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Sample records for gas phase photocatalytic

  1. Kinetic analysis of photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase formaldehyde over titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmin; Lian, Zhiwei; Ye, Xiaojiang; Shangguan, Wenfeng

    2005-07-01

    Degradation of formaldehyde with different initial concentration over titanium dioxide was carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. Photocatalytic rates were well described by the simplified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The kinetic analysis shows that the apparent first-order reaction coefficient is lower and half-life of photocatalysis is longer for low concentration than for high concentration formaldehyde. A network formation model of the photocatalytic products was established. Experimental results and analysis demonstrate that carbon dioxide concentration and carbon monoxide concentration in gas phase vary exponentially with the illumination time and may be even higher than gas-phase formaldehyde concentration if there is much pre-adsorbed formaldehyde in adsorption equilibrium on catalysts before illumination. Carbon monoxide is found to be one of the by-products during formaldehyde photooxidation.

  2. Photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase BTEX-contaminated waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Gratson, D A; Nimlos, M R; Wolfrum, E J

    1995-03-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been exploring heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) as a remediation technology for air streams contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylenes (BTEX). This research is a continuation of work performed on chlorinated organics. The photocatalytic oxidation of BTEX has been studied in the aqueous phase, however, a study by Turchi et al. showed a more economical system would involve stripping organic contaminants from the aqueous phase and treating the resulting gas stream. Another recent study by Turchi et al. indicated that PCO is cost competitive with such remediation technologies as activated carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration for some types of contaminated air streams. In this work we have examined the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene using ozone (0{sub 3}) as an additional oxidant. We varied the residence time in the PCO reactor, the initial concentration of the organic pollutant, and the initial ozone concentration in a single-pass reactor. Because aromatic hydrocarbons represent only a small fraction of the total hydrocarbons present in gasoline and other fuels, we also added octane to the reaction mixture to simulate the composition of air streams produced from soil-vapor-extraction or groundwater-stripping of sites contaminated with gasoline.

  3. Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation: Cost comparison with other air pollution control technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C S; Wolfrum, E J; Miller, R A

    1994-11-01

    Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) appears to be particularly well suited for waste streams with low pollutant concentrations (1000 ppm or less) and low to moderate flow rates (< 20,000 cubic feet per minute, cfm). The PCO technology is modular in nature and thus is well suited to treat dispersed or low flow rate streams. This same attribute minimizes the advantages of scale for PCO and makes the technology comparatively less attractive for high volume waste streams. Key advantages for PCO lie in its low operating cost and ability to completely destroy pollutants at ambient temperature and pressure.

  4. Study of solid/gas phase photocatalytic reactions by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nuño, Manuel; Ball, Richard J; Bowen, Chris R

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a novel methodology for the real-time study of solid-gas phase photocatalytic reactions in situ. A novel reaction chamber has been designed and developed to facilitate the investigation of photoactive materials under different gas compositions. UV irradiation in the wavelength of ranges 376-387 and 381-392 nm was provided using specially designed high efficiency light emitting diode arrays. The experiments used air containing 190 ppm NO2 in a moist environment with a relative humidity of 0.1%. Photocatalytic samples consisting of pressed pellets of rutile and anatase crystalline forms of TiO2 were monitored over a period of 150 min. An ultra-high vacuum right angled bleed valve allowed a controlled flow of gas from the main reaction chamber at atmospheric pressure to a residual gas analyser operating at a vacuum of 10(-5)  mbar. The apparatus and methodology have been demonstrated to provide high sensitivity (ppb). The rate of degradation of NO2 attributed to reaction at the TiO2 surface was sensitive to both crystal structures (anatase or rutile) and wavelength of irradiation.

  5. Spatial Separation of Charge Carriers in In2O3-x(OH)y Nanocrystal Superstructures for Enhanced Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    He, Le; Wood, Thomas E; Wu, Bo; Dong, Yuchan; Hoch, Laura B; Reyes, Laura M; Wang, Di; Kübel, Christian; Qian, Chenxi; Jia, Jia; Liao, Kristine; O'Brien, Paul G; Sandhel, Amit; Loh, Joel Y Y; Szymanski, Paul; Kherani, Nazir P; Sum, Tze Chien; Mims, Charles A; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2016-05-24

    The development of strategies for increasing the lifetime of photoexcited charge carriers in nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors is important for enhancing their photocatalytic activity. Intensive efforts have been made in tailoring the properties of the nanostructured photocatalysts through different ways, mainly including band-structure engineering, doping, catalyst-support interaction, and loading cocatalysts. In liquid-phase photocatalytic dye degradation and water splitting, it was recently found that nanocrystal superstructure based semiconductors exhibited improved spatial separation of photoexcited charge carriers and enhanced photocatalytic performance. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether this strategy is applicable in gas-phase photocatalysis. Using porous indium oxide nanorods in catalyzing the reverse water-gas shift reaction as a model system, we demonstrate here that assembling semiconductor nanocrystals into superstructures can also promote gas-phase photocatalytic processes. Transient absorption studies prove that the improved activity is a result of prolonged photoexcited charge carrier lifetimes due to the charge transfer within the nanocrystal network comprising the nanorods. Our study reveals that the spatial charge separation within the nanocrystal networks could also benefit gas-phase photocatalysis and sheds light on the design principles of efficient nanocrystal superstructure based photocatalysts. PMID:27159793

  6. The rate of photocatalytic oxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulamanti, Aikaterini K.; Korologos, Christos A.; Philippopoulos, Constantine J.

    In the present study, the gas-solid heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of six aromatic species of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-, o- and p-xylene over illuminated titania was carried out at ambient temperature in a continuous stirring-tank reactor. Initial VOC concentrations were in the low parts per million (ppm) range. Maximum conversions were over 90% for all compounds except from benzene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, while the residence time varied from 50 to 210 s. Intermediates were detected only in the case of the xylenes, but catalyst deactivation occurred for all six compounds. The PCO kinetics were well fit by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model for monomolecular surface reaction and it was proved that the reaction rate is related to both constants. The rate constants ranged from 0.147 ppm s -1 g cat-1 for benzene to 1.067 ppm s -1 g cat-1 for m-xylene, while the adsorption constants from 0.424 ppm -1 for ethylbenzene to 0.69 ppm -1 for toluene. The molecular structure of the compounds was found to play an important role in the reaction. Finally the efficiency of the procedure in the case of a mixture of these aromatic substances was tested.

  7. Gas-phase photocatalytic degradation of perchloroethylene on glass pellets immobilized with TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C.H.; Yuan, C.S.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this research was to study gas-phase photocatalytic degradation of perchloroethylene (PCE) under illumination of four 10-W near-ultraviolet (UV) light lamps. Experiments were performed in a photocatalytic reactor packed with Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2}-coated glass pellets. Anatase TiO{sub 2} was applied as the photocatalyst in the investigation. The effects of reaction parameters including influent PCE concentrations (10 to 50 ppm), water vapor content (0 to 100 % relative humidity), oxygen concentrations (0.31 to 21%), reactor space times (0.55 to 1.83 seconds), and irradiated light intensity (0.4 to 1.0 mW/cm{sup 2}) were investigated in the study. Experimental results indicated that fast photocatalytic degradation of PCE took place in the presence of TiO2 illuminated with near-UV light. Experimental results also showed that the highest degradation rate and quantum efficiency of PCE were 0.523 m mol/secgm and 5.2 %, respectively. The highest conversion ratio of PCE of 99.8 % was achieved in the study. Greater conversation ratios of PCE were observed for longer reaction time. Increase in the reaction rates of PCE by increasing influent PCE and oxygen concentrations were presented. Higher reaction rates of PCE under stronger illumination light intensity were detected. The degradation rates of PCE were proportional to light intensity with the power order of 1.2. On the other hand, the inhibited degradation of PCE was observed in the presence of water vapor. Lower reaction rates of PCE were detected when water vapor was present in the reaction. A modified Langmuir-Hishelwood kinetic was applied to model photocatalytic degradation of PCE. Two different adsorption sites on irradiated TiO2{sub 2} surfaces for the adsorption of PCE and oxygen molecules respectively were assumed in the model. The assumption of water vapor competing with PCE for reactive sites was considered in the reaction.

  8. Photocatalytic oxidation of H2S in the gas phase over TiO2-coated glass fiber filter.

    PubMed

    Brancher, Marlon; Franco, Davide; de Melo Lisboa, Henrique

    2016-11-01

    To promote the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gas phase, TiO2-coated glass fiber filters were packed in an annular photoreactor. Glass fibers coated with TiO2 thin films were characterized structurally and morphologically by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Flow rate and H2S inlet concentration were evaluated to determine the performance of the reactor. Removal efficiencies up to 99% were achieved for flow rate of 25 L h(-1) (residence time of 121 s) and H2S inlet concentration from 12 to 14 ppmv. The long-term experiment presented H2S removal of 89% for 16 h. After 28 h of continuous use, H2S degradation was observed at 64%, which suggests that the photocatalyst was losing activity due to deactivation. Moreover, the kinetics of the PCO of H2S according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) approach along with the mass balance of a plug-flow reactor was modeled. The reaction constant (k) was calculated at approximately 10.5 μmol m(-3) s(-1) and the adsorption constant (K) of approximately 5263 m(-3) mol with linearity (R2) of 0.98.

  9. Optimization of operating parameters for gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of H2S by novel vermiculate packed tubular reactor.

    PubMed

    Preethi, V; Kanmani, S

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen production by gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) was investigated on four semiconductor photocatalysts including CuGa1.6Fe0.4O2, ZnFe2O3, (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 and Ce/TiO2. The CdS and ZnS coated core shell particles (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 shows the highest rate of hydrogen (H2) production under optimized conditions. Packed bed tubular reactor was used to study the performance of prepared photocatalysts. Selection of the best packing material is a key for maximum removal efficiency. Cheap, lightweight and easily adsorbing vermiculate materials were used as a novel packing material and were found to be effective in splitting H2S. Effect of various operating parameters like flow rate, sulphide concentration, catalyst dosage, light irradiation were tested and optimized for maximum H2 conversion of 92% from industrial waste H2S. PMID:27562700

  10. Parallelization of photocatalytic gas-producing reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khnayzer, Rony S.; Martin, Douglas R.; Codding, Charles L.; Castellano, Felix N.

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput screening has been widely utilized in the pharmaceutical and manufacturing industry targeting the development of new molecules and materials for numerous applications. To enable more rapid progress in photocatalytic water-splitting reactions, the construction of high-throughput combinatorial photoreactors enabling the parallel optimization of relevant compositions under varieties of experimental conditions seems appropriate. This contribution describes a 16-photoreactor apparatus permitting the kinetic evaluation of photocatalytic gas-producing reactions using head-space pressure, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry operating in parallel, illustrated with molecular-based homogeneous photocatalytic H2-generating compositions.

  11. A high-throughput reaction system to measure the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation activity of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grasser, Jordan A.; Muggli, Darrin S.

    2009-07-15

    A sixteen-channel, high-throughput system was designed and built to test the activity of catalysts for gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of methanol. The system utilizes granular catalyst films to model relevant applications and allow for rapid processing. It is capable of 48 catalyst tests per day using the procedure described herein. Several experiments were performed to minimize both the within-node and between-node variances of the system. Utilizing the high-throughput system, the significance of preparation methods on the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes was investigated. A one-half fractional factorial experiment identified the factors that significantly impact catalyst activity as the following: precursor type (Degussa P-25, or nanotubes), platinum loading, the interaction between precursor and dope time, and the interaction between the precursor and calcination temperature. Based on experimental results, catalyst activity is optimized by doping TiO{sub 2} nanotubes directly (rather than doping P-25 prior to nanotube formation), a low platinum loading (0.01 wt %), and using a dope time of 30 min followed by calcination at 773 K. The optimum catalyst preparation conditions produced a catalyst that was three times more active than the starting P-25 material.

  12. Solving widespread low-concentration VOC air pollution problems: Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation answers the needs of many small businesses

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, C; Turchi, C; Gratson, D

    1995-04-01

    Many small businesses are facing new regulations under the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act. Regulators, as well as the businesses themselves, face new challenges to control small point-source air pollution emissions. An individual business-such as a dry cleaner, auto repair shop, bakery, coffee roaster, photo print shop, or chemical company-may be an insignificant source of air pollution, but collectively, the industry becomes a noticeable source. Often the businesses are not equipped to respond to new regulatory requirements because of limited resources, experience, and expertise. Also, existing control strategies may be inappropriate for these businesses, having been developed for major industries with high volumes, high pollutant concentrations, and substantial corporate resources. Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is an option for eliminating low-concentration, low-flow-rate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from small business point sources. The advantages PCO has over other treatment techniques are presented in this paper. This paper also describes how PCO can be applied to specific air pollution problems. We present our methodology for identifying pollution problems for which PCO is applicable and for reaching the technology`s potential end users. PCO is compared to other gas-phase VOC control technologies.

  13. TiO2-graphene nanocomposites for gas-phase photocatalytic degradation of volatile aromatic pollutant: is TiO2-graphene truly different from other TiO2-carbon composite materials?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhui; Tang, Zi-Rong; Fu, Xianzhi; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2010-12-28

    The nanocomposites of TiO(2)-graphene (TiO(2)-GR) have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal reaction of graphene oxide and TiO(2) in an ethanol-water solvent. We show that such a TiO(2)-GR nanocomposite exhibits much higher photocatalytic activity and stability than bare TiO(2) toward the gas-phase degradation of benzene, a volatile aromatic pollutant in air. By investigating the effect of different addition ratios of graphene on the photocatalytic activity of TiO(2)-GR systematically, we find that the higher weight ratio in TiO(2)-GR will decrease the photocatalytic activity. Analogous phenomenon is also observed for the liquid-phase degradation of dyes over TiO(2)-GR. In addition, the key features for TiO(2)-GR including enhancement of adsorptivity of pollutants, light absorption intensity, electron-hole pairs lifetime, and extended light absorption range have also been found in the composite of TiO(2) and carbon nanotubes (TiO(2)-CNT). These strongly manifest that TiO(2)-GR is in essence the same as other TiO(2)-carbon (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and activated carbon) composite materials on enhancement of photocatalytic activity of TiO(2), although graphene by itself has unique structural and electronic properties. Notably, this key fundamental question remains completely unaddressed in a recent report ( ACS Nano 2010 , 4 , 380 ) regarding liquid-phase degradation of dyes over the TiO(2)-GR photocatalyst. Thus, we propose that TiO(2)-GR cannot provide truly new insights into the fabrication of TiO(2)-carbon composite as high-performance photocatalysts. It is hoped that our work could avert the misleading message to the readership, hence offering a valuable source of reference on fabricating TiO(2)-carbon composites for their application as a photocatalyst in the environment cleanup. PMID:21117654

  14. The effect of water presence on the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korologos, Christos A.; Philippopoulos, Constantine J.; Poulopoulos, Stavros G.

    2011-12-01

    In the present work, the gas-solid heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene (BTEX) over UV-irradiated titanium dioxide was studied in an annular reactor operated in the CSTR (continuous stirred-tank reactor) mode. GC-FID and GC-MS were used for analysing reactor inlet and outlet streams. Initial BTEX concentrations were in the low parts per million (ppmv) range, whereas the water concentration was in the range of 0-35,230 ppmv and the residence time varied from 50 to 210 s. The effect of water addition on the photocatalytic process showed strong dependence on the type of the BTEX and the water vapour concentration. The increase in residence time resulted in a considerable increase in the conversion achieved for all compounds and experimental conditions. There was a clear interaction between residence time and water presence regarding the effect on conversions achieved. It was established that conversions over 95% could be achieved by adjusting appropriately the experimental conditions and especially the water concentration in the reactor. In all cases, no by-products were detected above the detection limit and carbon dioxide was the only compound detected. Finally, various Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic models have been tested in the analysis of the experimental data obtained. The kinetic data obtained confirmed that water had an active participation in the photocatalytic reactions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene since the model involving reaction of BTEX and water adsorbed on different active sites yielded the most successful fitting to the experimental results for the first three compounds, whereas the kinetic model based on the assumption that reaction between VOC and water dissociatively adsorbed on the photocatalyst takes place was the most appropriate in the case of m-xylene.

  15. Gas phase photocatalytic degradation on TiO{sub 2} pellets of volatile chlorinated organic compounds from a soil vapor extraction well

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki-Nishida, S.; Read, H.W.; Nagano, J.K.; Anderson, M.A.; Cervera-March, S.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1993-05-20

    The mineralization of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in gas stream from a soil vapor extraction (SVE) well was demonstrated with an annular photocatalytic reactor packed with porous TiO{sub 2} pellets in field trials at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. The TiO{sub 2} pellets were prepared using a sol-gel method. The experiments were performed at 55 to 60{degree}C using space times of 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} g s/mol for TCE and PCE. Chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) were detected as minor products from side reactions. On a molar basis, CCl{sub 4} and CHCl{sub 3} produced were about 2% and 0.2 % of the reactants.

  16. A new continuous device to perform S-L-G photocatalytic studies. [Solid-Liquid-Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, M.A.; Gimenez, J.; Simarro, R.; Cervera-March, S. )

    1992-07-01

    A new experimental device to carry out solid-liquid-gas photocatalytic studies is presented. It can operate as a continuous system with respect to both the gas and the liquid phase. The solid photocatalyst is held inside the system and is continuously recycled through it to enable the separation of the spent liquid. Steady values of liquid and gas composition as well as temperature and fluidodynamic variables can be set and controlled.

  17. Phase-dependent photocatalytic H2 evolution of copper zinc tin sulfide under visible light.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhi-Xian; Zhou, Wen-Hui; Kou, Dong-Xing; Zhou, Zheng-Ji; Wu, Si-Xin

    2014-10-28

    CZTS exhibited apparently phase-dependent photocatalytic H2 evolution under visible light. Possible factors for the phase-dependent photocatalytic activity of CZTS were discussed in detail. PMID:25205452

  18. [Radiation transformation mechanism in a photocatalytic reactor of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed].

    PubMed

    You, Hong; Luo, Wei-nan; Yao, Jie; Chen, Ping; Cai, Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    A novel three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor was established and the radiation transformation in which was investigated. The experimental results indicate that with the interaction of gas and solid (gas flux > 0.3m3/h), the radiation transformation in the reactor along radial direction conforms to a definite exponential function, which agrees to formula Rose about the rules of light intensity distribution through evenly suspended particles. The value of radiation energy is affected by the initial light intensity, the concentration of photocatalyst and the thickness of liquid layer. The aerated gas amount only influence the state of the fluidized bed and has little effect on the distribution of light intensity along radical direction. Photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B indicate that the efficiency of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed is much higher than slurry bed. The optimal catalyst concentration of this system is 10 - 12g/L.

  19. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of organics present in gas and liquid phases using Pt-TiO2/Zeolite (H-ZSM).

    PubMed

    Neppolian, B; Mine, Shinya; Horiuchi, Yu; Bianchi, C L; Matsuoka, M; Dionysiou, D D; Anpo, M

    2016-06-01

    TiO2-encapsulated H-ZSM photocatalysts were prepared by physical mixing of TiO2 and zeolites. Pt was immobilized on the surface of the TiO2-encapsulated zeolite (H-ZSM) catalysts by a simple photochemical reduction method. Different weight ratios of both TiO2 and Pt were hybridized with H-ZSM and the catalytic performance of the prepared catalysts was investigated for 2-propanol oxidation in liquid phase and acetaldehyde in gas phase reaction. Around 5-10 wt% TiO2-encapsulated H-ZSM catalysts was found to be optimal amount for the effective oxidation of the organics. Prior to light irradiation, Pt-TiO2-H-ZSM showed considerable amount of catalytic degradation of 2-propanol in the dark, forming acetone as an intermediate. In this study, Pt has played a major and important role on the total oxidation of 2-propanol as well as acetaldehyde. As a result, no residual organics were present in the pores of the zeolites. The catalysts could be reused more than three times without losing their catalytic activity in both phases. The Pt-TiO2-H-ZSM photocatalysts could overcome the problem of strong adsorption of organics in the zeolite pores (after the reaction). Thus, Pt-TiO2-H-ZSM can be used as a potential catalyst for both liquid and gas phase oxidation of organic pollutants.

  20. Solar photocatalytic gas-phase degradation of n-decane--a comparative study using cellulose acetate monoliths coated with P25 or sol-gel TiO₂ films.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Sandra M; Lopes, Filipe V S; Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Martins, Susana D S; Silva, Adrián M T; Faria, Joaquim L; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose acetate monoliths (CAM) were used as the substrate for the deposition of TiO2 films to produce honeycombed photoactive structures to fill a tubular photoreactor equipped with a compound parabolic collector. By using such a setup, an efficient single-pass gas-phase conversion was achieved in the degradation of n-decane, a model volatile organic compound. The CAM three-dimensional, gas-permeable transparent structure with a rugged surface enables a good adhesion of the catalytic coating. It also provides a rigid structure for packing the tubular photoreactor, and maximizing the illuminated catalyst surface. The efficiency of the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) process on n-decane degradation was evaluated under different operating conditions, such as feeding concentration (73 and 146 ppm), gas stream flow rate (73, 150, and 300 mL min(-1)), relative humidity (3 and 25 %), and UV irradiance (18.9, 29.1, and 38.4 WUV m(-2)). The results show that n-decane degradation by neat photolysis is negligible, but mineralization efficiencies of 86 and 82 % were achieved with P25-CAM and SG-CAM, respectively, for parent pollutant conversions above 95 %, under steady-state conditions. A mass transfer model, considering the mass balance to the plug-flow packed photoreactor, and PCO reaction given by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood bimolecular non-competitive two types of sites equation, was able to predict well the PCO kinetics under steady-state conditions, considering all the operational parameters tested. Overall, the performance of P25-CAM was superior taking into account mineralization efficiency, cost of preparation, surface roughness, and robustness of the deposited film.

  1. Opposite photocatalytic activity orders of low-index facets of anatase TiO₂ for liquid phase dye degradation and gaseous phase CO₂ photoreduction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liqun; Mao, Jin; Peng, Tianyou; Zan, Ling; Zhang, Youxiang

    2014-08-01

    We firstly demonstrate the opposite photocatalytic activity orders of low-index facets of anatase TiO2 in the liquid phase for rhodamine B (RhB) photocatalytic degradation and in the gaseous phase for the photoreduction of CO2 to CH4. The photocatalytic activity order in the liquid phase for RhB photocatalytic degradation is revealed as {001} > {101} > {010}, whereas the photocatalytic activity order {010} > {101} > {001} is found in the gaseous phase for the photoreduction of CO2 to CH4. The atomic arrangement of the different facets, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, photoluminescence spectra and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis show that the photoactivity order in the gas phase for the photoreduction of CO2 to CH4 mainly depends on the CO2 molecule adsorption properties on the different exposed facets, and the separation efficiency of the photo-generated carriers determines the photoactivity order for the dye degradation reaction in the liquid phase. These findings also provide a new direction to design efficient photocatalysts and the tuning of their photoreactivity for environmental and energy applications.

  2. Controllable synthesis of 3D BiVO₄ superstructures with visible-light-induced photocatalytic oxidation of NO in the gas phase and mechanistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Man; Nie, Haoyu; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Zhong, Lei

    2015-11-21

    A surfactant-free solvothermal method was developed for the controlled synthesis of diverse 3D ms-BiVO4 superstructures, including a flower, a double-layer half-open flower and a hollow tube with square cross-sections, via facilely adjusting the pH values with the aid of NH3·H2O. The effects of the morphologies of the prepared 3D ms-BiVO4 superstructure on the photocatalytic oxidation of NO were investigated, indicating that the enhanced photoactivity was not related to the surface area, but associated with the unique morphology, surface structure and good crystallinity. Moreover, the flower-like ms-BiVO4 photocatalyst with a more (040) reactive crystal plane exhibited higher photoactivity than those of other samples. The unique morphology helped with flushing the oxidation products accumulated on the surface of photocatalysts in the H2O2 system, and further improved the photoactivity. A trapping experiment was also conducted to examine the effects of the active species involved in the PCO of NO intuitively.

  3. Hematite nanoplates: Controllable synthesis, gas sensing, photocatalytic and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hongying; Sun, Dandan; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Guoying; Sun, Yaqiu; Gao, Dongzhao

    2016-01-15

    Uniform hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoplates exposing {001} plane as basal planes have been prepared by a facile solvothermal method under the assistance of sodium acetate. The morphological evolution of the nanoplates was studied by adjusting the reaction parameters including the solvent and the amount of sodium acetate. The results indicated that both the adequate nucleation/growth rate and selective adsorption of alcohol molecules and acetate anions contribute to the formation of the plate-like morphology. In addition, the size of the nanoplates can be adjusted from ca. 180nm to 740nm by changing the reaction parameters. Three nanoplate samples with different size were selected to investigate the gas sensing performance, photocatalytic and magnetic properties. As gas sensing materials, all the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates exhibited high gas sensitivity and stability toward n-butanol. When applied as photocatalyst, the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates show high photodegradation efficiency towards RhB. Both the gas sensing performance and the photocatalytic property of the products exhibit obvious size-dependent effect. Magnetic measurements reveal that the plate-like α-Fe2O3 particles possess good room temperature magnetic properties. PMID:26476200

  4. Hematite nanoplates: Controllable synthesis, gas sensing, photocatalytic and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hongying; Sun, Dandan; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Guoying; Sun, Yaqiu; Gao, Dongzhao

    2016-01-15

    Uniform hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoplates exposing {001} plane as basal planes have been prepared by a facile solvothermal method under the assistance of sodium acetate. The morphological evolution of the nanoplates was studied by adjusting the reaction parameters including the solvent and the amount of sodium acetate. The results indicated that both the adequate nucleation/growth rate and selective adsorption of alcohol molecules and acetate anions contribute to the formation of the plate-like morphology. In addition, the size of the nanoplates can be adjusted from ca. 180nm to 740nm by changing the reaction parameters. Three nanoplate samples with different size were selected to investigate the gas sensing performance, photocatalytic and magnetic properties. As gas sensing materials, all the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates exhibited high gas sensitivity and stability toward n-butanol. When applied as photocatalyst, the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates show high photodegradation efficiency towards RhB. Both the gas sensing performance and the photocatalytic property of the products exhibit obvious size-dependent effect. Magnetic measurements reveal that the plate-like α-Fe2O3 particles possess good room temperature magnetic properties.

  5. Valorization of Flue Gas by Combining Photocatalytic Gas Pretreatment with Microalgae Production.

    PubMed

    Eynde, Erik Van; Lenaerts, Britt; Tytgat, Tom; Blust, Ronny; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    Utilization of flue gas for algae cultivation seems to be a promising route because flue gas from fossil-fuel combustion processes contains the high amounts of carbon (CO2) and nitrogen (NO) that are required for algae growth. NO is a poor nitrogen source for algae cultivation because of its low reactivity and solublilty in water and its toxicity for algae at high concentrations. Here, we present a novel strategy to valorize NO from flue gas as feedstock for algae production by combining a photocatalytic gas pretreatment unit with a microalgal photobioreactor. The photocatalytic air pretreatment transforms NO gas into NO2 gas and thereby enhances the absorption of NOx in the cultivation broth. The absorbed NOx will form NO2(-) and NO3(-) that can be used as a nitrogen source by algae. The effect of photocatalytic air pretreatment on the growth and biomass productivity of the algae Thalassiosira weissflogii in a semicontinuous system aerated with a model flue gas (1% CO2 and 50 ppm of NO) is investigated during a long-term experiment. The integrated system makes it possible to produce algae with NO from flue gas as the sole nitrogen source and reduces the NOx content in the exhaust gas by 84%.

  6. Valorization of Flue Gas by Combining Photocatalytic Gas Pretreatment with Microalgae Production.

    PubMed

    Eynde, Erik Van; Lenaerts, Britt; Tytgat, Tom; Blust, Ronny; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    Utilization of flue gas for algae cultivation seems to be a promising route because flue gas from fossil-fuel combustion processes contains the high amounts of carbon (CO2) and nitrogen (NO) that are required for algae growth. NO is a poor nitrogen source for algae cultivation because of its low reactivity and solublilty in water and its toxicity for algae at high concentrations. Here, we present a novel strategy to valorize NO from flue gas as feedstock for algae production by combining a photocatalytic gas pretreatment unit with a microalgal photobioreactor. The photocatalytic air pretreatment transforms NO gas into NO2 gas and thereby enhances the absorption of NOx in the cultivation broth. The absorbed NOx will form NO2(-) and NO3(-) that can be used as a nitrogen source by algae. The effect of photocatalytic air pretreatment on the growth and biomass productivity of the algae Thalassiosira weissflogii in a semicontinuous system aerated with a model flue gas (1% CO2 and 50 ppm of NO) is investigated during a long-term experiment. The integrated system makes it possible to produce algae with NO from flue gas as the sole nitrogen source and reduces the NOx content in the exhaust gas by 84%. PMID:26838336

  7. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  8. Sunlight-promoted photocatalytic hydrogen gas evolution from water-suspended cellulose: a systematic study.

    PubMed

    Speltini, Andrea; Sturini, Michela; Dondi, Daniele; Annovazzi, Enrico; Maraschi, Federica; Caratto, Valentina; Profumo, Antonella; Buttafava, Armando

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a systematic study of cellulose (CLS) as a sacrificial biomass for photocatalytic H2 evolution from water. The idea is indeed to couple a largely available and not expensive biomass, and water, with a renewable energy like solar radiation. An aqueous CLS suspension irradiated either at 366 nm (UV-A) or under sunlight in the presence of Pt/TiO2 behaves as a H2 evolving system. The effects of irradiation time, catalyst and CLS concentrations, pH and water salinity are studied. Addition of CLS to the sample significantly improved H2 evolution from water splitting, with yields up to ten fold higher than those observed in neat water. The mechanism of the photocatalytic process relies on the TiO2-mediated CLS hydrolysis, under irradiation. The polysaccharide depolymerisation generates water-soluble species and intermediates, among them 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was identified. These intermediates are readily oxidized following the glucose photoreforming, thus enhancing water hydrogen ion reduction to give gas-phase H2. The formation of "colored" by-products from HMF self-polymerization involves a sort of "in situ dye sensitization" that allows an effective photoreaction even under solar light. The procedure is evaluated and successfully extended on cellulosic biomasses, i.e. rice husk and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) stems, not previously investigated for this application.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis, phase structure, optical and photocatalytic properties of Zn2SnO4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, Monaam; Barka-Bouaifel, Fatiha; Elhouichet, Habib; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Boussekey, Luc; Férid, Mokhtar; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2015-11-01

    Zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4 or ZTO) nanoparticles were synthesized via hydrothermal method using NaOH as a mineralizer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) of the synthesized ZTO nanoparticles revealed the formation of highly pure ZTO phase with the spinel-like structure. The nanoparticles have spherical shape with an average size of about 25 nm. The Raman spectrum of the sample was dominated by the A(1g) vibration mode of pure ZTO phase. From UV-Vis measurement, a band gap E(g) of 3.465 eV was determined. The photocatalytic activity of the ZTO nanoparticles was evaluated for the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The influence of catalyst concentration and irradiation time on the photocatalytic process was investigated. The ZTO catalyst showed the best photocatalytic performance at a concentration of 0.2 g/L, and the photodecomposition of RhB followed first-order kinetics with a rate constant k=0.0249 min(-1). The ZTO-assisted photocatalytic degradation of RhB occurred via two competitive processes: a photocatalytic process and a photosensitized process. The detection of hydroxyl radicals by fluorescence measurements suggests that these species play an important role in the photocatalytic process.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis, phase structure, optical and photocatalytic properties of Zn2SnO4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, Monaam; Barka-Bouaifel, Fatiha; Elhouichet, Habib; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Boussekey, Luc; Férid, Mokhtar; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2015-11-01

    Zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4 or ZTO) nanoparticles were synthesized via hydrothermal method using NaOH as a mineralizer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) of the synthesized ZTO nanoparticles revealed the formation of highly pure ZTO phase with the spinel-like structure. The nanoparticles have spherical shape with an average size of about 25 nm. The Raman spectrum of the sample was dominated by the A(1g) vibration mode of pure ZTO phase. From UV-Vis measurement, a band gap E(g) of 3.465 eV was determined. The photocatalytic activity of the ZTO nanoparticles was evaluated for the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The influence of catalyst concentration and irradiation time on the photocatalytic process was investigated. The ZTO catalyst showed the best photocatalytic performance at a concentration of 0.2 g/L, and the photodecomposition of RhB followed first-order kinetics with a rate constant k=0.0249 min(-1). The ZTO-assisted photocatalytic degradation of RhB occurred via two competitive processes: a photocatalytic process and a photosensitized process. The detection of hydroxyl radicals by fluorescence measurements suggests that these species play an important role in the photocatalytic process. PMID:26196720

  11. High photocatalytic activity of mixed anatase-rutile phases on commercial TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruu Siah, Wai; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is well-known as an active photocatalyst for degradation of various organic pollutants. Over the years, a wide range of TiO2 nanoparticles with different phase compositions, crystallinities, and surface areas have been developed. Due to the different methods and conditions used to synthesize these commercial TiO2 nanoparticles, the properties and photocatalytic performance would also be different from each other. In this study, the photocatalytic removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5- trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) was investigated on commercial Evonik P25, Evonik P90, Hombikat UV100 and Hombikat N100 TiO2 nanoparticles. Upon photocatalytic tests, it was found that overall, the photocatalytic activities of the P25 and the P90 were higher than the N100 and the UV100 for the removal of both 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. The high activities of the P25 and the P90 could be attributed to their phase compositions, which are made up of a mixture of anatase and rutile phases of TiO2. Whereas, the UV100 and the N100 are made up of 100% anatase phase of TiO2. The synergistic effect of the anatase/rutile mixture was reported to slow down the recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Consequently, the photocatalytic activity was increased on these TiO2 nanoparticles.

  12. Magnetically agitated photocatalytic reactor for photocatalytic oxidation of aqueous phase organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kostedt, William L; Drwiega, Jack; Mazyck, David W; Lee, Seung-Woo; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Wu, Chang-Yu; Chadik, Paul

    2005-10-15

    A magnetically agitated photocatalytic reactor (MAPR) has been developed and assessed for oxidation of phenol. The MAPR uses a titanium dioxide composite photocatalyst with a ferromagnetic barium ferrite core. The catalyst motion was controlled with a dual-component magnetic field. First, a permanent magnet above the reactor provided a static magnetic field to counteract the force of gravity, hence increasing catalyst exposure to UV. Second, an alternating magnetic field generated by a solenoid was used to agitate the catalyst, thus increasing mass transfer between pollutants and byproducts to the catalyst. Optimal performance of the MAPR was achieved with the permanent magnet present and 1 A of alternating current to the solenoid between 20 and 80 Hz. Operating with a 60-Hz signal at 1 A with the permanent magnet present and 100 mg of catalyst, the system reduced an 11 mg/L phenol concentration by97% and decreased nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon by 93% in 7 h using three 8-W 365-nm peak UV lamps.

  13. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  14. Efficient Photocatalytic Activities of TiO2 Hollow Fibers with Mixed Phases and Mesoporous Walls.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huilin; Shang, Minghui; Wang, Lin; Li, Wenge; Tang, Bin; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-01-01

    Currently, Degussa P25, with the typical mixed phases of anatase and rutile TiO2, is widely applied as the commercial photocatalysts. However, there are still some of obstacles for the P25 nanoparticles with totally high photocatalytic activities, especially for the catalytic stability due to their inevitable aggregation of the nanoparticles when used as the photocatalysts. In the present work, we reported the exploration of a novel TiO2 photocatalyst, which could offer an ideal platform for synergetic combination of the mixed-phase composition, hollow architecture and mesoporous walls for the desired excellent photocatalytic efficiency and robust stability. The mesoporous TiO2 hollow nanofibers were fabricated via a facile single capillary electrospinning technique, in which the foaming agents were used for creating mesopores throughout the walls of the hollow fibers. The obtained hollow fibers exhibit a high purity and possess the mixed phases of 94.6% anatase and 5.4% rutile TiO2. As compared to P25, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 hollow fibers exhibited much higher efficient photocatalytic activities and stabilities toward the hydrogen evolution with a rate of ~499.1 μmol g(-1)·h(-1) and ~99.5% degradation Rhodamine B (RhB) in 60 min, suggesting their promising application in efficient photocatalysts. PMID:26470013

  15. Efficient Photocatalytic Activities of TiO2 Hollow Fibers with Mixed Phases and Mesoporous Walls

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huilin; Shang, Minghui; Wang, Lin; Li, Wenge; Tang, Bin; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-01-01

    Currently, Degussa P25, with the typical mixed phases of anatase and rutile TiO2, is widely applied as the commercial photocatalysts. However, there are still some of obstacles for the P25 nanoparticles with totally high photocatalytic activities, especially for the catalytic stability due to their inevitable aggregation of the nanoparticles when used as the photocatalysts. In the present work, we reported the exploration of a novel TiO2 photocatalyst, which could offer an ideal platform for synergetic combination of the mixed-phase composition, hollow architecture and mesoporous walls for the desired excellent photocatalytic efficiency and robust stability. The mesoporous TiO2 hollow nanofibers were fabricated via a facile single capillary electrospinning technique, in which the foaming agents were used for creating mesopores throughout the walls of the hollow fibers. The obtained hollow fibers exhibit a high purity and possess the mixed phases of 94.6% anatase and 5.4% rutile TiO2. As compared to P25, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 hollow fibers exhibited much higher efficient photocatalytic activities and stabilities toward the hydrogen evolution with a rate of ~499.1 μmol g−1·h−1 and ~99.5% degradation Rhodamine B (RhB) in 60 min, suggesting their promising application in efficient photocatalysts. PMID:26470013

  16. Efficient Photocatalytic Activities of TiO2 Hollow Fibers with Mixed Phases and Mesoporous Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huilin; Shang, Minghui; Wang, Lin; Li, Wenge; Tang, Bin; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-10-01

    Currently, Degussa P25, with the typical mixed phases of anatase and rutile TiO2, is widely applied as the commercial photocatalysts. However, there are still some of obstacles for the P25 nanoparticles with totally high photocatalytic activities, especially for the catalytic stability due to their inevitable aggregation of the nanoparticles when used as the photocatalysts. In the present work, we reported the exploration of a novel TiO2 photocatalyst, which could offer an ideal platform for synergetic combination of the mixed-phase composition, hollow architecture and mesoporous walls for the desired excellent photocatalytic efficiency and robust stability. The mesoporous TiO2 hollow nanofibers were fabricated via a facile single capillary electrospinning technique, in which the foaming agents were used for creating mesopores throughout the walls of the hollow fibers. The obtained hollow fibers exhibit a high purity and possess the mixed phases of 94.6% anatase and 5.4% rutile TiO2. As compared to P25, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 hollow fibers exhibited much higher efficient photocatalytic activities and stabilities toward the hydrogen evolution with a rate of ~499.1 μmol g-1·h-1 and ~99.5% degradation Rhodamine B (RhB) in 60 min, suggesting their promising application in efficient photocatalysts.

  17. Water induced size and structure phase transition of CdS crystals and their photocatalytic property

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoyan; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Xue

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Excellent photocatalytic activity in degradation of RhB was found with the hexagonal CdS nanorods growing along [0 0 0 1] direction, which is a result of the exposed (0 0 0 1) facets in the ends. Display Omitted Highlights: ► CdS microwires and nanorods were attained by a modified CHM approach. ► The phase transition (cubic to hexagonal) was achieved by tuning the amount of H{sub 2}O. ► Excellent photocatalytic activity was found with the hexagonal CdS. ► Hexagonal CdS has the better catalytic property due to more (0 0 0 1) facets exposed. -- Abstract: Single-crystalline CdS microwires (mixed cubic and hexagonal phase) and nanorods (pure hexagonal phase) were synthesized by a modified composite-hydroxide-mediated (CHM) approach. Photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B with the CdS nanorods was studied under the simulated sunlight irradiation. Crystalline phase transition from cubic to hexagonal phase was achieved by adding a small amount of water in the melts. The phase structures and morphologies of the prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area of electron diffraction (SAED) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results show that the pure hexagonal phase structure could be obtained with 5 mL or more than 5 mL water added in the composite-hydroxide melts. The band–gap of the hexagonal nanorods was 2.435 eV observed from UV–vis reflection spectrum. Compared with the CdS nanoparticles (mixed cubic and hexagonal phase), we found that the hexagonal phase structure CdS nanorods revealed much better photocatalytic activity owing to the exposure of (0 0 0 1) polar facet on the end. It is expected that the present research may offer useful guidance to the potential application of CdS in the treatment of environmental pollution.

  18. Gas phase chemistry in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheimer, M.

    1976-01-01

    The significance of gas phase reactions in determining the nuclear structure of comets is discussed. The sublimation of parent molecules such as H2O, CH4, CO2, and NH3 from the surface of the nucleus and their subsequent photodissociation and ionization in forming observed cometary molecular species are elaborated.

  19. Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of Bismuth Precursor by Rapid Phase and Surface Transformation Using Structure-Guided Combustion Waves.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Yeol; Hwang, Hayoung; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-10

    The development of an efficient method for manipulating phase and surface transformations would facilitate the improvement of catalytic materials for use in a diverse range of applications. Herein, we present the first instance of a submicrosecond time frame direct phase and surface transformation of Bi(NO3)3 rods to nanoporous β-Bi2O3 rods via structure-guided combustion waves. Hybrid composites of the prepared Bi(NO3)3·H2O rods and organic fuel were fabricated by a facile preparation method. The anisotropic propagation of combustion waves along the interfacial boundaries of Bi(NO3)3·H2O rods induced direct phase transformation to β-Bi2O3 rods in the original structure due to the rapid pyrolysis, while the release of gas molecules enabled the formation of nanoporous structures on the surfaces of rods. The developed β-Bi2O3 rods showed improved photocatalytic activity for the photodegradation of rhodamine B in comparison with Bi(NO3)3·H2O rods and α-Bi2O3 rods due to the more suitable interdistance and the large contact areas of the porous surfaces. This new method of using structure-guided combustion waves for phase and surface transformation may contribute to the development of new catalysts as well as the precise manipulation of diverse micronanostructured materials.

  20. Pressure-induced phase transitions of exposed curved surface nano-TiO2 with high photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanwei; Chen, Fengjiao; Li, Xin; Yuan, Ye; Dong, Haini; Samanta, Sudeshna; Yu, Zhenhai; Rahman, Saqib; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Ke; Yan, Shuai; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We report a unique phase transition in compressed exposed curved surface nano-TiO2 with high photocatalytic activity using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy. High-pressure studies indicate that the anatase phase starts to transform into baddeleyite phase upon compression at 19.4 GPa, and completely transforms into the baddeleyite phase above 24.6 GPa. Upon decompression, the baddeleyite phase was maintained until the pressure was released to 6.4 GPa and then transformed into the α-PbO2 phase at 2.7 GPa. Together with the results of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and the pressure-volume relationship, this phase transition's characteristics during the compression-decompression cycle demonstrate that the truncated biconic morphology possessed excellent stability. This study may provide an insight to the mechanisms of stability for high photocatalytic activity of nano-TiO2.

  1. Photocatalytic Properties of TiO2 Thin Films Modified with Ag and Pt Nanoparticles Deposited by Gas Flow Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Maicu, M; Glöss, D; Frach, Peter; Hecker, D; Gerlach, G; Córdoba, José M

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a gas flow sputtering (GFS) process which allows the production and deposition of metal nanoparticles (NPs) in a vacuum environment is described. Aim of the study is to prove the potential of this technology for the fabrication of new TiO2 films with enhanced photocatalytic properties. For this purpose, Ag and Pt NPs have been produced and deposited on photocatalytic float glass coated with TiO2 thin films by magnetron sputtering. The influence of the process parameters and of the metal amount on the final properties of the particles (quantity, size, size distribution, oxidation state etc.,) was widely investigated. Moreover, the effect of the NPs on the photocatalytic activity of the resulting materials was evaluated for the case of the decomposition of stearic acid (SA) during UV-A irradiation. The reduction of the water contact angle (WCA) during the irradiation period was measured in order to test the photo-induced super-hydrophilicity (PSH).

  2. Photocatalytic abatement of NOx by C-TiO2/polymer composite coatings obtained by low pressure cold gas spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotti, M.; Dosta, S.; Fernández-Rodríguez, C.; Hernández-Rodríguez, M. J.; Cano, I. G.; Melián, E. Pulido; Guilemany, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we study the photocatalytic activity of carbon-modified TiO2 (C-TiO2)/polymer composite coatings obtained by low pressure cold gas spraying (LP-CGS). To produce the novel coatings, C-TiO2 was mixed with a ductile material, the polymer ECTFE, by means of a low energy ball milling (LEBM) process. The LEBM system permits the mechanical anchoring of small TiO2 aggregates around the large ductile polymeric particles. A well-bonded coating with good mechanical coupling was formed between the ball-milled mixture and the substrate. Photocatalytic tests showed that the LP-CGS nano-TiO2 coatings actively photodegraded NO and the by-product, NO2. Compared to commercial paint, the as-prepared coatings presented here enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  3. High rate deposition of photocatalytic TiO{sub 2} films with high activity by hollow cathode gas-flow sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Iwabuchi, Yoshinori; Yoshikawa, Masato; Sato, Yasushi; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2008-07-15

    Photocatalytic TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by a hollow cathode gas-flow sputtering method using two Ti metal targets mounted parallel to each other. The Ar and O{sub 2} flow rates were 3000 and 0-50 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), respectively, and total gas pressure during the deposition was maintained at 45 Pa. The highest deposition rate for the photocatalytic TiO{sub 2} films was 162 nm/min at 30 SCCM of O{sub 2} flow. The as-deposited films and postannealed films, annealed in air at 300 deg. C for 1 h, were used to carry out photocatalytic decomposition of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO). In particular, the postannealed films showed extremely high photocatalytic activity compared to the photocatalytic activity of films deposited by conventional reactive sputtering.

  4. Phase-controllable synthesis of nanosized nickel phosphides and comparison of photocatalytic degradation ability.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yonghong; Jin, Lina; Hong, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employed a facile hydrothermal route to successfully synthesize nanosized nickel phosphide particles with controlled phases via selecting different surfactants at different temperatures and times. The phases of the as-obtained products were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns and Rietveld refinement of XRD data. The morphologies of the products were characterized by (high resolution) transmission electron microscopy (HR/TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Experiments indicated that pure Ni2P phase could be prepared when nontoxic red phosphorus and nickel dichloride were used as starting materials in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, 30 K), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or polyethylene glycol 10000 (PEG-10000) at 160 °C for 10 h. When acrylamide (AM) was selected as the surfactant, however, pure Ni12P5 phase could be prepared by prolonging the reaction time to 20 h at 160 °C, or enhancing the reaction temperature to 180 °C for 10 h. Furthermore, the experiments indicated that the pure Ni2P phase possessed a stronger photocatalytic degradation ability than the pure Ni12P5 phase. PMID:21049133

  5. High visible light photocatalytic property of Co2+-doped TiO2 nanoparticles with mixed phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cong; Shu, Xin; Zhu, Da-chuan; Wei, Shang-hai; Wang, Yu-xin; Tu, Ming-jing; Gao, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Mixed phases Co2+-doped TiO2 nanoparticles have been prepared by a novel method combined with sol-gel and hydrothermal methods. The section of sol-gel method, sol, provides an unstable colloidal reaction system for the next reaction process. The hydrothermal method is to treat the above reaction system to prepare undoped and doped samples. The as-prepared samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the as-prepared samples contain three titania polymorphs: brookite, rutile and anatase phases. These titania polymorphs probably form polymorph-junctions that can extend the lifetime of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The photocatalytic activity has been evaluated by the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B in air under visible-light irradiation. The degradation results indicate that the photocatalytic activity of as-prepared samples is higher than that of Degussa P25, especially the doped sample. This is ascribed to the fact that the phases with smaller band gap can enhance visible-light photocatalytic activity, the polymorph-junctions effectively extend the photoelectron lifetime and the nano size effect and Co-doping induce the shift of the absorption edge into the visible-light region. Furthermore, the XRD, SEM, and TEM data indicate that Co2+-doping results in the decrease of particle size.

