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Sample records for gas phase structure

  1. Gas-phase diffusivity and tortuosity of structured soils.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Andreas H; Thorbjørn, Anne; Jensen, Maria P; Pedersen, Mette; Moldrup, Per

    2010-06-25

    Modeling gas-phase diffusion of volatile contaminants in the unsaturated zone relies on soil-gas diffusivity models often developed for repacked and structureless soil columns. These suffer from the flaw of not reflecting preferential diffusion through voids and fractures in the soil, thus possibly causing an underestimation of vapor migration towards building foundations and vapor intrusion to indoor environments. We measured the ratio of the gas diffusion coefficient in soil and in free air (D(p)/D(0)) for 42 variously structured, intact, and unsaturated soil cores taken from 6 Danish sites. Whilst the results from structureless fine sand were adequately described using previously proposed models, results that were obtained from glacial clay till and limestone exhibited a dual-porosity behavior. Instead, these data were successfully described using a dual-porosity model for gas-phase diffusivity, considering a presence of drained fractures surrounded by a lower diffusivity matrix. Based on individual model fits, the tortuosity of fractures in till and limestone was found to be highest in samples with a total porosity <40%, suggesting soil compaction to affect the geometry of the fractures. In summary, this study highlights a potential order of magnitude underestimation associated in the use of classical models for prediction of subsurface gas-phase diffusion coefficients in heterogeneous and fractured soils.

  2. Uridine Nucleoside Thiation: Gas-Phase Structures and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlow, Lucas; Lee, Justin; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The naturally occurring thiated uridine nucleosides, 4-thiouridine (s4Urd) and 2-thiouridine (s2Urd), play important roles in the function and analysis of a variety of RNAs. 2-Thiouridine and its C5 modified analogues are commonly found in tRNAs and are believed to play an important role in codon recognition possibly due to their different structure, which has been shown by NMR to be predominantly C3'-endo. 2-Thiouridine may also play an important role in facilitating nonenzymatic RNA replication and transcription. 4-Thiouridine is a commonly used photoactivatable crosslinker that is often used to study RNA-RNA and RNA-protein cross-linking behavior. Differences in the base pairing between uracil and 4-thiouracil with adenine and guanine are an important factor in their role as a cross linker. The photoactivity of s4Urd may also aid in preventing near-UV lethality in cells. An understanding of their intrinsic structure in the gas-phase may help further elucidate the roles these modified nucleosides play in the regulation of RNAs. In this work, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of the protonated forms of s2Urd and s4Urd were collected in the IR fingerprint region. Structural information is determined by comparison with theoretical linear IR spectra generated from density functional theory calculations using molecular modeling to generate low-energy candidate structures. Present results are compared with analogous results for the protonated forms of uridine and 2'-deoxyuridine as well as solution phase NMR data and crystal structures.

  3. Microwave spectrum and gas phase structure of maleimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Oncer, Onur; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of maleimide was measured in the 5-12 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, all unique singly substituted 13C isotopologues, and an sbnd ND, deuterium substituted isotopologue. The parent (or normal isotopologue) rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and quadrupole coupling constants are A = 6815.3251(12) MHz, B = 2361.85011(64) MHz, C = 1754.32750(64) MHz, DJ = 0.232(24) kHz, DJK = 0.546(54) kHz, 1.5χaa = 2.4227(53) MHz, and 0.25(χbb-χcc) = 1.3679(15) MHz. A best fit gas phase structure was determined using the experimental rotational constants of the isotopologues and some parameters from calculations. The inertial defect is Δ = -0.054 amu Å2, indicating a planar structure for maleimide, with no large amplitude motions observed on the sbnd NH hydrogen atom. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ provided rotational constants which are much closer (within 1-2%) to the experimental values compared to the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculated values.

  4. Gas-phase molecular structure and energetics of anionic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Jorge, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    The gas-phase stabilities of linear, branched and cyclic silicates made of up to five silicon atoms were studied with density functional theory (DFT). The starting geometries for the DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory were obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We have observed that geometric parameters and charges are mainly affected by the degree of deprotonation. Charges on Si atoms are also influenced by their degree of substitution. The enthalpy of deprotonation of the neutral species was found to decrease with the size of the molecule, while the average deprotonation enthalpy of highly charged compounds increased with molecular size. Furthermore, the formation of rings in highly charged silicates is enthalpically preferred to chain growth. These observations result from two competing effects: the easier distribution of negative charge in silicates with low charge density and the strong intramolecular repulsions present in silicates with high charge density. As a consequence, highly charged silicates in the gas phase tend to be as small and as highly condensed as possible, which is in line with experimental observations from solution NMR.

  5. Amphipols Outperform Dodecylmaltoside Micelles in Stabilizing Membrane Protein Structure in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Noncovalent mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as an invaluable technique to probe the structure, interactions, and dynamics of membrane proteins (MPs). However, maintaining native-like MP conformations in the gas phase using detergent solubilized proteins is often challenging and may limit structural analysis. Amphipols, such as the well characterized A8-35, are alternative reagents able to maintain the solubility of MPs in detergent-free solution. In this work, the ability of A8-35 to retain the structural integrity of MPs for interrogation by electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) is compared systematically with the commonly used detergent dodecylmaltoside. MPs from the two major structural classes were selected for analysis, including two β-barrel outer MPs, PagP and OmpT (20.2 and 33.5 kDa, respectively), and two α-helical proteins, Mhp1 and GalP (54.6 and 51.7 kDa, respectively). Evaluation of the rotationally averaged collision cross sections of the observed ions revealed that the native structures of detergent solubilized MPs were not always retained in the gas phase, with both collapsed and unfolded species being detected. In contrast, ESI-IMS-MS analysis of the amphipol solubilized MPs studied resulted in charge state distributions consistent with less gas phase induced unfolding, and the presence of lowly charged ions which exhibit collision cross sections comparable with those calculated from high resolution structural data. The data demonstrate that A8-35 can be more effective than dodecylmaltoside at maintaining native MP structure and interactions in the gas phase, permitting noncovalent ESI-IMS-MS analysis of MPs from the two major structural classes, while gas phase dissociation from dodecylmaltoside micelles leads to significant gas phase unfolding, especially for the α-helical MPs studied. PMID:25495802

  6. Equilibrium structure of gas phase o-benzyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groner, Peter; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    An equilibrium structure has been derived for o-benzyne from experimental rotational constants of seven isotopomers and vibration-rotation constants calculated from MP2 (full)/6-31G(d) quadratic and cubic force fields. In the case of benzene, this method yields results that are in excellent agreement with those obtained from high quality ab initio force fields. The ab initio-calculated vibrational averaging corrections were applied to the measured A0, B0 and C0 rotational constants and the resulting experimental, near-equilibrium, rotational constants were used in a least squares fit to determine the approximate equilibrium structural parameters. The C-C bond lengths for this equilibrium structure of o-benzyne are, beginning with the formal triple bond (C 1-C 2): 1.255, 1.383, 1.403 and 1.405 Å. The bond angles obtained are in good agreement with most of the recent ab initio predictions.

  7. Probing the glycosidic linkage: secondary structures in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, John P.; Cristina Stanca-Kaposta, E.; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Liu, B.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Gamblin, David P.; Kroemer, Romano T.

    2008-10-01

    The functional importance of carbohydrates in biological processes, particularly those involving specific molecular recognition, is immense. Characterizing the three-dimensional (3D) structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins, and their interactions with other molecules, not least the ubiquitous solvent, water, is a key starting point for understanding these processes. The combination of laser-based electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of mass-selected carbohydrate molecules and their hydrated complexes, conducted under molecular beam conditions, with ab initio computation is providing a uniquely powerful means of characterizing 3D carbohydrate conformations; the structures of their hydrated complexes, the hydrogen-bonded networks they support (or which support them); and the factors that determine their conformational and structural preferences.

  8. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  9. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  10. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies.

  11. Proton transfer from the inactive gas-phase nicotine structure to the bioactive aqueous-phase structure.

    PubMed

    Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Cimas, Alvaro; Seydou, Mahamadou; Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Sungyul; Schermann, Jean-Pierre

    2010-12-29

    The role of water in the structural change of nicotine from its inactive form in the gas phase to its bioactive form in aqueous solution has been investigated by two complementary theoretical approaches, i.e., geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics. Structures of the lowest-energy nicotineH(+)-(H(2)O)(n) complexes protonated either on the pyridine (inactive form) or pyrrolidine (active form) ring have been calculated, as well as the free-energy barriers for the proton-transfer tautomerization between the two cycles. These structures show chains of 2-4 water molecules bridging the two protonation sites. The room-temperature free-energy barrier to tautomerization along the minimum-energy path from the pyridine to the pyrrolidine cycle drops rapidly when the number of water molecules increases from 0 to 4, but still remains rather high (16 kJ/mol with four water molecules), indicating that the proton transfer is a rather difficult and rare event. We compare results obtained through this explicit water molecule approach to those obtained by means of continuum methods. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations of the proton-transfer process in bulk with explicit water molecules have been conducted at room temperature. No spontaneous proton transfers have been observed during the dynamics, and biased CPMD simulations have therefore been performed in order to measure the free-energy profile of the proton transfer in the aqueous phase and to reveal the proton-transfer mechanism through water bridges. The MD bias involves pulling the proton from the pyridine ring to the surrounding bulk. Dynamics show that this triggers the tautomerization toward the pyrrolidine ring, proceeding without energy barrier. The proton transfer is extremely fast, and protonation of the pyrrolidine ring was achieved within 0.5 ps. CPMD simulations confirmed the pivotal role played by the water molecules that bridge the two protonation sites of nicotine within the bulk of the

  12. Cryogenic Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry: Tracking Ion Structure from Solution to the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Servage, Kelly A; Silveira, Joshua A; Fort, Kyle L; Russell, David H

    2016-07-19

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is adding new dimensions, that is, structure and dynamics, to the field of biological mass spectrometry. There is increasing evidence that gas-phase ions produced by ESI can closely resemble their solution-phase structures, but correlating these structures can be complicated owing to the number of competing effects contributing to structural preferences, including both inter- and intramolecular interactions. Ions encounter unique hydration environments during the transition from solution to the gas phase that will likely affect their structure(s), but many of these structural changes will go undetected because ESI-IM-MS analysis is typically performed on solvent-free ions. Cryogenic ion mobility-mass spectrometry (cryo-IM-MS) takes advantage of the freeze-drying capabilities of ESI and a cryogenically cooled IM drift cell (80 K) to preserve extensively solvated ions of the type [M + xH](x+)(H2O)n, where n can vary from zero to several hundred. This affords an experimental approach for tracking the structural evolution of hydrated biomolecules en route to forming solvent-free gas-phase ions. The studies highlighted in this Account illustrate the varying extent to which dehydration can alter ion structure and the overall impact of cryo-IM-MS on structural studies of hydrated biomolecules. Studies of small ions, including protonated water clusters and alkyl diammonium cations, reveal structural transitions associated with the development of the H-bond network of water molecules surrounding the charge carrier(s). For peptide ions, results show that water networks are highly dependent on the charge-carrying species within the cluster. Specifically, hydrated peptide ions containing lysine display specific hydration behavior around the ammonium ion, that is, magic number clusters with enhanced stability, whereas peptides containing arginine do not display specific hydration around the

  13. Is it biologically relevant to measure the structures of small peptides in the gas-phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barran, Perdita E.; Polfer, Nick C.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Clarke, David J.; Langridge-Smith, Patrick R. R.; Langley, Ross J.; Govan, John R. W.; Maxwell, Alison; Dorin, Julia R.; Millar, Robert P.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2005-02-01

    Recent developments in sample introduction of biologically relevant molecules have heralded a new era for gas-phase methods of structural determination. One of the biggest challenges is to relate gas-phase structures, often measured in the absence of water and counter ions, with in vivo biologically active structures. An advantage of gas-phase based techniques is that a given peptide can be analysed in a variety of different forms, for example, as a function of charge state, or with additional water molecules. Molecular modelling can provide insight into experimental findings and help elucidate the differences between structural forms. Combining experiment and theory provides a thorough interrogation of candidate conformations. Here two important naturally occurring peptide systems have been examined in detail and results are assessed in terms of their biological significance. The first of these is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a decapeptide which is the central regulator of the reproductive system in vertebrates. We have examined several naturally occurring variants of this peptide using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Electron Capture Dissociation (ECD) in conjunction with Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Candidate conformations are modelled using the AMBER force field. Single amino acid changes, for example Gly6 --> Ala6, or Ala6 --> D-Ala6, have observable effects on the gas phase structure of GnRH. It has been shown that evolutionary primary sequence variations are key to the biological activity of GnRH, and it is thought that this is due to different binding affinities at target receptors. This work provides strong evidence that this activity is structurally based. The second system examined is the relationship between the quaternary structure and activity of two novel [beta]-defensins. FT-ICR mass spectrometry has been employed to characterize di-sulphide bridging and dissociation based experiments utilised to

  14. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory.

  15. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory. PMID:27331660

  16. Binding Energies of Protonated Betaine Complexes: A Probe of Zwitterion Structure in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Price, William D.; Jockusch, Rebecca A.

    2005-01-01

    The dissociation kinetics of proton-bound dimers of betaine with molecules of comparable gas-phase basicity were investigated using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD). Threshold dissociation energies were obtained from these data using master equation modeling. For bases that have comparable or higher gas-phase basicity, the binding energy of the protonated base·betaine complex is ~1.4 eV. For molecules that are ~2 kcal/mol or more less basic, the dissociation energy of the complexes is ~1.2 eV. The higher binding energy of the former is attributed to an ion–zwitterion structure which has a much larger ion–dipole interaction. The lower binding energy for molecules that are ~2 kcal/mol or more less basic indicates that an ion–molecule structure is more favored. Semiempirical calculations at both the AM1 and PM3 levels indicate the most stable ion–molecule structure is one in which the base interacts with the charged quaternary ammonium end of betaine. These results indicate that the measurement of binding energies of neutral molecules to biological ions could provide a useful probe for the presence of zwitterions and salt bridges in the gas phase. From the BIRD data, the gas-phase basicity of betaine obtained from the kinetic method is found to be 239.2 ± 1.0 kcal/mol. This value is in excellent agreement with the value of 239.3 kcal/mol (298 K) from ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-31+g** level. The measured value is slightly higher than those reported previously. This difference is attributed to entropy effects. The lower ion internal energy and longer time frame of BIRD experiments should provide values closer to those at standard temperature. PMID:16543945

  17. The structure of oxotitanium phthalocyanine: a gas-phase electron diffraction and computational study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexander V; Shlykov, Sergei A; Zhabanov, Yuriy A; Girichev, Georgy V

    2009-05-14

    The gas-phase molecular structure of oxotitanium phthalocyanine (TiOPc) has been studied by a synchronous gas electron diffraction and mass spectrometric experiment, and density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP hybrid method and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The molecule has an equilibrium structure of C4v symmetry with a convex macrocycle. The titanium atom is out-of-the-plane of the four central nitrogen atoms and forms a square pyramid with them, with the following parameters: r(Ti-N)=2.090(5) A, r(NN)=2.813(9) A (the side of the pyramid base), z(Ti)-z(N)=0.614 A (the height of the pyramid). Compared to solid-state crystal structures, the Ti-O distance in gas-phase TiOPc is shortened and the Ti-N distance is elongated, which can be attributed to significant intermolecular interaction in the crystals. PMID:19421550

  18. UV/Vis Action Spectroscopy and Structures of Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Viglino, Emilie; Shaffer, Christopher J; Tureček, František

    2016-06-20

    We report the first application of UV/Vis photodissociation action spectroscopy for the structure elucidation of tyrosine peptide cation radicals produced by oxidative intramolecular electron transfer in gas-phase metal complexes. Oxidation of Tyr-Ala-Ala-Ala-Arg (YAAAR) produces Tyr-O radicals by combined electron and proton transfer involving the phenol and carboxyl groups. Oxidation of Ala-Ala-Ala-Tyr-Arg (AAAYR) produces a mixture of cation radicals involving electron abstraction from the Tyr phenol ring and N-terminal amino group in combination with hydrogen-atom transfer from the Cα positions of the peptide backbone. PMID:27159034

  19. Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Ying Chen

    2005-06-30

    and between smooth-walled and rough-walled fractures. We then used these experimental data to verify and calibrate a field-scale method for inferring steam-water relative permeabilities from production data. After that, actual production data from active geothermal fields at The Geysers and Salton Sea in California were used to calculate the relative permeabilities of steam and water. These theoretical, experimental, and in-situ results provide better understanding of the likely behavior of geothermal, gascondensate, and steam injection reservoirs. From this work, the main conclusions are: (1) the liquid-gas relative permeabilities in fractures can be modeled by characterizing the flow structures which reflect the interactions among fluids and the rough fracture surface; (2) the steam-water flow behavior in fractures is different from air-water flow in the aspects of relative permeability, flow structure and residual/immobile phase saturations.

  20. Carbonyl Diisocyanate CO(NCO)2: Synthesis and Structures in Solid State and Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Krumm, Burkhard; Rest, Sebastian; Scharf, Regina; Schwabedissen, Jan; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2016-07-01

    A modified synthesis for carbonyl diisocyanate, CO(NCO)2, starting from trichloroisocyanuric acid and diphosgene is described. In addition to the previously reported (13)C NMR resonances, the (15)N NMR shift is determined for the first time. The structure in the solid state was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) on in situ grown crystals, that in the gas phase was experimentally determined by electron diffraction (GED) and for single molecules theoretically by quantum-chemical calculations. The structures are compared and discussed with related systems. Quantum-chemical calculations as well as GED and XRD prove syn-syn to be the conformation of lowest energy. In quantum-chemical calculations and GED the presence of a syn-anti conformer was confirmed and the structure of this conformer was determined.

  1. Electroscopy Ionization Photoelectron Spectroscopy: Probing the Electronic Structure of Inorganic Metal Complexes in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Tom; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-02-01

    The coupling of electrospray to photoelectron spectroscopy has allowed a number of negatively charged solution phase transition metal complexes to be transferred to the gas phase and studied by photoelectron spectroscopy for the first time. Experiments have been performed on a range of species, including classic square-planar and octahedral transition-metal halide complexes, metal-metal bonded species, transition metal bis(dithiolene) centers and a variety of mononuclear and polynuclear iron-sulfur clusters that are related to important bioinorganic centers. The studies have provided detailed information about the electronic structure and molecular orbital energy levels of these species, allowing for direct comparison with theoretical calculations, and providing insight into their intrinsic redox properties in the absence of solvation.

  2. Secondary structures of short peptide chains in the gas phase: Double resonance spectroscopy of protected dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wutharath; Dognon, Jean-Pierre; Canuel, Clélia; Piuzzi, François; Dimicoli, Iliana; Mons, Michel; Compagnon, Isabelle; von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard

    2005-02-01

    The conformational structure of short peptide chains in the gas phase is studied by laser spectroscopy of a series of protected dipeptides, Ac-Xxx-Phe-NH2, Xxx=Gly, Ala, and Val. The combination of laser desorption with supersonic expansion enables us to vaporize the peptide molecules and cool them internally; IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy in comparison to density functional theory calculations on Ac-Gly-Phe-NH2 permits us to identify and characterize the conformers populated in the supersonic expansion. Two main conformations, corresponding to secondary structures of proteins, are found to compete in the present experiments. One is composed of a doubly γ-fold corresponding to the 27 ribbon structure. Topologically, this motif is very close to a β-strand backbone conformation. The second conformation observed is the β-turn, responsible for the chain reversal in proteins. It is characterized by a relatively weak hydrogen bond linking remote NH and CO groups of the molecule and leading to a ten-membered ring. The present gas phase experiment illustrates the intrinsic folding properties of the peptide chain and the robustness of the β-turn structure, even in the absence of a solvent. The β-turn population is found to vary significantly with the residues within the sequence; the Ac-Val-Phe-NH2 peptide, with its two bulky side chains, exhibits the largest β-turn population. This suggests that the intrinsic stabilities of the 27 ribbon and the β-turn are very similar and that weakly polar interactions occurring between side chains can be a decisive factor capable of controlling the secondary structure.

  3. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure.

    PubMed

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N-methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000-1800  cm^{-1}, utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N-methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range.

  4. Dispersed-phase structure of pressure-atomized sprays at various gas densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, L.-K.; Wu, P.-K.; Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The dispersed-phase structure of the dense-spray region of pressure-atomized sprays was studied for atomization breakup conditions, considering large-scale (9.5 mm initial diameter) water jets in still air at ambient pressures of 1, 2, and 4 atm., with both fully-developed turbulent pipe flow and nonturbulent slug flow at the jet exit. Drop sizes and velocities, and liquid volume fractions and fluxes, were measured using holography. Measurements were compared with predictions based on the locally-homogeneous flow approximation as well as recent correlations of drop sizes after primary breakup of turbulent and nonturbulent liquids. The dispersed-flow region beyond the liquid surface was relatively dilute (liquid volume fractions less than 0.1 percent), with significant separated-flow effects throughout, and evidence of near-limit secondary breakup and drop deformation near the liquid surface. Turbulent primary breakup predictions were satisfactory at atmospheric pressure, where the correlation was developed, but failed to predict observed trends of decreasing drop sizes with increasing gas density due to aerodynamic effects; in contrast, the laminar primary breakup predictions successfully treated the relatively small effects of gas density for this breakup mechanism. Effects of liquid turbulence at the jet exit were qualitatively similar to single-phase flows, yielding faster mixing rates with increased turbulence levels even though drop sizes tended to increase as well.

  5. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure.

    PubMed

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N-methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000-1800  cm^{-1}, utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N-methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range. PMID:27661721

  6. Electronic Structure and Gas-Phase Behaviour of the Heaviest Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Anton, J.; Jacob, T.; Borschevsky, A.

    2010-04-30

    Electronic structures and gas-phase adsorption behaviour of the heaviest elements 112, 113 and 114 and of their lighter homologs Hg, Tl and Pb is studied on the basis of ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic and four-component Density Functional Theory molecular and cluster calculations. The heaviest elements were shown to have low adsorption enthalpies on Teflon and should, therefore, be well transported through Teflon capillaries from the target chamber to the chemistry set up. Adsorption enthalpies of these elements on the Au(111) surface are predicted as -44.5 kJ/mol, -158.6 kJ/mol and -68.5 kJ/mol, respectively, giving the following sequence in the adsorption temperatures 113>114>112.

  7. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  8. Mass spectrometric evaluation of the gas phase structure of noncovalent quadruplex DNA obtained by electrospray ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, C.G.; Cheng, Xueheng; Bakhtiar, R.; Van Orden, S.; Smith, R.D.; Schlegel, C.; Camp, D.G. II

    1994-12-31

    A number of quanine-rich DNA sequences have been recognized which assemble into quadrupole-helical non-Watson/Crick hybridized structures. These sequences have been localized in a number of key regions in chromosomal DNA including telomers and transcriptional promoters. The preservation of this tetrameric association in the gas phase following electrospray ionization (ESI) has been reported in this laboratory. The authors have extended these studies by the preparation of four candidate quadruplex oligomers. Three of these (I, 5{prime}-dCGC GGG GCG-3{prime}; II, 5{prime}dCGC GGGG GCG-3{prime} and III, 5{prime}-dCGC GGGGG GCG-3{prime}) differ in the number of quanine residues available for G-quartet stacking in the quadruplex array and a fourth (HG, 5{prime}-dCGC AGGG GCG03{prime}) is a sequence prominent in human telomeric DNA. During their preparation, the authors observed remarkable stability of the multimeric species in the condensed phase including intact migration in HPLC under apparently {open_quotes}denaturing{close_quotes} conditions. Under standard conditions (aqueous solution of oligonucleotide samples and nozzle-skimmer interface) on a linear quadrupole mass spectrometer oligonucleotide samples showed the typical distribution of charge states for unassociated oligonucleotides. ESI from phosphate-EDTA buffered solutions with the utilization of a capillary/skimmer interface arrangement which provides mild conditions for transfer of ions through the atmosphere/vacuum interface afforded spectra which show prominent contributions from species with quadrupole stoichiometry together monomeric materials.

  9. Hydrogen-bonded glycine-HCN complexes in gas phase: structure, energetics, electric properties and cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado da Silva, Arnaldo; Chakrabarty, Sumana; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2015-03-01

    Twelve hydrogen-bonded complexes of glycine and hydrogen cyanide have been studied using high-level quantum-chemical calculations in gas phase. In particular, six 1:1 glycine-HCN dimers and six 1:2 glycine-HCN trimers have been considered. Besides the characteristics of the hydrogen bonds and their effect on molecular structure and energetics, several molecular electric properties have been calculated utilising two different models: MP2/6-31++G(d,p) and DFT-B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p). Although the structural parameters calculated by the two models are similar, equilibrium electronic energies of the clusters show model dependence. The lowest energy dimer is same in both the models which is ca. 3.0 kcal/mol more stable than the highest energy dimer. However, the lowest energy trimer is different in two methods. The energetic difference of stability between the highest and lowest trimer is 4.2 kcal/mol (4.4 kcal/mol) at an MP2 (B3LYP) level of calculation. The bond angles of glycine, in particular, are quite sensitive to the hydrogen-bond formation. Four out of six trimers are found to be strongly cooperative in both the models. Significant changes of dipole moments and polarisabilities of isolated glycine and hydrogen cyanide are observed due to the formation of hydrogen bonding. The Rayleigh scattering intensities of all clusters are much larger than those of their constituent monomers.

  10. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  11. Structural study of methyl isonicotinate by gas phase electron diffraction combined with ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Hajime; Kuze, Nobuhiko; Fujiwara, Hideo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    1996-02-01

    The molecular structure of methyl isonicotinate was studied by gas phase electron diffraction combined with ab initio calculations. The molecular skeleton was assumed to be planar. The determined values of principal structure parameters ( rg and ∠ α) are as follows: r( NC) = 1.343(5) Å, r( C…C) ring = 1.401(3) Å, r( Cγ C) = 1.499(9) Å, r( C O) = 1.205(5) Å, r( C( O) O) = 1.331(8) Å, r( OC Me) = 1.430(8) Å, = 1.103(10) Å, ∠CNC = 117.6(9)°, ∠C βC γC β = 118.7(9)°, ∠C β,trans C γC(O) = 118.6(12), ∠C γCO = 121.4(12)°, ∠C γCO = 114.2(10)°, ∠COC = 115.4(15)°, where angled brackets denote average values and C γ,trans denotes the carbon atom which is trans to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Values in parentheses are the estimated limits of error (3σ) referring to the last significant digit. The structure of the ring in methyl isonicotinate agrees with that of pyridine within experimental error. In contrast, the structure parameters of the COOCH 3 group are significantly different from those of methyl acrylate and methyl acetate. These differences have been discussed in terms of hyperconjugation and steric effects.

  12. Probing secondary structures of peptide chains using gas phase laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mons, Michel

    2006-03-01

    A bottom-up approach involving conformer-specific IR studies of short peptide sequences enables us to map the intramolecular interactions that shape the peptide backbone, in particular those H-bonds that are responsible for stability and formation of secondary structures in proteins, like turns or helices. The combination of laser-desorption of solid samples coupled to the efficient cooling in a supersonic expansion makes it possible to isolate in the gas phase the lowest conformations of the energy landscape of small flexible biomolecules. The low temperature achieved enables spectroscopists to record UV spectra in which the contribution of each conformer populated can be distinguished and the corresponding conformation identified using IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy. Data collected are directly comparable to the best quantum chemistry calculations on these species and therefore constitute a severe test for the theoretical methods used. It will be shown how investigation of sequences with an increasing number of building blocks permits to deduce the robust structural trends of a peptide backbone: i) local conformational preference of the backbone in one-residue chains, ii) in capped dipeptides, the competition between a succession of local conformational preferences and overall folded structures, in which a different type of H-bonding scheme, involving distant H-bonding sites along the backbone, takes place: in particular beta-turns, the secondary structure responsible for chain reversals, and finally iii) evidence for the spontaneous helical folding (short 3-10 helix) of three-residue chains will be presented, illustrating the relative weakness of the H-bonding in these molecular assemblies.

  13. An enormous vibrational motion: the gas-phase structure of dimethyl-bis(methoxyethynyl) germanium.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Yezhov, Roman N; Gruener, Sergej V; Robertson, Heather E; Rankin, David W H

    2004-11-21

    The structure of dimethyl-bis(methoxyethynyl) germanium has been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction utilising flexible restraints from quantum chemical calculations. Theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-311+G* and MP2/6-311+G*) predict a low barrier to rotation of the methoxy groups in the molecule in addition to low-frequency vibrations of the long ethynyl chains. In the equilibrium structure the Ge-C[triple bond]C angles of the two methoxyethynyl fragments in the molecule are computed to deviate by up to 4 degrees from the linear arrangement. As a consequence of low-frequency large-amplitude vibrational motion the experimental structure of these fragments without applying vibrational corrections deviates considerably from linearity, while the structure corrected for vibrational effects using the harmonic approximation and taking into account a non-linear transformation between internal and Cartesian coordinates (r(h1)) shows closer agreement with theory. The main experimental structural parameters of dimethyl-bis(methoxyethynyl) germanium (r(h1)) are: r(Ge-C)(mean), 192.5(1) pm; DeltaGeC =r(Ge-C(methyl))-r(Ge-C(ethynyl)), 4.5(5) pm, r(C[triple bond]C)(mean), 122.8(2) pm; r(C-O)(mean), 138.9(3) pm; DeltaCO =r(C(methyl)-O)-r(C(ethynyl)-O), 14.5(2) pm, r(C-H)(mean), 109.1(4) pm; [angle](X-C-H)(mean)(X = Ge,O), 109(1) degree; [angle]C(ethynyl)-Ge-C(ethynyl), 108.1(4) degree; [angle]C(methyl)-Ge-C(methyl), 113.4(5) degree; [angle]Ge-C[triple bond]C, 163(1) degree; [angle]C[triple bond]C-O, 176(2) degree; [angle]C-O-C, 115.2(6) degree; methoxy group torsion, tau, 36(9) degree from the position in which the C-O bond eclipses the further Ge-C(ethynyl) bond. PMID:15540132

  14. Imaging molecular structure through femtosecond photoelectron diffraction on aligned and oriented gas-phase molecules.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzée, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus; Anielski, Denis; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Bomme, Cédric; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Niccola; De, Sankar; Decleva, Piero; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Filsinger, Frank; Foucar, Lutz; Gorkhover, Tais; Gumprecht, Lars; Hömke, André; Holmegaard, Lotte; Johnsson, Per; Kienitz, Jens S; Kierspel, Thomas; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Moshammer, Robert; Müller, Nele L M; Rudek, Benedikt; Savelyev, Evgeny; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Scholz, Frank; Schorb, Sebastian; Schulz, Joachim; Seltmann, Jörn; Stener, Mauro; Stern, Stephan; Techert, Simone; Thøgersen, Jan; Trippel, Sebastian; Viefhaus, Jens; Vrakking, Marc; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Küpper, Jochen; Ullrich, Joachim; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray free-electron laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C(8)H(5)F) and dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C(6)H(4)Br(2)) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.

  15. Gas-phase structures and thermochemistry of neutral histidine and its conjugated acid and base.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Bouchoux, Guy

    2013-04-28

    Extensive exploration of the conformational space of neutral, protonated and deprotonated histidine has been conducted at the G4MP2 level. Theoretical protonation and deprotonation thermochemistry as well as heats of formation of gaseous histidine and its ionized forms have been calculated at the G4 level considering either the most stable conformers or an equilibrium population of conformers at 298 K. These theoretical results were compared to evaluated experimental determinations. Recommended proton affinity and protonation entropy deduced from these comparisons are PA(His) = 980 kJ mol(-1) and ΔpS(His) ∼ 0 J mol(-1) K(-1), thus leading to a gas-phase basicity value of GB(His) = 947.5 kJ mol(-1). Similarly, gas phase acidity parameters are ΔacidH(o)(His) = 1373 kJ mol(-1), ΔacidS(His) ∼ 10 J mol(-1) K(-1) and ΔacidG(o)(His) = 1343 kJ mol(-1). Computed G4 heats of formation values are equal to -290, 265 and -451 kJ mol(-1) for gaseous neutral histidine and its protonated and deprotonated forms, respectively. The present computational data correct, and complete, previous thermochemical parameter estimates proposed for gas-phase histidine and its acido-basic properties.

  16. Gas phase chemistry in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheimer, M.

    1976-01-01

    The significance of gas phase reactions in determining the nuclear structure of comets is discussed. The sublimation of parent molecules such as H2O, CH4, CO2, and NH3 from the surface of the nucleus and their subsequent photodissociation and ionization in forming observed cometary molecular species are elaborated.

  17. Going clean: structure and dynamics of peptides in the gas phase and paths to solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Carsten; Rossi, Mariana

    2015-12-01

    The gas phase is an artificial environment for biomolecules that has gained much attention both experimentally and theoretically due to its unique characteristic of providing a clean room environment for the comparison between theory and experiment. In this review we give an overview mainly on first-principles simulations of isolated peptides and the initial steps of their interactions with ions and solvent molecules: a bottom up approach to the complexity of biological environments. We focus on the accuracy of different methods to explore the conformational space, the connections between theory and experiment regarding collision cross section evaluations and (anharmonic) vibrational spectra, and the challenges faced in this field.

  18. Structure of olefin-imidacloprid and gas-phase fragmentation chemistry of its protonated form.

    PubMed

    Fusetto, Roberto; White, Jonathan M; Hutton, Craig A; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2016-02-01

    One of the major insect metabolites of the widely used neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid, 1 (1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-N-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-amine), is the olefin 2. To better understand how the structure of olefin 2 relates to the gas-phase fragmentation of its protonated form, 2H(+), X-ray crystallography, tandem mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were carried out. Olefin 2 was found to be in a tautomeric form where the proton is on the N(1) position of the imidazole ring and forms a hydrogen bond to one of the oxygen atoms of the coplanar nitroamine group. Under conditions of low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a linear ion trap, 2H(+), formed via electrospray ionization (ESI), fragments via a major loss of water, together with minor competing losses of HNO2 and NO2•.This contrasts with 1H+, which mainly undergoes bond homolysis via NO2• loss. Thus, installation of the double bond in 2 plays a key role in facilitating the loss of water. DFT calculations, carried out using the B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory, revealed that loss of water was energetically more favourable compared to HNO2 and NO2• loss. Three multistep, energetically accessible mechanisms were identified for loss of water from 2H(+), and these have the following barriers: (I) direct proton transfer from N(5) of the pyridine to O(1) on the NO2 group (119 kJ mol(-1)); (II) rotation of the N(2)-N(4) bond (117 kJ mol(-1)); (III) 1,3-intramolecular proton transfer between the two oxygen atoms of the NO2 group (145 kJ mol(-1)). Given that the lowest barrier for the losses of HNO2 and NO2• is 156 kJ mol(-1), it is likely that all three water loss mechanisms occur concurrently.

  19. Gas-phase structure and reactivity of the keto tautomer of the deoxyguanosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-10-21

    Guanine radical cations are formed upon oxidation of DNA. Deoxyguanosine (dG) is used as a model, and the gas-phase infrared (IR) spectroscopic signature and gas-phase unimolecular and bimolecular chemistry of its radical cation, dG˙(+), A, which is formed via direct electrospray ionisation (ESI/MS) of a methanolic solution of Cu(NO3)2 and dG, are examined. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out on 28 isomers and comparisons between their calculated IR spectra and the experimentally-measured spectra suggest that A exists as the ground-state keto tautomer. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of A proceeds via cleavage of the glycosidic bond, while its ion–molecule reactions with amine bases occur via a number of pathways including hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer and adduct formation. A hidden channel, involving isomerisation of the radical cation via adduct formation, is revealed through the use of two stages of CID, with the final stage of CID showing the loss of CH2O as a major fragmentation pathway from the reformed radical cation, dG˙(+). Quantum chemistry calculations on the unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity are also consistent with A being present as a ground-state keto tautomer. PMID:25942055

  20. Gas-liquid two-phase flow structure in the multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yi; Zhao, An; Ren, Ying-yu; Dou, Fu-Xiang; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-05-01

    The multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane (MS-WCECP) is proposed for characterizing the physical structure of complex system. Firstly we use the method to investigate typical nonlinear time series. Compared with the multi-scale complexity entropy causality plane (MS-CECP), the MS-WCECP can not only uncover the dynamic information loss of complex system with the increase of scale, but also can characterize the complexity of nonlinear dynamic system. In particular, the algorithm of MS-WCECP performs strong anti-noise ability. Then we calculate the MS-WCECP for the conductance fluctuating signals measured from vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow experiments in a small diameter pipe, the results demonstrate that the MS-WCECP is a useful approach for exploring the stability and complexity in gas-liquid two-phase flows.

  1. Exploring Salt Bridge Structures of Gas-Phase Protein Ions using Multiple Stages of Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2014-04-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting noncovalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas-phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase.

  2. The singular gas-phase structure of 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (Ac3c).

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Ana I; Vaquero, Vanesa; Cabezas, Carlos; López, Juan C; Cativiela, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2011-07-13

    The natural nonproteinogenic α-amino acid 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (Ac(3)c) has been vaporized by laser ablation and studied in the gas phase by molecular-beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Comparison of the experimental rotational and (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants with the values predicted ab initio for these parameters has allowed the unambiguous identification of three Ac(3)c conformers differing in the hydrogen bonding pattern. Two of them resemble those characterized before for the coded aliphatic α-amino acids. Remarkably, a third conformer predicted to be energetically accessible for all of these amino acids but never observed (the so-called "missing conformer") has been found for Ac(3)c, close in energy to the global minimum. This is the first time that such a conformer, stabilized by an N-H···O(H) hydrogen bond, is detected in the rotational spectrum of a gaseous α-amino acid with a nonpolar side chain. The conjugative interaction established between the cyclopropane ring and the adjacent carbonyl group seems to be responsible for the unique conformational properties exhibited by Ac(3)c.

  3. Microwave spectra and gas phase structural parameters for N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adam M; Mitchell, Erik G; Sanchez, Daniel A; Block, Eric; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2011-12-22

    The microwave spectrum for N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione (pyrithione) was measured in the frequency range 6-18 GHz, providing accurate rotational constants and nitrogen quadrupole coupling strengths for three isotopologues, C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOH, C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOD, and C(5)H(4)(34)S(14)NOH. Pyrithione was found to be in a higher concentration in the gas phase than the other tautomer, 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO). Microwave spectroscopy is best suited to determine which structure predominates in the gas phase. The measured rotational constants were used to accurately determine the coordinates of the substituted atoms and provided sufficient data to determine some of the important structural parameters for pyrithione, the only tautomer observed in the present work. The spectra were obtained using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, with sufficient resolution to allow accurate measurements of the (14)N nuclear quadrupole hyperfine interactions. Ab initio calculations provided structural parameters and quadrupole coupling strengths that are in very good agreement with measured values. The experimental rotational constants for the parent compound are A = 3212.10(1), B = 1609.328(7), and C = 1072.208(6) MHz, yielding the inertial defect Δ(0) = -0.023 amu·Å(2) for the C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOH isotopologue. The observed near zero inertial defect clearly indicates a planar structure. The least-squares fit structural analysis yielded the experimental bond lengths R(O-H) = 0.93(2) Å, R(C-S) = 1.66(2) Å, and angle (N-O-H) = 105(4)° for the ground state structure.

  4. Microwave spectra and gas phase structural parameters for N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adam M; Mitchell, Erik G; Sanchez, Daniel A; Block, Eric; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2011-12-22

    The microwave spectrum for N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione (pyrithione) was measured in the frequency range 6-18 GHz, providing accurate rotational constants and nitrogen quadrupole coupling strengths for three isotopologues, C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOH, C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOD, and C(5)H(4)(34)S(14)NOH. Pyrithione was found to be in a higher concentration in the gas phase than the other tautomer, 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO). Microwave spectroscopy is best suited to determine which structure predominates in the gas phase. The measured rotational constants were used to accurately determine the coordinates of the substituted atoms and provided sufficient data to determine some of the important structural parameters for pyrithione, the only tautomer observed in the present work. The spectra were obtained using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, with sufficient resolution to allow accurate measurements of the (14)N nuclear quadrupole hyperfine interactions. Ab initio calculations provided structural parameters and quadrupole coupling strengths that are in very good agreement with measured values. The experimental rotational constants for the parent compound are A = 3212.10(1), B = 1609.328(7), and C = 1072.208(6) MHz, yielding the inertial defect Δ(0) = -0.023 amu·Å(2) for the C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOH isotopologue. The observed near zero inertial defect clearly indicates a planar structure. The least-squares fit structural analysis yielded the experimental bond lengths R(O-H) = 0.93(2) Å, R(C-S) = 1.66(2) Å, and angle (N-O-H) = 105(4)° for the ground state structure. PMID:22070758

  5. An experimental and computational investigation into the gas-phase acidities of tyrosine and phenylalanine: three structures for deprotonated tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Bokatzian, Samantha S; Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Using mass spectrometry and correlated molecular orbital theory, three deprotonated structures were revealed for the amino acid tyrosine. The structures were distinguished experimentally by ion/molecule reactions involving proton transfer and trimethylsilyl azide. Gas-phase acidities from proton transfer reactions and from G3(MP2) calculations generally agree well. The lowest energy structure, which was only observed experimentally using electrospray ionization from aprotic solvents, is deprotonated at the carboxylic acid group and is predicted to be highly folded. A second unfolded carboxylate structure is several kcal/mol higher in energy and primarily forms from protic solvents. Protic solvents also yield a structure deprotonated at the phenolic side chain, which experiments find to be intermediate in energy to the two carboxylate forms. G3(MP2) calculations indicate that the three structures differ in energy by only 2.5 kcal/mol, yet they are readily distinguished experimentally. Structural abundance ratios are dependent upon experimental conditions, including the solvent and accumulation time of ions in a hexapole. Under some conditions, carboxylate ions may convert to phenolate ions. For phenylalanine, which lacks a phenolic group, only one deprotonated structure was observed experimentally when electrosprayed from protic solvent. This agrees with G3(MP2) calculations that find the folded and unfolded carboxylate forms to differ by 0.3 kcal/mol.

  6. An Experimental and Computational Investigation into the Gas-Phase Acidities of Tyrosine and Phenylalanine: Three Structures for Deprotonated Tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bokatzian, Samantha S.; Stover, Michele L.; Plummer, Chelsea E.; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-06

    Using mass spectrometry and correlated molecular orbital theory, three deprotonated structures were revealed for the amino acid tyrosine. The structures were distinguished experimentally by ion/molecule reactions involving proton transfer and trimethylsilyl azide. Gas-phase acidities from proton transfer reactions and from G3(MP2) calculations generally agree well. The lowest energy structure, which was only observed experimentally using electrospray ionization from aprotic solvents, is deprotonated at the carboxylic acid group and is predicted to be highly folded. A second unfolded carboxylate structure is several kcal/mol higher in energy and primarily forms from protic solvents. Protic solvents also yield a structure deprotonated at the phenolic side chain, which experiments find to be intermediate in energy to the two carboxylate forms. G3(MP2) calculations indicate that the three structures differ in energy by only 2.5 kcal/mol, yet they are readily distinguished experimentally. Structural abundance ratios are dependent upon experimental conditions, including the solvent and accumulation time of ions in a hexapole. Under some conditions, carboxylate ions may convert to phenolate ions. For phenylalanine, which lacks a phenolic group, only one deprotonated structure was observed experimentally when electrosprayed from protic solvent. This agrees with G3(MP2) calculations that find the folded and unfolded carboxylate forms to differ by 0.3 kcal/mol.

  7. An experimental and computational investigation into the gas-phase acidities of tyrosine and phenylalanine: three structures for deprotonated tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Bokatzian, Samantha S; Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Using mass spectrometry and correlated molecular orbital theory, three deprotonated structures were revealed for the amino acid tyrosine. The structures were distinguished experimentally by ion/molecule reactions involving proton transfer and trimethylsilyl azide. Gas-phase acidities from proton transfer reactions and from G3(MP2) calculations generally agree well. The lowest energy structure, which was only observed experimentally using electrospray ionization from aprotic solvents, is deprotonated at the carboxylic acid group and is predicted to be highly folded. A second unfolded carboxylate structure is several kcal/mol higher in energy and primarily forms from protic solvents. Protic solvents also yield a structure deprotonated at the phenolic side chain, which experiments find to be intermediate in energy to the two carboxylate forms. G3(MP2) calculations indicate that the three structures differ in energy by only 2.5 kcal/mol, yet they are readily distinguished experimentally. Structural abundance ratios are dependent upon experimental conditions, including the solvent and accumulation time of ions in a hexapole. Under some conditions, carboxylate ions may convert to phenolate ions. For phenylalanine, which lacks a phenolic group, only one deprotonated structure was observed experimentally when electrosprayed from protic solvent. This agrees with G3(MP2) calculations that find the folded and unfolded carboxylate forms to differ by 0.3 kcal/mol. PMID:25299802

  8. Conformational analysis of green apple flavour: the gas-phase structure of ethyl valerate validated by microwave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mouhib, H; Stahl, W

    2012-04-10

    We report on the microwave spectrum of ethyl valerate, C(4)H(9)-COO-C(2)H(5), observed by molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (MB-FTMW). Highly accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants of the two most abundant conformers were determined. Their structure was investigated by comparison of the experimental rotational constants with those obtained by quantum chemical calculations. MP2/ 6-311++G(d,p) calculations failed to give a proper description of the observed conformers in the supersonic jet. Therefore, also other basis sets were tried using Hartree-Fock, second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2), and B3LYP methods to predict the observed gas-phase structures of the molecule. The quantum chemical results guided the conformer assignment of the rotational constants, obtained from the microwave experiment. One of the two observed conformers has C(s) symmetry, while the most abundant conformer has C(1) symmetry. The main conformer possesses a strong spectrum with high intensities. Additionally, harmonic frequency calculations at different levels of theory where carried out and a low lying vibration of the entire n-butyl group against the rest of the molecule was identified. The symbiotic interplay of microwave gas-phase investigations and quantum chemical calculations becomes evident in our results.

