence show that kinetic effects manifest as particle beams, production of temperature anisotropies and ring-like modulations, preferential heating of heavy ions. We use a numerical code able to reproduce the response of a typical electrostatic analyzer of top-hat type starting from velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) numerical simulations. Here, we show how optimized particle measurements by top-hat analysers can capture the kinetic features injected by turbulence in the VDFs.

  1. Nonlinear instability and chaos in plasma wave-wave interactions. II. Numerical methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kueny, C.S.; Morrison, P.J.

    1995-05-01

    In Part I of this work and Physics of Plasmas, June 1995, the behavior of linearly stable, integrable systems of waves in a simple plasma model was described using a Hamiltonian formulation. It was shown that explosive instability arises from nonlinear coupling between modes of positive and negative energy, with well-defined threshold amplitudes depending on the physical parameters. In this concluding paper, the nonintegrable case is treated numerically. Several sets of waves are considered, comprising systems of two and three degrees of freedom. The time evolution is modelled with an explicit symplectic integration algorithm derived using Lie algebraic methods. When initial wave amplitudes are large enough to support two-wave decay interactions, strongly chaotic motion destroys the separatrix bounding the stable region for explosive triplets. Phase space orbits then experience diffusive growth to amplitudes that are sufficient for explosive instability, thus effectively reducing the threshold amplitude. For initial amplitudes too small to drive decay instability, small perturbations might still grow to arbitrary size via Arnold diffusion. Numerical experiments do not show diffusion in this case, although the actual diffusion rate is probably underestimated due to the simplicity of the model.

  2. Elasticity of mechanical oscillators in nonequilibrium steady states: Experimental, numerical, and theoretical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Livia; De Gregorio, Paolo; Bonaldi, Michele; Borrielli, Antonio; Crivellari, Michele; Karapetyan, Gagik; Poli, Charles; Serra, Enrico; Thakur, Ram-Krishna; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2012-06-01

    We study experimentally, numerically, and theoretically the elastic response of mechanical resonators along which the temperature is not uniform, as a consequence of the onset of steady-state thermal gradients. Two experimental setups and designs are employed, both using low-loss materials. In both cases, we monitor the resonance frequencies of specific modes of vibration, as they vary along with variations of temperatures and of temperature differences. In one case, we consider the first longitudinal mode of vibration of an aluminum alloy resonator; in the other case, we consider the antisymmetric torsion modes of a silicon resonator. By defining the average temperature as the volume-weighted mean of the temperatures of the respective elastic sections, we find out that the elastic response of an object depends solely on it, regardless of whether a thermal gradient exists and, up to 10% imbalance, regardless of its magnitude. The numerical model employs a chain of anharmonic oscillators, with first- and second-neighbor interactions and temperature profiles satisfying Fourier's Law to a good degree. Its analysis confirms, for the most part, the experimental findings and it is explained theoretically from a statistical mechanics perspective with a loose notion of local equilibrium.

  3. Bioimpedance measurements in dentistry to detect inflammation: numerical modelling and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Cosoli, G; Scalise, L; Tricarico, G; Russo, P; Cerri, G

    2017-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements represent an advantageous method to evaluate the physio-pathological conditions of biological tissues and their use is spreading in different application fields, from the evaluation of body composition to the vital signs monitoring, passing through the individuation of cancer tissues and the detection of different substances (e.g. glucose measurements in people affected by diabetes). In fact, tissues electric properties vary with their conditions; for example, electrical conductivity increases when there is an inflammatory process, because of the presence of oedema, hyperaemia and infiltration. Inflammatory phenomena are frequent in dentistry, in diseases like periodontitis and peri-implantitis; however, at present the diagnosis is mainly done with the naked eye, by observing the gingiva redness and swelling. The aim of this work is to prove the feasibility of the inflammation detection by means of bioimpedance measurements. Both numerical simulations and preliminary experimental measurements provide significant outcomes in differentiating between healthy and inflamed tissues. Percentage differences in the impedance modulus equal to 4-20% (numerical simulations) and 35-56% (experimental measurements), respectively, depending on the considered conditions (e.g. electrodes characteristics and inflammation severity), were found. Such a measure could be integrated in electromedical devices designed, for example, for the therapy of peri-implantitis, in order to personalise the therapeutic dose in terms of intensity and duration and focusing it on the impaired area, minimising the effects on the surrounding tissues.

  4. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    The overall contractual effort and the theory and numerical solution for the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. Fundamental equations for steady flow of reacting gas-particle mixtures, method of characteristics, mesh point construction, and numerical integration of the conservation equations are considered herein.