  6. Rate processes in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction-rate theory and experiment are given a critical review from the engineers' point of view. Rates of heavy-particle, collision-induced reaction in gas phase are formulated in terms of the cross sections and activation energies for reaction. The effect of cross section function shape and of excited state contributions to reaction both cause the slope of Arrhenius plots to differ from the true activation energy, except at low temperature. The master equations for chemically reacting gases are introduced, and dissociation and ionization reactions are shown to proceed primarily from excited states about kT from the dissociation or ionization limit. Collision-induced vibration, vibration-rotation, and pure rotation transitions are treated, including three-dimensional effects and conservation of energy, which have usually been ignored. The quantum theory of transitions at potential surface crossing is derived, and results are found to be in fair agreement with experiment in spite of some questionable approximations involved.

  7. Facile synthesis and photocatalytic activity of bi-phase dispersible Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, HongLing; Zhang, WenXing; Li, XueMei; Fang, Ning; Wang, XianHong; Wu, JunHua

    2015-01-01

    Bi-phase dispersible Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by one-pot non-aqueous nanoemulsion with the use of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEO-PPO-PEO) as the surfactant. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) show high crystallinity of the Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles and an average particle size of ~19.4 nm. The ultraviolet-visible light absorbance spectrometry (UV-vis) and photoluminescence spectrophotometry (PL) demonstrate well dispersibility and excellent optical performance of Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles both in organic and aqueous solvent. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms Cu(1+) and Cu(2+) in ZnO. The observation using Sudan red (III) as probe molecule reveals that the Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles possess enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability which are promising for potential applications in photocatalysis.

  8. Facile synthesis and photocatalytic activity of bi-phase dispersible Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, HongLing; Zhang, WenXing; Li, XueMei; Fang, Ning; Wang, XianHong; Wu, JunHua

    2015-04-01

    Bi-phase dispersible Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by one-pot non-aqueous nanoemulsion with the use of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEO-PPO-PEO) as the surfactant. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) show high crystallinity of the Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles and an average particle size of ~19.4 nm. The ultraviolet-visible light absorbance spectrometry (UV-vis) and photoluminescence spectrophotometry (PL) demonstrate well dispersibility and excellent optical performance of Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles both in organic and aqueous solvent. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms Cu1+ and Cu2+ in ZnO. The observation using Sudan red (III) as probe molecule reveals that the Cu-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles possess enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability which are promising for potential applications in photocatalysis.

  9. Influence of crystalline phase and defects in the ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesized by thermal plasma route on its photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nawale, Ashok B.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S.V.; Mathe, V.L.; Das, A.K.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Thermal plasma synthesized nanophase zirconia showing the blue shift in the band gap of monoclinic phase as found from the photoabsorption spectroscopy was found to be the dominant parameter for the enhancement in its photocatalytic activity. The existence of different defect states and their concentration in as synthesized samples also inferred from the photoabsorption measurements were also found to be responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the samples. Highlights: ► Phase controlled structural formation of nanophase ZrO{sub 2} by thermal plasma route. ► Enhanced photocatalytic degradation rate of methylene blue dye. ► The blue shift in the band gap of monoclinic phase of nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2}. ► Existence of different defect states in the as synthesized nano phase ZrO{sub 2}. ► Several competing processes which controls the photocatalytic degradation rate. -- Abstract: The photocatalytic activity of pure ZrO{sub 2} samples, prepared by a thermal plasma route, and characterized by X-ray diffraction technique was tested for the degradation of methylene blue, which is known to be a hazardous dye. Although, all these samples synthesized at different operating pressures of the thermal plasma reactor showed the photocatalytic activity; the sample synthesized at 1.33 bar of operating pressure showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The blue shift in the band gap of monoclinic phase, as observed from the photo-absorption spectroscopy, may be attributed to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. The existence of different defect states and their concentration as, inferred from the photo-absorption measurements were also found to be responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the as synthesized samples.

  10. Nonaqueous seeded growth of flower-like mixed-phase titania nanostructures for photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.-C.; Lin, H.-C.; Chen, C.-H.; Liao, Y.-T.; Yang, C.-M.

    2010-09-15

    A nonaqueous seeded-grown synthesis of three-dimensional TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in the benzyl alcohol reaction system was reported. The synthesis was simple, high-yield, and requires no structural directing or capping agents. It could be largely accelerated by applying microwave heating. The TiO{sub 2} nanostructures had a unique flower-like morphology and high surface area. Furthermore, the structural analyses suggested that the nanostructures had a non-uniform distribution of crystalline phases, with the inner part rich in anatase and the outer part rich in rutile. After heat treatments, the mixed-phase TiO{sub 2} nanostructures exhibited high photocatalytic activities for the photodegradation of methylene blue as compared to Degussa P25. The high photoactivities may be associated with the high surface area and the synergistic effect resulting from the anisotropic mixed-phase nanostructures. The results demonstrate the uniqueness of the nonaqueous seeded growth and the potential of the TiO{sub 2} nanostructures for practical applications. - Graphical abstract: Flower-like TiO{sub 2} nanostructures synthesized by a nonaqueous seeded growth without using any structural directing or capping agents.

  11. Mesoporous mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Green synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jin; Zhang, Gaoke

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} was synthesized by a facile and green method. • Mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited good photocatalytic activity and stability. • The reactive species in the photocatalytic process were investigated. - Abstract: Mesoporous mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} was synthesized by calcining the GaOOH precursor. The composition, crystal phase and microstructures of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} were characterized in detail. The phase composition of the as-prepared Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} depended on the calcination temperature and the mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} was obtained at 600–700 °C. As compared to the pure-phase α-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited an enhanced photocatalytic property for the degradation of metronidazole solution. The heterojunction in the mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} was beneficial to the separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. Moreover, the mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} possessed mesopore structure, which increased more reaction sites and was in favor of the contact of metronidazole molecules with reaction sites. The recycling experiments show that the mixed-phase Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} has good stability and can be separated easily from the reaction system.

  12. One-pot solvothermal synthesis of dual-phase titanate/titania Nanoparticles and their adsorption and photocatalytic Performances

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin; Ho, Jeffery Weng Chye; Tay, Yee Yan; Lau, Wei Siew; Wijaya, Olivia; Lim, Jiexiang; Chen, Zhong

    2014-06-01

    Dual phase titanate/titania nanoparticles undergo phase transformation gradually with the increase of solvothermal synthesis temperature from 100 °C to 200 °C, and eventually are fully transformed into anatase TiO{sub 2}. The crystal structure change results in the changes of optical absorption, sensitizer/dopant formation and surface area of the materials which finally affect the overall dye removal ability. Reactions under dark and light have been conducted to distinguish the contributions of surface adsorption from photocatalytic degradation. The sample synthesized at 160 °C (S160) shows the best performances for both adsorption under dark and photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The adsorption mechanism for S160 is determined as monolayer adsorption based on the adsorption isotherm test under dark condition, and an impressive adsorption capacity of 162.19 mg/g is achieved. For the photocatalytic application, this sample at 0.1 g/L loading is also able to degrade 20 ppm MB within 6 hours under the visible light (>420 nm) condition. - Graphical abstract: The effect of solvothermal synthesis temperature on the formation and dye removal performance of dual phase titanate/titania nanoparticles was unveiled and optimized. - Highlights: • Low temperature one-pot solvothermal synthesis of dual-phase photocatalysts. • Correlation of the synthesis temperature is made with the phase composition. • Adsorption isotherm, kinetics, photocatalytic degradation were studied. • Synthesis at 160 °C yields the best material for adsorption of MB in dark. • The same sample also shows the best visible light degradation of MB.

  13. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness R a and R z were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2-5 µm) and protruding hills (10-50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher R a and R z surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  14. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness Ra and Rz were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by  Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2–5 µm) and protruding hills (10–50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher Ra and Rz surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  15. TiO2 hydrosols with high activity for photocatalytic degradation of formaldehyde in a gaseous phase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong-xu; Li, Fang-bai; Li, Xiang-zhong

    2008-03-21

    Two types of TiO2 hydrosols (TOSO and HTO) were prepared from titanium sulfate (TiOSO4) and metatitanic acid (H2TiO3) by a chemical precipitation-peptization method, respectively. The prepared hydrosols were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Barret-Joyner-Halender methods. The results showed that the TiO2 hydrosols with an anatase crystal structure had smaller particle sizes, higher surface areas, larger pore volume, and higher transparence than Degussa P-25 suspension. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 hydrosols was evaluated for formaldehyde degradation under UVA illumination in a gaseous phase. The results demonstrated that the photocatalytic activity with the catalyst loading of 2mgcm(-2) was ranked as an order of HTO>TOSO>P-25. The photocatalytic activity was further studied using the HTO catalyst under different experimental conditions. The results showed that catalyst loading, relative humidity, and initial concentration could influence the efficiency of HCHO photocatalytic degradation. It was found that a catalyst loading of more than 2mgcm(-2) and a relative humidity of 55% were two essential conditions for achieving the best performance under these experimental conditions. The repeated experiments indicated that the HTO catalyst was reasonably stable and could be repeatedly used for the HCHO oxidation under UVA irradiation. This investigation would be helpful to promote the application of TiO2 photocatalytic technique for indoor air purification.

  16. Hydrated metal ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Martin K

    2007-01-01

    Studying metal ion solvation, especially hydration, in the gas phase has developed into a field that is dominated by a tight interaction between experiment and theory. Since the studied species carry charge, mass spectrometry is an indispensable tool in all experiments. Whereas gas-phase coordination chemistry and reactions of bare metal ions are reasonably well understood, systems containing a larger number of solvent molecules are still difficult to understand. This review focuses on the rich chemistry of hydrated metal ions in the gas phase, covering coordination chemistry, charge separation in multiply charged systems, as well as intracluster and ion-molecule reactions. Key ideas of metal ion solvation in the gas phase are illustrated with rare-gas solvated metal ions.

  17. Titanium Dioxide Coatings Sprayed by a Water-Stabilized Plasma Gun (WSP) with Argon and Nitrogen as the Powder Feeding Gas: Differences in Structural, Mechanical and Photocatalytic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctibor, P.; Pala, Z.; Sedláček, J.; Štengl, V.; Píš, I.; Zahoranová, T.; Nehasil, V.

    2012-06-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were sprayed by a water-stabilized plasma gun to form robust self-supporting bodies with a photocatalytically active surface. Agglomerated nanometric powder was used as a feedstock. In one case argon was used as a powder-feeding as well as coating-cooling gas whereas in the other case nitrogen was used. Stainless steel was used as a substrate and the coatings were released after the cooling. Over one millimeter thick self-supporting bodies were studied by XRD, HR-TEM, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and photocatalytic tests. Selected tests were done at the surface as well as at the bottom side representing the contact surface with the substrate during the spray process. Porosity was studied by image analysis on polished cross sections where also microhardness was measured. The dominant phase present in the sprayed samples was rutile, whereas anatase was only a minor component. The hydrogen content in the nitrogen-assisted coating was higher, but the character of the optical absorption edge remained the same for both samples. Photoelectron spectroscopy revealed differences in the character of the O1s peak between both samples. The photocatalytic activity was tested by decomposition of acetone at UV illumination, whereas also the end products—CO and CO2—were monitored. The nitrogen-assisted coating was revealed as a more efficient photocatalyst. Certain aspects of a thermal post-treatment on the coatings are discussed as well. Color and electrical conductivity are markedly changed at annealing at 760 °C, whereas only very small changes of the as-sprayed coating character correspond to annealing at 500 °C.

  18. Electron-irradiation induced changes in the phases and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapnar, K. B.; Dhole, S. D.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Samples of TiO2 nanoparticles, with mixed anatase and rutile phases, were irradiated with 6.5 MeV electrons at fluences, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 × 1015 e cm-2 and characterized by several methods. With increasing electron fluence, a continuous decrease in the average particle size from ˜80 nm to around 30 nm were observed along with a decrease in the rutile and the anatase phases of TiO2, but at different rates, and growth of the TiO2 brookite phase at slow rate. The photocatalytic activities of different electron irradiated TiO2 samples, in the photodegradation of methylene blue, were studied by recording UV-Vis absorption spectra of the respective solutions. On electron irradiation, even though the rutile phase in the TiO2 was decreasing, the photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles increased continuously with fluence up to ˜3.0 × 1015 e cm-2, but decreased at 3.5 × 1015 e cm-2. The energy levels introduced by the brookite phase and the electron induced defects in TiO2 could have effectively reduced the electron-hole recombination rate in the absence of the rutile phase. The observed enhancement in the photocatalytic activity of the irradiated TiO2 is attributed to the formation of small size particles, the introduction of the oxygen related vacancies and other defects, the growth of the brookite phase, and increased absorption of radiation over the ultraviolet and visible range.

  19. Photocatalytic Properties of TiO2 Thin Films Modified with Ag and Pt Nanoparticles Deposited by Gas Flow Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Maicu, M; Glöss, D; Frach, Peter; Hecker, D; Gerlach, G; Córdoba, José M

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a gas flow sputtering (GFS) process which allows the production and deposition of metal nanoparticles (NPs) in a vacuum environment is described. Aim of the study is to prove the potential of this technology for the fabrication of new TiO2 films with enhanced photocatalytic properties. For this purpose, Ag and Pt NPs have been produced and deposited on photocatalytic float glass coated with TiO2 thin films by magnetron sputtering. The influence of the process parameters and of the metal amount on the final properties of the particles (quantity, size, size distribution, oxidation state etc.,) was widely investigated. Moreover, the effect of the NPs on the photocatalytic activity of the resulting materials was evaluated for the case of the decomposition of stearic acid (SA) during UV-A irradiation. The reduction of the water contact angle (WCA) during the irradiation period was measured in order to test the photo-induced super-hydrophilicity (PSH). PMID:26716202

  20. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of bicrystal phase TiO2 nanotubes containing TiO2-B and anatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanxi; Zhu, Kerong; Qi, Mengyao; Zhuang, Yonglong; Cheng, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Bicrystal phase TiO2 nanotubes (NTS) containing monoclinic TiO2-B and anatase were prepared by the hydrothermal reaction of anatase nanoparticles with NaOH aqueous solution and a heat treatment. Their structure was characterized by XRD, TEM and Raman spectra. The results showed that the bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS were formed after calcining H2Ti4O9·H2O NTS at 573 K. The bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS exhibit significantly higher photocatalytic activity than the single phase anatase NTS and Dessuga P-25 nanoparticles in the degradation of Methyl Orange aqueous solution under ultraviolet light irradiation, which is attributed to the large surface and interface areas of the bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS.

  1. Influence of anatase and rutile phase in TiO2 upon the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under solar irradiation in presence of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matos, J; Montaña, R; Rivero, E; Escudero, A; Uzcategui, D

    2014-01-01

    The influence of activated carbon (AC) on the photocatalytic activity of different crystalline TiO2 phases was verified in the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under UV and solar irradiation. The results showed a volcano trend with a maximum photoactivity for the crystalline phase ratio of anatase:rutile equal to 80:20 both under UV or solar irradiation. By contrast, in presence of AC the photocatalytic activity of the binary materials of TiO2/AC followed an exponential trend, increasing as a function of the increase in anatase proportion in the TiO2 framework. The increase in the photoactivity of the binary material TiO2/AC relative to neat TiO2 was up to 22 and about 17 times higher under UV and visible irradiation, respectively. The present results suggest that AC interacts more efficiently with anatase phase than with rutile phase.

  2. Photocatalytic Degradation of Two Commercial Reactive Dyes in Aqueous Phase Using Nanophotocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kansal, Sushil Kumar; Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Sukhmehar

    2009-07-01

    This study involves the photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Orange 4 (RO4) dyes, employing heterogeneous photocatalytic process. Photocatalytic activity of different semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) has been investigated. An attempt has been made to study the effect of process parameters through amount of catalyst, concentration of dye, and pH on photocatalytic degradation of RB5 and RO4. The experiments were carried out by varying pH (3-11), amount of catalyst (0.25-1.5 g/L), and initial concentration of dye (10-100 mg/L). The optimum catalyst dose was found to be 1.25 and 1 g/L for RB5 and RO4, respectively. In the case of RB5, maximum rate of decolorization was observed in acidic medium at pH 4, whereas the decolorization of RO4 reached maximum in basic region at pH 11. The performance of photocatalytic system employing ZnO/UV light was observed to be better than TiO2/UV system. The complete decolorization of RB5 was observed after 7 min with ZnO, whereas with TiO2, only 75% dye degraded in 7 min. In the case of RO4, 92 and 62% decolorization was noticed in the same duration.

  3. Nanostructures and porous silicon: activity and phase transformation in sensors and photocatalytic reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gole, James L.; Lewis, Stephen E.; Fedorov, Andrei; Prokes, Sharka

    2005-08-01

    Porous interfaces are being transformed within the framework of nanotechnology to develop highly efficient sensors, nanostructure modified microreactors, and active battery electrodes. We demonstrate the rapid and reversible sensing of HCl, NH3, CO, SO2, H2S, and NOx at or below the ppm level. Gold and tin-based nanostructured coatings are introduced to improve the detection of NH3, CO, and NOx as these coatings form the initial basis for introducing significant selectivity. These sensor suites are being extended to develop microreactors, with a goal to introduce quantum dot (QD) based photocatalysts within the porous interface structure. Highly efficient, visible light absorbing, anatase TiO2-xNx nanophotocatalysts have been formed in seconds at room temperature via the direct nitridation of anatase TiO2 nanocolloids. A tunability throughout the visible is found to depend upon the degree of nanoparticle agglomeration and upon the ready ability to seed these nanoparticles with metal (metal ions) including Pt, Co, and Ni. This metal ion seeding also leads to unique efficient phase transformations, including that of anatase to rutile TiO2, at room temperature. The visible light absorbing photocatalysts readily photodegrade methylene blue and gaseous ethylene. They can be transformed from liquids to gels and, in addition, can be placed on the surfaces of sensor and microreactor based configurations 1) to produce an improved photocatalytically induced solar based sensor response, and 2) with a goal to facilitate catalytically induced disinfection of airborne pathogens. In contrast to the nitridation process which is facile at the nanoscale, we find little or no direct nitridation of micrometer sized anatase or rutile TiO2 powders at room temperature. Thus, we illustrate an example of how a traversal to the nanoscale can vastly improve the efficiency for producing important submicron particles.

  4. Real Gas/Blunt Cone. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Eitelberg, Georg

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter recent activity in real-gas database definition and code validation will be summarized. In the Phase I report of the Working Group (WG) 181, aerothermodynamic problems were classified, for purpose of discussion, into seven types: aerodynamic parameters, viscous/shock interaction, boundary-layer transition, forebody-heating/heat-transfer, radiation and ablation, lee and base-region flow, and low-density flow. Several of these problem types were the subject of various chapters of the Phase 1 report describing real-gas effects and ground test facility issues. In this chapter some background and objectives outlined in the real-Gas effects Chapter V of the Phase 1 report will be reviewed. The results of the blunt cone test campaign developed under the auspices of the WG18 activity to study real-gas phenomena will be summarized, including the experimental and computational programs, issues and questions, and recommendations. Further, recent progress in other real-gas areas beyond the blunt cone test campaign will be discussed. Finally, a summary in which the present status of our understanding of real-gas issues will be presented.

  5. Nitrogen-modified nano-titania: True phase composition, microstructure and visible-light induced photocatalytic NOx abatement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobaldi, D. M.; Pullar, R. C.; Gualtieri, A. F.; Otero-Irurueta, G.; Singh, M. K.; Seabra, M. P.; Labrincha, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a popular photocatalyst used for many environmental and anti-pollution applications, but it normally operates under UV light, exploiting ∼5% of the solar spectrum. Nitrification of titania to form N-doped TiO2 has been explored as a way to increase its photocatalytic activity under visible light, and anionic doping is a promising method to enable TiO2 to harvest visible-light by changing its photo-absorption properties. In this paper, we explore the insertion of nitrogen into the TiO2 lattice using our green sol-gel nanosynthesis method, used to create 10 nm TiO2 NPs. Two parallel routes were studied to produce nitrogen-modified TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), using HNO3+NH3 (acid-precipitated base-peptised) and NH4OH (totally base catalysed) as nitrogen sources. These NPs were thermally treated between 450 and 800 °C. Their true phase composition (crystalline and amorphous phases), as well as their micro-/nanostructure (crystalline domain shape, size and size distribution, edge and screw dislocation density) was fully characterised through advanced X-ray methods (Rietveld-reference intensity ratio, RIR, and whole powder pattern modelling, WPPM). As pollutants, nitrogen oxides (NOx) are of particular concern for human health, so the photocatalytic activity of the NPs was assessed by monitoring NOx abatement, using both solar and white-light (indoor artificial lighting), simulating outdoor and indoor environments, respectively. Results showed that the onset of the anatase-to-rutile phase transformation (ART) occurred at temperatures above 450 °C, and NPs heated to 450 °C possessed excellent photocatalytic activity (PCA) under visible white-light (indoor artificial lighting), with a PCA double than that of the standard P25 TiO2 NPs. However, higher thermal treatment temperatures were found to be detrimental for visible-light photocatalytic activity, due to the effects of four simultaneous occurrences: (i) loss of OH groups and water adsorbed

  6. Novel nano coordination polymer based synthesis of porous ZnO hexagonal nanodisk for higher gas sorption and photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakibuddin, M.; Ananthakrishnan, Rajakumar

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II)-based nano co-ordination polymers (NCPs) are first prepared at room temperature from three different isomers of dihydroxysalophen (DHS) ligand with Zn(OAc)2·2H2O and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (BDC) in DMF solvent. Facile calcinations of [Zn (DHS) (BDC)]·nH2O (shortly denoted as Zn(II)-based NCP) at ambient conditions produces porous ZnO hexagonal nanodisks. Moreover, a novel approach has been introduced to observe the effect of ligand of the NCP on the physico-chemical properties of the as-synthesized ZnO. The porous ZnO nanodisks are characterized by FT-IR, PXRD, TEM, FESEM, EDX and BET analysis, and the results exhibit that they possess different sizes, surface areas and porosities. Nitrogen gas sorption capacity and photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared ZnO nanodisks are also checked, and it is noticed that they differ in these physico-chemical properties due to having different porosities and surface areas. A comparative study is also done with commercially available ZnO; interestingly, the commercial ZnO exhibited lower surface area, gas sorption and photocatalytic activity compared to the ZnO nanodisks. Hence, preparation of the ZnO through the NCP route and tuning their physico-chemical properties would offer new directions in synthesis of various nano metal oxides of unique properties.

  7. Surface modification of mixed-phase hydrogenated TiO2 and corresponding photocatalytic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Juan, Joon Ching; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaeiljadeh

    2015-12-01

    Preparation of highly photo-activated TiO2 is achievable by hydrogenation at constant temperature and pressure, with controlled hydrogenation duration. The formation of surface disorders and Ti3+ is responsible for the color change from white unhydrogenated TiO2 to bluish-gray hydrogenated TiO2. This color change, together with increased oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ enhanced the solar light absorption from UV to infra-red region. Interestingly, no band gap narrowing is observed. The photocatalytic activity in the UV and visible region is controlled by Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies respectively. Both Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increases the electron density on the catalyst surface thus facilitates rad OH radicals formation. The lifespan of surface photo-excited electrons and holes are also sustained thus prevents charge carrier recombination. However, excessive amount of oxygen vacancies deteriorates the photocatalytic activity as it serves as charge traps. Hydrogenation of TiO2 also promotes the growth of active {0 0 1} facets and facilitates the photocatalytic activity by higher concentration of surface OH radicals. However, the growth of {0 0 1} facets is small and insignificant toward the overall photo-kinetics. This work also shows that larger role is played by Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies rather than the surface disorders created during the hydrogenation process. It also demonstrates the ability of hydrogenated TiO2 to absorb wider range of photons even though at a similar band gap as unhydrogenated TiO2. In addition, the photocatalytic activity is shown to be decreased for extended hydrogenation duration due to excessive catalyst growth and loss in the total surface area. Thus, a balance in the physico-chemical properties of hydrogenated TiO2 is crucial to enhance the photocatalytic activity by simply controlling the hydrogenation duration.

  8. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  9. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  10. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  11. Mixed phase lamellar titania-titanate anchored with Ag2O and polypyrrole for enhanced adsorption and photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-09-01

    Ag2O/TiO2/polypyrrole composite was synthesized by stepwise modification of the rutile TiO2 though hydrothermal alkaline treatment to obtain mixed phase sodium titanate/titania (Na-TiO2) followed ion-exchange replacement of Na(+) by Ag(+) to get Ag2O/TiO2 (through precipitation) and H2O2 oxidative polymerization of pyrrole onto Ag2O/TiO2 to get final composite Ag2O/TiO2/polypyrrole (Ag2O/TiO2/PPY). Composite materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) and Raman analysis. The synthesized materials showed increase in the optical property, adsorption and photocatalytic scavenging of the methylene blue (MB). The adsorption capacity of MB onto the prepared materials was observed in the following order: TiO2photocatalytic decontamination of MB was as follows: TiO2photocatalytic decontamination was observed at pH 9. The kinetics studies revealed that the adsorption of MB followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. While kinetics for MB degradation were well defined by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model at low and high concentrations. The obtained results demonstrate that the synergistic effect of adsorption and visible light photocatalysis is enough capable for 100% removal of MB from aquatic solution. PMID:27244593

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2004-09-30

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  13. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu; Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2004-05-01

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  14. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  15. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  16. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  17. Efficient removal of toluene and benzene in gas phase by the TiO2/Y-zeolite hybrid photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masato; Hidaka, Manabu; Anpo, Masakazu

    2012-10-30

    Efficient removal of toluene or benzene molecules thinly diffused in gas phase was achieved by using TiO(2)/Y-zeolite hybrid photocatalysts. TiO(2) of 10 wt% hybridized with a hydrophobic USY zeolite showed higher photocatalytic reactivity as compared to TiO(2) hybridized with hydrophilic H-Y or Na-Y zeolites. This phenomenon can be explained by the fact that the hydrophobic USY zeolite efficiently adsorbs the organic compounds and smoothly supplies them onto the TiO(2) photocatalyst surface. However, the toluene or benzene molecules, which are strongly trapped on the hydrophilic H(+) or Na(+) sites of zeolite, cannot diffuse onto the TiO(2) surfaces, resulting in lower photocatalytic reactivity. Although the adsorption capacity of the pure TiO(2) sample rapidly deteriorated, the TiO(2)/Y-zeolite hybrid system maintained a high adsorption efficiency to remove such aromatic compounds for a long period. PMID:22947182

  18. Experimental Thermochemistry of Gas Phase Cytosine Tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. M.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    Enthalpies of interconversion are measured for the three lowest energy tautomers of isolated cytosine. The equilibrium distribution of tautomers near 600 K is frozen upon the capture of the gas phase species by low temperature helium nanodroplets. The temperature dependence of the gas phase cytosine tautomer populations is determined with infrared laser spectroscopy of the helium solvated species. The interconverison enthalpies obtained from the van't Hoff relation are 1.14 ± 0.21 and 1.63 ± 0.12 for the C31 rightleftharpoons C32 and C31 rightleftharpoons C1 equilibria, respectively. C31 and C32 are rotamers of an enol tautomer, and C1 is a keto tautomer. The interconversion enthalpies are compared to recent CCSD(T) thermochemistry calculations of cytosine tautomers.

  19. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  20. How to select gas-phase filters

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, G.; Winters, P.

    1997-10-01

    Removing airborne molecular contamination (AMC) from indoor industrial air is a challenging problem. Under OSHA, companies must mitigate harmful effects from corrosive, acid and alkaline gases to protect employee health. Equally important, corrosive gases tremendously impact and compromise operation of sensitive plant instrumentation and process control devices. Gases such as SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, VOCs, etc., are present in many manufacturing facilities. These contaminants can be controlled to tolerable levels with gas-phase filtration techniques. Because each manufacturing facility has its own unique problem, a one-size-fits-all-solution is not possible. The presented examples and laboratory data evaluate several gas-phase control technologies under varying contaminant concentrations and air stream velocities. Using this information, engineers can find the best solution for their AMC problem.

  1. The effect of doping titanium dioxide nanoparticles on phase transformation, photocatalytic activity and anti-bacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzby, Scott Edward

    Nanosized titanium dioxide has a variety of important applications in everyday life including a photocatalyst for pollution remediation, photovoltaic devices, sunscreen, etc. This study focuses on the various properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with various cation and anion species. Samples were produced by various methods including metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), plasma assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PA-MOCVD) and sol-gel. Numerous techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron microscopy both scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) were used for physical characterization. Photocatalytic properties were determined by the oxidation of methylene blue dye and 2-chlorophenol in water as well as gaseous formic acid with results analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultra violet - visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS). For the purpose of enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the effect of anion doping and the anatase-rutile phase ratio were studied. Although anatase, rutile and mixed crystallite phases all show some degree of activity in photocatalytic reactions, these results show that anatase is better suited for the degradation of organic compounds in an aqueous medium any advantage in photocatalytic activity gained through the enhancement in optical response from the smaller band gap by addition of rutile was overcome by the negatives associated with the rutile phase. Furthermore substitutional nitrogen doping showed significant improvement in UV photocatalysis as well as allowing for visible light activation of the catalyst. Further studies on the phase transitions in titanium dioxide nanoparticles were carried out by synthesizing various cation doped samples by sol-gel. Analysis of the phases by XRD showed an inverse relationship between dopant size and rutile percentage

  2. Colloidal nanocrystals of orthorhombic Cu2ZnGeS4: phase-controlled synthesis, formation mechanism and photocatalytic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Cong-Min; Regulacio, Michelle D.; Ye, Chen; Lim, Suo Hon; Lua, Shun Kuang; Xu, Qing-Hua; Dong, Zhili; Xu, An-Wu; Han, Ming-Yong

    2015-02-01

    The orthorhombic polymorph of Cu2ZnGeS4 (CZGS) is a metastable wurtzite-derived phase that can only be prepared in the bulk form by extensive heating at high temperatures (>=790 °C) when using the conventional solid-state reaction route. By employing a facile solution-based synthetic strategy, we were able to obtain phase-pure orthorhombic CZGS in nanocrystalline form at a much lower reaction temperature. Prior to this work, the colloidal synthesis of single-phase orthorhombic CZGS on the nanoscale has never been reported. We find that the use of an appropriate combination of coordinating solvents and precursors is crucial to the sole formation of this metastable phase in solution. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our experimental results. Because CZGS consists of environmentally benign metal components, it is regarded as a promising alternative material to the technologically useful yet toxic cadmium-containing semiconductors. The orthorhombic CZGS nanocrystals display strong photon absorption in the visible spectrum and are photocatalytically active in dye degradation under visible-light illumination.The orthorhombic polymorph of Cu2ZnGeS4 (CZGS) is a metastable wurtzite-derived phase that can only be prepared in the bulk form by extensive heating at high temperatures (>=790 °C) when using the conventional solid-state reaction route. By employing a facile solution-based synthetic strategy, we were able to obtain phase-pure orthorhombic CZGS in nanocrystalline form at a much lower reaction temperature. Prior to this work, the colloidal synthesis of single-phase orthorhombic CZGS on the nanoscale has never been reported. We find that the use of an appropriate combination of coordinating solvents and precursors is crucial to the sole formation of this metastable phase in solution. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our experimental results. Because CZGS consists of environmentally benign metal components, it is

  3. Intensification of gas-phase photoxidative dehydrogenation of ethanol to acetaldehyde by using phosphors as light carriers.

    PubMed

    Ciambelli, P; Sannino, D; Palma, V; Vaiano, V; Mazzei, R S

    2011-03-01

    In this work a significant improvement of VO(x)/TiO(2) photocatalytic activity in the selective partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde was achieved by the simultaneous irradiation with light emitting phosphorescent particles and UVA-LEDs as external light source. Photocatalytic tests were carried out in a gas-solid photocatalytic fluidized bed reactor at high illumination efficiency, in which the bed is constituted by VO(x)/TiO(2) photocatalyst at nominal V(2)O(5) content of 5 wt% and suitable selected phosphors, diluted with glass spheres. In this way, phosphors were fluidized together with the catalyst, excited by external UVA-LEDs, emitting their stored energy in close proximity to the catalyst. In the absence of phosphors the ethanol consumption rate initially grows linearly with initial alcohol concentration, then bends towards an asymptotic value for initial ethanol concentration higher than 0.5 vol%. By contrast, when phosphors are present, the ethanol consumption rate increased linearly in the overall range. In all cases acetaldehyde was the main product detected in gas phase with a selectivity of about 97%, ethylene and carbon dioxide the by-products. The results evidenced that the presence of phosphors allowed improved photon transfer, increasing the apparent quantum yield from 2 to 30% together with a high photoreactivity. PMID:20953515

  4. Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

    2000-09-11

    In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H{sub 2} via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown.

  5. Photocatalytic characteristics of single phase Fe-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles sensitized with vitamin B{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz; Bayati, R.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Anatase TiO{sub 2}/B{sub 12} hybrid nanostructured catalyst was successfully synthesized by sol–gel technique. • The nanoparticle catalyst was doped with iron at several concentrations. • Nanoparticles were characterized in detail by XRD, Raman, TEM, EDS, and spectroscopy techniques. • The formation mechanism and role of point defects on photocatalytic properties were discussed. • A structure-property-processing correlation was established. - Abstract: We report a processing-structure-property correlation in B{sub 12}-anatase titania hybrid catalysts doped with several concentrations of iron. Our results clearly show that low-level iron doping alters structure, defect content, and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO{sub 2}. XRD and Raman studies revealed formation of a single-phase anatase TiO{sub 2} where no iron based segregation in particular iron oxide, was detected. FT-IR spectra clearly confirmed sensitization of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with vitamin B{sub 12}. TEM micrographs and diffraction patterns confirmed crystallization of anatase nanoparticles with a radius of 15–20 nm. Both XRD and Raman signals showed a peak shift and a peak broadening which are surmised to originate from creation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancy and titanium interstitial. The doped samples revealed a narrower band gap as compared to undoped samples. Photocatalytic activity of the samples was assessed through measuring the decomposition rate of rhodamine B. It was found that sensitization with vitamin B{sub 12} and Fe-doping significantly enhances the photocatalytic efficiency of the anatase nanoparticles. We also showed that there is an optimum Fe-doping level where the maximum photocatalytic activity is achieved. The boost of photocatalytic activity was qualitatively understood to originate from a more effective use of the light photons, formation of point defects, which enhance the charge separation, higher carrier mobility.

  6. Gas phase grown silicon germanium nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Kaiser, M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the gas phase synthesis of highly crystalline and homogeneously alloyed Si1-xGex nanocrystals in continuous and pulsed plasmas. Agglomerated nanocrystals have been produced with remarkable control over their composition by altering the precursor GeH4 gas flow in a continuous plasma. We specially highlight that in the pulsed plasma mode, we obtain quantum-sized free standing alloy nanocrystals with a mean size of 7.3 nm. The presence of Si1-xGex alloy particles is confirmed with multiple techniques, i.e. Raman spectroscopy, XRD (Xray diffraction) and HRTEM (high resolution transmission electron microscopy) studies, with each of these methods consistently yielding the same composition. The nanocrystals synthesized here have potential applications in band-gap engineering for multijunction solar cells.

  7. Colloidal nanocrystals of orthorhombic Cu2ZnGeS4: phase-controlled synthesis, formation mechanism and photocatalytic behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cong-Min; Regulacio, Michelle D; Ye, Chen; Lim, Suo Hon; Lua, Shun Kuang; Xu, Qing-Hua; Dong, Zhili; Xu, An-Wu; Han, Ming-Yong

    2015-02-21

    The orthorhombic polymorph of Cu2ZnGeS4 (CZGS) is a metastable wurtzite-derived phase that can only be prepared in the bulk form by extensive heating at high temperatures (≥790 °C) when using the conventional solid-state reaction route. By employing a facile solution-based synthetic strategy, we were able to obtain phase-pure orthorhombic CZGS in nanocrystalline form at a much lower reaction temperature. Prior to this work, the colloidal synthesis of single-phase orthorhombic CZGS on the nanoscale has never been reported. We find that the use of an appropriate combination of coordinating solvents and precursors is crucial to the sole formation of this metastable phase in solution. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our experimental results. Because CZGS consists of environmentally benign metal components, it is regarded as a promising alternative material to the technologically useful yet toxic cadmium-containing semiconductors. The orthorhombic CZGS nanocrystals display strong photon absorption in the visible spectrum and are photocatalytically active in dye degradation under visible-light illumination.

  8. Structural, morphological, gas sensing and photocatalytic characterization of MoO3 and WO3 thin films prepared by the thermal vacuum evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, A.; Touihri, S.; Mhamdi, A.; Labidi, A.; Manoubi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Thin films of molybdenum trioxide and tungsten trioxide were deposited on glass substrates using a simplified thermal evaporation under vacuum method monitored by heat treatment in flowing oxygen at 500 °C for 1 h. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the films of MoO3 and WO3 were well crystallized in orthorhombic and monoclinic phase respectively with the crystallites preferentially oriented toward (2 0 0) direction parallel a-axis for both samples. In literature, we have shown in previous papers that structural and surface morphology of metal thin films play an important role in the gas detection mechanism. In this article, we have studied the response evolution of MoO3 and WO3 thin films sensors ethanol versus time, working temperature and the concentration of the ethanol. It was found that these films had high sensitivity to ethanol, which made them as a good candidate for the ethanol sensor. Finally, the photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated with respect to the degradation reaction of a wastewater containing methylene blue (MB) under UV-visible light irradiation. The molybdenum trioxide exhibits a higher degradation rate than the tungsten trioxide thin films under similar experimental conditions.

  9. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.P.

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: {alpha}-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  10. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  11. Mesoporous TiO2 single crystals: facile shape-, size-, and phase-controlled growth and efficient photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoli; Kuang, Qin; Yan, Keyou; Qiu, Yongcai; Qiu, Jianhang; Yang, Shihe

    2013-11-13

    In this work, we have succeeded in preparing rutile and anatase TiO2 mesoporous single crystals with diverse morphologies in a controllable fashion by a simple silica-templated hydrothermal method. A simple in-template crystal growth process was put forward, which involved heterogeneous crystal nucleation and oriented growth within the template, a sheer spectator, and an excluded volume, i.e., crystal growth by faithful negative replication of the silica template. A series of mesoporous single-crystal structures, including rutile mesoporous TiO2 nanorods with tunable sizes and anatase mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets with dominant {001} facets, have been synthesized to demonstrate the versatility of the strategy. The morphology, size, and phase of the TiO2 mesoporous single crystals can be tuned easily by varying the external conditions such as the hydrohalic acid condition, seed density, and temperature rather than by the silica template, which merely serves for faithful negative replication but without interfering in the crystallization process. To demonstrate the application value of such TiO2 mesoporous single crystals, photocatalytic activity was tested. The resultant TiO2 mesoporous single crystals exhibited remarkable photocatalytic performance on hydrogen evolution and degradation of methyl orange due to their increased surface area, single-crystal nature, and the exposure of reactive crystal facets coupled with the three-dimensionally connected mesoporous architecture. It was found that {110} facets of rutile mesoporous single crystals can be considered essentially as reductive sites with a key role in the photoreduction, while {001} facets of anatase mesoporous single crystals provided oxidation sites in the oxidative process. Such shape- and size-controlled rutile and anatase mesoporous TiO2 single crystals hold great promise for building energy conversion devices, and the simple solution-based hydrothermal method is extendable to the synthesis of other

  12. Giddings Austin chalk enters deep lean-gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Moritis, G.

    1995-12-25

    Deep lean gas is the latest phase in the growth of the Giddings field Austin chalk play. The first phase involved drilling vertical oil and gas wells. Next came the horizontal well boom in the shallower Austin chalk area, which is still continuing. And now this third phase places horizontal laterals in the Austen chalk at about 14,000--15,000 ft to produce lean gas. The article describes the producing wells and gas gathering.

  13. A comparative study of optical absorption and photocatalytic properties of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} doped with transition metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kernazhitsky, L.; Shymanovska, V.; Gavrilko, T.; Naumov, V.; Kshnyakin, V.; Khalyavka, T.

    2013-02-15

    The effect of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} doping with transition metal cations (Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}) on their optical absorption and photocatalytic properties was investigated. The obtained metal-doped TiO{sub 2} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is shown that doping effect on anatase (A) and rutile (R) properties is quite different, being much stronger and complicated on A than on R. Contrary to doped R, doped A revealed a significant red shift of the absorption edge along with the band gap narrowing. Photocatalytic activity of anatase increases upon doping in the order: Aphotocatalytic activity of rutile samples decreases upon doping in the series R>R/Co>R/Cu>R/Fe>R/Cr, indicating the inhibitory effect of impurity cations. This fact correlates with the decrease in the UV absorption of the doped rutile in the region of the Hg-lamp irradiation at 4.88 eV. - Graphical abstract: A red shift of the absorption edge of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase after doping with transition metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-phase anatase and rutile powders surface-doped with transition metal cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption edge and band gap of rutile do not change with surface doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Band gap of surface-doped anatase reduces being the lowest for A/Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping improves photocatalytic activity of anatase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping inhibits photocatalytic activity of rutile.

  14. Morphology-modulation of SnO2 Hierarchical Architectures by Zn Doping for Glycol Gas Sensing and Photocatalytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qinqin; Ju, Dianxing; Deng, Xiaolong; Huang, Jinzhao; Cao, Bingqiang; Xu, Xijin

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of SnO2 nanospheres was transformed into ultrathin nanosheets assembled architectures after Zn doping by one-step hydrothermal route. The as-prepared samples were characterized in detail by various analytical techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption technique. The Zn-doped SnO2 nanostructures proved to be the efficient gas sensing materials for a series of flammable and explosive gases detection, and photocatalysts for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under UV irradiation. It was observed that both of the undoped and Zn-doped SnO2 after calcination exhibited tremendous gas sensing performance toward glycol. The response (S = Ra/Rg) of Zn-doped SnO2 can reach to 90 when the glycol concentration is 100 ppm, which is about 2 times and 3 times higher than that of undoped SnO2 sensor with and without calcinations, respectively. The result of photocatalytic activities demonstrated that MO dye was almost completely degraded (~92%) by Zn-doped SnO2 in 150 min, which is higher than that of others (MO without photocatalyst was 23%, undoped SnO2 without and with calcination were 55% and 75%, respectively). PMID:25597269

  15. Gas-phase thermochemistry of chloropyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Amaral, Luísa M. P. F.; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A. V.

    2005-04-01

    The gas-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation of the 2,3,5-trichloropyridine compound was derived from the enthalpies of combustion of the crystalline solid measured by rotating-bomb calorimetry and its enthalpy of sublimation obtained by Calvet microcalorimetry at T = 298.15 K. The standard enthalpies of formation for this compound and for the other chlorosubstituted pyridines were determined by DFT calculations. The experimental enthalpy of formation of 2,3,5-trichloropyridine is (65.8 ± 2.3) kJ mol -1, in excellent agreement with the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) value. The affinity of pyridine to some metal cations was also calculated at the same DFT level of theory and compared with experimental data.

  16. Gas phase acidity of substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-04-01

    Deprotonation thermochemistry of benzene derivatives C 6H 5X (X = H, F, Cl, OH, NH 2, CN, CHO, NO 2, CH 3, C 2H 5, CHCH 2, CCH) has been examined at the G3B3 level of theory. For X = F, Cl, CN, CHO and NO 2, the most favorable deprotonation site is the ortho position of the phenyl ring. This regio-specificity is directly related to the field/inductive effect of the substituent. G3B3 gas phase acidities, Δ acidH° and Δ acidG°, compare within less than 4 kJ mol -1 with experimental data. A noticeable exception is nitrobenzene for which tabulated acidity appear to be underestimated by ca. 120 kJ mol -1.

  17. Transferring pharmaceuticals into the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Wolfgang; Krause, Tim; Rademann, Klaus

    2008-11-01

    The dissolution of molecules of biological interest in supercritical carbon dioxide is investigated using pulsed molecular beam mass spectrometry. Due to the mild processing temperatures of most supercritical fluids, their adiabatic expansion into vacuum permits to transfer even thermally very sensitive substances into the gas phase, which is particularly attractive for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In addition, supercritical CO2constitutes a chemically inert solvent that is compatible with hydrocarbon-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Here, we report on the dissolution and pulsed supersonic jet expansion of caffeine (C8H10N4O2), the provitamin menadione (C11H8O2), and the amino acid derivative l-phenylalanine tert-butyl ester hydrochloride (C6H5CH2CH(NH2)COOC(CH3)3[dot operator]HCl), into vacuum. An on-axis residual gas analyzer is used to monitor the relative amounts of solute and solvent in the molecular beam as a function of solvent densityE The excellent selectivity and sensitivity provided by mass spectrometry permits to probe even trace amounts of solutes. The strong density variation of CO2 close to the critical point results in a pronounced pressure dependence of the relative ion currents of solute and solvent molecules, reflecting a substantial change in solubility.

  18. Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

    2005-09-28

    The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

  19. Influences of TiO2 phase structures on the structures and photocatalytic hydrogen production of CuOx/TiO2 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanxu; Wang, Zhonglei; Huang, Weixin

    2016-12-01

    CuOx/TiO2 photocatalysts employing TiO2 with different phase structures as well as P25 as supports were prepared, and their structures and activity for photocatalytic H2 production in methanol/water solution under simulated solar light were comparatively studied. Structural characterization results demonstrated that the TiO2 phase structure strongly affects the CuOx-TiO2 interaction and copper species in various CuOx/TiO2 photocatalysts. The Cu2O-rutile TiO2 interaction is much stronger than the Cu2O-anatase TiO2 interaction, facilitates the interfacial charge transfer process within the Cu2O-rutile TiO2 heterojunction but disables supported Cu2O to catalyze the hole-participated methanol oxidation. The Cu2O-anatase TiO2 heterojunction with the appropriate Cu2O-anatase TiO2 interaction and thus the balancing efficiencies between the interfacial charge transfer process and hole-participated methanol oxidation is most photocatalytic active, and CuOx/P25 with the largest population of Cu2O-anatase TiO2 heterojunction exhibits the highest photocatalytic H2 production. These results provide novel insights in the applied surface science of CuOx/TiO2 photocatalysts.