  9. Experimental observation of the transition between gas-phase and aqueous solution structures for acetylcholine, nicotine, and muscarine ions.

    PubMed

    Seydou, Mahamadou; Grégoire, Gilles; Liquier, Jean; Lemaire, J; Schermann, Jean Pierre; Desfrançois, Charles

    2008-03-26

    Structural information on acetylcholine and its two agonists, nicotine, and muscarine has been obtained from the interpretation of infrared spectra recorded in the gas-phase or in low pH aqueous solutions. Simulated IR spectra have been obtained using explicit water molecules or a polarization continuum model. The conformational space of the very flexible acetylcholine ions is modified by the presence of the solvent. Distances between its pharmacophoric groups cover a lower range in hydrated species than in isolated species. A clear signature of the shift of protonation site in nicotine ions is provided by the striking change of their infrared spectrum induced by hydration. On the contrary, structures of muscarine ions are only slightly influenced by the presence of water.

  10. Gas phase studies of the Pesci decarboxylation reaction: synthesis, structure, and unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity of organometallic ions.

    PubMed

    O'Hair, Richard A J; Rijs, Nicole J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Decarboxylation chemistry has a rich history, and in more recent times, it has been recruited in the quest to develop cheaper, cleaner, and more efficient bond-coupling reactions. Thus, over the past two decades, there has been intense investigation into new metal-catalyzed reactions of carboxylic substrates. Understanding the elementary steps of metal-mediated transformations is at the heart of inventing new reactions and improving the performance of existing ones. Fortunately, during the same time period, there has been a convergence in mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, which allows these catalytic processes to be examined efficiently in the gas phase. Thus, electrospray ionization (ESI) sources have been combined with ion-trap mass spectrometers, which in turn have been modified to either accept radiation from tunable OPO lasers for spectroscopy based structural assignment of ions or to allow the study of ion-molecule reactions (IMR). The resultant "complete" gas-phase chemical laboratories provide a platform to study the elementary steps of metal-catalyzed decarboxylation reactions in exquisite detail. In this Account, we illustrate how the powerful combination of ion trap mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations can be systematically used to examine the formation of organometallic ions and their chemical transformations. Specifically, ESI-MS allows the transfer of inorganic carboxylate complexes, [RCO2M(L)n](x), (x = charge) from the condensed to the gas phase. These mass selected ions serve as precursors to organometallic ions [RM(L)n](x) via neutral extrusion of CO2, accessible by slow heating in the ion trap using collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach provides access to an array of organometallic ions with well-defined stoichiometry. In terms of understanding the decarboxylation process, we highlight the role of the metal center (M), the organic group (R), and the auxiliary ligand (L), along with cluster nuclearity, in

  11. Gas phase studies of the Pesci decarboxylation reaction: synthesis, structure, and unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity of organometallic ions.

    PubMed

    O'Hair, Richard A J; Rijs, Nicole J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Decarboxylation chemistry has a rich history, and in more recent times, it has been recruited in the quest to develop cheaper, cleaner, and more efficient bond-coupling reactions. Thus, over the past two decades, there has been intense investigation into new metal-catalyzed reactions of carboxylic substrates. Understanding the elementary steps of metal-mediated transformations is at the heart of inventing new reactions and improving the performance of existing ones. Fortunately, during the same time period, there has been a convergence in mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, which allows these catalytic processes to be examined efficiently in the gas phase. Thus, electrospray ionization (ESI) sources have been combined with ion-trap mass spectrometers, which in turn have been modified to either accept radiation from tunable OPO lasers for spectroscopy based structural assignment of ions or to allow the study of ion-molecule reactions (IMR). The resultant "complete" gas-phase chemical laboratories provide a platform to study the elementary steps of metal-catalyzed decarboxylation reactions in exquisite detail. In this Account, we illustrate how the powerful combination of ion trap mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations can be systematically used to examine the formation of organometallic ions and their chemical transformations. Specifically, ESI-MS allows the transfer of inorganic carboxylate complexes, [RCO2M(L)n](x), (x = charge) from the condensed to the gas phase. These mass selected ions serve as precursors to organometallic ions [RM(L)n](x) via neutral extrusion of CO2, accessible by slow heating in the ion trap using collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach provides access to an array of organometallic ions with well-defined stoichiometry. In terms of understanding the decarboxylation process, we highlight the role of the metal center (M), the organic group (R), and the auxiliary ligand (L), along with cluster nuclearity, in

  12. Gas phase IR spectra of tri-peptide Z-Pro-Leu-Gly: Effect of C-terminal amide capping on secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Yamada, Kohei; Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Fujii, Masaaki

    2012-04-01

    Three-residue peptides capped with benzyloxycarbonyl (Z-) group, Z-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2 and Z-Pro-Leu-Gly-OH, are investigated by infrared (IR) spectroscopy, using supersonic-jet laser desorption technique, in the N-H and O-H stretching frequency ranges. The IR spectra show clear evidence of the formation of different hydrogen-bonding network in the two peptides. The possible gas phase structure is proposed from density functional theory calculations using cc-pVDZ basis set. The Z-Pro-Leu-Gly-OH in the gas phase forms successive γ-turn structure with free C-terminal carboxyl group whereas main structural element in Z-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2 is β-turn with C-terminal sbnd NH2 group forming hydrogen bond. Structural information is employed to predict their binding capability in gas phase.

  13. The role of the detergent micelle in preserving the structure of membrane proteins in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Reading, Eamonn; Liko, Idlir; Allison, Timothy M; Benesch, Justin L P; Laganowsky, Arthur; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-04-01

    Despite the growing importance of the mass spectrometry of membrane proteins, it is not known how their transfer from solution into vacuum affects their stability and structure. To address this we have carried out a systematic investigation of ten membrane proteins solubilized in different detergents and used mass spectrometry to gain physicochemical insight into the mechanism of their ionization and desolvation. We show that the chemical properties of the detergents mediate the charge state, both during ionization and detergent removal. Using ion mobility mass spectrometry, we monitor the conformations of membrane proteins and show how the surface charge density dictates the stability of folded states. We conclude that the gas-phase stability of membrane proteins is increased when a greater proportion of their surface is lipophilic and is consequently protected by the physical presence of the micelle.

  14. Structure of dipeptides having N-terminal selenocysteine residues: a DFT study in gas and aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shilpi; Das, Gunajyoti

    2013-06-01

    Over the last few decades, dipeptides as well as their analogues have served as important model systems for the computational studies concerning the structure of protein and energetics of protein folding. Here, we present a density functional structural study on a set of seven dipeptides having N-terminal selenocysteine residues (the component in the C-terminus is varied with seven different combinations viz. Ala, Phe, Glu, Thr, Asn, Arg and Sec) in gas and simulated aqueous phase using a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The molecular geometries of the dipeptides are fully optimized at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level and subsequent frequency calculations confirm them as true minima. The effects of solvation and identity of the varying C-terminal residue on the energetics, structural features of the peptide planes, values of the ψ and ф dihedrals, geometry around the α-carbon atoms and theoretically predicted vibrational spectra of the dipeptides are investigated. Two types of intramolecular H-bonds, namely N…H-N and O…H-C, are found to play important roles in influencing the planarity of the peptide planes and geometry around the α-carbon atoms of the dipeptides. The identity of the varying C-terminal residue influences the values of ф, planarity of the peptide planes and geometry around the C₇ α-carbon atoms while the solvation effects are evident on the values of bond lengths and bond angles of the amide planes.

  15. Structure of Protonated Threonine Dimers in the Gas Phase: Salt-Bridged or Charge-Solvated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hong; Kong, Xianglei

    2015-09-01

    For homodimers of amino acids, their salt-bridged structures are gradually stabilized as the proton affinity of the component amino acid increases. Threonine has a proton affinity value located in the middle of the list of 20 natural amino acids. Thus, identifying whether the most stable isomer of protonated threonine dimer (Thr2H+) has a charge-solvated or salt-bridged structure is important and helpful for understanding the structures of other homodimers. By combining infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations, the structures of Thr2H+ were investigated. Based on calculations at the M062X/6-311++G(d,p)//M062X/6-311++G(d,p) level, the most stable isomer of Thr2H+ was computed to be a charge-solvated structure, with an energy 3.87 kcal/mol lower than the most stable salt-bridged isomer. The predicted infrared spectrum is in good agreement with the experimental spectrum. To evaluate the temperature effect on the distribution of different isomers, the relative concentrations of the six isomers of Thr2H+ were calculated at different temperatures, according to their partition functions and enthalpies. The results show that the isomers are dominated by charge-solvated structures at a temperature of 300 K.

  16. Unravelling the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the fumarate addition mechanism--a gas-phase ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Vyas, Shubham; Villano, Stephanie M; Maupin, C Mark; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-02-14

    The fumarate addition reaction mechanism is central to the anaerobic biodegradation pathway of various hydrocarbons, both aromatic (e.g., toluene, ethyl benzene) and aliphatic (e.g., n-hexane, dodecane). Succinate synthase enzymes, which belong to the glycyl radical enzyme family, are the main facilitators of these biochemical reactions. The overall catalytic mechanism that converts hydrocarbons to a succinate molecule involves three steps: (1) initial H-abstraction from the hydrocarbon by the radical enzyme, (2) addition of the resulting hydrocarbon radical to fumarate, and (3) hydrogen abstraction by the addition product to regenerate the radical enzyme. Since the biodegradation of hydrocarbon fuels via the fumarate addition mechanism is linked to bio-corrosion, an improved understanding of this reaction is imperative to our efforts of predicting the susceptibility of proposed alternative fuels to biodegradation. An improved understanding of the fuel biodegradation process also has the potential to benefit bioremediation. In this study, we consider model aromatic (toluene) and aliphatic (butane) compounds to evaluate the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the energetics and kinetics of the fumarate addition mechanism by means of high level ab initio gas-phase calculations. We predict that the rate of toluene degradation is ∼100 times faster than butane at 298 K, and that the first abstraction step is kinetically significant for both hydrocarbons, which is consistent with deuterium isotope effect studies on toluene degradation. The detailed computations also show that the predicted stereo-chemical preference of the succinate products for both toluene and butane are due to the differences in the radical addition rate constants for the various isomers. The computational and kinetic modeling work presented here demonstrates the importance of considering pre-reaction and product complexes in order to accurately treat gas phase systems that involve intra and inter

  17. Collision cross sections of proteins and their complexes: a calibration framework and database for gas-phase structural biology.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew F; Hall, Zoe; Giles, Kevin; Hoyes, John; Robinson, Carol V; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2010-11-15

    Collision cross sections in both helium and nitrogen gases were measured directly using a drift cell with RF ion confinement inserted within a quadrupole/ion mobility/time-of-flight hybrid mass spectrometer (Waters Synapt HDMS, Manchester, U.K.). Collision cross sections for a large set of denatured peptide, denatured protein, native-like protein, and native-like protein complex ions are reported here, forming a database of collision cross sections that spans over 2 orders of magnitude. The average effective density of the native-like ions is 0.6 g cm(-3), which is significantly lower than that for the solvent-excluded regions of proteins and suggests that these ions can retain significant memory of their solution-phase structures rather than collapse to globular structures. Because the measurements are acquired using an instrument that mimics the geometry of the commercial Synapt HDMS instrument, this database enables the determination of highly accurate collision cross sections from traveling-wave ion mobility data through the use of calibration standards with similar masses and mobilities. Errors in traveling-wave collision cross sections determined for native-like protein complexes calibrated using other native-like protein complexes are significantly less than those calibrated using denatured proteins. This database indicates that collision cross sections in both helium and nitrogen gases can be well-correlated for larger biomolecular ions, but non-correlated differences for smaller ions can be more significant. These results enable the generation of more accurate three-dimensional models of protein and other biomolecular complexes using gas-phase structural biology techniques.

  18. Probing the electronic properties and structural evolution of anionic gold clusters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei-Ming; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been discovered to exhibit remarkable catalytic properties in contrast to the chemical inertness of bulk gold. A prerequisite to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the catalytic effect of nanogold is a detailed understanding of the structural and electronic properties of gold clusters as a function of size. In this review, we describe joint experimental studies (mainly photoelectron spectroscopy) and theoretical calculations to probe the structural properties of anionic gold clusters. Electronic properties and structural evolutions of all known Aun- clusters as experimentally confirmed to date are summarized, covering the size ranges of n = 3-35 and 55-64. Recent experimental efforts in resolving the isomeric issues of small gold clusters using Ar-tagging, O2-titration and isoelectronic substitution are also discussed.

  19. Probing the structures of gas-phase rhodium cluster cations by far-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D. J.; Gruene, P.; Haertelt, M.; Meijer, G.; Fielicke, A.; Hamilton, S. M.; Hopkins, W. S.; Mackenzie, S. R.; Neville, S. P.; Walsh, T. R.

    2010-12-07

    The geometric structures of small cationic rhodium clusters Rh{sub n}{sup +} (n = 6-12) are investigated by comparison of experimental far-infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra with spectra calculated using density functional theory. The clusters are found to favor structures based on octahedral and tetrahedral motifs for most of the sizes considered, in contrast to previous theoretical predictions that rhodium clusters should favor cubic motifs. Our findings highlight the need for further development of theoretical and computational methods to treat these high-spin transition metal clusters.

  20. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  1. Gas-Phase Structures of Linalool and Coumarin Studied by Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. V. L.; Stahl, W.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2013-06-01

    The microwave spectra of two natural substances, linalool and coumarin, were recorded in the microwave range from 9 to 16 GHz and 8.5 to 10.5 GHz, respectively.Linalool is an acyclic monoterpene and the main component of lavender oil. It has a structure with many possible conformations. The geometry of the lowest energy conformer has been determined by a combination of microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Surprisingly, a globular rather than a prolate shape was found. This structure is probably stabilized by a π interaction between two double bonds which are arranged in two stacked layers of atoms within the molecule. A-E splittings due to the internal rotation of one methyl group could be resolved and the barrier to internal rotation was determined to be 400.20(64) cm^{-1}. The standard deviation of the fit was close to experimental accuracy. For an identification of the observed conformer not only the rotational constants but also the internal rotation parameters of one of the methyl groups were needed. Coumarin is a widely used flavor in perfumery as sweet woodruff scent. The aromatic structure allows solely for one planar conformer, which was found under molecular beam conditions and compared to other molecules with similar structures. Here, the rotational spectrum could be described by a set of parameters including the rotational constants and the centrifugal distortion constants using a semi-rigid molecule Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the rotational transitions of all nine ^{13}C isotopologues were measured in natural abundance. As a consequence, the microwave structure of coumarin could be almost completely determined.

  2. Gas-phase synthesis and structure of monomeric ZnOH: a model species for metalloenzymes and catalytic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zack, Lindsay N; Sun, Ming; Bucchino, Matthew P; Clouthier, Dennis J; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2012-02-16

    Monomeric ZnOH has been studied for the first time using millimeter and microwave gas-phase spectroscopy. ZnOH is important in surface processes and at the active site of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase. In the millimeter-wave direct-absorption experiments, ZnOH was synthesized by reacting zinc vapor, produced in a Broida-type oven, with water. In the Fourier-transform microwave measurements, ZnOH was produced in a supersonic jet expansion of CH(3)OH and zinc vapor, created by laser ablation. Multiple rotational transitions of six ZnOH isotopologues in their X(2)A' ground states were measured over the frequency range of 22-482 GHz, and splittings due to fine and hyperfine structure were resolved. An asymmetric top pattern was observed in the spectra, showing that ZnOH is bent, indicative of covalent bonding. From these data, spectroscopic constants and an accurate structure were determined. The Zn-O bond length was found to be similar to that in carbonic anhydrase and other model enzyme systems.

  3. Investigation of the gas-phase structure and rotational barrier of trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate and comparison with covalent sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defonsi Lestard, María E.; Tuttolomondo, María E.; Varetti, Eduardo L.; Wann, Derek A.; Robertson, Heather E.; Rankin, David W. H.; Altabef, Aida Ben

    2010-12-01

    The molecular structure of trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate, CF 3SO 2OSi(CH 3) 3, has been determined in the gas phase from electron-diffraction data supplemented by ab initio (MP2) and DFT calculations using 6-31G(d), 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G++(3df,3pd) basis sets. Both experimental and theoretical data indicate that only one gauche conformer is possible by rotating about the O-S bond. The anomeric effect is a fundamental stereoelectronic interaction and presents a profound influence on the electronic geometry. We have investigated the origin of the anomeric effect by means of NBO and AIM analysis. A natural bond orbital analysis showed that the lpπ[O bonded to Si)] → σ *[C-S] hyperconjugative interaction favors the gauche conformation. In addition, comparison of the structural and stereoelectronic properties of the title molecule with those of silyl trifluoromethanesulfonate and methyl trifluoromethanesulfonate has been carried out.

  4. Conformational Transformation of Five-Membered Rings: the Gas Phase Structure of 2-METHYLTETRAHYDROFURAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Vinh; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    2-Methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF) is a promising environmentally friendly solvent and biofuel component which is derived from renewable resources. Following the principles of Green Chemistry, 2-MeTHF has been evaluated in various fields like organometallics, metathesis, and biosynthesis on the way to more eco-friendly syntheses. Cyclopentane as the prototype of five-membered rings is well-known to exist as twist or envelope structures. However, the conformational analysis of its heterocyclic derivative 2-methyl-tetrahydrothiophene (MTTP) yielded two stable twist conformers and two envelope transition states. Here, we report on the heavy atom r_s structure of the oxygen-analog of MTTP, 2-MeTHF, studied by a combination of molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. One conformer of 2-MeTHF was observed and highly accurate molecular parameters were determined using the XIAM program. In addition, all 13C-isotopologues were assigned in natural abundance of 1%. A structural determination based on the r_s positions of all carbon atoms was achieved via Kraitchman's equations. The methyl group in 2-MeTHF undergoes internal rotation and causes A-E splittings of the rotational lines. The barrier was calculated to be 1142 wn at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, which is rather high. Accordingly, narrow A-E splittings could be observed for only a few transitions. However, the barrier height could be fitted while the angles between the internal rotor axis and the principal axes of inertia were taken from the experimental geometry. V. Pace, P. Hoyos, L. Castoldi, P. Domínguez de María, A. R. Alcántara, ChemSusChem 5 (2012), 1369-1379. a) D. F. Aycock, Org. Process Res. Dev. 11 (2007),156-159. b) M. Smoleń, M. Kȩdziorek, K. Grela, Catal. Commun. 44 (2014), 80-84. V. Van, C. Dindic, H.V.L. Nguyen, W. Stahl, ChemPhysChem 16 (2015), 291-294. H. Hartwig, H. Dreizler, Z. Naturforsch. A 51 (1996), 923-932. J. Kraitchman, Am. J. Phys. 21

  5. Structures and fragmentation of [Cu(uracil-H)(uracil)]+ in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Ali, Osama Y; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-02-01

    Complexes of copper (II) ions and uracil were studied using tandem mass spectrometry (Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, FTICR, mass spectrometry) including extensive isotopic labeling as well as theoretical calculations. Positive ion electrospray mass spectra of aqueous solutions of CuCl(2) and uracil show that the [Cu(Ura-H)(Ura)](+) ion is the most abundant ion even at low concentrations of uracil. Sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) experiments show that the lowest energy decomposition pathway for [Cu(Ura-H)(Ura)](+) , surprisingly, is not the loss of uracil, but the loss of HNCO followed by HCN as the most abundant secondary fragmentation product. MS(n) studies identified primary, secondary and tertiary fragmentation products. Extensive isotopic labeling studies, as well as computational studies allowed for a detailed fragmentation scheme for the [Cu(Ura-H)(Ura)](+) ion, beginning with the lowest energy structure. PMID:22183913

  6. Structures and fragmentations of cobalt(II)-cysteine complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, William; Spezia, Riccardo; Tournois, Guewen; Cartailler, Thierry; Tortajada, Jeanine

    2007-04-01

    The electronebulization of a cobalt(II)/cysteine(Cys) mixture in water/methanol (50/50) produced mainly cobalt-cationized species. Three main groups of the Co-cationized species can be distinguished in the ESI-MS spectrum: (1) the cobalt complexes including the cysteine amino acid only (they can be singly charged, for example, [Co(Cys)n- H]+ with n = 1-3 or doubly charged such as [Co + (Cys)2]2+); (2) the cobalt complexes with methanol: [Co(CH3OH)n- H]+ with n = 1-3, [Co(CH3OH)4]2+; and (3) the complexes with the two different types of ligands: [Co(Cys)(CH3OH) - H]+. Only the singly charged complexes were observed. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) products of the [Co(Cys)2]2+, [Co(Cys)2 - H]+ and [Co(Cys) - H]+ complexes were studied as a function of the collision energy, and mechanisms for the dissociation reactions are proposed. These were supported by the results of deuterium labelling experiments and by density functional theory calculations. Since [Co(Cys) - H]+ was one of the main product ions obtained upon the CID of [Co(Cys)2]2+ and of [Co(Cys)2 - H]+ under low-energy conditions, the fragmentation pathways of [Co(Cys) - H]+ and the resulting product ion structures were studied in detail. The resulting product ion structures confirmed the high affinity of cobalt(II) for the sulfur atom of cysteine. PMID:17323419

  7. Structural effect of the in situ generated titania on its ability to oxidize and capture the gas-phase elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hyun, Jung Eun

    2006-01-01

    Structural effect of the in situ generated TiO(2) sorbent particle was examined for its ability to capture elemental mercury under UV irradiation in a simulated combustion flue gas. Titania particles were prepared by thermal gas-phase oxidation of Titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) using a high temperature electric furnace reactor. The structural characteristics of the in situ generated TiO(2) at various synthesis temperatures were investigated; size distribution and the geometric mean diameter were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer, while fractal dimension and radius of gyration were evaluated from the transmission electron microscopy images. Results from the Hg(0) capture experiment show that with increasing titania synthesis temperature, the overall aggregate size increases and the morphology becomes more open-structured to gas-phase Hg(0) and UV light, resulting in the improved mercury removal capability. PMID:15949836

  8. Molecular structures of benzoic acid and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, obtained by gas-phase electron diffraction and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Aarset, Kirsten; Page, Elizabeth M; Rice, David A

    2006-07-20

    The structures of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C6H4OHCOOH) have been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction using results from quantum chemical calculations to inform restraints used on the structural parameters. Theoretical methods (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) predict two conformers for benzoic acid, one which is 25.0 kJ mol(-1) (MP2) lower in energy than the other. In the low-energy form, the carboxyl group is coplanar with the phenyl ring and the O-H group eclipses the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) carried out for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid gave evidence for seven stable conformers but one low-energy form (11.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy (MP2)) which again has the carboxyl group coplanar with the phenyl ring, the O-H of the carboxyl group eclipsing the C=O bond and the C=O of the carboxyl group oriented toward the O-H group of the phenyl ring. The effects of internal hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzoic acid can be clearly observed by comparison of pertinent structural parameters between the two compounds. These differences for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid include a shorter exocyclic C-C bond, a lengthening of the ring C-C bond between the substituents, and a shortening of the carboxylic single C-O bond. PMID:16836466

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Gas-Fluid and Fluid-Solid Phase Instability for Restricted Primitive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2009-08-01

    By considering the fluctuation of grand potential Ω around equilibrium with respect to small one-particle density fluctuations δρα(vec r), the phase instability of restricted primitive model (RPM) of ionic systems is investigated. We use the integral equation theory to calculate the direct correlation functions in the reference hypernetted chain approximation and obtain the spinodal line of RPM. Our analysis explicitly indicates that the gas-fluid phase instability is induced by k = 0 fluctuation mode, while the fluid-solid phase instability is related to k ≠ 0 fluctuation modes. The spinodal line is qualitatively consistent with the result of computer simulations by others.

  10. Structures of protonated thymine and uracil and their monohydrated gas-phase ions from ultraviolet action spectroscopy and theory.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Sara Øvad; Byskov, Camilla Skinnerup; Turecek, Frantisek; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2014-06-19

    The strong UV chromophores thymine (Thy) and uracil (Ura) have identical heteroaromatic rings that only differ by one methyl substituent. While their photophysics has been elucidated in detail, the effect on the excited states of base protonation and single water molecules is less explored. Here we report gas-phase absorption spectra of ThyH(+) and UraH(+) and monohydrated ions and demonstrate that the substituent is not only responsible for spectral shifts but also influences the tautomer distribution, being different for bare and monohydrated ions. Spectra interpretation is aided by calculations of geometrical structures and transition energies. The lowest free-energy tautomer (denoted 178, enol-enol form) accounts for 230-280 nm (ThyH(+)) and 225-270 nm (UraH(+)) bands. ThyH(+) hardly absorbs above 300 nm, whereas a discernible band is measured for UraH(+) (275-320 nm), ascribed to the second lowest free-energy tautomer (138, enol-keto form) comprising a few percent of the UraH(+) population at room temperature. Band widths are similar to those measured of cold ions in support of very short excited-state lifetimes. Attachment of a single water increases the abundance of 138 relative to 178, 138 now clearly present for ThyH(+). 138 resembles more the tautomer present in aqueous solution than 178 does, and 138 may indeed be a relevant transition structure. The band of ThyH(+)(178) is unchanged, that of UraH(+)(178) is nearly unchanged, and that of UraH(+)(138) blue-shifts by about 10 nm. In stark contrast to protonated adenine, more than one solvating water molecule is required to re-establish the absorption of ThyH(+) and UraH(+) in aqueous solution.

  11. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R; Bischoff, Florian A; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-28

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4 (-) and Al2O3-6 (-) are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm(-1). Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6 (-) anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3 (-). Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm(-1). Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm(-1)) and lower energies (850-570 cm(-1)), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm(-1) represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring. PMID:27369513

  12. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R.; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R.; Bischoff, Florian A.; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4- and Al2O3-6- are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm-1. Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6- anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3-. Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm-1. Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm-1) and lower energies (850-570 cm-1), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm-1 represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring.

  13. Permanent Electric Dipole Moments of Four Tryptamine Conformers in the Gas Phase. A New Diagnostic of Structure and Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, David; Nguyen, Tri V.

    2006-03-01

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy in the gas phase, in the absence and presence of an applied electric field, has been used to determine the charge distribution of a cross section of the energy landscape of tryptamine (TRA). We report the magnitude and direction of the permanent electric dipole moments of the four TRA conformers GPyout, GPyup, GPhup and Antiup in their S0 and S1 electronic states. Each dipole moment is unique, providing a powerful new tool for conformational analysis of biomolecules in the gas phase. A comparison of the results for the different conformers of TRA reveals that the position and orientation of the ethylamine side chain plays a major role in determining both the permanent and induced electric dipole moments of the different species in both electronic states

  14. Permanent electric dipole moments of four tryptamine conformers in the gas phase: A new diagnostic of structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tri V.; Pratt, David W.

    2006-02-01

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy in the gas phase, in the absence and presence of an applied electric field, has been used to determine the charge distribution of a cross section of the energy landscape of tryptamine (TRA). We report the magnitude and direction of the permanent electric dipole moments of the four TRA conformers GPyout, GPyup, GPhup, and Antiup in their S0 and S1 electronic states. Each dipole moment is unique, providing a powerful new tool for the conformational analysis of biomolecules in the gas phase. A comparison of the results for the different conformers of TRA reveals that the position and orientation of the ethylamine side chain play a major role in determining both the permanent and induced electric dipole moments of the different species in both electronic states.

  15. Structures of lithiated lysine and structural analogues in the gas phase: effects of water and proton affinity on zwitterionic stability.

    PubMed

    Lemoff, Andrew S; Bush, Matthew F; O'Brien, Jeremy T; Williams, Evan R

    2006-07-13

    The structures of lithiated lysine, ornithine, and related molecules, both with and without a water molecule, are investigated using both density functional theory and blackbody infrared radiative dissociation experiments. The lowest-energy structure of lithiated lysine without a water molecule is nonzwitterionic; the metal ion interacts with both nitrogen atoms and the carbonyl oxygen. Structures in which lysine is zwitterionic are higher in energy by more than 29 kJ/mol. In contrast, the singly hydrated clusters with the zwitterionic and nonzwitterionic forms of lysine are more similar in energy, with the nonzwitterionic form more stable by only approximately 7 kJ/mol. Thus, a single water molecule can substantially stabilize the zwitterionic form of an amino acid. Analogous molecules that have methyl groups attached to either the N-terminus (NMeLys) or the side-chain amine (Lys(Me)) have proton affinities greater than that of lysine. In the lithiated clusters with a water molecule attached, the zwitterionic forms of NMeLys and Lys(Me) are calculated to be approximately 4 and approximately 11 kJ/mol more stable than the nonzwitterionic forms, respectively. Calculations of the potential-energy pathway for interconversion between the different forms of lysine in the lithiated complex indicate multiple stable intermediates with an overall barrier height of approximately 83 kJ/mol between the lowest-energy nonzwitterionic form and the most accessible zwitterionic form. Experimentally determined binding energies of water are similar for all these complexes and range from 57 to 64 kJ/mol. These results suggest that loss of a water molecule from the lysine complexes is both energetically and entropically favored compared to interconversion between the nonzwitterionic and zwitterionic structures. Comparisons to calculated binding energies of water to the various structures show that the experimental results are most consistent with the nonzwitterionic forms. PMID

  16. Structure enhancement methodology using theory and experiment: gas-phase molecular structures using a dynamic interaction between electron diffraction, molecular mechanics, and ab initio data.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H

    2007-07-01

    A new method of incorporating ab initio theoretical data dynamically into the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) refinement process has been developed to aid the structure determination of large, sterically crowded molecules. This process involves calculating a set of differences between parameters that define the positions of peripheral atoms (usually hydrogen), as determined using molecular mechanics (MM), and those which use ab initio methods. The peripheral-atom positions are then updated continually during the GED refinement process, using MM, and the returned positions are modified using this set of differences to account for the differences between ab initio and MM methods, before being scaled back to the average parameters used to define them, as refined from experimental data. This allows the molecule to adopt a completely asymmetric structure if required, without being constrained by the MM parametrization, whereas the calculations can be performed on a practical time scale. The molecular structures of tri-tert-butylphosphine oxide and tri-tert-butylphosphine imide have been re-examined using this new technique, which we call SEMTEX (Structure Enhancement Methodology using Theory and EXperiment).

  17. Vibrational structure of n-π* transition of the UV absorption spectrum of acryloyl fluoride in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, Lidiya A; Tyulin, Vladimir I; Matveev, Vladimir K; Pentin, Yuriy A

    2014-03-25

    UV absorption spectrum of acryloyl fluoride molecule in the gas phase has been obtained in the region at 32600-35500 cm(-1) with the purpose of the investigation of the hindered internal rotation. The resolved vibrational structure of this spectrum consists of 92 absorption bands, each of which corresponds to a certain transition from the ground (S0) to excited (S1) electronic state. The assignment of all bands has been made. The values ν00trans=34831.8 cm(-1) and ν00cis=34679.2 cm(-1) have been determined. Several Deslandres Tables (DTs) have been constructed for torsional vibration of s-trans- and s-cis-isomers of investigated molecule. The origins in these DTs correspond to bands assigned to ν00 and to fundamental frequencies of each isomer in the S0 and S1 states. These DTs have been used to determine the harmonic frequencies ωe, anharmonicity coefficients x11, and frequencies of the torsional vibration transitions (0-υ) up to high values of the vibrational quantum number υ of s-trans- and s-cis-isomers in the both electronic states. The frequencies of torsional vibrations are ν1(″)=116.5cm(-1) for s-trans-isomer and ν1(″)=101.2 cm(-1) for s-cis-isomer in the S0 state. The frequencies of ones are ν1(')=170.4 cm(-1) for s-trans-isomer and ν1(')=139.7 cm(-1) for s-cis-isomer in the S1 state. The fundamental vibrational frequencies set has been found for isomers in the S0 and S1 states.

  18. Simulation of phase structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.

    1995-04-20

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing.

  19. Molecular structure and conformational composition of 1,1-dichlorobutane: a gas-phase electron diffraction and ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarset, Kirsten; Hagen, Kolbjørn; Stølevik, Reidar

    1997-09-01

    Gas-phase electron diffraction data obtained at 23°C, together with results from ab initio molecular orbital calculations ( {HF}/{6-31 G(d)}). were used to determine the structure and conformational composition of 1,1-dichlorobutane. Of the five distinguishable conformers (AA, G + A, AG +, G + G + and G + G -), the G + A conformer was found to be the low-energy form, and the investigation also indicated that certain amounts of the AA and G + G - conformers might be present. The symbols describing the conformers refer to torsion about the C 1C 2 and C 2C 3 bonds, anti (A) with H 5C 1C 2C 3 and C 1C 2C 3C 4 torsion angles of 180° and gauche (G + or G -) with torsion angles of + 60° or 300° (-60°) respectively. The results for the principal distances ( rg) and angles (∠ α) from the combined electron diffraction/ab initio study for the G + A conformer, with estimated 2σ uncertainties, were as follows: r( C1 C2) = 1.521(4) Å, r( C2 C3) = 1.539(4) Å, r( C3 C4) = 1.546(4) Å, r( C Cl6) = 1.782(3) Å, r( CCl7) = 1.782(3) Å, = 1.106(6) Å, ∠C 1C 2C 3 = 114.4(13)°, ∠C 2C 3C 4 = 112.5(13)°, ∠CCCl 6 = 110.4(7)°, ∠CCCl 7 = 111.9(7)°, <∠CCH> = 108.9(47)°. Only average values for r(CC), r(CCl), r(CH), ∠CCC, ∠CCX and ∠CCH were determined in the least-square refinements; the differences between the values for these parameters in the same conformer and between the different conformers were kept constant at the values obtained from the ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  20. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  1. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-07-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  2. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27400696

  4. An Unexpected Gas-Phase Binding Motif for Metal Dication Complexation with Peptides: Irmpd Spectroscopic Structure Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2011-06-01

    The favorable orientation of the amide linkage and the aromatic side chain of N-terminal Phe or Trp leads to several favorable motifs for metal ion binding to dipeptides, having distinct characteristics in the IR spectrum. Infrared multiple photon photodissociation spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser has enabled clear resolution of these isomeric forms. The spectral patterns of complexes of small dications (Mg2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) reveal an unexpected new isomeric form, in which the metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, forming a metal-nitrogen bond with covalent character which is unprecedented in such gas-phase complexes. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 Cm-1.

  5. Structural exploration and Förster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-β peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Förster theory (Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-β 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems.

  6. Structural exploration and Förster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-β peptides.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-14

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Förster theory (Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-β 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems. PMID:26178129

  7. Crosslinked structurally-tuned polymeric ionic liquids as stationary phases for the analysis of hydrocarbons in kerosene and diesel fuels by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Park, Rodney A; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-04-01

    Structurally-tuned ionic liquids (ILs) have been previously applied as the second dimension column in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and have demonstrated high selectivity in the separation of individual aliphatic hydrocarbons from other aliphatic hydrocarbons. However, the maximum operating temperatures of these stationary phases limit the separation of analytes with high boiling points. In order to address this issue, a series of polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based stationary phases were prepared in this study using imidazolium-based IL monomers via in-column free radical polymerization. The IL monomers were functionalized with long alkyl chain substituents to provide the needed selectivity for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Columns were prepared with different film thicknesses to identify the best performing stationary phase for the separation of kerosene. The bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([NTf2](-))-based PIL stationary phase with larger film thickness (0.28μm) exhibited higher selectivity for aliphatic hydrocarbons and showed a maximum allowable operating temperature of 300°C. PIL-based stationary phases containing varied amount of IL-based crosslinker were prepared to study the effect of the crosslinker on the selectivity and thermal stability of the resulting stationary phase. The optimal resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons was achieved when 50% (w/w) of crosslinker was incorporated into the PIL-based stationary phase. The resulting stationary phase exhibited good selectivity for different groups of aliphatic hydrocarbons even after being conditioned at 325°C. Finally, the crosslinked PIL-based stationary phase was compared with SUPELCOWAX 10 and DB-17 columns for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons in diesel fuel. Better resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons was obtained when employing the crosslinked PIL-based stationary phase as the second dimension column. PMID:26916595

  8. Crosslinked structurally-tuned polymeric ionic liquids as stationary phases for the analysis of hydrocarbons in kerosene and diesel fuels by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Park, Rodney A; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-04-01

    Structurally-tuned ionic liquids (ILs) have been previously applied as the second dimension column in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and have demonstrated high selectivity in the separation of individual aliphatic hydrocarbons from other aliphatic hydrocarbons. However, the maximum operating temperatures of these stationary phases limit the separation of analytes with high boiling points. In order to address this issue, a series of polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based stationary phases were prepared in this study using imidazolium-based IL monomers via in-column free radical polymerization. The IL monomers were functionalized with long alkyl chain substituents to provide the needed selectivity for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Columns were prepared with different film thicknesses to identify the best performing stationary phase for the separation of kerosene. The bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([NTf2](-))-based PIL stationary phase with larger film thickness (0.28μm) exhibited higher selectivity for aliphatic hydrocarbons and showed a maximum allowable operating temperature of 300°C. PIL-based stationary phases containing varied amount of IL-based crosslinker were prepared to study the effect of the crosslinker on the selectivity and thermal stability of the resulting stationary phase. The optimal resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons was achieved when 50% (w/w) of crosslinker was incorporated into the PIL-based stationary phase. The resulting stationary phase exhibited good selectivity for different groups of aliphatic hydrocarbons even after being conditioned at 325°C. Finally, the crosslinked PIL-based stationary phase was compared with SUPELCOWAX 10 and DB-17 columns for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons in diesel fuel. Better resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons was obtained when employing the crosslinked PIL-based stationary phase as the second dimension column.

  9. Rate processes in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction-rate theory and experiment are given a critical review from the engineers' point of view. Rates of heavy-particle, collision-induced reaction in gas phase are formulated in terms of the cross sections and activation energies for reaction. The effect of cross section function shape and of excited state contributions to reaction both cause the slope of Arrhenius plots to differ from the true activation energy, except at low temperature. The master equations for chemically reacting gases are introduced, and dissociation and ionization reactions are shown to proceed primarily from excited states about kT from the dissociation or ionization limit. Collision-induced vibration, vibration-rotation, and pure rotation transitions are treated, including three-dimensional effects and conservation of energy, which have usually been ignored. The quantum theory of transitions at potential surface crossing is derived, and results are found to be in fair agreement with experiment in spite of some questionable approximations involved.

  10. Electronic structure of BiGay(-) semiconductor clusters and the special stability of BiGa2- - A gas phase Zintl analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ujjwal; Ulises Reveles, J.; Melko, Joshua J.; Khanna, Shiv N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Here we present evidence that the gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO gap) can be tuned (1.12-1.89 eV) by changing the Ga composition of Bi 3Ga y anionic and neutral clusters, some of which display special stability. Collaboratively, mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy and computational results show that BiGa2- is a very stable cluster with a large calculated HOMO-LUMO gap of 1.89 eV, and can be viewed as a gas phase Zintl analogue of Sn52-, already synthesized in the solution phase. The stability of BiGa2- is further attributed to the fact that it has 12 valence electrons and possesses a closo structure in agreement with Wade's rules.

  11. Electronic Structure of Bi3Gay^- Semiconductor Clusters and the Special Stability of Bi3Ga2^- - A Gas Phase Zintl Analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulises Reveles, Jose; Gupta, Ujjwal; Melko, Joshua J.; Khanna, Shiv N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Here we present evidence that the gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO gap) can be tuned (1.12eV-1.89eV) by changing the Ga composition of Bi3Gay neutral and anionic clusters, some of which display special stability. Collaboratively, mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy and computational results show that Bi3Ga2^- is a very stable cluster with a large calculated HOMO-LUMO gap of 1.89 eV, and can be viewed as a gas phase Zintl analogue of Sn5^2-, already synthesized in the solution phase. The stability of Bi3Ga2^- is further attributed to the fact that it has 12 valence electrons and possesses a closo structure in agreement with Wade's rules.

  12. Structure and chemistry of the heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4]•+: a model system for the gas-phase oxidation of small hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Nicolas; Wende, Torsten; Chen, Kai; Jiang, Ling; Schlangen, Maria; Zhang, Xinhao; Asmis, Knut R; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4](•+) is generated via electrospray ionization and investigated with respect to both its electronic structure as well as its gas-phase reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, thus permitting a comparison to the well-known vanadium-oxide cation [V2O4](•+). As described in previous studies, the latter oxide exhibits no or just minor reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, and C2H4, while substitution of one vanadium by a phosphorus atom yields the reactive [VPO4](•+) ion; the latter brings about oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of saturated hydrocarbons, e.g., propane and butane as well as oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) to unsaturated hydrocarbons, e.g. ethene, at thermal conditions. Further, the gas-phase structure of [VPO4](•+) is determined by IR photodissociation spectroscopy and compared to that of [V2O4](•+). DFT calculations help to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The results underline the crucial role of phosphorus in terms of C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons by mixed VPO clusters.

  13. Structure and chemistry of the heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4]•+: a model system for the gas-phase oxidation of small hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Nicolas; Wende, Torsten; Chen, Kai; Jiang, Ling; Schlangen, Maria; Zhang, Xinhao; Asmis, Knut R; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4](•+) is generated via electrospray ionization and investigated with respect to both its electronic structure as well as its gas-phase reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, thus permitting a comparison to the well-known vanadium-oxide cation [V2O4](•+). As described in previous studies, the latter oxide exhibits no or just minor reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, and C2H4, while substitution of one vanadium by a phosphorus atom yields the reactive [VPO4](•+) ion; the latter brings about oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of saturated hydrocarbons, e.g., propane and butane as well as oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) to unsaturated hydrocarbons, e.g. ethene, at thermal conditions. Further, the gas-phase structure of [VPO4](•+) is determined by IR photodissociation spectroscopy and compared to that of [V2O4](•+). DFT calculations help to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The results underline the crucial role of phosphorus in terms of C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons by mixed VPO clusters. PMID:23432112

  14. Shell structure and phase relations in electronic properties of metal nanowires from an electron-gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong; Liu, Da-Jiang

    2010-09-01

    The electronic and dynamic properties of metal nanowires are analyzed by using a minimal electron-gas model (EGM), in which the nanowire is treated as a close system with variable Fermi energy as a function of nanowire radius. We show that the planar surface energy and the curvature energy from the EGM are reasonably consistent with those from previous stabilized-jellium-model calculations, especially for metals with low electron densities. The EGM shell structure due to the fillings of quantum-well subbands is similar to that from the stabilized jellium model. The crossings between subbands and Fermi energy level for the metal nanowire correspond to cusps on the chemical-potential curve versus nanowire radius, but inflection points on the surface-free-energy curve versus the radius, as in the case of metal nanofilms. We also find an oscillatory variation in electron density versus radius at the nanowire center with a global oscillation period which approximately equals half Fermi wavelength. Wire string tension, average binding energy, and thermodynamic stability from the EGM are in good agreement with the data from previous first-principles density-functional theory calculations. We also compare our model with those from previous reported free-electron models, in which the nanowire is treated as an open system with a constant Fermi energy. We demonstrate that the fundamental thermodynamic properties depend sensitively on the way that the potential wall is constructed in the models.

  15. Low symmetry in molecules with heavy peripheral atoms. The gas-phase structure of perfluoro(methylcyclohexane), C6F11CF3.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Wann, Derek A; Robertson, Heather E; Rankin, David W H

    2010-10-21

    When refining structures using gas electron diffraction (GED) data, assumptions are often made in order to reduce the number of required geometrical parameters. Where these relate to light, peripheral atoms there is little effect on the refined heavy-atom structure, which is well defined by the GED data. However, this is not the case when heavier atoms are involved. We have determined the gas-phase structure of perfluoro(methylcyclohexane), C(6)F(11)CF(3), using three different refinement methods and have shown that our new method, which makes use of both MP2 and molecular mechanics (MM) calculations to restrain the peripheral-atom geometry, gives a realistic structure without the need for damaging constraints. Only the conformer with the CF(3) group in an equatorial position was considered, as ab initio calculations showed this to be 25 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the axial conformer. Refinements combining both high-level and low-level calculations to give constraints were superior both to those based only on molecular mechanics and to those in which assumptions about the geometry were imposed.