  5. Scientific results of the Second Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition in the Ulleung Basin (UBGH2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, Michael; Kim, Gil-Young; Chun, Jong-Hwa; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2013-01-01

    As a part of Korean National Gas Hydrate Program, the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) was conducted from 9 July to 30 September, 2010 in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea using the D/V Fugro Synergy. The UBGH2 was performed to understand the distribution of gas hydrates as required for a resource assessment and to find potential candidate sites suitable for a future offshore production test, especially targeting gas hydrate-bearing sand bodies in the basin. The UBGH2 sites were distributed across most of the basin and were selected to target mainly sand-rich turbidite deposits. The 84-day long expedition consisted of two phases. The first phase included logging-while-drilling/measurements-while-drilling (LWD/MWD) operations at 13 sites. During the second phase, sediment cores were collected from 18 holes at 10 of the 13 LWD/MWD sites. Wireline logging (WL) and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were also acquired after coring operations at two of these 10 sites. In addition, seafloor visual observation, methane sensing, as well as push-coring and sampling using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) were conducted during both phases of the expedition. Recovered gas hydrates occurred either as pore-filling medium associated with discrete turbidite sand layers, or as fracture-filling veins and nodules in muddy sediments. Gas analyses indicated that the methane within the sampled gas hydrates is primarily of biogenic origin. This paper provides a summary of the operational and scientific results of the UBGH2 expedition as described in 24 papers that make up this special issue of the Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology.

  6. Numerical simulations of Aerosol and Trace Gas Emissions and Transformations over the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H.; Ren, X.; Li, Z.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is one of the most populated and polluted regions on Earth. In the past decades the rapid economic development has resulted in heavy atmospheric aerosol loadings in this region. The high aerosol concentrations induce severe environmental and climate problems, and aerosols can also affect human health and visibility. So there is a continued need to understand air quality in this region and transport of air pollutants from this region as populations grow, energy use increases, and industrial activity evolves. The unique mix of species over the NCP makes understanding the processes leading to transformations of primary pollutants and formation of secondary pollutants essential to predicting regional and global impacts. WRF-Chem simulations were performed for the NCP to investigate the emissions and transformations of air pollutants. MIX emission inventory of year 2010 (developed for MICS-Asia III and HTAP projects) was used to drive the WRF-Chem model. Modeling results were evaluated with observation data including OMI SO2/NO2 and MODIS AOD products to improve our knowledge of emission changes in the NCP between 2010 and 2016. We also estimated the regional transport of air pollutants from the NCP to downwind areas such as South Korea and Japan with WRF-Chem simulations constrained by these observations.

  7. How reliable are electrolyte and metabolite results measured by a blood gas analyzer in the ED?

    PubMed

    Uysal, Emin; Acar, Yahya Ayhan; Kutur, Ahmet; Cevik, Erdem; Salman, Necati; Tezel, Onur

    2016-03-01

    Blood gas analysis is a frequently ordered test in emergency departments for many indications. It is a rapid technique that can analyze electrolyte and metabolites in addition to pH and blood gases. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of electrolyte and metabolite results measured by blood gas and core laboratory analyzers. This was a prospective, single-center observational study conducted in a tertiary care center's emergency department. All adult patients requiring arterial/venous blood gas analysis and core laboratory tests together for any purpose were consecutively included in the study between April 2014 and July 2015. Patients younger than 16 years, having any intravenous infusion or blood transfusion prior to sampling, or who were pregnant were excluded. A total of 1094 patients' (male = 547, female = 547) paired blood samples were analyzed. The mean age was 58.10 ± 21.35 years, and there was no difference between arterial and venous sampling groups by age, pH, or sex (P = .93, .56, and .41, respectively). Correlation coefficients for hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, potassium, sodium, and chloride levels measured by blood gas analyzer and core laboratory analyzers were 0.922, 0.896, 0.964, 0.823, 0.854, and 0.791, respectively. Blood gas analysis results were strongly correlated for hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, potassium, and sodium levels but were only moderately correlated for chloride levels. These parameters as measured by a blood gas analyzer seem reliable in critical decision making but must be validated by core laboratory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction of a mantle plume and a segmented mid-ocean ridge: Results from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have proposed that changes in lithospheric thickness across a transform fault, due to the juxtaposition of seafloor of different ages, can impede lateral dispersion of an on-ridge mantle plume. The application of this “transform damming” mechanism has been considered for several plume-ridge systems, including the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge, the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot and the Southeast Indian Ridge, the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Iceland hotspot and the Kolbeinsey Ridge, the Afar plume and the ridges of the Gulf of Aden, and the Marion/Crozet hotspot and the Southwest Indian Ridge. This study explores the geodynamics of the transform damming mechanism using a three-dimensional finite element numerical model. The model solves the coupled steady-state equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, including thermal buoyancy and viscosity that is dependent on pressure and temperature. The plume is introduced as a circular thermal anomaly on the bottom boundary of the numerical domain. The center of the plume conduit is located directly beneath a spreading segment, at a distance of 200 km (measured in the along-axis direction) from a transform offset with length 100 km. Half-spreading rate is 0.5 cm/yr. In a series of numerical experiments, the buoyancy flux of the modeled plume is progressively increased to investigate the effects on the temperature and velocity structure of the upper mantle in the vicinity of the transform. Unlike earlier studies, which suggest that a transform always acts to decrease the along-axis extent of plume signature, these models imply that the effect of a transform on plume dispersion may be complex. Under certain ranges of plume flux modeled in this study, the region of the upper mantle undergoing along-axis flow directed away from the plume could be enhanced by the three-dimensional velocity and temperature structure associated with ridge

  9. On numerical schemes for solving the Euler equations of gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervieux, A.; Vijayasundaram, G.