  20. (0 0 1) Facet-exposed anatase-phase TiO2 nanotube hybrid reduced graphene oxide composite: Synthesis, characterization and application in photocatalytic degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xun; Shi, Tiejun; Wu, Jing; Zhou, Haiou

    2013-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and TiO2 nanotube (TNT) with (0 0 1) facet-exposed anatase phase are covalently bonded together to synthesize TNT hybrid RGO (RGO-TNT) through consecutive process such as hydrothermal reaction, HCl washing, lyophilization and heat treatment with graphene oxide (GO), TiO2 powder and high concentration NaOH solution as the starting materials. The TNT with the diameter between 10 and 20 nm characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is in anatase phase proven by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and HRTEM. Additionally, the more active (0 0 1) facet is exposed identified by HRTEM. More significantly, TNT is bridged to RGO by Csbnd Ti bond by the measurement of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoluminescence (PL) spectra has testified that RGO in RGO-TNT can transfer and accept photoelectrons from TNT. The photocatalytic activity of RGO-TNT for degrading methylene blue (MB) is enhanced by contrast with pure TNT, and changeable by adjusting the mass ratios of GO to TiO2 powder. Simultaneously, lyophilization is benefit for maintaining the high active surface area of RGO-TNT, which is deeply in relationship with a higher photocatalytic activity. After four running cycles of photocatalytic degradation, RGO-TNT has shown a high stability and perfect reproducibility.

  1. Hydrofluoric Acid Controlled TiO2 Phase Transformation from Rutile to Anatase at Room Temperature and Their Photocatalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Ge, Suxiang; Li, Dapeng; Jia, Gaoyang; Wang, Beibei; Yang, Zhen; Yang, Zongyang; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Yange; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we first present rutile TiO2 superstructures could be successfully transformed into anatase TiO2 nanoparticles at room temperature by adjusting the amount of hydrofluoric acid (HF) used in aqueous solution. Photocatalytic experiments demonstrated that the as prepared anatase TiO2 exhibited better photocatalytic performance than that of rutile TiO2. We further studied the photocatalytic degradation of RhB on different TiO2 via active species trapping experiments and confirmed that the presence of surface F- on TiO2 was beneficial for the formation of *OH, which was thought to be mainly responsible for the enhancement of photocatalytic performance.

  2. Phase transformations during HLnTiO{sub 4} (Ln=La, Nd) thermolysis and photocatalytic activity of obtained compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Silyukov, Oleg I. Abdulaeva, Liliia D.; Burovikhina, Alena A.; Rodionov, Ivan A.; Zvereva, Irina A.

    2015-03-15

    Layered HLnTiO{sub 4} (Ln=La, Nd) compounds belonging to Ruddlesden–Popper phases were found to form partially hydrated compounds Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}·xH{sub 2}O during thermal dehydration as well as defect oxides Ln{sub 2}□Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} as final products. Further heating of metastable defect Ln{sub 2}□Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} substances leads to the formation of pyrochlore-type oxides Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} {sub (p)}, with subsequent transformation under higher temperatures to stable layered 110-type perovskites Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The occurring structure transformations lead to an increase of photocatalytic activity in the order of HLnTiO{sub 4}photocatalytic activity in the order of HLnTiO{sub 4}photocatalytic activity of all obtained compounds. The hydrogen evolution rate increased in the course of the structure changes during thermolysis.

  3. Manual gas-phase isothiocyanate degradation.

    PubMed

    Brandt, W F; Frank, G

    1988-02-01

    We describe a manual gas-phase isothiocyanate degradation procedure for the primary structure determination of proteins and peptides. The proteins and peptides are applied to a polybrene-coated glass fiber filter wedged into a small glass column. The phenylisothiocyanate is directly pipetted onto the filter disk. The coupling and cleavage reactions are performed in small desiccators containing trimethylamine and trifluoroacetic acid vapors, respectively. The wash and extraction steps are performed by allowing the suitable solvents to percolate through the filter disk. The extracted anilinothiazolinone is then converted to the phenylthiohydantoin and identified by any one of a number of described methods. Our results show that this method is very sensitive and that the reactions proceed faster than those of the published automated procedure. No expensive equipment is required and the manual degradation can be performed by a laboratory assistant. A large number of samples can be simultaneously subjected to the degradation under identical conditions, making this an ideal method for physicochemical investigations into the isothiocyanate degradation. We also use this method to screen HPLC fractions after enzymatic protein fragmentation. Manually sequenced glass filters can be transferred to the automated instrument for more extended degradations.

  4. Infrared spectra of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keqing; Guo, B.; Bernath, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Recording the spectra of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules is of great astronomical interest. Infrared spectra of gas-phase naphthalene, pyrene, and chrysene were obtained in absorption and emission. The band positions and relative intensities were measured and compared with theoretical calculations. These data will be compared to the astronomical observations of the unidentified infrared emission bands.

  5. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  6. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, Kent M.

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  7. Phase Separation in a Polarized Fermi Gas at Zero Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pilati, S.; Giorgini, S.

    2008-01-25

    We investigate the phase diagram of asymmetric two-component Fermi gases at zero temperature as a function of polarization and interaction strength. The equations of state of the uniform superfluid and normal phase are determined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We find three different mixed states, where the superfluid and the normal phase coexist in equilibrium, corresponding to phase separation between (a) the polarized superfluid and the fully polarized normal gas, (b) the polarized superfluid and the partially polarized normal gas, and (c) the unpolarized superfluid and the partially polarized normal gas.

  8. Gas sensitivity and photocatalytic performance of cuprous oxide with novel morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ling; Wu, Yulin; Jin, Saijia; Zhang, Lun; Xun, Zhipeng

    2016-10-01

    In this work, Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) with quasi-spherical and bookmark-like morphologies were successfully synthesized via a new facile solution method. The morphologies of products were characterized to show porous surfaces and the size is as small as approximately 20-50 nm. Given the special morphology, Cu2O NPs exhibited superior gas sensitivity to either ethanol or acetone vapors and strong adsorption abilities and high degradation activities for methyl orange under visible-light irradiation. The investigation provided not only a way of synthesizing Cu2O particles with dozens of nanoscale, but also a way of improving its gas sensitivity and catalytic degradation ability.

  9. Heterogeneous photocatalytic effect of zinc oxide on photochemical smog formation reaction of C 4H 8-NO 2-air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Yazawa, Takenori; Ibusuki, Takashi

    As a model of heterogeneous photochemical smog formation reaction, butene-NO 2-air systems in the presence of zinc oxide were experimentally studied using a flowing reaction system. Zinc oxide revealed a remarkable photocatalytic action which involved the production of hitherto unreported species such as cyano-compounds (HCN and CH 3CN) as well as a striking change in the distribution of the reaction products (aldehydes, ketones, epoxides, alkyl nitrates, HNO 3, CO, CO 2, etc.). It is confirmed that ZnO little affected the initial process of gas-phase photochemical reactions but interacted photocatalytically with the gas-phase reaction products.

  10. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Cu/Cu2O hollow spheres with enhanced photocatalytic and gas sensing activities at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xinwei; Fan, Huiqing; Tian, Yuming; Zhang, Mingang; Yan, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Cu/Cu2O nano-heterostructure hollow spheres with a submicron diameter (200-500 nm) were prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method using Cu(OAc)2·H2O, PVP and ascorbic acid solution as the precursors. The morphology of the products could evolve with the hydrothermal time from solid spheres to thick-shell hollow spheres, then to thin-shell hollow spheres, and finally to nanoparticles. Moreover, the content of Cu in the products could be controlled by adjusting the hydrothermal time. The spontaneous forming of the hollow structure spheres was found to result from the Ostwald ripening effect during the low temperature (100 °C) hydrothermal reaction process. The photocatalytic degradation activities on MO under visible-light irradiation and the gas sensing activities toward the oxidizing NO2 gas of different Cu/Cu2O nano-heterostructure hollow spheres were investigated. As a result, the Cu/Cu2O nano-heterostructure hollow spheres obtained at the hydrothermal time of 30 min, with a rough/porous thin-shell structure and a Cu content of about 10.5 wt%, exhibited the best photocatalytic and gas sensing performances compared with others.

  11. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  12. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  13. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  14. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  15. Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Experimental Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Cannata, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-03-01

    The connection between the thermodynamics of charged finite nuclear systems and the asymptotically measured partitions in heavy ion collisions is discussed. Different independent signals compatible with a liquid-to-gas-like phase transition are reported. In particular abnormally large fluctuations in the measured observables are presented as a strong evidence of a first order phase transition with negative heat capacity.

  16. Interaction between phases in the liquid-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, R. S.; Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    This work analyzes the equilibrium between a liquid and a gas over this liquid separated by an interface. Various gas forms exist inside the liquid: dissolved gas molecules attached to solvent molecules, free gas molecules, and gaseous bubbles. Thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained between two phases; the first phase is the liquid containing dissolved and free molecules, and the second phase is the gas over the liquid and bubbles inside it. Kinetics of gas transition between the internal and external gas proceeds through bubbles and includes the processes of bubbles floating up and bubble growth as a result of association due to the Smoluchowski mechanism. Evolution of a gas in the liquid is considered using the example of oxygen in water, and numerical parameters of this system are given. In the regime under consideration for an oxygen-water system, transport of oxygen into the surrounding air proceeds through micron-size bubbles with lifetimes of hours. This regime is realized if the total number of oxygen molecules in water is small compared with the numbers of solvated and free molecules in the liquid.

  17. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  18. NMR study of stable radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obynochny, A. A.; Maryasov, A. G.; Shakirov, M. M.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    1993-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the NMR spectrum of methyl-substituted nitroxyl radical of the imidazoline series has been studied. The NMR signal induced by radicals in the gas phase has been observed. A shift of the lines of the NMR spectrum in the gas phase according to the Curie law is observed which allows one to determine the value of the hfi constant of the protons of different racial groups. The hfi constant for methyl-substituted radical within experimental accuracy coincides with those measured by other methods in the liquid phase. In the absorbed phase of the samples under study, a substantial contribution is made by the volumetric susceptibility of the liquid film. The diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility of the radical in the liquid state has been measured (in the film of 2 × 10 -6). When the thickness of the adsorbed film is small, the molecular exchange between the liquid and gas phases becomes noticeable, causing a corresponding additional shift of the lines. The gas-kinetic cross section for the radical (120 Å 2) has been estimated from the temperature dependence of the line width in the gas phase.

  19. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOEpatents

    Phillion, Donald W.

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  20. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  1. Evaluation of phase envelope on natural gas, condensate and gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promkotra, S.; Kangsadan, T.

    2015-03-01

    The experimentally gas hydrate are generated by condensate and natural gas. Natural gas and condensate samples are collected from a gas processing plant where is situated in the northeastern part of Thailand. Physical properties of the API gravity and density of condensate are presented in the range of 55-60° and 0.71-0.76 g/cm3. The chemical compositions of petroleum-field water are analyzed to evaluate the genesis of gas hydrate by experimental procedure. The hydrochemical compositions of petroleum-field waters are mostly the Na-Cl facies. This condition can estimate how the hydrate forms. Phase envelope of condensate is found only one phase which is liquid phase. The liquid fraction is 100% at 15°C and 101.327 kPa, with the critical pressure and temperature of 2,326 kPa and 611.5 K. However, natural gas can be separated in three phases which are vapor, liquid and solid phase with the pressure and temperature at 100 kPa and 274.2 K. The hydrate curves explicit both hydrate zone and nonhydrate zone. Phase envelope of gas hydrate from the phase diagram indicates the hydrate formation. The experimental results of hydrate form can correlate to the hydrate curve. Besides, the important factor of hydrate formation depends on impurity in the petroleum system.

  2. Phase-Dependent Photocatalytic Ability of TiO2: A First-Principles Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hui; Gu, Baohua; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: The electronic properties of defected TiO2 were investigated using the first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation. Three typical defects, oxygen vacancy, titanium interstitial, and titanium vacancy, were considered in three TiO2 polymorphs, anatase, rutile, and brookite, respectively. Our calculations demonstrated that defect band is formed by removing oxygen atom from or inserting interstitial Ti atom into the TiO2 lattice, which is responsible for the improvement of photocatalytic ability due to the enhanced visible-light absorption. Our calculations further revealed that the defect formation energy increases as following brookite, anatase, and rutile, indicating that defects are easy to be created in brookite TiO2. The relatively high defect density and wide defect band contribute to the better photocatalytic performance of brookite TiO2 in visible light.

  3. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of N-doped TiO2 produced in a solid phase reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Gang; Pan, Hongfei; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Zhihua; Wen, Bin

    2013-02-01

    N-doped TiO2 was synthesized by calcining a mixture of titanic acid and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) at temperatures above 500 °C. The final samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra. The photocatalytic activity of N-doped TiO2 was studied by assessing the degradation of methylene blue in an aqueous solution, under visible light and UV light irradiation. It was found that the N-doped TiO2 displayed higher photocatalytic activity than pure TiO2, under both visible and UV light.

  4. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Wong, C. Channy

    1999-08-02

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  5. Construction of α-β Phase Junction on Bi4V2O11 via Electrospinning Retardation Effect and Its Promoted Photocatalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chade; Chen, Gang; Sun, Jingxue; Zhou, Yansong

    2016-05-16

    The creation of a phase junction structure in photocatalysts is a wise approach to promote photocatalytic performance, as phase junctions possess the potential to inhibit the recombination of photoinduced charge carriers. Here, Bi4V2O11 nanofibers with an α-β phase junction are fabricated via electrospinning with subsequent calcination. Electrospinning offers the opportunity to keep α-Bi4V2O11 from transforming into β-Bi4V2O11 completely due to an electrospinning retardation effect, leading to the formation of an α-β Bi4V2O11 phase junction. Furthermore, the α-β Bi4V2O11 phase junction realizes a well-established type-II band alignment. Photoelectrochemical measurements and photoluminescence spectroscopic investigations demonstrate that the phase junction structure has a significant impact on the separation and transfer of photogenerated electrons and holes. Thus, the α-β phase junction on Bi4V2O11 holds the key to achieving promoted efficiency in the photocatalysis process.

  6. Gas and particulate phase products from the ozonolysis of acenaphthylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Healy, Robert M.; Tomaz, Sophie; Flaud, Pierre-Marie; Perraudin, Emilie; Wenger, John C.; Villenave, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recognized as important secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors in the urban atmosphere. In this work, the gas-phase ozonolysis of acenaphthylene was investigated in an atmospheric simulation chamber using a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and an aerosol time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) for on-line characterization of the oxidation products in the gas and particle phases, respectively. SOA samples were also collected on filters and analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS). The major gas-phase products included a range of oxygenated naphthalene derivatives such as 1,8-naphthalic anhydride, naphthalene 1,8-dicarbaldehyde and naphthaldehyde, as well as a secondary ozonide. Possible reaction mechanisms are proposed for the formation of these products and favoured pathways have been suggested. Many of these products were also found in the particle phase along with a range of oligomeric compounds. The same range of gas and particle phase products was observed in the presence and absence of excess cyclohexane, an OH scavenger, indicating that OH radical production from the ozonolysis of acenaphthylene is negligible. SOA yields in the range 23-37% were determined and indicate that acenaphthylene ozonolysis may contribute to part of the SOA observed in urban areas.

  7. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  8. Synthesis of nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 by one-pot two-phase separated hydrolysis-solvothermal processes and its high activity for photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingzheng; Jing, Liqiang; Zhou, Jia; Lin, Jingsheng; Fu, Honggang

    2010-04-15

    Si-doped and un-doped nanocrystalline TiO(2) samples have been synthesized by simple one-pot water-organic two-phase separated hydrolysis-solvothermal (HST) processes, and characterized by XRD, BET, TEM, FT-IR, DRS and surface photovoltage techniques. The effects of the solvothermal temperature and Si doping on the anatase thermal stability, and on the photocatalytic activity for degrading rhodamine B were investigated in detail. The results show that, as the solvothermal temperature rises, the crystallinity and thermal stability of the resulting nano-sized anatase TiO(2) gradually increase. Noticeably, the as-prepared TiO(2) obtained at appropriate solvothermal temperature (160 degrees C) exhibits high photocatalytic activity. Moreover, although Si doping does not improve the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared anatase TiO(2), it greatly enhances the anatase thermal stability and inhibits crystallite growth during the process of post-thermal treatment. Interestingly, the Si-doped TiO(2) post-treated at high temperature displays much higher photocatalytic activity than commercial P25 TiO(2). It is clearly demonstrated that the joint effects of high anatase crystallinity and large surface area lead to high photocatalytic activity. This work provides a simple and effective strategy for the synthesis of high-performance TiO(2)-based functional nanomaterials.

  9. Tm-doped TiO2 and Tm2Ti2O7 pyrochlore nanoparticles: enhancing the photocatalytic activity of rutile with a pyrochlore phase

    PubMed Central

    De los Santos, Desiré M; Aguilar, Teresa; Sánchez-Coronilla, Antonio; Fernández-Lorenzo, Concha; Alcántara, Rodrigo; Piñero, Jose Carlos; Blanco, Ginesa; Martín-Calleja, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tm-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using a water-controlled hydrolysis reaction. Analysis was performed in order to determine the influence of the dopant concentration and annealing temperature on the phase, crystallinity, and electronic and optical properties of the resulting material. Various characterization techniques were utilized such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV–vis spectroscopy. For the samples annealed at 773 and 973 K, anatase phase TiO2 was obtained, predominantly internally doped with Tm3+. ICP–AES showed that a doping concentration of up to 5.8 atom % was obtained without reducing the crystallinity of the samples. The presence of Tm3+ was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV–vis spectroscopy: the incorporation of Tm3+ was confirmed by the generation of new absorption bands that could be assigned to Tm3+ transitions. Furthermore, when the samples were annealed at 1173 K, a pyrochlore phase (Tm2Ti2O7) mixed with TiO2 was obtained with a predominant rutile phase. The photodegradation of methylene blue showed that this pyrochlore phase enhanced the photocatalytic activity of the rutile phase. PMID:25821701

  10. Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sylwester, Alan P.

    2007-01-02

    The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

  11. Effect of phase behavior on bypassing in enriched gas floods

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Bhogeswara, R.; Mohanty, K.K. )

    1994-05-01

    Enriched gas floods incorporate a complex interaction of heterogeneity, fingering, multiphase flow, and phase behavior. Experiments and simulations indicate that the optimum solvent enrichment in high-viscosity-ratio secondary gas floods can be below minimum miscibility enrichment (MME). The compositional path and resulting mobility profile in multidimensional multiple-contact miscible (MCM) or immiscible floods are different from their 1D counterparts for high-viscosity-ratio floods in heterogeneous media.

  12. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  13. Negative ion gas-phase chemistry of arenes.

    PubMed

    Danikiewicz, Witold; Zimnicka, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Reactions of aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds involving anions are of great importance in organic synthesis. Some of these reactions have been studied in the gas phase and are occasionally mentioned in reviews devoted to gas-phase negative ion chemistry, but no reviews exist that collect all existing information about these reactions. This work is intended to fill this gap. In the first part of this review, methods for generating arene anions in the gas phase and studying their physicochemical properties and fragmentation reactions are presented. The main topics in this part are as follows: processes in which gas-phase arene anions are formed, measurements and calculations of the proton affinities of arene anions, proton exchange reactions, and fragmentation processes of substituted arene anions, especially phenide ions. The second part is devoted to gas-phase reactions of arene anions. The most important of these are reactions with electrophiles such as carbonyl compounds and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and related compounds (Michael acceptors). Other reactions including oxidation of arene anions and halogenophilic reactions are also presented. In the last part of the review, reactions of electrophilic arenes with nucleophiles are discussed. The best known of these is the aromatic nucleophilic substitution (SN Ar) reaction; however, other processes that lead to the substitution of a hydrogen atom in the aromatic ring are also very important. Aromatic substrates in these reactions are usually but not always nitroarenes bearing other substituents in the ring. The first step in these reactions is the formation of an anionic σ-adduct, which, depending on the substituents in the aromatic ring and the structure of the attacking nucleophile, is either an intermediate or a transition state in the reaction path. In the present review, we attempted to collect the results of both experimental and computational studies of the aforementioned reactions conducted since the

  14. [Photocatalytic functional ceramic and its speciality of photodecomposition].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Dai, Wen-xin; Shao, Yu; Lin, Hua-xiang; Zheng, Hua-rong; Fu, Xian-zhi

    2004-07-01

    Photocatalytic ceramic was prepared by coating photocatalytic membrane on ceramic matrix. The photocatalytic behavior of the TiO2 coated ceramic for degradation of oleic acid, ethylene, SO2, NOx and sterilization was studied by using XRD, chromatogram, in-situ IR and spectrophotometer. The results showed that the photocatalytic ceramic prepared by special conditions have the function of environmental conservation such as the photodegradating organic contaminants, removing inorganic baleful gas and killing bacteria. Degradation ratio of ethylene, oleic acid, SO2 and NOx reached 95%-100% respectively for the photocatalytic functional ceramic.

  15. [Photocatalytic functional ceramic and its speciality of photodecomposition].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Dai, Wen-xin; Shao, Yu; Lin, Hua-xiang; Zheng, Hua-rong; Fu, Xian-zhi

    2004-07-01

    Photocatalytic ceramic was prepared by coating photocatalytic membrane on ceramic matrix. The photocatalytic behavior of the TiO2 coated ceramic for degradation of oleic acid, ethylene, SO2, NOx and sterilization was studied by using XRD, chromatogram, in-situ IR and spectrophotometer. The results showed that the photocatalytic ceramic prepared by special conditions have the function of environmental conservation such as the photodegradating organic contaminants, removing inorganic baleful gas and killing bacteria. Degradation ratio of ethylene, oleic acid, SO2 and NOx reached 95%-100% respectively for the photocatalytic functional ceramic. PMID:15515948

  16. Gas purification in the dense phase at the CATS terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Openshaw, P.J.; Carnell, P.J.H.; Rhodes, E.F.

    1999-07-01

    The purification and transportation of natural gas at very high pressures can help to minimize the capital cost of pipelines and processing equipment. However, complex mixtures of hydrocarbons undergo unusual phase changes, such as retrograde condensation, as the temperature and pressure are altered. The Central Area Transmission System (CATS) is a joint venture of Amoci, BG, Amerada Hess, Phillips, Agip and Fina operated by Amoco on behalf of the owners. The design of the CATS terminal has provided an interesting processing challenge. The terminal receives a total of 1.6 Bscf/d of rich gas from a number of offshore fields. All are relatively sweet but the small amounts of H{sub 2}S and Hg are removed. Fixed bed technology was selected as the most economic purification process, while minimizing hydrocarbon loss and operator involvement. Conventionally, the raw gas would be split into the different hydrocarbon fractions and each would be processed separately. This would require the installation of a large number of reactors. A more elegant solution is to treat the gas on arrival at the terminal in the dense phase. This option raised questions around whether a fixed bed would be prone to fouling, could the pressure drop be kept low enough to avoid phase separation and would inadvertent wetting by condensation cause problems. Details are given of the test work carried out to prove the viability of using fixed bed technology for dense phase gas processing, the eventual design adopted and the performance over the first year of service.

  17. Gas phase radiative effects in diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedir, Hasan

    Several radiation models are evaluated for a stagnation point diffusion flame of a solid fuel in terms of accuracy and computational time. Narrowband, wideband, spectral line weighted sum of gray gases (SLWSGG), and gray gas models are included in the comparison. Radiative heat flux predictions by the nongray narrowband, wideband, and SLWSGG models are found to be in good agreement with each other, whereas the gray gas models are found to be inaccurate. The narrowband model, the most complex among the models evaluated, is then applied first to a solid fuel and second to a pure gaseous diffusion flame. A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) diffusion flame in a stagnation point geometry is solved with the narrowband model with COsb2, Hsb2O, and MMA vapor included in participating species. A detailed account of the emission and absorption from these species as well as the radiative heat fluxes are given as a function of the stretch rate. It is found that at low stretch rate the importance of radiation is increased due to an increase in the optical thickness, and a decrease in the conductive heat flux. Results show that COsb2 is the biggest emitter and absorber in the flame, MMA vapor is the second and Hsb2O is the least important. A pure gaseous flame in an opposed jet configuration is solved with the narrowband radiation model with CO as the fuel, and Osb2 as the oxidizer. Detailed. chemical kinetics and transport are incorporated into the combustion model with the use of the CHEMKIN and TRANSPORT software packages. The governing equations are solved with a modified version of the OPPDIF code. Dry and wet CO flames as well as COsb2 dilution are studied. Comparison of the results with and without the consideration of radiation reveals that the radiation is important for the whole flammable range of dry CO flames and for the low stretch rates of wet flames. Without the consideration of radiation the temperature and the species mole fractions (especially of minor species

  18. New anatase-type Til-2xNbxAlxO2 solid solution nanoparticles: direct formation, phase stability, and photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masanori; Ito, Takaharu

    2006-12-01

    New anatase-type titania solid solutions co-doped with niobium and aluminum (Til-2xNbxAIlxO2 (X = 0 -0.20)) were synthesized as nanoparticles from precursor solutions of TiOSO4, NbCl5, and Al(NO3)3 under mild hydrothermal conditions at 180 degrees C for 5 h using the hydrolysis of urea. The lattice parameters a0 and c0 of anatase slightly and gradually increased, when the content of niobium and aluminum increased from X = 0 to 0.20. The crystallite size of anatase increased from 12 to 28 nm with increasing the value of X from 0 to 0.20. Their photocatalytic activity and adsorptivity were evaluated separately by the measurement of the concentration of methylene blue (MB) remained in the solution in the dark or under UV-light irradiation. The adsorptivity of TiO2 was improved by the formation of anatase-type Til-2xNbxAlxO2 solid solutions. The photocatalytic activity of anatase-type Til-2xNbxAlxO2 solid solutions was superior to that of commercially available anatase-type pure TiO2 (ST-01) and anatase-type pure TiO2 hydrothermally prepared. The new anatase phase of Til-2xNbxAlxO2 (X = 0-0.20) solid solutions existed stably up to 850 0C during heat treatment in air. In comparison with hydrothermal pure TiO2, the starting temperature of anatase-to-rutile phase transformation was delayed by the formation of Ti1-2xNbxAlxO, (X = 0-0.20) solid solutions, although its completing temperature was accelerated. PMID:17256336

  19. Gas-phase diffusivity and tortuosity of structured soils.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Andreas H; Thorbjørn, Anne; Jensen, Maria P; Pedersen, Mette; Moldrup, Per

    2010-06-25

    Modeling gas-phase diffusion of volatile contaminants in the unsaturated zone relies on soil-gas diffusivity models often developed for repacked and structureless soil columns. These suffer from the flaw of not reflecting preferential diffusion through voids and fractures in the soil, thus possibly causing an underestimation of vapor migration towards building foundations and vapor intrusion to indoor environments. We measured the ratio of the gas diffusion coefficient in soil and in free air (D(p)/D(0)) for 42 variously structured, intact, and unsaturated soil cores taken from 6 Danish sites. Whilst the results from structureless fine sand were adequately described using previously proposed models, results that were obtained from glacial clay till and limestone exhibited a dual-porosity behavior. Instead, these data were successfully described using a dual-porosity model for gas-phase diffusivity, considering a presence of drained fractures surrounded by a lower diffusivity matrix. Based on individual model fits, the tortuosity of fractures in till and limestone was found to be highest in samples with a total porosity <40%, suggesting soil compaction to affect the geometry of the fractures. In summary, this study highlights a potential order of magnitude underestimation associated in the use of classical models for prediction of subsurface gas-phase diffusion coefficients in heterogeneous and fractured soils.

  20. Gas-phase NMR studies of alcohols. Intrinsic acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; True, Nancy S.

    1985-05-01

    Gas-phase (≈100 Torr) 1H NMR spectra of eighteen simple aliphatic and unsaturated alcohols, four fluorinated alcohols, and two thiols were obtained at 148.6°C where hydrogen bonding has little effect on chemical shifts. For the methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, t-butanol, i- butanol, neopentanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and benzyl alcohol, the observed hydroxylic proton chemical shifts correlate with previously obtained relative gas-phase acidities from thermochemical analysis which employed equilibrium constants of proton transfer reactions measured via mass spectroscopic and ion cyclotron resonance techniques. The correlational dependence is 10.3(0.5) kcal/mol ppm with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. These results demonstrate that the trend of increasing acidity with increasing size of the alkyl substituent is also reflected in the neutral forms of the alcohols, indicating that the polarizability of the ionic forms is not the only determining factor in relative gas-phase acidities of alcohols. Although factors affecting the hydroxylic proton chemical shifts of the larger substituted and unsaturated alcohols are more complex, their observed 1H NMR spectra also reflect this trend. For methanol and ethanol observed gas-phase 1H chemical shifts are also compared with recent theoritical calculations. 3JHH coupling constants across CO bonds are ≈ 5.5 Hz, significantly smaller than typical 3JHH coupling across sp 3 hybrid C C bonds.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  2. Statistical and Microscopic Approach to Gas Phase Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, J. M.; Quereda, R.

    1983-01-01

    Describes advanced undergraduate laboratory exercise examining the dependence of the rate constants and the instantaneous concentrations with the nature and energy content in a gas-phase complex reaction. Computer program (with instructions and computation flow charts) used with the exercise is available from the author. (Author/JN)

  3. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  4. Realization of an excited, strongly correlated quantum gas phase.

    PubMed

    Haller, Elmar; Gustavsson, Mattias; Mark, Manfred J; Danzl, Johann G; Hart, Russell; Pupillo, Guido; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph

    2009-09-01

    Ultracold atomic physics offers myriad possibilities to study strongly correlated many-body systems in lower dimensions. Typically, only ground-state phases are accessible. Using a tunable quantum gas of bosonic cesium atoms, we realized and controlled in one-dimensional geometry a highly excited quantum phase that is stabilized in the presence of attractive interactions by maintaining and strengthening quantum correlations across a confinement-induced resonance. We diagnosed the crossover from repulsive to attractive interactions in terms of the stiffness and energy of the system. Our results open up the experimental study of metastable, excited, many-body phases with strong correlations and their dynamical properties. PMID:19729651

  5. Improved binary and ternary nanostructured photocatalysts for gas phase detoxification of toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez Roman, Rafael

    than P25 TiO2. The intensity of the peaks associated to the anatase crystal phase decreased with an increase in the Si or W content. Loading the Degussa and sol-gel catalysts with 2.5% MoS2 improves the photocatalytic performance for the toluene oxidation. The MoS2 was synthesized using an inverse micelle method and loaded on to the catalysts by incipient wetness impregnation. Doping the Degussa catalysts with MoS 2 dobles the initial activity relative to the unloaded catalysts. The MoS2 impregnated Degussa catalysts enhance the applicability of the visible light for the photocatalytic oxidation of toluene. Loading the 12.4% WO3-TiO2 sol-gel sample with 2.5% MoS2 increases the activity for the toluene oxidation using UV or visible light for the photocatalytic process. When MoS2 is loaded on a sample of 31.9% WO3-TiO2 no significant improvement of the activity occurred. All the MoS2 impregnated catalysts deactivate slower than the unloaded catalysts.

  6. Novel stationary phases based on asphaltenes for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Momotko, Malwina; Chruszczyk, Dorota; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of investigations on the possibility of the application of the asphaltene fraction isolated from the oxidized residue from vacuum distillation of crude oil as a stationary phase for gas chromatography. The results of the investigation revealed that the asphaltene stationary phases can find use for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds. The experimental values of Rohrschneider/McReynolds constants characterize the asphaltenes as stationary phases of medium polarity and selectivity similar to commercially available phases based on alkyl phthalates. Isolation of asphaltenes from the material obtained under controlled process conditions allows the production of a stationary phase having reproducible sorption properties and chromatographic columns having the same selectivity. Unique selectivity and high thermal stability make asphaltenes attractive as a material for stationary phases for gas chromatography. A low production cost from a readily available raw material (oxidized petroleum bitumens) is an important economic factor in case of application of the asphaltene stationary phases for preparative and process separations.

  7. Novel stationary phases based on asphaltenes for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Momotko, Malwina; Chruszczyk, Dorota; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of investigations on the possibility of the application of the asphaltene fraction isolated from the oxidized residue from vacuum distillation of crude oil as a stationary phase for gas chromatography. The results of the investigation revealed that the asphaltene stationary phases can find use for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds. The experimental values of Rohrschneider/McReynolds constants characterize the asphaltenes as stationary phases of medium polarity and selectivity similar to commercially available phases based on alkyl phthalates. Isolation of asphaltenes from the material obtained under controlled process conditions allows the production of a stationary phase having reproducible sorption properties and chromatographic columns having the same selectivity. Unique selectivity and high thermal stability make asphaltenes attractive as a material for stationary phases for gas chromatography. A low production cost from a readily available raw material (oxidized petroleum bitumens) is an important economic factor in case of application of the asphaltene stationary phases for preparative and process separations. PMID:27144876

  8. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls. PMID:26573993

  9. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  10. The physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-07-24

    Here, carbonyl oxides, also known as Criegee intermediates, are key intermediates in both gas phase ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and solution phase organic synthesis via ozonolysis. Although the study of Criegee intermediates in both arenas has a long history, direct studies in the gas phase have only recently become possible through new methods of generating stabilised Criegee intermediates in sufficient quantities. This advance has catalysed a large number of new experimental and theoretical investigations of Criegee intermediate chemistry. In this article we review the physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates, focusing on their molecular structure, spectroscopy, unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. These recent results have overturned conclusions from some previous studies, while confirming others, and have clarified areas of investigation that will be critical targets for future studies. In addition to expanding our fundamental understanding of Criegee intermediates, the rapidly expanding knowledge base will support increasingly predictive models of their impacts on society.

  11. Gas-Phase Studies of Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase (Fpg) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kiruba, G S M; Xu, Jiahui; Zelikson, Victoria; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase thermochemical properties (tautomerism, acidity, and proton affinity) have been measured and calculated for a series of nucleobase derivatives that have not heretofore been examined under vacuum. The studied species are substrates for the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which cleaves damaged nucleobases from DNA. The gas-phase results are compared and contrasted to solution-phase data, to afford insight into the Fpg mechanism. Calculations are also used to probe the energetics of various possible mechanisms and to predict isotope effects that could potentially allow for discrimination between different mechanisms. Specifically, (18) O substitution at the ribose O4' is predicted to result in a normal kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for a ring-opening "endocyclic" mechanism and an inverse KIE for a direct base excision "exocyclic" pathway.

  12. The physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-07-24

    Here, carbonyl oxides, also known as Criegee intermediates, are key intermediates in both gas phase ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and solution phase organic synthesis via ozonolysis. Although the study of Criegee intermediates in both arenas has a long history, direct studies in the gas phase have only recently become possible through new methods of generating stabilised Criegee intermediates in sufficient quantities. This advance has catalysed a large number of new experimental and theoretical investigations of Criegee intermediate chemistry. In this article we review the physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates, focusing on their molecular structure, spectroscopy, unimolecular andmore » bimolecular reactions. These recent results have overturned conclusions from some previous studies, while confirming others, and have clarified areas of investigation that will be critical targets for future studies. In addition to expanding our fundamental understanding of Criegee intermediates, the rapidly expanding knowledge base will support increasingly predictive models of their impacts on society.« less

  13. Gas-Phase Studies of Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase (Fpg) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kiruba, G S M; Xu, Jiahui; Zelikson, Victoria; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase thermochemical properties (tautomerism, acidity, and proton affinity) have been measured and calculated for a series of nucleobase derivatives that have not heretofore been examined under vacuum. The studied species are substrates for the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which cleaves damaged nucleobases from DNA. The gas-phase results are compared and contrasted to solution-phase data, to afford insight into the Fpg mechanism. Calculations are also used to probe the energetics of various possible mechanisms and to predict isotope effects that could potentially allow for discrimination between different mechanisms. Specifically, (18) O substitution at the ribose O4' is predicted to result in a normal kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for a ring-opening "endocyclic" mechanism and an inverse KIE for a direct base excision "exocyclic" pathway. PMID:26894440

  14. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ε-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas-phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution-phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters. PMID:25338221

  15. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, E. S.; Benilov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value Ts depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than Ts, the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with Ts being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  16. Gas-phase exposure history derived from material-phase concentration profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, G. C.; Little, J. C.; Xu, Y.; Rao, M.; Enke, D.

    Non-reactive gas-phase pollutants such as benzene diffuse into indoor furnishings and leave behind a unique material-phase concentration profile that serves as a record of the past gas-phase indoor concentrations. The inverse problem to be solved is the diffusion equation in a slab such as vinyl flooring. Using knowledge of the present material-phase concentration profile in the slab, we seek to determine the historical material-phase concentration at the surface exposed to indoor air, and hence the historical gas-phase concentration, which can be used directly to determine exposure. The problem as posed has a unique solution that may be solved using a variety of approaches. We use a trained artificial neural network (ANN) to derive solutions for hypothetical exposure scenarios. The ANN results show that it is possible to estimate the intensity and timing of past exposures from the material-phase concentration profile in a building material. The overall method is limited by (1) the resolution of techniques for measuring spatial material-phase concentration profiles, (2) how far back in time we seek to determine exposure and (3) the representational power of the ANN solution. For example, we estimate that this technique can estimate exposure to phenol up to 0.5 y in the past from analyses of vinyl flooring.

  17. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

  18. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  19. Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

    1994-12-01

    The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2006-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer

  1. Phase diagram of a bulk 1d lattice Coulomb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, V.; Monsarrat, R.; Dean, D. S.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-01-01

    The exact solution, via transfer matrix, of the simple one-dimensional lattice Coulomb gas (1d LCG) model can reproduce peculiar features of ionic liquid capacitors, such as overscreening, layering, and camel- and bell-shaped capacitance curves. Using the same transfer matrix method, we now compute the bulk properties of the 1d LCG in the constant voltage ensemble. We unveil a phase diagram with rich structure exhibiting low-density disordered and high-density ordered phases, separated by a first-order phase transition at low temperature; the solid state at full packing can be ordered or not, depending on the temperature. This phase diagram, which is strikingly similar to its three-dimensional counterpart, also sheds light on the behaviour of the confined system.

  2. [Photocatalytic removing of a mustard gas analogue 2-CEES vapor over SO4(2-)/TiO2].

    PubMed

    Han, Shi-tong; Xi, Hai-ling; Wang, Xu-xu; Fu, Xian-zhi

    2005-05-01

    Disinfection with photocatalysis, compared to with the conventional cleanout, is both high efficient and non contaminative, but the simple TiO2 photocatalyst is showing to be of low activity and low active stability so to be hardly practical application. In the paper, SO4(2-)/TiO2 were papered by surface modification of TiO2 with dilute H2SO4, and the photocatalytic degradation of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) on the samples was examined in a fixed-bed microreactor. The examination show that the acidic modification enhanced both the activity and the active stability of TiO2, and the sample ST200 prepared by calcination at 200 degrees C was better than ST400 by calcination at 400 degrees C. The effect of water vapor content and reaction temperature on the photocatalytic degradation of 2-CEES was also tested, showing that the sample ST200 had high activity and stability at 90 degrees C, and kept a constant activity when adding 30.5 mL/L water vapor into the reactive system in which 2-CEES initial concentration was low to < 61 microL x L(-1). In addition, it was found that supporting SO4(2-)/TiO2 on gamma-Al2O3, SiO2 and active carbon could improve on the activity and stability of SO4(2-)/TiO2, and on supports SiO2 is the best one.

  3. Superfluidity and phase transitions in a resonant Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Weichman, Peter B.; Park, Jae I.

    2008-10-01

    The atomic Bose gas is studied across a Feshbach resonance, mapping out its phase diagram, and computing its thermodynamics and excitation spectra. It is shown that such a degenerate gas admits two distinct atomic and molecular superfluid phases, with the latter distinguished by the absence of atomic off-diagonal long-range order, gapped atomic excitations, and deconfined atomic π-vortices. The properties of the molecular superfluid are explored, and it is shown that across a Feshbach resonance it undergoes a quantum Ising transition to the atomic superfluid, where both atoms and molecules are condensed. In addition to its distinct thermodynamic signatures and deconfined half-vortices, in a trap a molecular superfluid should be identifiable by the absence of an atomic condensate peak and the presence of a molecular one.

  4. Ionization of vitamin C in gas phase: Theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the gas phase ionization energies and photoelectron spectra of four important conformers of vitamin C were calculated. Symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction methodology employing the single and double excitation operators (SAC-CI SD-R) along with D95++(d,p) basis set were used for the calculations. Thermochemistry calculations were also performed on all possible conformers of vitamin C to find the relative stability of conformers in the gas phase. The calculated ionization bands of each conformer were assigned by calculating the contribution of natural bonding orbital (NBO) in the calculated canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization. SAC-CI calculations showed that the first ionization band of vitamin C is related to the π electrons of CC bond of the ring of molecule although, there is the lone electron pairs of oxygen atoms and π electrons of CO bond in the molecule. PMID:27092998

  5. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  6. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  7. The Nucleoside Uridine Isolated in the Gas Phase**

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the first experimental observation of the isolated nucleoside uridine, placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and characterized by Fourier transform microwave techniques. Free from the bulk effects of their native environments, anti/C2’-endo-g+ conformation has been revealed as the most stable form of uridine. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside. PMID:25683559

  8. The nucleoside uridine isolated in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2015-03-01

    Herein we present the first experimental observation of the isolated nucleoside uridine, placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and characterized by Fourier transform (FT) microwave techniques. Free from the bulk effects of their native environments, anti/C2'-endo-g+ conformation has been revealed as the most stable form of uridine. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside.

  9. Modeling Gas-Phase Chemistry in Cometary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.

    Gas-phase chemistry is central to understand the physics and chemistry of comets. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms seen in cometary atmospheres. The relevant physico-chemical processes are identified within a modeling framework to understand observations and in situ measurements of comets (e.g., Halley, Borrelly, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, Tempel 1, Wild 2) and to provide valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of their nuclei. Details of these processes are presented, from the collision-dominated inner coma to the solar wind interaction region. This extensive modeling effort to investigate these important cometary processes is highly relevant to ground-based observations of comets and past, on going, and future spacecraft missions to these primitive objects.Gas-phase chemistry is central to understand the physics and chemistry of comets. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms seen in cometary atmospheres. The relevant physico-chemical processes are identified within a modeling framework to understand observations and in situ measurements of comets (e.g., Halley, Borrelly, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, Tempel 1, Wild 2) and to provide valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of their nuclei. Details of these processes are presented, from the collision-dominated inner coma to the solar wind interaction region. This extensive modeling effort to investigate these important cometary processes is highly relevant to ground-based observations of comets and past, on going, and future spacecraft missions to these primitive objects.

  10. Modeling dissolved and free phase gas dynamics under decompression.

    PubMed

    Wienke, B R

    1990-04-01

    Dissolved and free gases do not behave the same way in tissue under pressure, and their interaction is complex. Differences are highlighted, particularly with respect to time scales, gradients and transport. Impacts of free phases on diving are described, contrasting increased off-gassing pressures, slower ascent rates, safety stops and reduced repetitive exposures as consistent practical measures within Haldane models (limited supersaturation) which can be played off against buildup of dissolved gas. Simple computations illustrate the points.

  11. Determination of gas phase and surface reactions in plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegemann, Dirk

    2009-10-01

    Using macroscopic kinetics, the reactions within the gas phase are governed by the reaction parameter power input per gas flow W/F, which corresponds to a specific energy, while reactions by energetic particle bombardment at the growing film surface are rather related to power input W alone. Assuming activation reactions, the mass deposition rate per gas flow can be described by an Arrhenius-like approach: [ RmF=G( -EaW / W F . - F ) ] Mixtures of hydrocarbons (C2H4) and reactive gases (CO2, N2+H2) were examined within low pressure RF plasmas. Thus, functional a-C:H:O or a-C:H:N plasma coatings result. At increasing energy input it is found that the deposited mass shows a deviation from the above equation, commonly related to energetic particle interactions. However, using the same range of W/F with varying power input W, it was found that the observed drop in deposition rate scales solely with energy input W/F for a-C:H:O, i.e. depending on plasma chemistry. a-C:H:N films, on the other hand, show both chemical and physical influences on the film growth. Hence, gas phase reactions such as a change of film-forming species play a major role in plasma polymerization.

  12. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en

  13. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the

  14. Integration of photocatalytic oxidation with air stripping of contaminated aquifers. Report for 1 October 1993--30 June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Changrani, R.; Raupp, G.B.; Turchi, C.

    1998-12-01

    The global objective of this work was to evaluate the integration of gas-solid ultraviolet (UV) photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) downstream of an air stripper as a technology for cost-effectively treating water pumped from an aquifer contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Experimental work was performed at the bench-scale in the laboratory during the first phase of the project, and at the pilot-scale in a simulated field-test situation during the second phase.

  15. Theory of Gas Injection: Interaction of Phase Behavior and Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindoruk, B.

    2015-12-01

    The theory of gas injection processes is a central element required to understand how components move and partition in the reservoir as one fluid is displacing another (i.e., gas is displacing oil). There is significant amount of work done in the area of interaction of phase-behavior and flow in multiphase flow conditions. We would like to present how the theory of gas injection is used in the industry to understand/design reservoir processes in various ways. The tools that are developed for the theory of gas injection originates from the fractional flow theory, as the first solution proposed by Buckley-Leveret in 1940's, for water displacing oil in porous media. After 1960's more and more complex/coupled equations were solved using the initial concept(s) developed by Buckley-Leverett, and then Welge et al. and others. However, the systematic use of the fractional flow theory for coupled set of equations that involves phase relationships (EOS) and phase appearance and disappearance was mainly due to the theory developed by Helfferich in early 80's (in petroleum literature) using method of characteristics primarily for gas injection process and later on by the systematic work done by Orr and his co-researchers during the last two decades. In this talk, we will present various cases that use and extend the theory developed by Helfferich and others (Orr et al., Lake et al. etc.). The review of various injection systems reveals that displacement in porous media has commonalities that can be represented with a unified theory for a class of problems originating from the theory of gas injection (which is in a way generalized Buckley-Leverett problem). The outcome of these solutions can be used for (and are not limited to): 1) Benchmark solutions for reservoir simulators (to quantify numerical dispersion, test numerical algorithms) 2) Streamline simulators 3) Design of laboratory experiments and their use (to invert the results) 4) Conceptual learning and to investigate

  16. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied.

  17. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied. PMID:25920667

  18. Electronic structure calculations of mercury mobilization from mineral phases and photocatalytic removal from water and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Fabiana; Stankowski, Martin; Hogan, Conor

    2014-09-15

    Mercury is a hazardous environmental pollutant mobilized from natural sources, and anthropogenically contaminated and disturbed areas. Current methods to assess mobility and environmental impact are mainly based on field measurements, soil monitoring, and kinetic modelling. In order to understand in detail the extent to which different mineral sources can give rise to mercury release it is necessary to investigate the complexity at the microscopic level and the possible degradation/dissolution processes. In this work, we investigated the potential for mobilization of mercury structurally trapped in three relevant minerals occurring in hot spring environments and mining areas, namely, cinnabar (α-HgS), corderoite (α-Hg3S2Cl2), and mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Quantum chemical methods based on density functional theory as well as more sophisticated approaches are used to assess the possibility of a) direct photoreduction and formation of elemental Hg at the surface of the minerals, providing a path for ready release in the environment; and b) reductive dissolution of the minerals in the presence of solutions containing halogens. Furthermore, we study the use of TiO2 as a potential photocatalyst for decontamination of polluted waters (mainly Hg(2+)-containing species) and air (atmospheric Hg(0)). Our results partially explain the observed pathways of Hg mobilization from relevant minerals and the microscopic mechanisms behind photocatalytic removal of Hg-based pollutants. Possible sources of disagreement with observations are discussed and further improvements to our approach are suggested.