  16. Identifying important structural features of ionic liquid stationary phases for the selective separation of nonpolar analytes by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Ingram, Isaiah C; Hantao, Leandro W; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-03-20

    A series of dicationic ionic liquid (IL)-based stationary phases were evaluated as secondary columns in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons from kerosene. In order to understand the role that structural features of ILs play on the selectivity of nonpolar analytes, the solvation parameter model was used to probe the solvation properties of the IL-based stationary phases. It was observed that room temperature ILs containing long free alkyl side chain substituents and long linker chains between the two cations possess less cohesive forces and exhibited the highest resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The anion component of the IL did not contribute significantly to the overall separation, as similar selectivities toward aliphatic hydrocarbons were observed when examining ILs with identical cations and different anions. In an attempt to further examine the separation capabilities of the IL-based GC stationary phases, columns of the best performing stationary phases were prepared with higher film thickness and resulted in enhanced selectivity of aliphatic hydrocarbons.

  17. Identifying important structural features of ionic liquid stationary phases for the selective separation of nonpolar analytes by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Ingram, Isaiah C; Hantao, Leandro W; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-03-20

    A series of dicationic ionic liquid (IL)-based stationary phases were evaluated as secondary columns in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons from kerosene. In order to understand the role that structural features of ILs play on the selectivity of nonpolar analytes, the solvation parameter model was used to probe the solvation properties of the IL-based stationary phases. It was observed that room temperature ILs containing long free alkyl side chain substituents and long linker chains between the two cations possess less cohesive forces and exhibited the highest resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The anion component of the IL did not contribute significantly to the overall separation, as similar selectivities toward aliphatic hydrocarbons were observed when examining ILs with identical cations and different anions. In an attempt to further examine the separation capabilities of the IL-based GC stationary phases, columns of the best performing stationary phases were prepared with higher film thickness and resulted in enhanced selectivity of aliphatic hydrocarbons. PMID:25698381

  18. Simple setup for gas-phase H/D exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale.

    PubMed

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3/D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium uptake of Leu-Enkephalin and Glu-Fibrinopeptide B, confirmed that this gas-phase HDX-MS approach allows for labeling of sites (heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens located on side-chains, N-terminus and C-terminus) not accessed by classical solution-phase HDX-MS. The simple setup is compatible with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow.

  19. Hydrated metal ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Martin K

    2007-01-01

    Studying metal ion solvation, especially hydration, in the gas phase has developed into a field that is dominated by a tight interaction between experiment and theory. Since the studied species carry charge, mass spectrometry is an indispensable tool in all experiments. Whereas gas-phase coordination chemistry and reactions of bare metal ions are reasonably well understood, systems containing a larger number of solvent molecules are still difficult to understand. This review focuses on the rich chemistry of hydrated metal ions in the gas phase, covering coordination chemistry, charge separation in multiply charged systems, as well as intracluster and ion-molecule reactions. Key ideas of metal ion solvation in the gas phase are illustrated with rare-gas solvated metal ions.

  20. Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Computational Approaches to Elucidate Gas-Phase Structures and Energetics of 2'-DEOXYCYTIDINE and Cytidine Sodium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanlong; Hamlow, Lucas; He, Chenchen; Gao, Juehan; Oomens, Jos; Rodgers, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    The local structures of DNA and RNA are influenced by protonation, deprotonation and noncovalent interactions with cations. In order to determine the effects of Na+ cationization on the gas-phase structures of 2'-deoxycytidine, [dCyd+Na]+, and cytidine, [Cyd+Na]+, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of these sodium cationized nucleosides are measured over the range extending from 500 to 1850 wn using the FELIX free electron laser. Complementary electronic structure calculations are performed to determine the stable low-energy conformations of these complexes. Geometry optimizations, frequency analyses, and IR spectra of these species are determined at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. Single-point energies are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory to determine the relative stabilities of these conformations. Comparison of the measure IRMPD action spectra and computed linear IR spectra enable the conformations accessed in the experiments to be elucidated. For both cytosine nucleosides, tridentate binding of the Na+ cation to the O2, O4' and O5' atoms of the nucleobase and sugar is observed. Present results for the sodium cationized nucleosides are compared to results for the analogous protonated forms of these nucleosides to elucidate the effects of multiple chelating interactions with the sodium cation vs. hydrogen bonding interactions in the protonated systems on the structures and stabilities of these nucleosides.

  1. A carbon foam with a bimodal micro–mesoporous structure prepared from larch sawdust for the gas-phase toluene adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shouxin; Huang, Zhanhua; Wang, Rui

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Network carbon foam containing a bimodal pore distribution was prepared from Larch. ► Liquefaction route was used for the preparation of morphology controllable carbon. ► Pore structure of carbon foam was controlled through KOH activation. - Abstract: A carbon foam with a bimodal micro–mesopore distribution, was prepared by submitting larch sawdust to liquefaction, resinification, foaming, carbonization and KOH activation. The morphology, pore texture and crystal microstructure was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption analysis and X-ray powder diffraction. A honeycomb structure with adjacent cells was observed for the precursor of carbon foam. After KOH activation, the cell wall of precursor shrunk and broke. This lead to the formation of a well-connected 3D network and developed ligament pore structure (surface area of 554–1918 m{sup 2}/g) containing bimodal pores, 2.1 and 3.9 nm in diameter. The porous carbon foam prepared at 700 °C exhibited a much higher gas-phase toluene removal than commercial activated carbon fiber owing to the 3D network and bimodal pore structure.

  2. Secondary structures of Val-Phe and Val-Tyr(Me) peptide chains in the gas phase: effect of the nature of the protecting groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wutharath; Dognon, Jean-Pierre; Piuzzi, François; Dimicoli, Iliana; Mons, Michel

    Recent experimental gas-phase studies of very similar peptide chain models (Ac-Val-Tyr(Me)-NHMe and Ac-Val-Phe-NH2) have led to different assignments for the secondary structures adopted: β-strand and β-turn, respectively. We present a discussion of the possible causes for such different behaviour in the light of quantum chemistry calculations. The consistent set of data presently obtained (relative energies and IR calculated spectra) leads us to propose the same structural assignment for the experimentally observed Val-Tyr(Me) and Val-Phe peptide chains, i.e. a β-turn conformation. In addition, calculations also suggest that the nature of the chemical protection on the C-terminal (-NHMe vs. -NH2) of the chain model does not affect its conformational preference, nor its structure or its energetics, which suggests the less simple, but more informative, -NH2-protected models for the determination of the intrinsic structural properties of a peptide chain.

  3. Gas-Phase Structure of Amyloid-β (12 - 28) Peptide Investigated by Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Capture Dissociation and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  4. The molecular structure of tetramethyldiarsine, As 2 (CH 3) 4, in the gas phase as determined by electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Anthony J.; Hunt, Nicholas I.; McGrady, G. Sean; Rankin, David W. H.; Robertson, Heather E.

    1991-08-01

    The structure of gaseous tetramethyldiarsine, As 2(CH 3) 4, has been determined by electron diffraction. At room temperature (about 290 K) the vapour consists of a mixture comprising about 60% of the gauche and 40% of the trans conformer, a finding consistent with the results of earlier spectroscopic studies of the liquid. Salient parameters of the structure are: r(AsAs) = 243.3(0.2) and r(AsC) = 197.3(0.2) pm; ∠AsAsC = 95.4(0.5), ∠CAsC = 95.3(1.1) and ∠AsCH = 109.3(0.9)°. These and other features are discussed in the light of the conformations and dimensions of related compounds of the Group V elements, e.g. P 2 (CH 3) 4 and As (CH 3) 3.

  5. Energetics and structural characterization of isomers using ion mobility and gas-phase H/D exchange: Learning from lasso peptides.

    PubMed

    Hanozin, Emeline; Morsa, Denis; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    State-of-the-art characterization of proteins using MS namely relies on fragmentation methods that allow exploring featured dissociative reaction pathways. These pathways are often initiated by a series of potentially informative mass-constant conformational changes that are nonetheless frequently overlooked by lack of adequate investigation techniques. In the present study, we propose a methodology to readily address both structural and energetic aspects of stereoisomerization reactions using ion mobility coupled with MS. To this end, a commercial spectrometer was used as a reactor comprising an energy resolved collisional activation step intended at promoting controlled conformational changes and a structural assignment step dedicated to the identification of the generated isomers. This identification relies on ion mobility and other on-line coupled techniques, namely an originally designed gas-phase H/D exchange experiment. We here apply this methodology to characterize the isomerization kinetics of capistruin, a 19-residue long lasso-folded peptide. We expect this approach to bring insights into the physical origin of global dissociation thresholds monitored in MS/MS experiments and to set a promising basis for quantitative investigations of the stability of different molecular folds.

  6. Prioritizing testing of organic compounds detected as gas phase air pollutants: structure-activity study for human contact allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R; Macina, O T; Graham, C; Rosenkranz, H S; Cass, G R; Karol, M H

    1997-01-01

    Organic compounds that are used or generated anthropogenically in large quantities in cities can be identified through their presence in the urban atmosphere and in air pollutant source emissions. Compounds identified by this method were screened to evaluate their potential to act as contact allergens. The CASE and MULTICASE computer programs, which are based on the detection of structure-activity relationships (SAR), were used to evaluate this potential. These relationships first are determined by comparing chemical structures to biological activity within a learning set comprised of 458 compounds, each of which had been tested experimentally in human trials for its sensitization potential. Using the information contained in this learning set, CASE and MULTICASE predicted the activity of 238 compounds found in the atmosphere for their ability to act as contact allergens. The analysis finds that 21 of 238 compounds are predicted to be active contact allergens (probability >0.5), with potencies ranging from mild to very strong. The compounds come from chemical classes that include chlorinated aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons, N-containing compounds, phenols, alkenes, and an S-containing compound. Using the measured airborne concentrations or emission rates of these compounds as an indication of the extent of their use, together with their predicted potencies, provides an efficient method to prioritize the experimental assessment of contact sensitization of untested organic compounds that can be detected as air pollutants. Images Figure 1. PMID:9300925

  7. Understanding the structure and dynamic of odorants in the gas phase using a combination of microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhib, Halima

    2014-07-01

    This tutorial is an introduction for PhD students and researchers who intend to start their future work in the field of microwave spectroscopy to investigate structural and dynamical aspects of isolated molecular systems in the gas phase. Although the presented case studies are related to odorants, i.e., volatile molecules that possess a noticeable scent, the background and applications of the method can be transferred to any other resembling molecular system. In the early days, microwave spectroscopy was mainly related to the structure determination of very small systems such as OCS or ammonia, where the bond lengths could be determined with high accuracy by measuring the different isotopic species of the molecules. Nowadays, the method is far more advanced and is also used to tackle various fundamental molecular problems in different fields such as physical chemistry and molecular physics. Interesting questions that can be investigated concern, e.g., the molecular structure, i.e., the different conformations, not only of the isolated molecule but also of van der Waals complexes with water, noble gases or other molecules. The dynamical and intra- or intermolecular effects can be straightforwardly observed without the influence of the environment as in the condensed phase. This evolution was only achieved by using quantum chemical methods as a complementary tool to elude the necessity of isotopologues for structure determination, which cannot be realized for large systems (>5 atoms). The combination of microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations is the method of choice when it comes to sampling the conformational space of molecules. This is particularly the case when small energy differences make it difficult to determine the conformers of the lowest energy using computational methods alone. Although quantum chemical calculations are important for the validation of microwave spectra, the focus of the tutorial is set on the experimental part of the

  8. Gas-Phase Molecular Structure of Nopinone and its Water Complexes Studied by Microwave Fourier Transform Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeman, Elias M.; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.

    2016-06-01

    Several monoterpenes and terpenoids are biogenic volatile organic compounds which are emitted in the atmosphere, where they react with OH, O_3 and NO_x etc. to give rise to several oxidation and degradation products. Their decomposition products are a major source of secondray organic aerosol (SOA). Spectroscopic information on these atmospheric species is still very scarce. The rotational spectrum of nopinone (C_9H14O) one of the major oxidation products of β-pinene, and of its water complexes were recorded in a supersonic jet expansion with a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer over the range 2-20 GHz. The structure of the unique stable conformer of the nopinone was optimized using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. Signals from the parent species and from the 13C and 18O isotopomers were observed in natural abundance. A magnetic hyperfine structure associated with the pairs of hydrogen nuclei in the methylene groups was observed and modeled. The structures of several conformers of the nopinone-water complexes with up to three molecules of water were optimized using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. The energetically most stable of calculated conformers were observed and anlyzed. The rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters were fitted to a Watson's Hamiltonian in the A-reduction. The present work provides the first spectroscopic characterization of nopinone and its water complexes in the gas phase. A. Calogirou, B.R. Larsen, and D. Kotzias, Atmospheric Environment, 33, 1423-1439, (1999) P. Paasonen et al., Nat. Geosci., 6, 438-442 (2013) D. Zhang and R. Zhang The Journal of Chemical Physics, 122, 114308, (2005) R. Winterhalter et al. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 35, 165-197, (2000)

  9. Transition metals as electron traps. I. Structures, energetics, electron capture, and electron-transfer-induced dissociations of ternary copper-peptide complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Turecek, Frantisek; Jones, Jace W; Holm, Anne I S; Panja, Subhasis; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Hvelplund, Preben

    2009-05-01

    Electron-induced dissociations of gas-phase ternary copper-2,2'-bipyridine complexes of Gly-Gly-Gly and Gly-Gly-Leu were studied on a time scale ranging from 130 ns to several milliseconds using a combination of charge-reversal ((+)CR(-)) and electron-capture-induced dissociation (ECID) measured on a beam instrument and electron capture dissociation (ECD) measured in a Penning trap. Charge-reduced intermediates were observed on the short time scale in the (+)CR(-) and ECID experiments but not in ECD. Ion dissociations following electron transfer or capture mostly occurred by competitive bpy or peptide ligand loss, whereas peptide backbone fragmentations were suppressed in the presence of the ligated metal ion. Extensive electron structure theory calculations using density functional theory and large basis sets provided optimized structures and energies for the precursor ions, charge-reduced intermediates, and dissociation products. The Cu complexes underwent substantial structure changes upon electron capture. Cu was calculated to be pentacoordinated in the most stable singly charged complexes of the [Cu(peptide-H)bpy](+*) type where it carried a approximately +1 atomic charge. Cu coordination in charge-reduced [Cu(peptide-H)bpy] intermediates depended on the spin state. The themodynamically more stable singlet states had tricoordinated Cu, whereas triplet states had a tetracoordinated Cu. Cu was tricoordinated in stable [Cu(peptide-H)bpy](-*) products of electron transfer. [Cu(peptide)bpy](2+*) complexes contained the peptide ligand in a zwitterionic form while Cu was tetracoordinated. Upon electron capture, Cu was tri- or tetracoordinated in the [Cu(peptide)bpy](+) charge-reduced analogs and the peptide ligands underwent prototropic isomerization to canonical forms. The role of excited singlet and triplet electronic states is assessed. PMID:19132713

  10. Microwave Spectrum for a Second Higher Energy Conformer of Cyclopropanecarboxylic Acid and Determination of the Gas Phase Structure of the Ground State.

    PubMed

    Pejlovas, Aaron M; Lin, Wei; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2015-10-01

    Microwave spectra for a higher-energy conformer of cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (CPCA) were measured using a Flygare-Balle-type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The rotational constants (in megahertz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kilohertz) for this higher-energy conformer are A = 7452.3132(57), B = 2789.8602(43), C = 2415.0725(40), DJ = 0.29(53), and DJK = 2.5(12). Differences between rotational constants for this excited-state conformation and the ground state are primarily due to the acidic OH bond moving from a position cis relative to the cyclopropyl group about the C1-C9 bond to the more stable trans conformation. Calculations indicate that the relative abundance of the higher-energy state should be 15% to 17% at room temperature, but the observed relative abundance for the supersonic expansion conditions is about 1%. The measurements of rotational transitions for the trans form of CPCA were extended to include all of the unique (13)C singly substituted positions. These measurements, along with previously measured transitions of the parent and -OD isotopologues, were used to determine a best-fit gas-phase structure.

  11. Gas phase fragmentation of eta2 coordinated aldehydes in [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]-: aldehyde structure dictates the nature of the products.

    PubMed

    Waters, Tom; Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2009-09-28

    The gas phase fragmentation reactions of eta2 coordinated aldehydes in [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]-, which have previously been shown to play a role in the catalytic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, were examined using a combination of isotope labelling experiments and collision induced dissociation in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The experimental data were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The types of fragmentation reactions observed depend on the nature of the R group. When R = H, the dominant fragmentation channel involves formation of [VO2H2]-via loss of CO. Minor losses of H2 and CH2O are also observed. When R = Me, loss of H2 is observed to give rise to an ion at m/z 125 corresponding to the formula [V, O3, C2, H2]-. DFT calculations on the [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]- and their CID reaction products have identified minimum energy structures for all reactants and products involved. DFT calculations also provided insights into key intermediates on the potential energy surface associated with these fragmentation reactions, including: [(H2)VO2(CO)]- in the case of R = H; and [HVO2(eta1-OCHCH2)]- in the case of R = Me. The results presented provide insights into potential side reactions occurring during catalysis of alcohols over vanadium oxides, for instance, the over-oxidation of methanol to carbon monoxide. PMID:19727457

  12. Gas-phase rate coefficients for the reactions of NO 3, OH and O 3 with α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones: Structure-activity relations (SARs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrang, Christian; King, Martin D.; Canosa-Mas, Carlos E.; Flugge, Mark; Wayne, Richard P.

    Gas-phase rate coefficients for the atmospherically important reactions of NO 3, OH and O 3 are predicted for 55 α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones. The rate coefficients were calculated using a correlation described previously [Pfrang, C., King, M.D., C. E. Canosa-Mas, C.E., Wayne, R.P., 2006. Atmospheric Environment 40, 1170-1179]. These rate coefficients were used to extend structure-activity relations for predicting the rate coefficients for the reactions of NO 3, OH or O 3 with alkenes to include α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones. Conjugation of an alkene with an α, β-keto or α, β-ester group will reduce the value of a rate coefficient by a factor of ˜110, ˜2.5 and ˜12 for reaction with NO 3, OH or O 3, respectively. The actual identity of the alkyl group, R, in -C(O)R or -C(O)OR has only a small influence. An assessment of the reliability of the SAR is given that demonstrates that it is useful for reactions involving NO 3 and OH, but less valuable for those of O 3 or peroxy nitrate esters.

  13. Real Gas/Blunt Cone. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Eitelberg, Georg

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter recent activity in real-gas database definition and code validation will be summarized. In the Phase I report of the Working Group (WG) 181, aerothermodynamic problems were classified, for purpose of discussion, into seven types: aerodynamic parameters, viscous/shock interaction, boundary-layer transition, forebody-heating/heat-transfer, radiation and ablation, lee and base-region flow, and low-density flow. Several of these problem types were the subject of various chapters of the Phase 1 report describing real-gas effects and ground test facility issues. In this chapter some background and objectives outlined in the real-Gas effects Chapter V of the Phase 1 report will be reviewed. The results of the blunt cone test campaign developed under the auspices of the WG18 activity to study real-gas phenomena will be summarized, including the experimental and computational programs, issues and questions, and recommendations. Further, recent progress in other real-gas areas beyond the blunt cone test campaign will be discussed. Finally, a summary in which the present status of our understanding of real-gas issues will be presented.

  14. Structural verification for GAS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Mark Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist the Get Away Special (GAS) experimenter in conducting a thorough structural verification of its experiment structural configuration, thus expediting the structural review/approval process and the safety process in general. Material selection for structural subsystems will be covered with an emphasis on fasteners (GSFC fastener integrity requirements) and primary support structures (Stress Corrosion Cracking requirements and National Space Transportation System (NSTS) requirements). Different approaches to structural verifications (tests and analyses) will be outlined especially those stemming from lessons learned on load and fundamental frequency verification. In addition, fracture control will be covered for those payloads that utilize a door assembly or modify the containment provided by the standard GAS Experiment Mounting Plate (EMP). Structural hazard assessment and the preparation of structural hazard reports will be reviewed to form a summation of structural safety issues for inclusion in the safety data package.

  15. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  16. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  17. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  18. Gas-phase doubly charged complexes of cyclic peptides with copper in +1, +2 and +3 formal oxidation states: formation, structures and electron capture dissociation.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Carlos; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Giorgi, Gianluca; Tureček, František

    2012-02-01

    Copper complexes with a cyclic D-His-β-Ala-L-His-L-Lys and all-L-His-β-Ala-His-Lys peptides were generated by electrospray which were doubly charged ions that had different formal oxidation states of Cu(I), Cu(II) and Cu(III) and different protonation states of the peptide ligands. Electron capture dissociation showed no substantial differences between the D-His and L-His complexes. All complexes underwent peptide cross-ring cleavages upon electron capture. The modes of ring cleavage depended on the formal oxidation state of the Cu ion and peptide protonation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, using the B3LYP with an effective core potential at Cu and M06-2X functionals, identified several precursor ion structures in which the Cu ion was threecoordinated to pentacoordinated by the His and Lys side-chain groups and the peptide amide or enolimine groups. The electronic structure of the formally Cu(III) complexes pointed to an effective Cu(I) oxidation state with the other charge residing in the peptide ligand. The relative energies of isomeric complexes of the [Cu(c-HAHK + H)](2+) and [Cu(c-HAHK - H)](2+) type with closed electronic shells followed similar orders when treated by the B3LYP and M06-2X functionals. Large differences between relative energies calculated by these methods were obtained for open-shell complexes of the [Cu(c-HAHK)](2+) type. Charge reduction resulted in lowering the coordination numbers for some Cu complexes that depended on the singlet or triplet spin state being formed. For [Cu(c-HAHK - H)](2+) complexes, solution H/D exchange involved only the N-H protons, resulting in the exchange of up to seven protons, as established by ultra-high mass resolution measurements. Contrasting the experiments, DFT calculations found the lowest energy structures for the gas-phase ions that were deprotonated at the peptide C(α) positions.

  19. Manual gas-phase isothiocyanate degradation.

    PubMed

    Brandt, W F; Frank, G

    1988-02-01

    We describe a manual gas-phase isothiocyanate degradation procedure for the primary structure determination of proteins and peptides. The proteins and peptides are applied to a polybrene-coated glass fiber filter wedged into a small glass column. The phenylisothiocyanate is directly pipetted onto the filter disk. The coupling and cleavage reactions are performed in small desiccators containing trimethylamine and trifluoroacetic acid vapors, respectively. The wash and extraction steps are performed by allowing the suitable solvents to percolate through the filter disk. The extracted anilinothiazolinone is then converted to the phenylthiohydantoin and identified by any one of a number of described methods. Our results show that this method is very sensitive and that the reactions proceed faster than those of the published automated procedure. No expensive equipment is required and the manual degradation can be performed by a laboratory assistant. A large number of samples can be simultaneously subjected to the degradation under identical conditions, making this an ideal method for physicochemical investigations into the isothiocyanate degradation. We also use this method to screen HPLC fractions after enzymatic protein fragmentation. Manually sequenced glass filters can be transferred to the automated instrument for more extended degradations.

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2004-09-30

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu; Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2004-05-01

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  2. The gas-phase molecular structure of 1,1-diethynylsilacyclobutane as determined by means of electron diffraction and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakkouri, Marwan; Grosser, Martin

    2002-06-01

    As a continuation of our systematic investigation of the effect of substituents on the ring geometry and dynamics in silacyclobutanes and in order to explore the role of the silicon atom as a mediator for electronic interactions between the attached fragments, we studied the molecular structure of 1,1-diethynylsilacyclobutane (DESCB) by means of gas-phase electron diffraction and ab initio calculations. The structural refinement of the electron diffraction data yielded the following bond lengths ( ra) and bond angles (uncertainties are 3σ): r( Si- C)=1.874(2) Å, r( Si- C)=1.817(1) Å, r(- C C-)=1.209(1) Å, r( C- C)=1.563(2) Å, ∠(C-Si-C)=79.2(6)°, ∠(C-Si-C)=106.5(6)°. The geminal Si-CC moieties were found to be bent outwards by 3.1(15)° and the puckering angle was determined to be 30.0(15)°. The evidently short Si-C bond length, which was also reproduced by the ab initio calculations, could be rationalized as being the consequence of the electronic interaction between the outer π charges of the triple bond and the 3pπ orbitals at the silicon atom. It is also likely that the conjugation of the geminal ethynyl groups leads to an enhancement of this bond contraction. Electrostatic interactions and the subsequent reduction of the covalent radius of the silicon atom may also contribute to this bond shortening. It has been found that the endocyclic Si-C bond length fits nicely within a scheme describing a monotonous decrease of the Si-C bond length with the increase of the electronegativity of the substituent in various geminally substituted silacyclobutanes. A series of related silacyclobutanes and acyclic diethynylsilanes have been studied by applying various ab initio methods and their optimized structures were compared to the structure of DESCB. Among these compounds are 1,1-dicyanosilacyclobutane (DCYSCB), which is isoelectronic to DESCB, 1,1-diethynylcyclobutane (DECB) which is isovalent to DESCB, monoethynylsilacyclobutane (MESCB

  3. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  4. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  5. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  6. Experimental Thermochemistry of Gas Phase Cytosine Tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. M.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    Enthalpies of interconversion are measured for the three lowest energy tautomers of isolated cytosine. The equilibrium distribution of tautomers near 600 K is frozen upon the capture of the gas phase species by low temperature helium nanodroplets. The temperature dependence of the gas phase cytosine tautomer populations is determined with infrared laser spectroscopy of the helium solvated species. The interconverison enthalpies obtained from the van't Hoff relation are 1.14 ± 0.21 and 1.63 ± 0.12 for the C31 rightleftharpoons C32 and C31 rightleftharpoons C1 equilibria, respectively. C31 and C32 are rotamers of an enol tautomer, and C1 is a keto tautomer. The interconversion enthalpies are compared to recent CCSD(T) thermochemistry calculations of cytosine tautomers.

  7. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  8. How to select gas-phase filters

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, G.; Winters, P.

    1997-10-01

    Removing airborne molecular contamination (AMC) from indoor industrial air is a challenging problem. Under OSHA, companies must mitigate harmful effects from corrosive, acid and alkaline gases to protect employee health. Equally important, corrosive gases tremendously impact and compromise operation of sensitive plant instrumentation and process control devices. Gases such as SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, VOCs, etc., are present in many manufacturing facilities. These contaminants can be controlled to tolerable levels with gas-phase filtration techniques. Because each manufacturing facility has its own unique problem, a one-size-fits-all-solution is not possible. The presented examples and laboratory data evaluate several gas-phase control technologies under varying contaminant concentrations and air stream velocities. Using this information, engineers can find the best solution for their AMC problem.

  9. Phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, W.; Guo, G.-C.

    2011-09-15

    We study the phase separation of a spin-polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling near a wide Feshbach resonance. As a result of the competition between spin-orbit coupling and population imbalance, the phase diagram for a uniform gas develops a rich structure of phase separation involving topologically nontrivial gapless superfluid states. We then demonstrate the phase separation induced by an external trapping potential and discuss the optimal parameter region for the experimental observation of the gapless superfluid phases.

  10. Negative ion gas-phase chemistry of arenes.

    PubMed

    Danikiewicz, Witold; Zimnicka, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Reactions of aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds involving anions are of great importance in organic synthesis. Some of these reactions have been studied in the gas phase and are occasionally mentioned in reviews devoted to gas-phase negative ion chemistry, but no reviews exist that collect all existing information about these reactions. This work is intended to fill this gap. In the first part of this review, methods for generating arene anions in the gas phase and studying their physicochemical properties and fragmentation reactions are presented. The main topics in this part are as follows: processes in which gas-phase arene anions are formed, measurements and calculations of the proton affinities of arene anions, proton exchange reactions, and fragmentation processes of substituted arene anions, especially phenide ions. The second part is devoted to gas-phase reactions of arene anions. The most important of these are reactions with electrophiles such as carbonyl compounds and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and related compounds (Michael acceptors). Other reactions including oxidation of arene anions and halogenophilic reactions are also presented. In the last part of the review, reactions of electrophilic arenes with nucleophiles are discussed. The best known of these is the aromatic nucleophilic substitution (SN Ar) reaction; however, other processes that lead to the substitution of a hydrogen atom in the aromatic ring are also very important. Aromatic substrates in these reactions are usually but not always nitroarenes bearing other substituents in the ring. The first step in these reactions is the formation of an anionic σ-adduct, which, depending on the substituents in the aromatic ring and the structure of the attacking nucleophile, is either an intermediate or a transition state in the reaction path. In the present review, we attempted to collect the results of both experimental and computational studies of the aforementioned reactions conducted since the

  11. Inductive and steric effects on the gas-phase structure of tert-butyl acetate. Electron diffraction and ab initio MO investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Onozaki, Manabu; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    1994-09-01

    Gas electron diffusion and HF/4-21 G calculations on geometric parameters and harmonic force constants are used to study the molecular structure of tert-butyl acetate. This determined that C{sub 1} = O{sub 2} is (cis) to O{sub 4}-C{sub 5} and the tert-butyl group is staggered to the C{sub 1}-O{sub 4} bond. The structural parameters are also determined. C{sub 1}-O{sub 4} bond length shortening is rationalized in terms of the resonance effect and the electron-releasing inductive effect of substituents. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-07-24

    Here, carbonyl oxides, also known as Criegee intermediates, are key intermediates in both gas phase ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and solution phase organic synthesis via ozonolysis. Although the study of Criegee intermediates in both arenas has a long history, direct studies in the gas phase have only recently become possible through new methods of generating stabilised Criegee intermediates in sufficient quantities. This advance has catalysed a large number of new experimental and theoretical investigations of Criegee intermediate chemistry. In this article we review the physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates, focusing on their molecular structure, spectroscopy, unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. These recent results have overturned conclusions from some previous studies, while confirming others, and have clarified areas of investigation that will be critical targets for future studies. In addition to expanding our fundamental understanding of Criegee intermediates, the rapidly expanding knowledge base will support increasingly predictive models of their impacts on society.

  13. The physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase

    DOE PAGES

    Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-07-24

    Here, carbonyl oxides, also known as Criegee intermediates, are key intermediates in both gas phase ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and solution phase organic synthesis via ozonolysis. Although the study of Criegee intermediates in both arenas has a long history, direct studies in the gas phase have only recently become possible through new methods of generating stabilised Criegee intermediates in sufficient quantities. This advance has catalysed a large number of new experimental and theoretical investigations of Criegee intermediate chemistry. In this article we review the physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates, focusing on their molecular structure, spectroscopy, unimolecular andmore » bimolecular reactions. These recent results have overturned conclusions from some previous studies, while confirming others, and have clarified areas of investigation that will be critical targets for future studies. In addition to expanding our fundamental understanding of Criegee intermediates, the rapidly expanding knowledge base will support increasingly predictive models of their impacts on society.« less

  14. Vibrational spectra and gas-phase structure of N-methyl-S,S-bis(trifluoromethyl)sulfimide, CH3N=S(CF3)2.

    PubMed

    Trautner, Frank; Alvarez, Rosa M S; Cutin, Edgardo H; Robles, Norma L; Mews, Rüdiger; Oberhammer, Heinz

    2005-10-17

    The molecular structure of N-methyl-S,S-bis(trifluoromethyl)sulfimide, CH3N=S(CF3)2, was determined by gas electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations [B3LYP and MP2 with 6-31+G(2df,p) basis sets]. Furthermore, vibrational spectra, IR (gas) and Raman (liquid), were recorded. These spectra were assigned by comparison with analogous molecules and with calculated frequencies and intensities (HF, B3LYP, and MP2 with 6-311G basis sets). All experimental data and computational methods result in a single conformer with syn orientation of the CH3 group relative to the bisector of the two CF3 groups. The molecule possesses C1 symmetry, slightly distorted from CS symmetry. The N=S bond length in this compound [1.522(10) A] is longer than that in imidosulfur difluorides RN=SF2 [1.476(4) A - 1.487(5) A].

  15. Gas phase grown silicon germanium nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Kaiser, M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the gas phase synthesis of highly crystalline and homogeneously alloyed Si1-xGex nanocrystals in continuous and pulsed plasmas. Agglomerated nanocrystals have been produced with remarkable control over their composition by altering the precursor GeH4 gas flow in a continuous plasma. We specially highlight that in the pulsed plasma mode, we obtain quantum-sized free standing alloy nanocrystals with a mean size of 7.3 nm. The presence of Si1-xGex alloy particles is confirmed with multiple techniques, i.e. Raman spectroscopy, XRD (Xray diffraction) and HRTEM (high resolution transmission electron microscopy) studies, with each of these methods consistently yielding the same composition. The nanocrystals synthesized here have potential applications in band-gap engineering for multijunction solar cells.

  16. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  17. The molecular structure of silyl cyanide, determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction, microwave spectroscopy and high resolution infra-red spectroscopy, in solution in a nematic phase by NMR spectroscopy, and in the crystalline phase at 100 K by X-ray crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Peter D.; Blake, Alexander J.; Cockman, Russell W.; Cradock, Stephen; Ebsworth, E. A. V.; Rankin, David W. H.

    1989-02-01

    The molecular structure of silyl cyanide has been determined in the gas phase by analysis of electron diffraction data and rotation constants, both separately and together, in solution in a nematic liquid crystal by NMR spectroscopy, and in the crystalline phase at 100 K by X-ray crystallography. In the gas phase the parameters ( rav) are: SiC 184.96(4), CN 115.63(5), SiH 148.73(11) pm and ∠HSiC 107.25(4)°. In the crystalline phase the molecules lie on mirror planes, with near-linear chains of molecules ⋯SiCN⋯SiCN⋯. The non-bonded N⋯Si distance is 278.9(2) pm, and this fairly strong interaction is associated with lengthening of the SiC bondlength to 189.96(18) pm, and narrowing of the HSiC angles to 100.4(7)°. The CN distance is 114.28(23) pm. Angles in the chain are SiCN 179.04(15), N⋯SiC 177.62(6) and CN⋯Si 176.66(13)°. In solution in a liquid crystal solvent the structure ( rα°) also shows narrowing of the HSiC angles, to 104.84(14)°. Absolute values of bondlengths cannot be determined by this method, but the ratios r(SiH): r(CN) = 1.2762(24) and r(SiC): r(CN) = 1.6374(34) are consistent with a structure midway between those observed in the gaseous and crystalline phases. Interaction between cyanide groups in the solvent and silyl groups is postulated to account for this behaviour.

  18. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.P.

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: {alpha}-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  19. The Effect of a Covalent and a Noncovalent Small-Molecule Inhibitor on the Structure of Abg β-Glucosidase in the Gas-Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh; Douglas, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    The effects of binding two small-molecule inhibitors to Agrobacterium sp. strain ATCC 21400 (Abg) β-glucosidase on the conformations and stability of gas-phase ions of Abg have been investigated. Biotin-iminosugar conjugate (BIC) binds noncovalently to Abg while 2,4-dinitro-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-β- d-glucopyranoside (2FG-DNP) binds covalently with loss of DNP. In solution, Abg is a dimer. Mass spectra show predominantly dimer ions, provided care is taken to avoid dissociation of dimers in solution and dimer ions in the ion sampling interface. When excess inhibitor, either covalent or noncovalent, is added to solutions of Abg, mass spectra show peaks almost entirely from 2:2 inhibitor-enzyme dimer complexes. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments show similar dissociation channels for the apo-enzyme and 2FG-enzyme dimers. The +21 dimer produces +10 and +11 monomers. The internal energy required to dissociate the +21 2FG-enzyme to its monomers (767 ± 30 eV) is about 36 eV higher than that for the apo-enzyme dimer (731 ± 6 eV), reflecting the stabilization of the free enzyme dimer by the 2FG inhibitor. The primary dissociation channels for the noncovalent BIC-enzyme dimer are loss of neutral and charged BIC. The internal energy required to induce loss of BIC is 482 ± 8 eV, considerably less than that required to dissociate the dimers. For a given charge state, ions of the covalent and noncovalent complexes have about 15 % and 25 % lower cross sections, respectively, compared with the apo-enzyme. Thus, binding the inhibitors causes the gas-phase protein to adopt more compact conformations. Noncovalent binding surprisingly produces the greatest change in protein ion conformation, despite the weaker inhibitor binding.

  20. Density functional theory investigations on the structure and dissolution mechanisms for cellobiose and xylan in an ionic liquid: gas phase and cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Payal, Rajdeep Singh; Bharath, R; Periyasamy, Ganga; Balasubramanian, S

    2012-01-19

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out for cellobiose and xylan chosen as models for cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, in gas phase, implicit and explicit solvent (water, methanol, and the ionic liquid, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium acetate) media using plane wave and atom centered basis set approaches in order to find out lowest energy conformers and configurations. Geometry, vibrational properties, and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values have been discussed under all three conditions. Calculations predict that inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding play an important role in the dissolution processes. In the gas phase and in implicit solvent, the anti-anti conformer of cellobiose and the anti-syn conformer of xylan are the most stable due to the formation of a large number of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. However, in the cluster calculations containing ion pairs of the ionic liquid (IL) surrounding the cellulosic units, the anti-syn conformer of cellobiose is more stable as intramolecular hydrogen bonds are substituted by intermolecular ones formed with the ions of the IL. The complexes of cellobiose (or of xylan) with the ions of the ionic liquid are stable with large negative binding energies ranging between -21 and -55 kcal mol(-1). The predicted (1)H NMR values of the lowest energy cellobiose conformers are in good agreement with the experimental value. Xylan binds stronger with the IL than cellobiose does by 20 kcal mol(-1). Furthermore, the two pentose rings in xylan are rotated by 60° to each other in contrast to their coplanarity in cellobiose, which can explain the higher solubility and the amorphous nature of hemicellulose in ionic liquids. The fewer number of hydroxyl groups in xylan (relative to cellobiose) does not affect the number of cations present in its first solvation shell while the number of anions is reduced.

  1. Molecular structures and conformational compositions of 2-chlorobutane and 2-bromobutane; an investigation using gas-phase electron-diffraction data and ab initio molecular orbital calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarset, Kirsten; Hagen, Kolbjørn; Stølevik, Reidar

    2001-06-01

    The structure and conformational composition of 2-chlorobutane and 2-bromobutane have been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) at 25°C, together with ab initio molecular orbital calculations (HF/6-311+G(d,p)). These molecules may exist as three distinguishable conformers (G+, A, and G-). The symbols refer to anti (A) with a torsion angle Φ2(X 8-C 2-C 3-C 4) of about 180° and gauche (G+ and G-) with torsion angles Φ2(X 8-C 2-C 3-C 4) of about +60° and 300°(-60°), respectively. It was not possible; from our GED-data alone, to accurately determine the conformational composition because the distance distributions for two of the conformers (G+ and G-) are very similar. The conformational composition for 2-chlorobutane obtained from the ab initio calculations (G+ 62%, A 25% G- 13%) was found to fit the experimental data quite well. For 2-bromobutane the ab initio calculated conformational composition (G+ 58%, A 28% G- 14%) did not, however, fit the experimental data. Here a much better fit was obtained by using only 10% of the A conformer and using the relative energy for the two gauche conformers, as obtained in the ab initio molecular orbital calculations, to calculate the relative amounts of the two gauche forms (G+ 73%, A 10% G- 17%). The results for the principal distances ( rg) and angles ∠ α for the G+ conformer of 2-chlorobutane, with estimated 2 σ uncertainties, obtained from the combined GED/ab initio study are: r( C1- C2)=1.524(3) Å, r( C2- C3)=1.528(3) Å, r( C3- C4)=1.539(3) Å, r( C- Cl)=1.812(3) Å, r( C- H) ave=1.098(4) Å, ∠C 1C 2C 3=111.5(16)°, ∠C 2C 3C 4=113.3(5)°, ∠C 1C 2C1=110.4(9)°. The results for the G+ conformer of 2-bromobutane are: r( C1- C2)=1.526(4) Å, r( C2- C3)=1.530(4) Å, r( C3- C4)=1.540(4) Å, r( C- Br)=1.982(5) Å, r( C- H) ave=1.111(8) Å, ∠C 1C 2C 3=112.5(16)°, ∠C 2C 3C 4=114.6(15)°, ∠C 1C 2Br=110.1(16)°. Only average values for r(C-C), r(C-H), ∠CCC, and ∠CCH could be determined in the

  2. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  3. ¹J(CH) couplings in Group 14/IVA tetramethyls from the gas-phase NMR and DFT structural study: a search for the best computational protocol.

    PubMed

    Nazarski, Ryszard B; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2014-08-01

    Four tetramethyl compounds EMe4 (E = C, Si, Ge, and Pb) were studied by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy in gaseous and liquid states at 300 K. Extrapolation of experimental vapor-phase C-H J-couplings to a zero-pressure limit permitted determining the (1)J(0,CH)s in methyl groups of their nearly isolated molecules. Theoretical predictions of the latter NMR parameters were also performed in a locally dense basis sets/pseudopotential (Sn, Pb) approach, by applying a few DFT methods pre-selected in calculations of other gas-phase molecular properties of all these species and SnMe4 (bond lengths, C-H stretching IR vibrations). A very good agreement theory vs. experiment was achieved with some computational protocols for all five systems. The trends observed in their geometry and associated coupling constants ((1)J(CH)s, (2)J(HH)s) are discussed and rationalized in terms of the substituent-induced rehybridization of the methyl group (treated as a ligand) carbon, by using Bent's rule and the newly proposed, theoretically derived values of the Mulliken electronegativity (χ) of related atoms and groups. All these χ data for the Group-14/IVA entities were under a lot of controversy for a very long time. As a result, the recommended χ values are semi-experimentally confirmed for the first time and only a small correction is suggested for χ(Ge) and χ(GeMe3).

  4. Giddings Austin chalk enters deep lean-gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Moritis, G.

    1995-12-25

    Deep lean gas is the latest phase in the growth of the Giddings field Austin chalk play. The first phase involved drilling vertical oil and gas wells. Next came the horizontal well boom in the shallower Austin chalk area, which is still continuing. And now this third phase places horizontal laterals in the Austen chalk at about 14,000--15,000 ft to produce lean gas. The article describes the producing wells and gas gathering.

  5. Phase diagram of a bulk 1d lattice Coulomb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, V.; Monsarrat, R.; Dean, D. S.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-01-01

    The exact solution, via transfer matrix, of the simple one-dimensional lattice Coulomb gas (1d LCG) model can reproduce peculiar features of ionic liquid capacitors, such as overscreening, layering, and camel- and bell-shaped capacitance curves. Using the same transfer matrix method, we now compute the bulk properties of the 1d LCG in the constant voltage ensemble. We unveil a phase diagram with rich structure exhibiting low-density disordered and high-density ordered phases, separated by a first-order phase transition at low temperature; the solid state at full packing can be ordered or not, depending on the temperature. This phase diagram, which is strikingly similar to its three-dimensional counterpart, also sheds light on the behaviour of the confined system.

  6. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure.

    PubMed

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems. PMID:26493915

  7. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-I{sub h}, ice-I{sub c}, ice-II, and C{sub 0} interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C{sub 0} water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C{sub 0} hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  8. Gas-phase thermochemistry of chloropyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Amaral, Luísa M. P. F.; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A. V.

    2005-04-01

    The gas-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation of the 2,3,5-trichloropyridine compound was derived from the enthalpies of combustion of the crystalline solid measured by rotating-bomb calorimetry and its enthalpy of sublimation obtained by Calvet microcalorimetry at T = 298.15 K. The standard enthalpies of formation for this compound and for the other chlorosubstituted pyridines were determined by DFT calculations. The experimental enthalpy of formation of 2,3,5-trichloropyridine is (65.8 ± 2.3) kJ mol -1, in excellent agreement with the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) value. The affinity of pyridine to some metal cations was also calculated at the same DFT level of theory and compared with experimental data.

  9. Gas phase acidity of substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-04-01

    Deprotonation thermochemistry of benzene derivatives C 6H 5X (X = H, F, Cl, OH, NH 2, CN, CHO, NO 2, CH 3, C 2H 5, CHCH 2, CCH) has been examined at the G3B3 level of theory. For X = F, Cl, CN, CHO and NO 2, the most favorable deprotonation site is the ortho position of the phenyl ring. This regio-specificity is directly related to the field/inductive effect of the substituent. G3B3 gas phase acidities, Δ acidH° and Δ acidG°, compare within less than 4 kJ mol -1 with experimental data. A noticeable exception is nitrobenzene for which tabulated acidity appear to be underestimated by ca. 120 kJ mol -1.

  10. Transferring pharmaceuticals into the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Wolfgang; Krause, Tim; Rademann, Klaus

    2008-11-01

    The dissolution of molecules of biological interest in supercritical carbon dioxide is investigated using pulsed molecular beam mass spectrometry. Due to the mild processing temperatures of most supercritical fluids, their adiabatic expansion into vacuum permits to transfer even thermally very sensitive substances into the gas phase, which is particularly attractive for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In addition, supercritical CO2constitutes a chemically inert solvent that is compatible with hydrocarbon-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Here, we report on the dissolution and pulsed supersonic jet expansion of caffeine (C8H10N4O2), the provitamin menadione (C11H8O2), and the amino acid derivative l-phenylalanine tert-butyl ester hydrochloride (C6H5CH2CH(NH2)COOC(CH3)3[dot operator]HCl), into vacuum. An on-axis residual gas analyzer is used to monitor the relative amounts of solute and solvent in the molecular beam as a function of solvent densityE The excellent selectivity and sensitivity provided by mass spectrometry permits to probe even trace amounts of solutes. The strong density variation of CO2 close to the critical point results in a pronounced pressure dependence of the relative ion currents of solute and solvent molecules, reflecting a substantial change in solubility.