    The first-order upwind schemes of Godunov-Van Leer, Steger-Warming, Godunov, Roe, Osher and Glimm; Godunov type scheme I; the second-order upwind schemes of Van Leer, Fromm-Van Leer, Hancock-Van Leer, and Moretti; and the second-order centered schemes of Richtmyer, Mac Cormack, Lerat-Peyrat, and Jameson are described. Their performances for the shock-tube problem proposed by Sod are compared. The schemes of Godunov-Van Leer, Glimm, Fromm-Van Leer, and Hancock-Van Leer produced the best results. All the First-order upwind schemes, the Glimm scheme, the Jameson scheme, and the Hancock-Van Leer scheme can be extended to two dimensions in the finite element setting.

  10. Nitrogen isotopes determination in natural gas: analytical method and first results on magmatic, hydrothermal and soil gas samples.

    PubMed

    Grassa, Fausto; Capasso, Giorgio; Oliveri, Ygor; Sollami, Aldo; Carreira, Paula; Rosario Carvalho, M; Marques, Jose M; Nunes, Joao C

    2010-06-01

    A continuous-flow GC/IRMS technique has been developed to analyse delta(15)N values for molecular nitrogen in gas samples. This method provides reliable results with accuracy better than 0.15 per thousand and reproducibility (1sigma) within+/-0.1 per thousand for volumes of N(2) between 1.35 (about 56 nmol) and 48.9 muL (about 2 mumol). The method was tested on magmatic and hydrothermal gases as well as on natural gas samples collected from various sites. Since the analysis of nitrogen isotope composition may be prone to atmospheric contamination mainly in samples with low N(2) concentration, we set the instrument to determine also N(2) and (36)Ar contents in a single run. In fact, based on the simultaneously determined N(2)/(36)Ar ratios and assuming that (36)Ar content in crustal and mantle-derived fluids is negligible with respect to (36)Ar concentration in the atmosphere, for each sample, the degree of atmospheric contamination can be accurately evaluated. Therefore, the measured delta(15)N values can be properly corrected for air contamination.

  11. Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine. Certain foods may cause gas. Foods that produce gas in one person may not cause gas in another. You can reduce the amount of gas you have by Drinking lots of water and non-fizzy drinks Eating more slowly so you swallow less air ...

  12. The CMS RPC gas gain monitoring system: An overview and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colonna, D.; Daniello, L.; Fabbri, F. L.; Giardoni, M.; Ortenzi, B.; Paolozzi, A.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Ponzio, B.; Pucci, C.; Russo, A.; Roselli, G.; Colaleo, A.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Ranieri, A.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Guida, R.; Polese, G.; Cavallo, N.; Cimmino, A.; Lomidze, D.; Noli, P.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baesso, P.; Necchi, M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.

    2009-05-01

    The status of the Compact Solenoid Spectrometer (CMS) Resistive Plate Counter (RPC) Gas Gain Monitoring (GGM) system developed at the Frascati Laboratory of INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) is reported. The GGM system is a cosmic ray telescope based on small RPC detectors operated with the same gas mixture used by the CMS RPC system. The GGM gain and efficiency are continuously monitored on-line, thus providing a fast and accurate determination of any shift in working point conditions. The construction details and the first result of GGM commissioning are described.

  13. Gas separation in a membrane unit: Experimental results and theoretical predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Tranchino, L.; Santarossa, R.; Carta, F. ); Fabiani, C.; Bimbi, L. )

    1989-11-01

    A laboratory membrane separation unit was assembled by using composite hollow fibers. It was tested in an automated apparatus for gas separation measurements. The performances of the system were measured for CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} mixtures as functions of temperature, pressure, stage cut, feed gas composition, and flow regime. The results were analyzed on the basis of a predictive mathematical model of the process. A good fitting of the data was obtained in most cases except at high pressure, probably as a consequence of structural changes of the active layer of the fibers under pressurization.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Sensing Using Small Unmanned Aerial Systems - Field Experiment Results and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Christensen, L. E.; Brockers, R.; Thompson, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Requirements for greenhouse gas point source detection and quantification often require high spatial resolution on the order of meters. These applications, which help close the gap in emissions estimate uncertainties, also demand sensing with high sensitivity and in a fashion that accounts for spatiotemporal variability on the order of seconds to minutes. Low-cost vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) provide a means to detect and identify the location of point source gas emissions while offering ease of deployment and high maneuverability. Our current fielded gas sensing sUAS platforms are able to provide instantaneous in situ concentration measurements at locations within line of sight of the operator. Recent results from field experiments demonstrating methane detection and plume characterization will be discussed here, including performance assessment conducted via a controlled release experiment in 2