  19. Fundamental thermochemical properties of amino acids: gas-phase and aqueous acidities and gas-phase heats of formation.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Jackson, Virgil E; Matus, Myrna H; Adams, Margaret A; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2012-03-01

    The gas-phase acidities of the 20 L-amino acids have been predicted at the composite G3(MP2) level. A broad range of structures of the neutral and anion were studied to determine the lowest energy conformer. Excellent agreement is found with the available experimental gas-phase deprotonation enthalpies, and the calculated values are within experimental error. We predict that tyrosine is deprotonated at the CO(2)H site. Cysteine is predicted to be deprotonated at the SH but the proton on the CO(2)H is shared with the S(-) site. Self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations with the COSMO parametrization were used to predict the pK(a)'s of the non-zwitterion form in aqueous solution. The differences in the non-zwitterion pK(a) values were used to estimate the free energy difference between the zwitterion and nonzwitterion forms in solution. The heats of formation of the neutral compounds were calculated from atomization energies and isodesmic reactions to provide the first reliable set of these values in the gas phase. Further calculations were performed on five rare amino acids to predict their heats of formation, acidities, and pK(a) values.

  20. Photocatalytic process of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gas by TiO2-polyacrylonitrile nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunyan; Ran, Xu; Hu, Jianglei; Shao, Changlu

    2013-10-15

    TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully fabricated on electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers via the coupling of electrospinning and hydrothermal pathway. A straightforward photocatalysis oxidation process has been developed for simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gas using the TiO2-PAN photocatalyst. Also, the influences of some important operating parameters, such as titanium loading content of catalyst, flue gas humidity, flue gas flow, and inlet flue gas temperature on removal efficiencies of SO2 and NO were investigated. The results demonstrated that removal efficiencies of 99.3% for SO2 and 71.2% for NO were attained under the following optimal experiment conditions: titanium loading content, 6.78 At %; gas flow rate, 200 mL/min; flue gas humidity, 5%; inlet flue gas temperature, 40 °C. Furthermore, the presumed reaction mechanism of SO2 and NO removal using TiO2-PAN photocatalyst under UV light was proposed. PMID:24024677

  1. Investigation into adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Qijin; Tang, Shankang; Wang, Lintong; Zhang, Yunchen

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene were investigated considering the operating variables and kinetic mechanism using nano-titania agglomerates in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor (AFBPR) designed. The special adsorption equilibrium constant, adsorption active sites, and apparent reaction rate coefficient of benzene were determined by linear regression analysis at various gas velocities and relative humidities (RH). Based on a series of photocatalytic degradation kinetic equations, the influences of operating variables on degradation efficiency, apparent reaction rate coefficient and half-life were explored. The findings indicated that the operating variables have obviously influenced the adsorption/photocatalytic degradation and corresponding kinetic parameters. In the photocatalytic degradation process, the relationship between photocatalytic degradation efficiency and RH indicated that water molecules have a dual-function which was related to the structure characteristics of benzene. The optimal operating conditions for photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in AFBPR were determined as the fluidization number at 1.9 and RH required related to benzene concentration. This investigation highlights the importance of controlling RH and benzene concentration in order to obtain the desired synergy effect in photocatalytic degradation processes.

  2. DSMC Convergence for Microscale Gas-Phase Heat Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, D. J.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The convergence of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is investigated for gas-phase heat conduction at typical microscale conditions. A hard-sphere gas is confined between two fully accommodating walls of unequal temperature. Simulations are performed for small system and local Knudsen numbers, so continuum flow exists outside the Knudsen layers. The ratio of the DSMC thermal conductivity to the Chapman-Enskog value in the central region is determined for over 200 combinations of time step, cell size, and number of computational molecules per cell. In the limit of vanishing error, this ratio approaches 1.000 to within the correlation uncertainty. In the limit of infinite computational molecules per cell, the difference from unity depends quadratically on time step and cell size as these quantities become small. The coefficients of these quadratic terms are in good agreement with Green-Kubo values found by Hadjiconstantinou, Garcia, and co-workers. These results demonstrate that DSMC can accurately simulate microscale gas-phase heat conduction. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  4. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  5. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure.

    PubMed

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems. PMID:26493915

  6. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-I{sub h}, ice-I{sub c}, ice-II, and C{sub 0} interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C{sub 0} water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C{sub 0} hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  7. Two heterometallic-organic frameworks composed of iron(III)-salen-based ligands and d(10) metals: gas sorption and visible-light photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yang, Jin; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Jian-Fang

    2015-03-01

    Two examples of heterometallic-organic frameworks (HMOFs) composed of dicarboxyl-functionalized Fe(III)-salen complexes and d(10) metals (Zn, Cd), [Zn2(Fe-L)2(μ2-O)(H2O)2]⋅4 DMF⋅4 H2O (1) and [Cd2(Fe-L)2(μ2-O)(H2O)2]⋅2 DMF⋅H2O (2) (H4L = 1,2-cyclohexanediamino-N,N'-bis(3-methyl-5-carboxysalicylidene), have been synthesized and structurally characterized. In 1 and 2, each square-pyramidal Fe(III) atom is embedded in the [N2O2] pocket of an L(4-) anion, and these units are further bridged by a μ2-O anion to give an (Fe-L)2(μ2-O) dimer. The two carboxylate groups of each L(4-) anion bridge Zn(II) or Cd(II) atoms to afford a 3D porous HMOF. The gas sorption and magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. Remarkably, 1 and 2 show activity for the photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) under visible-light irradiation, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first time that this has been observed for Fe(III)-salen-based HMOFs.

  8. Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic porcelain stoneware slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, M.; Guarini, G.; Zanelli, C.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.; Dondi, M.

    2011-10-01

    Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic industrial porcelain stoneware large slabs were realized by deposition of nanostructured TiO2 coatings. Different surface finishing and experimental conditions were considered in order to assess the industrial feasibility. Photocatalytic and wetting behaviour of functionalized slabs mainly depends on surface phase composition in terms of anatase/rutile ratio, this involving - as a key issue - the deposition of TiO2 on industrially sintered products with an additional annealing step to strengthen coatings' performances and durability.

  9. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  10. Characterisation, phase stability and surface chemical properties of photocatalytic active Zr and Y co-doped anatase TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Andreas; Lejon, Christian; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Štengl, Vaclav; Österlund, Lars

    2013-03-01

    We report on the characterization, phase stability, surface chemical and photocatalytic properties of Zr and Y co-doped anatase TiO2 nanoparticles prepared by homogenous hydrolysis methods using urea as precipitating agent. The materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, BET isotherm and BJH pore size distribution measurements. It is shown that Y and Zr ions replace Ti ions in the anatase TiO2 structures up to a critical total dopant concentration of approximately 13 wt%. The co-doped particles show increased phase stability compared to pure anatase TiO2 nanoparticles. The anatase to rutile phase transformation is shown to be preceded by cation segregation and dissolution with concomitant precipitation of Y2Ti2-xZrxO7 and ZrTiO4. Co-doping modifies the optical absorption edge with a resulting attenuation of the Urbach tail. The band gap is slightly blue-shifted at high doping concentrations, and red shifted at lower doping concentrations. Formic acid adsorption was used as a probe molecule to investigate surface chemical properties and adsorbate structures. It was found that the relative abundance of monodentate formate compared to bidentate coordinated formate decreases with increasing doping concentration. This is attributed to an increased surface acidity with increasing dopant concentration. Photodegradation of formic acid occurred on all samples. With mode-resolved in situ FTIR spectroscopy it is shown that the rate of photodegradation of monodentate formate species are higher than for bidentate formate species. Thus our results show that the trend of decreasing photo-degradation rate with increasing dopant concentration can be explained by the adsorbate structure, which is controlled by the acidity of the surface.

  11. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Gas-phase Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. D.; Witt, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to produce fluorescence spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the gas-phase for comparison with blue luminescence (BL) emission observed in astrophysical sources Vijh et al. (2004, 2005a,b). The BL occurs roughly from 350 to 450 nm, with a sharp peak near 380 nm. PAHs with three to four rings, e.g. anthracene and pyrene, were found to produce luminescence in the appropriate spectral region, based on existing studies. Relatively few studies of the gas-phase fluorescence of PAHs exist; those that do exist have dealt primarily with the same samples commonly available for purchase such as pyrene and anthracene. In an attempt to understand the chemistry of the nebular environment we also obtained several nitrogen substituted PAHs from our colleagues at NASA Ames. In order to simulate the astrophysical environment we also took spectra by heating the PAHs in a flame. The flame environment counteracts the formation of eximers and permits the spectroscopy of free-flying neutral molecules. Experiments with coal tar demonstrate that fluorescence spectroscopy reveals primarily the presence of the smallest molecules, which are most abundant and which possess the highest fluorescence efficiencies. One gas-phase PAH that seems to fit the BL spectrum most closely is phenanthridine. In view of the results from the spectroscopy of coal tar, a compound containing a mixture of PAHs ranging from small to very large PAH molecules, we can not preclude the presence of larger PAHs in interstellar sources exhibiting BL.

  12. Mechanisms of the water-gas-shift reaction by iron pentacarbonyl in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Rozanska, Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2008-10-01

    We analyzed the mechanisms of the water-gas-shift reaction catalyzed by Fe(CO) 5/OH (-) in the gas phase using DFT methods. The systematic analysis of the accessible reaction mechanisms and the consideration of the Gibbs free energies allows for different reaction routes than previously suggested. In the dominant catalytic cycle, the hydride [FeH(CO) 4]- is the important intermediate. Associative reaction mechanisms are not favorable under moderate and low pressures. At high pressure, a side reaction takes over and prevents the conversion of H 2O and CO to H 2 and CO 2 and leads to the formation of HCOOH.

  13. Photocatalytic Coatings for Exploration and Spaceport Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project developed self-cleaning photocatalytic coatings that remove contamination without human intervention. The coatings chemically remove organic contaminants and leave no residue. The photocatalyst will not negatively affect other coating properties, especially corrosion resistance. Titanium dioxide, TiO2, is an extremely popular photocatalyst because of its chemical stability, nontoxicity, and low cost. TiO2 is commonly used in the photocatalytic oxidation of organic matter or pollutants in the gas and liquid phases. However, TiO2 does have some drawbacks. It has limited light absorption because of its large band-gap and suffers from a photonic efficiency of less than 10 percent for organic degradation. Dopants can lower the band-gap and improve efficiency. Since the photocatalytically active form of TiO2 is a nanocrystalline powder, it can be difficult to make a robust coating with enough catalyst loading to be effective. Photocatalysts become active when certain light energy is absorbed. When photons with an energy greater than the band-gap, Eg, (wavelengths shorter than 400 nm) impinge upon the surface of the TiO2, an electron-hole pair is formed. The electron-hole pair oxidizes adsorbed substances either directly or via reactive intermediates that form on the surface, such as hydroxyl radicals (OH) or superoxide ions (O2-). Several factors can influence the band-gap energy of TiO2, two of which are crystal structure and impurities. TiO2 exists as three crystal structures brookite, anatase, and rutile that can be controlled via heat treatment. Anatase is the most photocatalytically active crystal form of TiO2. Doping TiO2 with impurities can alter its band-gap energy, as well as its effectiveness as a catalyst. Depending on their size, dopant atoms can occupy either the substitutional or interstitial lattice positions. Atoms that are relatively large will assume the interstitial positions and create a much greater energy disturbance in the crystal than

  14. Template-free preparation of volvox-like Cd(x)Zn(1-x)S nanospheres with cubic phase for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hangyue; Liu, Qingyun; Liu, Weimin; Ge, Jiechao; Lan, Minhuan; Wang, Chao; Geng, Jianxin; Wang, Pengfei

    2014-03-01

    Volvox-like Cdx Zn1-x S solid solutions with a cubic zinc blend structure were synthesized through a template-free ethylene glycol process. Cd(Ac)2 ⋅2 H2 O, Zn(Ac)2 ⋅2 H2 O, and thiourea are used as the starting materials and dissolved in ethylene glycol. These reaction precursors and solvent not only contributed to control over the formation of the volvox-like spherical geometry, but also exerted vigorous domination for existence of cubic-phase Cdx Zn1-x S nanostructures. As-prepared volvox-like Cdx Zn1-x S nanospheres have a diameter of around 100 nm with extensional shells. These samples show excellent photocatalytic H2 evolution activity from water splitting under visible-light irradiation without any cocatalyst or scaffolding, owing to their tunable band gap, cubic zinc blend structure, and unique hierarchical porous structure with a high surface area (as high as 95.2 m(2)  g(-1) ). PMID:24403243

  15. Gas-phase chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, P. K.; Chatha, J. P. S.; Vohra, K. G.

    1983-08-01

    Chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes such as linallol, geraniol, d-limonene and α-pinene have been studied in the gas phase at low pressures. Methylglyoxal phosphorescence has been observed in the first two reactions. Emissions from HCHO( 1A 2) and glyoxal ( 3A u) are observed in the reaction of ozone with d-limonene and formation of excited glyoxal is found to be first order in ozone. The reaction of ozone with β-pinene gives rise to emission from a α-dicarbonyl compound and this is found to be first order in ozone. The mechanisms for the formation of excited species are proposed.

  16. Quantum Phases of a Two-Dimensional Dipolar Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bruun, G. M.; Taylor, E.

    2008-12-12

    We examine the superfluid and collapse instabilities of a quasi-two-dimensional gas of dipolar fermions aligned by an orientable external field. It is shown that the interplay between the anisotropy of the dipole-dipole interaction, the geometry of the system, and the p-wave symmetry of the superfluid order parameter means that the effective interaction for pairing can be made very large without the system collapsing. This leads to a broad region in the phase diagram where the system forms a stable superfluid. Analyzing the superfluid transition at finite temperatures, we calculate the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless temperature as a function of the dipole angle.

  17. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  18. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  19. NMR of molecules partially oriented in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijl, Peter C. M.; MacLean, C.; Skoglund, Cynthia; Bothner-By, Aksel A.

    The vapor phase 2H NMR spectra of monodeuterobenzene and pentadeuterofluorobenzene were recorded at 14.1 T. Reduction of the collision time, and thus of the linewidth, was accomplished by compressing the gas to 10.8 atm with ethane. The molecules are aligned by the field of the spectrometer and, as a consequence, quadrupolar couplings are recorded. Differences from the liquid-phase spectra arise in some of the quadrupolar splittings as well as in the scalar D-F couplings. It is rationalized that the deviating quadrupolar interaction cannot be caused by interactions resulting from incomplete quenching of the rotation, but originates from environmental effects on the quadrupolar coupling in the liquid. The results agree with recent microwave experiments.

  20. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ∗ =0.23Σσ ∗ + 1.51; where H ∗ is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and Σσ ∗ is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ∗. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ∗⩾30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ⩾5 - 0.5 μM (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  1. Chemical Nuclear Polarization of Biradicals Created by Photolysis of Cyclic Aliphatic Ketones in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obynochnyia, A. A.; Purtovb, P. A.; Salikhova, K. M.

    2008-02-01

    Chemical nuclear polarization (CNP) of short-lived biradicals created in the photolysis of cyclic ketones in the gas phase with a buffer gas of CDCl3 molecules was studied theoretically and experimentally. The magnetoresonance and kinetic parameters were proposed for the biradicals. The experimental fact that the CNP of cycloundecanone in the gas phase and liquid was the strongest was confirmed by calculations. The computational results agree well with the experiment for both gas and liquid phases.

  2. Method for predicting photocatalytic oxidation rates of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Melanie L; Liljestrand, Howard M

    2003-01-01

    In designing a photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) system for a given air pollution source, destruction rates for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are required. The objective of this research was to develop a systematic method of predicting PCO rate constants by correlating rate constants with physical-chemical characteristics of compounds. Accordingly, reaction rate constants were determined for destruction of volatile organics over a titanium dioxide (TiO2) catalyst in a continuous mixed-batch reactor. It was found that PCO rate constants for alkanes and alkenes vary linearly with gas-phase ionization potential (IP) and with gas-phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant. The correlations allow rates of destruction of compounds not tested in this research to be predicted based on physical-chemical characteristics. PMID:12568248

  3. Gas-phase molecular structure and energetics of anionic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Jorge, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    The gas-phase stabilities of linear, branched and cyclic silicates made of up to five silicon atoms were studied with density functional theory (DFT). The starting geometries for the DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory were obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We have observed that geometric parameters and charges are mainly affected by the degree of deprotonation. Charges on Si atoms are also influenced by their degree of substitution. The enthalpy of deprotonation of the neutral species was found to decrease with the size of the molecule, while the average deprotonation enthalpy of highly charged compounds increased with molecular size. Furthermore, the formation of rings in highly charged silicates is enthalpically preferred to chain growth. These observations result from two competing effects: the easier distribution of negative charge in silicates with low charge density and the strong intramolecular repulsions present in silicates with high charge density. As a consequence, highly charged silicates in the gas phase tend to be as small and as highly condensed as possible, which is in line with experimental observations from solution NMR.

  4. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  5. Thermochemical aspects of proton transfer in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Gal, J F; Maria, P C; Raczyńska, E D

    2001-07-01

    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the development of new theories of acidity and basicity, which are currently well accepted. The thermochemistry of proton transfer in the absence of solvent attracted much interest during this period, because of the fundamental importance of the process. Nevertheless, before the 1950s, few data were available, either from lattice energy evaluations or from calculations using the emerging molecular orbital theory. Advances in mass spectrometry during the last 40 years allowed studies of numerous systems with better accuracy. Thousands of accurate gas-phase acidities or basicities are now available, for simple atomic and molecular systems and for large biomolecules. The intrinsic effect of structure on the Brønsted basic or acidic properties of molecules and the influence of solvents have been unravelled. In this tutorial, the basics of the thermodynamic principles involved are given, and the mass spectrometric techniques are briefly reviewed. Advances in the design and measurements of gas-phase superacids and superbases are described. Recent studies concerning biomolecules are also evoked.

  6. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Désiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  7. Enhanced photocatalytic activity for degrading pollutants of g-C3N4 by promoting oxygen adsorption after H3BO3 modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengming; Raziq, Fazal; Liu, Chong; Li, Zhijun; Sun, Liqun; Jing, Liqiang

    2015-12-01

    The g-C3N4 has been modified by a hydrothermal post treatment with orthoboric acid. It is shown that the surface modification with an appropriate amount of orthoboric acid obviously enhances the surface photovoltage responses of g-C3N4, clearly indicating that the separation of photogenerated charges is greatly improved. This is well responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activities for degrading representative gas-phase acetaldehyde, and liquid-phase phenol. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the amount of O2 adsorbed on the surfaces of g-C3N4 is greatly increased after H3BO3 modification based on the O2 temperature-programmed desorption curves. It is suggested that the orthoboric acid modification favors O2 adsorption to promote the photogenerated electrons captured for improved photocatalytic activities. This work would provide feasible routes to further improve the photocatalytic performance of semiconductors for degrading pollutants.

  8. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  9. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere.

  10. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  11. Gas-Phase Dissociation Pathways of Multiply Charged Peptide Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jurchen, John C.; Garcia, David E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies of cluster formation and dissociation have been conducted to determine properties of matter in the transition from the condensed phase to the gas phase using materials as diverse as atomic nuclei, noble gasses, metal clusters, and amino acids. Here, electrospray ionization is used to extend the study of cluster dissociation to peptides including leucine enkephalin with 7–19 monomer units and 2–5 protons, and somatostatin with 5 monomer units and 4 protons under conditions where its intramolecular disulfide bond is either oxidized or reduced. Evaporation of neutral monomers and charge separation by cluster fission are the competing dissociation pathways of both peptides. The dominant fission product for all leucine enkephalin clusters studied is a proton-bound dimer, presumably due to the high gas-phase stability of this species. The branching ratio of the fission and evaporation processes for leucine enkephalin clusters appears to be determined by the value of z2/n for the cluster where z is the charge and n the number of monomer units in the cluster. Clusters with low and high values of z2/n dissociate primarily by evaporation and cluster fission respectively, with a sharp transition between dissociation primarily by evaporation and primarily by fission measured at a z2/n value of ~0.5. The dependence of the dissociation pathway of a cluster on z2/n is similar to the dissociation of atomic nuclei and multiply charged metal clusters indicating that leucine enkephalin peptide clusters exist in a state that is more disordered, and possibly fluid, rather than highly structured in the dissociative transition state. The branching ratio, but not the dissociation pathway of [somatostatin5 + 4H]4+ is altered by the reduction of its internal disulfide bond indicating that monomer conformational flexibility plays a role in peptide cluster dissociation. PMID:14652186

  12. An in-situ synthesis of Ag/AgCl/TiO2/hierarchical porous magnesian material and its photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Fazhou; Shu, Chang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Wenqin; Hu, Shuguang

    2016-02-01

    The absorption ability and photocatalytic activity of photocatalytic materials play important roles in improving the pollutants removal effects. Herein, we reported a new kind of photocatalytic material, which was synthesized by simultaneously designing hierarchical porous magnesian (PM) substrate and TiO2 catalyst modification. Particularly, PM substrate could be facilely prepared by controlling its crystal phase (Phase 5, Mg3Cl(OH)5·4H2O), while Ag/AgCl particles modification of TiO2 could be achieved by in situ ion exchange between Ag+ and above crystal Phase. Physiochemical analysis shows that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material has higher visible and ultraviolet light absorption response, and excellent gas absorption performance compared to other controls. These suggested that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material could produce more efficient photocatalytic effects. Its photocatalytic reaction rate was 5.21 and 30.57 times higher than that of TiO2/PM and TiO2/imporous magnesian substrate, respectively. Thus, this material and its intergration synthesis method could provide a novel strategy for high-efficiency application and modification of TiO2 photocatalyst in engineering filed.

  13. An in-situ synthesis of Ag/AgCl/TiO2/hierarchical porous magnesian material and its photocatalytic performance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Fazhou; Shu, Chang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Wenqin; Hu, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    The absorption ability and photocatalytic activity of photocatalytic materials play important roles in improving the pollutants removal effects. Herein, we reported a new kind of photocatalytic material, which was synthesized by simultaneously designing hierarchical porous magnesian (PM) substrate and TiO2 catalyst modification. Particularly, PM substrate could be facilely prepared by controlling its crystal phase (Phase 5, Mg3Cl(OH)5·4H2O), while Ag/AgCl particles modification of TiO2 could be achieved by in situ ion exchange between Ag+ and above crystal Phase. Physiochemical analysis shows that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material has higher visible and ultraviolet light absorption response, and excellent gas absorption performance compared to other controls. These suggested that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material could produce more efficient photocatalytic effects. Its photocatalytic reaction rate was 5.21 and 30.57 times higher than that of TiO2/PM and TiO2/imporous magnesian substrate, respectively. Thus, this material and its intergration synthesis method could provide a novel strategy for high-efficiency application and modification of TiO2 photocatalyst in engineering filed. PMID:26883972

  14. An in-situ synthesis of Ag/AgCl/TiO2/hierarchical porous magnesian material and its photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Fazhou; Shu, Chang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Wenqin; Hu, Shuguang

    2016-02-17

    The absorption ability and photocatalytic activity of photocatalytic materials play important roles in improving the pollutants removal effects. Herein, we reported a new kind of photocatalytic material, which was synthesized by simultaneously designing hierarchical porous magnesian (PM) substrate and TiO2 catalyst modification. Particularly, PM substrate could be facilely prepared by controlling its crystal phase (Phase 5, Mg3Cl(OH)5 · 4H2O), while Ag/AgCl particles modification of TiO2 could be achieved by in situ ion exchange between Ag(+) and above crystal Phase. Physiochemical analysis shows that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material has higher visible and ultraviolet light absorption response, and excellent gas absorption performance compared to other controls. These suggested that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material could produce more efficient photocatalytic effects. Its photocatalytic reaction rate was 5.21 and 30.57 times higher than that of TiO2/PM and TiO2/imporous magnesian substrate, respectively. Thus, this material and its intergration synthesis method could provide a novel strategy for high-efficiency application and modification of TiO2 photocatalyst in engineering filed.

  15. Influence of the inlet air in efficiency of photocatalytic devices for mineralization of VOCs in air-conditioning installations.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Relinque, E; Castellote, M

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays, a large proportion of photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) devices are being implemented in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems. However, no systematic studies have been carried out regarding the influence of inlet air preconditioning. To analyse the impact of the inlet air-conditions into photocatalytic efficiency, a simulated air-conditioning duct with flowing gas through inside was designed. Isobutylene was chosen as the target VOCs. The concentration in the gas phase was monitored using a photoionization detector. The influence of flow rate, relative humidity and temperature on the VOC removal efficiency was analysed. Experimental results were presented in terms of gas-removal efficiency (η) and clean air delivery rate (CADR) and analysed on a kinetic basis. From them, the weight of each parameter in the global process has been determined, from bigger to smaller contribution, flow>temperature>relative humidity. Also, the relevance of the inlet air conditions has been illustrated in a model room in order to determinate the time necessary to obtain a threshold value accomplishing with enough air quality and the energy consumption of the device. Additionally, the photocatalytic decontamination has been assimilated to the "air exchange rate", a parameter commonly used in indoor air quality studies. The results show that preconditioning of air can improve the efficiency of photocatalytic devices and bring important energy savings.

  16. The Diamagnetic Phase Transition of Dense Electron Gas: Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Lü, Guoliang; Zhu, Chunhua; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of the de Haas-van Alphen effect and diamagnetic phase transition which is associated with magnetic domain formation. The “magnetic interaction” between delocalized magnetic moments of electrons (the Shoenberg effect), can result in an effect of the diamagnetic phase transition into domains of alternating magnetization (Condon's domains). Associated with the domain formation are prominent magnetic field oscillation and anisotropic magnetic stress which may be large enough to fracture the crust of magnetar with a super-strong field. Even if the fracture is impossible as in “low-field” magnetar, the depinning phase transition of domain wall (DW) motion driven by low field rate (mainly due to the Hall effect) in the randomly perturbed crust can result in a catastrophically variation of magnetic field. This intermittent motion, similar to the avalanche process, makes the Hall effect be dissipative. These qualitative consequences about magnetized electron gas are consistent with observations of magnetar emission, and especially the threshold critical dynamics of driven DW can partially overcome the difficulties of “low-field” magnetar bursts and the heating mechanism of transient, or “outbursting” magnetar.

  17. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  18. Surface phase of TiO{sub 2} modified with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and its effect on the photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yangyang; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Qian; Yan, Song; Zhao, Shanlin; Luo, Genxiang; Li, Can

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}-900 °C (or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4}-900 °C), with surface anatase phase, show the similar photocatalytic activity. The presence of the surface anatase phase is important for high photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} modified with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4}-900 °C or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4}-900 °C){sub .} - Highlights: • Loading La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on anatase TiO{sub 2} is an effective method for stabilizing the anatase phases both in the surface and in the bulk region. • The high crystallinity of the surface anatase phase is important for high photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} modified with La{sub 2}O{sub 3.} - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles modified with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by an impregnation method using anatase TiO{sub 2} support (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}) or amorphous Ti(OH){sub 4} support (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4}). The bulk and surface crystalline phases of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} (or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4}) have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and UV Raman spectroscopy. Besides, morphology and particle size of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4} samples have been determined by TEM (transmission electron microscope) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), respectively. It is found that the phase transformation and increase of the particle size of TiO{sub 2} can be more effectively inhibited in the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} than in the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4}. Photocatalytic experiments indicated that the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} (or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti(OH){sub 4}) samples with surface anatase phase have the similar overall photocatalytic activities. Moreover, it is found that the high crystallinity of surface anatase phase is benefit for the high photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} modified with La{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  19. Phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, W.; Guo, G.-C.

    2011-09-15

    We study the phase separation of a spin-polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling near a wide Feshbach resonance. As a result of the competition between spin-orbit coupling and population imbalance, the phase diagram for a uniform gas develops a rich structure of phase separation involving topologically nontrivial gapless superfluid states. We then demonstrate the phase separation induced by an external trapping potential and discuss the optimal parameter region for the experimental observation of the gapless superfluid phases.

  20. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starsich, Fabian H. L.; Hirt, Ann M.; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2014-12-01

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  1. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Starsich, Fabian H L; Hirt, Ann M; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2014-12-19

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields. PMID:25422410

  2. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Robert Classen

    2002-12-31

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

  3. Conformational Study of Taurine in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo, Vanessa; Sanz, M. Eugenia; López, Juan C.; Alonso, José L.

    2009-08-01

    The conformational preferences of the amino sulfonic acid taurine (NH2-CH2-CH2-SO3H) have been investigated in the gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) in the 6-14 GHz frequency range. One conformer has been observed, and its rotational, centrifugal distortion, and hyperfine quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of its rotational spectrum. Comparison of the experimental constants with those calculated theoretically identifies the detected conformer unambiguously. The observed conformer of taurine is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond O-H···N between the hydrogen of the sulfonic acid group and the nitrogen atom of the amino group.

  4. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  5. Silicon Nanowire-Based Devices for Gas-Phase Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  6. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  7. Optical properties of anthocyanins in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaochuan; Calzolari, Arrigo; Baroni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase optical properties of the six most common anthocyanins are studied using time-dependent density-functional theory. Different anthocyanins are classified into three groups, according to the number of low-frequency peaks displayed in the UV-vis spectrum. This behavior is analyzed in terms of one-electron transitions and interaction effects, the latter being rationalized using a suitable double-pole model. Moving from PBE to hybrid exchange-correlation functionals results in a hypsochromic shift of the optical gap. While the colors thus predicted do not quite match those observed in solution, thus highlighting the importance of solvation effects, adoption of hybrid functionals remarkably determines a greater chromatic uniformity of different molecules, in qualitative agreement with experimental evidence in acidic solutions.

  8. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  9. Ab initio kinetics of gas phase decomposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2010-12-01

    The thermal and kinetic aspects of gas phase decomposition reactions can be extremely complex due to a large number of parameters, a variety of possible intermediates, and an overlap in thermal decomposition traces. The experimental determination of the activation energies is particularly difficult when several possible reaction pathways coexist in the thermal decomposition. Ab initio calculations intended to provide an interpretation of the experiment are often of little help if they produce only the activation barriers and ignore the kinetics of the decomposition process. To overcome this ambiguity, a theoretical study of a complete picture of gas phase thermo-decomposition, including reaction energies, activation barriers, and reaction rates, is illustrated with the example of the β-octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) molecule by means of quantum-chemical calculations. We study three types of major decomposition reactions characteristic of nitramines: the HONO elimination, the NONO rearrangement, and the N-NO(2) homolysis. The reaction rates were determined using the conventional transition state theory for the HONO and NONO decompositions and the variational transition state theory for the N-NO(2) homolysis. Our calculations show that the HMX decomposition process is more complex than it was previously believed to be and is defined by a combination of reactions at any given temperature. At all temperatures, the direct N-NO(2) homolysis prevails with the activation barrier at 38.1 kcal/mol. The nitro-nitrite isomerization and the HONO elimination, with the activation barriers at 46.3 and 39.4 kcal/mol, respectively, are slow reactions at all temperatures. The obtained conclusions provide a consistent interpretation for the reported experimental data. PMID:21077597

  10. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds.

  11. Estimation of gas phase mixing in packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, S.; Thunman, H.; Leckner, B.; Hermansson, S.

    2008-04-15

    An improved model is presented for estimation of the mixing of gaseous species in a packed bed for fuel conversion. In particular, this work clarifies the main characteristics of mixing of volatiles and oxidizers in a burning bed of high-volatile solid fuel. Expressions are introduced to represent the active role of degradation of the solid particles in the mixing within the gas phase. During drying and devolatilization the solids modify the behavior of the gas flow: the volatiles released from the surface of the particles increase the turbulence in the system, and hence the rates of the homogeneous reactions under mixing-limited conditions. Numerical experiments are carried out to test the validity of this conclusion regarding mixing in different geometries. The flow of volatiles leaving the fuel particles is shown to contribute significantly to mixing, especially at low air flows through a bed. However, the fraction of the particle surface where volatiles are released and its orientation in the bed should be better determined in order to increase the accuracy of the estimates of turbulent mixing. (author)

  12. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  13. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  14. Singular effect of crystallite size on the charge carrier generation and photocatalytic activity of nano-TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Mathias; Pastorello, Murilo; Sigoli, Fernando A.; Silva, Juliana M. de Souza e.; Mazali, Italo O.

    2014-11-01

    Photocatalytic processes on nanometric titanium oxide have been extensively studied from the standpoint of solar energy utilization and remediation of water and gas streams polluted with organic molecules. It is accepted that TiO2 crystallite size and crystalline phase are among the parameters involved in the control of the photocatalytic activity. However, while changing the catalyst nanoparticle size, other attributes important to assess photocatalytic activity may be modified, making thus difficult to define to which extension the photoactivity changes are related only to size differences. Therefore, aiming at studying exclusively the size effect and the parameters directly related to size on the photocatalytic activity of nanometric TiO2, in this work it was explored a method to synthesize TiO2 nanoparticles with controlled size, highly similar morphology and comparable phase and degree of crystallinity. A set composed of four samples of nano-TiO2 loaded porous Vycor glass, each sample having a specific TiO2 nanoparticle size, was tested on the photoactivated process of depollution of solutions of salicylic acid and methylene blue. The photocatalytic activity observed for the organic compounds tested was inversely proportional to the TiO2 nanoparticle size. An opposite tendency was observed for the generation of OH radicals during photocatalyst illumination, as more radicals are formed on the material containing the larger TiO2 nanoparticles. Results of this study suggest that photocatalytic activity of nano-TiO2 is less favored by the enhanced light absorption response and the higher generation of oxidative species observed for the larger nanoparticles. Better catalysts were obtained when nano-TiO2 exhibited high surface-to-volume ratio and had small recombination volumes, which respectively favors pollutant adsorption-desorption on catalyst surface and reduce the number of recombined charge carriers.

  15. Band alignment and enhanced photocatalytic activation of α/β-Bi2O3 heterojunctions via in situ phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lianwei; Wang, Guilin; Li, Dan; San, Xingyuan; Liu, Lizhu; Dong, Limin; Wu, Ze

    2015-05-01

    The assembling heterojunction, one of the key topics in photocatalysts and semiconductors (SCs), is generally accomplished in at least two steps, of which the first step is the synthesis of a matrix, and then the growth of the second phase on the matrix. Herein we present the preparation of α/β-Bi2O3 heterojunctions by an in situ phase transformation technique. Under normal pressure, a facile citrate method was used to synthesize β-Bi2O3 nanosheets and α/β-Bi2O3 heterojunctions. The novel features of the process are the mild operating conditions by an appropriate selection of heat treatment temperature and time. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we found that a number of nano-sized α-Bi2O3 form on the β-Bi2O3 nanosheet via a controlled β→α phase transition, generating a large number of heterojunctions. The CM1 (calcining β-Bi2O3 precursor at 363 °C for 4 h) heterojunction achieves a strong visible light absorption and dye absorption capacity and produces a very high reaction rate for Rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) revealed excellent charge transfer characteristics of the heterojunction, which accounts for its high photoactivity. Using the X-ray electron valence band spectra, it is found that the valence band of α-Bi2O3 is more negative than that of β-Bi2O3. Thus, in heterojunctions, the photogenerated holes in β-Bi2O3 are transferred to α-Bi2O3 with good charge transport characteristics by the intrinsic driving force in the interface field. Furthermore, a separated hole can accomplish a transfer process from α-Bi2O3 to the aqueous solution within its lifetime due to the diameter of α-Bi2O3 being less than 17.6 nm. PMID:25820418

  16. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  17. Uridine Nucleoside Thiation: Gas-Phase Structures and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlow, Lucas; Lee, Justin; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The naturally occurring thiated uridine nucleosides, 4-thiouridine (s4Urd) and 2-thiouridine (s2Urd), play important roles in the function and analysis of a variety of RNAs. 2-Thiouridine and its C5 modified analogues are commonly found in tRNAs and are believed to play an important role in codon recognition possibly due to their different structure, which has been shown by NMR to be predominantly C3'-endo. 2-Thiouridine may also play an important role in facilitating nonenzymatic RNA replication and transcription. 4-Thiouridine is a commonly used photoactivatable crosslinker that is often used to study RNA-RNA and RNA-protein cross-linking behavior. Differences in the base pairing between uracil and 4-thiouracil with adenine and guanine are an important factor in their role as a cross linker. The photoactivity of s4Urd may also aid in preventing near-UV lethality in cells. An understanding of their intrinsic structure in the gas-phase may help further elucidate the roles these modified nucleosides play in the regulation of RNAs. In this work, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of the protonated forms of s2Urd and s4Urd were collected in the IR fingerprint region. Structural information is determined by comparison with theoretical linear IR spectra generated from density functional theory calculations using molecular modeling to generate low-energy candidate structures. Present results are compared with analogous results for the protonated forms of uridine and 2'-deoxyuridine as well as solution phase NMR data and crystal structures.

  18. Uptake of Organic Gas Phase Species by 1-Methylnaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Xia, J.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    Using a droplet train apparatus, the mass accommodation coefficients (α) on 1-methylnapthalene of gas phase m-xylene, ethylbenzene, butylbenzene, α-pinene, γ-terpinene, and 2-methyl-2-hexanol were measured as a function of temperature (265 K to 296 K). 1-methylnapthalene was selected as a surrogate for hydrophobic and aromatic hydrocarbons found in tropospheric aerosols. The mass accommodation coefficients (α) of all the molecules obtained from these measurements exhibit negative temperature dependence. The upper and lower values of α at 265 K and 296 K respectively are: for m-xylene 0.44 and 0.26; for ethylbenzene 0.37 and 0.22; for butylbenzene 0.47 and 0.31; for α-pinene 0.47 and 0.096; for γ-terpinene 0.39 and 0.12; for 2-methyl-2-hexanol 0.44 and 0.26. The uptake measurements also yielded values for the product HDl1/2 for most of the molecules studied (H = Henry's law constant, Dl = liquid phase diffusion coefficient). Using calculated values of Dl the Henry's law constant is obtained, and expressed in the form ln H (M/atm) = -A + B/T. The A and B values for the molecules studied are listed in Table 1. Table 1: A and B values for the Henry's law constant H expressed as ln H (M/atm) = -A + B/T \\ m-xylene: A=7.20, B=4060\\ethylbenzene: A=5.81, B=3660\\butylbenzene: A=16.95, B=7330α-pinene: A=15.69, B=6360\\2-methyl-2-hexanol: A=9.95, B=4760

  19. Tricrystalline TiO2 with enhanced photocatalytic activity and durability for removing volatile organic compounds from indoor air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunyang; Zhu, Lizhong; Yang, Kun

    2015-06-01

    It is important to develop efficient and economic techniques for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air. Heterogeneous TiO2-based semiconductors are a promising technology for achieving this goal. Anatase/brookite/rutile tricrystalline TiO2 with mesoporous structure was synthesized by a low-temperature hydrothermal route in the presence of HNO3. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photocatalytic decomposition of toluene in air under UV light illumination. The results show that tricrystalline TiO2 exhibited higher photocatalytic activity and durability toward gaseous toluene than bicrystalline TiO2, due to the synergistic effects of high surface area, uniform mesoporous structure and junctions among mixed phases. The tricrystalline TiO2 prepared at RHNO3=0.8, containing 80.7% anatase, 15.6% brookite and 3.7% rutile, exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity, about 3.85-fold higher than that of P25. The high activity did not significantly degrade even after five reuse cycles. In conclusion, it is expected that our study regarding gas-phase degradation of toluene over tricrystalline TiO2 will enrich the chemistry of the TiO2-based materials as photocatalysts for environmental remediation and stimulate further research interest on this intriguing topic.

  20. Tricrystalline TiO2 with enhanced photocatalytic activity and durability for removing volatile organic compounds from indoor air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunyang; Zhu, Lizhong; Yang, Kun

    2015-06-01

    It is important to develop efficient and economic techniques for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air. Heterogeneous TiO2-based semiconductors are a promising technology for achieving this goal. Anatase/brookite/rutile tricrystalline TiO2 with mesoporous structure was synthesized by a low-temperature hydrothermal route in the presence of HNO3. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photocatalytic decomposition of toluene in air under UV light illumination. The results show that tricrystalline TiO2 exhibited higher photocatalytic activity and durability toward gaseous toluene than bicrystalline TiO2, due to the synergistic effects of high surface area, uniform mesoporous structure and junctions among mixed phases. The tricrystalline TiO2 prepared at RHNO3=0.8, containing 80.7% anatase, 15.6% brookite and 3.7% rutile, exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity, about 3.85-fold higher than that of P25. The high activity did not significantly degrade even after five reuse cycles. In conclusion, it is expected that our study regarding gas-phase degradation of toluene over tricrystalline TiO2 will enrich the chemistry of the TiO2-based materials as photocatalysts for environmental remediation and stimulate further research interest on this intriguing topic. PMID:26040745

  1. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  2. Gas-phase chemistry of alkylcarbonate anions and radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-02-01

    Alkylcarbonate anions and radicals ROCOO-/ (R = H, CH3, C2H5, i-C3H7, and t-C4H9) are investigated in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations. Structural parameters and energies are obtained at the MP2/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theoryE Standard enthalpies of formation for the anions and radicals are determined via atomization energies and isodesmic reactions using the CBS-Q method. Further, alkylcarbonate anions are probed by metastable ion and collisional activation experiments, and the chemistry of the neutral radicals is investigated by charge-reversal and neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry. Although decarboxylation dominates the unimolecular reactivity of the species for both charge states, some other interesting features are observed, particularly for the anions, such as the formation of the CO3- radical anion or the presence of ionic fragments formed via hydrogen atom transfer.

  3. Gas-phase study of Fe sup + -benzyne with alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Yongqing Huang; Freiser, B.S. )

    1989-03-29

    The unimolecular chemistry of Fe{sup +}-benzyne and its reactivity with small alkanes in the gas phase are studied by Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS). Collision-induced dissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields benzyne loss exclusively. In contrast, photodissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields not only cleavage of benzyne from Fe{sup +}, but competitive loss of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} as well. The Fe{sup +}-benzyne is formed from chlorobenzene by loss of HCl. This dehydrochlorination of chlorobenzene also occurs in secondary reactions up to six times forming products of the type Fe{sup +}-polyphenylene. Fe{sup +}-benzyne reacts with alkanes larger than methane to form a wide variety of product ions by mechanisms including hydrogenation and methanation of the benzyne ligand. All of the product ions can be explained by mechanisms based on Fe{sup +} insertion into either C-C or C-H bonds as the reaction-initiating step, followed by either alkyl or H migration from Fe{sup +} onto the benzyne ligand or, alternatively, by the migratory insertion of benzyne into a metal-carbon or metal-hydrogen bond. Photodissociation and ion-molecule reaction studies yield a value for the metal-ligand bond energy of D{degree} (Fe{sup +}-benzyne) = 76 {plus minus} 10 kcal/mol.

  4. Gas-phase electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalyavi, N.; Catani, K. J.; Sanelli, J. A.; Dryza, V.; Bieske, E. J.

    2015-08-01

    The visible and near-UV electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation is measured in the gas phase by photodissociation of indole+-Ar and indole+-He complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. A series of resolved vibronic transitions extending from 610 to 460 nm are assigned to the D2 ← D0 band system, while weak transitions between 390 and 360 nm are assigned to the D3 ← D0 system, and a stronger, broad, unresolved absorption between 350 and 300 nm is attributed to the D4 ← D0 system. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used to assign vibronic structure of the D2 ← D0 band system, and show that the main active vibrational modes correspond to in-plane ring deformations. The strongest D2 ← D0 vibronic transitions of indole+-He do not correspond with any catalogued diffuse interstellar bands, even considering band displacements of up to 50 cm-1possibly caused by the attached He atom.

  5. Microwave spectrum and gas phase structure of maleimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Oncer, Onur; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of maleimide was measured in the 5-12 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, all unique singly substituted 13C isotopologues, and an sbnd ND, deuterium substituted isotopologue. The parent (or normal isotopologue) rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and quadrupole coupling constants are A = 6815.3251(12) MHz, B = 2361.85011(64) MHz, C = 1754.32750(64) MHz, DJ = 0.232(24) kHz, DJK = 0.546(54) kHz, 1.5χaa = 2.4227(53) MHz, and 0.25(χbb-χcc) = 1.3679(15) MHz. A best fit gas phase structure was determined using the experimental rotational constants of the isotopologues and some parameters from calculations. The inertial defect is Δ = -0.054 amu Å2, indicating a planar structure for maleimide, with no large amplitude motions observed on the sbnd NH hydrogen atom. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ provided rotational constants which are much closer (within 1-2%) to the experimental values compared to the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculated values.

  6. An empirical model for gas phase acidity and basicity estimation.

    PubMed

    You, H; Kim, G E; Na, C H; Lee, S; Lee, C J; Cho, K-H; Akiyama, Y; Ishida, T; No, K T

    2014-01-01

    Gas phase acidity and basicity estimation models have been developed for acidic and basic functional groups of amino acid side-chains and also for a number of small organic molecules. The acidic functional groups include aliphatic and aromatic alcohol, and aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acid, and the basic functional groups include aliphatic, aromatic and hetero-aromatic amines, and also pyridino-, pyrazolo- and imidazolo-groupings. The models are described in terms of a linear combination of descriptors that highly influence reactivity at the reaction centres of the functional groups. In order to describe the chemical environments of the deprotonating and protonating sites, atomic descriptors such as the effective atomic electronegativity and effective atomic polarizability of the atoms in the reaction field and the electrostatic potentials at the reaction sites have been introduced. The coefficient of determination (r(2)) of each model is above 0.8, apart from the imidazole model. The models are readily applicable, ranging from simple organic molecules to proteins.

  7. Experimental Determination of Gas Phase Thermodynamic Properties of Bimolecular Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anne S.; Maroun, Zeina; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate determination of the atmospheric abundance of hydrogen bound bimolecular complexes is necessary, as hydrogen bonds are partly responsible for the formation and growth of aerosol particles. The abundance of a complex is related to the Gibbs free energy of complex formation (Δ G), which is often obtained from quantum chemical calculations that rely on calculated values of the enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) of complex formation. However, calculations of Δ H and in particular Δ S are associated with large uncertainties, and accurate experimental values are therefore crucial for theoretical benchmarking studies. Infrared measurements of gas phase hydrogen bound complexes were performed in the 300 to 373 K range, and lead to a purely experimental determination of Δ H using the van't Hoff equation. Equilibrium constants were determined by combining an experimental and calculated OH-stretching intensity, from which values of Δ G and hence Δ S could be determined. Thus we can determine Δ G, Δ H and Δ S for a bimolecular complex. We find that in the 300 to 373 K temperature range the determined Δ H and Δ S values are independent of temperature.