  11. Gas dynamics in the impulsive phase of solar flares. II. The structure of the transition region--a diagnostic of energy transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, A.G.; Nagai, F.

    1985-01-15

    Optically thin line emissiosn formed in the solar transition region provides sensitive diagnostics of the atmospheric structure at these levels. Observations of such emission lines during the impulsive phase of solar flares show that a good correlation exists between the energy input rate (as evidenced by, for example, the hard X-ray flux) and the intensity I of a given line, and thus also the differential emission measure quantity DEM = n/sup 2/dx/d ln T, where n is the density and dx/d ln T is the temperature scale length. In this paper, we calculate and contrast the predicted temporal behavior of DEM for two models of energy transport in a flaring loop. We find that a model in which the principal mechanism of energy transport is thermal conduction cannot satisfactorily reproduce the basic observational trend noted above. On the other hand, a model in which the energy is transported throughout the flaring loop principally by collisional degradation of a beam of accelerated suprathermal electrons does adequately reproduce observed behavior. We therefore conclude that electron beam heating is a likely candidate for energy transport in the impulsive phase of flares.

  12. Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

    2005-09-28

    The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

  13. Fundamental thermochemical properties of amino acids: gas-phase and aqueous acidities and gas-phase heats of formation.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Jackson, Virgil E; Matus, Myrna H; Adams, Margaret A; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2012-03-01

    The gas-phase acidities of the 20 L-amino acids have been predicted at the composite G3(MP2) level. A broad range of structures of the neutral and anion were studied to determine the lowest energy conformer. Excellent agreement is found with the available experimental gas-phase deprotonation enthalpies, and the calculated values are within experimental error. We predict that tyrosine is deprotonated at the CO(2)H site. Cysteine is predicted to be deprotonated at the SH but the proton on the CO(2)H is shared with the S(-) site. Self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations with the COSMO parametrization were used to predict the pK(a)'s of the non-zwitterion form in aqueous solution. The differences in the non-zwitterion pK(a) values were used to estimate the free energy difference between the zwitterion and nonzwitterion forms in solution. The heats of formation of the neutral compounds were calculated from atomization energies and isodesmic reactions to provide the first reliable set of these values in the gas phase. Further calculations were performed on five rare amino acids to predict their heats of formation, acidities, and pK(a) values.

  14. Infrared spectra of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keqing; Guo, B.; Bernath, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Recording the spectra of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules is of great astronomical interest. Infrared spectra of gas-phase naphthalene, pyrene, and chrysene were obtained in absorption and emission. The band positions and relative intensities were measured and compared with theoretical calculations. These data will be compared to the astronomical observations of the unidentified infrared emission bands.

  15. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  16. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, Kent M.

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  17. Phase structure of liposome in lipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianxi; Li, Yuzhuo; Mueller, Anja

    2011-11-01

    Gas microbubbles present in ultrasound imaging contrast agents are stabilized by lipid aggregates that typically contain a mixture of lipids. In this study, the phase structure of the lipid mixtures that contained two or three lipids was investigated using three different methods: dynamic light scattering, (1)H NMR, and microfluidity measurements with fluorescence probes. Three lipids that are commonly present in imaging agents (DPPC, DPPE-PEG, and DPPA) were used. Two types of systems, two-lipid model systems and simulated imaging systems were investigated. The results show that liposomes were the dominant aggregates in all the samples studied. The polar PEG side chains from the PEGylated lipid lead to the formation of micelles and micellar aggregates in small sizes. In the ternary lipid systems, almost all the lipids were present in bilayers with micelles absent and free lipids at very low concentration. These results suggest that liposomes, not micelles, contribute to the stabilization of microbubbles in an ultrasound imaging contrast agent.

  18. Phase Separation in a Polarized Fermi Gas at Zero Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pilati, S.; Giorgini, S.

    2008-01-25

    We investigate the phase diagram of asymmetric two-component Fermi gases at zero temperature as a function of polarization and interaction strength. The equations of state of the uniform superfluid and normal phase are determined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We find three different mixed states, where the superfluid and the normal phase coexist in equilibrium, corresponding to phase separation between (a) the polarized superfluid and the fully polarized normal gas, (b) the polarized superfluid and the partially polarized normal gas, and (c) the unpolarized superfluid and the partially polarized normal gas.

  19. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  20. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  1. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  2. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  3. Incommensurate Structure of Phosphorus Phase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa; Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2007-04-27

    There are six known phases for phosphorus at room temperature under high pressure. Only the structure of phase IV, which exists from 107 GPa to 137 GPa, remains unsolved. We performed a powder x-ray diffraction experiment and a Rietveld analysis and successfully determined its structure to be an incommensurately modulated structure by only 1 site of atomic position. High-pressure phases of halogens and chalcogens have previously been shown to have a similar modulated structure; however, phosphorus phase IV is different from them and was shown to be the third case.

  4. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  5. Thermochemical aspects of proton transfer in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Gal, J F; Maria, P C; Raczyńska, E D

    2001-07-01

    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the development of new theories of acidity and basicity, which are currently well accepted. The thermochemistry of proton transfer in the absence of solvent attracted much interest during this period, because of the fundamental importance of the process. Nevertheless, before the 1950s, few data were available, either from lattice energy evaluations or from calculations using the emerging molecular orbital theory. Advances in mass spectrometry during the last 40 years allowed studies of numerous systems with better accuracy. Thousands of accurate gas-phase acidities or basicities are now available, for simple atomic and molecular systems and for large biomolecules. The intrinsic effect of structure on the Brønsted basic or acidic properties of molecules and the influence of solvents have been unravelled. In this tutorial, the basics of the thermodynamic principles involved are given, and the mass spectrometric techniques are briefly reviewed. Advances in the design and measurements of gas-phase superacids and superbases are described. Recent studies concerning biomolecules are also evoked.

  6. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Désiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  7. The crystal structure of methane phase III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Marcus A.; Press, Werner; Nöldeke, Christian; Asmussen, Bernd; Prager, Michael; Ibberson, Richard M.

    2003-07-01

    Methane is the simplest organic molecule, and like many supposedly simple molecular materials it has a rich phase diagram. While crystal structures could be determined for two of the solid phases, that of the low temperature phase III remained unsolved. Using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and a direct-space Monte Carlo simulated annealing approach, this fundamental structure has now finally been solved. It is orthorhombic with space group Cmca, and 16 molecules in the unit cell. The structure is closely related to that of phase II, yet is no subgroup of it.

  8. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  9. The gas-phase structure of 1-selena-closo-dodecaborane(11), 1-SeB11H11, determined by the concerted use of electron diffraction and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Hnyk, Drahomír; Wann, Derek A; Holub, Josef; Bühl, Michael; Robertson, Heather E; Rankin, David W H

    2008-01-01

    The molecular structure of 1-selena-closo-dodecaborane(11), 1-SeB11H11, has been determined by the concerted use of quantum chemical calculations and gas-phase electron diffraction. The structure has C(5v) symmetry and is distorted from a regular icosahedron mainly through the expansion of the pentagon of boron atoms adjacent to selenium, with r(a3,1)(B-B) = 192.2(2) pm. The Se-B bond length is extremely well determined [r(a3,1) (Se-B) = 212.9(2) pm] and this is reflected by a pronounced peak in the radial-distribution curve. The accuracy of the experimental structure, as well as that calculated at the MP2/962(d) level, has been gauged by comparison of the 11B chemical shifts (calculated at two different gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO) levels) with experimental NMR values. The inclusion of electron correlation in the magnetic property calculations (GIAO-MP2) gave superior results to those carried out using GIAO-Hartree-Fock.

  10. Solvation-induced σ-complex structure formation in the gas phase: a revisit to the infrared spectroscopy of [C6H6-(CH3OH)2]+.

    PubMed

    Mizuse, Kenta; Suzuki, Yuta; Mikami, Naohiko; Fujii, Asuka

    2011-10-20

    Structures of the [C(6)H(6)-(CH(3)OH)(2)](+) cluster cation are investigated with infrared (IR) spectroscopy. While the noncovalent type structure has been confirmed for the n = 1 cluster of [C(6)H(6)-(CH(3)OH)(n)](+), only contradictory interpretations have been given for the spectra of n = 2, in which significant changes have been observed with the Ar tagging. In the present study, we revisit IR spectroscopy of the n = 2 cluster from the viewpoint of the σ-complex structure, which includes a covalent bond formation between the benzene and methanol moieties. The observed spectral range is extended to the lower-frequency region, and the spectrum is measured with and without Ar and N(2) tagging. A strongly hydrogen-bonded OH stretch band, which is characteristic to the σ-complex structure, is newly found with the tagging. The remarkable spectral changes with the tagging are interpreted by the competition between the σ-complex and noncovalent complex structures in the [C(6)H(6)-(CH(3)OH)(2)](+) system. This result shows that the microsolvation only with one methanol molecule can induce the σ-complex structure formation.

  11. Gas-Phase Dissociation Pathways of Multiply Charged Peptide Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jurchen, John C.; Garcia, David E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies of cluster formation and dissociation have been conducted to determine properties of matter in the transition from the condensed phase to the gas phase using materials as diverse as atomic nuclei, noble gasses, metal clusters, and amino acids. Here, electrospray ionization is used to extend the study of cluster dissociation to peptides including leucine enkephalin with 7–19 monomer units and 2–5 protons, and somatostatin with 5 monomer units and 4 protons under conditions where its intramolecular disulfide bond is either oxidized or reduced. Evaporation of neutral monomers and charge separation by cluster fission are the competing dissociation pathways of both peptides. The dominant fission product for all leucine enkephalin clusters studied is a proton-bound dimer, presumably due to the high gas-phase stability of this species. The branching ratio of the fission and evaporation processes for leucine enkephalin clusters appears to be determined by the value of z2/n for the cluster where z is the charge and n the number of monomer units in the cluster. Clusters with low and high values of z2/n dissociate primarily by evaporation and cluster fission respectively, with a sharp transition between dissociation primarily by evaporation and primarily by fission measured at a z2/n value of ~0.5. The dependence of the dissociation pathway of a cluster on z2/n is similar to the dissociation of atomic nuclei and multiply charged metal clusters indicating that leucine enkephalin peptide clusters exist in a state that is more disordered, and possibly fluid, rather than highly structured in the dissociative transition state. The branching ratio, but not the dissociation pathway of [somatostatin5 + 4H]4+ is altered by the reduction of its internal disulfide bond indicating that monomer conformational flexibility plays a role in peptide cluster dissociation. PMID:14652186

  12. STAEBL: Structural tailoring of engine blades, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, M. S.; Brown, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (STAEBL) program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center in 1980 to introduce optimal structural tailoring into the design process for aircraft gas turbine engine blades. The standard procedure for blade design is highly iterative with the engineer directly providing most of the decisions that control the design process. The goal of the STAEBL program has been to develop an automated approach to generate structurally optimal blade designs. The program has evolved as a three-phase effort with the developmental work being performed contractually by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. Phase 1 was intended as a proof of concept in which two fan blades were structurally tailored to meet a full set of structural design constraints while minimizing DOC+I (direct operating cost plus interest) for a representative aircraft. This phase was successfully completed and was reported in reference 1 and 2. Phase 2 has recently been completed and is the basis for this discussion. During this phase, three tasks were accomplished: (1) a nonproprietary structural tailoring computer code was developed; (2) a dedicated approximate finite-element analysis was developed; and (3) an approximate large-deflection analysis was developed to assess local foreign object damage. Phase 3 is just beginning and is designed to incorporated aerodynamic analyses directly into the structural tailoring system in order to relax current geometric constraints.

  13. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  14. Phase structure in a chiral model of nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Phat, Tran Huu; Anh, Nguyen Tuan; Tam, Dinh Thanh

    2011-08-15

    The phase structure of symmetric nuclear matter in the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (ENJL) model is studied by means of the effective potential in the one-loop approximation. It is found that chiral symmetry gets restored at high nuclear density and a typical first-order phase transition of the liquid-gas transition occurs at zero temperature, T=0, which weakens as T grows and eventually ends up with a second-order critical point at T=20 MeV. This phase transition scenario is confirmed by investigating the evolution of the effective potential versus the effective nucleon mass and the equation of state.

  15. Structure and mechanism of the formation of core-shell nanoparticles obtained through a one-step gas-phase synthesis by electron beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Nomoev, Andrey V; Bardakhanov, Sergey P; Schreiber, Makoto; Bazarova, Dashima G; Romanov, Nikolai A; Baldanov, Boris B; Radnaev, Bair R; Syzrantsev, Viacheslav V

    2015-01-01

    The structure of core-shell Cu@silica and Ag@Si nanoparticles obtained in one-step through evaporation of elemental precursors by a high-powered electron beam are investigated. The structure of the core and shell of the particles are investigated in order to elucidate their mechanisms of formation and factors affecting the synthesis. It is proposed that the formation of Cu@silica particles is mainly driven by surface tension differences between Cu and Si while the formation of Ag@Si particles is mainly driven by differences in the vapour concentration of the two components.

  16. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  17. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185959

  18. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  19. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  20. Experimental observation of structures with subtle balance between strong hydrogen bond and weak n → π(*) interaction: Gas phase laser spectroscopy of 7-azaindole⋯fluorosubstituted pyridines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Santosh K; Vaishnav, Jamuna K; Das, Aloke

    2016-09-14

    In this study, interplay between a strong hydrogen bond and a very weak n → π(*) interaction has been probed through experiment for the first time. We have used resonant 2-photon ionization, Infrared-ultraviolet double resonance spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculation to determine the structures of 7-azaindole⋯2,6-difluoropyridine and 7-azaindole⋯2,3,5,6-tetrafluororpyridine complexes, which are stabilized by both hydrogen bonding and n → π(*) interaction. The structures of the complexes studied in the present work have been compared with the double hydrogen bonded (N-H⋯N and C-H⋯N) planar structure of 7-azaindole⋯2-fluoropyridine. It has been found that the strength of the N-H⋯N hydrogen bond in the 7-azaindole⋯2,6-substituted fluoropyridines is affected due to several factors. The main reason for huge reduction in the strength of this N-H⋯N hydrogen bond in these complexes is due to loss of the C-H⋯N hydrogen bond, through substitution of fluorine atoms in 2 and 6 positions, which induces major structural changes by bending the hydrogen bond and introducing the n → π(*) interaction. Effect of fluorination as well as presence of the n → π(*) interaction in these complexes also contributes to the reduction of the strength of the N-H⋯N interaction. Although it is difficult to quantify the role of the n → π(*) interaction to affect the strength of the hydrogen bond, observation of the structures, where a strong hydrogen bond and a weak n → π(*) interaction co-exist, is confirmed. PMID:27634255

  1. Experimental observation of structures with subtle balance between strong hydrogen bond and weak n → π* interaction: Gas phase laser spectroscopy of 7-azaindole⋯fluorosubstituted pyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Santosh K.; Vaishnav, Jamuna K.; Das, Aloke

    2016-09-01

    In this study, interplay between a strong hydrogen bond and a very weak n → π* interaction has been probed through experiment for the first time. We have used resonant 2-photon ionization, Infrared-ultraviolet double resonance spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculation to determine the structures of 7-azaindole⋯2,6-difluoropyridine and 7-azaindole⋯2,3,5,6-tetrafluororpyridine complexes, which are stabilized by both hydrogen bonding and n → π* interaction. The structures of the complexes studied in the present work have been compared with the double hydrogen bonded (N-H⋯N and C-H⋯N) planar structure of 7-azaindole⋯2-fluoropyridine. It has been found that the strength of the N-H⋯N hydrogen bond in the 7-azaindole⋯2,6-substituted fluoropyridines is affected due to several factors. The main reason for huge reduction in the strength of this N-H⋯N hydrogen bond in these complexes is due to loss of the C-H⋯N hydrogen bond, through substitution of fluorine atoms in 2 and 6 positions, which induces major structural changes by bending the hydrogen bond and introducing the n → π* interaction. Effect of fluorination as well as presence of the n → π* interaction in these complexes also contributes to the reduction of the strength of the N-H⋯N interaction. Although it is difficult to quantify the role of the n → π* interaction to affect the strength of the hydrogen bond, observation of the structures, where a strong hydrogen bond and a weak n → π* interaction co-exist, is confirmed.

  2. Intramolecular structure and dynamics of mequinol and guaiacol in the gas phase: Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of their S{sub 1} states

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Rodríguez-Matus, Marcela; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo E-mail: gmerino@mda.cinvestav.mx; Cabellos, José Luis; Merino, Gabriel E-mail: gmerino@mda.cinvestav.mx; Yi, John T.; Pratt, David W.; Schmitt, Michael

    2015-09-07

    The molecular structures of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and mequinol (4-methoxyphenol) have been studied using high resolution electronic spectroscopy in a molecular beam and contrasted with ab initio computations. Mequinol exhibits two low frequency bands that have been assigned to electronic origins of two possible conformers of the molecule, trans and cis. Guaiacol also shows low frequency bands, but in this case, the bands have been assigned to the electronic origin and vibrational modes of a single conformer of the isolated molecule. A detailed study of these bands indicates that guaiacol has a vibrationally averaged planar structure in the ground state, but it is distorted along both in-plane and out-of-plane coordinates in the first electronically excited state. An intramolecular hydrogen bond involving the adjacent   –OH and   –OCH{sub 3} groups plays a major role in these dynamics.

  3. Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Experimental Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Cannata, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-03-01

    The connection between the thermodynamics of charged finite nuclear systems and the asymptotically measured partitions in heavy ion collisions is discussed. Different independent signals compatible with a liquid-to-gas-like phase transition are reported. In particular abnormally large fluctuations in the measured observables are presented as a strong evidence of a first order phase transition with negative heat capacity.

  4. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  5. Phase analysis of amplitude binary mask structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Shaping of light behind masks using different techniques is the milestone of the printing industry. The aerial image distribution or the intensity distribution at the printing distances defines the resolution of the structure after printing. Contrast and phase are the two parameters that play a major role in shaping of light to get the desired intensity pattern. Here, in contrast to many other contributions that focus on intensity, we discuss the phase evolution for different structures. The amplitude or intensity characteristics of the structures in a binary mask at different proximity gaps have been analyzed extensively for many industrial applications. But the phase evolution from the binary mask having OPC structures is not considered so far. The mask we consider here is the normal amplitude binary mask but having high resolution Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) structures for corners. The corner structures represent a two dimensional problem which is difficult to handle with simple rules of phase masks design and therefore of particular interest. The evolution of light from small amplitude structures might lead to high contrast by creating sharp phase changes or phase singularities which are points of zero intensity. We show the phase modulation at different proximity gaps and can visualize the shaping of light according to the phase changes. The analysis is done with an instrument called High Resolution Interference Microscopy (HRIM), a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that gives access to three-dimensional phase and amplitude images. The current paper emphasizes on the phase measurement of different optical proximity correction structures, and especially on corners of a binary mask.

  6. The hydrothermal evolution of the phase and shape of ZnS nanostructures and their gas-sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pengfei; Gong, Guodong; Zhan, Fangyi; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Rong; Cao, Yali

    2016-02-14

    This work presents the evolution of the phase and shape of ZnS along the hydrothermal holding time or the dosage of the surfactant. The ZnS sensor obviously showed phase-/defect-dependent gas-sensing performances indicating that the wurtzite-type structure, as well the defect will improve its gas-sensing activities. PMID:26781594

  7. Structures of [M(Ura-H)(H2 O)n ](+) (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba; n = 1-3) complexes in the gas phase by IRMPD spectroscopy and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Power, Barry; Haldys, Violette; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Fridgen, Travis D

    2016-03-01

    The structures of singly and doubly (and for Mg, triply) hydrated group 2 metal dications bound to deprotonated uracil were explored in the gas phase using infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (1000-1900 cm(-1) ) and the O-H/N-H stretching region (2700-3800 cm(-1) ) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra were then compared with the computed IR spectra for various isomers. Calculations were performed using B3LYP with the 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set for all atoms except Ba(2+) and Sr(2+) , for which the LANL2DZ or the def2-TZVPP basis sets with relativistic core potentials were used. Atoms-in-molecules analysis was conducted for all lowest energy structures. The lowest energy isomers in all cases are those in which the one uracil is deprotonated at the N3 position, and the metal is coordinated to the N3 and O4 of uracil. Regardless of the degree of solvation, all water molecules are bound to the metal ion and participate in a hydrogen bond with a carbonyl of the uracil moiety.

  8. Structures of [M(Ura-H)(H2 O)n ](+) (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba; n = 1-3) complexes in the gas phase by IRMPD spectroscopy and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Power, Barry; Haldys, Violette; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Fridgen, Travis D

    2016-03-01

    The structures of singly and doubly (and for Mg, triply) hydrated group 2 metal dications bound to deprotonated uracil were explored in the gas phase using infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (1000-1900 cm(-1) ) and the O-H/N-H stretching region (2700-3800 cm(-1) ) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra were then compared with the computed IR spectra for various isomers. Calculations were performed using B3LYP with the 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set for all atoms except Ba(2+) and Sr(2+) , for which the LANL2DZ or the def2-TZVPP basis sets with relativistic core potentials were used. Atoms-in-molecules analysis was conducted for all lowest energy structures. The lowest energy isomers in all cases are those in which the one uracil is deprotonated at the N3 position, and the metal is coordinated to the N3 and O4 of uracil. Regardless of the degree of solvation, all water molecules are bound to the metal ion and participate in a hydrogen bond with a carbonyl of the uracil moiety. PMID:26956390

  9. Interaction between phases in the liquid-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, R. S.; Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    This work analyzes the equilibrium between a liquid and a gas over this liquid separated by an interface. Various gas forms exist inside the liquid: dissolved gas molecules attached to solvent molecules, free gas molecules, and gaseous bubbles. Thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained between two phases; the first phase is the liquid containing dissolved and free molecules, and the second phase is the gas over the liquid and bubbles inside it. Kinetics of gas transition between the internal and external gas proceeds through bubbles and includes the processes of bubbles floating up and bubble growth as a result of association due to the Smoluchowski mechanism. Evolution of a gas in the liquid is considered using the example of oxygen in water, and numerical parameters of this system are given. In the regime under consideration for an oxygen-water system, transport of oxygen into the surrounding air proceeds through micron-size bubbles with lifetimes of hours. This regime is realized if the total number of oxygen molecules in water is small compared with the numbers of solvated and free molecules in the liquid.

  10. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  11. NMR study of stable radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obynochny, A. A.; Maryasov, A. G.; Shakirov, M. M.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    1993-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the NMR spectrum of methyl-substituted nitroxyl radical of the imidazoline series has been studied. The NMR signal induced by radicals in the gas phase has been observed. A shift of the lines of the NMR spectrum in the gas phase according to the Curie law is observed which allows one to determine the value of the hfi constant of the protons of different racial groups. The hfi constant for methyl-substituted radical within experimental accuracy coincides with those measured by other methods in the liquid phase. In the absorbed phase of the samples under study, a substantial contribution is made by the volumetric susceptibility of the liquid film. The diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility of the radical in the liquid state has been measured (in the film of 2 × 10 -6). When the thickness of the adsorbed film is small, the molecular exchange between the liquid and gas phases becomes noticeable, causing a corresponding additional shift of the lines. The gas-kinetic cross section for the radical (120 Å 2) has been estimated from the temperature dependence of the line width in the gas phase.

  12. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOEpatents

    Phillion, Donald W.

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  13. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Falvo, Cyril; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Mulas, Giacomo; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  14. Ab initio structural and spectroscopic study of HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = 0,+1,−1) in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yaghlane, Saida Ben; Cotton, C. Eric; Francisco, Joseph S. E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr; Linguerri, Roberto; Hochlaf, Majdi E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr

    2013-11-07

    Accurate ab initio computations of structural and spectroscopic parameters for the HPS/HSP molecules and corresponding cations and anions have been performed. For the electronic structure computations, standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster techniques in conjunction with large basis sets have been adopted. In particular, we present equilibrium geometries, rotational constants, harmonic vibrational frequencies, adiabatic ionization energies, electron affinities, and, for the neutral species, singlet-triplet relative energies. Besides, the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) for HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = −1,0,1) systems have been generated at the standard coupled cluster level with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality. By applying perturbation theory to the calculated PESs, an extended set of spectroscopic constants, including τ, first-order centrifugal distortion and anharmonic vibrational constants has been obtained. In addition, the potentials have been used in a variational approach to deduce the whole pattern of vibrational levels up to 4000 cm{sup −1} above the minima of the corresponding PESs.

  15. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    SciTech Connect

    Bréchignac, Philippe Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Mulas, Giacomo

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  16. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  17. Evaluation of phase envelope on natural gas, condensate and gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promkotra, S.; Kangsadan, T.

    2015-03-01

    The experimentally gas hydrate are generated by condensate and natural gas. Natural gas and condensate samples are collected from a gas processing plant where is situated in the northeastern part of Thailand. Physical properties of the API gravity and density of condensate are presented in the range of 55-60° and 0.71-0.76 g/cm3. The chemical compositions of petroleum-field water are analyzed to evaluate the genesis of gas hydrate by experimental procedure. The hydrochemical compositions of petroleum-field waters are mostly the Na-Cl facies. This condition can estimate how the hydrate forms. Phase envelope of condensate is found only one phase which is liquid phase. The liquid fraction is 100% at 15°C and 101.327 kPa, with the critical pressure and temperature of 2,326 kPa and 611.5 K. However, natural gas can be separated in three phases which are vapor, liquid and solid phase with the pressure and temperature at 100 kPa and 274.2 K. The hydrate curves explicit both hydrate zone and nonhydrate zone. Phase envelope of gas hydrate from the phase diagram indicates the hydrate formation. The experimental results of hydrate form can correlate to the hydrate curve. Besides, the important factor of hydrate formation depends on impurity in the petroleum system.

  18. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  19. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  20. A novel phase shifting structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veena; Dubey, Vishesh; Ahmad, Azeem; Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new and novel phase shifting technique for qualitative as well as quantitative measurement in microscopy. We have developed a phase shifting device which is robust, inexpensive and involves no mechanical movement. In this method, phase shifting is implemented using LED array, beam splitters and defocused projection of Ronchi grating. The light from the LEDs are made incident on the beam splitters at spatially different locations. Due to variation in the geometrical distances of LEDs from the Ronchi grating and by sequentially illuminating the grating by switching on one LED at a time the phase shifted grating patterns are generated. The phase shifted structured patterns are projected onto the sample using microscopic objective lens. The phase shifted deformed patterns are recorded by a CCD camera. The initial alignment of the setup involves a simple procedure for the calibration for equal fringe width and intensity such that the phase shifted fringes are at equal phase difference. Three frame phase shifting algorithm is employed for the reconstruction of the phase map. The method described here is fully automated so that the phase shifted images are recorded just by switching of LEDs and has been used for the shape measurement of microscopic industrial objects. The analysis of the phase shifted images provides qualitative as well as quantitative information about the sample. Thus, the method is simple, robust and low cost compared to PZT devices commonly employed for phase shifting.

  1. Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy as a Tool to Study the Structures of Odorant Molecules and Weakly Bound Complexes in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, Sabrina; Betz, Thomas; Medcraft, Chris; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of trans-cinnamaldehyde ((2E)-3-phenylprop-2-enal) has been obtained with chirped-pulse microwave spectroscopy in the frequency range of 2 - 8.5 GHz. The odorant molecule is the essential component in cinnamon oil and causes the characteristic smell. In the measured high-resolution spectrum, we were able to assign the rotational spectra of two conformers of trans-cinnamaldehyde as well as all singly 13C-substituted species of the lowest-energy conformer in natural abundance. Two different methods were used to determine the structure from the rotational constants, which will be compared within this contribution. In addition, the current progress of studying ether-alcohol complexes, aiming at an improved understanding of the interplay between hydrogen bonding and dispersion interaction, will be reported. Here, a special focus is placed on the complexes of diphenylether with small aliphatic alcohols.

  2. Structures of diamond-like phases

    SciTech Connect

    Greshnyakov, V. A.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2011-07-15

    The diamond-like phases containing carbon atoms with the same degree of hybridization, which is close to sp{sup 3}, are classified. It is found that twenty such phases can exist, and ten of them are described for the first time. Molecular mechanics and semi-empirical quantum-mechanical methods are used to calculate the geometrically optimized structures of diamond-like phase clusters and to determine their structural parameters and properties, such as the density, the bulk modulus, and the sublimation energy. The difference between the properties of the diamond-like phases and those of diamond is found to be determined by the difference between the structures of these phases and diamond.

  3. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S.; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM‐MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM‐MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM‐MS data of two IDPs; α‐Synuclein (α‐Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C‐II (ApoC‐II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC‐II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α‐Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC‐II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM‐MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  4. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-08-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM-MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM-MS data of two IDPs; α-Synuclein (α-Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC-II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α-Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC-II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM-MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  5. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Wong, C. Channy

    1999-08-02

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  6. Gas and particulate phase products from the ozonolysis of acenaphthylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Healy, Robert M.; Tomaz, Sophie; Flaud, Pierre-Marie; Perraudin, Emilie; Wenger, John C.; Villenave, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recognized as important secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors in the urban atmosphere. In this work, the gas-phase ozonolysis of acenaphthylene was investigated in an atmospheric simulation chamber using a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and an aerosol time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) for on-line characterization of the oxidation products in the gas and particle phases, respectively. SOA samples were also collected on filters and analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS). The major gas-phase products included a range of oxygenated naphthalene derivatives such as 1,8-naphthalic anhydride, naphthalene 1,8-dicarbaldehyde and naphthaldehyde, as well as a secondary ozonide. Possible reaction mechanisms are proposed for the formation of these products and favoured pathways have been suggested. Many of these products were also found in the particle phase along with a range of oligomeric compounds. The same range of gas and particle phase products was observed in the presence and absence of excess cyclohexane, an OH scavenger, indicating that OH radical production from the ozonolysis of acenaphthylene is negligible. SOA yields in the range 23-37% were determined and indicate that acenaphthylene ozonolysis may contribute to part of the SOA observed in urban areas.

  7. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  8. On the interplay between geometrical structure and magnetic anisotropy: a relativistic density-functional study of mixed Pt-Co and Pt-Fe trimers and tetramers in the gas-phase and supported on graphene.

    PubMed

    Błoński, Piotr; Hafner, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of mixed Pt-Co and Pt-Fe trimers and tetramers in the gas-phase and supported on a free-standing graphene layer have been calculated using density-functional theory. The influence of the strong magnetic moments of the 3d atoms on the Pt atoms and the influence of the strong spin-orbit coupling contributed by the Pt atoms on the 3d atoms have been studied in detail. All mixed trimers form isocele triangles in the gas-phase. On a graphene layer the structure is influenced by the strong binding of the 3d atoms, leading to an asymmetric configuration for Pt-rich and more symmetric structures for 3d-rich clusters. The magnetic anisotropy energy defined as the energy difference for easy and hard magnetization directions varies between 5 and 13 meV/atom for the free trimers, but is strongly reduced to values between 0.7 and 6.6 meV/atom for the graphene-supported clusters. The saddle-point energy representing the barrier against magnetization reversal is on average 3 meV/atom for free trimers, it is reduced to 2 meV/atom for the more symmetric PtCo(Fe)(2) clusters, and to only about 0.3 meV/atom for the asymmetric Pt(2)Co(Fe) cluster on graphene. For the mixed tetramers the strong magnetism stabilizes a flat geometric structure, except for Pt(3)Co which forms a distorted trigonal pyramid. The geometry of the graphene-supported tetramers is very different due to the requirement of a good match to the substrate. Large magnetic anisotropy energies are found for free Pt(3)Co where the change of the magnetization direction also induces a transition from a high- to a low-moment magnetic isomer. For all other free tetramers the magnetic anisotropy energy ranges between 3 to 5 meV/atom only, it is further reduced to 0.4 to 3.8 meV/atom for the graphene-supported tetramers. The reduction is strongest for Pt(3)Fe/graphene because of the asymmetric structure of the adsorption complex. The barriers against magnetization reversal range between

  9. Porous Silicon Structures as Optical Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Levitsky, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a short review of recent progress in the field of optical gas sensors based on porous silicon (PSi) and PSi composites, which are separate from PSi optochemical and biological sensors for a liquid medium. Different periodical and nonperiodical PSi photonic structures (bares, modified by functional groups or infiltrated with sensory polymers) are described for gas sensing with an emphasis on the device specificity, sensitivity and stability to the environment. Special attention is paid to multiparametric sensing and sensor array platforms as effective trends for the improvement of analyte classification and quantification. Mechanisms of gas physical and chemical sorption inside PSi mesopores and pores of PSi functional composites are discussed. PMID:26287199

  10. Solid phase microextraction coupled with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for high-resolution metabolite profiling in apples: implementation of structured separations for optimization of sample preparation procedure in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Risticevic, Sanja; DeEll, Jennifer R; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-08-17

    Metabolomics currently represents one of the fastest growing high-throughput molecular analysis platforms that refer to the simultaneous and unbiased analysis of metabolite pools constituting a particular biological system under investigation. In response to the ever increasing interest in development of reliable methods competent with obtaining a complete and accurate metabolomic snapshot for subsequent identification, quantification and profiling studies, the purpose of the current investigation is to test the feasibility of solid phase microextraction for advanced fingerprinting of volatile and semivolatile metabolites in complex samples. In particular, the current study is focussed on the development and optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) - comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-ToFMS) methodology for metabolite profiling of apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.). For the first time, GC × GC attributes in terms of molecular structure-retention relationships and utilization of two-dimensional separation space on orthogonal GC × GC setup were exploited in the field of SPME method optimization for complex sample analysis. Analytical performance data were assessed in terms of method precision when commercial coatings are employed in spiked metabolite aqueous sample analysis. The optimized method consisted of the implementation of direct immersion SPME (DI-SPME) extraction mode and its application to metabolite profiling of apples, and resulted in a tentative identification of 399 metabolites and the composition of a metabolite database far more comprehensive than those obtainable with classical one-dimensional GC approaches. Considering that specific metabolome constituents were for the first time reported in the current study, a valuable approach for future advanced fingerprinting studies in the field of fruit biology is proposed. The current study also intensifies the understanding of SPME

  11. Synthesis, structure and gas-phase reactivity of the mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)L(Ph)3]BF4 (L(Ph) = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane).

    PubMed

    Zavras, Athanasios; Ariafard, Alireza; Khairallah, George N; White, Jonathan M; Mulder, Roger J; Canty, Allan J; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-11-21

    Borohydrides react with silver salts to give products that span multiple scales ranging from discrete mononuclear compounds through to silver nanoparticles and colloids. The cluster cations [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3](+) are observed upon electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of solutions containing sodium borohydride, silver(I) tetrafluoroborate and bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (L(Me)) or bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (L(Ph)). By adding NaBH4 to an acetonitrile solution of AgBF4 and L(Ph), cooled to ca. -10 °C, we have been able to isolate the first mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster, [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)L(Ph)3]BF4, and structurally characterise it via X-ray crystallography. Combined gas-phase experiments (L(Me) and L(Ph)) and DFT calculations (L(Me)) reveal how loss of a ligand from the cationic complexes [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3](+) provides a change in geometry that facilitates subsequent loss of BH3 to produce the dihydride clusters, [Ag3(H)2Ln](+) (n = 1 and 2). Together with the results of previous studies (Girod et al., Chem. - Eur. J., 2014, 20, 16626), this provides a direct link between mixed silver hydride/borohydride nanoclusters, silver hydride nanoclusters, and silver nanoclusters.

  12. Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sylwester, Alan P.

    2007-01-02

    The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

  13. Effect of phase behavior on bypassing in enriched gas floods

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Bhogeswara, R.; Mohanty, K.K. )

    1994-05-01

    Enriched gas floods incorporate a complex interaction of heterogeneity, fingering, multiphase flow, and phase behavior. Experiments and simulations indicate that the optimum solvent enrichment in high-viscosity-ratio secondary gas floods can be below minimum miscibility enrichment (MME). The compositional path and resulting mobility profile in multidimensional multiple-contact miscible (MCM) or immiscible floods are different from their 1D counterparts for high-viscosity-ratio floods in heterogeneous media.

  14. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  15. Gas purification in the dense phase at the CATS terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Openshaw, P.J.; Carnell, P.J.H.; Rhodes, E.F.

    1999-07-01

    The purification and transportation of natural gas at very high pressures can help to minimize the capital cost of pipelines and processing equipment. However, complex mixtures of hydrocarbons undergo unusual phase changes, such as retrograde condensation, as the temperature and pressure are altered. The Central Area Transmission System (CATS) is a joint venture of Amoci, BG, Amerada Hess, Phillips, Agip and Fina operated by Amoco on behalf of the owners. The design of the CATS terminal has provided an interesting processing challenge. The terminal receives a total of 1.6 Bscf/d of rich gas from a number of offshore fields. All are relatively sweet but the small amounts of H{sub 2}S and Hg are removed. Fixed bed technology was selected as the most economic purification process, while minimizing hydrocarbon loss and operator involvement. Conventionally, the raw gas would be split into the different hydrocarbon fractions and each would be processed separately. This would require the installation of a large number of reactors. A more elegant solution is to treat the gas on arrival at the terminal in the dense phase. This option raised questions around whether a fixed bed would be prone to fouling, could the pressure drop be kept low enough to avoid phase separation and would inadvertent wetting by condensation cause problems. Details are given of the test work carried out to prove the viability of using fixed bed technology for dense phase gas processing, the eventual design adopted and the performance over the first year of service.

  16. Nuclear Structure of the Noble Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Nakyeong

    Modern physics usually pictures the nuclear structure as about sphere and treats various detailed situation as perturbative, which may be obscured. In addition, the explanation why 235U undergoes nuclear fission and 238U does not is too difficult and unclear for the people to understand. However, in this paper, we introduce a new approach on the nuclear structure of the noble gas, which simultaneously can explain several phenomena that is obscurely elucidated by modern physics. We consider a 1:1 ratio between protons and neutrons and need the concept of the symmetry of the nuclear structure, because the electron's shell of the noble gas is fully occupied. From these, we can predict the number of neutrons of each noble gas exactly

  17. Gas phase radiative effects in diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedir, Hasan

    Several radiation models are evaluated for a stagnation point diffusion flame of a solid fuel in terms of accuracy and computational time. Narrowband, wideband, spectral line weighted sum of gray gases (SLWSGG), and gray gas models are included in the comparison. Radiative heat flux predictions by the nongray narrowband, wideband, and SLWSGG models are found to be in good agreement with each other, whereas the gray gas models are found to be inaccurate. The narrowband model, the most complex among the models evaluated, is then applied first to a solid fuel and second to a pure gaseous diffusion flame. A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) diffusion flame in a stagnation point geometry is solved with the narrowband model with COsb2, Hsb2O, and MMA vapor included in participating species. A detailed account of the emission and absorption from these species as well as the radiative heat fluxes are given as a function of the stretch rate. It is found that at low stretch rate the importance of radiation is increased due to an increase in the optical thickness, and a decrease in the conductive heat flux. Results show that COsb2 is the biggest emitter and absorber in the flame, MMA vapor is the second and Hsb2O is the least important. A pure gaseous flame in an opposed jet configuration is solved with the narrowband radiation model with CO as the fuel, and Osb2 as the oxidizer. Detailed. chemical kinetics and transport are incorporated into the combustion model with the use of the CHEMKIN and TRANSPORT software packages. The governing equations are solved with a modified version of the OPPDIF code. Dry and wet CO flames as well as COsb2 dilution are studied. Comparison of the results with and without the consideration of radiation reveals that the radiation is important for the whole flammable range of dry CO flames and for the low stretch rates of wet flames. Without the consideration of radiation the temperature and the species mole fractions (especially of minor species

  18. Polymerization in the gas phase, in clusters, and on nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    El-Shall, M Samy

    2008-07-01

    Gas phase and cluster experiments provide unique opportunities to quantitatively study the effects of initiators, solvents, chain transfer agents, and inhibitors on the mechanisms of polymerization. Furthermore, a number of important phenomena, unique structures, and novel properties may exist during gas-phase and cluster polymerization. In this regime, the structure of the growing polymer may change dramatically and the rate coefficient may vary significantly upon the addition of a single molecule of the monomer. These changes would be reflected in the properties of the oligomers deposited from the gas phase. At low pressures, cationic and radical cationic polymerizations may proceed in the gas phase through elimination reactions. In the same systems at high pressure, however, the ionic intermediates may be stabilized, and addition without elimination may occur. In isolated van der Waals clusters of monomer molecules, sequential polymerization with several condensation steps can occur on a time scale of a few microseconds following the ionization of the gas-phase cluster. The cluster reactions, which bridge gas-phase and condensed-phase chemistry, allow examination of the effects of controlled states of aggregation. This Account describes several examples of gas-phase and cluster polymerization studies where the most significant results can be summarized as follows: (1) The carbocation polymerization of isobutene shows slower rates with increasing polymerization steps resulting from entropy barriers, which could explain the need for low temperatures for the efficient propagation of high molecular weight polymers. (2) Radical cation polymerization of propene can be initiated by partial charge transfer from an ionized aromatic molecule such as benzene coupled with covalent condensation of the associated propene molecules. This novel mechanism leads exclusively to the formation of propene oligomer ions and avoids other competitive products. (3) Structural information

  19. Polymerization in the gas phase, in clusters, and on nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    El-Shall, M Samy

    2008-07-01

    Gas phase and cluster experiments provide unique opportunities to quantitatively study the effects of initiators, solvents, chain transfer agents, and inhibitors on the mechanisms of polymerization. Furthermore, a number of important phenomena, unique structures, and novel properties may exist during gas-phase and cluster polymerization. In this regime, the structure of the growing polymer may change dramatically and the rate coefficient may vary significantly upon the addition of a single molecule of the monomer. These changes would be reflected in the properties of the oligomers deposited from the gas phase. At low pressures, cationic and radical cationic polymerizations may proceed in the gas phase through elimination reactions. In the same systems at high pressure, however, the ionic intermediates may be stabilized, and addition without elimination may occur. In isolated van der Waals clusters of monomer molecules, sequential polymerization with several condensation steps can occur on a time scale of a few microseconds following the ionization of the gas-phase cluster. The cluster reactions, which bridge gas-phase and condensed-phase chemistry, allow examination of the effects of controlled states of aggregation. This Account describes several examples of gas-phase and cluster polymerization studies where the most significant results can be summarized as follows: (1) The carbocation polymerization of isobutene shows slower rates with increasing polymerization steps resulting from entropy barriers, which could explain the need for low temperatures for the efficient propagation of high molecular weight polymers. (2) Radical cation polymerization of propene can be initiated by partial charge transfer from an ionized aromatic molecule such as benzene coupled with covalent condensation of the associated propene molecules. This novel mechanism leads exclusively to the formation of propene oligomer ions and avoids other competitive products. (3) Structural information

  20. Jahn-Teller solitons, structural phase transitions, and phase separation.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Dennis P

    2006-02-01

    It is demonstrated that under common conditions a molecular solid subject to Jahn-Teller interactions supports stable Q-ball-like nontopological solitons. Such solitons represent a localized lump of excess electric charge in periodic motion accompanied by a time-dependent shape distortion of a set of adjacent molecules. The motion of the distortion can correspond to a true rotation or to a pseudorotation about the symmetric shape configuration. These solitons are stable for Jahn-Teller coupling strengths below a critical value; however, as the Jahn-Teller coupling approaches this critical value, the size of the soliton diverges signaling an incipient structural phase transition. The soliton phase mimics features commonly attributed to phase separation in complex solids. PMID:16486846

  1. Jahn-Teller Solitons, Structural Phase Transitions, and Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2006-02-01

    It is demonstrated that under common conditions a molecular solid subject to Jahn-Teller interactions supports stable Q-ball-like nontopological solitons. Such solitons represent a localized lump of excess electric charge in periodic motion accompanied by a time-dependent shape distortion of a set of adjacent molecules. The motion of the distortion can correspond to a true rotation or to a pseudorotation about the symmetric shape configuration. These solitons are stable for Jahn-Teller coupling strengths below a critical value; however, as the Jahn-Teller coupling approaches this critical value, the size of the soliton diverges signaling an incipient structural phase transition. The soliton phase mimics features commonly attributed to phase separation in complex solids.

  2. Direct atomic structure determination by the inspection of structural phase.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Philip N H; Moodie, Alexander F; Etheridge, Joanne

    2013-08-27

    A century has passed since Bragg solved the first atomic structure using diffraction. As with this first structure, all atomic structures to date have been deduced from the measurement of many diffracted intensities using iterative and statistical methods. We show that centrosymmetric atomic structures can be determined without the need to measure or even record a diffracted intensity. Instead, atomic structures can be determined directly and quickly from the observation of crystallographic phases in electron diffraction patterns. Furthermore, only a few phases are required to achieve high resolution. This represents a paradigm shift in structure determination methods, which we demonstrate with the moderately complex α-Al2O3. We show that the observation of just nine phases enables the location of all atoms with a resolution of better than 0.1 Å. This level of certainty previously required the measurement of thousands of diffracted intensities.