  8. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S.; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM‐MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM‐MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM‐MS data of two IDPs; α‐Synuclein (α‐Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C‐II (ApoC‐II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC‐II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α‐Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC‐II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM‐MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  9. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-08-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM-MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM-MS data of two IDPs; α-Synuclein (α-Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC-II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α-Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC-II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM-MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  10. Iron Polypyridyl Complexes for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Carolyn L; DiRisio, Ryan J; Screen, Megan E; Mayer, Kathryn J; McNamara, William R

    2016-09-01

    A series of Fe(III) complexes were recently reported that are stable and active electrocatalysts for reducing protons into hydrogen gas. Herein, we report the incorporation of these electrocatalysts into a photocatalytic system for hydrogen production. Hydrogen evolution is observed when these catalysts are paired with fluorescein (chromophore) and triethylamine (sacrificial electron source) in a 1:1 ethanol:water mixture. The photocatalytic system is highly active and stable, achieving TONs > 2100 (with respect to catalyst) after 24 h. Catalysis proceeds through a reductive quenching pathway with a quantum yield of over 3%. PMID:27548389

  11. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  12. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  13. Concurrence of aqueous and gas phase contamination of groundwater in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of rapid development of unconventional oil and natural gas resources using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling on regional groundwater quality has received significant attention. Major concerns are methane or oil/gas related hydrocarbon (such as TPHs, BTEX including benzene, toluene, ethybenzene and xylene) leaks into the aquifer due to the failure of casing and/or stray gas migration. Previously, we investigated the relationship between oil and gas activity and dissolved methane concentration in a drinking water aquifer with the major finding being the presence of thermogenic methane contamination, but did not find detectable concentrations of TPHs or BTEX. To understand if aqueous and gas phases from the producing formation were transported concurrently to drinking water aquifers without the presence of oil/gas related hydrocarbons, the ionic composition of three water groups was studied: (1) uncontaminated deep confined aquifer, (2) suspected contaminated groundwater - deep confined aquifer containing thermogenic methane, and (3) produced water from nearby oil and gas wells that would represent aqueous phase contaminants. On the basis of quantitative and spatial analysis, we identified that the "thermogenic methane contaminated" groundwater did not have similarities to produced water in terms of ionic character (e.g. Cl/TDS ratio), but rather to the "uncontaminated" groundwater. The analysis indicates that aquifer wells with demonstrated gas phase contamination have not been contacted by an aqueous phase from oil and gas operations according to the methodology we use in this study and the current groundwater quality data from COGCC. However, the research does not prove conclusively that this the case. The results may provide insight on contamination mechanisms since improperly sealed well casing may result in stray gas but not aqueous phase transport.

  14. Concurrence of aqueous and gas phase contamination of groundwater in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of rapid development of unconventional oil and natural gas resources using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling on regional groundwater quality has received significant attention. Major concerns are methane or oil/gas related hydrocarbon (such as TPHs, BTEX including benzene, toluene, ethybenzene and xylene) leaks into the aquifer due to the failure of casing and/or stray gas migration. Previously, we investigated the relationship between oil and gas activity and dissolved methane concentration in a drinking water aquifer with the major finding being the presence of thermogenic methane contamination, but did not find detectable concentrations of TPHs or BTEX. To understand if aqueous and gas phases from the producing formation were transported concurrently to drinking water aquifers without the presence of oil/gas related hydrocarbons, the ionic composition of three water groups was studied: (1) uncontaminated deep confined aquifer, (2) suspected contaminated groundwater - deep confined aquifer containing thermogenic methane, and (3) produced water from nearby oil and gas wells that would represent aqueous phase contaminants. On the basis of quantitative and spatial analysis, we identified that the "thermogenic methane contaminated" groundwater did not have similarities to produced water in terms of ionic character (e.g. Cl/TDS ratio), but rather to the "uncontaminated" groundwater. The analysis indicates that aquifer wells with demonstrated gas phase contamination have not been contacted by an aqueous phase from oil and gas operations according to the methodology we use in this study and the current groundwater quality data from COGCC. However, the research does not prove conclusively that this the case. The results may provide insight on contamination mechanisms since improperly sealed well casing may result in stray gas but not aqueous phase transport. PMID:26519629

  15. Importance of the gas phase role to the prediction of energetic material behavior: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.N.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Sander, R.K.

    2005-03-15

    Various thermal (radiative, conductive, and convective) initiation experiments are performed to demonstrate the importance of the gas phase role in combustion modeling of energetic materials (EM). A previously published condensed phase model that includes a predicted critical irradiance above which ignition is not possible is compared to experimental laser ignition results for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Experimental results conflict with the predicted critical irradiance concept. The failure of the model is believed to result from a misconception about the role of the gas phase in the ignition process of energetic materials. The model assumes that ignition occurs at the surface and that evolution of gases inhibits ignition. High speed video of laser ignition, oven cook-off and hot wire ignition experiments captures the ignition of HMX and TNT in the gas phase. A laser ignition gap test is performed to further evaluate the effect of gas phase laser absorption and gas phase disruption on the ignition process. Results indicate that gas phase absorption of the laser energy is probably not the primary factor governing the gas phase ignition observations. It is discovered that a critical gap between an HMX pellet and a salt window of 6 mm{+-}0.4 mm exists below which ignition by CO{sub 2} laser is not possible at the tested irradiances of 29 W/cm{sup 2} and 38 W/cm{sup 2} for HMX ignition. These observations demonstrate that a significant disruption of the gas phase, in certain scenarios, will inhibit ignition, independent of any condensed phase processes. These results underscore the importance of gas phase processes and illustrate that conditions can exist where simple condensed phase models are inadequate to accurately predict the behavior of energetic materials.

  16. Enhancement in the photocatalytic nature of nitrogen-doped PVD-grown titanium dioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tavares, C. J.; Marques, S. M.; Viseu, T.; Teixeira, V.; Carneiro, J. O.; Alves, E.; Barradas, N. P.; Munnik, F.; Girardeau, T.; Riviere, J.-P.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide semiconductor photocatalytic thin films have been deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron physical vapor deposition on glass substrates for self-cleaning applications. In order to increase the photocatalytic efficiency of the titania coatings, it is important to enhance the catalysts absorption of light from the solar spectra. Bearing this fact in mind, a reduction in the titania semiconductor band-gap has been attempted by using nitrogen doping from a coreactive gas mixture of N{sub 2}:O{sub 2} during the titanium sputtering process. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy was used in order to assess the composition of the titania thin films, whereas heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis granted the evaluation of the doping level of nitrogen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided valuable information about the cation-anion binding within the semiconductor lattice. The as-deposited thin films were mostly amorphous, however, after a thermal annealing in vacuum at 500 deg. C the crystalline polymorph anatase and rutile phases have been developed, yielding an enhancement in the crystallinity. Spectroscopic ellipsometry experiments enabled the determination the refractive index of the thin films as a function of the wavelength, while from the optical transmittance it was possible to estimate the semiconductor indirect band-gap of these coatings, which has been proven to decrease as the N-doping increases. The photocatalytic performance of the titania films has been characterized by the degradation rate of an organic reactive dye under UV/visible irradiation. It has been found that for a certain critical limit of 1.19 at. % of nitrogen doping in the titania anatase crystalline lattice enhances the photocatalytic behavior of the thin films and it is in accordance with the observed semiconductor band-gap narrowing to 3.18 eV. By doping the titania lattice with nitrogen, the photocatalytic activity is enhanced under both UV and

  17. Sampling and determination of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide following removal of ozone by gas-phase reaction with nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.L.; Markovits, G.Y.; Ferreri, E.M.; Kelly, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method for determination of hydrogen peroxide in the ambient atmosphere is described, using impinger or diffusion scrubber collection of hydrogen peroxide with aqueous-phase analysis by an enzyme-catalyzed fluorescence technique. Interference from ozone at ambient levels is removed by gas-phase titration with excess nitric oxide. The impinger and diffusion scrubber collection techniques are shown to give equivalent results for atmospheric gas-phase hydrogen peroxide with limits of detection of 0.1 ppbv for approximately 60-min and 10-min sampling times, respectively.

  18. Photocatalytic Iron Oxide Coatings Produced by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Salehi, M.; Amirnasr, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.; Kalantari, Y.; Mohammadnezhad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, hematite coatings with semiconductor properties have received attention for photocatalytic applications. In this study, plasma and flame spraying techniques were used for hematite deposition on 316 stainless steel plates. X-ray diffraction was used for phase composition analysis, and methylene blue was used as an organic pollutant to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of thermally sprayed coatings. The results showed that all these coatings could act under visible-light irradiation but the one deposited by flame spraying at 20 cm stand-off distance showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The results showed that wavelength of the light source and pH of the solution affected the photocatalytic activity significantly. It was also shown that thermally sprayed iron oxide coatings could have a high photo-absorption ability, which could positively affect the photocatalytic activity.

  19. Laboratory Investigations of Titan Haze Formation: Characterization of Gas Phase and Particle Phase Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Sarah; Yoon, Heidi; Li, Rui; deGouw, Joost; Tolbert, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan’s atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, the discovery of very heavy ions, coupled with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation measurements that show haze absorption up to 1000 km altitude (Liang et al., 2007), indicates that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere. The energy environment of the thermosphere is significantly different from the stratosphere; in particular there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2, in the upper atmosphere. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan’s atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini (Vuitton et al., 2007). Additionally, measurements obtained by the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyzer (ACP) carried by Huygens to Titan’s surface may indicate that Titan’s aerosols contain significant amounts of nitrogen (Israël et al., 2005, 2006). The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan’s atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase

  20. A chamber study on the reactions of O3, NO, NO2 and selected VOCs with a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material.

    PubMed

    Mothes, F; Böge, O; Herrmann, H

    2016-08-01

    Chamber studies were performed to investigate the efficiency of a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material to depollute contaminated air. The results showed a photocatalytic effect on ozone (O3), proven by an increase of the geometric uptake coefficient from 5.2 × 10(-6) for the inactive to 7.7 × 10(-6) for the active material under irradiation. Measured first-order rate constants for nitrogen oxides (NOx) under irradiation are in the range of 2.6-5.9 × 10(-4) s(-1), which is significantly higher compared to the inactive material (7.3-9.7 × 10(-5) s(-1)) demonstrating the photocatalytic effect. However, no significant photocatalytic degradation was observed for the studied volatile organic compounds (VOCs) toluene and isoprene resulting in only an upper limit uptake coefficient of 5.0 × 10(-7) for both VOCs. In all experiments using the photocatalytically active material, a clear formation of small carbonyl (C1-C5) gas phase compounds was identified which is suggested to result from the photocatalytic degradation of organic additives. In contrast to the uptake observed for pure O3, during the experiments with NOx (≥50 % relative humidity), a clear photocatalytic formation of O3 was observed. For the material investigated, an empirically derived overall zero-order rate constant of k 0 (O3) ≈ 5 × 10(7) molecules cm(-3) s(-1) was determined. The results demonstrate the necessity of detailed studies of heterogeneous reactions on such surfaces under more complex simulated atmospheric conditions as enabled by simulation chambers.

  1. A chamber study on the reactions of O3, NO, NO2 and selected VOCs with a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material.

    PubMed

    Mothes, F; Böge, O; Herrmann, H

    2016-08-01

    Chamber studies were performed to investigate the efficiency of a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material to depollute contaminated air. The results showed a photocatalytic effect on ozone (O3), proven by an increase of the geometric uptake coefficient from 5.2 × 10(-6) for the inactive to 7.7 × 10(-6) for the active material under irradiation. Measured first-order rate constants for nitrogen oxides (NOx) under irradiation are in the range of 2.6-5.9 × 10(-4) s(-1), which is significantly higher compared to the inactive material (7.3-9.7 × 10(-5) s(-1)) demonstrating the photocatalytic effect. However, no significant photocatalytic degradation was observed for the studied volatile organic compounds (VOCs) toluene and isoprene resulting in only an upper limit uptake coefficient of 5.0 × 10(-7) for both VOCs. In all experiments using the photocatalytically active material, a clear formation of small carbonyl (C1-C5) gas phase compounds was identified which is suggested to result from the photocatalytic degradation of organic additives. In contrast to the uptake observed for pure O3, during the experiments with NOx (≥50 % relative humidity), a clear photocatalytic formation of O3 was observed. For the material investigated, an empirically derived overall zero-order rate constant of k 0 (O3) ≈ 5 × 10(7) molecules cm(-3) s(-1) was determined. The results demonstrate the necessity of detailed studies of heterogeneous reactions on such surfaces under more complex simulated atmospheric conditions as enabled by simulation chambers. PMID:27102618

  2. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Carmichael, Ian; Denifl, Stephan; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C5H4N4O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp - H) anion (C5H3N4O-) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp - NH)-, C4H3N4-/C4HN3O-, C4H2N3-, C3NO-/HC(HCN)CN-, OCN-, CN-, and O-. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  3. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  4. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of ionized corannulene in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galué, Héctor Alvaro; Rice, Corey A.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Oomens, Jos

    2011-02-01

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of radical cationic and protonated corannulene were recorded by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy using the IR free electron laser for infrared experiments. Electrospray ionization was used to generate protonated corannulene and an IRMPD spectrum was recorded in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer monitoring H-loss as a function of IR frequency. The radical cation was produced by 193-nm UV photoionization of the vapor of corannulene in a 3D quadrupole trap and IR irradiation produces H, H2, and C2Hx losses. Summing the spectral response of the three fragmentation channels yields the IRMPD spectrum of the radical cation. The spectra were analyzed with the aid of quantum-chemical calculations carried out at various levels of theory. The good agreement of theoretical and experimental spectra for protonated corannulene indicates that protonation occurs on one of the peripheral C-atoms, forming an sp3 hybridized carbon. The spectrum of the radical cation was examined taking into account distortions of the C5v geometry induced by the Jahn-Teller effect as a consequence of the degenerate 2E1 ground electronic state. As indicated by the calculations, the five equivalent Cs minima are separated by marginal barriers, giving rise to a dynamically distorted system. Although in general the character of the various computed vibrational bands appears to be in order, only a qualitative match to the experimental spectrum is found. Along with a general redshift of the calculated frequencies, the IR intensities of modes in the 1000-1250 cm-1 region show the largest discrepancy with the harmonic predictions. In addition to CH "in-plane" bending vibrations, these modes also exhibit substantial deformation of the pentagonal inner ring, which may relate directly to the vibronic interaction in the radical cation.

  6. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  7. CHAOS III: Gas-phase Abundances in NGC 5457

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Moustakas, John

    2016-10-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope observations of 109 H ii regions in NGC 5457 (M101) obtained with the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. We have robust measurements of one or more temperature-sensitive auroral emission lines for 74 H ii regions, permitting the measurement of “direct” gas-phase abundances. Comparing the temperatures derived from the different ionic species, we find: (1) strong correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii], consistent with little or no intrinsic scatter; (2) a correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii], but with significant intrinsic dispersion; (3) overall agreement between T[N ii], T[S ii], and T[O ii], as expected, but with significant outliers; (4) the correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii] match the predictions of photoionization modeling while the correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii] is offset from the prediction of photoionization modeling. Based on these observations, which include significantly more observations of lower excitation H ii regions, missing in many analyses, we inspect the commonly used ionization correction factors (ICFs) for unobserved ionic species and propose new empirical ICFs for S and Ar. We have discovered an unexpected population of H ii regions with a significant offset to low values in Ne/O, which defies explanation. We derive radial gradients in O/H and N/O which agree with previous studies. Our large observational database allows us to examine the dispersion in abundances, and we find intrinsic dispersions of 0.074 ± 0.009 in O/H and 0.095 ± 0.009 in N/O (at a given radius). We stress that this measurement of the intrinsic dispersion comes exclusively from direct abundance measurements of H ii regions in NGC 5457.

  8. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Nonoxide Nanoparticles in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Kumfer, B. M.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase combustion synthesis is a promising process for creating nanoparticles for the growing nanostructure materials industry. The challenges that must be addressed are controlling particle size, preventing hard agglomerates, maintaining purity, and, if nonoxides are synthesized, protecting the particles from oxidation and/or hydrolysis during post-processing. Sodium-halide Flame Encapsulation (SFE) is a unique methodology for producing nonoxide nanoparticles that addresses these challenges. This flame synthesis process incorporates sodium and metal-halide chemistry, resulting in nanoparticles that are encapsulated in salt during the early stages of their growth in the flame. Salt encapsulation has been shown to allow control of particle size and morphology, while serving as an effective protective coating for preserving the purity of the core particles. Metals and compounds that have been produced using this technology include Al, W, Ti, TiB2, AlN, and composites of W-Ti and Al-AlN. Oxygen content in SFE synthesized nano- AlN has been measured by neutron activation analysis to be as low as 0.54wt.%, as compared to over 5wt.% for unprotected AlN of comparable size. The overall objective of this work is to study the SFE process and nano-encapsulation so that they can be used to produce novel and superior materials. SFE experiments in microgravity allow the study of flame and particle dynamics without the influence of buoyancy forces. Spherical sodium-halide flames are produced in microgravity by ejecting the halide from a spherical porous burner into a quiescent atmosphere of sodium vapor and argon. Experiments are performed in the 2.2 sec Drop Tower at the NASA-Glenn Research Center. Numerical models of the flame and particle dynamics were developed and are compared with the experimental results.

  9. Liquid-gas phase separation in confined vibrated dry granular matter.

    PubMed

    Roeller, Klaus; Clewett, James P D; Bowley, R M; Herminghaus, Stephan; Swift, Michael R

    2011-07-22

    A new phase transition is observed experimentally in a dry granular gas subject to vertical vibration between two horizontal plates. Molecular dynamics simulations of this system allow us to investigate the observed phase separation in detail. We find a high-density, low temperature liquid, coexisting with a low-density, high temperature gas moving coherently. The importance of the coherent motion for phase separation is investigated using frequency modulation.

  10. Condensed-phase versus gas-phase ozonolysis of catechol: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Timothy J.; Medeiros, Nicholas; Hinrichs, Ryan Z.

    2012-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of volatile aromatic compounds contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), especially in urban environments. Aromatic SOA precursors typically require oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, although recent work suggests that ozonolysis of 1,2-benzenediols produces SOA in high yields. We employed attenuated total reflectance and transmission infrared spectroscopy to investigate the heterogeneous ozonolysis of catechol thin films. Formation of the dominant condensed-phase product muconic acid was highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) with few products detected below 40% RH and a maximum reactive uptake coefficient of γ = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-5 measured at 81.2% RH. We also performed quantum chemical calculations mapping out several reaction pathways for the homogeneous ozonolysis of gaseous catechol. 1,3-cycloaddition transition states were rate limiting with the most favorable activation energies at 45.4 and 47.1 kJ mol-1 [CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)] corresponding to addition across and adjacent to the diol Cdbnd C, respectively. Gas-phase rate constants, calculated using transition state theory, were six orders of magnitude slower than experimental values. In contrast, a calculated activation energy was lower for the ozonolysis of a catechol•H2O complex, which serves as a first-approximation for modeling the ozonolysis of condensed-phase catechol. These combined results suggests that homogeneous ozonolysis of catechol may not be important for the formation of secondary organic aerosols but that ozonolysis of surface-adsorbed catechol may contribute to SOA growth.

  11. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  12. Synthesis of Metal Ion-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles Using Two-Phase Method and Their Photocatalytic Activity Under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy-Trinh; Hong, Seong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, TiO2 and metal ion-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by solvothermal reaction of titanium butoxide precursor in the presence of oleic acid, oleylamine and vapor water and they were characterized by XRD, Raman, TEM and DRS. We also investigated the photocatalytic activity of these oxides for the decomposition of Rhodamine B. From XRD and Raman results, doping of the metal ion in the crystal lattice did not change the high crystallinity of the TiO2 structure, and all the metal ions were incorporated into the structures of titania as well as replaced titanium ion or located at interstitial site. The absorption band shifted to a higher wavelength on the metal ion-doped TiO2 samples compared to the pure TiO2 sample. The Ce ion- doped TiO2 catalysts showed the higher photocatalytic activity compared to the pure TiO2 and a commercial P-25 catalysts and 1% Ce-doped TiO2 showed the highest photocatalytic activity.

  13. Synthesis of Metal Ion-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles Using Two-Phase Method and Their Photocatalytic Activity Under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy-Trinh; Hong, Seong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, TiO2 and metal ion-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by solvothermal reaction of titanium butoxide precursor in the presence of oleic acid, oleylamine and vapor water and they were characterized by XRD, Raman, TEM and DRS. We also investigated the photocatalytic activity of these oxides for the decomposition of Rhodamine B. From XRD and Raman results, doping of the metal ion in the crystal lattice did not change the high crystallinity of the TiO2 structure, and all the metal ions were incorporated into the structures of titania as well as replaced titanium ion or located at interstitial site. The absorption band shifted to a higher wavelength on the metal ion-doped TiO2 samples compared to the pure TiO2 sample. The Ce ion- doped TiO2 catalysts showed the higher photocatalytic activity compared to the pure TiO2 and a commercial P-25 catalysts and 1% Ce-doped TiO2 showed the highest photocatalytic activity. PMID:27433699

  14. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanobarbed fibers treated with atmospheric pressure plasma using O{sub 2} gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun-Uk; Ahn, Kyun; Jeong, Se-Young; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kim, Jong-Pil; Bae, Jong-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Gyu; Kwon, Se-Hun; Lee, Hyung Woo

    2010-11-29

    TiO{sub 2} nanobarbed fibers (NBFs) were prepared by growing rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods on anatase TiO{sub 2} nanofibers via electrospinning and hydrothermal reaction processes. There was a large increase in the photocatalytic activity of O{sub 2}-plasma-treated (OP)-TiO{sub 2} NBFs relative to that of the TiO{sub 2} NBFs; this is due to the hydroxylation of the surface of the TiO{sub 2} NBFs by OP treatment. The repeatability of the photocatalytic activity of the OP-TiO{sub 2} NBFs was found to be high and the decolorization rate after ten cycles was 88.3% of the initial value. These results indicate that OP-TiO{sub 2} NBFs have great potential for use as a photocatalyst.

  15. Three-phase measurements of oil and gas trapping in sand packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mansoori, Saleh K.; Iglauer, Stefan; Pentland, Christopher H.; Blunt, Martin J.

    2009-10-01

    We measure the trapped saturations of oil and gas as a function of initial saturation in water-wet sand packs. We start with a water-saturated column and inject octane (oil), while water and oil are produced from the bottom. Once water production has ceased, air (gas) then enters from the top, allowing oil and gas to drain under gravity for different times. Finally water is then injected from the bottom to trap both oil and gas. The columns are sliced and the fluids analyzed using gas chromatography. We find that for high initial gas saturations more gas can be trapped in the presence of oil than in a two-phase (gas/water) system. The residual gas saturation can be over 20% compared to 14% in two-phase flow [Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Pentland CH, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurements of non-wetting phase trapping applied to carbon dioxide storage. Energy Procedia 2009;1(1):3173-80]. This is unlike previous measurements on consolidated media, where the trapped gas saturation is either similar or lower to that reached in an equivalent two-phase experiment. For lower initial gas saturation, the amount of trapping follows the initial-residual trend seen in two-phase experiments. The amount of oil trapped is insensitive to initial gas saturation or the amount of gas that is trapped, again in contrast to measurements on consolidated media. More oil is trapped than would be predicted from an equivalent two-phase (oil/water) system, although the trapped saturation is never larger than the maximum reached in two-phase flow (around 11%) [Pentland CH, Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurement of non-wetting phase trapping in sand packs. In: SPE 115697, proceedings of the SPE annual technical conference and exhibition, Denver, Colorado, USA; 21-24 September 2008]. These initially surprising results are explained in the context of oil layer stability and the competition between snap-off and piston-like advance. In two-phase systems, displacement is principally

  16. Gas phase chemistry of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, J.; Matos, A.P. de; Evans, W.

    1996-01-09

    The gas phase chemistry of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)samarium, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm, was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS). Positive electron impact (EI) spectra showed the formation of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2} Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +}, and Sm{sup +}. All three ions reacted with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm by charge transfer, as verified by double-resonance techniques, and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +} also formed the (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 3}Sm{sub 2}{sup +} ion in a condensation reaction with neutral (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm. The laser desorption/ionization (LDI) spectra showed, in addition to (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +}, and Sm{sup +}, the formation of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}H)Sm{sup +} and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}. The latter species most probably involves a tetramethylfulvenide ligand. Access to all of the ionic species cited here could also be obtained by reacting laser-desorbed Sm{sup +} ions with pentamethylcyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}H. (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}H)Sm{sup +}, and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +} were formed as primary products, and the metallocene ion (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm{sup +} resulted from the rapid addition of C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}H to (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results. PMID:26307695

  18. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results.

  19. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  20. Enhancement of gas-phase diffusion in the presence of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Angert, A.

    2003-04-01

    Gas diffusion in porous media occurs in both the gas and liquid phases. In many instances, gas diffusion in the liquid phase is ignored. However, under many conditions, gas diffusion in the liquid phase may be more important than gas diffusion in the gas phase. Two different cases will be examined in this work. The first case is a continuous liquid path between the gas concentrations of interest modeled after Jury et al. (1984). The second case is the situation at low liquid saturation where liquid islands exist. For the first case, Jury's model can be rewritten as a ratio of the total gas diffusion in the gas and liquid phases to that just in the gas phase. The liquid diffusion coefficient is approximately 10-4 times the gas diffusion coefficient consistent with Jury et al. (1984). The ratio of total diffusion to gas-phase diffusion is then only a function of Henry's constant and the liquid saturation. For higher values of Henry's constant, such as for CO2 and O2, the effect of diffusion in the liquid phase is small except at high liquid saturations. For small values of Henry's constant, such as for some VOCs and explosive compounds, diffusion in the liquid phase dominates for low and moderate liquid saturation values. The second case is the enhancement of diffusion caused by liquid islands at low liquid saturation. Enhanced vapor diffusion across liquid islands has been observed and modeled by Webb and Ho (1999), where condensation and evaporation occur on opposite ends of the liquid island. Vapor diffusion enhancement of up to a factor of 10 has been observed. Similarly, gas can diffuse through the liquid island. For high values of Henry's constant, gas diffusion through liquid islands is negligible and can be ignored. For small values of Henry's constant, diffusion through liquid islands may be much greater than diffusion through gas, so the rate is enhanced. The work was sponsored by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) under the

  1. The gas-phase thermal chemistry of tetralin and related model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malandra, J.

    1993-05-01

    The thesis is divided into 5 papers: gas-phase thermal decomposition of tetralin; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 3-benzocycloheptenone and 1,3, 4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzothiepin-2,2-dioxide (model systems for gas-phase pyrolysis of tetralin); high-temperature gas-phase reactions of o-allylbenzyl radicals generated by flash vacuum pyrolysis of is(o-allylbenzyl) oxalate; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane; and flash vacuum pyrolysis of o-allyltoluene, o-(3-butenyl)toluene and o-(pentenyl)toluene were also used.

  2. Mm/submm Study of Gas-Phase Photoproducts from Methanol Interstellar Ice Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, AJ; Smith, Houston Hartwell; Milam, Stefanie N.; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Icy grain reactions have gained quite the popularity in the astrochemistry community to explain the formation of complex organic molecules. Through temperature programmed desorption and photolysis experiments we use rotational spectroscopy to measure the gas-phase products of icy grain reactions. Previous results include testing detection limits of the system by temperature programmed desorption of methanol and water ices, photochemistry of gas-phase methanol, and detection of photodesorbed water from a pure water ice surface. Current work that will be discussed focuses on the detection of gas-phase CO and other photoproducts from an ice surface.

  3. The Noble Gas Record of Gas-Water Phase Interaction in the Tight-Gas-Sand Reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Zhou, Z.; Harris, N. B.

    2015-12-01

    The mass of hydrocarbons that have migrated through tight-gas-sandstone systems before the permeability reduces to trap the hydrocarbon gases provides critical information in the hydrocarbon potential analysis of a basin. The noble gas content (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) of the groundwater has a unique isotopic and elemental composition. As gas migrates through the water column, the groundwater-derived noble gases partition into the hydrocarbon phase. Determination of the noble gases in the produced hydrocarbon phase then provides a record of the type of interaction (simple phase equilibrium or open system Rayleigh fractionation). The tight-gas-sand reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains represent one of the most significant gas resources in the United States. The producing reservoirs are generally developed in low permeability (averaging <0.1mD) Upper Cretaceous fluvial to marginal marine sandstones and commonly form isolated overpressured reservoir bodies encased in even lower permeability muddy sediments. We present noble gas data from producing fields in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming; the the Piceance Basin, Colorado; and in the Uinta Basin, Utah. The data is consistent from all three basins. We show how in each basin the noble gases record open system gas migration through a water column at maximum basin burial. The data within an open system model indicates that the gas now in-place represents the last ~10% of hydrocarbon gas to have passed through the water column, most likely prior to permeability closedown.

  4. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure, and photocatalytic activity of a new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase, Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Zhenhua; Tang Kaibin Shao Qian; Li Guocan; Zeng Suyuan; Zheng Huagui

    2008-04-15

    A new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been synthesized for the first time. The detailed structure determination of Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} performed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microscopy (ED) shows that it crystallizes in the space group Fmmm [a{approx}5.5153(1), b{approx}5.4646(1), c{approx}18.2375(3)A]. UV-visible diffuse reflection spectrum of the prepared Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} indicates that it had absorption in the UV region. The photocatalytic activity of the Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders was evaluated by degradation of RhB molecules in water under ultra visible light irradiation. The results showed that Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} has high photocatalytic activity at room temperature. Therefore, the preparation and properties studies of Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} with a two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper structure suggest potential future applications in photocatalysis. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of a two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} A new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been synthesized for the first time. Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystallizes in the space group Fmmm determined by powder X-ray and electron diffraction. UV-visible diffuse reflection spectra and the photocatalytic degradation of RhB molecules in water under ultra visible light irradiation show that Li{sub 2}CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 7} is a potential material in photocatalysis.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, and photocatalytic activity of the new three-layer aurivillius phases, Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dong; Tang Kaibin; Liang Zhenhua; Zheng Huagui

    2010-02-15

    Two new three-layer Aurivillius phases Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La) have been synthesized. The detailed structure determination of Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La) performed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron microscopy (SAED) shows that they all crystallize in the space group I/4mmm. UV-visible diffuse reflection spectrum of the prepared Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La) indicates that it had absorption in the ultraviolet (UV) region. The photocatalytic activity of the Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La) powders was evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B (RB) molecules in water under UV light irradiation. The results showed that Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La) has high photocatalytic activity at room temperature. Therefore, the preparation and properties studies of Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La) with a three-layer Aurivillius structure suggest potential future applications in photocatalysis. - Graphical abstract: Two new three-layer Aurivillius phases Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12} (A=Bi, La) have been synthesized by a conventional solid state reaction method. And this is the crystal structure of the three-layer Aurivillius phases, Bi{sub 2}ASrTi{sub 2}TaO{sub 12}.

  7. An investigation into the flow behavior of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in normal gravity with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, Peter J.; Heist, Timothy J.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid behavior in normal gravity of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in an enclosed circular cylinder heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above was investigated. Flow visualization was used to obtain qualitative data on both systems. The use of thermochromatic liquid crystal particles as liquid phase flow tracers was evaluated as a possible means of simultaneously gathering both flow pattern and temperature gradient data for the two phase system. The results of the flow visualization experiments performed on both systems can be used to gain a better understanding of the behavior of such systems in a reduced gravity environment and aid in the verification of a numerical model of the system.

  8. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  9. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 over Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites prepared with a simple and rapid silver mirror method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bingcheng; Zhou, Yong; Li, Peng; Tu, Wenguang; Li, Ping; Tang, Lanqin; Ye, Jinhua; Zou, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The photocatalytic reduction of CO2 over Ag/TiO2 composites prepared with a simple silver mirror reaction method was investigated under UV-visible irradiation in both gas-phase (CO2 + water vapor) and aqueous solution (CO2-saturated NaHCO3 solution) systems. The as-prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite exhibits efficient photocatalytic activity due to the surface plasmonic resonance and electron sink effect of the Ag component, which was found to be closely related to the size and loading amount of Ag. The rapid silver method is effective at curbing the size of Ag, so photocatalytic activity can be improved. Diverse organic chemical products were detected, including mainly methane and methanol as well as a small amount of C2 and C3 species such as acetaldehyde and acetone. Possible photocatalytic mechanisms were proposed. This artificial photosynthesis process may give a prosperous route to the removal of CO2 while simultaneously converting CO2 to valuable fuels based on highly efficient photocatalysts.The photocatalytic reduction of CO2 over Ag/TiO2 composites prepared with a simple silver mirror reaction method was investigated under UV-visible irradiation in both gas-phase (CO2 + water vapor) and aqueous solution (CO2-saturated NaHCO3 solution) systems. The as-prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite exhibits efficient photocatalytic activity due to the surface plasmonic resonance and electron sink effect of the Ag component, which was found to be closely related to the size and loading amount of Ag. The rapid silver method is effective at curbing the size of Ag, so photocatalytic activity can be improved. Diverse organic chemical products were detected, including mainly methane and methanol as well as a small amount of C2 and C3 species such as acetaldehyde and acetone. Possible photocatalytic mechanisms were proposed. This artificial photosynthesis process may give a prosperous route to the removal of CO2 while simultaneously converting CO2 to valuable fuels based on highly

  10. Development of Numerical Simulation Method for Compressible Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation method of compressible gas-liquid two-phase flow is developed for analyses of a cavitation bubble. Thermodynamic state of both phases is described with stiffened gas equation of state. Interface of two phases is captured by Level-Set method. As internal energy jump between two phases is critical for the stability of computation, total energy equation is modified so that inviscid flux of energy is smoothly connected across the interface. Detail of governing equations as well as their discretization is described followed by the result of one-dimensional simple example computation.

  11. Gas-phase mercury reduction to measure total mercury in the flue gas of a coal-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Meischen, Sandra J; Van Pelt, Vincent J; Zarate, Eugene A; Stephens, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous elemental and total (elemental + oxidized) mercury (Hg) in the flue gas from a coal-fired boiler was measured by a modified ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer. Challenges to Hg measurement were the spectral interferences from other flue gas components and that UV measures only elemental Hg. To eliminate interference from flue gas components, a cartridge filled with gold-coated sand removed elemental Hg from a flue gas sample. The Hg-free flue gas was the reference gas, eliminating the spectral interferences. To measure total Hg by UV, oxidized Hg underwent a gas-phase, thermal-reduction in a quartz cell heated to 750 degrees C. Simultaneously, hydrogen was added to flash react with the oxygen present forming water vapor and preventing Hg re-oxidation as it exits the cell. Hg concentration results are in parts per billion by volume Hg at the flue gas oxygen concentration. The modified Hg analyzer and the Ontario Hydro method concurrently measured Hg at a field test site. Measurements were made at a 700-MW steam turbine plant with scrubber units and selective catalytic reduction. The flue gas sampled downstream of the selective catalytic reduction contained 2100 ppm SO2 and 75 ppm NOx. Total Hg measured by the Hg analyzer was within 20% of the Ontario Hydro results. PMID:14871013

  12. Gas-phase mercury reduction to measure total mercury in the flue gas of a coal-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Meischen, Sandra J; Van Pelt, Vincent J; Zarate, Eugene A; Stephens, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous elemental and total (elemental + oxidized) mercury (Hg) in the flue gas from a coal-fired boiler was measured by a modified ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer. Challenges to Hg measurement were the spectral interferences from other flue gas components and that UV measures only elemental Hg. To eliminate interference from flue gas components, a cartridge filled with gold-coated sand removed elemental Hg from a flue gas sample. The Hg-free flue gas was the reference gas, eliminating the spectral interferences. To measure total Hg by UV, oxidized Hg underwent a gas-phase, thermal-reduction in a quartz cell heated to 750 degrees C. Simultaneously, hydrogen was added to flash react with the oxygen present forming water vapor and preventing Hg re-oxidation as it exits the cell. Hg concentration results are in parts per billion by volume Hg at the flue gas oxygen concentration. The modified Hg analyzer and the Ontario Hydro method concurrently measured Hg at a field test site. Measurements were made at a 700-MW steam turbine plant with scrubber units and selective catalytic reduction. The flue gas sampled downstream of the selective catalytic reduction contained 2100 ppm SO2 and 75 ppm NOx. Total Hg measured by the Hg analyzer was within 20% of the Ontario Hydro results.

  13. Steady deflagration of HMX with simple kinetics: A gas phase chain reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, M.J.; Brewster, M.Q.; Son, S.F.

    1998-08-01

    A new approach is presented for modeling steady combustion of energetic solids, in particular HMX. A simplified, global, gas phase chain reaction kinetic mechanism is employed. Specifically, a zero-order, high activation energy thermal decomposition initiation reaction in the condensed phase followed by a second-order, low activation energy chain reaction in the gas phase is assumed. A closed-form solution is obtained, which is based on the activation energy asymptotics analysis of Lengelle in the condensed phase and the assumption of zero activation energy in the gas phase. Comparisons between the model and a variety of experimental observations over a wide range of pressures and initial temperatures are presented and demonstrate the validity of the approach. The model provides excellent agreement with burning rate data (including sensitivity to pressure and initial temperature) and temperature profile data (in particular the gas phase). This suggests that in the realm of simplified, approximate kinetics modeling of energetic solids, the low gas phase activation energy limit is a more appropriate model than the classical high activation energy limit or heuristic flame sheet models. The model also indicates that the condensed phase reaction zone plays an important role in determining the deflagration rate of HMX, underscoring the need for better understanding of the chemistry in this zone.

  14. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T.; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S.; Bakr, Waseem S.

    2016-08-01

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions.

  15. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DEPOSITION OF A COMPOUND THAT PARTITIONS BETWEEN GAS AND PARTICULATE PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    How will atmospheric deposition behave for a compound when it reversibly sorbs between gas and atmospheric particulate phases? Two factors influence the answer. What physical mechanisms occur in the sorption process? What are the concentration and composition of atmospheric par...

  16. Identification of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate in the Los Angeles atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eatough, D.J.; White, V.F.; Hansen, L.D.; Eatough, N.L.; Cheney, J.L.

    1986-09-01

    Gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate have been identified in the atmosphere in Los Angeles. Gas-phase concentrations of these two alkyl sulfates were determined by using analytical methods based on the collection of the compounds before collection of particles using diffusion denuders and after collection of particles using resin beds or sorption filters, and specific analysis of the collected alkyl sulfates by ion chromatography. The data show the dimethyl sulfate is present in both particles and the gas phase. The concentration of total gas-phase methyl sulfates was found to vary from 34 to 178 nmol/m/sup 3/ during the smog episode studied. These species constituted a significant fraction of the total sulfur budget in the Los Angeles basin during the sampling period.

  17. Identification of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate in the Los Angeles atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eatough, D.J.; White, V.F.; Hansen, L.D.; Eatough, N.L.; Cheney, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical techniques were developed for the collection and determination of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid based on collection of the alkyl sulfate compounds with both denuder tubes and resin sorption beds and analysis of the collected material by ion chromatography. Gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid were identified in Los Angeles using these techniques. The data indicate that dimethyl sulfate is present in both particles and in the gas phase. The concentration of gas-phase methyl sulfates was found to be several micrograms/cu m. These species thus account for a significant fraction of the total sulfur budget in the Los Angeles Basin during the sample period.

  18. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  19. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions. PMID:27610853

  20. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions.

  1. Gas-phase water-mediated equilibrium between methylglyoxal and its geminal diol.

    PubMed

    Axson, Jessica L; Takahashi, Kaito; De Haan, David O; Vaida, Veronica

    2010-04-13

    In aqueous solution, aldehydes, and to a lesser extent ketones, hydrate to form geminal diols. We investigate the hydration of methylglyoxal (MG) in the gas phase, a process not previously considered to occur in water-restricted environments. In this study, we spectroscopically identified methylglyoxal diol (MGD) and obtained the gas-phase partial pressures of MG and MGD. These results, in conjunction with the relative humidity, were used to obtain the equilibrium constant, K(P), for the water-mediated hydration of MG in the gas phase. The Gibbs free energy for this process, DeltaG(o), obtained as a result, suggests a larger than expected gas-phase diol concentration. This may have significant implications for understanding the role of organics in atmospheric chemistry.

  2. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  3. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  4. Scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho

    1993-01-01

    A scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity, based on the dominant physical mechanism, was carried out with the goal of predicting the gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe under conditions of microgravity. The results demonstrated the effect of inlet geometry on the flow regime transition. A comparison of the predictions with existing experimental data showed good agreement.

  5. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  6. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  7. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoıˆt

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  8. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  9. Optical pyrometer based on the gas phase photoacoustic effect.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangling; Diebold, Gerald J

    2016-05-15

    A photoacoustic cell containing an infrared active gas and equipped with a pair of infrared transmitting windows that alternately views two bodies at different temperatures through a pair of chopping wheels acts as a differential detector of the radiation emitted by the two bodies. A theory for the photoacoustic signal shows that the device acts to monitor the difference in the incidances between the two bodies integrated over the absorptions of the gas in the cell. Experiments are reported showing that the response of the pyrometer depends on the relative temperatures of heated bodies, the absorption coefficient of the gas in the cell, and the modulation frequency of the chopping wheels. The instrument is shown to be a sensitive detector of a null in the integrated incidance of the two bodies. PMID:27176967

  10. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shenyang; Burkes, Douglas E.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Xu, Zhijie

    2016-10-01

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was developed. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn't cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along <110> directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along <110> directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  11. Gas phase dispersion in a small rotary kiln

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1981-07-01

    A study was made of nonideal flow of gas in a rotary kiln reactor. A rotating tube 0.165 m in diameter by 2.17 m long, with internal lifting flights, was operated at room temperature. Rotational speeds from 2.0 to 7.0 rpm, air flow rates from 0.351 to 4.178 m/sup 3//h, and solid contents of 0.0, 5.1, and 15.3% of tube volume were studied. Residence time distribution of the gas was measured by means of the pulse injection technique using a helium tracer. A model was developed based on dispersive flow that exchanges with a deadwater region. Two parameters, a dispersion number describing bulk gas flow and an interchange factor describing exchange between the flow region and the gas trapped in the solids bed, were sufficient to correlate the data, but these parameters are sensitive to experimental error. The model is applicable to analysis of other flow systems, such as packed beds.

  12. Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

  13. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions. PMID:26099988

  14. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions.

  15. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  16. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185959

  17. TiO2-graphene oxide nanocomposite as advanced photocatalytic materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Graphene oxide composites with photocatalysts may exhibit better properties than pure photocatalysts via improvement of their textural and electronic properties. Results TiO2-Graphene Oxide (TiO2 - GO) nanocomposite was prepared by thermal hydrolysis of suspension with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and titania peroxo-complex. The characterization of graphene oxide nanosheets was provided by using an atomic force microscope and Raman spectroscopy. The prepared nanocomposites samples were characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area and Barrett–Joiner–Halenda porosity, X-ray Diffraction, Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. UV/VIS diffuse reflectance spectroscopy was employed to estimate band-gap energies. From the TiO2 - GO samples, a 300 μm thin layer on a piece of glass 10×15 cm was created. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared layers was assessed from the kinetics of the photocatalytic degradation of butane in the gas phase. Conclusions The best photocatalytic activity under UV was observed for sample denoted TiGO_100 (k = 0.03012 h-1), while sample labeled TiGO_075 (k = 0.00774 h-1) demonstrated the best activity under visible light. PMID:23445868

  18. Improvement of photocatalytic activity of brookite titanium dioxide nanorods by surface modification using chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Menendez-Flores, Victor M.; Murakami, Naoya; Ohno, Teruhisa

    2012-05-01

    Surface morphology of brookite titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods was modified by chemical etching with aqueous hydrogen (H2O2)-ammonia (NH3) or sulfuric acid (H2SO4) solution. The brookite nanorods after chemical etching were characterized by TEM, SAED, FE-SEM, XRD and specific surface area measurements. Brookite nanorods after chemical etching with H2O2-NH3 solution exposed new crystal faces in the tips, and nanorods with sharper tips were observed. On the other hand, etching with H2SO4 at 200 °C induced morphological changes in the tip faces and broadened the angle between tip faces as a result of dissolution along the [0 0 1] direction, though brookite nanorods were only slightly etched after etching with H2SO4 at room temperature. Photocatalytic activity of brookite nanorods was tested by toluene decomposition in gas phase under ultraviolet irradiation. Brookite nanorods etched with H2O2-NH3 solution showed higher photocatalytic activity than that of brookite nanorods before etching. In the case of H2SO4 etching at 200 °C, brookite nanorods after etching exhibited lower photocatalytic activity. One reason for this may be that the formation of newly exposed crystal faces by H2O2-NH3 etching improved separation of redox sites due to their strong oxidation ability.

  19. Photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide with immobilized titanium dioxide films synthesized by hydrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongbiao; Wang, Haiqiang; Liu, Yue; Gu, Zhuoliang

    2008-02-28

    Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of nitric oxide (NO) with immobilized TiO2 films was studied in this paper. The immobilized TiO2 films were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The characterization for the physicochemical properties of catalysts prepared under different hydrothermal conditions were carried out by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements (BET) and scanning electron micrograph (SEM). It was found that the PCO efficiency of the catalyst was mainly depended on the hydrothermal conditions. The optimal values of hydrothermal temperature and hydrothermal time were 200 degrees C and 24 h, respectively. Furthermore, it was also known that the photocatalytic efficiency would decrease remarkably when the calcination temperature was over than 450 degrees C. Under the optimal conditions (hydrothermal condition: 200 degrees C for 24 h; calcination temperature: 450 degrees C), the photocatalytic efficiency of catalyst could reach 60% higher than that of Degussa P25.

  20. [Photocatalytic degradation of low level formaldehyde on TiO2 porous film].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Guo, Fen; Xing, Ying; Xian, Cai-Jun; Guo, Bao-Wen

    2005-07-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of low level formaldehyde in the gas phase was studied in a intermittent recirculation photocatalytic reaction system with TiO2 porous film photocatalyst coated on stainless steel mesh. The effects of carrier of the photocatalyst, coating cycle of the photocatalyst, the initial concentration of formaldehyde and the illumination source were investigated respectively. The study of the aging stability of the photocatalyst was carried out as well. Results show that the degradation efficiency of formaldehyde increased with the increase of mesh number. The degradation efficiency also increased with the increase of carrier number, but the influence of carrier number on the degradation efficiexcy was gradually weakened with increasing carrier number. The activity of the photocatalyst firstly increased and then decreased when coating cycle increased from 1 cycle to 6 cycles. When initial concentration was in the range of 1.34 - 10.72 mg/m3, the change of formaldehyde concentration markedly increased with the increase of initial concentration, but the degradation efficiency increased and subsequently decreased with increasing initial concentration. The degradation efficiency with germicidal light was approximately 19.0% higher than that with black light holding same power, and the enhancement in light intensity could approximately increase the degradation efficiency by 20.5%. Finally, the experiment on the longevity of the photocatalyst indicated that the photocatalyst had the good photocatalytic activity after being used for 4 cycles.

  1. Gas phase condensation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica nanoparticles - control of the intraparticle phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötzel, C.; Kurland, H.-D.; Grabow, J.; Müller, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a γ-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to γ-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis.Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs

  2. Control of gas phase nanoparticle shape and its effect on MRI relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktaş, Sıtkı; Thornton, Stuart C.; Binns, Chris; Lari, Leonardo; Pratt, Andrew; Kröger, Roland; Horsfield, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    We have used a sputtering gas aggregation source to produce Fe@FeO nanoparticles with different shapes, by annealing them at different temperatures in the gas phase. Without annealing, the most common shape found for the nanoparticles is cubic but annealing the nanoparticles at 1129 °C transforms the cubes into cuboctahedra. Measurements of the MRI relaxivity show that the cubic nanoparticles have a higher performance by a factor of two, which is attributed to a higher saturation magnetization for this shape. This indicates that the shape-control enabled by gas-phase synthesis is important for obtaining optimal performance in applications.

  3. A pressure cell for nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of gas phases

    SciTech Connect

    Minzer, M.; Bradley, J. A.; Musgrave, R.; Seidler, G. T.; Skilton, A.

    2008-08-15

    We report the design and performance of a gas-phase sample cell for measurements of momentum transfer (q) dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS). NRIXS measurements from He gas at 2 MPa (20 bars) readily demonstrate dipole-allowed and dipole-forbidden final states for two-electron excitations. Direct comparison of gas-phase NRIXS measurements with the corresponding nonresonant electron energy loss spectroscopy results (EELS) will be a valuable method for characterizing systematic errors in either technique for studies that require absolute normalization of the double differential cross section.

  4. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  5. Pore network modeling of two-phase flow in a liquid-(disconnected) gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Maria C.; Araujo, Mariela; Lago, Marcelo E.

    2007-02-01

    The appropriate description of two-phase flow in some systems requires a detailed analysis of the fundamental equations of flow and transport including momentum transfer between fluid phases. In the particular case of two-phase flow of oil and gas through porous media, when the gas phase is present as disconnected bubbles, there are inconsistencies in calculated flow properties derived by using the conventional Darcean description. In a two-phase system, the motion of one fluid phase may induce significant changes in the mobility of the second phase, as known from the generalized transport equations derived by Whitaker and Kalaydjian. The relevance of such coupling coefficients with respect to the conventional relative permeability term in two-phase Darcean flow is evaluated in this work for an oil-(disconnected) gas system. The study was performed using a new Pore Network Simulator specially designed for this case. Results considering both, Darcy's equation and generalized flow equations suggest that the four transport coefficients (effective permeabilities and coupling coefficients) are needed for a proper description of the macroscopic flow in a liquid-disconnected gas system.

  6. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  7. Comment on "Pairing and phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas".

    PubMed

    Zwierlein, Martin W; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Partridge et al. (Reports, 27 January 2006, p. 503) reported pairing and phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas. We argue that it is not possible to distinguish the superfluid from the normal regimes in the presented data, or to discern which clouds were phase-separated. Some of the reported conclusions are inconsistent with recent experiments.

  8. Photocatalytic/Magnetic Composite Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chang-Yu; Goswami, Yogi; Garretson, Charles; Andino, Jean; Mazyck, David

    2007-01-01

    Photocatalytic/magnetic composite particles have been invented as improved means of exploiting established methods of photocatalysis for removal of chemical and biological pollutants from air and water. The photocatalytic components of the composite particles are formulated for high levels of photocatalytic activity, while the magnetic components make it possible to control the movements of the particles through the application of magnetic fields. The combination of photocatalytic and magnetic properties can be exploited in designing improved air- and water treatment reactors.

  9. Are gas-phase models of interstellar chemistry tenable? The case of methanol.

    PubMed

    Garrod, Robin; Park, In Hee; Caselli, Paola; Herbst, Eric

    2006-01-01

    We consider the case of methanol production in cold dark clouds, also known as quiescent cores, for which recent work shows that a purely gas-phase synthesis is unlikely to produce a sufficient amount to explain the observational fractional abundance of approximately 10(-9). Moreover, recent experiments appear to confirm a previous hypothesis that methanol can be formed on cold grain surfaces by the hydrogenation of CO via successive reactions with hydrogen atoms. In this paper we consider two ways of including the surface formation of methanol into chemical models of cold dark clouds. First, we use a gas-phase model and artificially include the surface formation of methanol in the same manner that the formation of molecular hydrogen is included. Secondly, we utilize a gas-grain code with a new mechanism for desorption following exothermic chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The latter method can reproduce the observed fractional abundance of gas-phase methanol and many other gas-phase species in the well-studied cold dark cloud TMC1-CP but the best fit to the observational data occurs at times significantly later than at ages estimated from gas-phase models.

  10. Experimental parameters affecting hypercoulometric response in gas-phase coulometry.

    PubMed

    Ciccioli, P; Hayes, J M

    1985-01-01

    The response of an electron-capture detector designed for coulometric response was examined as a function of solute, pulse interval, carrier-gas type, solute amount, carrier-gas flow rate, and chromatographic-peak profile. For CCl3F, it was shown that the average numbers of electrons absorbed per molecule ranged from 1.0 to 4.1, varying primarily with pulse interval but also displaying a complex dependence on sample amount. Comparison of these results with theoretical expectations leads to the conclusion that a 1:1 "coulometric response" may not be observed under certain operating conditions. Because the specific conditions required depend on many variables, including, to some extent, sample amount, true coulometric operation of an electron-capture detector is difficult to establish and maintain. Effects which may contribute to the production of hypercoulometric response are critically discussed.

  11. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  12. A high phase-space-density gas of polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Ni, K-K; Ospelkaus, S; de Miranda, M H G; Pe'er, A; Neyenhuis, B; Zirbel, J J; Kotochigova, S; Julienne, P S; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2008-10-10

    A quantum gas of ultracold polar molecules, with long-range and anisotropic interactions, not only would enable explorations of a large class of many-body physics phenomena but also could be used for quantum information processing. We report on the creation of an ultracold dense gas of potassium-rubidium (40K87Rb) polar molecules. Using a single step of STIRAP (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) with two-frequency laser irradiation, we coherently transfer extremely weakly bound KRb molecules to the rovibrational ground state of either the triplet or the singlet electronic ground molecular potential. The polar molecular gas has a peak density of 10(12) per cubic centimeter and an expansion-determined translational temperature of 350 nanokelvin. The polar molecules have a permanent electric dipole moment, which we measure with Stark spectroscopy to be 0.052(2) Debye (1 Debye = 3.336 x 10(-30) coulomb-meters) for the triplet rovibrational ground state and 0.566(17) Debye for the singlet rovibrational ground state.

  13. Spray characterization and gas phase interaction downstream of a simplified atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebrard, P.; Trichet, P.; Millan, P.

    1992-07-01

    A detailed study of the flowfield produced by a simplified airblast atomizer was performed. This atomizer consists of an annular liquid sheet introduced into coflowing nonswirling and swirling air flow fields. Droplet size and velocity were measured in the resultant spray using a two components Phase/Doppler Particle Analyzer. A complete set of measurements was obtained at axial locations from 8 mm to 150 mm downstream from the nozzle. Laser velocimetry was also employed to measure the gas phase properties. The effect of swirl on droplet transport process is examined for this type of airblast atomizer and the results demonstrate the strong influence the spray has on the gas phase.

  14. Development and Evaluation of Gold-Centered Monolayer Protected Nanoparticle Stationary Phases for Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Gwen M.; Grate, Jay W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2004-12-10

    The current status for the development of novel open-tubular gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases consists of thin films of gold-centered monolayer protected nanoparticles (MPNs) is reported. Dodecanethiol MPNs, in which the monolayer is dodecanethiol linked to the gold nanoparticle, have shown great promise as a GC stationary phase with efficient columns having been produced in a variety of capillary i.d.'s with stationary phase film depths ranging from 10-60 nm, +/- 2 nm at a given film depth. Stationary phase operational parameters are discussed including maximum operating temperature, sample capacity, and stationary phase lifetime and robustness.

  15. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  16. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  17. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  18. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  19. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  20. Two-phase turbine engines. [using gas-liquid mixture accelerated in nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.; Hays, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a two-phase turbine which utilizes a uniform mixture of gas and liquid accelerated in nozzles of the types reported by Elliott and Weinberg (1968). The mixture acts directly on an axial flow or tangential impulse turbine or is separated into gas and liquid streams which operate separately on a gas turbine and a hydraulic turbine. The basic two-phase cycles are examined, taking into account working fluids, aspects of nozzle expansion, details of turbine cycle operation, and the effect of mixture ratio variation. Attention is also given to two-phase nozzle efficiency, two-phase turbine operating characteristics and efficiencies, separator turbines, and impulse turbine experiments.

  1. Dynamic phase equilibrium during formation and dissociation of marine gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Lowell, R. P.; Germanovich, L.

    2002-12-01

    Methane gas hydrate (MGH) is stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those in the marine sediments near continental margins. Much attention has been focused on related issues of MGH as a potential energy resource, a possible role in submarine sediment failure, and an agent in global climate change. Particularly, there has been controversy over whether and how methane released from dissociating marine gas hydrate makes its way to the ocean and the atmosphere. Despite its apparent importance, a comprehensive understanding of how a marine MGH system dynamically adjusts itself in a changing environment is still absent. A robust theory describing phase balance and dynamic equilibrium is a necessary step toward a better understanding of the dynamic behaviors of MGH systems. We have developed a method to determine the balance and equilibrium of a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) gas hydrate system. Analysis shows that there are dynamic feedbacks between MGH formation/dissociation and changes in pressure, temperature and salinity. A few important observations of this study are: 1) formation of brine with gas hydrate, 2) development of water-limited situation in certain circumstances, 3) broad region of coexisting three phases of hydrate, liquid and free gas, and 4) significant over pressurization due to MGH dissociation. It is also found that 1) free gas is able to migrate through gas hydrate stability zone, 2) a layer of coexisting hydrate, liquid and free gas can resides below the BSR, and 3) significant excess pore pressure can be built up within the three-phase zone resulting from either continuous sedimentation, seafloor temperature increase, or sea level drop. We will discuss their implications to marine gas hydrate systems. The meanings of BSR and BHSZ (base of hydrate stability zone) in the context of these new findings will be discussed.

  2. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  3. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies.

  4. Volatile garlic odor components: gas phases and adsorbed exhaled air analysed by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Laakso, I; Seppänen-Laakso, T; Hiltunen, R; Müller, B; Jansen, H; Knobloch, K

    1989-06-01

    Combined headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HSGC-MS) was used in the analysis of garlic volatile compounds. Twenty major components were identified in the gas phases enriched by fresh, sliced garlic cloves ( ALLIUM SATIVUM L, Allioceae, Liliidae). Suspended dry garlic powder and crushed garlic, incubated in vegetable oil, revealed a different pattern since mainly the amounts of di- and trisulfides were decreased. The considerable compositional differences found in the analyses for the gas phase of garlic cloves, kept in oil, are likely associated with the poor stability of allicin in a lipophilic environment; a marked increase in the amounts of 2-propene-1-thiol, acetic acid, and ethanol was observed in the gas phase, whereas trisulfides were present in traces only. The occurrence of 2-propene-1-thiol and diallyl disulfide, the two principal sulfur components in exhaled air, also may indicate a rapid degradation of most garlic volatile components probably caused by the enzymatically active human salivary or digestive system. PMID:17262412

  5. Gas chromatography on wall-coated open-tubular columns with ionic liquid stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F; Lenca, Nicole

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids have moved from novel to practical stationary phases for gas chromatography with an increasing portfolio of applications. Ionic liquids complement conventional stationary phases because of a combination of thermophysical and solvation properties that only exist for ionic solvents. Their high thermal stability and low vapor pressure makes them suitable as polar stationary phases for separations requiring high temperatures. Ionic liquids are good solvents and can be used to expand the chemical space for separations. They are the only stationary phases with significant hydrogen-bond acidity in common use; they extend the hydrogen-bond basicity of conventional stationary phases; they are as dipolar/polarizable as the most polar conventional stationary phases; and some ionic liquids are significantly less cohesive than conventional polar stationary phases. Problems in column coating techniques and related low column performance, column activity, and stationary phase reactivity require further exploration as the reasons for these features are poorly understood at present.

  6. Development of a gas phase source for perfluoroalkyl acids to examine atmospheric sampling methods.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, John J; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Young, Cora J

    2016-06-21

    An inability to produce environmentally relevant gaseous mixing ratios of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), ubiquitous global contaminants, limits the analytical reliability of atmospheric chemists to make accurate gas and particulate measurements that are demonstrably free of interferences due to sampling artefacts. A gas phase source for PFAAs based on the acid displacement mechanism using perfluoropropionate (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been constructed. The displacement efficiency of gas phase perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is inversely related to chain length. Decreasing displacement efficiencies for PFPrA, PFBA, PFHxA, and PFOA were 90% ± 20%, 40% ± 10%, 40% ± 10%, 9% ± 4%, respectively. Generating detectable amounts of gas phase perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) was not possible. It is likely that lower vapour pressure and much higher acidity play a role in this lack of emission. PFCA emission rates were not elevated by increasing relative humidity (25%-75%), nor flow rate of carrier gas from 33-111 sccm. Overall, reproducible gaseous production of PFCAs was within the error of the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a displacing acid (±20%) and was accomplished using a dry nitrogen flow of 33 ± 2 sccm. A reproducible mass emission rate of 0.97 ± 0.10 ng min(-1) (n = 8) was observed for PFBA. This is equivalent to an atmospheric mixing ratio of 12 ppmv, which is easily diluted to environmentally relevant mixing ratios of PFBA. Conversely, generating gas phase perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by sublimating the solid acid under the same conditions produced a mass emission rate of 2800 ng min(-1), which is equivalent to a mixing ratio of 18 ppthv and over a million times higher than suspected atmospheric levels. Thus, for analytical certification of atmospheric sampling methods, generating gas phase standards for PFCAs is best accomplished using acid displacement under dry conditions

  7. Double-side active TiO2-modified nanofiltration membranes in continuous flow photocatalytic reactors for effective water purification.

    PubMed

    Romanos, G Em; Athanasekou, C P; Katsaros, F K; Kanellopoulos, N K; Dionysiou, D D; Likodimos, V; Falaras, P

    2012-04-15

    A chemical vapour deposition (CVD) based innovative approach was applied with the purpose to develop composite TiO(2) photocatalytic nanofiltration (NF) membranes. The method involved pyrolytic decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapor and formation of TiO(2) nanoparticles through homogeneous gas phase reactions and aggregation of the produced intermediate species. The grown nanoparticles diffused and deposited on the surface of γ-alumina NF membrane tubes. The CVD reactor allowed for online monitoring of the carrier gas permeability during the treatment, providing a first insight on the pore efficiency and thickness of the formed photocatalytic layers. In addition, the thin TiO(2) deposits were developed on both membrane sides without sacrificing the high yield rates. Important innovation was also introduced in what concerns the photocatalytic performance evaluation. The membrane efficiency to photo degrade typical water pollutants, was evaluated in a continuous flow water purification device, applying UV irradiation on both membrane sides. The developed composite NF membranes were highly efficient in the decomposition of methyl orange exhibiting low adsorption-fouling tendency and high water permeability. PMID:21999989

  8. Analysis of Developing Gas/liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Michael Z. Podowski; Steven P. Antal; Donna Post Guillen; Matthias Beyer; Dirk Lucas

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a mechanistically based CFD model that can be used to simulate process equipment operating in the churn-turbulent regime. The simulations were performed using a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE–CMFD [Antal et al,2000]. A complete four-field model, including the continuous liquid field and three dispersed gas fields representing bubbles of different sizes, was first carefully tested for numerical convergence and accuracy, and then used to reproduce the experimental results from the TOPFLOW test facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. Institute of Safety Research [Prasser et al,2007]. Good progress has been made in simulating the churn-turbulent flows and comparison the NPHASE-CMFD simulations with TOPFLOW experimental data. The main objective of the paper is to demonstrate capability to predict the evolution of adiabatic churn-turbulent gas/liquid flows. The proposed modelling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for dispersed bubble fields [Tselishcheva et al, 2009]. Along with closure laws based on interaction between bubbles and continuous liquid, the effect of height on air density has been included in the model. The figure below presents the developing flow results of the study, namely total void fraction at different axial locations along the TOPFLOW facility test section. The complete model description, as well as results of simulations and validation will be presented in the full paper.

  9. Phase-field simulations of gas density within bubbles under irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Anter El-Azab; Michael Tonks

    2011-05-01

    Phase-field simulations are used to study the evolution of gas density within irradiation-induced bubbles. In our simulations, the dpa rate, gas production rate, and defect diffusivities are systematically varied to understand their effect on bubble nucleation rates, bubble densities, and the distribution of gas concentration within bubbles and in the solid regions. We find that gas densities within bubbles fluctuate drastically in the early nucleation stages, when growth rates are highest, but converge to steady-state values during the later coarsening stages. The steady-state gas densities within bubbles correspond with the ratio of total accumulated vacancy content divided by the total accumulated gas content, in agreement with a thermodynamic analysis concerning free-energy minimization.

  10. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  11. Effect of additives on gas-phase catalysis with immobilised Thermoanaerobacter species alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH T).

    PubMed

    Trivedi, A H; Spiess, A C; Daussmann, T; Büchs, J

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a strategy for preparing an efficient immobilised alcohol dehydrogenase preparation for a gas-phase reaction. The effects of additives such as buffers and sucrose on the immobilisation efficiency (residual activity and protein loading) and on the gas-phase reaction efficiency (initial reaction rate and half-life) of Thermoanaerobacter sp. alcohol dehydrogenase were studied. The reduction of acetophenone to 1-phenylethanol under in situ cofactor regeneration using isopropanol as co-substrate was used as a model reaction at fixed reaction conditions (temperature and thermodynamic activities). A strongly enhanced thermostability of the enzyme in the gas-phase reaction was achieved when the enzyme was immobilised with 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7) containing sucrose five times the protein amount (on weight/weight basis). This resulted in a remarkable productivity of 200 g L(-1) day(-1) even at non-optimised reaction conditions. The interaction of additives with the enzyme and water affects the immobilisation and gas-phase efficiencies of the enzyme. However, it was not possible to predict the effect of additives on the gas-phase reaction efficiency even after knowing their effect on the immobilisation efficiency.

  12. Numerical Computation of Flame Spread over a Thin Solid in Forced Concurrent Flow with Gas-phase Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Ching-Biau; T'ien, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Excerpts from a paper describing the numerical examination of concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid in purely forced flow with gas-phase radiation are presented. The computational model solves the two-dimensional, elliptic, steady, and laminar conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species. Gas-phase combustion is modeled via a one-step, second order finite rate Arrhenius reaction. Gas-phase radiation considering gray non-scattering medium is solved by a S-N discrete ordinates method. A simplified solid phase treatment assumes a zeroth order pyrolysis relation and includes radiative interaction between the surface and the gas phase.

  13. Design of composite photocatalyst of TiO2 and Y-zeolite for degradation of 2-propanol in the gas phase under UV and visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kamegawa, Takashi; Ishiguro, Yasushi; Kido, Ryota; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2014-10-13

    Hydrophobic Y-zeolite (SiO2/Al2O3 = 810) and TiO2 composite photocatalysts were designed by using two different types of TiO2 precursors, i.e., titanium ammonium oxalate and ammonium hexafluorotitanate. The porous structure, surface property and state of TiO2 were investigated by various characterization techniques. By using an ammonium hexafluorotitanate as a precursor, hydrophobic modification of the Y-zeolite surface and realizing visible light sensitivity was successfully achieved at the same time after calcination at 773 K in the air. The prepared sample still maintained the porous structure of Y-zeolite and a large surface area. Highly crystalline anatase TiO2 was also formed on the Y-zeolite surface by the role of fluorine in the precursor. The usages of ammonium hexafluorotitanate were effective for the improvement of the photocatalytic performance of the composite in the degradation of 2-propanol in the gas phase under UV and visible light (λ > 420 nm) irradiation.

  14. The warm molecular gas and dust of Seyfert galaxies: two different phases of accretion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezcua, M.; Prieto, M. A.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Tristram, K.; Neumayer, N.; Kotilainen, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of warm molecular gas (1000-3000 K), traced by the near-IR H2 2.12 μm line, has been imaged with a resolution <0.5 arcsec in the central 1 kpc of seven nearby Seyfert galaxies. We find that this gas is highly concentrated towards the central 100 pc and that its morphology is often symmetrical. Lanes of warm H2 gas are observed only in three cases (NGC 1068, NGC 1386 and Circinus) for which the morphology is much wider and extended than the dust filaments. We conclude that there is no one-to-one correlation between dust and warm gas. This indicates that, if the dust filaments and lanes of warm gas are radial streaming motions of fuelling material, they must represent two different phases of accretion: the dust filaments represent a colder phase than the gas close to the nucleus (within ˜100 pc). We predict that the morphology of the nuclear dust at these scales should resemble that of the cold molecular gas (e.g. CO at 10-40 K), as we show for CenA and NGC 1566 by Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations, whereas the inner H2 gas traces a much warmer phase of material identified with warmer (40-500 K) molecular gas such as CO(6-5) or HCN (as shown by ALMA for NGC 1068 and NGC 1097). We also find that X-ray heating is the most likely dominant excitation mechanism of the H2 gas for most sources.

  15. Air-sea transfer of gas phase controlled compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Bell, T. G.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Brooks, I. M.; Nightingale, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Gases in the atmosphere/ocean have solubility that spans several orders of magnitude. Resistance in the molecular sublayer on the waterside limits the air-sea exchange of sparingly soluble gases such as SF6 and CO2. In contrast, both aerodynamic and molecular diffusive resistances on the airside limit the exchange of highly soluble gases (as well as heat). Here we present direct measurements of air-sea methanol and acetone transfer from two open cruises: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The transfer of the highly soluble methanol is essentially completely airside controlled, while the less soluble acetone is subject to both airside and waterside resistances. Both compounds were measured concurrently using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, with their fluxes quantified by the eddy covariance method. Up to a wind speed of 15 m s-1, observed air-sea transfer velocities of these two gases are largely consistent with the expected near linear wind speed dependence. Measured acetone transfer velocity is ∼30% lower than that of methanol, which is primarily due to the lower solubility of acetone. From this difference we estimate the “zero bubble” waterside transfer velocity, which agrees fairly well with interfacial gas transfer velocities predicted by the COARE model. At wind speeds above 15 m s-1, the transfer velocities of both compounds are lower than expected in the mean. Air-sea transfer of sensible heat (also airside controlled) also appears to be reduced at wind speeds over 20 m s-1. During these conditions, large waves and abundant whitecaps generate large amounts of sea spray, which is predicted to alter heat transfer and could also affect the air-sea exchange of soluble trace gases. We make an order of magnitude estimate for the impacts of sea spray on air-sea methanol transfer.

  16. Gas-phase disproportionation of nitric oxide at elevated pressures.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Ishida, Takanobu; Todoroki, Yukiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mayumi, Mitsufumi

    2003-02-01

    T.P. Melia's chemical kinetics study of the disproportionation of nitric oxide (NO), 3NO --> NO2 + N2O, (Melia, T.P. (1965) J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem., 27, 95-98), which is the most quoted quantitative investigation presently available, revealed a rather strong dependence of the effective rate constant, Kk' of Melia's third-order rate law, -d[NO]/dt = Kk'[NO]3, on the initial pressure of NO. In order to estimate extent of accumulation of NO2 and N2O as a function of time by integration of the rate law, we have evaluated the dependence of the effective rate constant as a function of pressure and thus as a function of time on the basis of the non-ideality of NO gas. Although our approach is crude in that the non-idealities of NO2 and N2O and other NOx products and a probable deviation of the gas mixture from the Dalton's law have not been considered, it provides a means for approximately estimating the rate of accumulation of NO2 and N2O based on Melia's data. According to these calculations, the extent of the disproportionation is generally negligible at low initial pressures, e.g. 5 atm or less, while at 200 atm, the mole fractions of NO2 and N2O can become as high as 12-13% only after 10 days. These values are alarmingly high for handling pressured NO- in N2-mixture in either research or clinical settings. This information must be borne in mind when compressed NO in commercial cylinders is employed in high precision experiments. Disproportionation of NO under pressure also deserves attention in inhalation of low doses of NO in the treatment of diseases characterized by pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia.

  17. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Li, Zhaofei; Hirai, Kei; Tassel, Cédric; Loyer, François; Ichikawa, Noriya; Abe, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Takano, Mikio; Hernandez, Olivier J.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H2 and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures.

  18. Dispersion and surface functionalization of oxide nanoparticles for transparent photocatalytic and UV-protecting coatings and sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Bertrand; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Villaluenga, Irune; Berriozabal, Gemma; De Miguel, Yolanda R.; Bergström, Lennart

    2013-04-01

    This review describes recent efforts on the synthesis, dispersion and surface functionalization of the three dominating oxide nanoparticles used for photocatalytic, UV-blocking and sunscreen applications: titania, zinc oxide, and ceria. The gas phase and liquid phase synthesis is described briefly and examples are given of how weakly aggregated photocatalytic or UV-absorbing oxide nanoparticles with different composition, morphology and size can be generated. The principles of deagglomeration are reviewed and the specific challenges for nanoparticles highlighted. The stabilization of oxide nanoparticles in both aqueous and non-aqueous media requires a good understanding of the magnitude of the interparticle forces and the surface chemistry of the materials. Quantitative estimates of the Hamaker constants in various media and measurements of the isoelectric points for the different oxide nanoparticles are presented together with an overview of different additives used to prepare stable dispersions. The structural and chemical requirements and the various routes to produce transparent photocatalytic and nanoparticle-based UV-protecting coatings, and UV-blocking sunscreens are described and discussed.

  19. Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

  20. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Stationary Phases in Microfabricated Gas-Chromatography Columns.

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Douglas; Sillerud, Colin Halliday

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to integrate Sandia's microfabricated gas-chromatography ( GC) columns with a stationary phase material that is capable of retaining high-volatility chemicals and permanent gases. The successful integration of such a material with GCs would dramatically expand the repertoire of detectable compounds for Sandia's various microanalysis systems. One such promising class of candidate materials is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this report we detail our methods for controlled deposition of HKUST-1 MOF stationary phases within GC columns. We demonstrate: the chromatographic separation of natural gas; a method for determining MOF film thickness from chromatography alone; and the first-reported GC x GC separation of natural gas -- in general -- let alone for two disparate MOF stationary phases. In addition we determine the fundamental thermodynamic constant for mass sorption, the partition coefficient, for HKUST-1 and several light hydrocarbons and select toxic industrial chemicals.

  1. Modeling the effects of gas phase CO2 intrusion on the biogeochemistry of variably saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altevogt, Andrew S.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2005-09-01

    The transport of gas phase carbon dioxide through unsaturated soils has the potential to significantly alter the soil biogeochemistry. Leakage of CO2 from deep reservoirs, either naturally occurring or anthropogenically emplaced, may displace oxygen in the soil gas and hence radically alter the redox conditions of a soil. Furthermore, the formation of carbonic acid in the aqueous phase will alter the pH of the soil system. A two-dimensional numerical model has been developed to explore the effects of gaseous CO2 leakage on the biogeochemistry of a variably saturated porous media. The model describes the sequential degradation of organic carbon by microorganisms using a series of terminal electron acceptors. Gas phase CO2 intrusion results in changes in redox conditions and pH of the soil water, both of which lead to alteration of the biogeochemistry of the soil. Alteration of the biogeochemical profile of a representative field site is explored with the numerical model.

  2. Polymerization in the gas phase, in clusters, and on nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    El-Shall, M Samy

    2008-07-01

    Gas phase and cluster experiments provide unique opportunities to quantitatively study the effects of initiators, solvents, chain transfer agents, and inhibitors on the mechanisms of polymerization. Furthermore, a number of important phenomena, unique structures, and novel properties may exist during gas-phase and cluster polymerization. In this regime, the structure of the growing polymer may change dramatically and the rate coefficient may vary significantly upon the addition of a single molecule of the monomer. These changes would be reflected in the properties of the oligomers deposited from the gas phase. At low pressures, cationic and radical cationic polymerizations may proceed in the gas phase through elimination reactions. In the same systems at high pressure, however, the ionic intermediates may be stabilized, and addition without elimination may occur. In isolated van der Waals clusters of monomer molecules, sequential polymerization with several condensation steps can occur on a time scale of a few microseconds following the ionization of the gas-phase cluster. The cluster reactions, which bridge gas-phase and condensed-phase chemistry, allow examination of the effects of controlled states of aggregation. This Account describes several examples of gas-phase and cluster polymerization studies where the most significant results can be summarized as follows: (1) The carbocation polymerization of isobutene shows slower rates with increasing polymerization steps resulting from entropy barriers, which could explain the need for low temperatures for the efficient propagation of high molecular weight polymers. (2) Radical cation polymerization of propene can be initiated by partial charge transfer from an ionized aromatic molecule such as benzene coupled with covalent condensation of the associated propene molecules. This novel mechanism leads exclusively to the formation of propene oligomer ions and avoids other competitive products. (3) Structural information

  3. Polymerization in the gas phase, in clusters, and on nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    El-Shall, M Samy

    2008-07-01

    Gas phase and cluster experiments provide unique opportunities to quantitatively study the effects of initiators, solvents, chain transfer agents, and inhibitors on the mechanisms of polymerization. Furthermore, a number of important phenomena, unique structures, and novel properties may exist during gas-phase and cluster polymerization. In this regime, the structure of the growing polymer may change dramatically and the rate coefficient may vary significantly upon the addition of a single molecule of the monomer. These changes would be reflected in the properties of the oligomers deposited from the gas phase. At low pressures, cationic and radical cationic polymerizations may proceed in the gas phase through elimination reactions. In the same systems at high pressure, however, the ionic intermediates may be stabilized, and addition without elimination may occur. In isolated van der Waals clusters of monomer molecules, sequential polymerization with several condensation steps can occur on a time scale of a few microseconds following the ionization of the gas-phase cluster. The cluster reactions, which bridge gas-phase and condensed-phase chemistry, allow examination of the effects of controlled states of aggregation. This Account describes several examples of gas-phase and cluster polymerization studies where the most significant results can be summarized as follows: (1) The carbocation polymerization of isobutene shows slower rates with increasing polymerization steps resulting from entropy barriers, which could explain the need for low temperatures for the efficient propagation of high molecular weight polymers. (2) Radical cation polymerization of propene can be initiated by partial charge transfer from an ionized aromatic molecule such as benzene coupled with covalent condensation of the associated propene molecules. This novel mechanism leads exclusively to the formation of propene oligomer ions and avoids other competitive products. (3) Structural information

  4. Amphipols Outperform Dodecylmaltoside Micelles in Stabilizing Membrane Protein Structure in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Noncovalent mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as an invaluable technique to probe the structure, interactions, and dynamics of membrane proteins (MPs). However, maintaining native-like MP conformations in the gas phase using detergent solubilized proteins is often challenging and may limit structural analysis. Amphipols, such as the well characterized A8-35, are alternative reagents able to maintain the solubility of MPs in detergent-free solution. In this work, the ability of A8-35 to retain the structural integrity of MPs for interrogation by electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) is compared systematically with the commonly used detergent dodecylmaltoside. MPs from the two major structural classes were selected for analysis, including two β-barrel outer MPs, PagP and OmpT (20.2 and 33.5 kDa, respectively), and two α-helical proteins, Mhp1 and GalP (54.6 and 51.7 kDa, respectively). Evaluation of the rotationally averaged collision cross sections of the observed ions revealed that the native structures of detergent solubilized MPs were not always retained in the gas phase, with both collapsed and unfolded species being detected. In contrast, ESI-IMS-MS analysis of the amphipol solubilized MPs studied resulted in charge state distributions consistent with less gas phase induced unfolding, and the presence of lowly charged ions which exhibit collision cross sections comparable with those calculated from high resolution structural data. The data demonstrate that A8-35 can be more effective than dodecylmaltoside at maintaining native MP structure and interactions in the gas phase, permitting noncovalent ESI-IMS-MS analysis of MPs from the two major structural classes, while gas phase dissociation from dodecylmaltoside micelles leads to significant gas phase unfolding, especially for the α-helical MPs studied. PMID:25495802

  5. Modeling of the gas-phase chemistry in C-H-O gas mixtures for diamond chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherbridge, James R.; May, Paul W.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2001-05-01

    The boundaries of the diamond deposition region in the C-H-O (Bachmann) atomic phase composition diagram have been reproduced successfully for 38 different C, H, and O containing gas mixtures using the CHEMKIN computer package, together with just two criteria—a minimum mole fraction of methyl radicals [CH3] and a limiting value of the [H]/[C2H2] ratio. The diamond growth/no-growth boundary coincides with the line along which the input mole fractions of C and O are equal. For every gas mixture studied, no-growth regions are found to coincide with a negligible (<10-10) mole fraction of CH3 radicals, while for gas mixtures lying within the diamond growth region the CH3 mole fraction is ˜10-7. Each no-growth→diamond growth boundary is seen to be accompanied by a 2-3 order of magnitude step in CH3 mole fraction. The boundary between diamond and nondiamond growth is less clearly defined, but can be reproduced by assuming a critical, temperature dependent [H]/[C2H2] ratio (0.2, in the case that Tgas=2000 K) that reflects the crucial role of H atoms in the etching of nondiamond phases. The analysis allows prediction of the composition process window for good quality diamond growth for all stable input gas mixtures considered in this study.

  6. Gas-phase chemiluminescence and chemi-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of chemiluminescence (or more broadly chemi-excitation) and chemi-ionization have major similarities from a fundamental kinetic and dynamic point of view. However, since the former has primarily been investigated using optical spectroscopic techniques and the latter largely by mass spectroscopic (and other gaseous electronic) methods, the two phenomena have apparently never, explicitly been discussed together in one volume. In addition to a number of review articles on each individual subject, several meetings and books have had chemiluminescence and bioluminescence as their theme and those have been dominated by condensed phase work. On the other hand, chemi-ionization is often discussed in the contest of gaseous electronics, plasma chemistry and combustion. It is the goal of this book to present a more unified understanding of the two phenomena.

  7. Discontinuous phase transition in a dimer lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    I study a dimer model on the square lattice with nearest neighbor exclusion as the only interaction. Detailed simulations using tomographic entropic sampling show that as the chemical potential is varied, there is a strongly discontinuous phase transition, at which the particle density jumps by about 18% of its maximum value, 1/4. The transition is accompanied by the onset of orientational order, to an arrangement corresponding to the {1/2, 0, 1/2} structure identified by Phares et al. [Physica B 409, 1096 (2011)] in a dimer model with finite repulsion at fixed density. Using finite-size scaling and Binder's cumulant, the expected scaling behavior at a discontinuous transition is verified in detail. The discontinuous transition can be understood qualitatively given that the model possesses eight equivalent maximum-density configurations, so that its coarse-grained description corresponds to that of the q = 8 Potts model.

  8. Gas adsorption/absorption heat switch, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The service life and/or reliability of far-infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is presently limited by the cryocooler. The life and/or reliability, however, can be extended by using redundant cryocoolers. To reduce parasitic heat leak, each stage of the inactive redundant cryocooler must be thermally isolated from the optical system, while each stage of the active cryocooler must be thermally connected to the system. The thermal break or the thermal contact can be controlled by heat switches. Among different physical mechanisms for heat switching, mechanically activated heat switches tend to have low reliability and, furthermore, require a large contact force. Magnetoresistive heat switches are, except at very low temperatures, of very low efficiency. Heat switches operated by the heat pipe principle usually require a long response time. A sealed gas gap heat switch operated by an adsorption pump has no mechanical motion and should provide the reliability and long lifetime required in long-term space missions. Another potential application of a heat switch is the thermal isolation of the optical plane during decontamination.

  9. The interstellar gas-phase chemistry of HCN and HNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.

    2014-09-01

    We review the reactions involving hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) in dark molecular clouds to elucidate new chemical sources and sinks of these isomers. We find that the most important reactions for the HCN-HNC system are dissociative recombination (DR) reactions of HCNH+ (HCNH+ + e-), the ionic CN + H3+, HCN + C+, HCN and HNC reactions with H+/He+/H3+/H3O+/HCO+, the N + CH2 reaction and two new reactions: H + CCN and C + HNC. We test the effect of the new rate constants and branching ratios on the predictions of gas-grain chemical models for dark cloud conditions. The rapid C + HNC reaction keeps the HCN/HNC ratio significantly above 1 as long as the carbon atom abundance remains high. However, the reaction of HCN with H3+ followed by DR of HCNH+ acts to isomerize HCN into HNC when carbon atoms and CO are depleted leading to an HCN/HNC ratio close to or slightly greater than 1. This agrees well with observations in TMC-1 and L134N taking into consideration the overestimation of HNC abundances through the use of the same rotational excitation rate constants for HNC as for HCN in many radiative transfer models.

  10. Distribution of Organophosphate Esters between the Gas and Particle Phase-Model Predictions vs Measured Data.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Wolschke, Hendrik; Diamond, Miriam L; Jantunen, Liisa M; Scheringer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Gas-particle partitioning is one of the key factors that affect the environmental fate of semivolatile organic chemicals. Many organophosphate esters (OPEs) have been reported to primarily partition to particles in the atmosphere. However, because of the wide range of their physicochemical properties, it is unlikely that OPEs are mainly in the particle phase "as a class". We compared gas-particle partitioning predictions for 32 OPEs made by the commonly used OECD POV and LRTP Screening Tool ("the Tool") with the partitioning models of Junge-Pankow (J-P) and Harner-Bidleman (H-B), as well as recently measured data on OPE gas-particle partitioning. The results indicate that half of the tested OPEs partition into the gas phase. Partitioning into the gas phase seems to be determined by an octanol-air partition coefficient (log KOA) < 10 and a subcooled liquid vapor pressure (log PL) > -5 (PL in Pa), as well as the total suspended particle concentration (TSP) in the sampling area. The uncertainty of the physicochemical property data of the OPEs did not change this estimate. Furthermore, the predictions by the Tool, J-P- and H-B-models agreed with recently measured OPE gas-particle partitioning. PMID:27144674

  11. Plasma-produced phase-pure cuprous oxide nanowires for methane gas sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Qijin Zhang, Fengyan; Yan, Wei; Randeniya, Lakshman; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-03-28

    Phase-selective synthesis of copper oxide nanowires is warranted by several applications, yet it remains challenging because of the narrow windows of the suitable temperature and precursor gas composition in thermal processes. Here, we report on the room-temperature synthesis of small-diameter, large-area, uniform, and phase-pure Cu{sub 2}O nanowires by exposing copper films to a custom-designed low-pressure, thermally non-equilibrium, high-density (typically, the electron number density is in the range of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}) inductively coupled plasmas. The mechanism of the plasma-enabled phase selectivity is proposed. The gas sensors based on the synthesized Cu{sub 2}O nanowires feature fast response and recovery for the low-temperature (∼140 °C) detection of methane gas in comparison with polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}O thin film-based gas sensors. Specifically, at a methane concentration of 4%, the response and the recovery times of the Cu{sub 2}O nanowire-based gas sensors are 125 and 147 s, respectively. The Cu{sub 2}O nanowire-based gas sensors have a potential for applications in the environmental monitoring, chemical industry, mining industry, and several other emerging areas.

  12. Contributions of gas-phase plasma chemistry to surface modifications and gas-surface interactions: investigations of fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, Michael F., II

    The fundamental aspects of inductively coupled fluorocarbon (FC) plasma chemistry were examined, with special emphasis on the contributions of gas-phase species to surface modifications. Characterization of the gas-phase constituents of single-source CF4-, C2F6-, C3F 8-, and C3F6-based plasmas was performed using spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. The effects of varying plasma parameters, including applied rf power (P) and system pressure (p) were examined. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were employed to monitor the behavior of excited and ground CFx (x = 1,2) radicals, respectively. Mass spectrometric techniques, including ion energy analyses, elucidated behaviors of nascent ions in the FC plasmas. These gas-phase data were correlated with the net effect of substrate processing for Si and ZrO2 surfaces. Surface-specific analyses were performed for post-processed substrates via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle goniometry. Generally, precursors with lower F/C ratios tended to deposit robust FC films of high surface energy. Precursors of higher F/C ratio, such as CF4, were associated with etching or removal of material from surfaces. Nonetheless, a net balance between deposition of FC moieties and etching of material exists for each plasma system. The imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique provided insight into the phenomena occurring at the interface of the plasma gas-phase and substrate of interest. IRIS results demonstrate that CFx radicals scatter copiously, with surface scatter coefficients, S, generally greater than unity under most experimental conditions. Such considerable S values imply surface-mediated production of the CFx radicals at FC-passivated sites. It is inferred that the primary route to surface production of CFx arises from energetic ion bombardment and ablation of surface FC films. Other factors which may influence the observed CFx

  13. Study of Hind Limb Tissue Gas Phase Formation in Response to Suspended Adynamia and Hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced joint/muscle activity (hypo kinesia) as well as reduced or null loading of limbs (adynamia) in gravity would result in reduced decompression-induced gas phase and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Finding a correlation between the two phenomena would correspond to the proposed reduction in tissue gas phase formation in astronauts undergoing decompression during extravehicular activity (EVA) in microgravity. The observation may further explain the reported low incidence of DCS in space.

  14. Characterization of annular two-phase gas-liquid flows in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, W. Scott; Mcquillen, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A series of two-phase gas-liquid flow experiments were developed to study annular flows in microgravity using the NASA Lewis Learjet. A test section was built to measure the liquid film thickness around the perimeter of the tube permitting the three dimensional nature of the gas-liquid interface to be observed. A second test section was used to measure the film thickness, pressure drop and wall shear stress in annular microgravity two-phase flows. Three liquids were studied to determine the effects of liquid viscosity and surface tension. The result of this study provide insight into the wave characteristics, pressure drop and droplet entrainment in microgravity annular flows.

  15. Direct gas-phase epoxidation of propylene to propylene oxide through radical reactions: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, Ali Can; Fellah, Mehmet Ferdi; Onal, Isik

    2010-03-01

    The gas-phase radical chain reactions which utilize O 2 as the oxidant to produce propylene oxide (PO) are investigated through theoretical calculations. The transition states and energy profiles were obtained for each path. The rate constants were also calculated. The energetics for the competing pathways indicate that PO can be formed selectively due to its relatively low activation barrier (9.3 kcal/mol) which is in a good agreement with the experimental value (11 kcal/mol) of gas-phase propylene epoxidation. The formation of the acrolein and combustion products have relatively high activation barriers and are not favored. These results also support the recent experimental findings.

  16. Atmospheric chemistry of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: formation of atmospheric mutagens.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, R; Arey, J

    1994-01-01

    The atmospheric chemistry of the 2- to 4-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which exist mainly in the gas phase in the atmosphere, is discussed. The dominant loss process for the gas-phase PAH is by reaction with the hydroxyl radical, resulting in calculated lifetimes in the atmosphere of generally less than one day. The hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated reactions and nitrate (NO3) radical-initiated reactions often lead to the formation of mutagenic nitro-PAH and other nitropolycyclic aromatic compounds, including nitrodibenzopyranones. These atmospheric reactions have a significant effect on ambient mutagenic activity, indicating that health risk assessments of combustion emissions should include atmospheric transformation products. PMID:7821285

  17. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  18. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.; Yoshida, I.

    2009-02-16

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  19. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 over Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites prepared with a simple and rapid silver mirror method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bingcheng; Zhou, Yong; Li, Peng; Tu, Wenguang; Li, Ping; Tang, Lanqin; Ye, Jinhua; Zou, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The photocatalytic reduction of CO2 over Ag/TiO2 composites prepared with a simple silver mirror reaction method was investigated under UV-visible irradiation in both gas-phase (CO2 + water vapor) and aqueous solution (CO2-saturated NaHCO3 solution) systems. The as-prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite exhibits efficient photocatalytic activity due to the surface plasmonic resonance and electron sink effect of the Ag component, which was found to be closely related to the size and loading amount of Ag. The rapid silver method is effective at curbing the size of Ag, so photocatalytic activity can be improved. Diverse organic chemical products were detected, including mainly methane and methanol as well as a small amount of C2 and C3 species such as acetaldehyde and acetone. Possible photocatalytic mechanisms were proposed. This artificial photosynthesis process may give a prosperous route to the removal of CO2 while simultaneously converting CO2 to valuable fuels based on highly efficient photocatalysts. PMID:27231820

  20. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 over Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites prepared with a simple and rapid silver mirror method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bingcheng; Zhou, Yong; Li, Peng; Tu, Wenguang; Li, Ping; Tang, Lanqin; Ye, Jinhua; Zou, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The photocatalytic reduction of CO2 over Ag/TiO2 composites prepared with a simple silver mirror reaction method was investigated under UV-visible irradiation in both gas-phase (CO2 + water vapor) and aqueous solution (CO2-saturated NaHCO3 solution) systems. The as-prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite exhibits efficient photocatalytic activity due to the surface plasmonic resonance and electron sink effect of the Ag component, which was found to be closely related to the size and loading amount of Ag. The rapid silver method is effective at curbing the size of Ag, so photocatalytic activity can be improved. Diverse organic chemical products were detected, including mainly methane and methanol as well as a small amount of C2 and C3 species such as acetaldehyde and acetone. Possible photocatalytic mechanisms were proposed. This artificial photosynthesis process may give a prosperous route to the removal of CO2 while simultaneously converting CO2 to valuable fuels based on highly efficient photocatalysts.

  1. Self-similarity of phase-space networks of frustrated spin models and lattice gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Wang, Feng; Han, Yilong

    2013-03-01

    We studied the self-similar properties of the phase-spaces of two frustrated spin models and two lattice gas models. The frustrated spin models included (1) the anti-ferromagnetic Ising model on a two-dimensional triangular lattice (1a) at the ground states and (1b) above the ground states and (2) the six-vertex model. The two lattice gas models were (3) the one-dimensional lattice gas model and (4) the two-dimensional lattice gas model. The phase spaces were mapped to networks so that the fractal analysis of complex networks could be applied, i.e. the box-covering method and the cluster-growth method. These phase spaces, in turn, establish new classes of networks with unique self-similar properties. Models 1a, 2, and 3 with long-range power-law correlations in real space exhibit fractal phase spaces, while models 1b and 4 with short-range exponential correlations in real space exhibit nonfractal phase spaces. This behavior agrees with one of untested assumptions in Tsallis nonextensive statistics. Hong Kong GRC grants 601208 and 601911

  2. A microcomputer-controlled gas phase microreactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.M.

    1983-08-01

    Although automated reactors are effective tools for studying a single type of reaction or optimizing catalyst performance, they may not be well suited for exploratory research. These reactors generally have several shortcomings. First, they may have limited versatility since they are usually designed with a single application in mind. Second, computer systems used for process control and data acquisition are often expensive and complex, so that once they are set up for a given application, it is quite difficult to adapt them for another. Because of these restrictions, experimental reactors are often operated manually, requiring a full-time operator to monitor operations and acquire data. This is a greater problem in laboratories where projects are often short-term, and the costs of setting up an automated reactor may outweigh the benefits of automation. For an automated reactor to be cost-effective in such an environment, both reactor hardware and control software must be versatile enough that they can be easily modified and adapted for different experiments. An automated gas-flow microreactor has been designed and constructed which is both inexpensive and flexible. The reactor is capable of performing three different types of experiments, 1) continuous reagent feed with analysis of the product stream, 2) pulsed-flow experiments, and 3) temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reaction (TPR). Conversion of the reactor from one configuration to another requires less than one hour. Process control and data acquisition are performed using an Apple II Plus microcomputer (Apple Computer Corp., Cupertino, Calif.) and an ISAAC interface device (Cyborg Corp., Newton, Mass.).