  3. Structural phase transitions in monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha June; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has provided opportunities to develop ultimate thin channel devices. In contrast to graphene, the existence of moderate band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling gives rise to exotic electronic properties which vary with layer thickness, lattice structure, and symmetry. TMDs commonly appear in two structures with distinct symmetries, trigonal prismatic 2H and octahedral 1T phases which are semiconducting and metallic, respectively. In this work, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides (MoX2, where X = S, Se, Te) through first-principles density functional calculations. We find a tendency that the semiconducting 2H phase is more stable than the metallic 1T phase. We show that a spontaneous symmetry breaking of 1T phase leads to various distorted octahedral (1T') phases, thus inducing a metal-to-semiconductor transition. We discuss the effects of carrier doping on the structural stability and the modification of the electronic structure. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under Grant No. NRF-2005-0093845 and Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Grant No. SSTFBA1401-08.

  4. Gas-phase synthesis and reactivity of Cu(+)-benzyne complexes.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yunfeng; Shen, Shanshan; Weng, Guofeng; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2014-10-11

    Cu(+)-benzyne complexes bearing bidentate nitrogen ligands were synthesized in the gas phase for the first time using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The addition reactivity of copper-stabilized benzyne with amines was studied in the ion trap analyzer. The structures of products were identified by comparing their MS(n) data with authentic compounds obtained from another generation route.

  5. Field ionization kinetic and electron impact studies of gas phase transition states - The cyclic bromonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. M.; Giguere, R. J.; Falick, A. M.; Aberth, W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Cis- and trans-isomers of 4-t-butylcyclohexyl bromide were studied to determine the mechanism of cyclic bromonium ion formation. The field ionization kinetic and electron impact data indicate that the formation of the cyclic structure occurs simultaneously with loss of the neutral fragment. The data also show that little or no gas-phase cis-trans isomerization occurs.

  6. Gas-phase metalloprotein complexes interrogated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faull, Peter A.; Korkeila, Karoliina E.; Kalapothakis, Jason M.; Gray, Andrew; McCullough, Bryan J.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase biomolecular structure may be explored through a number of analytical techniques. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) continues to prove itself as a sensitive and reliable bioanalytical tool for gas-phase structure determination due to intense study and development over the past 15 years. A vast amount of research interest, especially in protein and peptide conformational studies has generated a wealth of structural information for biological systems from small peptides to megadalton-sized biomolecules. In this work, linear low field IM-MS has been used to study gas-phase conformations and determine rotationally averaged collision cross-sections of three metalloproteins--cytochrome c, haemoglobin and calmodulin. Measurements have been performed on the MoQToF, a modified QToF 1 instrument (Micromass UK Ltd., Manchester, UK) modified in house. Gas-phase conformations and cross-sections of multimeric cytochrome c ions of the form [xM + nH+]n+ for x = 1-3 (monomer to trimer) have been successfully characterised and measured. We believe these to be the first reported collision cross-sections of higher order multimeric cytochrome c. Haemoglobin is investigated to obtain structural information on the associative mechanism of tetramer formation. Haemoglobin molecules, comprising apo- and holo-monomer chains, dimer and tetramer are transferred to the gas phase under a range of solution conditions. Structural information on the proposed critical intermediate, semi-haemoglobin, is reported. Cross-sections of the calcium binding protein calmodulin have been obtained under a range of calcium-bound conditions. Metalloprotein collision cross-sections from ion mobility measurements are compared with computationally derived values from published NMR and X-ray crystallography structural data. Finally we consider the change in the density of the experimentally measured rotationally averaged collision cross-section for compact geometries of the electrosprayed proteins.

  7. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  8. Gas-phase NMR studies of alcohols. Intrinsic acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; True, Nancy S.

    1985-05-01

    Gas-phase (≈100 Torr) 1H NMR spectra of eighteen simple aliphatic and unsaturated alcohols, four fluorinated alcohols, and two thiols were obtained at 148.6°C where hydrogen bonding has little effect on chemical shifts. For the methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, t-butanol, i- butanol, neopentanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and benzyl alcohol, the observed hydroxylic proton chemical shifts correlate with previously obtained relative gas-phase acidities from thermochemical analysis which employed equilibrium constants of proton transfer reactions measured via mass spectroscopic and ion cyclotron resonance techniques. The correlational dependence is 10.3(0.5) kcal/mol ppm with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. These results demonstrate that the trend of increasing acidity with increasing size of the alkyl substituent is also reflected in the neutral forms of the alcohols, indicating that the polarizability of the ionic forms is not the only determining factor in relative gas-phase acidities of alcohols. Although factors affecting the hydroxylic proton chemical shifts of the larger substituted and unsaturated alcohols are more complex, their observed 1H NMR spectra also reflect this trend. For methanol and ethanol observed gas-phase 1H chemical shifts are also compared with recent theoritical calculations. 3JHH coupling constants across CO bonds are ≈ 5.5 Hz, significantly smaller than typical 3JHH coupling across sp 3 hybrid C C bonds.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  10. Statistical and Microscopic Approach to Gas Phase Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, J. M.; Quereda, R.

    1983-01-01

    Describes advanced undergraduate laboratory exercise examining the dependence of the rate constants and the instantaneous concentrations with the nature and energy content in a gas-phase complex reaction. Computer program (with instructions and computation flow charts) used with the exercise is available from the author. (Author/JN)

  11. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  12. Topological phase structure of entangled qudits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, A. Z.; Oxman, L. E.

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the appearance of fractional topological phases on cyclic evolutions of entangled qudits. The original result reported by Oxman and Khoury [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 240503 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.240503] is detailed and extended to qudits of different dimensions. The topological nature of the phase evolution and its restriction to fractional values are related to both the structure of the projective space of states and entanglement. For maximally entangled states of qudits with the same Hilbert-space dimension, the fractional geometric phases are the only ones attainable under local SU(d) operations, an effect that can be experimentally observed through conditional interference.

  13. Realization of an excited, strongly correlated quantum gas phase.

    PubMed

    Haller, Elmar; Gustavsson, Mattias; Mark, Manfred J; Danzl, Johann G; Hart, Russell; Pupillo, Guido; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph

    2009-09-01

    Ultracold atomic physics offers myriad possibilities to study strongly correlated many-body systems in lower dimensions. Typically, only ground-state phases are accessible. Using a tunable quantum gas of bosonic cesium atoms, we realized and controlled in one-dimensional geometry a highly excited quantum phase that is stabilized in the presence of attractive interactions by maintaining and strengthening quantum correlations across a confinement-induced resonance. We diagnosed the crossover from repulsive to attractive interactions in terms of the stiffness and energy of the system. Our results open up the experimental study of metastable, excited, many-body phases with strong correlations and their dynamical properties. PMID:19729651

  14. Novel stationary phases based on asphaltenes for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Momotko, Malwina; Chruszczyk, Dorota; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of investigations on the possibility of the application of the asphaltene fraction isolated from the oxidized residue from vacuum distillation of crude oil as a stationary phase for gas chromatography. The results of the investigation revealed that the asphaltene stationary phases can find use for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds. The experimental values of Rohrschneider/McReynolds constants characterize the asphaltenes as stationary phases of medium polarity and selectivity similar to commercially available phases based on alkyl phthalates. Isolation of asphaltenes from the material obtained under controlled process conditions allows the production of a stationary phase having reproducible sorption properties and chromatographic columns having the same selectivity. Unique selectivity and high thermal stability make asphaltenes attractive as a material for stationary phases for gas chromatography. A low production cost from a readily available raw material (oxidized petroleum bitumens) is an important economic factor in case of application of the asphaltene stationary phases for preparative and process separations.

  15. Novel stationary phases based on asphaltenes for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Momotko, Malwina; Chruszczyk, Dorota; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of investigations on the possibility of the application of the asphaltene fraction isolated from the oxidized residue from vacuum distillation of crude oil as a stationary phase for gas chromatography. The results of the investigation revealed that the asphaltene stationary phases can find use for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds. The experimental values of Rohrschneider/McReynolds constants characterize the asphaltenes as stationary phases of medium polarity and selectivity similar to commercially available phases based on alkyl phthalates. Isolation of asphaltenes from the material obtained under controlled process conditions allows the production of a stationary phase having reproducible sorption properties and chromatographic columns having the same selectivity. Unique selectivity and high thermal stability make asphaltenes attractive as a material for stationary phases for gas chromatography. A low production cost from a readily available raw material (oxidized petroleum bitumens) is an important economic factor in case of application of the asphaltene stationary phases for preparative and process separations. PMID:27144876

  16. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls. PMID:26573993

  17. Gas-phase chemistry of alkylcarbonate anions and radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-02-01

    Alkylcarbonate anions and radicals ROCOO-/ (R = H, CH3, C2H5, i-C3H7, and t-C4H9) are investigated in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations. Structural parameters and energies are obtained at the MP2/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theoryE Standard enthalpies of formation for the anions and radicals are determined via atomization energies and isodesmic reactions using the CBS-Q method. Further, alkylcarbonate anions are probed by metastable ion and collisional activation experiments, and the chemistry of the neutral radicals is investigated by charge-reversal and neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry. Although decarboxylation dominates the unimolecular reactivity of the species for both charge states, some other interesting features are observed, particularly for the anions, such as the formation of the CO3- radical anion or the presence of ionic fragments formed via hydrogen atom transfer.

  18. Gas-phase electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalyavi, N.; Catani, K. J.; Sanelli, J. A.; Dryza, V.; Bieske, E. J.

    2015-08-01

    The visible and near-UV electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation is measured in the gas phase by photodissociation of indole+-Ar and indole+-He complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. A series of resolved vibronic transitions extending from 610 to 460 nm are assigned to the D2 ← D0 band system, while weak transitions between 390 and 360 nm are assigned to the D3 ← D0 system, and a stronger, broad, unresolved absorption between 350 and 300 nm is attributed to the D4 ← D0 system. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used to assign vibronic structure of the D2 ← D0 band system, and show that the main active vibrational modes correspond to in-plane ring deformations. The strongest D2 ← D0 vibronic transitions of indole+-He do not correspond with any catalogued diffuse interstellar bands, even considering band displacements of up to 50 cm-1possibly caused by the attached He atom.

  19. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  20. Gas-Phase Studies of Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase (Fpg) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kiruba, G S M; Xu, Jiahui; Zelikson, Victoria; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase thermochemical properties (tautomerism, acidity, and proton affinity) have been measured and calculated for a series of nucleobase derivatives that have not heretofore been examined under vacuum. The studied species are substrates for the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which cleaves damaged nucleobases from DNA. The gas-phase results are compared and contrasted to solution-phase data, to afford insight into the Fpg mechanism. Calculations are also used to probe the energetics of various possible mechanisms and to predict isotope effects that could potentially allow for discrimination between different mechanisms. Specifically, (18) O substitution at the ribose O4' is predicted to result in a normal kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for a ring-opening "endocyclic" mechanism and an inverse KIE for a direct base excision "exocyclic" pathway.

  1. Gas-Phase Studies of Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase (Fpg) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kiruba, G S M; Xu, Jiahui; Zelikson, Victoria; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase thermochemical properties (tautomerism, acidity, and proton affinity) have been measured and calculated for a series of nucleobase derivatives that have not heretofore been examined under vacuum. The studied species are substrates for the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which cleaves damaged nucleobases from DNA. The gas-phase results are compared and contrasted to solution-phase data, to afford insight into the Fpg mechanism. Calculations are also used to probe the energetics of various possible mechanisms and to predict isotope effects that could potentially allow for discrimination between different mechanisms. Specifically, (18) O substitution at the ribose O4' is predicted to result in a normal kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for a ring-opening "endocyclic" mechanism and an inverse KIE for a direct base excision "exocyclic" pathway. PMID:26894440

  2. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ε-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas-phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution-phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters. PMID:25338221

  3. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, E. S.; Benilov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value Ts depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than Ts, the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with Ts being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  4. Gas-phase exposure history derived from material-phase concentration profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, G. C.; Little, J. C.; Xu, Y.; Rao, M.; Enke, D.

    Non-reactive gas-phase pollutants such as benzene diffuse into indoor furnishings and leave behind a unique material-phase concentration profile that serves as a record of the past gas-phase indoor concentrations. The inverse problem to be solved is the diffusion equation in a slab such as vinyl flooring. Using knowledge of the present material-phase concentration profile in the slab, we seek to determine the historical material-phase concentration at the surface exposed to indoor air, and hence the historical gas-phase concentration, which can be used directly to determine exposure. The problem as posed has a unique solution that may be solved using a variety of approaches. We use a trained artificial neural network (ANN) to derive solutions for hypothetical exposure scenarios. The ANN results show that it is possible to estimate the intensity and timing of past exposures from the material-phase concentration profile in a building material. The overall method is limited by (1) the resolution of techniques for measuring spatial material-phase concentration profiles, (2) how far back in time we seek to determine exposure and (3) the representational power of the ANN solution. For example, we estimate that this technique can estimate exposure to phenol up to 0.5 y in the past from analyses of vinyl flooring.

  5. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  6. Lightweight solar concentrator structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Kaplan, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the program conducted by Ultramet under SBIR Phase 2 Contract NAS3-25418. The objective of this program was to develop lightweight materials and processes for advanced high accuracy Space Solar Concentrators using rigidized foam for the substrate structure with an integral optical surface.

  7. Bistable defect structures in blue phase devices.

    PubMed

    Tiribocchi, A; Gonnella, G; Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E; Salvadore, F

    2011-12-01

    Blue phases are liquid crystals made up by networks of defects, or disclination lines. While existing phase diagrams show a striking variety of competing metastable topologies for these networks, very little is known as to how to kinetically reach a target structure, or how to switch from one to the other, which is of paramount importance for devices. We theoretically identify two confined blue phase I systems in which by applying an appropriate series of electric field it is possible to select one of two bistable defect patterns. Our results may be used to realize new generation and fast switching energy-saving bistable devices in ultrathin surface treated blue phase I wafers. PMID:22182126

  8. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

  9. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  10. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  11. Structural assembly demonstration experiment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Bowden, Mary L.; Miller, Rene H.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this phase of the structural assembly and demonstration experiment (SADE) program was to begin to define a shuttle flight experiment that would yield data to compare on-orbit assembly operations of large space structures with neutral buoyancy simulations. In addition, the experiment would be an early demonstration of structural hardware and human capabilities in extravehicular activity (EVA). The objectives of the MIT study, as listed in the statement of work, were: to provide support in establishing a baseline neutral buoyancy testing data base, to develop a correlation technique between neutral buoyancy test results and on-orbit operations, and to prepare the SADE experiment plan (MSFC-PLAN-913).

  12. Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

    1994-12-01

    The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2006-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer

  14. Structural support bracket for gas flow path

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-08-02

    A structural support system is provided in a can annular gas turbine engine having an arrangement including a plurality of integrated exit pieces (IEPs) forming an annular chamber for delivering gases from a plurality of combustors to a first row of turbine blades. A bracket structure is connected between an IEP and an inner support structure on the engine. The bracket structure includes an axial bracket member attached to an IEP and extending axially in a forward direction. A transverse bracket member has an end attached to the inner support structure and extends circumferentially to a connection with a forward end of the axial bracket member. The transverse bracket member provides a fixed radial position for the forward end of the axial bracket member and is flexible in the axial direction to permit axial movement of the axial bracket member.

  15. The 'sticky business' of cleaning gas-phase membrane proteins: a detergent oriented perspective.

    PubMed

    Borysik, Antoni J; Robinson, Carol V

    2012-11-14

    In recent years the properties of gas-phase detergent clusters have come under close scrutiny due in part to their participation in the analysis of intact membrane protein complexes by mass spectrometry. The detergent molecules that cover the protein complex are removed in the gas-phase by thermally agitating the ions by collision-induced dissociation. This process however, is not readily controlled and can frequently result in the disruption of protein structure. Improved methods of releasing proteins from detergent clusters are clearly required. To facilitate this the structural properties of detergent clusters along with the mechanistic details of their dissociation need to be understood. Pivotal to understanding the properties of gas-phase detergent clusters is the technique of ion mobility mass spectrometry. This technique can be used to assign polydisperse detergent clusters and provide information about their geometries and packing densities. In this article we consider the shapes of detergent clusters and show that these clusters possess geometries that are inconsistent with those in solution. We analyse the distributions of clusters in detail using tandem mass spectrometry and suggest that the mean charge of clusters formed from certain detergents is governed by electrostatic repulsion. We discuss the dissociation of detergent clusters and propose that detergent evaporation it a key process in the protection of protein complexes during high energy collisions in the gas-phase.

  16. Study of the thymine molecule: equilibrium structure from joint analysis of gas-phase electron diffraction and microwave data and assignment of vibrational spectra using results of ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Natalja; Khaikin, Leonid S; Grikina, Olga E; Rykov, Anatolii N; Vogt, Jürgen

    2008-08-21

    Thymine is one of the nucleobases which forms the nucleic acid (NA) base pair with adenine in DNA. The study of molecular structure and dynamics of nucleobases can help to understand and explain some processes in biological systems and therefore it is of interest. Because the scattered intensities on the C, N, and O atoms as well as some bond lengths in thymine are close to each other the structural problem cannot been solved by the gas phase electron diffraction (GED) method alone. Therefore the rotational constants from microvawe (MW) studies and differences in the groups of N-C, C=O, N-H, and C-H bond lengths from MP2 (full)/cc-pVQZ calculations were used as supplementary data. The analysis of GED data was based on the C(s) molecular symmetry according to results of the structure optimizations at the MP2 (full) level using 6-311G (d,p), cc-pVTZ, and cc-pVQZ basis sets confirmed by vibrational frequency calculations with 6-311G (d,p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. Mean-square amplitudes as well as harmonic and anharmonic vibrational corrections to the internuclear distances (r(e)-r(a)) and to the rotational constants (B(e)(k)-B(0)(k), where k = A, B, C) were calculated from the quadratic (MP2 (full)/cc-pVTZ) and cubic (MP2 (full)/6-311G (d,p)) force constants (the latter were used only for anharmonic corrections). The harmonic force field was scaled using published IR and Raman spectra of the parent and N1,N3-dideuterated species, which were for the first time completely assigned in the present work. The main equilibrium structural parameters of the thymine molecule determined from GED data supplemented by MW rotational constants and results of MP2 calculations are the following (bond lengths in Angstroms and bond angles in degrees with 3sigma in parentheses): r(e) (C5=C6) = 1.344 (16), r(e) (C5-C9) = 1.487 (8), r(e) (N1-C6) = 1.372 (3), r(e) (N1-C2) = 1.377 (3), r(e) (C2-N3) = 1.378 (3), r(e) (N3-C4) = 1.395 (3), r(e) (C2=O7) = 1.210 (1), r(e) (C4=O8) = 1.215 (1

  17. Superfluidity and phase transitions in a resonant Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Weichman, Peter B.; Park, Jae I.

    2008-10-01

    The atomic Bose gas is studied across a Feshbach resonance, mapping out its phase diagram, and computing its thermodynamics and excitation spectra. It is shown that such a degenerate gas admits two distinct atomic and molecular superfluid phases, with the latter distinguished by the absence of atomic off-diagonal long-range order, gapped atomic excitations, and deconfined atomic π-vortices. The properties of the molecular superfluid are explored, and it is shown that across a Feshbach resonance it undergoes a quantum Ising transition to the atomic superfluid, where both atoms and molecules are condensed. In addition to its distinct thermodynamic signatures and deconfined half-vortices, in a trap a molecular superfluid should be identifiable by the absence of an atomic condensate peak and the presence of a molecular one.

  18. Ionization of vitamin C in gas phase: Theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the gas phase ionization energies and photoelectron spectra of four important conformers of vitamin C were calculated. Symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction methodology employing the single and double excitation operators (SAC-CI SD-R) along with D95++(d,p) basis set were used for the calculations. Thermochemistry calculations were also performed on all possible conformers of vitamin C to find the relative stability of conformers in the gas phase. The calculated ionization bands of each conformer were assigned by calculating the contribution of natural bonding orbital (NBO) in the calculated canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization. SAC-CI calculations showed that the first ionization band of vitamin C is related to the π electrons of CC bond of the ring of molecule although, there is the lone electron pairs of oxygen atoms and π electrons of CO bond in the molecule. PMID:27092998

  19. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  20. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  1. The Nucleoside Uridine Isolated in the Gas Phase**

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the first experimental observation of the isolated nucleoside uridine, placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and characterized by Fourier transform microwave techniques. Free from the bulk effects of their native environments, anti/C2’-endo-g+ conformation has been revealed as the most stable form of uridine. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside. PMID:25683559

  2. The nucleoside uridine isolated in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2015-03-01

    Herein we present the first experimental observation of the isolated nucleoside uridine, placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and characterized by Fourier transform (FT) microwave techniques. Free from the bulk effects of their native environments, anti/C2'-endo-g+ conformation has been revealed as the most stable form of uridine. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside.

  3. Modeling Gas-Phase Chemistry in Cometary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.

    Gas-phase chemistry is central to understand the physics and chemistry of comets. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms seen in cometary atmospheres. The relevant physico-chemical processes are identified within a modeling framework to understand observations and in situ measurements of comets (e.g., Halley, Borrelly, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, Tempel 1, Wild 2) and to provide valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of their nuclei. Details of these processes are presented, from the collision-dominated inner coma to the solar wind interaction region. This extensive modeling effort to investigate these important cometary processes is highly relevant to ground-based observations of comets and past, on going, and future spacecraft missions to these primitive objects.Gas-phase chemistry is central to understand the physics and chemistry of comets. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms seen in cometary atmospheres. The relevant physico-chemical processes are identified within a modeling framework to understand observations and in situ measurements of comets (e.g., Halley, Borrelly, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, Tempel 1, Wild 2) and to provide valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of their nuclei. Details of these processes are presented, from the collision-dominated inner coma to the solar wind interaction region. This extensive modeling effort to investigate these important cometary processes is highly relevant to ground-based observations of comets and past, on going, and future spacecraft missions to these primitive objects.

  4. Modeling dissolved and free phase gas dynamics under decompression.

    PubMed

    Wienke, B R

    1990-04-01

    Dissolved and free gases do not behave the same way in tissue under pressure, and their interaction is complex. Differences are highlighted, particularly with respect to time scales, gradients and transport. Impacts of free phases on diving are described, contrasting increased off-gassing pressures, slower ascent rates, safety stops and reduced repetitive exposures as consistent practical measures within Haldane models (limited supersaturation) which can be played off against buildup of dissolved gas. Simple computations illustrate the points.

  5. Determination of gas phase and surface reactions in plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegemann, Dirk

    2009-10-01

    Using macroscopic kinetics, the reactions within the gas phase are governed by the reaction parameter power input per gas flow W/F, which corresponds to a specific energy, while reactions by energetic particle bombardment at the growing film surface are rather related to power input W alone. Assuming activation reactions, the mass deposition rate per gas flow can be described by an Arrhenius-like approach: [ RmF=G( -EaW / W F . - F ) ] Mixtures of hydrocarbons (C2H4) and reactive gases (CO2, N2+H2) were examined within low pressure RF plasmas. Thus, functional a-C:H:O or a-C:H:N plasma coatings result. At increasing energy input it is found that the deposited mass shows a deviation from the above equation, commonly related to energetic particle interactions. However, using the same range of W/F with varying power input W, it was found that the observed drop in deposition rate scales solely with energy input W/F for a-C:H:O, i.e. depending on plasma chemistry. a-C:H:N films, on the other hand, show both chemical and physical influences on the film growth. Hence, gas phase reactions such as a change of film-forming species play a major role in plasma polymerization.

  6. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en

  7. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the

  8. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A. Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  9. Theory of Gas Injection: Interaction of Phase Behavior and Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindoruk, B.

    2015-12-01

    The theory of gas injection processes is a central element required to understand how components move and partition in the reservoir as one fluid is displacing another (i.e., gas is displacing oil). There is significant amount of work done in the area of interaction of phase-behavior and flow in multiphase flow conditions. We would like to present how the theory of gas injection is used in the industry to understand/design reservoir processes in various ways. The tools that are developed for the theory of gas injection originates from the fractional flow theory, as the first solution proposed by Buckley-Leveret in 1940's, for water displacing oil in porous media. After 1960's more and more complex/coupled equations were solved using the initial concept(s) developed by Buckley-Leverett, and then Welge et al. and others. However, the systematic use of the fractional flow theory for coupled set of equations that involves phase relationships (EOS) and phase appearance and disappearance was mainly due to the theory developed by Helfferich in early 80's (in petroleum literature) using method of characteristics primarily for gas injection process and later on by the systematic work done by Orr and his co-researchers during the last two decades. In this talk, we will present various cases that use and extend the theory developed by Helfferich and others (Orr et al., Lake et al. etc.). The review of various injection systems reveals that displacement in porous media has commonalities that can be represented with a unified theory for a class of problems originating from the theory of gas injection (which is in a way generalized Buckley-Leverett problem). The outcome of these solutions can be used for (and are not limited to): 1) Benchmark solutions for reservoir simulators (to quantify numerical dispersion, test numerical algorithms) 2) Streamline simulators 3) Design of laboratory experiments and their use (to invert the results) 4) Conceptual learning and to investigate

  10. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied.

  11. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied. PMID:25920667

  12. DSMC Convergence for Microscale Gas-Phase Heat Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, D. J.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The convergence of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is investigated for gas-phase heat conduction at typical microscale conditions. A hard-sphere gas is confined between two fully accommodating walls of unequal temperature. Simulations are performed for small system and local Knudsen numbers, so continuum flow exists outside the Knudsen layers. The ratio of the DSMC thermal conductivity to the Chapman-Enskog value in the central region is determined for over 200 combinations of time step, cell size, and number of computational molecules per cell. In the limit of vanishing error, this ratio approaches 1.000 to within the correlation uncertainty. In the limit of infinite computational molecules per cell, the difference from unity depends quadratically on time step and cell size as these quantities become small. The coefficients of these quadratic terms are in good agreement with Green-Kubo values found by Hadjiconstantinou, Garcia, and co-workers. These results demonstrate that DSMC can accurately simulate microscale gas-phase heat conduction. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  14. Phase structure of higher spin black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang; Wang, Yi-Nan

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phase structure of the black holes with one single higher spin hair, focusing specifically on the spin 3 and spin widetilde{4} black holes. Based on dimensional analysis and the requirement of thermodynamic consistency, we derive a universal formula relating the entropy with the conserved charges for arbitrary AdS 3 higher spin black holes. Then we use it to study the phase structure of the higher spin black holes. We find that there are six branches of solutions in the spin 3 gravity, eight branches of solutions in the spin widetilde{4} gravity and twelve branches of solutions in the G 2 gravity. In each case, all the branches are related by a simple angle shift in the entropy functions. In the spin 3 case, we reproduce all the results found before. In the spin widetilde{4} case, we find that at low temperature it lies in the BTZ branch while at high temperature it undergoes a phase transition to one of the two other branches, depending on the signature of the chemical potential, a reflection of charge conjugate asymmetry found before.

  15. A Universal Density Structure for Circumgalactic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.

    2016-10-01

    We develop a new method to constrain the physical conditions in the cool (∼104 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) from measurements of ionic column densities by assuming that the cool CGM spans a large range of gas densities and that small high-density clouds are hierarchically embedded in large low-density clouds. The new method combines the information available from different sightlines during the photoionization modeling, thus yielding tighter constraints on CGM properties compared to traditional methods that model each sightline individually. Applying this new technique to the COS Halos survey of low-redshift ∼L* galaxies, we find that we can reproduce all observed ion columns in all 44 galaxies in the sample, from the low ions to {{O}} {{VI}}, with a single universal density structure for the cool CGM. The gas densities span the range 50≲ ρ /{\\bar{ρ }}b≲ 5× {10}5 ({\\bar{ρ }}b is the cosmic mean), while the physical size of individual clouds scales as ∼ρ ‑1, from ≈35 kpc for the low-density {{O}} {{VI}} clouds to ≈6 pc for the highest-density low-ion clouds. The deduced cloud sizes are too small for this density structure to be driven by self-gravity; thus, its physical origin is unclear. The implied cool CGM mass within the virial radius is (1.3 ± 0.4) × 1010 {M}ȯ (∼1% of the halo mass), distributed rather uniformly over the 4 decades in density. The mean cool gas density profile scales as {R}-1.0+/- 0.3, where R is the distance from the galaxy center. We construct a 3D model of the cool CGM based on our results, which we argue provides a benchmark for the CGM structure in hydrodynamic simulations. Our results can be tested by measuring the coherence scales of different ions.

  16. {HIGH Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy of 2,6-DIAMINOPYRIDINE in the Gas PHASE}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Casey L.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Young, Justin W.; Thomas, Jessica A.; Pratt, David W.

    2009-06-01

    Ab initio calculations suggest that 2,6-diaminopyridine (26DAP) has several interesting low-frequency vibrations arising from motion of its amino groups. For this reason, 26DAP has been studied in the gas phase using both low resolution and high resolution electronic spectroscopy techniques. Presented here are the results of this study, which provide information about the structural and dynamical properties of 26DAP in both the ground and excited electronic states. The results will be discussed. footnote

  17. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Miskowiec, Andrew; Kirkegaard, Marie C; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W; Trowbridge, Lee; Rondinone, Adam; Anderson, Brian

    2015-12-10

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxyfluoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl fluoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures followed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous structure), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielastic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform restricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O-H bond (r = 0.92 Å). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps(-1)) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps(-1)). PMID:26575434

  18. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  19. Structural and relative energy assessments of DFT functionals and the MP2 method to describe the gas phase methylation of nitronates: [R(1)R(2)CNO2](-) + CH3I.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ayyaz; Longo, Ricardo L

    2016-06-22

    The performances of 26 combinations of density-functional theory (DFT) functionals or second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) methods and basis sets were evaluated for the calculation of the activation energy (Δ(‡)E), the energy available (ΔRCE) to the reactant complex, the energy of reaction (ΔrE), and rotational constants of the main structures involved in the methylation reactions of nitronates, [R(1)R(2)CNO2](-) + CH3I, in the gas phase, where R(1) = R(2) = H, R(1) = H and R(2) = CH3, R(1) = R(2) = CH3, and R(1) + R(2) = c-(CH2)2. The separated reactants and products, the reactant and product complexes, and the transition states were considered, leading to 43 data points for the statistical analysis for each method under assessment. Five statistical quantifiers: the mean signed error (MSE), the mean unsigned error (MUE), the percent mean relative error (% MRE), best and worse (BW), and the confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the performance of methods relative to the CCSD(T)/CBS//MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ reference method. The DFT functionals included the widely applied B3LYP and M06-2X global-hybrids and the recently available DSD-PBEP86, DSD-PBEP86-D3BJ and PWPB95 double-hybrids. The basis sets involved an effective core potential (ECP) for describing the inner electrons of iodine such as LANL2DZdp and aug-cc-pVXZ-PP (X = D, T, and Q), and all-electron basis sets for the remaining atoms. The energy available to the reactant complex is described quite well by all methods, however, only the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP method provided values within 2 kcal mol(-1) (8.4 kJ mol(-1)) from the reference method for Δ(‡)E and ΔrE. Amongst the DFT methods, the global-hybrid M06-2X functional produced the best overall results including BW and CI. Notice that all methods yielded the smallest Δ(‡)E for the C-methylation pathway. The rotational constants of the reactant complexes and the transition state structures were compared, for which the MP2 method and the M06-2X

  20. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices.

  1. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-01

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures. PMID:27497577

  2. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edison, John R.; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-01

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures.

  3. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Gas-phase Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. D.; Witt, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to produce fluorescence spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the gas-phase for comparison with blue luminescence (BL) emission observed in astrophysical sources Vijh et al. (2004, 2005a,b). The BL occurs roughly from 350 to 450 nm, with a sharp peak near 380 nm. PAHs with three to four rings, e.g. anthracene and pyrene, were found to produce luminescence in the appropriate spectral region, based on existing studies. Relatively few studies of the gas-phase fluorescence of PAHs exist; those that do exist have dealt primarily with the same samples commonly available for purchase such as pyrene and anthracene. In an attempt to understand the chemistry of the nebular environment we also obtained several nitrogen substituted PAHs from our colleagues at NASA Ames. In order to simulate the astrophysical environment we also took spectra by heating the PAHs in a flame. The flame environment counteracts the formation of eximers and permits the spectroscopy of free-flying neutral molecules. Experiments with coal tar demonstrate that fluorescence spectroscopy reveals primarily the presence of the smallest molecules, which are most abundant and which possess the highest fluorescence efficiencies. One gas-phase PAH that seems to fit the BL spectrum most closely is phenanthridine. In view of the results from the spectroscopy of coal tar, a compound containing a mixture of PAHs ranging from small to very large PAH molecules, we can not preclude the presence of larger PAHs in interstellar sources exhibiting BL.

  4. Mechanisms of the water-gas-shift reaction by iron pentacarbonyl in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Rozanska, Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2008-10-01

    We analyzed the mechanisms of the water-gas-shift reaction catalyzed by Fe(CO) 5/OH (-) in the gas phase using DFT methods. The systematic analysis of the accessible reaction mechanisms and the consideration of the Gibbs free energies allows for different reaction routes than previously suggested. In the dominant catalytic cycle, the hydride [FeH(CO) 4]- is the important intermediate. Associative reaction mechanisms are not favorable under moderate and low pressures. At high pressure, a side reaction takes over and prevents the conversion of H 2O and CO to H 2 and CO 2 and leads to the formation of HCOOH.

  5. Symmetry considerations in structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Mato, J. M.; Aroyo, M. I.; Orobengoa, D.

    2012-03-01

    The most important symmetry arguments to be considered in the analysis of structural phase transitions are reviewed. A practical approach is used, with the discussion of many examples. In particular, we stress the straightforward application of computer tools freely available in internet to solve these symmetry-related problems. We focus on programs available on the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (www.cryst.ehu.es), but also the use of some programs from the ISOTROPY site (http://stokes.byu.edu/isotropy.html) is discussed.

  6. Gas-phase chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, P. K.; Chatha, J. P. S.; Vohra, K. G.

    1983-08-01

    Chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes such as linallol, geraniol, d-limonene and α-pinene have been studied in the gas phase at low pressures. Methylglyoxal phosphorescence has been observed in the first two reactions. Emissions from HCHO( 1A 2) and glyoxal ( 3A u) are observed in the reaction of ozone with d-limonene and formation of excited glyoxal is found to be first order in ozone. The reaction of ozone with β-pinene gives rise to emission from a α-dicarbonyl compound and this is found to be first order in ozone. The mechanisms for the formation of excited species are proposed.

  7. Quantum Phases of a Two-Dimensional Dipolar Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bruun, G. M.; Taylor, E.

    2008-12-12

    We examine the superfluid and collapse instabilities of a quasi-two-dimensional gas of dipolar fermions aligned by an orientable external field. It is shown that the interplay between the anisotropy of the dipole-dipole interaction, the geometry of the system, and the p-wave symmetry of the superfluid order parameter means that the effective interaction for pairing can be made very large without the system collapsing. This leads to a broad region in the phase diagram where the system forms a stable superfluid. Analyzing the superfluid transition at finite temperatures, we calculate the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless temperature as a function of the dipole angle.

  8. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  9. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  10. NMR of molecules partially oriented in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijl, Peter C. M.; MacLean, C.; Skoglund, Cynthia; Bothner-By, Aksel A.

    The vapor phase 2H NMR spectra of monodeuterobenzene and pentadeuterofluorobenzene were recorded at 14.1 T. Reduction of the collision time, and thus of the linewidth, was accomplished by compressing the gas to 10.8 atm with ethane. The molecules are aligned by the field of the spectrometer and, as a consequence, quadrupolar couplings are recorded. Differences from the liquid-phase spectra arise in some of the quadrupolar splittings as well as in the scalar D-F couplings. It is rationalized that the deviating quadrupolar interaction cannot be caused by interactions resulting from incomplete quenching of the rotation, but originates from environmental effects on the quadrupolar coupling in the liquid. The results agree with recent microwave experiments.

  11. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ∗ =0.23Σσ ∗ + 1.51; where H ∗ is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and Σσ ∗ is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ∗. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ∗⩾30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ⩾5 - 0.5 μM (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  12. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Trowbridge, Lee D.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Anderson, Brian B.

    2015-11-17

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxy uoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl uoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures fol- lowed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous struc- ture), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielas- tic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform re- stricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O{H bond (r = 0.92 A). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps-1) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps-1).

  13. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates

    DOE PAGES

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Trowbridge, Lee D.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Anderson, Brian B.

    2015-11-17

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxy uoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl uoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures fol- lowed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous struc- ture), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielas- tic neutron scattering results compare well with previousmore » measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform re- stricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O{H bond (r = 0.92 A). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps-1) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps-1).« less

  14. High performance liquid chromatographic separations of gas oil samples and their hydrotreated products using commercial normal phases.

    PubMed

    Oro, Nicole E; Lucy, Charles A

    2011-10-28

    Three commercially available high performance liquid chromatography columns are used in normal phase or quasi-normal phase mode for the separation of gas oil samples. The columns are tested with 20 analytical standards to determine their suitability for separations of petroleum samples and their ability to separate the nitrogen group-types (pyrrole and pyridine) found in petroleum. The columns studied are polymeric hypercrosslinked polystyrene (HGN), a biphenyl phase, and a Chromegabond "DNAP" column from ES Industries. The HGN column separates gas oils based on both ring structure and heteroatom, while the biphenyl phase has low retention of most compounds studied in quasi-normal phase mode. The "DNAP" column is selective for nitrogen-containing compounds, separating them from PAHs as well as oxygen and sulphur compounds. Retention data of standards on all three columns is shown, along with chromatograms of gas oil samples on the HGN and "DNAP" columns.

  15. Growth mechanism of a gas clathrate hydrate from a dilute aqueous gas solution: a molecular dynamics simulation of a three-phase system.

    PubMed

    Nada, Hiroki

    2006-08-24

    A molecular dynamics simulation of a three-phase system including a gas clathrate, liquid water, and a gas was carried out at 298 K and high pressure in order to investigate the growth mechanism of the clathrate from a dilute aqueous gas solution. The simulation indicated that the clathrate grew on interfaces between the clathrate and the liquid water, after transfer of the gas molecules from the gas phase to the interfaces. The results suggest a two-step process for growth: first, gas molecules are arranged at cage sites, and second, H(2)O molecules are ordered near the gas molecules. The results also suggest that only the H(2)O molecules, which are surrounded or sandwiched by the gas molecules, form the stable polygons that constitute the cages of the clathrate. In addition, the growth of the clathrate from a concentrated aqueous gas solution was also simulated, and the results suggested a growth mechanism in which many H(2)O and gas molecules correctively form the structure of the clathrate. The clathrate grown from the concentrated solution contained some empty cages, whereas the formation of empty cages was not observed during the growth from the dilute solution. The results obtained by both simulations are compared with the results of an experimental study, and the growth mechanism of the clathrate in a real system is discussed.

  16. Chemical Nuclear Polarization of Biradicals Created by Photolysis of Cyclic Aliphatic Ketones in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obynochnyia, A. A.; Purtovb, P. A.; Salikhova, K. M.

    2008-02-01

    Chemical nuclear polarization (CNP) of short-lived biradicals created in the photolysis of cyclic ketones in the gas phase with a buffer gas of CDCl3 molecules was studied theoretically and experimentally. The magnetoresonance and kinetic parameters were proposed for the biradicals. The experimental fact that the CNP of cycloundecanone in the gas phase and liquid was the strongest was confirmed by calculations. The computational results agree well with the experiment for both gas and liquid phases.

  17. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  18. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  19. Insights into the structures of the gas-phase hydrated cations M⁺(H₂O)(n)Ar (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs; n = 3-5) using infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M

    2015-03-12

    The hydration of alkali cations yields a variety of structural conformers with varying numbers of water molecules in the first solvation shell. How these ions move from the aqueous phase into biological systems, such as at the entrance of an ion channel, depends on the interplay between competing intermolecular forces, which first must involve ion-water and water-water interactions. New infrared action spectra, using argon as a messenger or "spy", for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), with up to five water molecules are reported, and new structural conformers determined from ab initio calculations, combined with previous results on Rb(+) and Cs(+), have identified structural transitions at each hydration level. These transitions are a result of the delicate balance between competing noncovalent interactions and represent a quantitative microscopic view of the macroscopic enthalpy-entropy competition between energy and structural variety. Smaller cations (Li(+) and Na(+)), with higher charge density, yield structural configurations with extended linear networks of hydrogen bonds. Larger cations (Rb(+) and Cs(+)), with lower charge density, generate configurations with cyclic hydrogen-bonded water subunits. It appears that K(+) is somewhat unique, with very simple (and predominantly) single structural conformers. This has led to the suggestion that K(+) can "move" easily in or through biological systems, concealing its identity as an ion, under the "appearance" or disguise of a water molecule. PMID:25651135

  20. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere.

  1. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  2. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  3. Gas-phase ion isomer analysis reveals the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-03-18

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values, which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M → (c)b) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored.

  4. Structure analysis of turbulent liquid phase by POD and LSE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, S. Muthuvalu, M. S.; Siddiqui, M. I.; Heikal, M. R. Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, vortical structures and turbulence characteristics of liquid phase in both single liquid phase and two-phase slug flow in pipes were studied. Two dimensional velocity vector fields of liquid phase were obtained by Particle image velocimetry (PIV). Two cases were considered one single phase liquid flow at 80 l/m and second slug flow by introducing gas at 60 l/m while keeping liquid flow rate same. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Linear stochastic estimation techniques were used for the extraction of coherent structures and analysis of turbulence in liquid phase for both cases. POD has successfully revealed large energy containing structures. The time dependent POD spatial mode coefficients oscillate with high frequency for high mode numbers. The energy distribution of spatial modes was also achieved. LSE has pointed out the coherent structured for both cases and the reconstructed velocity fields are in well agreement with the instantaneous velocity fields.

  5. Development of a gas-phase stereochemical protocol. Intrinsic diastereoselectivity in hydride reductions of cyclohexanones

    SciTech Connect

    Yeunghaw Ho; Squires, R.R. )

    1992-12-30

    A common feature of classical, intuitive models and modern molecular orbital-based theories for diastereoselectivity in ketone reduction reactions is an emphasis on the structural and electronic properties of the substrate, despite the fact that the stereochemical outcome of these reactions often displays marked sensitivity to the solvent and the type of counter-ion employed with ionic and polar reducing agents. One way to separate intrinsic and extrinsic effects on the stereochemistry of ketone reduction reactions is to examine them in the gas phase, where solvent and counterion effects are absent. The authors describe here an experimental method for distinguishing the diastereomeric products of gas-phase hydride reduction reactions, and its application in determining the intrinsic diastereoselectivity involved in reductions of alkyl-substituted cyclohexanones. 1 tab.

  6. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres. PMID:26263321

  7. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres.

  8. Community structure revealed by phase locking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Cai, Shi-min; Fu, Zhongqian

    2014-09-01

    Community structure can naturally emerge in paths to synchronization, and scratching it from the paths is a tough issue that accounts for the diverse dynamics of synchronization. In this paper, with assumption that the synchronization on complex networks is made up of local and collective processes, we proposed a scheme to lock the local synchronization (phase locking) at a stable state, meanwhile, suppress the collective synchronization based on Kuramoto model. Through this scheme, the network dynamics only contains the local synchronization, which suggests that the nodes in the same community synchronize together and these synchronization clusters well reveal the community structure of network. Furthermore, by analyzing the paths to synchronization, the relations or overlaps among different communities are also obtained. Thus, the community detection based on the scheme is performed on five real networks and the observed community structures are much more apparent than modularity-based fast algorithm. Our results not only provide a deep insight to understand the synchronization dynamics on complex network but also enlarge the research scope of community detection.

  9. Macromolecular structure phasing by neutron anomalous diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Maxime G.; Mason, Sax A.; Mossou, Estelle; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Mitchell, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we show for the first time that neutron anomalous dispersion can be used in a practical manner to determine experimental phases of a protein crystal structure, providing a new tool for structural biologists. The approach is demonstrated through the use of a state-of-the-art monochromatic neutron diffractometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in combination with crystals of perdeuterated protein that minimise the level of hydrogen incoherent scattering and enhance the visibility of the anomalous signal. The protein used was rubredoxin in which cadmium replaced the iron at the iron-sulphur site. While this study was carried out using a steady-state neutron beam source, the results will be of major interest for capabilities at existing and emerging spallation neutron sources where time-of-flight instruments provide inherent energy discrimination. In particular this capability may be expected to offer unique opportunities to a rapidly developing structural biology community where there is increasing interest in the identification of protonation states, protein/water interactions and protein-ligand interactions – all of which are of central importance to a wide range of fundamental and applied areas in the biosciences. PMID:27511806

  10. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  11. Dusty Plasma Structures in Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, D. V.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    The possibility of attainment of large Mach numbers is analyzed for the case of heavy ions drifting in a light gas. Under conditions of typical experiments with dust structures in plasmas, the use of the mixture of light and heavy gases is shown to make it possible to suppress the ion heating in the electric field and to form supersonic flows characterized by large Mach numbers. The drift of krypton ions in helium is considered as an example. Experiments with dc glow discharge at 1-10% of Kr show that the transition to the discharge in mixture leads to increase of interaction anisotropy and reinforcement of coupling of dust particles in the direction of ion drift. On the other hand, under certain conditions the phenomenon of abnormal 'heating' of dust particles was observed when the particles can obtain high kinetic energy which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical.

  12. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  13. The Diamagnetic Phase Transition of Dense Electron Gas: Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Lü, Guoliang; Zhu, Chunhua; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of the de Haas-van Alphen effect and diamagnetic phase transition which is associated with magnetic domain formation. The “magnetic interaction” between delocalized magnetic moments of electrons (the Shoenberg effect), can result in an effect of the diamagnetic phase transition into domains of alternating magnetization (Condon's domains). Associated with the domain formation are prominent magnetic field oscillation and anisotropic magnetic stress which may be large enough to fracture the crust of magnetar with a super-strong field. Even if the fracture is impossible as in “low-field” magnetar, the depinning phase transition of domain wall (DW) motion driven by low field rate (mainly due to the Hall effect) in the randomly perturbed crust can result in a catastrophically variation of magnetic field. This intermittent motion, similar to the avalanche process, makes the Hall effect be dissipative. These qualitative consequences about magnetized electron gas are consistent with observations of magnetar emission, and especially the threshold critical dynamics of driven DW can partially overcome the difficulties of “low-field” magnetar bursts and the heating mechanism of transient, or “outbursting” magnetar.

  14. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  15. Flammable Gas Diffusion from Waste Transfer Associated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-06-24

    This report assesses potential accumulation of flammable gases in interim isolated concrete waste transfer structures. A hypothetical scenario was analyzed in which flammable gas was generated by spilled waste on the transfer structure floor. Results showed that the flammable gas would safely diffuse out of the concrete structures and equilibrium concentrations were well below the lower flammability limit.

  16. Flammable Gas Diffusion from Waste Transfer Associated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM, J.E.; ESTEY, S.D.

    2002-11-20

    This report assesses potential accumulation of flammable gases in interim isolated concrete waste transfer structures. A hypothetical scenario was analyzed in which flammable gas was generated by spilled waste on the transfer structure floor. Results showed that the flammable gas would safely diffuse out of the concrete structures and equilibrium concentrations were orders of magnitude below the lower flammability limit.

  17. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starsich, Fabian H. L.; Hirt, Ann M.; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2014-12-01

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  18. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Starsich, Fabian H L; Hirt, Ann M; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2014-12-19

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields. PMID:25422410

  19. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Robert Classen

    2002-12-31

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

  20. Conformational Study of Taurine in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo, Vanessa; Sanz, M. Eugenia; López, Juan C.; Alonso, José L.

    2009-08-01

    The conformational preferences of the amino sulfonic acid taurine (NH2-CH2-CH2-SO3H) have been investigated in the gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) in the 6-14 GHz frequency range. One conformer has been observed, and its rotational, centrifugal distortion, and hyperfine quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of its rotational spectrum. Comparison of the experimental constants with those calculated theoretically identifies the detected conformer unambiguously. The observed conformer of taurine is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond O-H···N between the hydrogen of the sulfonic acid group and the nitrogen atom of the amino group.

  1. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  2. Silicon Nanowire-Based Devices for Gas-Phase Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  3. Optical properties of anthocyanins in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaochuan; Calzolari, Arrigo; Baroni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase optical properties of the six most common anthocyanins are studied using time-dependent density-functional theory. Different anthocyanins are classified into three groups, according to the number of low-frequency peaks displayed in the UV-vis spectrum. This behavior is analyzed in terms of one-electron transitions and interaction effects, the latter being rationalized using a suitable double-pole model. Moving from PBE to hybrid exchange-correlation functionals results in a hypsochromic shift of the optical gap. While the colors thus predicted do not quite match those observed in solution, thus highlighting the importance of solvation effects, adoption of hybrid functionals remarkably determines a greater chromatic uniformity of different molecules, in qualitative agreement with experimental evidence in acidic solutions.

  4. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  5. Ab initio kinetics of gas phase decomposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2010-12-01

    The thermal and kinetic aspects of gas phase decomposition reactions can be extremely complex due to a large number of parameters, a variety of possible intermediates, and an overlap in thermal decomposition traces. The experimental determination of the activation energies is particularly difficult when several possible reaction pathways coexist in the thermal decomposition. Ab initio calculations intended to provide an interpretation of the experiment are often of little help if they produce only the activation barriers and ignore the kinetics of the decomposition process. To overcome this ambiguity, a theoretical study of a complete picture of gas phase thermo-decomposition, including reaction energies, activation barriers, and reaction rates, is illustrated with the example of the β-octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) molecule by means of quantum-chemical calculations. We study three types of major decomposition reactions characteristic of nitramines: the HONO elimination, the NONO rearrangement, and the N-NO(2) homolysis. The reaction rates were determined using the conventional transition state theory for the HONO and NONO decompositions and the variational transition state theory for the N-NO(2) homolysis. Our calculations show that the HMX decomposition process is more complex than it was previously believed to be and is defined by a combination of reactions at any given temperature. At all temperatures, the direct N-NO(2) homolysis prevails with the activation barrier at 38.1 kcal/mol. The nitro-nitrite isomerization and the HONO elimination, with the activation barriers at 46.3 and 39.4 kcal/mol, respectively, are slow reactions at all temperatures. The obtained conclusions provide a consistent interpretation for the reported experimental data. PMID:21077597

  6. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds.

  7. Estimation of gas phase mixing in packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, S.; Thunman, H.; Leckner, B.; Hermansson, S.

    2008-04-15

    An improved model is presented for estimation of the mixing of gaseous species in a packed bed for fuel conversion. In particular, this work clarifies the main characteristics of mixing of volatiles and oxidizers in a burning bed of high-volatile solid fuel. Expressions are introduced to represent the active role of degradation of the solid particles in the mixing within the gas phase. During drying and devolatilization the solids modify the behavior of the gas flow: the volatiles released from the surface of the particles increase the turbulence in the system, and hence the rates of the homogeneous reactions under mixing-limited conditions. Numerical experiments are carried out to test the validity of this conclusion regarding mixing in different geometries. The flow of volatiles leaving the fuel particles is shown to contribute significantly to mixing, especially at low air flows through a bed. However, the fraction of the particle surface where volatiles are released and its orientation in the bed should be better determined in order to increase the accuracy of the estimates of turbulent mixing. (author)

  8. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  9. The application of ultrasonic phased array technology to offshore platform structures inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baohua, Shan; Hua, Wang; Zhongdong, Duan; Jinping, Ou

    2007-04-01

    Aimed at the practical requirement of tubular joints weld inspection of offshore platform structures of Shengli oil field, the ultrasonic phased array inspection arithmetic for offshore platform structures is proposed. The integrated design of ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system for offshore platform structures is completed, the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system for offshore platform structure is integrated on the basis of the each module and the exploitation of subsystem, which is made up of computer, ultrasonic circuit system, scanning device and phased array transducer. The ultrasonic phased array inspection experiment of T shape tubular joint model is performed with the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system for offshore platform structures, the flaws characteristic could be exactly estimated and the flaws size could be measured. Experiment results indicate that the ultrasonic phased array inspection arithmetic for offshore platform structures is practical, the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system could inspect artificial defects in tubular joint model, such as slag inclusion, crack, gas porosity, etc., the whole development trend of flaws is factually imaging by the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology of offshore platform structures.

  10. The Decomposition of Hydrazine in the Gas Phase and over an Iridium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2013-09-30

    Hydrazine is an important rocket fuel, used as both a monopropellant and a bipropellant. This paper presents theoretical results to complement the extensive experimental studies of the gas phase and Ir catalyzed decompositions involved in the monopropellant applications of hydrazine. Gas phase electronic structure theory calculations that include electron correlation predict that numerous molecular and free radical reactions occur within the same energy range as the basic free radical pathways: NN bond breaking around 65 kcal/mol and NH bond breaking around 81 kcal/mol. The data suggest that a revision to existing kinetics modeling is desirable, based on the energetics and the new elementary steps reported herein. A supported Ir-6 octahedron model for the Shell 405 Iridium catalyst used in thrusters was developed. Self-Consistent Field and electron correlation calculations (with core potentials and associated basis sets) find a rich chemistry for hydrazine on this catalyst model. The model catalyst provides dramatically lower NN and NH bond cleavage energies and an even smaller barrier to breaking the NH bond by NH2 abstractions. Thus, the low temperature decomposition over the catalyst is interpreted in terms of consecutive NH2 abstractions to produce ammonia and nitrogen. The higher temperature channel, which has hydrogen and nitrogen products, may be due to a mixture of two mechanisms. These two mechanisms are successive NH cleavages with surface H + H recombinations, and the same type of assisted H-2 eliminations found to occur in the gas phase part of this study.

  11. Gas-Phase Photoluminescence Characterization of Stoichiometrically Pure Nonanuclear Lanthanoid Hydroxo Complexes Comprising Europium or Gadolinium.

    PubMed

    Greisch, Jean-François; Chmela, Jiří; Harding, Michael E; Klopper, Wim; Kappes, Manfred M; Schooss, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    Gas-phase photoluminescence measurements involving mass-spectrometric techniques enable determination of the properties of selected molecular systems with knowledge of their exact composition and unaffected by matrix effects such as solvent interactions or crystal packing. The resulting reduced complexity facilitates a comparison with theory. Herein, we provide a detailed report of the intrinsic luminescence properties of nonanuclear europium(III) and gadolinium(III) 9-hydroxyphenalen-1-one (HPLN) hydroxo complexes. Luminescence spectra of [Eu9(PLN)16(OH)10](+) ions reveal an europium-centered emission dominated by a 4-fold split Eu(III) hypersensitive transition, while photoluminescence lifetime measurements for both complexes support an efficient europium sensitization via a PLN-centered triplet-state manifold. The combination of gas-phase measurements with density functional theory computations and ligand-field theory is used to discuss the antiprismatic core structure of the complexes and to shed light on the energy-transfer mechanism. This methodology is also employed to fit a new set of parameters, which improves the accuracy of ligand-field computations of Eu(III) electronic transitions for gas-phase species. PMID:26974169

  12. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  13. Thermodynamics of the sorption of organic compounds on polyethylene glycol 400-permethylated β-cyclodextrin stationary phase and its enantioselectivity in gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraeva, Yu. G.; Onuchak, L. A.; Evdokimova, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The thermodynamic characteristics of sorption of 24 organic compounds of various classes from the gas phase on the binary stationary phase based on polyethylene glycol 400 and permethylated β-cyclodextrin were determined. The influence of geometrical structure and optical activity of organic compounds on the possibility of forming sorbate-macrocycle complexes was examined. It was found that the studied stationary phase shows the enantioselectivity towards low-polar terpenes under the conditions of gas chromatography.

  14. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, Eric Robert

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr{sub 4}, HfBr{sub 4}, RfBr{sub 4}, NbBr{sub 5}, TaOBr{sub 3}, HaCl{sub 5}, WBr{sub 6}, FrBr, and BiBr{sub 3}. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub a}) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} was observed: RfBr{sub 4} > ZrBr{sub 4} > HfBr{sub 4}. The {Delta}H{sub a} values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of {sup 261}Rf was performed. {sup 261}Rf was produced via the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74{sub -6}{sup +7} seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78{sub -6}{sup +11} seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75{+-}7 seconds for {sup 261}Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant temperature) gas phase chromatography instrument to a thermochromatographic (variable temperature

  15. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamics and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model suited for detailed studies of aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (1 × 1 km2) to regional scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM). The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others well suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The organic mass partitioning was either modeled with a 2-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) or with the traditional two-product model approach. In ADCHEM these models consider the diffusion limited and particle size dependent condensation and evaporation of 110 and 40 different organic compounds respectively. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 61 different species, using 130 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malmö in southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, aerosol dynamic processes, vertical and horizontal mixing, coupled or uncoupled condensation and the secondary organic aerosol formation. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results

  16. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamic and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model ideally suited for detailed studies on aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (1×1 km2) to regional or global scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM), which has been developed and used at Lund University since 2007. The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions), which is not treated in Lagrangian box-models (0-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others ideally suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 63 different species, using 119 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malmö in Southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, coupled or uncoupled condensation, the volatility basis set (VBS) or traditional 2-product model for secondary organic aerosol formation, different aerosol dynamic processes and vertical and horizontal mixing. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results with little numerical diffusion when more than 50 size bins are used between 1.5 and 2500 nm

  17. SSME structural dynamic model development, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, M. J.; Wilson, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    A set of test correlated mathematical models of the SSME High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) housing and rotor assembly was produced. New analysis methods within the EISI/EAL and SPAR systems were investigated and runstreams for future use were developed. The LOX pump models have undergone extensive modification since the first phase of this effort was completed. The rotor assembly from the original model was abandoned and a new, more detailed model constructed. A description of the new rotor math model is presented. Also, the pump housing model was continually modified as additional test data have become available. This model is documented along with measured test results. Many of the more advanced features of the EAL/SPAR finite element analysis system were exercised. These included the cyclic symmetry option, the macro-element procedures, and the fluid analysis capability. In addition, a new tool was developed that allows an automated analysis of a disjoint structure in terms of its component modes. A complete description of the implementation of the Craig-Bampton method is given along with two worked examples.

  18. Velocity phase encoded MRI of gas flow in the acoustic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Geoffrey

    This thesis explores the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study acoustic oscillations of a gas in a cylindrical tube. It describes experiments performed under conditions where the gas is in the Acoustic Viscous Boundary Layer and its flow is laminar. Velocity maps acquired at discrete phases of the acoustic oscillation are presented, and are compared with thermoacoustic theory. This represents the first time that such information has been obtained using MRI. An important component of the work reported in this thesis involves the design, construction, and characterization of an acousto-mechanical resonator (AMR). This device can drive oscillatory gas motion and impose density variations at rates that are compatible with MRI data acquisition. To date it has been operated at frequencies ranging from 0.7 Hz to 1.65 Hz and with peak gas displacement amplitudes of up to 2.5 cm. The AMR is based on a modular design intended to permit the study of acoustic flow through a variety of different structures and under a variety of different conditions. MRI experiments were performed on a mixture of thermally-polarized 3He and O2. The latter is used to increase the 3He longitudinal nuclear relaxation rate T1 --1 to a value comparable to the acoustic frequency. In turn, measurements of T1 --1 provide a means for determining the precise composition of the gas mixture. Velocity phase-encoding techniques were then used to map acoustic flow fields: A bipolar magnetic field gradient pulse inserted into the imaging sequence stores velocity information in the phase of the complex image data. The MRI pulse sequence is synchronized with the periodic motion of the gas so that the velocity measurement can be performed at discrete and well-defined phases of the acoustic cycle. These non-invasive flow imaging experiments provide information that is complementary to that which can be obtained from other gas velocity probes, and may lead to new opportunities in the study of acoustic

  19. ACCUMULATION OF FLAMMABLE GAS IN SEALED WASTE TRANSFER ASSOCIATED STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-06-24

    This report assesses potential accumulation of flammable gases in sealed waste transfer structures. A hypothetical scenario was analyzed in which flammable gas was generated by spilled waste on the transfer structure floor. Results showed that the flammable gas concentration builds slowly and it would take decades to reach the lower flammability limit (LFL) in these hypothetical scenarios. Qualitative and quantitative analyses are used to provide a conservative assessment of the flammable gas hazard. This assessment includes steel transfer structures, transfer structures with external coatings (e.g., coatings applied during interim isolation), and internal coatings (e.g., polyurea that is being applied to active transfer structures as part of Project W-314).

  20. Detergent release prolongs the lifetime of native-like membrane protein conformations in the gas-phase.

    PubMed

    Borysik, Antoni J; Hewitt, Dominic J; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-04-24

    Recent studies have suggested that detergents can protect the structure of membrane proteins during their transition from solution to the gas-phase. Here we provide mechanistic insights into this process by interrogating the structures of membrane protein-detergent assemblies in the gas-phase using ion mobility mass spectrometry. We show a clear correlation between the population of native-like protein conformations and the degree of detergent attachment to the protein in the gas-phase. Interrogation of these protein-detergent assemblies, by tandem mass spectrometry, enables us to define the mechanism by which detergents preserve native-like protein conformations in a solvent free environment. We show that the release of detergent is more central to the survival of these conformations than the physical presence of detergent bound to the protein. We propose that detergent release competes with structural collapse for the internal energy of the ion and permits the observation of transient native-like membrane protein conformations that are otherwise lost to structural rearrangement in the gas-phase.

  1. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Gas Taylor Flows incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.; Walsh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the heat transfer characteristics associated with liquid-gas Taylor flows in mini channels incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM). Taylor flows have been shown to result in heat transfer enhancements due to the fluid recirculation experienced within liquid slugs which is attributable to the alternating liquid slug and gas bubble flow structure. Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) also offer significant potential with increased thermal capacity due to the latent heat required to cause phase change. The primary aim of this work was to examine the overall heat transfer potential associated with combining these two novel liquid cooling technologies. By investigating the local heat transfer characteristics, the augmentation/degradation over single phase liquid cooling was quantified while examining the effects of dimensionless variables, including Reynolds number, liquid slug length and gas void fraction. An experimental test facility was developed which had a heated test section and allowed MPCM-air Taylor flows to be subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. Infrared thermography was used to record high resolution experimental wall temperature measurements and determine local heat transfer coefficients from the thermal entrance point. 30.2% mass particle concentration of the MPCM suspension fluid was examined as it provided the maximum latent heat for absorption. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in experimental wall temperatures associated with MPCM-air Taylor flows when compared with the Graetz solution for conventional single phase coolants. Total enhancement in the thermally developed region is observed to be a combination of the individual contributions due to recirculation within the liquid slugs and also absorption of latent heat. Overall, the study highlights the potential heat transfer enhancements that are attainable within heat exchange devices employing MPCM

  2. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  3. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  4. 1-Phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane, 1-Ph-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11). Synthesis, Characterization, and Structure As Determined in the Gas Phase by Electron Diffraction, in the Crystalline Phase at 199 K by X-ray Diffraction, and by ab Initio Computations.

    PubMed

    Brain, Paul T.; Cowie, Jill; Donohoe, David J.; Hnyk, Drahomír; Rankin, David W. H.; Reed, David; Reid, Bruce D.; Robertson, Heather E.; Welch, Alan J.; Hofmann, Matthias; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué

    1996-03-13

    The compound 1-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12), 1-C(6)H(5)-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11) (1), has been synthesized and characterized by a complete assignment of its (11)B NMR spectrum via (11)B{(1)H}/(11)B{(1)H} (COSY), (1)H{(11)B(selective)} and (1)H{(11)B}/(1)H{(11)B} (COSY) spectroscopy. An electron- and X-ray diffraction investigation of 1, complemented by ab initio calculations, has been undertaken. The gas-phase electron-diffraction (GED) data can be fitted by several models describing conformations which differ in the position of the phenyl ring with respect to the carborane cage. Local symmetries ofC(2)(v)() and D(6)(h)() for the 1,2-C(2)B(10) and C(6) moieties, respectively, were adopted in the GED model in order to simplify the problem. In addition, constraints among the close-lying C-C and B-B bonds were employed. However, even though such simplifications led to satisfactory refinements (R(G) = 0.069-0.071), a unique, definitive solution could not be gained. The (C-C)(mean), (C-B)(mean) and (B-B)(mean) bond lengths,r(a), are ca. 1.44, 1.72, and 1.78 Å, respectively. The C(6) hexagon, with r(a)(C-C) = ca. 1.394 Å, either eclipses the C(1)-C(2) vector (overall C(s)() symmetry) or more or less eclipses the C(1)-B(4) cluster bond (overall C(1) symmetry). In contrast, in the solid at 199 K, the ring lies at a position intermediate between the two GED positions, as determined by X-ray crystallography [C(8)H(16)B(10), monoclinic P2(1)/a: a = 12.047(3) Å, b = 18.627(4) Å, c = 12.332(5) Å, beta = 110.09(4) degrees, Z = 8]. The C-B distances span the range 1.681(6)-1.743(5) Å, and B-B lengths lie between 1.756(6) and 1.795(6) Å. A similar conformation was found for the theoretical (RHF/6-31G level) structure which was fully optimized in C(1) symmetry. The r(e) distances are consistent with the dimensions derived in the experimental studies. IGLO calculations of the (11)B chemical shifts, in addition to SCF single-point energies of the GED structures

  5. 1-Phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane, 1-Ph-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11). Synthesis, Characterization, and Structure As Determined in the Gas Phase by Electron Diffraction, in the Crystalline Phase at 199 K by X-ray Diffraction, and by ab Initio Computations.

    PubMed

    Brain, Paul T.; Cowie, Jill; Donohoe, David J.; Hnyk, Drahomír; Rankin, David W. H.; Reed, David; Reid, Bruce D.; Robertson, Heather E.; Welch, Alan J.; Hofmann, Matthias; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué

    1996-03-13

    The compound 1-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12), 1-C(6)H(5)-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11) (1), has been synthesized and characterized by a complete assignment of its (11)B NMR spectrum via (11)B{(1)H}/(11)B{(1)H} (COSY), (1)H{(11)B(selective)} and (1)H{(11)B}/(1)H{(11)B} (COSY) spectroscopy. An electron- and X-ray diffraction investigation of 1, complemented by ab initio calculations, has been undertaken. The gas-phase electron-diffraction (GED) data can be fitted by several models describing conformations which differ in the position of the phenyl ring with respect to the carborane cage. Local symmetries ofC(2)(v)() and D(6)(h)() for the 1,2-C(2)B(10) and C(6) moieties, respectively, were adopted in the GED model in order to simplify the problem. In addition, constraints among the close-lying C-C and B-B bonds were employed. However, even though such simplifications led to satisfactory refinements (R(G) = 0.069-0.071), a unique, definitive solution could not be gained. The (C-C)(mean), (C-B)(mean) and (B-B)(mean) bond lengths,r(a), are ca. 1.44, 1.72, and 1.78 Å, respectively. The C(6) hexagon, with r(a)(C-C) = ca. 1.394 Å, either eclipses the C(1)-C(2) vector (overall C(s)() symmetry) or more or less eclipses the C(1)-B(4) cluster bond (overall C(1) symmetry). In contrast, in the solid at 199 K, the ring lies at a position intermediate between the two GED positions, as determined by X-ray crystallography [C(8)H(16)B(10), monoclinic P2(1)/a: a = 12.047(3) Å, b = 18.627(4) Å, c = 12.332(5) Å, beta = 110.09(4) degrees, Z = 8]. The C-B distances span the range 1.681(6)-1.743(5) Å, and B-B lengths lie between 1.756(6) and 1.795(6) Å. A similar conformation was found for the theoretical (RHF/6-31G level) structure which was fully optimized in C(1) symmetry. The r(e) distances are consistent with the dimensions derived in the experimental studies. IGLO calculations of the (11)B chemical shifts, in addition to SCF single-point energies of the GED structures

  6. Electrical impedance imaging in two-phase, gas-liquid flows: 1. Initial investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. T.; Ovacik, L.; Jones, O. C.

    1991-01-01

    The determination of interfacial area density in two-phase, gas-liquid flows is one of the major elements impeding significant development of predictive tools based on the two-fluid model. Currently, these models require coupling of liquid and vapor at interfaces using constitutive equations which do not exist in any but the most rudimentary form. Work described herein represents the first step towards the development of Electrical Impedance Computed Tomography (EICT) for nonintrusive determination of interfacial structure and evolution in such flows.

  7. The molecular structure of TbI 3, DyI 3, HoI 3 and ErI 3 as determined by synchronous gas-phase electron diffraction and mass spectrometric experiment assisted by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlykov, Sergey A.; Giricheva, Nina I.; Lapykina, Elena A.; Girichev, Georgiy V.; Oberhammer, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    A first gas electron diffraction study of TbI 3, DyI 3, HoI 3 and ErI 3 has been carried out in combination with mass spectrometric vapour monitoring at 1117(10), 1117(10), 1132(10) and 1102(10) K, respectively. Up to 4 mol.% of dimeric species was observed in addition to the dominating monomeric molecules. The change of the thermal-averaged rg-configuration parameters of the molecules in the series TbI 3 → ErI 3 reflect the lanthanide contraction. A low value of the shrinkage δ(I…I) even at such a high temperatures may be considered due to vibration effects in molecule whose equilibrium geometric nuclear structure is planar and which correspond to configurationally-averaged 4f n electronic state. B3LYP and МР2 calculations performed in this work with large core potential for lanthanide atoms also resulted in equilibrium geometry of D 3h symmetry. According to the both quantum chemical methods applied the potential function the non-planar vibration is essentially anharmonic, which is therefore to be taken into account to correctly describe nuclear dynamics in molecules such as LnI 3. Different models applied in this study predict the equilibrium distance re(Ln-I) to be shorter than the thermal-averaged rg(Ln-I) distance by 0.002-0.018(1) Å.

  8. Amphipathic Polymers Enable the Study of Functional Membrane Proteins in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins are notoriously challenging to analyze using mass spectrometry (MS) because of their insolubility in aqueous solution. Current MS methods for studying intact membrane proteins involve solubilization in detergent. However, detergents can destabilize proteins, leading to protein unfolding and aggregation, or resulting in inactive entities. Amphipathic polymers, termed amphipols, can be used as a substitute for detergents and have been shown to enhance the stability of membrane proteins. Here, we show the utility of amphipols for investigating the structural and functional properties of membrane proteins using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The functional properties of two bacterial outer-membrane β-barrel proteins, OmpT and PagP, in complex with the amphipol A8-35 are demonstrated, and their structural integrities are confirmed in the gas phase using ESI-MS coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The data illustrate the power of ESI-IMS-MS in separating distinct populations of amphipathic polymers from the amphipol–membrane complex while maintaining a conformationally “nativelike” membrane protein structure in the gas phase. Together, the data indicate the potential importance and utility of amphipols for the analysis of membrane proteins using MS. PMID:23072351

  9. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  10. Uptake of Organic Gas Phase Species by 1-Methylnaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Xia, J.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    Using a droplet train apparatus, the mass accommodation coefficients (α) on 1-methylnapthalene of gas phase m-xylene, ethylbenzene, butylbenzene, α-pinene, γ-terpinene, and 2-methyl-2-hexanol were measured as a function of temperature (265 K to 296 K). 1-methylnapthalene was selected as a surrogate for hydrophobic and aromatic hydrocarbons found in tropospheric aerosols. The mass accommodation coefficients (α) of all the molecules obtained from these measurements exhibit negative temperature dependence. The upper and lower values of α at 265 K and 296 K respectively are: for m-xylene 0.44 and 0.26; for ethylbenzene 0.37 and 0.22; for butylbenzene 0.47 and 0.31; for α-pinene 0.47 and 0.096; for γ-terpinene 0.39 and 0.12; for 2-methyl-2-hexanol 0.44 and 0.26. The uptake measurements also yielded values for the product HDl1/2 for most of the molecules studied (H = Henry's law constant, Dl = liquid phase diffusion coefficient). Using calculated values of Dl the Henry's law constant is obtained, and expressed in the form ln H (M/atm) = -A + B/T. The A and B values for the molecules studied are listed in Table 1. Table 1: A and B values for the Henry's law constant H expressed as ln H (M/atm) = -A + B/T \\ m-xylene: A=7.20, B=4060\\ethylbenzene: A=5.81, B=3660\\butylbenzene: A=16.95, B=7330α-pinene: A=15.69, B=6360\\2-methyl-2-hexanol: A=9.95, B=4760

  11. Phase transitions and domain structures in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Eftihia

    2011-12-01

    Thin film ferroelectrics and multiferroics are two important classes of materials interesting both from a scientific and a technological prospective. The volatility of lead and bismuth as well as environmental issues regarding the toxicity of lead are two disadvantages of the most commonly used ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) materials such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and SrBi2Ta2O9. Therefore lead-free thin film ferroelectrics are promising substitutes as long as (a) they can be grown on technologically important substrates such as silicon, and (b) their T c and Pr become comparable to that of well established ferroelectrics. On the other hand, the development of functional room temperature ferroelectric ferromagnetic multiferroics could lead to very interesting phenomena such as control of magnetism with electric fields and control of electrical polarization with magnetic fields. This thesis focuses on the understanding of material structure-property relations using nonlinear optical spectroscopy. Nonlinear spectroscopy is an excellent tool for probing the onset of ferroelectricity, and domain dynamics in strained ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Second harmonic generation was used to detect ferroelectricity and the antiferrodistortive phase transition in thin film SrTiO3. Incipient ferroelectric CaTiO3 has been shown to become ferroelectric when strained with a combination of SHG and dielectric measurements. The tensorial nature of the induced nonlinear polarization allows for probing of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 polarization contributions in nanoscale BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices. In addition, nonlinear optics was used to demonstrate ferroelectricity in multiferroic EuTiO3. Finally, confocal SHG and Raman microscopy were utilized to visualize polar domains in incipient ferroelectric and ferroelastic CaTiO3.

  12. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    temperature or below. For many spectroscopic measurements, low temperatures have been achieved by co-condensing the actinide vapor in rare gas or inert molecule host matrices. Spectra recorded in matrices are usually considered to be minimally perturbed. Trapping the products from gas-phase reactions that occur when trace quantities of reactants are added to the inert host gas has resulted in the discovery of many new actinide species. Selected aspects of the matrix isolation data were discussed in chapter 17. In the present chapter we review the spectroscopic matrix data in terms of its relationship to gas-phase measurements, and update the description of the new reaction products found in matrices to reflect the developments that have occurred during the past two years. Spectra recorded in matrix environments are usually considered to be minimally perturbed, and this expectation is borne out for many closed shell actinide molecules. However, there is growing evidence that significant perturbations can occur for open shell molecules, resulting in geometric distortions and/or electronic state reordering. Studies of actinide reactions in the gas phase provide an opportunity to probe the relationship between electronic structure and reactivity. Much of this work has focused on the reactions of ionic species, as these may be selected and controlled using various forms of mass spectrometry. As an example of the type of insight derived from reaction studies, it has been established that the reaction barriers for An+ ions are determined by the promotion energies required to achieve the 5fn6d7s configuration. Gas-phase reaction studies also provide fundamental thermodynamic properties such as bond dissociation and ionization energies. In recent years, an increased number of gas-phase ion chemistry studies of bare (atomic) and ligated (molecular) actinide ions have appeared, in which relevant contributions to fundamental actinide chemistry have been made. These studies were initiated

  13. On the structure of supercritical phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Y.S. )

    1990-06-10

    A novel physical picture is presented for the normal-to-supercritical phase transition in QED around a large-Z nucleus. The process is described as the decay of the false vacuum in close analogy to the first-order phase transition in statistical mechanics. The irreversible nature of the transition is pointed out and the physical implications of this picture are discussed.

  14. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  15. Gas-phase study of Fe sup + -benzyne with alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Yongqing Huang; Freiser, B.S. )

    1989-03-29

    The unimolecular chemistry of Fe{sup +}-benzyne and its reactivity with small alkanes in the gas phase are studied by Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS). Collision-induced dissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields benzyne loss exclusively. In contrast, photodissociation of Fe{sup +}-benzyne yields not only cleavage of benzyne from Fe{sup +}, but competitive loss of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} as well. The Fe{sup +}-benzyne is formed from chlorobenzene by loss of HCl. This dehydrochlorination of chlorobenzene also occurs in secondary reactions up to six times forming products of the type Fe{sup +}-polyphenylene. Fe{sup +}-benzyne reacts with alkanes larger than methane to form a wide variety of product ions by mechanisms including hydrogenation and methanation of the benzyne ligand. All of the product ions can be explained by mechanisms based on Fe{sup +} insertion into either C-C or C-H bonds as the reaction-initiating step, followed by either alkyl or H migration from Fe{sup +} onto the benzyne ligand or, alternatively, by the migratory insertion of benzyne into a metal-carbon or metal-hydrogen bond. Photodissociation and ion-molecule reaction studies yield a value for the metal-ligand bond energy of D{degree} (Fe{sup +}-benzyne) = 76 {plus minus} 10 kcal/mol.

  16. An empirical model for gas phase acidity and basicity estimation.

    PubMed

    You, H; Kim, G E; Na, C H; Lee, S; Lee, C J; Cho, K-H; Akiyama, Y; Ishida, T; No, K T

    2014-01-01

    Gas phase acidity and basicity estimation models have been developed for acidic and basic functional groups of amino acid side-chains and also for a number of small organic molecules. The acidic functional groups include aliphatic and aromatic alcohol, and aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acid, and the basic functional groups include aliphatic, aromatic and hetero-aromatic amines, and also pyridino-, pyrazolo- and imidazolo-groupings. The models are described in terms of a linear combination of descriptors that highly influence reactivity at the reaction centres of the functional groups. In order to describe the chemical environments of the deprotonating and protonating sites, atomic descriptors such as the effective atomic electronegativity and effective atomic polarizability of the atoms in the reaction field and the electrostatic potentials at the reaction sites have been introduced. The coefficient of determination (r(2)) of each model is above 0.8, apart from the imidazole model. The models are readily applicable, ranging from simple organic molecules to proteins.

  17. Experimental Determination of Gas Phase Thermodynamic Properties of Bimolecular Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anne S.; Maroun, Zeina; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate determination of the atmospheric abundance of hydrogen bound bimolecular complexes is necessary, as hydrogen bonds are partly responsible for the formation and growth of aerosol particles. The abundance of a complex is related to the Gibbs free energy of complex formation (Δ G), which is often obtained from quantum chemical calculations that rely on calculated values of the enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) of complex formation. However, calculations of Δ H and in particular Δ S are associated with large uncertainties, and accurate experimental values are therefore crucial for theoretical benchmarking studies. Infrared measurements of gas phase hydrogen bound complexes were performed in the 300 to 373 K range, and lead to a purely experimental determination of Δ H using the van't Hoff equation. Equilibrium constants were determined by combining an experimental and calculated OH-stretching intensity, from which values of Δ G and hence Δ S could be determined. Thus we can determine Δ G, Δ H and Δ S for a bimolecular complex. We find that in the 300 to 373 K temperature range the determined Δ H and Δ S values are independent of temperature.

  18. Theoretical comparison of ketene dimerization in the gas and liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Morales, Giovanni; Martínez, Ramiro; Ziegler, Tom

    2008-04-10

    We present the first theoretical comparison between ketene dimerization in gas phase and ketene dimerization in solution. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the ketene dimerization were carried out considering the following product dimers: diketene (d-I), 1,3-cyclobutanedione (d-II), 2,4-dimethylene-1,3-dioxetane (d-III), and 2-methyleneoxetan-3-one (d-IV). All structures were optimized at the PW86x+PBEc/DZP level of theory. Based on these geometries, a total of 58 meta and hybrid functionals were used to evaluate the heat of dimerization. The MPW1K functional was found to fit the experimental data best and subsequently used in the final analyses for all energy calculations. It was found on both kinetic and thermodynamic grounds that only d-I and d-II are formed during ketene dimerization in gas phase and solution. In gas phase, d-I is favored over d-II by 2 kcal/mol. However, the dimerization barrier for d-I is 1 kcal/mol higher than for d-II. Solvation makes dimerization more favorable. On the enthalpic surface this is due to a favorable interaction between the dimer dipole moment and solvent molecules. The dimer is stabilized further on the Gibbs energy surface by an increase of the dimerization entropy in solution compared to gas phase. The species d-I remains the most stable dimer in solution by 1 kcal/mol. Kinetically, the dimerization barriers for the relevant species d-I and d-II are cut in half by solvation, due to both favorable dimer-dipole/solvent interactions (DeltaH++, DeltaG++) and an increase in the activation entropies (DeltaS++). While the dimerization barrier for d-II is lowest for the gas phase and toluene, the barrier for d-I formation becomes lowest for the more polar solvent acetone by 1 kcal/mol as d-I dimerization has the most polar transition state.

  19. Quasi-two-dimensional diamond crystals: Deposition from a gaseous phase and structural-morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, A. M.; Ismagilov, R. R.; Ashkinazi, E. E.; Orekhov, A. S.; Malykhin, S. A.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    Diamond films predominantly consisting of plane micrometer-size crystallites with a thickness of several dozen nanometers have been deposited from a methane-hydrogen gas mixture activated by a dc gas discharge. The crystallite structure has been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and diffraction. A possible mechanism of formation of plane crystallites during deposition of diamond from the gas phase has been discussed. It has been shown that the results agree with the theoretical concepts of formation of crystals with a face-centered cubic lattice.

  20. Constraints on modified Chaplygin gas from large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bikash Chandra; Thakur, Prasenjit; Beesham, Aroon

    2016-10-01

    We study cosmological models with modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) to determine observational constraints on its EoS parameters using the background and the growth tests data. The background test data consists of H(z)-z data, Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations peak parameter, CMB shift parameter, SN Ia data and the growth test data consists of the linear growth function for the large scale structures of the universe are considered to study MCG in favor of dark energy. For a given range of redshift, the Wiggle-Z measurements and rms mass fluctuations from Ly-α data, employed for analyzing cosmological models numerically to constrain the MCG parameters. The Wang-Steinhardt ansatz for the growth index (γ ) and growth function (f) are also considered for numerical analysis. The best-fit values of EoS parameters determined here are used to study the variation of f, growth index (γ ), EoS parameter, squared sound speed and deceleration parameter with redshift. The constraints on the MCG parameters found here are compared with that of GCG (generalized Chaplygin gas) model for viable cosmology. Cosmologies with MCG satisfactorily describe late acceleration followed by a matter dominated phase. The range of values of EoS parameters, the associated parameters (f, γ , ω , Ω, c2s, q) are also determined from observational data in order to understand the suitability of the MCG model.

  1. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  3. Concurrence of aqueous and gas phase contamination of groundwater in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of rapid development of unconventional oil and natural gas resources using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling on regional groundwater quality has received significant attention. Major concerns are methane or oil/gas related hydrocarbon (such as TPHs, BTEX including benzene, toluene, ethybenzene and xylene) leaks into the aquifer due to the failure of casing and/or stray gas migration. Previously, we investigated the relationship between oil and gas activity and dissolved methane concentration in a drinking water aquifer with the major finding being the presence of thermogenic methane contamination, but did not find detectable concentrations of TPHs or BTEX. To understand if aqueous and gas phases from the producing formation were transported concurrently to drinking water aquifers without the presence of oil/gas related hydrocarbons, the ionic composition of three water groups was studied: (1) uncontaminated deep confined aquifer, (2) suspected contaminated groundwater - deep confined aquifer containing thermogenic methane, and (3) produced water from nearby oil and gas wells that would represent aqueous phase contaminants. On the basis of quantitative and spatial analysis, we identified that the "thermogenic methane contaminated" groundwater did not have similarities to produced water in terms of ionic character (e.g. Cl/TDS ratio), but rather to the "uncontaminated" groundwater. The analysis indicates that aquifer wells with demonstrated gas phase contamination have not been contacted by an aqueous phase from oil and gas operations according to the methodology we use in this study and the current groundwater quality data from COGCC. However, the research does not prove conclusively that this the case. The results may provide insight on contamination mechanisms since improperly sealed well casing may result in stray gas but not aqueous phase transport.

  4. Concurrence of aqueous and gas phase contamination of groundwater in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of rapid development of unconventional oil and natural gas resources using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling on regional groundwater quality has received significant attention. Major concerns are methane or oil/gas related hydrocarbon (such as TPHs, BTEX including benzene, toluene, ethybenzene and xylene) leaks into the aquifer due to the failure of casing and/or stray gas migration. Previously, we investigated the relationship between oil and gas activity and dissolved methane concentration in a drinking water aquifer with the major finding being the presence of thermogenic methane contamination, but did not find detectable concentrations of TPHs or BTEX. To understand if aqueous and gas phases from the producing formation were transported concurrently to drinking water aquifers without the presence of oil/gas related hydrocarbons, the ionic composition of three water groups was studied: (1) uncontaminated deep confined aquifer, (2) suspected contaminated groundwater - deep confined aquifer containing thermogenic methane, and (3) produced water from nearby oil and gas wells that would represent aqueous phase contaminants. On the basis of quantitative and spatial analysis, we identified that the "thermogenic methane contaminated" groundwater did not have similarities to produced water in terms of ionic character (e.g. Cl/TDS ratio), but rather to the "uncontaminated" groundwater. The analysis indicates that aquifer wells with demonstrated gas phase contamination have not been contacted by an aqueous phase from oil and gas operations according to the methodology we use in this study and the current groundwater quality data from COGCC. However, the research does not prove conclusively that this the case. The results may provide insight on contamination mechanisms since improperly sealed well casing may result in stray gas but not aqueous phase transport. PMID:26519629

  5. Importance of the gas phase role to the prediction of energetic material behavior: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.N.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Sander, R.K.

    2005-03-15

    Various thermal (radiative, conductive, and convective) initiation experiments are performed to demonstrate the importance of the gas phase role in combustion modeling of energetic materials (EM). A previously published condensed phase model that includes a predicted critical irradiance above which ignition is not possible is compared to experimental laser ignition results for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Experimental results conflict with the predicted critical irradiance concept. The failure of the model is believed to result from a misconception about the role of the gas phase in the ignition process of energetic materials. The model assumes that ignition occurs at the surface and that evolution of gases inhibits ignition. High speed video of laser ignition, oven cook-off and hot wire ignition experiments captures the ignition of HMX and TNT in the gas phase. A laser ignition gap test is performed to further evaluate the effect of gas phase laser absorption and gas phase disruption on the ignition process. Results indicate that gas phase absorption of the laser energy is probably not the primary factor governing the gas phase ignition observations. It is discovered that a critical gap between an HMX pellet and a salt window of 6 mm{+-}0.4 mm exists below which ignition by CO{sub 2} laser is not possible at the tested irradiances of 29 W/cm{sup 2} and 38 W/cm{sup 2} for HMX ignition. These observations demonstrate that a significant disruption of the gas phase, in certain scenarios, will inhibit ignition, independent of any condensed phase processes. These results underscore the importance of gas phase processes and illustrate that conditions can exist where simple condensed phase models are inadequate to accurately predict the behavior of energetic materials.

  6. Synthesis of alloys with controlled phase structure

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1999-04-20

    A method is described for preparing controlled phase alloys useful for engineering and hydrogen storage applications. This novel method avoids melting the constituents by employing vapor transport, in a hydrogen atmosphere, of an active metal constituent, having a high vapor pressure at temperatures {approx_equal}300 C and its subsequent condensation on and reaction with the other constituent (substrate) of an alloy thereby forming a controlled phase alloy and preferably a single phase alloy. It is preferred that the substrate material be a metal powder such that diffusion of the active metal constituent, preferably magnesium, and reaction therewith can be completed within a reasonable time and at temperatures {approx_equal}300 C thereby avoiding undesirable effects such as sintering, local compositional inhomogeneities, segregation, and formation of unwanted second phases such as intermetallic compounds. 4 figs.

  7. Synthesis of alloys with controlled phase structure

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Stephen Everett; Thomas, George John; Bauer, Walter; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi

    1999-04-20

    A method for preparing controlled phase alloys useful for engineering and hydrogen storage applications. This novel method avoids melting the constituents by employing vapor transport, in a hydrogen atmosphere, of an active metal constituent, having a high vapor pressure at temperatures .apprxeq.300 C. and its subsequent condensation on and reaction with the other constituent (substrate) of an alloy thereby forming a controlled phase alloy and preferably a single phase alloy. It is preferred that the substrate material be a metal powder such that diffusion of the active metal constituent, preferably magnesium, and reaction therewith can be completed within a reasonable time and at temperatures .apprxeq.300 C. thereby avoiding undesirable effects such as sintering, local compositional inhomogeneities, segregation, and formation of unwanted second phases such as intermetallic compounds.

  8. Discontinuous phase transition in a dimer lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    I study a dimer model on the square lattice with nearest neighbor exclusion as the only interaction. Detailed simulations using tomographic entropic sampling show that as the chemical potential is varied, there is a strongly discontinuous phase transition, at which the particle density jumps by about 18% of its maximum value, 1/4. The transition is accompanied by the onset of orientational order, to an arrangement corresponding to the {1/2, 0, 1/2} structure identified by Phares et al. [Physica B 409, 1096 (2011)] in a dimer model with finite repulsion at fixed density. Using finite-size scaling and Binder's cumulant, the expected scaling behavior at a discontinuous transition is verified in detail. The discontinuous transition can be understood qualitatively given that the model possesses eight equivalent maximum-density configurations, so that its coarse-grained description corresponds to that of the q = 8 Potts model.