  3. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  4. Modeling the final phase of landfill gas generation from long-term observations.

    PubMed

    Tintner, Johannes; Kühleitner, Manfred; Binner, Erwin; Brunner, Norbert; Smidt, Ena

    2012-06-01

    For waste management, methane emissions from landfills and their effect on climate change are of serious concern. Current models for biogas generation that focus on the economic use of the landfill gas are usually based on first order chemical reactions (exponential decay), underestimating the long-term emissions of landfills. The presented study concentrated on the curve fitting and the quantification of the gas generation during the final degradation phase under optimal anaerobic conditions. For this purpose the long-term gas generation (240-1,830 days) of different mechanically biologically treated (MBT) waste materials was measured. In this study the late gas generation was modeled by a log-normal distribution curve to gather the maximum gas generation potential. According to the log-normal model the observed gas sum curve leads to higher values than commonly used exponential decay models. The prediction of the final phase of landfill gas generation by a fitting model provides a basis for CO(2) balances in waste management and some information to which extent landfills serve as carbon sink.

  5. Gas-Phase Database for Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Chu, Pamela M.; Rhoderick, G C.; Johnson, P A.

    2004-12-10

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are each creating quantitative databases containing the vapor-phase infrared spectra of pure chemicals. The digital databases have been created with both laboratory and remote-sensing applications in mind. A spectral resolution of {approx} 0.1 cm{sup -1} was selected to avoid degrading sharp spectral features, while also realizing that atmospheric broadening typically limits line widths to 0.1 cm{sup -1}. Calculated positional (wave number, cm{sup -1}) uncertainty is {le} 0.005 cm{sup -1}, while the 1{sigma} statistical uncertainty in absorbance values is <2% for most compounds. The latter was achieved by measuring multiple (typically {ge} 9) path length-concentration burdens and fitting a weighted Beer's law plot to each wave number channel. The two databases include different classes of compounds and were compared using 12 samples. Though these 12 samples span a range of polarities, absorption strengths, and vapor pressures, the data agree to within experimental uncertainties with only one exception.

  6. Photooxygenation and gas-phase reactivity of multiply threaded pseudorotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Nowosinski, Karol; Warnke, Stephan; Pagel, Kevin; Komáromy, Dávid; Jiang, Wei; Schalley, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    The solution-phase photooxygenation of multiply threaded crown/ammonium pseudorotaxanes containing anthracene spacers is monitored by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron-resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The oxygenated pseudorotaxanes are mass-selected and fragmented by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and/or collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments and and their behavior compared to that of the non-oxygenated precursors. [4+2]Cycloreversion reactions lead to the loss of O2, when no other reaction channel with competitive energy demand is available. Thus, the release of molecular oxygen can serve as a reference reaction for the energy demand of other fragmentation reactions such as the dissociation of the crown/ammonium binding motifs. The photooxygenation induces curvature into the initially planar anthracene and thus significantly changes the geometry of the divalent, anthracene-spacered wheel. This is reflected in ion-mobility data. Coulomb repulsion in multiply charged pseudorotaxanes assists the oxygen loss as the re-planarization of the anthracene increases the distance between the two charges. PMID:27041657

  7. In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent J; Goldstein, Allen H; Kreisberg, Nathan M; Hering, Susanne V

    2010-04-13

    An understanding of the gas/particle-phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds is critical in determining atmospheric aerosol formation processes and growth rates, which in turn affect global climate and human health. The Study of Organic Aerosol at Riverside 2005 campaign was performed to gain a better understanding of the factors responsible for aerosol formation and growth in Riverside, CA, a region with high concentrations of secondary organic aerosol formed through the phase transfer of low-volatility reaction products from the oxidation of precursor gases. We explore the ability of the thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) to measure gas-to-particle-phase transitioning for several organic compound classes (polar and nonpolar) found in the ambient Riverside atmosphere by using in situ observations of several hundred semivolatile organic compounds. Here we compare TAG measurements to modeled partitioning of select semivolatile organic compounds. Although TAG was not designed to quantify the vapor phase of semivolatile organics, TAG measurements do distinguish when specific compounds are dominantly in the vapor phase, are dominantly in the particle phase, or have both phases present. Because the TAG data are both speciated and time-resolved, this distinction is sufficient to see the transition from vapor to particle phase as a function of carbon number and compound class. Laboratory studies typically measure the phase partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds by using pure compounds or simple mixtures, whereas hourly TAG phase partitioning measurements can be made in the complex mixture of thousands of polar/nonpolar and organic/inorganic compounds found in the atmosphere. PMID:20142511

  8. Effect of liquid distribution on gas-water phase mass transfer in an unsaturated sand during infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1994-09-01

    Gas-water phase mass transfer was examined in a homogeneous sand with both the gas and water phase mobile: water was infiltrated from the top of the sand column while benzene-laden air flowed upward from the bottom. Mass-transfer limitations for this situation may be important for applications of bioventing, where water and nutrients are added at the ground surface simultaneously with induced air movement to carry oxygen and volatile organics to microbial populations. Gas- and water-phase samples indicate that gas-water phase mass transfer was sufficiently fast that equilibrium between gas and water phases was achieved at all sampling locations within the porous medium. Lower-bound estimates for the gas-water mass-transfer rate coefficient show that mass transfer was at least 10-40 times larger than predictions made from an empirical model developed for gas-water phase mass transfer in an identical porous medium. A water-phase tracer test demonstrates that water flow was much more uniform in this study than in those earlier experiments, which is a likely explanation for the differing rates of gas-water phase mass transfer. It is hypothesized that the liquid distribution in previous laboratory experiments was less uniform because of preferential flow paths due to wetting front instabilities. Gas-water phase mass-transfer rate coefficients reported in this investigation are for an ideal situation of uniform water infiltration: mass-transfer rates in field soils are expected to be significantly smaller.

  9. Gas phase fragmentation of protonated betaine and its clusters.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Jean Ann; Feketeová, Linda; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2009-10-21

    Betaine [(CH(3))(3)N(+)CH(2)COO(-)] is a methylated version of glycine and is a zwitterion in its neutral form. In this work, we have subjected protonated betaine, (+)(CH(3))(3)NCH(2)COOH, to a range of fragmentation experiments which involve vibrational excitation, electronic excitation and electron capture. Low-energy (eV) collisions in combination with deuterium labelling reveal that the lowest energy dissociation pathway is the formation of N(CH(3))(3)(+) and CH(2)COOH. The dominant channel after 50 keV collisions with molecular oxygen is the same as that after low-energy collisions; however, more fragmentation is seen which is most likely due to electronic excitation of the ions in the collision processes. Subsequent dissociation of the radical N(CH(3))(3)(+) was observed in agreement with the electron ionisation spectrum of N(CH(3))(3). Electron-induced dissociation by 22 eV electrons produced similar fragments to those formed after high-energy collision-induced dissociation. With caesium atoms as the target gas, protonated betaine captured electrons to give neutrals. These were reionised to cations a microsecond later in collisions with O(2). The dominant dissociation channel of the betaine radical, [(CH(3))(3)NCH(2)COOH] , involves formation of N(CH(3))(3) and CH(2)COOH, as revealed from the presence of N(CH(3))(3)(+) radical cations. This channel is associated with a kinetic energy release of 0.1-0.2 eV. The CH(2)COOH radical is unstable to dissociation into CH(3) and CO(2) but in charge reversal experiments (two Cs collisions), CH(2)[double bond, length as m-dash]C(OH)O(-) anions were formed due to the short time between the collisions (nanoseconds). Density functional theory calculations support the spectral interpretations. Collision-induced dissociation of protonated betaine clusters resulted dominantly in loss of neutral betaines. PMID:20449019

  10. Method of photocatalytic nanotagging

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Song, Yujiang

    2010-04-27

    A nanotagged chemical structure comprising a chemical structure with an associated photocatalyst and a tagging nanoparticle (a nanotag) grown in proximity to the photocatalyst, and a method for making the nanotagged chemical structure. The nanoparticle is grown in proximity to the photocatalyst by using a photocatalytic reduction reaction.

  11. Formation routes of interstellar glycine involving carboxylic acids: possible favoritism between gas and solid phase.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Sergio; Baptista, Leonardo; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa M; Andrade, Diana P P

    2011-11-01

    Despite the extensive search for glycine (NH₂CH₂COOH) and other amino acids in molecular clouds associated with star-forming regions, only upper limits have been derived from radio observations. Nevertheless, two of glycine's precursors, formic acid and acetic acid, have been abundantly detected. Although both precursors may lead to glycine formation, the efficiency of reaction depends on their abundance and survival in the presence of a radiation field. These facts could promote some favoritism in the reaction pathways in the gas phase and solid phase (ice). Glycine and these two simplest carboxylic acids are found in many meteorites. Recently, glycine was also observed in cometary samples returned by the Stardust space probe. The goal of this work was to perform theoretical calculations for several interstellar reactions involving the simplest carboxylic acids as well as the carboxyl radical (COOH) in both gas and solid (ice) phase to understand which reactions could be the most favorable to produce glycine in interstellar regions fully illuminated by soft X-rays and UV, such as star-forming regions. The calculations were performed at four different levels for the gas phase (B3LYP/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, MP2/6-31G*, and MP2/6-31++G**) and at MP2/6-31++G** level for the solid phase (ice). The current two-body reactions (thermochemical calculation) were combined with previous experimental data on the photodissociation of carboxylic acids to promote possible favoritism for glycine formation in the scenario involving formic and acetic acid in both gas and solid phase. Given that formic acid is destroyed more in the gas phase by soft X-rays than acetic acid is, we suggest that in the gas phase the most favorable reactions are acetic acid with NH or NH₂OH. Another possible reaction involves NH₂CH₂ and COOH, one of the most-produced radicals from the photodissociation of acetic acid. In the solid phase, we suggest that the reactions of formic acid with NH

  12. Quantitative Fourier transform infrared analysis of gas phase cigarette smoke and other gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto, R.; Church, D.F.; Pryor, W.A. )

    1989-03-01

    A new method for the analysis of selected components in complex gas mixtures has been developed utilizing a relatively inexpensive Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a continuous flow gas cell. The method was used to monitor nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide concentrations in cigarette smoke with time. Using multivariate least-square regression analysis, it is possible to simultaneously quantitate both NO and NO{sub 2}, even in the presence of overlapping peaks. Using this method, the oxidation of nitric oxide in the presence of isoprene in cigarette smoke and in a model system was followed with time. The method also can be applied to other compounds in smoke or to any other gaseous mixture.

  13. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging of liquid and gas two-phase flow in packed beds.

    PubMed

    Sankey, M H; Holland, D J; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F

    2009-02-01

    Single-phase liquid flow in porous media such as bead packs and model fixed bed reactors has been well studied by MRI. To some extent this early work represents the necessary preliminary research to address the more challenging problem of two-phase flow of gas and liquid within these systems. In this paper, we present images of both the gas and liquid velocities during stable liquid-gas flow of water and SF(6) within a packing of 5mm spheres contained within columns of diameter 40 and 27 mm; images being acquired using (1)H and (19)F observation for the water and SF(6), respectively. Liquid and gas flow rates calculated from the velocity images are in agreement with macroscopic flow rate measurements to within 7% and 5%, respectively. In addition to the information obtained directly from these images, the ability to measure liquid and gas flow fields within the same sample environment will enable us to explore the validity of assumptions used in numerical modelling of two-phase flows. PMID:19059796

  14. Fizzy Extraction of Volatile and Semivolatile Compounds into the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Hao; Urban, Pawel L

    2016-09-01

    Extraction of volatile and semivolatile compounds from liquid matrixes with high yields, and transferring the extracts to detectors in real time, is challenging. Common extraction procedures involve heating the samples to release the analytes to the gas phase and, in some cases, trapping the gas-phase analytes into sorbents or containers. Here, we propose a new method for fast extraction of volatile and semivolatile compounds from liquid matrixes. This method involves dissolution of a carrier gas in the liquid sample by applying a moderate overpressure (∼150 kPa) and stirring the sample. An abrupt decompression of the extraction chamber leads to effervescence. In this step, many bubbles are instantly formed in the sample matrix. The dissolved carrier gas as well as dissolved volatiles are liberated into the headspace of the extraction chamber within a short period of time (few seconds). The gaseous effluent of the extraction chamber is immediately transferred to the online detector; in this case, an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The fast release of the gas-phase extract gives rise to a high signal recorded by the detector; several times higher than the signal recorded during direct infusion of headspace vapors without fizzy extraction. This feature provides the means to detect and quantify analytes present in solutions in a short period of time. Here we show that fizzy extraction is suitable for analysis of volatile/semivolatile compounds present in various samples, including those containing complex matrixes. PMID:27504910

  15. Effect of surfactants on gas holdup of two-phase bubble columns

    SciTech Connect

    Estevez, L.A. ); Saez, E.; Pachino, J.; Cavicchioli, I. )

    1988-01-01

    Two-phase experiments have been carried out using organic liquids with a surfactant and air in a bubble column 30 (cm) inside diameter and 3 (m) tall. Under the presence of the surfactant, two distinct regions are observed: a bubbling region is the lower part, and a froth zone in the upper part of the column. Intrinsic gas holdups were measured in each region. Results showed that intrinsic gas holdup did not change significantly with surfactant concentration. However, the position of the limiting surface separating the two regions varied considerably with surfactant concentration, thus affecting strongly the overall gas holdup. Based on the described experimental observations, correlations for intrinsic and overall gas holdups have been proposed. Intrinsic gas holdups have been correlated and a function of gas and liquid superficial velocities, and not as functions of surfactant concentration. Overall gas holdups have been expressed in terms of intrinsic gas holdup and of the fraction PHI of the column that is occupied by the froth region. The variable PHI is the one that has been correlated in terms of the surfactant concentration.

  16. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  17. OH REACTION KINETICS OF GAS-PHASE A- AND G-HEXACHLOROCYCLOHEXANE AND HEXACHLOROBENZENE. (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of the hydroxyl
    radical (OH) with - and -hexachlorocyclohexane (-
    and The 'sticky business' of cleaning gas-phase membrane proteins: a detergent oriented perspective.

    PubMed

    Borysik, Antoni J; Robinson, Carol V

    2012-11-14

    In recent years the properties of gas-phase detergent clusters have come under close scrutiny due in part to their participation in the analysis of intact membrane protein complexes by mass spectrometry. The detergent molecules that cover the protein complex are removed in the gas-phase by thermally agitating the ions by collision-induced dissociation. This process however, is not readily controlled and can frequently result in the disruption of protein structure. Improved methods of releasing proteins from detergent clusters are clearly required. To facilitate this the structural properties of detergent clusters along with the mechanistic details of their dissociation need to be understood. Pivotal to understanding the properties of gas-phase detergent clusters is the technique of ion mobility mass spectrometry. This technique can be used to assign polydisperse detergent clusters and provide information about their geometries and packing densities. In this article we consider the shapes of detergent clusters and show that these clusters possess geometries that are inconsistent with those in solution. We analyse the distributions of clusters in detail using tandem mass spectrometry and suggest that the mean charge of clusters formed from certain detergents is governed by electrostatic repulsion. We discuss the dissociation of detergent clusters and propose that detergent evaporation it a key process in the protection of protein complexes during high energy collisions in the gas-phase.

  18. Chemical studies of elements with Z ⩾ 104 in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türler, Andreas; Eichler, Robert; Yakushev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Chemical investigations of superheavy elements in the gas-phase, i.e. elements with Z ≥ 104, allow assessing the influence of relativistic effects on their chemical properties. Furthermore, for some superheavy elements and their compounds quite unique gas-phase chemical properties were predicted. The experimental verification of these properties yields supporting evidence for a firm assignment of the atomic number. Prominent examples are the high volatility observed for HsO4 or the very weak interaction of Cn with gold surfaces. The unique properties of HsO4 were exploited to discover the doubly-magic even-even nucleus 270Hs and the new isotope 271Hs. The combination of kinematic pre-separation and gas-phase chemistry allowed gaining access to a new class of relatively fragile compounds, the carbonyl complexes of elements Sg through Mt. A not yet resolved issue concerns the interaction of Fl with gold surfaces. While competing experiments agree on the fact that Fl is a volatile element, there are discrepancies concerning its adsorption on gold surfaces with respect to its daughter Cn. The elucidation of these and other questions amounts to the fascination that gas-phase chemical investigations exert on current research at the extreme limits of chemistry today.

  19. Gas-phase synthesis and reactivity of Cu(+)-benzyne complexes.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yunfeng; Shen, Shanshan; Weng, Guofeng; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2014-10-11

    Cu(+)-benzyne complexes bearing bidentate nitrogen ligands were synthesized in the gas phase for the first time using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The addition reactivity of copper-stabilized benzyne with amines was studied in the ion trap analyzer. The structures of products were identified by comparing their MS(n) data with authentic compounds obtained from another generation route.

  1. Methylation of 2-Naphthol Using Dimethyl Carbonate under Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tundo, Pietro; Rosamilia, Anthony E.; Arico, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    This experiment investigates the methylation of 2-naphthol with dimethyl carbonate. The volatility of the substrates, products, and co-products allows the reaction to be performed using a continuous-flow gas-phase setup at ambient pressure. The reaction uses catalytic quantities of base, achieves high conversion, produces little waste, and…

  2. GAS-PHASE OXIDATION PRODUCTS OF BIPHENYL AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our laboratory recently measured the gas-phase reaction rate constants of
    polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with the hydroxyl radical (OH) and concluded
    that OH reactions are the primary removal pathway of PCBs from the atmosphere.
    With the reaction system previousl...

  3. Planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, I. A.; Platonov, V. I.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The high selectivity of the adsorption layer for low-boiling alkanes is shown, the separation factor (α) couple iso-butane / butane is 1.9 at a column temperature of 50 °C.The paper presents sorption and selective properties of planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the stationary phase.

  4. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS IN GAS PHASE USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols were studied in a gas phase photochemical reactor using immobilized TiO2 catalyst. An annular photoreactor was used at 463K with an average contact time of 32sec. The system was found to be specifically suited for the...

  5. Ozonation of coal vitrinites of different metamorphism degrees in gas and liquid phases

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Semenova; Y.F. Patrakov

    2007-02-15

    The comparative analysis of the dynamics of accumulation of oxygen-containing groups in coals of different metamorphism degrees under their ozonation in the gas phase and in chloroform has been performed. The coals of the middle stage of metamorphism demonstrate the highest reactivity. The ozonation in chloroform proceeds with a higher intensity.

  6. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions (10-1000 nm aerodynamic diameter), physical and chemical properties of fine particle matter (PM2.5) with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 micrometers, and gas-phase emissions from controlled open burning of assorted taxa were measured. Chemical speciation of ...

  7. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  8. Generation of naphthoquinone radical anions by electrospray ionization: solution, gas-phase, and computational chemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Vessecchi, Ricardo; Naal, Zeki; Lopes, José N C; Galembeck, Sérgio E; Lopes, Norberto P

    2011-06-01

    Radical anions are present in several chemical processes, and understanding the reactivity of these species may be described by their thermodynamic properties. Over the last years, the formation of radical ions in the gas phase has been an important issue concerning electrospray ionization mass spectrometry studies. In this work, we report on the generation of radical anions of quinonoid compounds (Q) by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The balance between radical anion formation and the deprotonated molecule is also analyzed by influence of the experimental parameters (gas-phase acidity, electron affinity, and reduction potential) and solvent system employed. The gas-phase parameters for formation of radical species and deprotonated species were achieved on the basis of computational thermochemistry. The solution effects on the formation of radical anion (Q(•-)) and dianion (Q(2-)) were evaluated on the basis of cyclic voltammetry analysis and the reduction potentials compared with calculated electron affinities. The occurrence of unexpected ions [Q+15](-) was described as being a reaction between the solvent system and the radical anion, Q(•-). The gas-phase chemistry of the electrosprayed radical anions was obtained by collisional-induced dissociation and compared to the relative energy calculations. These results are important for understanding the formation and reactivity of radical anions and to establish their correlation with the reducing properties by electrospray ionization analyses. PMID:21561138

  9. Field ionization kinetic and electron impact studies of gas phase transition states - The cyclic bromonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. M.; Giguere, R. J.; Falick, A. M.; Aberth, W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Cis- and trans-isomers of 4-t-butylcyclohexyl bromide were studied to determine the mechanism of cyclic bromonium ion formation. The field ionization kinetic and electron impact data indicate that the formation of the cyclic structure occurs simultaneously with loss of the neutral fragment. The data also show that little or no gas-phase cis-trans isomerization occurs.

  10. (129) Xe and (131) Xe nuclear magnetic dipole moments from gas phase NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2015-04-01

    (3) He, (129) Xe and (131) Xe NMR measurements of resonance frequencies in the magnetic field B0=11.7586 T in different gas phase mixtures have been reported. Precise radiofrequency values were extrapolated to the zero gas pressure limit. These results combined with new quantum chemical values of helium and xenon nuclear magnetic shielding constants were used to determine new accurate nuclear magnetic moments of (129) Xe and (131) Xe in terms of that of the (3) He nucleus. They are as follows: μ((129) Xe) = -0.7779607(158)μN and μ((131) Xe) = +0.6918451(70)μN . By this means, the new 'helium method' for estimations of nuclear dipole moments was successfully tested. Gas phase NMR spectra demonstrate the weak intermolecular interactions observed on the (3) He and (129) Xe and (131) Xe shielding in the gaseous mixtures with Xe, CO2 and SF6 .

  11. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  12. Determination of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.D.; White, V.F.; Eatough, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical techniques were developed for the collection and determination of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid in the flue lines and plumes of power plants and in the ambient atmosphere. The techniques involve the collection of the gas phase species in denuders which are selective for monomethyl sulfuric acid or which collect both dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid, and determination of the deposition pattern of the collected alkyl sulfates in the denuder. In addition, both dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid are collected in filter pack, sorbent-bed combinations which allow for the separate determination of both dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid or for their joint collection and determination. Monomethyl sulfuric acid is determined by ion chromatography. Dimethyl sulfate is determined either by ion chromatography or by gas chromatography, depending on the collection device used.

  13. Microfluidic generation of uniform water droplets using gas as the continuous phase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kunqiang; Lu, Annie Xi; Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; DeVoe, Don L; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2015-06-15

    Microfluidic schemes for forming uniform aqueous microdroplets usually rely on contacting the aqueous liquid (dispersed phase) with an immiscible oil (continuous phase). Here, we demonstrate that the oil can be substituted with gas (nitrogen or air) while still retaining the ability to generate discrete and uniform aqueous droplets. Our device is a capillary co-flow system, with the inner flow of water getting periodically dispersed into droplets by the external flow of gas. The droplet size and different formation modes can be tuned by varying the liquid and gas flow rates. Importantly, we identify the range of conditions that correspond to the "dripping mode", i.e., where discrete droplets are consistently generated with no satellites. We believe this is a significant development that will be beneficial for chemical and biological applications requiring clean and contaminant-free droplets, including DNA amplification, drug encapsulation, and microfluidic cell culture. PMID:25744861

  14. Determination of gas phase adsorption isotherms--a simple constant volume method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekeun; Cai, Zhangli; Sorial, George A

    2006-08-01

    Single and ternary solute gas phase adsorption isotherms were conducted in this study to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple constant volume method, which was utilized by using Tedlar gas sampling bags as a constant volume batch reactor. For this purpose, gas phase adsorption of toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) on two types of activated carbons, BPL-bituminous base and OVC--coconut base, were investigated. For the single solute adsorption, the experimental adsorption data were found to be well correlated with Freundlich and Myers adsorption equations. The pore size distribution of adsorbents was found to affect their adsorption capacities; its effect was dependant on the solute concentration. The ternary adsorption experimental isotherms were accurately predicted by using the well-known model, i.e., ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST).

  15. Lattice model theory of the equation of state covering the gas, liquid, and solid phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Tanaka, T.; Chan, E. M.; Horiguchi, T.; Foreman, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The three stable states of matter and the corresponding phase transitions were obtained with a single model. Patterned after Lennard-Jones and Devonshires's theory, a simple cubic lattice model containing two fcc sublattices (alpha and beta) is adopted. The interatomic potential is taken to be the Lennard-Jones (6-12) potential. Employing the cluster variation method, the Weiss and the pair approximations on the lattice gas failed to give the correct phase diagrams. Hybrid approximations were devised to describe the lattice term in the free energy. A lattice vibration term corresponding to a free volume correction is included semi-phenomenologically. The combinations of the lattice part and the free volume part yield the three states and the proper phase diagrams. To determine the coexistence regions, the equalities of the pressure and Gibbs free energy per molecule of the coexisting phases were utilized. The ordered branch of the free energy gives rise to the solid phase while the disordered branch yields the gas and liquid phases. It is observed that the triple point and the critical point quantities, the phase diagrams and the coexistence regions plotted are in good agreement with the experimental values and graphs for argon.

  16. FIELD METHODS TO MEASURE CONTAMINANT REMOVAL EFFECTIVENESS OF GAS-PHASE AIR FILTRATION EQUIPMENT - PHASE 1: SEARCH OF LITERATURE AND PRIOR ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, Phase 1 of a two-phase research project, gives results of a literature search into the
    effectiveness of in-field gas-phase air filtration equipment (GPAFE) test methods, including required instrumentation and costs. GPAFE has been used in heating, ventilation, and ...

  17. Gas-phase metalloprotein complexes interrogated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faull, Peter A.; Korkeila, Karoliina E.; Kalapothakis, Jason M.; Gray, Andrew; McCullough, Bryan J.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase biomolecular structure may be explored through a number of analytical techniques. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) continues to prove itself as a sensitive and reliable bioanalytical tool for gas-phase structure determination due to intense study and development over the past 15 years. A vast amount of research interest, especially in protein and peptide conformational studies has generated a wealth of structural information for biological systems from small peptides to megadalton-sized biomolecules. In this work, linear low field IM-MS has been used to study gas-phase conformations and determine rotationally averaged collision cross-sections of three metalloproteins--cytochrome c, haemoglobin and calmodulin. Measurements have been performed on the MoQToF, a modified QToF 1 instrument (Micromass UK Ltd., Manchester, UK) modified in house. Gas-phase conformations and cross-sections of multimeric cytochrome c ions of the form [xM + nH+]n+ for x = 1-3 (monomer to trimer) have been successfully characterised and measured. We believe these to be the first reported collision cross-sections of higher order multimeric cytochrome c. Haemoglobin is investigated to obtain structural information on the associative mechanism of tetramer formation. Haemoglobin molecules, comprising apo- and holo-monomer chains, dimer and tetramer are transferred to the gas phase under a range of solution conditions. Structural information on the proposed critical intermediate, semi-haemoglobin, is reported. Cross-sections of the calcium binding protein calmodulin have been obtained under a range of calcium-bound conditions. Metalloprotein collision cross-sections from ion mobility measurements are compared with computationally derived values from published NMR and X-ray crystallography structural data. Finally we consider the change in the density of the experimentally measured rotationally averaged collision cross-section for compact geometries of the electrosprayed proteins.

  18. Conformations and spectroscopic properties of laccaic acid A in the gas phase and in implicit water.

    PubMed

    Dokmaisrijan, Supaporn; Payaka, Apirak; Tantishaiyakul, Vimon; Chairat, Montra; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2013-03-15

    Conformations and spectroscopic properties of laccaic acid A (lacA) were studied by means of the experimental and theoretical approaches. The minimum energy conformers of lacA in the gas phase and in implicit water obtained from the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculations displayed the same orientation of the COOH and OH groups on the anthraquinone-based component. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the COOH, C=O and OH groups are very strong. In contrast, the orientations of the Ph(OH)CH(2)CH(2)NHCOCH(3) substituent moiety on the anthraquinone-based component in the gas phase and in implicit water are completely different. The substituent prefers to bind with the anthraquinone-based component in the gas phase while it moves away from the anthraquinone-based component in implicit water. The calculated IR spectra of the two lowest-lying energy conformers of lacA in the gas phase fit to the experimental FTIR spectrum. The full assignments of the vibrational modes with the correlated vibrational wavenumbers of those conformers were proposed here, for the first time. The intramolecular H-bond formations in lacA can cause the shift of the vibrational wavenumber for the COOH, C=O, OH and NH groups as compared to the normal vibrations of these groups. The NMR spectra showed that the stabilities of the two lowest-lying energy conformers of lacA in the gas phase are comparable and this is consistent with their computational energies. The UV-Vis spectra of the lowest-lying energy conformers of lacA in implicit water were compared with the experimental UV-Vis spectrum. The calculations suggested that the electronic transition in the visible region involves with the singlet π→π(*) excitation which the electron density transfers to a COOH group on the anthraquinone ring.

  19. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  20. Computer code for gas-liquid two-phase vortex motions: GLVM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T. T.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program aimed at the phase separation between gas and liquid at zero gravity, induced by vortex motion, is developed. It utilizes an explicit solution method for a set of equations describing rotating gas-liquid flows. The vortex motion is established by a tangential fluid injection. A Lax-Wendroff two-step (McCormack's) numerical scheme is used. The program can be used to study the fluid dynamical behavior of the rotational two-phase fluids in a cylindrical tank. It provides a quick/easy sensitivity test on various parameters and thus provides the guidance for the design and use of actual physical systems for handling two-phase fluids.

  1. INTEGRATION OF PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION WITH AIR STRIPPING OF CONTAMINATED AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale laboratory studies and pilot scale studies in a simulated field-test situation were performed to evaluate the integration of gas-solid ultaviolet (UV) photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) downstream if an air stripper unit as a technology for cost-effectively treating water...

  2. Gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene over cobalt phosphide catalysts with different P contents.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, J A; Infantes-Molina, A; Rodríguez-Castellón, E; Jiménez-López, A

    2013-09-15

    The gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of chlorobenzene (CB) at atmospheric pressure was investigated over silica-supported cobalt and cobalt phosphide catalysts containing different P loading and a fixed amount of cobalt (5 wt.%). The effect of the initial P/Co molar ratio on the stoichiometry of the cobalt phosphide phase, the acidity and the hydrogen activation capability were discussed and these properties correlated with the catalytic activity. Catalytic results indicated that the cobalt phosphide phase is much more active than the monometallic cobalt one. The activity raised with the P content present in the sample due to the formation of the CoP phase instead of the Co₂P one, which favored the formation of hydrogen spillover species, increased the amount of weak acid sites and the number of exposed superficial cobalt atoms probably related to a better dispersion of the active phase. All the catalysts gave rise benzene as the main reaction product.

  3. Fluid Phase Separation (FPS) experiment for flight on a space shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Bruce; Wingo, Dennis; Bower, Mark; Amborski, Robert; Blount, Laura; Daniel, Alan; Hagood, Bob; Handley, James; Hediger, Donald; Jimmerson, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    The separation of fluid phases in microgravity environments is of importance to environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and materials processing in space. A successful fluid phase separation experiment will demonstrate a proof of concept for the separation technique and add to the knowledge base of material behavior. The phase separation experiment will contain a premixed fluid which will be exposed to a microgravity environment. After the phase separation of the compound has occurred, small samples of each of the species will be taken for analysis on the Earth. By correlating the time of separation and the temperature history of the fluid, it will be possible to characterize the process. The experiment has been integrated into space available on a manifested Get Away Special (GAS) experiment, CONCAP 2, part of the Consortium for Materials Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) Program, scheduled for STS-42. The design and the production of a fluid phase separation experiment for rapid implementation at low cost is presented.

  4. A generalized expression for lag-time in the gas-phase permeation of hollow tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. K.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Hamaker, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized expression for the nonsteady-state parameter, lag-time, has been obtained from Fick's second law for gas-phase transport through hollow, cylindrical membranes. This generalized expression is simplified for three limiting cases of practical interest: (1) diffusion controlled transport, (2) phase boundary reaction control at the inlet surface, and (3) phase boundary reaction control at the outlet surface. In all three cases the lag-time expressions were found to be inversely proportional only to the diffusion coefficient and functionally dependent on the membrane radii. Finally, the lag-time expressions were applied to experimentally obtained lag-time data for alpha-phase titanium and alpha-phase iron.

  5. LSPRAY: Lagrangian Spray Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing and Unstructured Gas-Phase Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Manthena S.

    1998-01-01

    Sprays occur in a wide variety of industrial and power applications and in the processing of materials. A liquid spray is a phase flow with a gas as the continuous phase and a liquid as the dispersed phase (in the form of droplets or ligaments). Interactions between the two phases, which are coupled through exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy, can occur in different ways at different times and locations involving various thermal, mass, and fluid dynamic factors. An understanding of the flow, combustion, and thermal properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray requires careful modeling of the rate-controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as other phenomena. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on sprays to unstructured grids and parallel computing. LSPRAY, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo probability density function (PDF) solver. The LSPRAY solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements in the gas-phase solvers. It is used specifically for fuel sprays within gas turbine combustors, but it has many other uses. The spray model used in LSPRAY provided favorable results when applied to stratified-charge rotary combustion (Wankel) engines and several other confined and unconfined spray flames. The source code will be available with the National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  6. Extended-Charge-Transfer Excitons in Crystalline Supramolecular Photocatalytic Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hestand, Nicholas J; Kazantsev, Roman V; Weingarten, Adam S; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I; Spano, Frank C

    2016-09-14

    Coupling among chromophores in molecular assemblies is responsible for phenomena such as resonant energy transfer and intermolecular charge transfer. These processes are central to the fields of organic photovoltaics and photocatalysis, where it is necessary to funnel energy or charge to specific regions within the system. As such, a fundamental understanding of these transport processes is essential for developing new materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications. Recently, photocatalytic systems based on photosensitizing perylene monomimide (PMI) chromophore amphiphiles were found to show variation in hydrogen gas (H2) production as a function of nanostructure crystallinity. The 2D crystalline systems form in aqueous electrolyte solution, which provides a high dielectric environment where the Coulomb potential between charges is mitigated. This results in relatively weakly bound excitons that are ideal for reducing protons. In order to understand how variations in crystalline structure affect H2 generation, two representative PMI systems are investigated theoretically using a modified Holstein Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian includes both molecular Frenkel excitations (FE) and charge-transfer excitations (CTE) coupled nonadiabatically to local intramolecular vibrations. Signatures of FE/CTE mixing and the extent of electron/hole separation are identified in the optical absorption spectrum and are found to correlate strongly to the observed H2 production rates. The absorption spectral signatures are found to sensitively depend on the relative phase between the electron and hole transfer integrals, as well as the diabatic energy difference between the Frenkel and CT exciton bands. Our analysis provides design rules for artificial photosynthetic systems based on organic chromophore arrays. PMID:27589150

  7. Study on photocatalytic degradation of several volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guo-Min; Cheng, Zhen-Xing; Chen, Hong; Li, Guo-Wen; Miao, Ting

    2006-02-01

    The gas-phase photolytic and photocatalytic reactions of several aromatics and chlorohydrocarbons were investigated. The experimental results revealed that chlorohydrocarbons like trichloroethylene, dichloromethane and chloroform could be degraded through either photolysis or photocatalysis under irradiation of germicidal lamp, and the elimination rate of chlorohydrocarbons through photolysis was quicker than that through photocatalysis. UV light from a germicidal lamp could directly lead to degradation of toluene but could hardly act on benzene. The photodegradation rate for these volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through photolysis followed an order: trichloroethylene>chloroform>dichloromethane>toluene>benzene>carbon tetrachloride, and through photocatalysis followed: trichloroethylene>chloroform>toluene>dichloromethane>benzene>carbon tetrachloride. Besides, a series of modified TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by depositing noble metal, doping with transition metal ion, recombining with metal oxides and modifying with super strong acid. Activity of these catalysts was examined upon photocatalytic degradation of benzene as a typical compound that was hard to be degraded. It indicated that these modification methods could promote the activity of TiO2 catalyst to different extent. The apparent zero-order reaction rate constant for degrading benzene over SnO2/TiO2 catalyst had the highest value, which was nearly three times as that over P25 TiO2. But it simultaneously had the lowest rate for mineralizing the objective compound. In spite that Fe3+/TiO2 catalyst behaved slightly less active than SnO2/TiO2 for degradation of benzene, the mineralization rate over Fe3+/TiO2 was the highest one among the prepared catalysts.

  8. Chemical models of interstellar gas-grain processes. II - The effect of grain-catalysed methane on gas phase evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Paul D.; Charnley, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    The effects on gas phase chemistry which result from the continuous desorption of methane molecules from grain surfaces are studied. Significant and sustained enhancements in the abundances of several complex hydrocarbon molecules are found, in good agreement with their observed values in TMC-1. The overall agreement is, however, just as good for the case of zero CH4 desorption efficiency. It is thus impossible to determine from the models whether or not the grain-surface production of methane is responsible for the observed abundances of some hydrocarbon molecules.

  9. Two-solvent method synthesis of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles embedded in SBA-15: Gas-sensing and photocatalytic properties study

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Peng; Zhang, Lili; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Liu, Xiansong; Wu, Mingzai

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: Different loadings of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica (sample S1, S2 and S3) show higher response to H{sub 2} at lower operating temperature than pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Two-solvent method is firstly used to synthesize SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica (SBA-15). • The SnO{sub 2}/SBA-15 nanocomposites show higher response to H{sub 2} at lower operating temperature than pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • The SnO{sub 2}/SBA-15 nanocomposites have higher photodegradation ability toward methylene blue than pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. - Abstract: Different loadings of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica (SBA-15) were prepared via a two-solvent method with the ordered hexagonal mesoporous structure of SBA-15 kept. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and N{sub 2} adsorption porosimetry were employed to characterize the nanocomposites. Compared with pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles, the SnO{sub 2}/SBA-15 nanocomposites show higher response to H{sub 2} at lower operating temperature. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SnO{sub 2}/SBA-15 for degradation of methylene blue was investigated under UV light irradiation and the results show that the SnO{sub 2}/SBA-15 nanocomposites have higher photodegradation ability toward methylene blue than pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  10. The role of gas phase reactions in the deflagration-to-detonation transition of high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.; Derr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The inadequacies of the two commonly used assumptions are shown, along with the need for considering gas phase reactions. Kinetic parameters that describe the gas phase reactions for several ingredients are provided, and the first steps in convective combustion leading to deflagration to detonation transition are described.

  11. The hydrothermal evolution of the phase and shape of ZnS nanostructures and their gas-sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pengfei; Gong, Guodong; Zhan, Fangyi; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Rong; Cao, Yali

    2016-02-14

    This work presents the evolution of the phase and shape of ZnS along the hydrothermal holding time or the dosage of the surfactant. The ZnS sensor obviously showed phase-/defect-dependent gas-sensing performances indicating that the wurtzite-type structure, as well the defect will improve its gas-sensing activities. PMID:26781594

  12. Visible Light-Driven Photocatalytic Activity of Oleic Acid-Coated TiO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized from Absolute Ethanol Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huihui; Liu, Bin; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Wang, Yuhua

    2015-10-01

    The one-step synthesis of oleic acid-coated TiO2 nanoparticles with visible light-driven photocatalytic activity was reported by this manuscript, using oleic acid-ethanol as crucial starting materials. The photocatalytic degradation of nitrogen monoxide (deNOx) in the gas phase was investigated in a continuous reactor using a series of TiO2 semiconductors, prepared from oleic acid- or acetic acid-ethanol solution. The surface modification on TiO2 by organic fatty acid, oleic acid, could reinvest TiO2 photocatalyst with the excellent visible light response. The deNOx ability is almost as high as 30 % destruction in the visible light region ( λ > 510 nm) which is similar to the nitrogen-doped TiO2. Meanwhile, acetic acid, a monobasic acid, has a weaker ability on visible light modification of TiO2.

  13. Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Ram S.; Shoham, Ovadia

    1999-10-28

    The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

  14. Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

    2001-01-10

    The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

  15. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  16. Gas-Phase Lasers - a Historical Perspective in Relation to the GEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Gerry

    1997-10-01

    Understanding of gas-phase lasers inevitably involves an expertise in many of the specialties of the GEC community - especially homogenous and heterogeneous kinetics, collision cross-sections, gas breakdown physics and fundamental swarm parameters. The GEC community decided early in the evolution of gas-phase lasers to include papers on this topic and the result was many years of contributions to the evolution of and improvement in our understanding of this important class of lasers. Many of the ground-breaking results in gas laser technology were presented at the GEC over the last 3 decades as the traditional rare-gas atomic physics and low-temperature plasma groups turned their attention to parameters of interest to the laser modelers and experimenters. This paper will trace the development of this field, especially as it pertained to the GEC. Some of the key results will be highlighted, together with some of the unpublished trivia and anecdotal incidents in order to capture the flavor of the rapid developments in the early days. The talk will include speculation as to the direction this field is taking, and some suggestions as to opportunities. This work supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy.

  17. Investigation of gas-phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) was begun during World War 2 to produce enriched uranium for defense purposes. These plants, which utilized UF{sub 6} gas, were used primarily for this purpose through 1964. From 1959 through 1968, production shifted primarily to uranium enrichment to supply the nuclear power industry. Additional UF{sub 6}-handling facilities were built in feed and fuel-processing plants associated with the uranium enrichment process. Two of the five process buildings at Oak ridge were shut down in 1964. Uranium enrichment activities at Oak Ridge were discontinued altogether in 1985. In 1987, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to proceed with a permanent shutdown of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). DOE intends to begin decommissioning and decontamination (D D) of ORGDP early in the next century. The remaining two GDPs are expected to be shut down during the next 10 to 40 years and will also require D D, as will the other UF{sub 6}-handling facilities. This paper presents an investigation of gas- phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping using powerful fluorinating reagents that convert nonvolatile uranium compounds to volatile UF{sub 6}. These reagents include ClF{sub 3}, F{sub 2}, and other compounds. The scope of D D at the GDPs, previous work of gas-phase decontamination, four concepts for using gas-phase decontamination, plans for further study of gas-phase decontamination, and the current status of this work are discussed. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Brauers, Theo; Häseler, Rolf; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank N.; Lohse, Insa; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important trace gas in the atmosphere due to its contribution to the cycles of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and hydrogen oxides (HOX). In the past decades, ground-based observations of HONO around the world showed much higher daytime concentrations than can be explained by the known gas-phase chemistry (i.e., HONO + hν → OH + NO, HONO + OH → NO2 + H2O, OH + NO + M → HONO + M). Different light-dependent reactions on ground surfaces have been proposed as additional daytime HONO sources. However, due to lack of measurements, little is known about the concentrations of HONO and its sources in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) at higher altitudes above the earth's surface. The airship Zeppelin NT is an ideal platform to investigate the chemistry and dynamics of the PBL. During the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012 and 2013, HONO and its gas-phase sources and sinks were measured simultaneously on-board the airship Zeppelin NT, for the lowest 1 km of the PBL. In the upper part of the altitude range during morning hours, when the airmass is still isolated from processes at the earth's surface by the remaining nocturnal boundary layer, we find unexpectedly large concentrations of HONO which can neither be explained by heterogeneous reactions on aerosol and ground surfaces, nor by known gas-phase reactions. Our observations show evidence for an unknown gas-phase light-dependent HONO production which dominates the overall HONO formation in the lower troposphere. This new HONO source requires NOX and possibly OH or HO2 radicals. As a result, the general impact of HONO on the OH formation is likely overestimated.

  19. Chemical mechanisms of photocatalytic de-soiling and de-polluting processes in indoor environments and urban surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleiman, M.; Rosseler, O.; Montesinos, N.; Litter, M.; Bikiel, D.; Kirchstetter, T.; Bluhm, H.; Ahmed, M.; Salmeron, M.; Destaillats, H.

    2013-12-01

    Photocatalysis has been postulated as a promising approach for the de-pollution of indoor air and urban atmospheres, and for self-cleaning surfaces. Building materials and coatings containing nano-sized TiO2 photocatalytic functionalities are gaining market share, including self-cleaning building envelope materials (coatings, mortar, plaster, architectural fabrics and tiles) and indoor air purifiers. While many studies have reported good performance of photocatalysis in the removal of organic pollutants from indoor air, more information is needed to understand secondary emissions of potentially harmful byproducts from photocatalytic air cleaners. This presentation will describe analytical methods and experimental results from room-sized chamber experiments using a realistic challenge VOC mixture at low ppb levels. We will also present results from separate studies that used synchrotron-based surface spectroscopic and mass spectrometric methods to better understand the photocatalytic mechanisms that regulate the de-soiling and de-polluting activity. Two photocatalytic processes were studied: de-noxification (NOx removal) and de-soiling (removal of deposited black carbon or soot). Ambient pressure XPS was used to study surface and gas-phase species formed during adsorption of NO2 on TiO2 and subsequent UV irradiation at λ = 365 nm. The results illustrate how NOx chemistry on TiO2 surfaces can be affected by the presence of water vapor, heteroatoms present as impurities, and carbonaceous soiling. The reactivity of NOx and NO3- on surfaces leads to reduced adsorbed and gas-phase nitrogenated species. These processes need to be considered in the engineering of depolluting materials and incorporated into atmospheric models. De-soiling properties were investigated by analyzing soot oxidation on TiO2 surfaces. Model soot samples were used as surrogates of urban grime. Using laser desorption coupled with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry synchrotron ionization, we

  20. Development of a highly controlled gas-phase nanoparticle generator for inhalation exposure studies.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, M; Riikonen, J; Tapper, U; Backman, U; Joutsensaari, J; Auvinen, A; Lehto, V P; Jokiniemi, J

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a gas-phase nanoparticle generator that produces stable and well-defined size distributions for TiO(2). The online analyses of the gas-phase compounds and total number concentration of the generated particles as well as the off-line analysis of the filter samples confirmed the stability of the production. The major advantage of this reactor is that the test substance is directly in the aerosol phase, and thus no preprocessing is needed. This eliminates the physicochemical changes between bulk and administrated material during storing or processing. This system is easy to adjust to different experimental setups and precursors. As a result, well-characterized nanomaterials for inhalation exposure studies can be produced. At mass concentration of 30 mg/Nm(3), the count mean diameter was 126 nm (geometric SD 1.6), mass mean diameter was 161 nm (2.0), mass median aerodynamic diameter was 125 nm, and the concentrations of harmful gas-phase by-products remained low. The produced powder consisted of crystals of anatase (77 vol%) and brookite (23 vol%), and its specific surface area was 69 m(2)/g.