  9. Quantifying the stabilizing effects of protein–ligand interactions in the gas phase

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Reading, Eamonn; Liko, Idlir; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of protein–ligand interactions on protein stability are typically monitored by a number of established solution-phase assays. Few translate readily to membrane proteins. We have developed an ion-mobility mass spectrometry approach, which discerns ligand binding to both soluble and membrane proteins directly via both changes in mass and ion mobility, and assesses the effects of these interactions on protein stability through measuring resistance to unfolding. Protein unfolding is induced through collisional activation, which causes changes in protein structure and consequently gas-phase mobility. This enables detailed characterization of the ligand-binding effects on the protein with unprecedented sensitivity. Here we describe the method and software required to extract from ion mobility data the parameters that enable a quantitative analysis of individual binding events. This methodology holds great promise for investigating biologically significant interactions between membrane proteins and both drugs and lipids that are recalcitrant to characterization by other means. PMID:26440106

  10. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L; Luongo, Carl A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-10-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  11. Inclusion Complexes of Ionic Liquids and Cyclodextrins: Are They Formed in the Gas Phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ana M.; Schröder, Bernd; Barata, Tânia; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with α- and β-cyclodextrins was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with variable collision induced dissociation energy and quantum chemical gas-phase calculations. The center-of-mass energy at which 50 % of a precursor ion decomposes (Ecm,1/2) was determined for the isolated [cyclodextrin + cation]+ or [cyclodextrin + anion]- adduct ions of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with different alkyl chain lengths combined with a large set of anions, such as chloride, bromide, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, trifluoromethanesulfonate, methanesulfonate, dicyanamide, and hydrogensulfate. Moreover, both symmetric and asymmetric imidazolium cationic cores were evaluated. The relative interaction energies in the adduct ions were interpreted in terms of the influence of cation/anion structures and their inherent properties, such as hydrophobicity and hydrogen bond accepting ability, in the complexation process with the cyclodextrins. The trends observed in the mass spectral data together with quantum-chemical calculations suggest that in the gas phase, cations and anions will preferentially interact with the lower or upper rim of the cyclodextrin, respectively, as opposed to what has been reported in condensed phase where the formation of an inclusion complex between ionic liquid and cyclodextrin is assumed.

  12. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  13. Sampling and determination of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide following removal of ozone by gas-phase reaction with nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.L.; Markovits, G.Y.; Ferreri, E.M.; Kelly, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method for determination of hydrogen peroxide in the ambient atmosphere is described, using impinger or diffusion scrubber collection of hydrogen peroxide with aqueous-phase analysis by an enzyme-catalyzed fluorescence technique. Interference from ozone at ambient levels is removed by gas-phase titration with excess nitric oxide. The impinger and diffusion scrubber collection techniques are shown to give equivalent results for atmospheric gas-phase hydrogen peroxide with limits of detection of 0.1 ppbv for approximately 60-min and 10-min sampling times, respectively.

  14. Ultrafast electron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie

    Ultrafast electron diffraction has emerged since the end of last century, and has become an increasingly important tool for revealing great details of molecular dynamics. In comparison to spectroscopic techniques, ultrafast electron diffraction directly probes time-resolved structure of target molecules, and therefore can potentially provide "molecular movies" of the reactions being studied. These molecular movies are critical for understanding and ultimately controlling the energy conversion pathways and efficiencies of photochemical processes. In this dissertation, I have focused on ultrafast electron diffraction from gas-phase molecules, and have investigated several long-standing challenges that have been preventing researchers from being able to achieve 3-D molecular movies of photochemical reactions. The first challenge is to resolve the full 3-D structure for molecules in the gas phase. The random orientation of molecules in the gas phase smears out the diffraction signal, which results in only 1-D structural information being accessible. The second challenge lies in temporal resolution. In order to resolve coherent nuclear motions on their natural time scale, a temporal resolution of ˜200 femtosecond or better is required. However, due to experimental limitations the shortest temporal resolution that had been achieved was only a few picoseconds in early 2000, by Zewail group from Caltech. The first challenge is tackled by laser-alignment. In the first half of the dissertation, I approach this method both theoretically and experimentally, and demonstrate that by using a short laser pulse to transiently align target molecules in space, 3-D molecular structure can be reconstructed ab-initio from diffraction patterns. The second half of the dissertation presents two experiments, both of which are important steps toward imaging coherent nuclear motions in real time during photochemical reactions. The first experiment simultaneously resolves molecular alignment

  15. Phase diagrams of adsorption systems and calibration functions in the lattice-gas model.

    PubMed

    Tovbin, Yuriy K; Rabinovich, Alexander B

    2004-07-01

    Using the calibration function is suggested to increase the accuracy of approximate equations in the lattice-gas model at calculating various concentration dependences of equilibrium characteristics for nonideal adsorption systems in the vicinity of the critical point. This function should provide a shift of the approximate result to the exact one, when the lattice-gas model equations are used in the quality of the interpolation tool between the exact solutions. A comparison of approximate equations with Onsager's exact solution preferrably allows a use of the quasi-chemical approximation as the interpolation procedure and the exact information on the critical point. The modified lattice-gas model takes into account next the molecular properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid: the long-range potential of adsorbate-adsorbate, an excluded volume of the adsorption site, and a contribution of the triple interactions, as well as a softness of the lattice structure. The modified lattice-gas model with the calibration function is used for the phase diagram descriptions for argon adsorption on the homogeneous (111) CdCl2 face (two-dimensional systems) and for methane adsorption in carbon slitlike pores (three-dimensional system) as well as the other equilibrium characteristics of mentioned systems.

  16. Study of solid/gas phase photocatalytic reactions by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nuño, Manuel; Ball, Richard J; Bowen, Chris R

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a novel methodology for the real-time study of solid-gas phase photocatalytic reactions in situ. A novel reaction chamber has been designed and developed to facilitate the investigation of photoactive materials under different gas compositions. UV irradiation in the wavelength of ranges 376-387 and 381-392 nm was provided using specially designed high efficiency light emitting diode arrays. The experiments used air containing 190 ppm NO2 in a moist environment with a relative humidity of 0.1%. Photocatalytic samples consisting of pressed pellets of rutile and anatase crystalline forms of TiO2 were monitored over a period of 150 min. An ultra-high vacuum right angled bleed valve allowed a controlled flow of gas from the main reaction chamber at atmospheric pressure to a residual gas analyser operating at a vacuum of 10(-5)  mbar. The apparatus and methodology have been demonstrated to provide high sensitivity (ppb). The rate of degradation of NO2 attributed to reaction at the TiO2 surface was sensitive to both crystal structures (anatase or rutile) and wavelength of irradiation.

  17. Using a plenoptic sensor to reconstruct vortex phase structures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chensheng; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C

    2016-07-15

    A branch point problem and its solution commonly involve recognizing and reconstructing a vortex phase structure around a singular point. In laser beam propagation through random media, the destructive phase contributions from various parts of a vortex phase structure will cause a dark area in the center of the beam's intensity profile. This null of intensity can, in turn, prevent the vortex phase structure from being recognized. In this Letter, we show how to use a plenoptic sensor to transform the light field of a vortex beam so that a simple and direct reconstruction algorithm can be applied to reveal the vortex phase structure. As a result, we show that the plenoptic sensor is effective in detecting branch points and can be used to reconstruct phase distortion in a beam in a wide sense. PMID:27420487

  18. Laboratory Investigations of Titan Haze Formation: Characterization of Gas Phase and Particle Phase Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Sarah; Yoon, Heidi; Li, Rui; deGouw, Joost; Tolbert, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan’s atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, the discovery of very heavy ions, coupled with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation measurements that show haze absorption up to 1000 km altitude (Liang et al., 2007), indicates that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere. The energy environment of the thermosphere is significantly different from the stratosphere; in particular there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2, in the upper atmosphere. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan’s atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini (Vuitton et al., 2007). Additionally, measurements obtained by the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyzer (ACP) carried by Huygens to Titan’s surface may indicate that Titan’s aerosols contain significant amounts of nitrogen (Israël et al., 2005, 2006). The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan’s atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase

  19. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Carmichael, Ian; Denifl, Stephan; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C5H4N4O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp - H) anion (C5H3N4O-) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp - NH)-, C4H3N4-/C4HN3O-, C4H2N3-, C3NO-/HC(HCN)CN-, OCN-, CN-, and O-. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  20. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  1. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy of ionized corannulene in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galué, Héctor Alvaro; Rice, Corey A.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Oomens, Jos

    2011-02-01

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of radical cationic and protonated corannulene were recorded by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy using the IR free electron laser for infrared experiments. Electrospray ionization was used to generate protonated corannulene and an IRMPD spectrum was recorded in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer monitoring H-loss as a function of IR frequency. The radical cation was produced by 193-nm UV photoionization of the vapor of corannulene in a 3D quadrupole trap and IR irradiation produces H, H2, and C2Hx losses. Summing the spectral response of the three fragmentation channels yields the IRMPD spectrum of the radical cation. The spectra were analyzed with the aid of quantum-chemical calculations carried out at various levels of theory. The good agreement of theoretical and experimental spectra for protonated corannulene indicates that protonation occurs on one of the peripheral C-atoms, forming an sp3 hybridized carbon. The spectrum of the radical cation was examined taking into account distortions of the C5v geometry induced by the Jahn-Teller effect as a consequence of the degenerate 2E1 ground electronic state. As indicated by the calculations, the five equivalent Cs minima are separated by marginal barriers, giving rise to a dynamically distorted system. Although in general the character of the various computed vibrational bands appears to be in order, only a qualitative match to the experimental spectrum is found. Along with a general redshift of the calculated frequencies, the IR intensities of modes in the 1000-1250 cm-1 region show the largest discrepancy with the harmonic predictions. In addition to CH "in-plane" bending vibrations, these modes also exhibit substantial deformation of the pentagonal inner ring, which may relate directly to the vibronic interaction in the radical cation.

  3. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  4. CHAOS III: Gas-phase Abundances in NGC 5457

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Moustakas, John

    2016-10-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope observations of 109 H ii regions in NGC 5457 (M101) obtained with the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. We have robust measurements of one or more temperature-sensitive auroral emission lines for 74 H ii regions, permitting the measurement of “direct” gas-phase abundances. Comparing the temperatures derived from the different ionic species, we find: (1) strong correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii], consistent with little or no intrinsic scatter; (2) a correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii], but with significant intrinsic dispersion; (3) overall agreement between T[N ii], T[S ii], and T[O ii], as expected, but with significant outliers; (4) the correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii] match the predictions of photoionization modeling while the correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii] is offset from the prediction of photoionization modeling. Based on these observations, which include significantly more observations of lower excitation H ii regions, missing in many analyses, we inspect the commonly used ionization correction factors (ICFs) for unobserved ionic species and propose new empirical ICFs for S and Ar. We have discovered an unexpected population of H ii regions with a significant offset to low values in Ne/O, which defies explanation. We derive radial gradients in O/H and N/O which agree with previous studies. Our large observational database allows us to examine the dispersion in abundances, and we find intrinsic dispersions of 0.074 ± 0.009 in O/H and 0.095 ± 0.009 in N/O (at a given radius). We stress that this measurement of the intrinsic dispersion comes exclusively from direct abundance measurements of H ii regions in NGC 5457.

  5. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Nonoxide Nanoparticles in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Kumfer, B. M.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase combustion synthesis is a promising process for creating nanoparticles for the growing nanostructure materials industry. The challenges that must be addressed are controlling particle size, preventing hard agglomerates, maintaining purity, and, if nonoxides are synthesized, protecting the particles from oxidation and/or hydrolysis during post-processing. Sodium-halide Flame Encapsulation (SFE) is a unique methodology for producing nonoxide nanoparticles that addresses these challenges. This flame synthesis process incorporates sodium and metal-halide chemistry, resulting in nanoparticles that are encapsulated in salt during the early stages of their growth in the flame. Salt encapsulation has been shown to allow control of particle size and morphology, while serving as an effective protective coating for preserving the purity of the core particles. Metals and compounds that have been produced using this technology include Al, W, Ti, TiB2, AlN, and composites of W-Ti and Al-AlN. Oxygen content in SFE synthesized nano- AlN has been measured by neutron activation analysis to be as low as 0.54wt.%, as compared to over 5wt.% for unprotected AlN of comparable size. The overall objective of this work is to study the SFE process and nano-encapsulation so that they can be used to produce novel and superior materials. SFE experiments in microgravity allow the study of flame and particle dynamics without the influence of buoyancy forces. Spherical sodium-halide flames are produced in microgravity by ejecting the halide from a spherical porous burner into a quiescent atmosphere of sodium vapor and argon. Experiments are performed in the 2.2 sec Drop Tower at the NASA-Glenn Research Center. Numerical models of the flame and particle dynamics were developed and are compared with the experimental results.

  6. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  7. Dual-phase Cr-Ta alloys for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Brady, Michael P.; Zhu, Jiahong; Tortorelli, Peter F.

    2001-01-01

    Dual phase alloys of chromium containing 2 to 11 atomic percent tantalum with minor amounts of Mo, Cr, Ti, Y, La, Cr, Si and Ge are disclosed. These alloys contain two phases including Laves phase and Cr-rich solid solution in either eutectic structures or dispersed Laves phase particles in the Cr-rich solid solution matrix. The alloys have superior mechanical properties at high temperature and good oxidation resistance when heated to above 1000.degree. C. in air.

  8. Liquid-gas phase separation in confined vibrated dry granular matter.

    PubMed

    Roeller, Klaus; Clewett, James P D; Bowley, R M; Herminghaus, Stephan; Swift, Michael R

    2011-07-22

    A new phase transition is observed experimentally in a dry granular gas subject to vertical vibration between two horizontal plates. Molecular dynamics simulations of this system allow us to investigate the observed phase separation in detail. We find a high-density, low temperature liquid, coexisting with a low-density, high temperature gas moving coherently. The importance of the coherent motion for phase separation is investigated using frequency modulation.

  9. Condensed-phase versus gas-phase ozonolysis of catechol: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Timothy J.; Medeiros, Nicholas; Hinrichs, Ryan Z.

    2012-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of volatile aromatic compounds contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), especially in urban environments. Aromatic SOA precursors typically require oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, although recent work suggests that ozonolysis of 1,2-benzenediols produces SOA in high yields. We employed attenuated total reflectance and transmission infrared spectroscopy to investigate the heterogeneous ozonolysis of catechol thin films. Formation of the dominant condensed-phase product muconic acid was highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) with few products detected below 40% RH and a maximum reactive uptake coefficient of γ = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-5 measured at 81.2% RH. We also performed quantum chemical calculations mapping out several reaction pathways for the homogeneous ozonolysis of gaseous catechol. 1,3-cycloaddition transition states were rate limiting with the most favorable activation energies at 45.4 and 47.1 kJ mol-1 [CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)] corresponding to addition across and adjacent to the diol Cdbnd C, respectively. Gas-phase rate constants, calculated using transition state theory, were six orders of magnitude slower than experimental values. In contrast, a calculated activation energy was lower for the ozonolysis of a catechol•H2O complex, which serves as a first-approximation for modeling the ozonolysis of condensed-phase catechol. These combined results suggests that homogeneous ozonolysis of catechol may not be important for the formation of secondary organic aerosols but that ozonolysis of surface-adsorbed catechol may contribute to SOA growth.

  10. [Raman Characterization of Hydrate Crystal Structure Influenced by Mine Gas Concentration].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-yong; Zhou, Hong-ji; Wu, Qiang; Gao, Xia

    2016-01-01

    CH4 /C2H6/N2 mixed hydrate formation experiments were performed at 2 degrees C and 5 MPa for three different mine gas concentrations (CH4/C2H6/N2, G1 = 54 : 36 : 10, G2 = 67.5 : 22.5 : 10, G3 = 81 : 9 : 10). Raman spectra for hydration products were obtained by using Microscopic Raman Spectrometer. Hydrate structure is determined by the Raman shift of symmetric C-C stretching vibration mode of C2H6 in the hydrate phase. This work is focused on the cage occupancies and hydration numbers, calculated by the fitting methods of Raman peaks. The results show that structure I (s I) hydrate forms in the G1 and G2 gas systems, while structure II (s II) hydrate forms in the G3 gas system, concentration variation of C2H6 in the gas samples leads to a change in hydrate structure from s I to s II; the percentages of CH4 and C2H6 in s I hydrate phase are less affected by the concentration of gas samples, the percentages of CH4 are respectively 34.4% and 35.7%, C2H6 are respectively 64.6% and 63.9% for gas systems of G1 and G2, the percentages of CH4 and 2 H6 are respectively 73.5% and 22.8% for gas systems of G3, the proportions of object molecules largely depend on the hydrate structure; CH4 and C2H6 molecules occupy 98%, 98% and 92% of the large cages and CH4 molecules occupy 80%, 60% and 84% of the small cages for gas systems of G1, G2 and G3, respectively; additionally, N2 molecules occupy less than 5% of the small cages is due to its weak adsorption ability and the lower partial pressure.

  11. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  12. The structure of hydrophobic gas diffusion electrodes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J.

    1972-01-01

    The 'flooded agglomerate' model of the Teflon-bonded gas diffusion electrode is discussed. A mathematical treatment of the 'flooded agglomerate' model is given; it can be used to predict the performance of the electrode as a function of measurable physical parameters.

  13. Gas-phase H2O and CO2 towards massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Lahuis, F.; Wright, C. M.; Doty, S. D.

    2000-11-01

    We present a study of gas-phase H2O and CO2 towards a sample of 14 massive protostars with the ISO-SWS. Modeling of the H2O spectra using a homogeneous model with a constant excitation temperature Tex shows that the H2O abundances increase with temperature, up to a few times 10-5 with respect to H2 for the hottest sources (Tex~ 500 K). This is still a factor of 10 lower than the H2O ice abundances observed towards cold sources in which evaporation is not significant (Keane et al. 2000). Gas-phase CO2 is not abundant in our sources. The abundances are nearly constant for Tex >~ 100 K at a value of a few times 10-7, much lower than the solid-state abundances of ~1-3× 10-6 (Gerakines et al. 1999). Gas/solid ratios have been determined, using the solid-state features of H2O (Keane et al. 2000) and CO2 (Gerakines et al. 1999) as observed with ISO-SWS towards the same objects. For both H2O and CO2 the gas/solid ratio increases with temperature, but the increase is much stronger for H2O than for CO2, suggesting a different type of chemistry. In addition to the homogeneous models, a power law model has been developed for one of our sources, based on the physical structure of this region as determined from submillimeter data by van der Tak et al. (1999). The resulting H2O model spectrum gives a good fit to the data.

  14. Three-phase measurements of oil and gas trapping in sand packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mansoori, Saleh K.; Iglauer, Stefan; Pentland, Christopher H.; Blunt, Martin J.

    2009-10-01

    We measure the trapped saturations of oil and gas as a function of initial saturation in water-wet sand packs. We start with a water-saturated column and inject octane (oil), while water and oil are produced from the bottom. Once water production has ceased, air (gas) then enters from the top, allowing oil and gas to drain under gravity for different times. Finally water is then injected from the bottom to trap both oil and gas. The columns are sliced and the fluids analyzed using gas chromatography. We find that for high initial gas saturations more gas can be trapped in the presence of oil than in a two-phase (gas/water) system. The residual gas saturation can be over 20% compared to 14% in two-phase flow [Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Pentland CH, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurements of non-wetting phase trapping applied to carbon dioxide storage. Energy Procedia 2009;1(1):3173-80]. This is unlike previous measurements on consolidated media, where the trapped gas saturation is either similar or lower to that reached in an equivalent two-phase experiment. For lower initial gas saturation, the amount of trapping follows the initial-residual trend seen in two-phase experiments. The amount of oil trapped is insensitive to initial gas saturation or the amount of gas that is trapped, again in contrast to measurements on consolidated media. More oil is trapped than would be predicted from an equivalent two-phase (oil/water) system, although the trapped saturation is never larger than the maximum reached in two-phase flow (around 11%) [Pentland CH, Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurement of non-wetting phase trapping in sand packs. In: SPE 115697, proceedings of the SPE annual technical conference and exhibition, Denver, Colorado, USA; 21-24 September 2008]. These initially surprising results are explained in the context of oil layer stability and the competition between snap-off and piston-like advance. In two-phase systems, displacement is principally

  15. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  16. Atomic Structure and Phase Transformations in Pu Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Cynn, H; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Moore, K T; Evans, W J; Farber, D L; Jeffries, J R; Massalski, T B

    2008-04-28

    Plutonium and plutonium-based alloys containing Al or Ga exhibit numerous phases with crystal structures ranging from simple monoclinic to face-centered cubic. Only recently, however, has there been increased convergence in the actinides community on the details of the equilibrium form of the phase diagrams. Practically speaking, while the phase diagrams that represent the stability of the fcc {delta}-phase field at room temperature are generally applicable, it is also recognized that Pu and its alloys are never truly in thermodynamic equilibrium because of self-irradiation effects, primarily from the alpha decay of Pu isotopes. This article covers past and current research on several properties of Pu and Pu-(Al or Ga) alloys and their connections to the crystal structure and the microstructure. We review the consequences of radioactive decay, the recent advances in understanding the electronic structure, the current research on phase transformations and their relations to phase diagrams and phase stability, the nature of the isothermal martensitic {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation, and the pressure-induced transformations in the {delta}-phase alloys. New data are also presented on the structures and phase transformations observed in these materials following the application of pressure, including the formation of transition phases.

  17. 2D ice from first principles: structures and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Schusteritsch, Georg; Pickard, Chris J.; Salzmann, Christoph G.; Michaelides, Angelos

    Despite relevance to disparate areas such as cloud microphysics and tribology, major gaps in the understanding of the structures and phase transitions of low-dimensional water ice remain. Here we report a first principles study of confined 2D ice as a function of pressure. We find that at ambient pressure hexagonal and pentagonal monolayer structures are the two lowest enthalpy phases identified. Upon mild compression the pentagonal structure becomes the most stable and persists up to ca. 2 GPa at which point square and rhombic phases are stable. The square phase agrees with recent experimental observations of square ice confined within graphene sheets. We also find a double layer AA stacked square ice phase, which clarifies the difference between experimental observations and earlier force field simulations. This work provides a fresh perspective on 2D confined ice, highlighting the sensitivity of the structures observed to both the confining pressure and width.

  18. Photoinduced intermolecular cross-linking of gas phase triacylglycerol lipid ions.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuai; Pham, Huong T; Blanksby, Stephen J; Reid, Gavin E

    2015-01-01

    Complex mixtures of plant derived triglycerol (TG) lipids are commonly used as feedstock components for the production of industrial polymers. However, there remains a need for the development of analytical strategies to investigate the intrinsic intermolecular cross-linking reactivity of individual TG molecules within these mixtures as a function of their structures and physicochemical properties, and for the characterization of the resultant products. Here, to address this need, we describe a novel multistage tandem mass spectrometry based method for intermolecular cross-linking and subsequent structural characterization of TG lipid ions in the gas phase. Cross-linking reactions were initiated using 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation tandem mass spectrometry (UVPD-MS/MS) of saturated or unsaturated TG dimers introduced via electrospray ionization into a linear ion trap mass spectrometer as noncovalent complexes with protonated 3,4-, 2,4- or 3,5- diiodoaniline (diIA). UVPD resulted in the initial formation of an anilinyl biradical via the sequential loss of two iodine radicals, which underwent further reaction to yield multiple cross-linked TG products along with competing noncross-linking processes. These chemistries are proposed to occur via sequential combinations of hydrogen abstraction (H-abstraction), radical addition and radical recombination. Multistage collision induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS(n)) was used to obtain evidence for the structures and mechanisms of formation for these products, as a function of both the TG lipid and diIA ion structures. The efficiency of the UVPD reaction was shown to be dependent on the number of unsaturation sites present within the TG lipids. However, when unsaturation sites were present, formation of the cross-linked and noncross-linked product ions via H-abstraction and radical addition mechanisms was found to be competitive. Finally, the identity of the anilinyl biradical (e.g., 3,4- versus 2

  19. All metal valve structure for gas systems

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Ray W.; Pawlak, Donald A.; Ramey, Alford J.

    1984-11-13

    A valve assembly with a resilient metal seat member is disclosed for providing a gas-tight seal in a gas handling system. The valve assembly also includes a valve element for sealing against the valve seat member; and an actuating means for operating the valve element. The valve seat member is a one-piece stainless steel ring having a central valve port and peripheral mounting flange, and an annular corrugation in between. A groove between the first and second ridges serves as a flexure zone during operation of the valve member and thus provides the seating pressure between the inner ridge or valve seat and the valve element. The outer annular ridge has a diameter less than said valve element to limit the seating motion of the valve element, preventing non-elastic deformation of the seat member.

  20. Distillation tray structural parameter study: Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The purpose here is to identify the structural parameters (plate thickness, liquid level, beam size, number of beams, tray diameter, etc.) that affect the structural integrity of distillation trays in distillation columns. Once the sensitivity of the trays' dynamic response to these parameters has been established, the designer will be able to use this information to prepare more accurate specifications for the construction of new trays. Information is given on both static and dynamic analysis, modal response, and tray failure details.

  1. Gas phase chemistry of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, J.; Matos, A.P. de; Evans, W.

    1996-01-09

    The gas phase chemistry of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)samarium, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm, was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS). Positive electron impact (EI) spectra showed the formation of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2} Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +}, and Sm{sup +}. All three ions reacted with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm by charge transfer, as verified by double-resonance techniques, and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +} also formed the (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 3}Sm{sub 2}{sup +} ion in a condensation reaction with neutral (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm. The laser desorption/ionization (LDI) spectra showed, in addition to (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +}, and Sm{sup +}, the formation of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}H)Sm{sup +} and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}. The latter species most probably involves a tetramethylfulvenide ligand. Access to all of the ionic species cited here could also be obtained by reacting laser-desorbed Sm{sup +} ions with pentamethylcyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}H. (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}H)Sm{sup +}, and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +} were formed as primary products, and the metallocene ion (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm{sup +} resulted from the rapid addition of C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}H to (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results. PMID:26307695

  3. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results.

  4. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  5. Enhancement of gas-phase diffusion in the presence of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Angert, A.

    2003-04-01

    Gas diffusion in porous media occurs in both the gas and liquid phases. In many instances, gas diffusion in the liquid phase is ignored. However, under many conditions, gas diffusion in the liquid phase may be more important than gas diffusion in the gas phase. Two different cases will be examined in this work. The first case is a continuous liquid path between the gas concentrations of interest modeled after Jury et al. (1984). The second case is the situation at low liquid saturation where liquid islands exist. For the first case, Jury's model can be rewritten as a ratio of the total gas diffusion in the gas and liquid phases to that just in the gas phase. The liquid diffusion coefficient is approximately 10-4 times the gas diffusion coefficient consistent with Jury et al. (1984). The ratio of total diffusion to gas-phase diffusion is then only a function of Henry's constant and the liquid saturation. For higher values of Henry's constant, such as for CO2 and O2, the effect of diffusion in the liquid phase is small except at high liquid saturations. For small values of Henry's constant, such as for some VOCs and explosive compounds, diffusion in the liquid phase dominates for low and moderate liquid saturation values. The second case is the enhancement of diffusion caused by liquid islands at low liquid saturation. Enhanced vapor diffusion across liquid islands has been observed and modeled by Webb and Ho (1999), where condensation and evaporation occur on opposite ends of the liquid island. Vapor diffusion enhancement of up to a factor of 10 has been observed. Similarly, gas can diffuse through the liquid island. For high values of Henry's constant, gas diffusion through liquid islands is negligible and can be ignored. For small values of Henry's constant, diffusion through liquid islands may be much greater than diffusion through gas, so the rate is enhanced. The work was sponsored by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) under the

  6. The gas-phase thermal chemistry of tetralin and related model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malandra, J.

    1993-05-01

    The thesis is divided into 5 papers: gas-phase thermal decomposition of tetralin; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 3-benzocycloheptenone and 1,3, 4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzothiepin-2,2-dioxide (model systems for gas-phase pyrolysis of tetralin); high-temperature gas-phase reactions of o-allylbenzyl radicals generated by flash vacuum pyrolysis of is(o-allylbenzyl) oxalate; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane; and flash vacuum pyrolysis of o-allyltoluene, o-(3-butenyl)toluene and o-(pentenyl)toluene were also used.

  7. Mm/submm Study of Gas-Phase Photoproducts from Methanol Interstellar Ice Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, AJ; Smith, Houston Hartwell; Milam, Stefanie N.; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Icy grain reactions have gained quite the popularity in the astrochemistry community to explain the formation of complex organic molecules. Through temperature programmed desorption and photolysis experiments we use rotational spectroscopy to measure the gas-phase products of icy grain reactions. Previous results include testing detection limits of the system by temperature programmed desorption of methanol and water ices, photochemistry of gas-phase methanol, and detection of photodesorbed water from a pure water ice surface. Current work that will be discussed focuses on the detection of gas-phase CO and other photoproducts from an ice surface.

  8. The Noble Gas Record of Gas-Water Phase Interaction in the Tight-Gas-Sand Reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Zhou, Z.; Harris, N. B.

    2015-12-01

    The mass of hydrocarbons that have migrated through tight-gas-sandstone systems before the permeability reduces to trap the hydrocarbon gases provides critical information in the hydrocarbon potential analysis of a basin. The noble gas content (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) of the groundwater has a unique isotopic and elemental composition. As gas migrates through the water column, the groundwater-derived noble gases partition into the hydrocarbon phase. Determination of the noble gases in the produced hydrocarbon phase then provides a record of the type of interaction (simple phase equilibrium or open system Rayleigh fractionation). The tight-gas-sand reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains represent one of the most significant gas resources in the United States. The producing reservoirs are generally developed in low permeability (averaging <0.1mD) Upper Cretaceous fluvial to marginal marine sandstones and commonly form isolated overpressured reservoir bodies encased in even lower permeability muddy sediments. We present noble gas data from producing fields in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming; the the Piceance Basin, Colorado; and in the Uinta Basin, Utah. The data is consistent from all three basins. We show how in each basin the noble gases record open system gas migration through a water column at maximum basin burial. The data within an open system model indicates that the gas now in-place represents the last ~10% of hydrocarbon gas to have passed through the water column, most likely prior to permeability closedown.

  9. Turing structures in dc gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Self-organized spatial plasma structures exhibit many similarities with Turing structures obtained in biology and chemistry. Using an analytical mesoscopic approach, it is shown that plasma balls of fire belong to the same class of Turing structures like the Brusselator. It is also mathematically proved that the existence of these self-organized plasma structures is related with a negative differential resistance. There are also established the mathematical conditions which the negative differential resistance must satisfy for obtaining a stationary ball of fire at the anode of a plasma diode.

  10. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  11. Gas-phase basicities of polyfunctional molecules. Part 4: Carbonyl groups as basic sites.

    PubMed

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    This article constitutes the fourth part of a general review of the gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of polyfunctional molecules (Part 1: Theory and methods, Mass Spectrom Rev 2007, 26:775-835, Part 2: Saturated basic sites, Mass Spectrom Rev 2012, 31:353-390, Part 3: Amino acids, Mass Spectrom Rev 2012, 31:391-435). This fourth part is devoted to carbonyl containing polyfunctional molecules. After a short reminder of the methods of determination of gas-phase basicity and the underlying physicochemical concepts, specific examples are examined under two major chapters. In the first one, aliphatic and unsaturated (conjugated and cyclic) ketones, diketones, ketoalcohols, and ketoethers are considered. A second chapter describes the protonation energetic of gaseous acids and derivatives including diacids, diesters, diamides, anhydrides, imides, ureas, carbamates, amino acid derivatives, and peptides. Experimental data were re-evaluated according to the presently adopted basicity scale. Structural and energetic information given by G3 and G4 quantum chemistry computations on typical systems are presented.

  12. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vernieres, Jerome Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Bobo, Jean-François; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  13. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernieres, Jerome; Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Bobo, Jean-François; Diaz, Rosa E.; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO3 phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  14. Detection of the Elusive Triazane Molecule (N3 H5 ) in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Förstel, Marko; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Jones, Brant M; Sun, Bing-Jian; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chang, Agnes H-H; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2015-10-26

    We report the detection of triazane (N3 H5 ) in the gas phase. Triazane is a higher order nitrogen hydride of ammonia (NH3 ) and hydrazine (N2 H4 ) of fundamental importance for the understanding of the stability of single-bonded chains of nitrogen atoms and a potential key intermediate in hydrogen-nitrogen chemistry. The experimental results along with electronic-structure calculations reveal that triazane presents a stable molecule with a nitrogen-nitrogen bond length that is a few picometers shorter than that of hydrazine and has a lifetime exceeding 6±2 μs at a sublimation temperature of 170 K. Triazane was synthesized through irradiation of ammonia ice with energetic electrons and was detected in the gas phase upon sublimation of the ice through soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with a reflectron-time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Isotopic substitution experiments exploiting [D3 ]-ammonia ice confirmed the identification through the detection of its fully deuterated counterpart [D5 ]-triazane (N3 D5 ).

  15. Nanoparticles-chemistry, new synthetic approaches, gas phase clustering and novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumaran Nair, A.; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Rosemary, M. J.; Tom, Renjis T.; Rajeev Kumar, V. R.; Jeba Singh, D. M. David; Cyriac, Jobin; Jain, Prashant; Kalesh, K. A.; Bhattacharya, Shreya; Pradeep, T.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, an overview of the synthesis, chemistry and applications of nanosystems carried out in our laboratory is presented. The discussion is divided into four sections, namely (a) chemistry of nanoparticles, (b) development of new synthetic approaches, (c) gas phase clusters and (d) device structures and applications. In `chemistry of nanoparticles' we describe a novel reaction between nanoparticles of Ag and Au with halocarbons. The reactions lead to the formation of various carbonaceous materials and metal halides. In `development of new synthetic approaches' our one-pot methodologies for the synthesis of core-shell nanosystems of Au, Ag and Cu protected with TiO_2 and ZrO_2 as well as various polymers are discussed. Some results on the interaction of nanoparticles with biomolecules are also detailed in this section. The third section covers the formation of gas phase aggregates/clusters of thiol-protected sub-nanoparticles. Laser desorption of H_2MoO_4, H_2WO_4, MoS_2, and WS_2 giving novel clusters is discussed. The fourth section deals with the development of simple devices and technologies using nanomaterials described above.

  16. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  17. [Calculation of flammability limits of gas phases with ethylene oxide in sterilisers].

    PubMed

    Askar, Enis; Schröder, Volkmar; Acikalin, Aydan; Steinbach, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    A calculation method for flammability limits of gas phases with ethylene oxide in sterilisers was developed. Using the Software GasEq and the newly developed Makro "SterEx" for MS-Excel, flammability limits of mixtures with ethylene oxide, air and inert gases at temperatures between 20 degrees C and 100 degrees C and pressures between 0.4 bar and 1.0 bar can be calculated. This method can be used to easily determine safe operating conditions. The used semi-empirical model is based upon the assumption of constant flame temperature profiles at the flammability limits subject to the EO-concentration for different mixtures. To collect model parameters and to validate the model, several experiments with mixtures of ethylene oxide, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapour and air were carried out to determine flammability limits. To simulate the structural conditions of sterilisers, the experiments were conducted in accordance to DIN EN 1839-B in a closed autoclave with temperatures and pressures relevant for sterilisation processes. The calculation of flammability limits of process gas mixtures with "SterEx" provides good agreement with flammability limits that were determined in experiments. PMID:19037868

  18. An investigation into the flow behavior of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in normal gravity with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, Peter J.; Heist, Timothy J.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid behavior in normal gravity of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in an enclosed circular cylinder heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above was investigated. Flow visualization was used to obtain qualitative data on both systems. The use of thermochromatic liquid crystal particles as liquid phase flow tracers was evaluated as a possible means of simultaneously gathering both flow pattern and temperature gradient data for the two phase system. The results of the flow visualization experiments performed on both systems can be used to gain a better understanding of the behavior of such systems in a reduced gravity environment and aid in the verification of a numerical model of the system.

  19. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  20. Phase structure rewrite systems in information retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbiel, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Operational level automatic indexing requires an efficient means of normalizing natural language phrases. Subject switching requires an efficient means of translating one set of authorized terms to another. A phrase structure rewrite system called a Lexical Dictionary is explained that performs these functions. Background, operational use, other applications and ongoing research are explained.

  1. Far-Ir Spectroscopy of Neutral Gas Phase Peptides: Signatures from Combined Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahé, Jérôme; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Bakker, Daniël; Jaeqx, Sander; Rijs, Anouk

    2016-06-01

    Within the past two decades, action vibrational spectroscopy has become an almost routine experimental method to probe the structures of molecules and clusters in the gas phase (neutral and ions). Such experiments are mainly performed in the 1000-4000 wn fingerprint regions. Though successful in many respects, these spectral domains can be however restrictive in the information provided, and sometimes reach limitations for unravelling structures without ambiguity. In a collaborative work with the group of Dr A.M. Rijs (FELIX laboratory, Radbout University, The Netherlands) we have launched a new strategy where the far-IR/Tera-Hertz domain (100-800 wn domain) is experimentally probed for neutral gas phase molecules. Our group in Paris apply finite temperature DFT-based molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations in order to unravel the complex signatures arising in the far-IR domain, and provide an unambiguous assignment both of the structural conformation of the gas phase molecules (taking into account the experimental conditions) and an understanding of the spectral signatures/fingerprints. We will discuss our experimental and theoretical investigations on two neutral peptides in the 100-800 wn far-IR spectral domain, i.e. Z-Ala6 and PheGly dipeptide, that represent two systems which definitive conformational assignment was not possible without the far IR signatures. We will also present our very recent results on the Phe-X peptide series, where X stands for Gly, Ala, Pro, Val, Ser, Cys, combining experiments and DFT-MD simulations, providing a detailed understanding of the vibrational fingerprints in the far-IR domain. In all exemples, we will show how DFT-MD simulations is the proper theoretical tool to account for vibrational anharmonicities and mode couplings, of prime importance in the far-IR domain. References : J. Mahé, S. Jaeqx, A.M. Rijs, M.P. Gaigeot, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17 :25905 (2015) S. Jaeqx, J. Oomens, A. Cimas, M.P. Gaigeot, A.M. Rijs, Angew

  2. Gas-phase lithium cation basicity of histamine and its agonist 2-([beta]-aminoethyl)-pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmann, M.; Raczynska, E. D.; Gal, J. F.; Maria, P. C.

    2007-11-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation basicities (LCBs) were obtained for histamine (HA) and its agonist 2-([beta]-aminoethyl)-pyridine (AEP) from collision-induced dissociation of lithium adducts using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). For measurements, MeO(CH2)2OMe, Et3PO and (Me2N)3PO (HMPA) were used as the reference compounds. The experimental LCB of AEP was located between those of Et3PO and (Me2N)3PO. The experimental LCB of HA was found to be higher than those of AEP and HMPA by more than 2 kcal mol-1 clearly indicating that the LCB of HA is higher than any LCB for a neutral base yet measured (crown-ethers excepted). The experimental LCBs of the parent bases (pyridine and imidazole) are lower by more than 10 kcal mol-1. In parallel, DFT calculations {B3LYP/6-31G*//B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-311+G**//B3LYP/6-31G*} were performed for HA, AEP and their lithium adducts. Among the 22 reasonable conformations of the HA-Li+ adduct, only one appears to be significantly more stable than the others. This is also the case for one structure among seven conformations of the AEP-Li+ adduct. These two stable structures have the [`]scorpion' conformation, in which the Li+ cation is almost equally chelated by two basic nitrogen atoms, the ring N-aza and the chain N-amino. Other HA-Li+ and AEP-Li+ conformations have noticeably higher energies than the [`]scorpion' structures. The difference between the DFT calculated LCBs of HA and AEP (about 4 kcal mol-1) is in agreement with that experimentally obtained (>2 kcal mol-1). The high experimental and theoretical values of LCB for HA and AEP militate in favor of a strong chelation of Li+ by both ligands in the gas-phase. This chelation effect was also evidenced previously for the proton gas-phase basicity.

  3. Gas-phase peptide fragmentation: how understanding the fundamentals provides a springboard to developing new chemistry and novel proteomic tools.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Christopher K; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2008-10-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the evolution of some of the key concepts in the gas-phase fragmentation of different classes of peptide ions under various conditions [e.g. collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD)], and then demonstrates how these concepts can be used to develop new methods. For example, an understanding of the role of the mobile proton and neighboring group interactions in the fragmentation reactions of protonated peptides has led to the design of the 'SELECT' method. For ETD, a model based on the Landau-Zener theory reveals the role of both thermodynamic and geometric effects in the electron transfer from polyatomic reagent anions to multiply protonated peptides, and this predictive model has facilitated the design of a new strategy to form ETD reagent anions from precursors generated via ESI. Finally, two promising, emerging areas of gas-phase ion chemistry of peptides are also described: (1) the design of new gas-phase radical chemistry to probe peptide structure, and (2) selective cleavage of disulfide bonds of peptides in the gas phase via various physicochemical approaches.

  4. Metal-ligand redox reactions in gas-phase quaternary peptide-metal complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisar, T.; Gatlin, C. L.; Turecek, F.

    1997-03-01

    The dipeptides Phe-Leu, Leu-Phe, Leu-Ala, and Ala-Leu form quaternary complexes of the type [Cu(II)(peptide - 2H+M)bpy]+ in the gas phase when electrosprayed in the presence of Cu(II) salts, 2.2'-bipyridyl (bpy), and an alkali hydroxide (MOH). The gas-phase complexes decarboxylate on collisional activation at low ion kinetic energies. The resulting ions undergo unusual eliminations of neutral Na, K, and Rb, which depend on the peptide structure. The ionization energy of the decarboxylated Phe-Leu-Cu-bpy complex was bracketed at 4.2 eV. Other collision-induced dissociations also depend on the alkali metal ion and the peptide structure. Ab initio calculations on a model system are reported and used to discuss the electronic properties of the peptide complexes.

  5. Structural transitions in condensed colloidal virus phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Barr, Steve; Udit, Andrew; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Nguyen, Thanh; Finn, M. G.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Analogous to monatomic systems colloidal phase behavior is entirely determined by the interaction potential between particles. This potential can be tuned using solutes such as multivalent salts and polymers with varying affinity for the colloids to create a hierarchy of attractions. Bacteriophage viruses are a naturally occurring type of colloidal particle with characteristics difficult to achieve by laboratory synthesis. They are monodisperse, nanometers in size, and have heterogeneous surface charge distributions. We use the MS2 and Qbeta bacteriophages (diameters 27-28nm) to understand the interplay between different attraction mechanisms on nanometer-sized colloids. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is used to characterize the inter-particle interaction between colloidal viruses using several polymer species and different salt types.

  6. Nano-structured lead dioxide as a novel stationary phase for solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Mehdinia, Ali; Mousavi, Mir Fazllolah; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2006-11-17

    The first study on the high efficiency of nano-structured lead dioxide as a new fiber for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) purposes has been reported. The size of the PbO2 particles was in the range of 34-136 nm. Lead dioxide-based fibers were prepared via electrochemical deposition on a platinum wire. The extraction properties of the fiber to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) were examined using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) mode coupled to gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The results obtained proved the suitability of proposed fibers for the sampling of organic compounds from water. The extraction procedure was optimized by selecting the appropriate extraction parameters, including preparation conditions of coating, salt concentration, time and temperature of adsorption and desorption and stirring rate. The calibration graphs were linear in a concentration range of 0.1-100 microg l(-1) (R2 > 0.994) with detection limits below 0.012 microg l(-1) level. Single fiber repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility were less than 10.0 and 12.5%, respectively. The PbO2 coating was proved to be very stable at relatively high temperatures (up to 300 degrees C) with a high extraction capacity and long lifespan (more than 50 times). Higher chemical resistance and lower cost are among the advantages of PbO2 fibers over commercially available SPME fibers. Good recoveries (81-108%) were obtained when environmental samples were analyzed.

  7. Development of Numerical Simulation Method for Compressible Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation method of compressible gas-liquid two-phase flow is developed for analyses of a cavitation bubble. Thermodynamic state of both phases is described with stiffened gas equation of state. Interface of two phases is captured by Level-Set method. As internal energy jump between two phases is critical for the stability of computation, total energy equation is modified so that inviscid flux of energy is smoothly connected across the interface. Detail of governing equations as well as their discretization is described followed by the result of one-dimensional simple example computation.

  8. CIUSuite: A Quantitative Analysis Package for Collision Induced Unfolding Measurements of Gas-Phase Protein Ions.

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, Joseph D; Rabuck-Gibbons, Jessica N; Tian, Yuwei; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-11-17

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a technology of growing importance for structural biology, providing complementary 3D structure information for biomolecules within samples that are difficult to analyze using conventional analytical tools through the near-simultaneous acquisition of ion collision cross sections (CCSs) and masses. Despite recent advances in IM-MS instrumentation, the resolution of closely related protein conformations remains challenging. Collision induced unfolding (CIU) has been demonstrated as a useful tool for resolving isocrossectional protein ions, as they often follow distinct unfolding pathways when subjected to collisional heating in the gas phase. CIU has been used for a variety of applications, from differentiating binding modes of activation state-selective kinase inhibitors to characterizing the domain structure of multidomain proteins. With the growing utilization of CIU as a tool for structural biology, significant challenges have emerged in data analysis and interpretation, specifically the normalization and comparison of CIU data sets. Here, we present CIUSuite, a suite of software modules designed for the rapid processing, analysis, comparison, and classification of CIU data. We demonstrate these tools as part of a series of workflows for applications in comparative structural biology, biotherapeutic analysis, and high throughput screening of kinase inhibitors. These examples illustrate both the potential for CIU in general protein analysis as well as a demonstration of best practices in the interpretation of CIU data. PMID:26489593

  9. Gas-phase mercury reduction to measure total mercury in the flue gas of a coal-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Meischen, Sandra J; Van Pelt, Vincent J; Zarate, Eugene A; Stephens, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous elemental and total (elemental + oxidized) mercury (Hg) in the flue gas from a coal-fired boiler was measured by a modified ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer. Challenges to Hg measurement were the spectral interferences from other flue gas components and that UV measures only elemental Hg. To eliminate interference from flue gas components, a cartridge filled with gold-coated sand removed elemental Hg from a flue gas sample. The Hg-free flue gas was the reference gas, eliminating the spectral interferences. To measure total Hg by UV, oxidized Hg underwent a gas-phase, thermal-reduction in a quartz cell heated to 750 degrees C. Simultaneously, hydrogen was added to flash react with the oxygen present forming water vapor and preventing Hg re-oxidation as it exits the cell. Hg concentration results are in parts per billion by volume Hg at the flue gas oxygen concentration. The modified Hg analyzer and the Ontario Hydro method concurrently measured Hg at a field test site. Measurements were made at a 700-MW steam turbine plant with scrubber units and selective catalytic reduction. The flue gas sampled downstream of the selective catalytic reduction contained 2100 ppm SO2 and 75 ppm NOx. Total Hg measured by the Hg analyzer was within 20% of the Ontario Hydro results. PMID:14871013

  10. Gas-phase mercury reduction to measure total mercury in the flue gas of a coal-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Meischen, Sandra J; Van Pelt, Vincent J; Zarate, Eugene A; Stephens, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous elemental and total (elemental + oxidized) mercury (Hg) in the flue gas from a coal-fired boiler was measured by a modified ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer. Challenges to Hg measurement were the spectral interferences from other flue gas components and that UV measures only elemental Hg. To eliminate interference from flue gas components, a cartridge filled with gold-coated sand removed elemental Hg from a flue gas sample. The Hg-free flue gas was the reference gas, eliminating the spectral interferences. To measure total Hg by UV, oxidized Hg underwent a gas-phase, thermal-reduction in a quartz cell heated to 750 degrees C. Simultaneously, hydrogen was added to flash react with the oxygen present forming water vapor and preventing Hg re-oxidation as it exits the cell. Hg concentration results are in parts per billion by volume Hg at the flue gas oxygen concentration. The modified Hg analyzer and the Ontario Hydro method concurrently measured Hg at a field test site. Measurements were made at a 700-MW steam turbine plant with scrubber units and selective catalytic reduction. The flue gas sampled downstream of the selective catalytic reduction contained 2100 ppm SO2 and 75 ppm NOx. Total Hg measured by the Hg analyzer was within 20% of the Ontario Hydro results.

  11. Steady deflagration of HMX with simple kinetics: A gas phase chain reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, M.J.; Brewster, M.Q.; Son, S.F.

    1998-08-01

    A new approach is presented for modeling steady combustion of energetic solids, in particular HMX. A simplified, global, gas phase chain reaction kinetic mechanism is employed. Specifically, a zero-order, high activation energy thermal decomposition initiation reaction in the condensed phase followed by a second-order, low activation energy chain reaction in the gas phase is assumed. A closed-form solution is obtained, which is based on the activation energy asymptotics analysis of Lengelle in the condensed phase and the assumption of zero activation energy in the gas phase. Comparisons between the model and a variety of experimental observations over a wide range of pressures and initial temperatures are presented and demonstrate the validity of the approach. The model provides excellent agreement with burning rate data (including sensitivity to pressure and initial temperature) and temperature profile data (in particular the gas phase). This suggests that in the realm of simplified, approximate kinetics modeling of energetic solids, the low gas phase activation energy limit is a more appropriate model than the classical high activation energy limit or heuristic flame sheet models. The model also indicates that the condensed phase reaction zone plays an important role in determining the deflagration rate of HMX, underscoring the need for better understanding of the chemistry in this zone.

  12. Two Dimensional Ice from First Principles: Structures and Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Schusteritsch, Georg; Pickard, Chris J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-15

    Despite relevance to disparate areas such as cloud microphysics and tribology, major gaps in the understanding of the structures and phase transitions of low-dimensional water ice remain. Here, we report a first principles study of confined 2D ice as a function of pressure. We find that at ambient pressure hexagonal and pentagonal monolayer structures are the two lowest enthalpy phases identified. Upon mild compression, the pentagonal structure becomes the most stable and persists up to ∼2  GPa, at which point the square and rhombic phases are stable. The square phase agrees with recent experimental observations of square ice confined within graphene sheets. This work provides a fresh perspective on 2D confined ice, highlighting the sensitivity of the structures observed to both the confining pressure and the width.

  13. Two Dimensional Ice from First Principles: Structures and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Schusteritsch, Georg; Pickard, Chris J.; Salzmann, Christoph G.; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Despite relevance to disparate areas such as cloud microphysics and tribology, major gaps in the understanding of the structures and phase transitions of low-dimensional water ice remain. Here, we report a first principles study of confined 2D ice as a function of pressure. We find that at ambient pressure hexagonal and pentagonal monolayer structures are the two lowest enthalpy phases identified. Upon mild compression, the pentagonal structure becomes the most stable and persists up to ˜2 GPa , at which point the square and rhombic phases are stable. The square phase agrees with recent experimental observations of square ice confined within graphene sheets. This work provides a fresh perspective on 2D confined ice, highlighting the sensitivity of the structures observed to both the confining pressure and the width.

  14. Two Dimensional Ice from First Principles: Structures and Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Schusteritsch, Georg; Pickard, Chris J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-15

    Despite relevance to disparate areas such as cloud microphysics and tribology, major gaps in the understanding of the structures and phase transitions of low-dimensional water ice remain. Here, we report a first principles study of confined 2D ice as a function of pressure. We find that at ambient pressure hexagonal and pentagonal monolayer structures are the two lowest enthalpy phases identified. Upon mild compression, the pentagonal structure becomes the most stable and persists up to ∼2  GPa, at which point the square and rhombic phases are stable. The square phase agrees with recent experimental observations of square ice confined within graphene sheets. This work provides a fresh perspective on 2D confined ice, highlighting the sensitivity of the structures observed to both the confining pressure and the width. PMID:26824547

  15. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T.; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S.; Bakr, Waseem S.

    2016-08-01

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions.

  16. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DEPOSITION OF A COMPOUND THAT PARTITIONS BETWEEN GAS AND PARTICULATE PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    How will atmospheric deposition behave for a compound when it reversibly sorbs between gas and atmospheric particulate phases? Two factors influence the answer. What physical mechanisms occur in the sorption process? What are the concentration and composition of atmospheric par...

  17. Identification of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate in the Los Angeles atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eatough, D.J.; White, V.F.; Hansen, L.D.; Eatough, N.L.; Cheney, J.L.

    1986-09-01

    Gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate have been identified in the atmosphere in Los Angeles. Gas-phase concentrations of these two alkyl sulfates were determined by using analytical methods based on the collection of the compounds before collection of particles using diffusion denuders and after collection of particles using resin beds or sorption filters, and specific analysis of the collected alkyl sulfates by ion chromatography. The data show the dimethyl sulfate is present in both particles and the gas phase. The concentration of total gas-phase methyl sulfates was found to vary from 34 to 178 nmol/m/sup 3/ during the smog episode studied. These species constituted a significant fraction of the total sulfur budget in the Los Angeles basin during the sampling period.

  18. Identification of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate in the Los Angeles atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eatough, D.J.; White, V.F.; Hansen, L.D.; Eatough, N.L.; Cheney, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical techniques were developed for the collection and determination of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid based on collection of the alkyl sulfate compounds with both denuder tubes and resin sorption beds and analysis of the collected material by ion chromatography. Gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid were identified in Los Angeles using these techniques. The data indicate that dimethyl sulfate is present in both particles and in the gas phase. The concentration of gas-phase methyl sulfates was found to be several micrograms/cu m. These species thus account for a significant fraction of the total sulfur budget in the Los Angeles Basin during the sample period.

  19. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  20. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions. PMID:27610853

  1. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions.

  2. Gas-phase water-mediated equilibrium between methylglyoxal and its geminal diol.

    PubMed

    Axson, Jessica L; Takahashi, Kaito; De Haan, David O; Vaida, Veronica

    2010-04-13

    In aqueous solution, aldehydes, and to a lesser extent ketones, hydrate to form geminal diols. We investigate the hydration of methylglyoxal (MG) in the gas phase, a process not previously considered to occur in water-restricted environments. In this study, we spectroscopically identified methylglyoxal diol (MGD) and obtained the gas-phase partial pressures of MG and MGD. These results, in conjunction with the relative humidity, were used to obtain the equilibrium constant, K(P), for the water-mediated hydration of MG in the gas phase. The Gibbs free energy for this process, DeltaG(o), obtained as a result, suggests a larger than expected gas-phase diol concentration. This may have significant implications for understanding the role of organics in atmospheric chemistry.

  3. Recent developments in phasing and structure refinement for macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Paul D.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Read, Randy J.; Richardson, Jane S.; Richardson, David C.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Central to crystallographic structure solution is obtaining accurate phases in order to build a molecular model, ultimately followed by refinement of that model to optimize its fit to the experimental diffraction data and prior chemical knowledge. Recent advances in phasing and model refinement and validation algorithms make it possible to arrive at better electron density maps and more accurate models. PMID:19700309

  4. Structure of Palladium Nanoclusters for Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, K.J.; Ingham, B.; Toney, M.F.; Brown, S.A.; Lassesson, A.; /SLAC, SSRL /Canterbury U.

    2009-05-11

    Palladium nanoclusters produced by inert gas aggregation/magnetron sputtering are used as building blocks for the construction of nano electronic devices with large surface to volume ratios that can be used as sensitive hydrogen gas sensors in fuel cells and in petrochemical plants. X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to characterize the structure, lattice constant, particle diameter and oxide thickness of the palladium nanoclusters in order to understand the operation of these sensors. Grazing incidence XRD (GIXRD) of heat treated Pd clusters has shown that the palladanite structure forms at elevated temperatures.

  5. High pressure structural phase transitions of PbPo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencherif, Y.; Boukra, A.; Zaoui, A.; Ferhat, M.

    2012-09-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate the high pressure phase transitions and dynamical properties of the less known lead polonium compound. The calculated ground state parameters for the NaCl phase show good agreement with the experimental data. The obtained results show that the intermediate phase transition for this compound is the orthorhombic Pnma phase. The PbPo undergoes from the rocksalt to Pnma phase at 4.20 GPa. Further structural phase transition from intermediate to CsCl phase has been found at 8.5 GPa. In addition, phonon dispersion spectra were derived from linear-response to density functional theory. In particular, we show that the dynamical properties of PbPo exhibit some peculiar features compared to other III-V compounds. Finally, thermodynamics properties have been also addressed from quasiharmonic approximation.

  6. A DMPA Langmuir monolayer study: from gas to solid phase. An atomistic description by molecular dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Giner-Casares, J J; Camacho, L; Martín-Romero, M T; Cascales, J J López

    2008-03-01

    In this work, a DMPA Langmuir monolayer at the air/water interface was studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, an atomistic picture of a Langmuir monolayer was drawn from its expanded gas phase to its final solid condensed one. In this sense, some properties of monolayers that were traditionally poorly or even not reproduced in computer simulations, such as lipid domain formation or pressure-area per lipid isotherm, were properly reproduced in this work. Thus, the physical laws that control the lipid domain formation in the gas phase and the structure of lipid monolayers from the gas to solid condensed phase were studied. Thanks to the atomistic information provided by the molecular dynamics simulations, we were able to add valuable information to the experimental description of these processes and to access experimental data related to the lipid monolayers in their expanded phase, which is difficult or inaccessible to study by experimental techniques. In this sense, properties such as lipids head hydration and lipid structure were studied.

  7. A DMPA Langmuir monolayer study: from gas to solid phase. An atomistic description by molecular dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Giner-Casares, J J; Camacho, L; Martín-Romero, M T; Cascales, J J López

    2008-03-01

    In this work, a DMPA Langmuir monolayer at the air/water interface was studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, an atomistic picture of a Langmuir monolayer was drawn from its expanded gas phase to its final solid condensed one. In this sense, some properties of monolayers that were traditionally poorly or even not reproduced in computer simulations, such as lipid domain formation or pressure-area per lipid isotherm, were properly reproduced in this work. Thus, the physical laws that control the lipid domain formation in the gas phase and the structure of lipid monolayers from the gas to solid condensed phase were studied. Thanks to the atomistic information provided by the molecular dynamics simulations, we were able to add valuable information to the experimental description of these processes and to access experimental data related to the lipid monolayers in their expanded phase, which is difficult or inaccessible to study by experimental techniques. In this sense, properties such as lipids head hydration and lipid structure were studied. PMID:18225932

  8. Theoretical study on the properties of linear and cyclic amides in gas phase and water solution.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Martínez, S; Hall, K R; Balbuena, P B

    2006-07-27

    The structural and energetic properties of a group of selected amides, of well-known importance for the design of efficient clathrate inhibitors, are calculated with Hartree-Fock and density functional theory, B3LYP, theoretical levels, and a 6-311++g** basis set in the gas phase and a water solution. The conformational behavior of the molecules is studied through the scanning of the torsional potential energy surfaces and by the analysis of the differences in the energetic and structural properties between the isomers. The properties of the amides in water solution are determined within a self-consistent reaction field approach with a polarizable continuum model that allows the calculation of the different contributions to the free energy of solvation. The calculated barriers to rotation are in good agreement with the available experimental data and the comparison of the gas and water results shows the strong effect of the solute polarization. The properties of different amide-water complexes are calculated and compared with available experimental information.

  9. Phase Transitions and Domain Structures in Nanoferroelectrics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanyuk, Arkadi

    2006-03-01

    A review of the Landau-type theory of size effects in ferroelectric phase transitions will be presented. An aspect of this theory, a question about the ``critical thickness'' of ferroelectric thin films will be the main emphasis. This question can be reduced to that of the size dependence of temperature of ferroelectric phase transition by taking into account two possibilities for such a transition: formation of (i) single- or (ii) multi-domain ferroelectric state. In a defect-free sample, two factors would define which of these possibilities is realized: the depolarizing field and the specific features of the sample surface reflected in the boundary conditions for the Landau-type equations in addition to the conventional electrodynamics boundary conditions. The possibility of the transition into the single domain state strongly depends on a character of electrodes and the additional boundary conditions, while it is much less important for the multi-domain case. In realistic conditions, the transition would proceed into the multi-domain state, especially in near cubic ferroelectrics, e.g. films of cubic perovskites with an elastic mismatch between the film and a substrate. Importantly, the shift of a transition temperature with respect to a bulk is relatively small in this case. The message is that, while studying the question about the ``critical thickness'', multi-domain states rather than single domain ones should be considered first of all, contrary to the approach in some recent papers where only monodomain state was studied.. In particular, there is no definite indication of ultimate ``critical thickness'' for a multi domain ferroelectric state in nearly cubic samples. Along with ultra thin films the ferroelectric nanopowders are also intensively studied now. Here the size effects are more complicated because of long-range interaction between the particles. The problems which the theory faces here are briefly commented upon. It is worth mentioning that

  10. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  11. Scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho

    1993-01-01

    A scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity, based on the dominant physical mechanism, was carried out with the goal of predicting the gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe under conditions of microgravity. The results demonstrated the effect of inlet geometry on the flow regime transition. A comparison of the predictions with existing experimental data showed good agreement.

  12. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  13. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  14. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoıˆt

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  15. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  16. Optical pyrometer based on the gas phase photoacoustic effect.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangling; Diebold, Gerald J

    2016-05-15

    A photoacoustic cell containing an infrared active gas and equipped with a pair of infrared transmitting windows that alternately views two bodies at different temperatures through a pair of chopping wheels acts as a differential detector of the radiation emitted by the two bodies. A theory for the photoacoustic signal shows that the device acts to monitor the difference in the incidances between the two bodies integrated over the absorptions of the gas in the cell. Experiments are reported showing that the response of the pyrometer depends on the relative temperatures of heated bodies, the absorption coefficient of the gas in the cell, and the modulation frequency of the chopping wheels. The instrument is shown to be a sensitive detector of a null in the integrated incidance of the two bodies. PMID:27176967

  17. Reactions of metal cluster anions with inorganic and organic molecules in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-07-28

    The study of gas phase ion-molecule reactions by state-of-the-art mass spectrometric experiments in conjunction with quantum chemistry calculations offers an opportunity to clarify the elementary steps and mechanistic details of bond activation and conversion processes. In the past few decades, a considerable number of publications have been devoted to the ion-molecule reactions of metal clusters, the experimentally and theoretically tractable models for the active phase of condensed phase systems. The focus of this perspective concerns progress on activation and transformation of important inorganic and organic molecules by negatively charged metal clusters. The metal cluster anions cover bare metal clusters as well as ligated systems with oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, among others. The following important issues have been summarized and discussed: (i) dependence of chemical reactivity and selectivity on cluster structures and sizes, metals and metal oxidation states, odd-even electron numbers, etc. and (ii) effects of doping, ligation, and pre-adsorption on the reactivity of metal clusters toward rather inert molecules. PMID:27346242

  18. Graphitic carbon nitride as high-resolution stationary phase for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunzhong; Qi, Meiling; Fu, Ruonong

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the first example of utilization of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as stationary phase for capillary gas chromatographic (GC) separations. The statically coated g-C3N4 column showed the column efficiencies of 3760 plates/m and weak polarity. Its resolving capability and retention behaviours were investigated by using the Grob test mixture, and mixtures of diverse types of analytes, and structural and positional isomers. The results showed superior separation performance of the g-C3N4 stationary phase for some critical analytes and preferential retention for aromatic analytes. Specifically, it exhibited high-resolution capability for aromatic and aliphatic isomers such as methylnaphthalenes and dimethylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene and anthracene and alkane isomers. In addition, g-C3N4 column showed excellent thermal stability up to 280°C and good repeatability with relative standard deviation (RSD) values less than 0.09% for intra-day, below 0.23% for inter-day and in the range of 1.9-8.4% for between-column, respectively. The advantageous separation performance shows the potential of g-C3N4 and related materials as stationary phase in GC and other separation technologies.

  19. Preparation and study of the Fe sub 2 sup + -benzyne ion in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongqing; Freiser, B.S. )

    1990-03-07

    The results of a study of the preparation and reactivity of the Fe{sup +}{sub 2}-benzyne ion in the gas phase is reported herein. This study continues the investigation into the reactivity of transition-metal dinuclear ions as compared with their constituent monoatomic ionic species. The enhanced reactivity of Fe{sup +}{sub 2}-benzyne over the Fe{sub 2}{sup +} is thought to be due to two effects: (1) the ligand polarizes or in some way changes the electronic structure of the metal center to prevent oxidative addition and (2) the combination of the highly unsaturated benzyne ligand provides a very efficient pathway for further reaction steps following initial metal center oxidative insertion. 24 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic stability of zwitterionic histidine: Effects of gas phase hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Sik; Kim, Ju-Young; Han, Yuna; Shim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Sungyul

    2015-09-01

    We present calculations for histidine-(H2O)n (n = 0-6) to examine the effects of micro-hydrating water molecules on the relative stability of the zwitterionic vs. canonical forms of histidine. We calculate the structures and Gibbs free energies of the conformers at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We find that six water molecules are required to produce the thermodynamically stable histidine zwitterion. By calculating the barriers of canonical ↔ zwitterionic transformation, we predict that both the most stable canonical and zwitterionic forms of histidine-(H2O)6 may be observed in low temperature gas phase environment.

  1. Moisture effects on greenhouse gases generation in nitrifying gas-phase compost biofilters.

    PubMed

    Maia, Guilherme D N; Day, George B; Gates, Richard S; Taraba, Joseph L; Coyne, Mark S

    2012-06-01

    Gas-phase compost biofilters are extensively used in concentrated animal feeding operations to remove odors and, in some cases, ammonia from air sources. The expected biochemical pathway for these predominantly aerobic systems is nitrification. However, non-uniform media with low oxygen levels can shift biofilter microbial pathways to denitrification, a source of greenhouse gases. Several factors contribute to the formation of anoxic/anaerobic zones: media aging, media and particle structure, air velocity distribution, compaction, biofilm thickness, and moisture content (MC) distribution. The present work studies the effects of media moisture conditions on ammonia (NH(3)) removal and greenhouse gas generation (nitrous oxide, N(2)O and methane, CH(4)) for gas-phase compost biofilters subject to a 100-day controlled drying process. Continuous recordings were made for the three gases and water vapor (2.21-h sampling cycle, each cycle consisted of three gas species, and water vapor, for a total of 10,050 data points). Media moisture conditions were classified into three corresponding media drying rate (DR) stages: Constant DR (wetter media), falling DR, and stable-dry system. The first-half of the constant DR period (0-750 h; MC=65-52%, w.b.) facilitated high NH(3) removal rates, but higher N(2)O generation and no CH(4) generation. At the drier stages of the constant DR (750-950 h; MC=52-48%, w.b.) NH(3) removal remained high but N(2)O net generation decreased to near zero. In the falling DR stage (1200-1480 h; MC=44-13%) N(2)O generation decreased, CH(4) increased, and NH(3) was no longer removed. No ammonia removal or greenhouse gas generation was observed in the stable-dry system (1500-2500 h; MC=13%). These results indicate that media should remain toward the drier region of the constant DR (in close proximity to the falling DR stage; MC=50%, approx.), to maintain high levels of NH(3) removal, reduced levels of N(2)O generation, and nullify levels of CH(4

  2. A Protocol for Detecting and Scavenging Gas-phase Free Radicals in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Long-Xi; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Freed, Jack H.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with human cancers. It has been reported that most of the lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking 5,6,7,12. Although tobacco tars and related products in the particle phase of cigarette smoke are major causes of carcinogenic and mutagenic related diseases, cigarette smoke contains significant amounts of free radicals that are also considered as an important group of carcinogens9,10. Free radicals attack cell constituents by damaging protein structure, lipids and DNA sequences and increase the risks of developing various types of cancers. Inhaled radicals produce adducts that contribute to many of the negative health effects of tobacco smoke in the lung3. Studies have been conducted to reduce free radicals in cigarette smoke to decrease risks of the smoking-induced damage. It has been reported that haemoglobin and heme-containing compounds could partially scavenge nitric oxide, reactive oxidants and carcinogenic volatile nitrosocompounds of cigarette smoke4. A 'bio-filter' consisted of haemoglobin and activated carbon was used to scavenge the free radicals and to remove up to 90% of the free radicals from cigarette smoke14. However, due to the cost-ineffectiveness, it has not been successfully commercialized. Another study showed good scavenging efficiency of shikonin, a component of Chinese herbal medicine8. In the present study, we report a protocol for introducing common natural antioxidant extracts into the cigarette filter for scavenging gas phase free radicals in cigarette smoke and measurement of the scavenge effect on gas phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) using spin-trapping Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Spectroscopy1,2,14. We showed high scavenging capacity of lycopene and grape seed extract which could point to their future application in cigarette filters. An important advantage of these prospective scavengers is that they can be obtained in large quantities from byproducts of tomato or wine

  3. A protocol for detecting and scavenging gas-phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Xi; Dzikovski, Boris G; Freed, Jack H

    2012-01-02

    Cigarette smoking is associated with human cancers. It has been reported that most of the lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking (5,6,7,12). Although tobacco tars and related products in the particle phase of cigarette smoke are major causes of carcinogenic and mutagenic related diseases, cigarette smoke contains significant amounts of free radicals that are also considered as an important group of carcinogens(9,10). Free radicals attack cell constituents by damaging protein structure, lipids and DNA sequences and increase the risks of developing various types of cancers. Inhaled radicals produce adducts that contribute to many of the negative health effects of tobacco smoke in the lung(3). Studies have been conducted to reduce free radicals in cigarette smoke to decrease risks of the smoking-induced damage. It has been reported that haemoglobin and heme-containing compounds could partially scavenge nitric oxide, reactive oxidants and carcinogenic volatile nitrosocompounds of cigarette smoke(4). A 'bio-filter' consisted of haemoglobin and activated carbon was used to scavenge the free radicals and to remove up to 90% of the free radicals from cigarette smoke(14). However, due to the cost-ineffectiveness, it has not been successfully commercialized. Another study showed good scavenging efficiency of shikonin, a component of Chinese herbal medicine(8). In the present study, we report a protocol for introducing common natural antioxidant extracts into the cigarette filter for scavenging gas phase free radicals in cigarette smoke and measurement of the scavenge effect on gas phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) using spin-trapping Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Spectroscopy(1,2,14). We showed high scavenging capacity of lycopene and grape seed extract which could point to their future application in cigarette filters. An important advantage of these prospective scavengers is that they can be obtained in large quantities from byproducts of

  4. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shenyang; Burkes, Douglas E.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Xu, Zhijie

    2016-10-01

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was developed. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn't cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along <110> directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along <110> directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  5. Fluid and structural measurements to advance gas turbine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, the current status of fluid and structural measurements is reviewed, and some potential improvements in gas turbine machinery, directly associated with the new measuring capability are discussed. Some considerations concerning the impact of the new capability on the methods and approaches that will be used in the further development of advanced technology, in general, and to aeropropulsion gas turbine machinery, in particular, are presented.

  6. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  7. Investigations of pressure induced structural phase transformations in pentaerythritol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Nandini; Sharma, Surinder M.; Sikka, S. K.

    2005-10-01

    We have investigated the pressure induced structural changes in pentaerythritol {2,2-bis-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol} with the help of X-ray diffraction studies. Our results show that this compound undergoes transformations to a lower symmetry phase between 5.2-5.9 GPa. It further undergoes phase transformations at ˜8.5 and ˜11 GPa; eventually evolving to a disordered phase beyond 14-15 GPa in agreement with our earlier Raman studies. On release of pressure from 18.5 GPa, the compound transforms back to the initial tetragonal phase.

  8. Pattern formation arising from condensation of a homogeneous gas into a binary, phase-separating liquid.

    PubMed

    Pooley, C M; Balazs, Anna C; Yeomans, J M

    2005-08-01

    We examine the nucleated growth of a binary, immiscible liquid drop within a homogeneous gas. The system couples the growth of the liquid drop with the phase separation of the immiscible components and, thus, can potentially reveal novel pattern formation. To carry out this study, we first characterize the thermodynamic properties of the system in terms of an appropriate Ginzburg-Landau free energy density. By minimizing this free energy, we construct the equilibrium phase diagram for the system. We then use a lattice Boltzmann algorithm to solve the hydrodynamic equations describing the dynamical evolution of the fluid. We observe intriguing tentaclelike structures within the nucleation and growth regime and explore how the formation of these structures depends on the thermodynamic and transport properties of the system. We give scaling laws describing domain growth in both the diffusion- and flow-limited regimes. The results highlight the novel physics that can emerge when there is interplay between the ordering of a density and a concentration field.

  9. Gas phase dispersion in a small rotary kiln

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1981-07-01

    A study was made of nonideal flow of gas in a rotary kiln reactor. A rotating tube 0.165 m in diameter by 2.17 m long, with internal lifting flights, was operated at room temperature. Rotational speeds from 2.0 to 7.0 rpm, air flow rates from 0.351 to 4.178 m/sup 3//h, and solid contents of 0.0, 5.1, and 15.3% of tube volume were studied. Residence time distribution of the gas was measured by means of the pulse injection technique using a helium tracer. A model was developed based on dispersive flow that exchanges with a deadwater region. Two parameters, a dispersion number describing bulk gas flow and an interchange factor describing exchange between the flow region and the gas trapped in the solids bed, were sufficient to correlate the data, but these parameters are sensitive to experimental error. The model is applicable to analysis of other flow systems, such as packed beds.

  10. Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

  11. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions. PMID:26099988

  12. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions.

  13. Gas phase condensation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica nanoparticles - control of the intraparticle phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötzel, C.; Kurland, H.-D.; Grabow, J.; Müller, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a γ-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to γ-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis.Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs

  14. Control of gas phase nanoparticle shape and its effect on MRI relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktaş, Sıtkı; Thornton, Stuart C.; Binns, Chris; Lari, Leonardo; Pratt, Andrew; Kröger, Roland; Horsfield, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    We have used a sputtering gas aggregation source to produce Fe@FeO nanoparticles with different shapes, by annealing them at different temperatures in the gas phase. Without annealing, the most common shape found for the nanoparticles is cubic but annealing the nanoparticles at 1129 °C transforms the cubes into cuboctahedra. Measurements of the MRI relaxivity show that the cubic nanoparticles have a higher performance by a factor of two, which is attributed to a higher saturation magnetization for this shape. This indicates that the shape-control enabled by gas-phase synthesis is important for obtaining optimal performance in applications.

  15. A pressure cell for nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of gas phases

    SciTech Connect

    Minzer, M.; Bradley, J. A.; Musgrave, R.; Seidler, G. T.; Skilton, A.

    2008-08-15

    We report the design and performance of a gas-phase sample cell for measurements of momentum transfer (q) dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS). NRIXS measurements from He gas at 2 MPa (20 bars) readily demonstrate dipole-allowed and dipole-forbidden final states for two-electron excitations. Direct comparison of gas-phase NRIXS measurements with the corresponding nonresonant electron energy loss spectroscopy results (EELS) will be a valuable method for characterizing systematic errors in either technique for studies that require absolute normalization of the double differential cross section.

  16. Initiation of the ice phase by marine biogenic surfaces in supersaturated gas and supercooled aqueous phases.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Peter A; Aller, Josephine Y; Knopf, Daniel A

    2011-11-28

    Biogenic particles have the potential to affect the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere with subsequent consequences for the hydrological cycle and climate. We present laboratory observations of heterogeneous ice nucleation in immersion and deposition modes under atmospherically relevant conditions initiated by Nannochloris atomus and Emiliania huxleyi, marine phytoplankton with structurally and chemically distinct cell walls. Temperatures at which freezing, melting, and water uptake occur are observed using optical microscopy. The intact and fragmented unarmoured cells of N. atomus in aqueous NaCl droplets enhance ice nucleation by 10-20 K over the homogeneous freezing limit and can be described by a modified water activity based ice nucleation approach. E. huxleyi cells covered by calcite plates do not enhance droplet freezing temperatures. Both species nucleate ice in the deposition mode at an ice saturation ratio, S(ice), as low as ~1.2 and below 240 K, however, for each, different nucleation modes occur at warmer temperatures. These observations show that markedly different biogenic surfaces have both comparable and contrasting effects on ice nucleation behaviour depending on the presence of the aqueous phase and the extent of supercooling and water vapour supersaturation. We derive heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, J(het), and cumulative ice nuclei spectra, K, for quantification and analysis using time-dependent and time-independent approaches, respectively. Contact angles, α, derived from J(het)via immersion freezing depend on T, a(w), and S(ice). For deposition freezing, α can be described as a function of S(ice) only. The different approaches yield different predictions of atmospheric ice crystal numbers primarily due to the time evolution allowed for the time-dependent approach with implications for the evolution of mixed-phase and ice clouds.

  17. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  18. Pore network modeling of two-phase flow in a liquid-(disconnected) gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Maria C.; Araujo, Mariela; Lago, Marcelo E.

    2007-02-01

    The appropriate description of two-phase flow in some systems requires a detailed analysis of the fundamental equations of flow and transport including momentum transfer between fluid phases. In the particular case of two-phase flow of oil and gas through porous media, when the gas phase is present as disconnected bubbles, there are inconsistencies in calculated flow properties derived by using the conventional Darcean description. In a two-phase system, the motion of one fluid phase may induce significant changes in the mobility of the second phase, as known from the generalized transport equations derived by Whitaker and Kalaydjian. The relevance of such coupling coefficients with respect to the conventional relative permeability term in two-phase Darcean flow is evaluated in this work for an oil-(disconnected) gas system. The study was performed using a new Pore Network Simulator specially designed for this case. Results considering both, Darcy's equation and generalized flow equations suggest that the four transport coefficients (effective permeabilities and coupling coefficients) are needed for a proper description of the macroscopic flow in a liquid-disconnected gas system.

  19. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  20. Comment on "Pairing and phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas".

    PubMed

    Zwierlein, Martin W; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Partridge et al. (Reports, 27 January 2006, p. 503) reported pairing and phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas. We argue that it is not possible to distinguish the superfluid from the normal regimes in the presented data, or to discern which clouds were phase-separated. Some of the reported conclusions are inconsistent with recent experiments.

  1. Are gas-phase models of interstellar chemistry tenable? The case of methanol.

    PubMed

    Garrod, Robin; Park, In Hee; Caselli, Paola; Herbst, Eric

    2006-01-01

    We consider the case of methanol production in cold dark clouds, also known as quiescent cores, for which recent work shows that a purely gas-phase synthesis is unlikely to produce a sufficient amount to explain the observational fractional abundance of approximately 10(-9). Moreover, recent experiments appear to confirm a previous hypothesis that methanol can be formed on cold grain surfaces by the hydrogenation of CO via successive reactions with hydrogen atoms. In this paper we consider two ways of including the surface formation of methanol into chemical models of cold dark clouds. First, we use a gas-phase model and artificially include the surface formation of methanol in the same manner that the formation of molecular hydrogen is included. Secondly, we utilize a gas-grain code with a new mechanism for desorption following exothermic chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The latter method can reproduce the observed fractional abundance of gas-phase methanol and many other gas-phase species in the well-studied cold dark cloud TMC1-CP but the best fit to the observational data occurs at times significantly later than at ages estimated from gas-phase models.

  2. Formation of Structured Water and Gas Hydrate by the Use of Xenon Gas in Vegetable Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toru; Kawagoe, Yoshinori; Makino, Yoshio; Oshita, Seiichi

    Freezing is a valuable technique for food preservation. However, vegetables are known to be softening remarkably after freezing and thawing process. It is expected to find alternative technique instead of freezing. Recently, the application of structured water and/or gas hydrate had been attempted to prolong the preservation of vegetable. In this study, the formation process of structure water and/or gas hydrate in pure water and carrot tissue was investigated by using NMR relaxation times, T1 and T2, of which applying condition was up to 0.4MPa and 0.8MPa at 5oC. Under the pressure of 0.4MPa, no gas hydrate was appeared, however, at 0.8MPa, formation of gas hydrate was recognized in both water and carrot tissue. Once the gas hydrate formation process in carrot tissue started, T1 and T2 increased remarkably. After that, as the gas hydrate developed, then T1 and T2 turned to decrease. Since this phenomenon was not observed in pure water, it is suggested that behavior of NMR relaxation time just after the formation of gas hydrate in carrot tissue may be peculiar to compartment system such as inter and intracellular spaces.

  3. Experimental parameters affecting hypercoulometric response in gas-phase coulometry.

    PubMed

    Ciccioli, P; Hayes, J M

    1985-01-01

    The response of an electron-capture detector designed for coulometric response was examined as a function of solute, pulse interval, carrier-gas type, solute amount, carrier-gas flow rate, and chromatographic-peak profile. For CCl3F, it was shown that the average numbers of electrons absorbed per molecule ranged from 1.0 to 4.1, varying primarily with pulse interval but also displaying a complex dependence on sample amount. Comparison of these results with theoretical expectations leads to the conclusion that a 1:1 "coulometric response" may not be observed under certain operating conditions. Because the specific conditions required depend on many variables, including, to some extent, sample amount, true coulometric operation of an electron-capture detector is difficult to establish and maintain. Effects which may contribute to the production of hypercoulometric response are critically discussed.

  4. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  5. A Phase-Field Method for Simulating Fluid-Structure Interactions in Multi-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoning; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    We investigate two-phase flow instabilities by numerical simulations of fluid structure interactions in two-phase flow. The first case is a flexible pipe conveying two fluids, which exhibits self-sustained oscillations at high Reynolds number and tension related parameter. Well-defined two-phase flow patterns, i.e., slug flow and bubbly flow, are observed. The second case is external two-phase cross flow past a circular cylinder, which induces a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability due to density stratification. We solve the Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the structure equation in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) framework. For the fluid solver, a spectral/hp element method is employed for spatial discretization and backward differentiation for time discretization. For the structure solver, a Galerkin method is used in Lagrangian coordinates for spatial discretization and the Newmark- β scheme for time discretization.

  6. A high phase-space-density gas of polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Ni, K-K; Ospelkaus, S; de Miranda, M H G; Pe'er, A; Neyenhuis, B; Zirbel, J J; Kotochigova, S; Julienne, P S; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2008-10-10

    A quantum gas of ultracold polar molecules, with long-range and anisotropic interactions, not only would enable explorations of a large class of many-body physics phenomena but also could be used for quantum information processing. We report on the creation of an ultracold dense gas of potassium-rubidium (40K87Rb) polar molecules. Using a single step of STIRAP (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) with two-frequency laser irradiation, we coherently transfer extremely weakly bound KRb molecules to the rovibrational ground state of either the triplet or the singlet electronic ground molecular potential. The polar molecular gas has a peak density of 10(12) per cubic centimeter and an expansion-determined translational temperature of 350 nanokelvin. The polar molecules have a permanent electric dipole moment, which we measure with Stark spectroscopy to be 0.052(2) Debye (1 Debye = 3.336 x 10(-30) coulomb-meters) for the triplet rovibrational ground state and 0.566(17) Debye for the singlet rovibrational ground state.

  7. Possible Structural Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgun, Engin; Sahin, Hasan; Peeters, Francois

    2014-03-01

    Most of the the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) have graphene-like hexagonal crystal structure which are composed of metal atom layers (M) sandwiched between layers of chalcogen atoms (X) and these structures have MX2 stoichiometry. Chalcogen layers can be stacked on top of each other in two different forms: H phase made of trigonal prismatic holes for metal atoms and T phase that consists staggered chalcogen layers forming octahedral holes for metals. Among the TMDs that have been reported to be stable, individual layers of MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2 have 1H structure in their ground state while dichalcogens of Ti, V and Ta prefer the 1T phase. In our study we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying for the possible phase transitions in TMDs. Our calculations based on first-principles techniques reveal that in addition to H and T phases various distorted H and T phases can be also stabilized by point defects. These new phases have entirely different electronic properties.

  8. Spray characterization and gas phase interaction downstream of a simplified atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebrard, P.; Trichet, P.; Millan, P.

    1992-07-01

    A detailed study of the flowfield produced by a simplified airblast atomizer was performed. This atomizer consists of an annular liquid sheet introduced into coflowing nonswirling and swirling air flow fields. Droplet size and velocity were measured in the resultant spray using a two components Phase/Doppler Particle Analyzer. A complete set of measurements was obtained at axial locations from 8 mm to 150 mm downstream from the nozzle. Laser velocimetry was also employed to measure the gas phase properties. The effect of swirl on droplet transport process is examined for this type of airblast atomizer and the results demonstrate the strong influence the spray has on the gas phase.

  9. Development and Evaluation of Gold-Centered Monolayer Protected Nanoparticle Stationary Phases for Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Gwen M.; Grate, Jay W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2004-12-10

    The current status for the development of novel open-tubular gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases consists of thin films of gold-centered monolayer protected nanoparticles (MPNs) is reported. Dodecanethiol MPNs, in which the monolayer is dodecanethiol linked to the gold nanoparticle, have shown great promise as a GC stationary phase with efficient columns having been produced in a variety of capillary i.d.'s with stationary phase film depths ranging from 10-60 nm, +/- 2 nm at a given film depth. Stationary phase operational parameters are discussed including maximum operating temperature, sample capacity, and stationary phase lifetime and robustness.

  10. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  11. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  12. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  13. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 2, User`s manual for CASCADR8

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Been, K.B.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. This is volume two to the CASCADER series, titled CASCADR8. It embodies the concepts presented in volume one of this series. To properly understand how the CASCADR8 model works, the reader should read volume one first. This volume presents the input and output file structure for CASCADR8, and a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas.

  14. Two-phase turbine engines. [using gas-liquid mixture accelerated in nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.; Hays, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a two-phase turbine which utilizes a uniform mixture of gas and liquid accelerated in nozzles of the types reported by Elliott and Weinberg (1968). The mixture acts directly on an axial flow or tangential impulse turbine or is separated into gas and liquid streams which operate separately on a gas turbine and a hydraulic turbine. The basic two-phase cycles are examined, taking into account working fluids, aspects of nozzle expansion, details of turbine cycle operation, and the effect of mixture ratio variation. Attention is also given to two-phase nozzle efficiency, two-phase turbine operating characteristics and efficiencies, separator turbines, and impulse turbine experiments.

  15. Dynamic phase equilibrium during formation and dissociation of marine gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Lowell, R. P.; Germanovich, L.

    2002-12-01

    Methane gas hydrate (MGH) is stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those in the marine sediments near continental margins. Much attention has been focused on related issues of MGH as a potential energy resource, a possible role in submarine sediment failure, and an agent in global climate change. Particularly, there has been controversy over whether and how methane released from dissociating marine gas hydrate makes its way to the ocean and the atmosphere. Despite its apparent importance, a comprehensive understanding of how a marine MGH system dynamically adjusts itself in a changing environment is still absent. A robust theory describing phase balance and dynamic equilibrium is a necessary step toward a better understanding of the dynamic behaviors of MGH systems. We have developed a method to determine the balance and equilibrium of a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) gas hydrate system. Analysis shows that there are dynamic feedbacks between MGH formation/dissociation and changes in pressure, temperature and salinity. A few important observations of this study are: 1) formation of brine with gas hydrate, 2) development of water-limited situation in certain circumstances, 3) broad region of coexisting three phases of hydrate, liquid and free gas, and 4) significant over pressurization due to MGH dissociation. It is also found that 1) free gas is able to migrate through gas hydrate stability zone, 2) a layer of coexisting hydrate, liquid and free gas can resides below the BSR, and 3) significant excess pore pressure can be built up within the three-phase zone resulting from either continuous sedimentation, seafloor temperature increase, or sea level drop. We will discuss their implications to marine gas hydrate systems. The meanings of BSR and BHSZ (base of hydrate stability zone) in the context of these new findings will be discussed.

  16. Correlation between gas permeability and pore structure of coal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, J.; Gao, F.; Li, Y.; Niu, H.; Gao, H.

    2012-04-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in unminable coal seams represents a promising option for CO2 geologic storage, because the injected CO2 may enhance coalbed methane recovery (CO2-ECBM), which could partly offset the costs of the storage process. The CO2-ECBM technology is based on the relative affinity of CO2 and CH4 to coals under given pressure and temperature conditions. The excess sorption capacity of coals for CO2 is generally higher than the sorption capacity for methane. The coal seams are characterized by a dual porosity structure including cleat and matrix pores. The cleats in the coal seams are considered as highways for gas and water flow, while the matrix is the storage location of gas by adsorption. The slow transport process of gas in coal matrix may constrain the efficiency of the displacement of CH4 by CO2 due to the compacted pore structure of the coal matrix. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the correlation between permeability of gas and pore structure in coal matrix is crucial for the CO2-ECBM processes. Yangquan coals originating from the Qingshui basin, which contains gas-rich coals in China, were selected for the tests in this study. Yangquan coals are classified as anthracite. In order to avoid the influence of coal cleats on fluid flow, small coal plugs (~6 mm in diameter, ~13 mm in length) were selected and fixed in the sample compartment by special glue. A test system for simultaneously measuring adsorption-porosity-permeability on the coal matrix blocks in its free state is constructed. The permeability of gas and porosity in coal plugs to He under different gas pressure and temperature conditions were simultaneously investigated. The permeability and excess sorption capacity of the coal plugs to He, N2, CH4 and CO2 were compared at a constant gas pressure and temperature. It is expected that gas break through a cleat-plug is much faster than that through a coal matrix-plug. Different sample plugs with the different pore structure results

  17. Photoisomerization action spectrum of retinal protonated Schiff base in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, N. J. A.; Catani, K. J.; Adamson, B. D.; Wille, U.; Bieske, E. J.

    2014-04-28

    The photophysical behaviour of the isolated retinal protonated n-butylamine Schiff base (RPSB) is investigated in the gas phase using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The RPSB cations are introduced by electrospray ionisation into an ion mobility mass spectrometer where they are exposed to tunable laser radiation in the region of the S{sub 1} ← S{sub 0} transition (420–680 nm range). Four peaks are observed in the arrival time distribution of the RPSB ions. On the basis of predicted collision cross sections with nitrogen gas, the dominant peak is assigned to the all-trans isomer, whereas the subsidiary peaks are assigned to various single, double and triple cis geometric isomers. RPSB ions that absorb laser radiation undergo photoisomerization, leading to a detectable change in their drift speed. By monitoring the photoisomer signal as a function of laser wavelength an action spectrum, extending from 480 to 660 nm with a clear peak at 615 ± 5 nm, is obtained. The photoisomerization action spectrum is related to the absorption spectrum of isolated retinal RPSB molecules and should help benchmark future electronic structure calculations.

  18. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)-CO-N2-noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system.

  19. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)−CO−N2−noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system. PMID:26039983

  20. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)-CO-N2-noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system. PMID:26039983