  1. Risk Assessment Related to Atmospheric Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gas and Particle Phases near Industrial Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Noelia; Cuadras, Anna; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background: Inhalation is one of the main means of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because of their ubiquitous presence in the atmosphere. However, most studies have considered only PAHs found in the particle phase and have omitted the contribution of the gas-phase PAHs to the risk. Objective: We estimated the lifetime lung cancer risk from PAH exposure by inhalation in people living next to the largest chemical site in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area. Methods: We determined 18 PAHs in the atmospheric gas and particle phase. We monitored the PAHs for 1 year in three locations near the chemical site in different seasons. We used toxic equivalence factors to calculate benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) equivalents (BaP-eq) for individual PAHs and applied the World Health Organization unit risk (UR) for BaP (UR = 8.7 × 10–5) to estimate lifetime cancer risks due to PAH exposures. Results: We observed some spatial and seasonal variability in PAH concentrations. The contribution of gas-phase PAHs to the total BaP-eq value was between 34% and 86%. The total estimated average lifetime lung cancer risk due to PAH exposure in the study area was 1.2 × 10–4. Conclusions: The estimated risk was higher than values recommended by the World Health Organization and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency but lower than the threshold value of 10–3 that is considered an indication of definite risk according to similar risk studies. The results also showed that risk may be underestimated if the contributions of gas-phase PAHs are not considered. PMID:21478082

  2. PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C Millett; Anter El-Azab

    2011-01-01

    We present a phase-field model for inert gas bubble formation and evolution in irradiated metals. The model evolves vacancy, self-interstitial, and fission gas atoms through a coupled set of Cahn-Hilliard and Allen-Cahn equations, capturing the processes of defect generation, recombination, annihilation at GB sinks, as well as intragranular and intergranular bubble nucleation and growth in polycrystalline microstructures. Illustrative results are presented that characterize bubble growth and shrinkage, as well as the bubble density, size and nucleation rate as a function of varying irradiation conditions. Finally, intergranular bubble characteristics such as shape, pinning energy on GB motion, and bubble density are investigated.

  3. Gas-phase chemistry in dense interstellar clouds including grain surface molecular depletion and desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, E. A.; Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    We present time-dependent models of the chemical evolution of molecular clouds which include depletion of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces and desorption, as well as gas-phase interactions. We have included three mechanisms to remove species from the grain mantles: thermal evaporation, cosmic-ray-induced heating, and photodesorption. A wide range of parameter space has been explored to examine the abundance of species present both on the grain mantles and in the gas phase as a function of both position in the cloud (visual extinction) and of evolutionary state (time). The dominant mechanism that removes molecules from the grain mantles is cosmic-ray desorption. At times greater than the depletion timescale, the abundances of some simple species agree with abundances observed in the cold dark cloud TMC-1. Even though cosmic-ray desorption preserves the gas-phase chemistry at late times, molecules do show significant depletions from the gas phase. Examination of the dependence of depletion as a function of density shows that when the density increases from 10(exp 3)/cc to 10(exp 5)/cc several species including HCO(+), HCN, and CN show gas-phase abundance reductions of over an order of magnitude. The CO: H2O ratio in the grain mantles for our standard model is on the order of 10:1, in reasonable agreement with observations of nonpolar CO ice features in rho Ophiuchus and Serpens. We have also examined the interdependence of CO depletion with the space density of molecular hydrogen and binding energy to the grain surface. We find that the observed depletion of CO in Taurus in inconsistent with CO bonding in an H2O rich mantle, in agreement with observations. We suggest that if interstellar grains consist of an outer layer of CO ice, then the binding energies for many species to the grain mantle may be lower than commonly used, and a significant portion of molecular material may be maintained in the gas phase.

  4. Temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient: An application to predict indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjuan; Mandin, Corinne; Blanchard, Olivier; Mercier, Fabien; Pelletier, Maud; Le Bot, Barbara; Glorennec, Philippe; Ramalho, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    The indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be predicted from their respective concentrations in airborne particles by applying the particle/gas partitioning equilibrium. The temperature used for partitioning is often set to 25°C. However, indoor temperatures frequently differ from this reference value. This assumption may result in errors in the predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentrations. To improve the prediction model, the temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient must be addressed. In this paper, a theoretical relationship between the particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature was developed based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. The SVOC particle/gas partition coefficients predicted by employing the derived theoretical relationship agree well with the experimental data retrieved from the literature (R>0.93). The influence of temperature on the equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration was quantified by a dimensionless analysis of the derived relationship between the SVOC particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature. The predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration decreased by between 31% and 53% when the temperature was lowered by 6°C, while it increased by up to 750% when the indoor temperature increased from 15°C to 30°C.

  5. Temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient: An application to predict indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjuan; Mandin, Corinne; Blanchard, Olivier; Mercier, Fabien; Pelletier, Maud; Le Bot, Barbara; Glorennec, Philippe; Ramalho, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    The indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be predicted from their respective concentrations in airborne particles by applying the particle/gas partitioning equilibrium. The temperature used for partitioning is often set to 25°C. However, indoor temperatures frequently differ from this reference value. This assumption may result in errors in the predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentrations. To improve the prediction model, the temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient must be addressed. In this paper, a theoretical relationship between the particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature was developed based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. The SVOC particle/gas partition coefficients predicted by employing the derived theoretical relationship agree well with the experimental data retrieved from the literature (R>0.93). The influence of temperature on the equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration was quantified by a dimensionless analysis of the derived relationship between the SVOC particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature. The predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration decreased by between 31% and 53% when the temperature was lowered by 6°C, while it increased by up to 750% when the indoor temperature increased from 15°C to 30°C. PMID:27152992

  6. Initiation of the ice phase by marine biogenic surfaces in supersaturated gas and supercooled aqueous phases.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Peter A; Aller, Josephine Y; Knopf, Daniel A

    2011-11-28

    Biogenic particles have the potential to affect the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere with subsequent consequences for the hydrological cycle and climate. We present laboratory observations of heterogeneous ice nucleation in immersion and deposition modes under atmospherically relevant conditions initiated by Nannochloris atomus and Emiliania huxleyi, marine phytoplankton with structurally and chemically distinct cell walls. Temperatures at which freezing, melting, and water uptake occur are observed using optical microscopy. The intact and fragmented unarmoured cells of N. atomus in aqueous NaCl droplets enhance ice nucleation by 10-20 K over the homogeneous freezing limit and can be described by a modified water activity based ice nucleation approach. E. huxleyi cells covered by calcite plates do not enhance droplet freezing temperatures. Both species nucleate ice in the deposition mode at an ice saturation ratio, S(ice), as low as ~1.2 and below 240 K, however, for each, different nucleation modes occur at warmer temperatures. These observations show that markedly different biogenic surfaces have both comparable and contrasting effects on ice nucleation behaviour depending on the presence of the aqueous phase and the extent of supercooling and water vapour supersaturation. We derive heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, J(het), and cumulative ice nuclei spectra, K, for quantification and analysis using time-dependent and time-independent approaches, respectively. Contact angles, α, derived from J(het)via immersion freezing depend on T, a(w), and S(ice). For deposition freezing, α can be described as a function of S(ice) only. The different approaches yield different predictions of atmospheric ice crystal numbers primarily due to the time evolution allowed for the time-dependent approach with implications for the evolution of mixed-phase and ice clouds.

  7. Source reconciliation of atmospheric gas-phase and particle-phase pollutants during a severe photochemical smog episode.

    PubMed

    Schauer, James J; Fraser, Matthew P; Cass, Glen R; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2002-09-01

    A comprehensive organic compound-based receptor model is developed that can simultaneously apportion the source contributions to atmospheric gas-phase organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, fine particle organic compounds, and fine particle mass. The model is applied to ambient data collected at four sites in the south coast region of California during a severe summertime photochemical smog episode, where the model determines the direct primary contributions to atmospheric pollutants from 11 distinct air pollution source types. The 11 sources included in the model are gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, whole gasoline vapors, gasoline headspace vapors, organic solvent vapors, whole diesel fuel, paved road dust, tire wear debris, meat cooking exhaust, natural gas leakage, and vegetative detritus. Gasoline engine exhaust plus whole gasoline vapors are the predominant sources of volatile organic gases, while gasoline and diesel engine exhaust plus diesel fuel vapors dominate the emissions of semivolatile organic compounds from these sources during the episode studied at all four air monitoring sites. The atmospheric fine particle organic compound mass was composed of noticeable contributions from gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, meat cooking, and paved road dust with smaller but quantifiable contributions from vegetative detritus and tire wear debris. In addition, secondary organic aerosol, which is formed from the low-vapor pressure products of gas-phase chemical reactions, is found to be a major source of fine particle organic compound mass under the severe photochemical smog conditions studied here. The concentrations of secondary organic aerosol calculated in the present study are compared with previous fine particle source apportionment results for less intense photochemical smog conditions. It is shown that estimated secondary organic aerosol concentrations correlate fairly well with the

  8. A Chain of Modeling Tools For Gas and Aqueous Phase Chemstry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audiffren, N.; Djouad, R.; Sportisse, B.

    Atmospheric chemistry is characterized by the use of large set of chemical species and reactions. Handling with the set of data required for the definition of the model is a quite difficult task. We prsent in this short article a preprocessor for diphasic models (gas phase and aqueous phase in cloud droplets) named SPACK. The main interest of SPACK is the automatic generation of lumped species related to fast equilibria. We also developped a linear tangent model using the automatic differentiation tool named ODYSSEE in order to perform a sensitivity analysis of an atmospheric multi- phase mechanism based on RADM2 kinetic scheme.Local sensitivity coefficients are computed for two different scenarii. We focus in this study on the sensitivity of the ozone,NOx,HOx, system with respect to some aqueous phase reactions and we inves- tigate the influence of the reduction in the photolysis rates in the area below the cloud region.

  9. Gas phase chemical studies of superheavy elements using the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator - Stopping range determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittwer, D.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Aksenov, N. V.; Albin, Yu. V.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Dressler, R.; Eichler, R.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Henderson, R. A.; Hübener, S.; Kenneally, J. M.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Lobanov, Yu. V.; Moody, K. J.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Petrushkin, O. V.; Polyakov, A. N.; Piguet, D.; Rasmussen, P.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Serov, A.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Shishkin, S. V.; Sukhov, A. M.; Stoyer, M. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Vostokin, G. K.; Wegrzecki, M.; Wilk, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, gas phase chemistry experiments with heaviest elements are usually performed with the gas-jet technique with the disadvantage that all reaction products are collected in a gas-filled thermalisation chamber adjacent to the target. The incorporation of a physical preseparation device between target and collection chamber opens up the perspective to perform new chemical studies. But this approach requires detailed knowledge of the stopping force (STF) of the heaviest elements in various materials. Measurements of the energy loss of mercury (Hg), radon (Rn), and nobelium (No) in Mylar and argon (Ar) were performed at low kinetic energies of around (40-270) keV per nucleon. The experimentally obtained values were compared with STF calculations of the commonly used program for calculating stopping and ranges of ions in matter (SRIM). Using the obtained data points an extrapolation of the STF up to element 114, eka-lead, in the same stopping media was carried out. These estimations were applied to design and to perform a first chemical experiment with a superheavy element behind a physical preseparator using the nuclear fusion reaction 244Pu( 48Ca; 3n) 289114. One decay chain assigned to an atom of 285112, the α-decay product of 289114, was observed.

  10. Single-shot gas-phase thermometry by time-to-frequency mapping of coherence dephasing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Orin; Bremer, Marshall T; Pestov, Dmitry; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh; Dantus, Marcos

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate a single-beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) technique for gas-phase thermometry that assesses the species-specific local gas temperature by single-shot time-to-frequency mapping of Raman-coherence dephasing. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed with air in a temperature-controlled gas cell. Impulsive excitation of molecular vibrations by an ultrashort pump/Stokes pulse is followed by multipulse probing of the 2330 cm(-1) Raman transition of N(2). This sequence of colored probe pulses, delayed in time with respect to each other and corresponding to three isolated spectral bands, imprints the coherence dephasing onto the measured CARS spectrum. For calibration purposes, the dephasing rates are recorded at various gas temperatures, and the relationship is fitted to a linear regression. The calibration data are then used to determine the gas temperature and are shown to provide better than 15 K accuracy. The described approach is insensitive to pulse energy fluctuations and can, in principle, gauge the temperature of multiple chemical species in a single laser shot, which is deemed particularly valuable for temperature profiling of reacting flows in gas-turbine combustors.

  11. Single-shot gas-phase thermometry by time-to-frequency mapping of coherence dephasing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Orin; Bremer, Marshall T; Pestov, Dmitry; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh; Dantus, Marcos

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate a single-beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) technique for gas-phase thermometry that assesses the species-specific local gas temperature by single-shot time-to-frequency mapping of Raman-coherence dephasing. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed with air in a temperature-controlled gas cell. Impulsive excitation of molecular vibrations by an ultrashort pump/Stokes pulse is followed by multipulse probing of the 2330 cm(-1) Raman transition of N(2). This sequence of colored probe pulses, delayed in time with respect to each other and corresponding to three isolated spectral bands, imprints the coherence dephasing onto the measured CARS spectrum. For calibration purposes, the dephasing rates are recorded at various gas temperatures, and the relationship is fitted to a linear regression. The calibration data are then used to determine the gas temperature and are shown to provide better than 15 K accuracy. The described approach is insensitive to pulse energy fluctuations and can, in principle, gauge the temperature of multiple chemical species in a single laser shot, which is deemed particularly valuable for temperature profiling of reacting flows in gas-turbine combustors. PMID:22747235

  12. The nature of interfaces and charge trapping sites in photocatalytic mixed-phase TiO{sub 2} from first principles modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Juan C.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Nolan, Michael

    2015-01-14

    Mixed phase rutile/anatase catalysts show increased reactivity compared with the pure phases alone. However, the mechanism causing this effect is not fully understood. The electronic properties of the interface and the relative energy of the electron in each phase play a key role in lowering the rate of recombination of electron hole pairs. Using density functional theory and the +U correction, we calculated the bands offsets between the phases taking into account the effect of the interface. Our model included several thousands atoms, and thus is a good representation of an interface between actual nanoparticles. We found rutile to have both higher conduction and valence band offsets than rutile, leading to an accumulation of electrons in the anatase phase accompanied by hole accumulation in the rutile phase. We also probed the electronic structure of our heterostructure and found a gap state caused by electrons localized in undercoordinated Ti atoms which were present within the interfacial region. Interfaces between bulk materials and between exposed surfaces both showed electron trapping at undercoordinated sites. These undercoordinated (typically four) atoms present localized electrons that could enable reduction reactions in the interfacial region, and could explain the increased reactivity of mixed-phase TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst materials.

  13. Determination of local values of gas and liquid mass flux in highly loaded two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burick, R. J.; Scheuerman, C. H.; Falk, A. Y.

    1974-01-01

    A measurement system using a deceleration probe was designed for determining the local values of gas and liquid mass flux in various gas/liquid droplet sprayfields. The system was used to characterize two-phase flowfields generated by gas/liquid rocket-motor injectors. Measurements were made at static pressures up to 500 psia and injected mass flow ratios up to 20. The measurement system can also be used at higher pressures and in gas/solid flowfields.

  14. Gas phase NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine. Environmental effects on kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; Leung, Doris Y.; True, Nancy S.

    1984-04-01

    Gas phase 1H NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine are consistent with first order chemical exchange rate constants which are ca. 25 times faster than those observed in neat liquids at corresponding temperatures. The associated kinetic parameters: Eact(∞), 20.5(1.1) kcal mol -1, Δ H‡, 19.7(1.0) kcal mol -1 and Δ G‡, 21.1(0.4) kcal mol -1 are approximately 2.5 kcal mol -1 lower than the most recently reported values for the neat liquid. The observed phase dependence is consistent with a process proceeding via a freely rotating transition state.

  15. Fluorometric method for the determination of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Gregory L.; Lazrus, Allan L.

    1986-12-01

    The fluorometric gas-phase hydrogen peroxide procedure is based on the technique used by Lazrus et. al. for the determination of H2O2 in the liquid phase. The analytical method utilizes the reaction of H2O2 with horseradish peroxidase and p-hydroxphenylacetic acid (POPHA) to form the fluorescent dimer of POPHA. The analytical reaction responds stoichiometrically to both H2O2 and some organic hydroperoxides. To discriminate H2O2 from organic hydroperoxides, catalase is used to preferentially destroy H2O2. Using a dual-channel flow system the H2O2 concentration is determined by difference.

  16. Fluorometric method for the determination of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Gregory L.; Lazrus, Allan L.

    1986-01-01

    The fluorometric gas-phase hydrogen peroxide procedure is based on the technique used by Lazrus et. al. for the determination of H2O2 in the liquid phase. The analytical method utilizes the reaction of H2O2 with horseradish peroxidase and p-hydroxphenylacetic acid (POPHA) to form the fluorescent dimer of POPHA. The analytical reaction responds stoichiometrically to both H2O2 and some organic hydroperoxides. To discriminate H2O2 from organic hydroperoxides, catalase is used to preferentially destroy H2O2. Using a dual-channel flow system the H2O2 concentration is determined by difference.

  17. Gas phase infrared spectra from quasi-classical Kubo time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutier, J.; Vuilleumier, R.; Bonella, S.; Ciccotti, G.

    2015-09-01

    We generalise the recently developed phase integration method (PIM) to obtain a computable approximation of the Kubo expression for quantum time correlation functions. Our scheme combines exact sampling of the quantum thermal density with classical dynamics to provide a quasi-classical approximation for the correlation function. The method will be specialised to the evaluation of the momentum autocorrelation function, with the goal to compute infrared spectra of simple molecules in the gas phase. Application to two simple but interesting benchmark systems shows that the approach is accurate and stable over a broad range of temperatures.

  18. Finite-momentum superfluidity and phase transitions in a p-wave resonant Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungsoo; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2011-10-15

    We study a degenerate two-species gas of bosonic atoms interacting through a p-wave Feshbach resonance as, for example, realized in a {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture. We show that, in addition to a conventional atomic and a p-wave molecular spinor-1 superfluidity at large positive and negative detunings, respectively, the system generically exhibits a finite-momentum atomic-molecular superfluidity at intermediate detuning around the unitary point. We analyze the detailed nature of the corresponding phases and the associated quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  19. Finite-momentum superfluidity and phase transitions in a p-wave resonant Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungsoo; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2011-10-01

    We study a degenerate two-species gas of bosonic atoms interacting through a p-wave Feshbach resonance as, for example, realized in a 85Rb-87Rb mixture. We show that, in addition to a conventional atomic and a p-wave molecular spinor-1 superfluidity at large positive and negative detunings, respectively, the system generically exhibits a finite-momentum atomic-molecular superfluidity at intermediate detuning around the unitary point. We analyze the detailed nature of the corresponding phases and the associated quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  20. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2012-05-29

    The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

  1. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  2. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xianlong; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Tosi, M. P.; Fazio, Rosario; Campo, V. L. Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern.

  3. Polar Effects Control the Gas-phase Reactivity of Charged para-Benzyne Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wittrig, Ashley M.; Archibold, Enada F.; Sheng, Huaming; Nash, John J.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2014-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of charged para-benzynes is entirely unexplored as they and/or their precursors tend to undergo ring-opening upon their generation. We report here a gas-phase reactivity study of two such benzynes, the 2,5-didehydropyridinium and 5,8-didehydroisoquinolinium cations, generated in a modified dual-linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer. Both biradicals were found to form diagnostic products with organic molecules, indicating the presence of two radical sites. As opposed to earlier predictions that the singlet-triplet (S-T) splitting controls the radical reactivity of such species, the 2,5-didehydropyridinium cation reacts much faster in spite of its larger S-T splitting. Calculated vertical electron affinities of the radical sites of the para-benzynes, a parameter related to the polarity of the transition states of their reactions, appears to be the most important reactivity controlling factor. PMID:25838787

  4. Counting basic sites in oligopeptides via gas-phase ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    Cations derived from oligopeptides ranging from laminin fragment (5 residues) to {beta}-lactoglobulin (162 residues) have been subjected to gas-phase ion/molecule reactions with hydroiodic acid. The sum of the ion charge state and the maximum number of molecules of hydroiodic acid that attach to the ion is equal to the total number of lysines, arginines, histidines, and N-termini consisting of a primary amine for ions derived from all 21 oligopeptides studied. These results suggest that ion/molecule reactions can provide useful information regarding oligopeptide basic site number, which might be used as a criterion for searching protein data bases instead of, or in conjunction with, use of proteolytic digestion or gas-phase ion dissociation procedures. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  6. Formation of organic acids from the gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene was studied in static chamber experiments using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. Two isomers of C(7)-diacids and three isomers of C(7)-aldehydic acids were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Possible mechanisms of formation of these acids were investigated using different OH radical scavengers and relative humidities, and were compared to those reported earlier for the ozonolysis of beta-pinene. In addition, branching ratios for some of the individual reaction steps, e.g. the branching ratio between the two hydroperoxide channels of the C(7)-CI, were deduced from the quantitative product yield data. Branching ratios for POZ decomposition and the stabilisation/decomposition of the C(7-)CI were also obtained from measurements of the C(7) primary carbonyl product. PMID:19458821

  7. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianlong, Gao; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario; Tosi, M. P.; Campo, V. L., Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern.

  8. Unusual hydroxyl migration in the fragmentation of β-alanine dication in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Maclot, Sylvain; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Huber, Bernd A; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-07-14

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fragmentation of doubly positively charged β-alanine molecules in the gas phase. The dissociation of the produced dicationic molecules, induced by low-energy ion collisions, is analysed by coincidence mass spectrometric techniques; the coupling with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations allows rationalisation of the experimental observations. The present strategy gives deeper insights into the chemical mechanisms of multiply charged amino acids in the gas phase. In the case of the β-alanine dication, in addition to the expected Coulomb explosion and hydrogen migration processes, we have found evidence of hydroxyl-group migration, which leads to unusual fragmentation products, such as hydroxymethyl cation, and is necessary to explain some of the observed dominant channels.

  9. Development of a gas-phase stereochemical protocol. Intrinsic diastereoselectivity in hydride reductions of cyclohexanones

    SciTech Connect

    Yeunghaw Ho; Squires, R.R. )

    1992-12-30

    A common feature of classical, intuitive models and modern molecular orbital-based theories for diastereoselectivity in ketone reduction reactions is an emphasis on the structural and electronic properties of the substrate, despite the fact that the stereochemical outcome of these reactions often displays marked sensitivity to the solvent and the type of counter-ion employed with ionic and polar reducing agents. One way to separate intrinsic and extrinsic effects on the stereochemistry of ketone reduction reactions is to examine them in the gas phase, where solvent and counterion effects are absent. The authors describe here an experimental method for distinguishing the diastereomeric products of gas-phase hydride reduction reactions, and its application in determining the intrinsic diastereoselectivity involved in reductions of alkyl-substituted cyclohexanones. 1 tab.

  10. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres. PMID:26263321

  11. Methods and apparatus for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides methods for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers in an electrochemical cell having a cation exchange membrane in intimate contact with the anode and cathode. The electrochemical conversion of cathodic depolarizers at the cathode lowers the cell potential necessary to achieve a desired electrochemical conversion, such as ozone evolution, at the anode. When gaseous cathodic depolarizers, such as oxygen, are used, a gas diffusion cathode having the cation exchange membrane bonded thereto is preferred. When liquid phase cathodic depolarizers are used, the cathode may be a flow-by electrode, flow-through electrode, packed-bed electrode or a fluidized-bed electrode in intimate contact with the cation exchange membrane.

  12. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres.

  13. Multifunctional acid formation from the gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-pinene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2008-10-28

    The gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-pinene was studied in static chamber experiments, using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. A range of multifunctional organic acids-including pinic acid, norpinic acid, pinalic-3-acid, pinalic-4-acid, norpinalic acid and OH-pinalic acid-were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Formation yields for these products under systematically varying reaction conditions (by adding different OH radical scavengers and Criegee intermediate scavengers) were investigated and compared with those observed from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, allowing detailed information on product formation mechanisms to be elucidated. In addition, branching ratios for the initial steps of the reaction were inferred from quantitative measurements of primary carbonyl formation. Atmospheric implications of this work are discussed.

  14. Mass-independent oxygen isotopic partitioning during gas-phase SiO2 formation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Yanchulova, Petia; Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-25

    Meteorites contain a wide range of oxygen isotopic compositions that are interpreted as heterogeneity in solar nebula. The anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions of refractory mineral phases may reflect a chemical fractionation process in the nebula, but there are no experiments to demonstrate this isotope effect during particle formation through gas-phase reactions. We report experimental results of gas-to-particle conversion during oxidation of silicon monoxide that define a mass-independent line (slope one) in oxygen three-isotope space of (18)O/(16)O versus (17)O/(16)O. This mass-independent chemical reaction is a potentially initiating step in nebular meteorite formation, which would be capable of producing silicate reservoirs with anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions. PMID:24159043

  15. Gas-Phase Femtosecond Particle Spectroscopy: A Bottom-Up Approach to Nucleotide Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavros, Vasilios G.; Verlet, Jan R. R.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize how gas-phase ultrafast charged-particle spectroscopy has been used to provide an understanding of the photophysics of DNA building blocks. We focus on adenine and discuss how, following UV excitation, specific interactions determine the fates of its excited states. The dynamics can be probed using a systematic bottom-up approach that provides control over these interactions and that allows ever-larger complexes to be studied. Starting from a chromophore in adenine, the excited state decay mechanisms of adenine and chemically substituted or clustered adenine are considered and then extended to adenosine mono-, di-, and trinucleotides. We show that the gas-phase approach can offer exquisite insight into the dynamics observed in aqueous solution, but we also highlight stark differences. An outlook is provided that discusses some of the most promising developments in this bottom-up approach.

  16. Gas-Phase Femtosecond Particle Spectroscopy: A Bottom-Up Approach to Nucleotide Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stavros, Vasilios G; Verlet, Jan R R

    2016-05-27

    We summarize how gas-phase ultrafast charged-particle spectroscopy has been used to provide an understanding of the photophysics of DNA building blocks. We focus on adenine and discuss how, following UV excitation, specific interactions determine the fates of its excited states. The dynamics can be probed using a systematic bottom-up approach that provides control over these interactions and that allows ever-larger complexes to be studied. Starting from a chromophore in adenine, the excited state decay mechanisms of adenine and chemically substituted or clustered adenine are considered and then extended to adenosine mono-, di-, and trinucleotides. We show that the gas-phase approach can offer exquisite insight into the dynamics observed in aqueous solution, but we also highlight stark differences. An outlook is provided that discusses some of the most promising developments in this bottom-up approach.

  17. Imaging molecular structure through femtosecond photoelectron diffraction on aligned and oriented gas-phase molecules.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzée, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus; Anielski, Denis; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Bomme, Cédric; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Niccola; De, Sankar; Decleva, Piero; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Filsinger, Frank; Foucar, Lutz; Gorkhover, Tais; Gumprecht, Lars; Hömke, André; Holmegaard, Lotte; Johnsson, Per; Kienitz, Jens S; Kierspel, Thomas; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Moshammer, Robert; Müller, Nele L M; Rudek, Benedikt; Savelyev, Evgeny; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Scholz, Frank; Schorb, Sebastian; Schulz, Joachim; Seltmann, Jörn; Stener, Mauro; Stern, Stephan; Techert, Simone; Thøgersen, Jan; Trippel, Sebastian; Viefhaus, Jens; Vrakking, Marc; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Küpper, Jochen; Ullrich, Joachim; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray free-electron laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C(8)H(5)F) and dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C(6)H(4)Br(2)) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.

  18. Gas-Phase Synthesis of 1-Silacyclopenta-2,4-diene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Dangi, Beni B; Thomas, Aaron M; Sun, Bing-Jian; Chou, Tzu-Jung; Chang, Agnes H H; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2016-07-01

    Silole (1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene) was synthesized for the first time by the bimolecular reaction of the simplest silicon-bearing radical, silylidyne (SiH), with 1,3-butadiene (C4 H6 ) in the gas phase under single-collision conditions. The absence of consecutive collisions of the primary reaction product prevents successive reactions of the silole by Diels-Alder dimerization, thus enabling the clean gas-phase synthesis of this hitherto elusive cyclic species from acyclic precursors in a single-collision event. Our method opens up a versatile and unconventional path to access a previously rather obscure class of organosilicon molecules (substituted siloles), which have been difficult to access through classical synthetic methods.

  19. Decay of the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-06-01

    We establish the optimal {Lp-L2(1 ≤ p < 6/5)} time decay rates of the solution to the Cauchy problem for the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model and analyze the influences of the damping on the qualitative behaviors of solution. Compared with the viscous liquid-gas two-phase flow model (Zhang and Zhu in J Differ Equ 258:2315-2338, 2015), our results imply that the friction effect of the damping is stronger than the dissipation effect of the viscosities and enhances the decay rate of the velocity. Our proof is based on Hodge decomposition technique, the {Lp-L2} estimates for the linearized equations and an elaborate energy method.

  20. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  1. Velocity phase encoded MRI of gas flow in the acoustic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Geoffrey

    This thesis explores the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study acoustic oscillations of a gas in a cylindrical tube. It describes experiments performed under conditions where the gas is in the Acoustic Viscous Boundary Layer and its flow is laminar. Velocity maps acquired at discrete phases of the acoustic oscillation are presented, and are compared with thermoacoustic theory. This represents the first time that such information has been obtained using MRI. An important component of the work reported in this thesis involves the design, construction, and characterization of an acousto-mechanical resonator (AMR). This device can drive oscillatory gas motion and impose density variations at rates that are compatible with MRI data acquisition. To date it has been operated at frequencies ranging from 0.7 Hz to 1.65 Hz and with peak gas displacement amplitudes of up to 2.5 cm. The AMR is based on a modular design intended to permit the study of acoustic flow through a variety of different structures and under a variety of different conditions. MRI experiments were performed on a mixture of thermally-polarized 3He and O2. The latter is used to increase the 3He longitudinal nuclear relaxation rate T1 --1 to a value comparable to the acoustic frequency. In turn, measurements of T1 --1 provide a means for determining the precise composition of the gas mixture. Velocity phase-encoding techniques were then used to map acoustic flow fields: A bipolar magnetic field gradient pulse inserted into the imaging sequence stores velocity information in the phase of the complex image data. The MRI pulse sequence is synchronized with the periodic motion of the gas so that the velocity measurement can be performed at discrete and well-defined phases of the acoustic cycle. These non-invasive flow imaging experiments provide information that is complementary to that which can be obtained from other gas velocity probes, and may lead to new opportunities in the study of acoustic

  2. Automated Resistivity Monitoring of Free Phase Gas Dynamics in a Northern Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, N.; Slater, L. D.; Sharma, S.; Lewis, E.; Comas, X.; Schafer, K. V.; Reeve, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Peatlands are sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide, yet release large amounts of methane to the atmosphere. The net effect of this interchange is not well understood. Some conceptual models indicate steady diffusion and ebullition of methane from shallow peat dominates atmospheric fluxes, while others suggest episodic ebullition events from deep peat dominate methane emissions. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of various geophysical techniques to monitor changes in free phase gas content in peat. To better understand the mechanisms of free phase gas production in peat, we have established an autonomous DC resistivity monitoring system as part of the second year of a multi-scale, multi-method study within Caribou Bog, an ombotrophic patterned peatland located in Maine. DC resistivity is a readily automated imaging method, well suited for long-term studies of free phase gas dynamics below ground. Assuming negligible variation in fluid conductivity, changes in resistivity can be attributed to increases or decreases in gas content. Our system gathers data at approximately 4-hour intervals on a grid of 72 electrodes at 1.5 m separations and covering an area of 336 m^2. Full reciprocal datasets are also recorded for error analysis. Four vertical electrode arrays were installed from zero to 6 m depth within the grid and sampled multiple times daily over a period of 2 weeks using a Wenner configuration for validation of inversion results. To help identify forcing mechanisms on gas release, temperature, pressure, and pore fluid specific conductance are continuously recorded from sensors at various depths within the study area. Using a differencing inversion scheme, we identified small but significant changes in resistivity over time in response to gas build up, redistribution and release. These changes were particularly notable in the upper peat, where our models show localized shifts in resistivity of over 25% within one day. In addition, vertical radar profiles

  3. 3-D Numerical Simulation for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Aeration Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, R.; Tian, R.; Yan, S. Y.; Li, S.

    In the crafts of activated sludge treatment, oxygen supply and the suspending state of activated sludge are primary factors to keep biochemistry process carrying on normally. However, they are all controlled by aeration. So aeration is crucial. The paper focus on aeration, use CFD software to simulate the field of aeration tank which is designed by sludge load method. The main designed size of aeration tank is: total volume: 20 000 m3; corridor width: 8m; total length of corridors: 139m; number of corridors: 3; length of one single corridor: 48m; effective depth: 4.5m; additional depth: 0.5m. According to the similarity theory, a geometrical model is set up in proportion of 10:1. The way of liquid flow is submerge to avoid liquid flow out directly. The grid is plotted by dividing the whole computational area into two parts. The bottom part which contains gas pipe and gas exit hole and the above part which is the main area are plotted by tetrahedron and hexahedron respectively. In boundary conditions, gas is defined as the primary-phase, and liquid is defined as the secondary-phase. Choosing mixture model, two-phase flow field of aeration tank is simulated by solved the Continuity equation for the mixture, Momentum equation for the mixture, Volume fraction equation for the secondary phases and Relative velocity formula when gas velocity is 10m/s, 20m/s, 30m/s. what figure shows is the contour of velocity magnitude for the mixture phase when gas velocity is 20m/s. Through analysis, the simulation tendency is agreed with actual running of aeration tank. It is feasible to use mixture model to simulate flow field of aeration tank by fluent software. According to the simulation result, the better velocity of liquid or gas (the quantity of inlet air) can be chosen by lower cost, and also the performance of aeration tank can be forecast. It will be helpful for designing and operation.

  4. Simulation of a turbulent spray flame using coupled PDF gas phase and spray flamelet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Hai-Wen; Gutheil, Eva

    2008-04-15

    A joint mixture fraction-enthalpy probability density function (PDF) is proposed for the simulation of turbulent spray flames. The PDF transport equation is deduced and modeled. The interaction-by-exchange-with-the-mean (IEM) model that has been developed for gas-phase flows is extended to describe molecular mixing in nonreactive and reactive spray flows. The joint PDF transport equation is solved by a hybrid finite-volume and Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. Standard spray and turbulence models are used to describe the gas phase and the liquid phase. A turbulent methanol/air spray flame is simulated using the present method. Detailed chemistry is implemented through the spray flamelet model. The precalculated spray flamelet library for methanol/air combustion comprises 23 species and 168 elementary reactions. Thus, the model is capable of predicting the formation of radicals and of pollutants. Different values for the model constant C{sub {phi}} in the IEM model are tested. The numerical results for the gas velocity, the gas temperature, and the mass fraction of methanol vapor are compared with experimental data in the literature. Good agreement with experiment is obtained when C{sub {phi}}=2.0. Marginal PDFs of mixture fraction, enthalpy, and gas temperature are presented. The computed PDFs of mixture fraction are compared with the presumed standard {beta} function and modified {beta} function. The results show that the standard {beta} function fails to reproduce bimodal shapes observed in transported PDF computation, while the modified {beta} function, fits the computed PDFs very well. Moreover, joint PDFs of mixture fraction and enthalpy are presented and analyzed. The enthalpy and mixture fraction are strongly correlated. The samples that deviate from the linear correlation are due to the energy consumption of local spray evaporation. (author)

  5. Photoisomerization action spectroscopy of the carbocyanine dye DTC+ in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Brian D; Coughlan, Neville J A; da Silva, Gabriel; Bieske, Evan J

    2013-12-19

    Molecular photoisomerization plays a crucial role in diverse biological and technological contexts. Here, we combine ion mobility spectrometry and laser spectroscopy to characterize the photoisomerization of molecular cations in the gas phase. The target molecular ions, polymethine dye cations 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine (DTC(+)), are propelled through helium buffer gas by an electric field and are photoisomerized by light from a tunable laser. Photoexcitation over the 450-570 nm range converts trans-DTC(+) to cis-DTC(+), noticeably modifying the ions' arrival time distribution. The photoisomerization action spectrum, which has a maximum at 535 nm, resembles the absorption spectrum of DTC(+) in solution but is shifted 25 nm to shorter wavelength. Comparisons between measured and calculated mobilities suggest that the photoisomer involves a twist about the second C-C bond in the methine chain (8,9-cis isomer) rather than a twist about the first methine C-C bond (2,8-cis isomer). It is postulated that the excited gas-phase ions internally convert from the S1 Franck-Condon region to the S0 manifold and explore the conformational landscape as they cool through He buffer gas collisions. Master equation simulations of the relaxation process in the S0 manifold suggest that the 8,9-cis isomer is preferred over the 2,8-cis isomer because it lies lower in energy and because it is separated from the trans isomer by a substantially higher barrier. The study demonstrates that the photoisomerization of molecular ions can be probed selectively in the gas phase, providing insights into photoisomerization mechanisms and information on the solvent-free absorption spectrum.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF SUBSURFACE FATE OF MONOETHANOLAMINE AT SOUR GAS PROCESSING PLANT SITES-PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Sorensen

    1999-02-01

    Alkanolamines are commonly used by the natural gas industry to remove hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and other acid gases from the natural gas in which they occur (''sour'' gas if hydrogen sulfide is present). At sour gas-processing plants, as at all plants that use alkanolamines for acid gas removal (AGR), spills and on-site management of wastes containing alkanolamines and associated reaction products have occasionally resulted in subsurface contamination that is presently the focus of some environmental concern. In 1994, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) initiated a three-phase program to investigate the natural attenuation processes that control the subsurface transport and fate of the most commonly used alkanolamine in Canada, monoethanolamine (MEA). Funding for the MEA research program was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), Canadian Occidental Petroleum Ltd. (CanOxy), Gas Research Institute (GRI), Environment Canada, and the National Energy Board of Canada. The MEA research program focused primarily on examining the biodegradability of MEA and MEA-related waste materials in soils and soil-slurries under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions, evaluating the mobility of MEA in soil and groundwater and the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques for removing contaminants and toxicity from MEA-contaminated soil. The presently inactive Okotoks sour gas-processing plant, owned by CanOxy in Alberta, Canada, was the source of samples and field data for much of the laboratory-based experimental work and was selected to be the location for the field-based efforts to evaluate remediation techniques. The objective of the research program is to provide the natural gas industry with ''real world'' data and insights developed under laboratory and field conditions regarding the effective and environmentally sound use of biological methods for the remediation of soil

  7. Modeling of dilute two-phase multispecies solid/gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Raptis, A.C.

    1986-06-01

    The report gives a detailed description of the analytical modeling that underlies the numerical code for predicting the flow of dilute solid/gas flows in pipes. The model is two-phase multispecies. Particles of one size are treated as one species and the equations of particle dynamics include terms to account for momentum transfer between species and the wall friction on each species of particles. New expressions for particle/particle interaction and wall friction for multispecies flow are derived. Results of parametric studies based on the new expressions are described. The predictions of this model for gas/powder flow through a venturi are compared with experimental measurements. The model's capability for predicting the flow in Argonne's Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility will be the subject of a companion report. 26 refs., 16 figs.

  8. Cross-correlation video recording of gas-vapor-droplet two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Roman S.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.; Zhdanova, Alyona O.; Strizhak, Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental investigations of gas-vapor-droplet two-phase flow formation during single water droplets and their aggregate motion through high-temperature (more than 1000 K) combustion products have been conducted with usage of cross-correlation measuring facility and optical methods of "tracer" visualization ("Particle Image Velocimetry" and "Interferometric Particle Imaging"). Modes of droplet motion in high-temperature gases area have been established. It has been determined the influence of the main droplet (sizes, composition, temperature, dispersability, form, velocity) and gas (temperature and velocity) characteristics on parameters of forming gas-vapor-droplet mixtures. The main elements of advanced firefighting technologies with the usage of time and space apportioned polydisperse composition water droplet flows have been formulated. Physical and predictive mathematical models have been developed to determine the basic parameters of equipment which is necessary for operation with these technology usage.

  9. Gas engine heat pump system and component efficiency and reliability improvement, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-01-01

    The Gas Research Institute is directing several research projects to develop gas fired heat pumps for residential and light commercial use. The project work discussed in the report identifies and evaluates potential improvements in the cycle and key components of these heat pumps and provides short- and long-term inputs for the heat pump product development efforts. Principal results of Phase I studies under the project are: test procedures for gas fired heat pumps (GFHP), a cycle analysis model for GFHP's, an assessment of appropriate compressor technology for GFHP's, specification of fan operating strategies, a review of emission standards for GFHP's, identification of low-temperature capacity enhancement issues, a guide on the sizing of field tests, current assessments of foreign technology valuable to GFHP's, and an assessment of the health and safety attributes of methylene chloride.

  10. Phase diagram and universality of the Lennard-Jones gas-liquid system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ito, Nobuyasu; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-05-28

    The gas-liquid phase transition of the three-dimensional Lennard-Jones particles system is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The gas and liquid densities in the coexisting state are determined with high accuracy. The critical point is determined by the block density analysis of the Binder parameter with the aid of the law of rectilinear diameter. From the critical behavior of the gas-liquid coexisting density, the critical exponent of the order parameter is estimated to be β = 0.3285(7). Surface tension is estimated from interface broadening behavior due to capillary waves. From the critical behavior of the surface tension, the critical exponent of the correlation length is estimated to be ν = 0.63(4). The obtained values of β and ν are consistent with those of the Ising universality class. PMID:22667535

  11. Phase diagram and universality of the Lennard-Jones gas-liquid system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ito, Nobuyasu; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-05-28

    The gas-liquid phase transition of the three-dimensional Lennard-Jones particles system is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The gas and liquid densities in the coexisting state are determined with high accuracy. The critical point is determined by the block density analysis of the Binder parameter with the aid of the law of rectilinear diameter. From the critical behavior of the gas-liquid coexisting density, the critical exponent of the order parameter is estimated to be β = 0.3285(7). Surface tension is estimated from interface broadening behavior due to capillary waves. From the critical behavior of the surface tension, the critical exponent of the correlation length is estimated to be ν = 0.63(4). The obtained values of β and ν are consistent with those of the Ising universality class.

  12. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  13. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  14. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  15. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  16. Method and apparatus for selective capture of gas phase analytes using metal .beta.-diketonate polymers

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Scott D [Kennewick, WA

    2011-06-21

    A process and sensor device are disclosed that employ metal .beta.-diketonate polymers to selectively capture gas-phase explosives and weaponized chemical agents in a sampling area or volume. The metal .beta.-diketonate polymers can be applied to surfaces in various analytical formats for detection of: improvised explosive devices, unexploded ordinance, munitions hidden in cargo holds, explosives, and chemical weapons in public areas.

  17. Organic molecules in ices and their release into the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayolle, Edith; Oberg, Karin I.; Garrod, Robin; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Michaut, Xavier; Fillion, Jean-Hugues

    2015-08-01

    Organic molecules in the early stages of star formation are mainly produced in icy mantles surrounding interstellar dust grains. Identifying these complex organics and quantifying their abundance during the evolution of young stellar objects is of importance to understand the emergence of life. Simple molecules in ices, up to methanol in size, have been identified in the interstellar medium through their mid-IR vibrations, but band confusion prevents detections of more complex and less abundant organic molecules in interstellar ices. The presence of complex organics on grains can instead be indirectly inferred from observations of their rotational lines in the gas phase following ice sublimation.Thermal sublimation of protostellar ices occurs when icy grains flow toward a central protostar, resulting in the formation of a hot-core or a hot-corinos. The high degree of chemical complexity observed in these dense and warm regions can be the results of i) direct synthesis on the grains followed by desorption, but also to ii) the desorption of precursors from the ice followed by gas-phase chemistry. I will show how spatially resolved millimetric observations of hot cores and cooler protostellar environments, coupled to ice observations can help us pinpoint the ice or gas-phase origin of these organic species.Organic molecules have also recently been observed in cold environments where thermal desorption can be neglected. The presence of these cold molecules in the gas phase is most likely due to non-thermal desorption processes induced by, for e.g., photon-, electron-, cosmic-ray-irradiation, shock, exothermic reactions... I will present laboratory and observational efforts that push our current understanding of these non-thermal desorption processes and how they could be use to quantify the amount of organics in ices.

  18. Gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from the ozonolysis of ten different terpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Anita; Goldstein, Allen H.; Keywood, Melita D.; Gao, Song; Varutbangkul, Varuntida; Bahreini, Roya; Ng, Nga L.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-04-01

    The ozonolyses of six monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, 3-carene, terpinolene, α-terpinene, and myrcene), two sesquiterpenes (α-humulene and β-caryophyllene), and two oxygenated terpenes (methyl chavicol and linalool) were conducted individually in Teflon chambers to examine the gas-phase oxidation product and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from these reactions. Particle size distribution and number concentration were monitored and allowed for the calculation of the SOA yield from each experiment, which ranged from 1 to 54%. A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used to monitor the evolution of gas-phase products, identified by their mass to charge ratio (m/z). Several gas-phase oxidation products, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, acetic acid, and nopinone, were identified and calibrated. Aerosol yields, and the yields of these identified and calibrated oxidation products, as well as many higher m/z oxidation products observed with the PTR-MS, varied significantly between the different parent terpene compounds. The sum of measured oxidation products in the gas and particle phase ranged from 33 to 77% of the carbon in the reacted terpenes, suggesting there are still unmeasured products from these reactions. The observations of the higher molecular weight oxidation product ions provide evidence of previously unreported compounds and their temporal evolution in the smog chamber from multistep oxidation processes. Many of the observed ions, including m/z 111 and 113, have also been observed in ambient air above a Ponderosa pine forest canopy, and our results confirm they are consistent with products from terpene + O3 reactions. Many of these products are stable on the timescale of our experiments and can therefore be monitored in field campaigns as evidence for ozone oxidative chemistry.

  19. Binding Energies of Protonated Betaine Complexes: A Probe of Zwitterion Structure in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Price, William D.; Jockusch, Rebecca A.

    2005-01-01

    The dissociation kinetics of proton-bound dimers of betaine with molecules of comparable gas-phase basicity were investigated using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD). Threshold dissociation energies were obtained from these data using master equation modeling. For bases that have comparable or higher gas-phase basicity, the binding energy of the protonated base·betaine complex is ~1.4 eV. For molecules that are ~2 kcal/mol or more less basic, the dissociation energy of the complexes is ~1.2 eV. The higher binding energy of the former is attributed to an ion–zwitterion structure which has a much larger ion–dipole interaction. The lower binding energy for molecules that are ~2 kcal/mol or more less basic indicates that an ion–molecule structure is more favored. Semiempirical calculations at both the AM1 and PM3 levels indicate the most stable ion–molecule structure is one in which the base interacts with the charged quaternary ammonium end of betaine. These results indicate that the measurement of binding energies of neutral molecules to biological ions could provide a useful probe for the presence of zwitterions and salt bridges in the gas phase. From the BIRD data, the gas-phase basicity of betaine obtained from the kinetic method is found to be 239.2 ± 1.0 kcal/mol. This value is in excellent agreement with the value of 239.3 kcal/mol (298 K) from ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-31+g** level. The measured value is slightly higher than those reported previously. This difference is attributed to entropy effects. The lower ion internal energy and longer time frame of BIRD experiments should provide values closer to those at standard temperature. PMID:16543945

  20. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory.