Science.gov

Sample records for gas poor transition

  1. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  2. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  3. Circumgalactic gas absorption in extremely metal-poor dwarf dalaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filho, M. E.; Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz Tuñón, C.

    2017-03-01

    Accretion of metal-poor gas via cold accretion flows has been recently proposed as a means to trigger/sustain star formation in extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies (XMPs), a scenario in agreement with theoretical predictions. We report on the tentative detection of CaII absorption used to trace the conditions of the gas clouds in the halo of the XMP UGCA 20.

  4. Marriage or dissolution? Union transitions among poor cohabiting women.

    PubMed

    Lichter, Daniel T; Qian, Zhenchao; Mellott, Leanna M

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the incentives and barriers to marriage among cohabiting women, especially disadvantaged mothers who are targets of welfare reform. We use the newly released cohabitation data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2000), which tracks the partners of cohabiting women across survey waves. Our results support several conclusions. First, cohabiting unions are short-lived--about one-half end within one year, and over 90% end by the fifth year. Unlike most previous research, our results show that most cohabiting unions end by dissolution of the relationship rather than by marriage. Second, transitions to marriage are especially unlikely among poor women; less than one-third marry within five years. Cohabitation among poor women is more likely than that among nonpoor women to be a long-term alternative or substitute for traditional marriage. Third, our multinomial analysis of transitions from cohabitation into marriage or dissolution highlights the salience of economically disadvantaged family backgrounds, cohabitation and fertility histories, women's economic resources, and partner characteristics. These results are interpreted in a policy environment that increasingly views marriage as an economic panacea for low-income women and their children.

  5. Dust-to-gas Ratio in the Extremely Metal-poor Galaxy I Zw 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Fisher, David B.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Gordon, Karl. D.; Roman-Duval, Julia; Donaldson, Jessica; Meléndez, Marcio; Cannon, John M.

    2012-06-01

    The blue compact dwarf galaxy I Zw 18 is one of the most metal-poor systems known in the local universe (12+log(O/H) = 7.17). In this work we study I Zw 18 using data from Spitzer, Herschel Space Telescope, and IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our data set includes the most sensitive maps of I Zw 18, to date, in both the far-infrared and the CO J = 1 → 0 transition. We use dust emission models to derive a dust mass upper limit of only M dust <= 1.1 × 104 M ⊙ (3σ limit). This upper limit is driven by the non-detection at 160 μm, and it is a factor of 4-10 times smaller than previous estimates (depending on the model used). We also estimate an upper limit to the total dust-to-gas mass ratio of M Dust/M gas <= 5.0 × 10-5. If a linear correlation between the dust-to-gas mass ratio and metallicity (measured as O/H) were to hold, we would expect a ratio of 3.9 × 10-4. We also show that the infrared spectral energy distribution is similar to that of starbursting systems.

  6. HD 100453: A Link Between Gas-Rich Protoplanetary Disks and Gas-Poor Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, K. A.; Grady, C. A.; Hamaguchi, K.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Brittain, S.; Sitko, M.; Carpenter, W. J.; Williams, J. P.; Mathews, G. S.; Williger, G. M.; van Boekel, R.; Carmona, A.; Henning, Th.; van den Ancker, M. E.; Meeus, G.; Chen, X. P.; Petre, R.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2009-05-01

    HD 100453 has an IR spectral energy distribution (SED) which can be fit with a power law plus a blackbody. Previous analysis of the SED suggests that the system is a young Herbig Ae star with a gas-rich, flared disk. We reexamine the evolutionary state of the HD 100453 system by refining its age (based on a candidate low-mass companion) and by examining limits on the disk extent, mass accretion rate, and gas content of the disk environment. We confirm that HD 100453B is a common proper motion companion to HD 100453A, with a spectral type of M4.0V-M4.5V, and derive an age of 10 ± 2 Myr. We find no evidence of mass accretion onto the star. Chandra ACIS-S imagery shows that the Herbig Ae star has L x/L bol and an X-ray spectrum similar to nonaccreting β Pic Moving Group early F stars. Moreover, the disk lacks the conspicuous Fe II emission and excess FUV continuum seen in spectra of actively accreting Herbig Ae stars, and from the FUV continuum, we find the accretion rate is < 1.4 × 10-9 M sun yr-1. A sensitive upper limit to the CO J = 3-2 intensity indicates that the gas in the outer disk is likely optically thin. Assuming a [CO]/[H2] abundance of 1 × 10-4 and a depletion factor of 103, we find that the mass of cold molecular gas is less than ~0.33 M J and that the gas-to-dust ratio is no more than ~4:1 in the outer disk. The combination of a high fractional IR excess luminosity, a relatively old age, an absence of accretion signatures, and an absence of detectable circumstellar molecular gas suggests that the HD 100453 system is in an unusual state of evolution between a gas-rich protoplanetary disk and a gas-poor debris disk.

  7. Extremely metal-poor gas at a redshift of 7.

    PubMed

    Simcoe, Robert A; Sullivan, Peter W; Cooksey, Kathy L; Kao, Melodie M; Matejek, Michael S; Burgasser, Adam J

    2012-12-06

    In typical astrophysical environments, the abundance of heavy elements ranges from 0.001 to 2 times the solar value. Lower abundances have been seen in selected stars in the Milky Way's halo and in two quasar absorption systems at redshift z = 3 (ref. 4). These are widely interpreted as relics from the early Universe, when all gas possessed a primordial chemistry. Before now there have been no direct abundance measurements from the first billion years after the Big Bang, when the earliest stars began synthesizing elements. Here we report observations of hydrogen and heavy-element absorption in a spectrum of a quasar at z =  7.04, when the Universe was just 772 million years old (5.6 per cent of its present age). We detect a large column of neutral hydrogen but no corresponding metals (defined as elements heavier than helium), limiting the chemical abundance to less than 1/10,000 times the solar level if the gas is in a gravitationally bound proto-galaxy, or to less than 1/1,000 times the solar value if it is diffuse and unbound. If the absorption is truly intergalactic, it would imply that the Universe was neither ionized by starlight nor chemically enriched in this neighbourhood at z ≈ 7. If it is gravitationally bound, the inferred abundance is too low to promote efficient cooling, and the system would be a viable site to form the predicted but as yet unobserved massive population III stars.

  8. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  9. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line.

  10. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  11. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    SciTech Connect

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  12. CAUSES OF POOR SEALANT PERFORMANCE IN SOIL-GAS- RESISTANT FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses causes of poor sealant performance in soil-gas-resistant foundations. ealants for radon-resistant foundation construction must seal the gap between concrete sections. odern sealants have such low permeability that seal performance depends only on the permeabil...

  13. The transition from good to poor health: an econometric study of the older population.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Neil J; Denton, Frank T; Robb, A Leslie; Spencer, Byron G

    2004-09-01

    This is a study of the influence of socioeconomic factors on the state of health of older Canadians. Three years of panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics are used to model the transition probabilities between good and poor health. Care is taken to avoid the problem of endogeneity of income in modelling its effects, and to adjust reported income to free it from its strong association with age at the time of the survey. Of particular note are the significant effects found for income, in spite of universal public health care coverage. Significant effects are found also for age, education, and other variables.

  14. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1995-12-31

    The view that natural gas is thermolytic, coming from decomposing organic debris, has remained almost unchallenged for nearly half a century. Disturbing contradictions exist, however: Oil is found at great depth, at temperatures where only gas should exist and oil and gas deposits show no evidence of the thermolytic debris indicative of oil decomposing to gas. Moreover, laboratory attempts to duplicate the composition of natural gas, which is typically between 60 and 95+ wt% methane in C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}, have produced insufficient amounts of methane (10 to 60%). It has been suggested that natural gas may be generated catalytically, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. This talk will discuss experimental results that support this hypothesis. Various transition metals, as pure compounds and in source rocks, will be shown to generate a catalytic gas that is identical to natural gas. Kinetic results suggest robust catalytic activity under moderate catagenetic conditions.

  15. Gas flow with straight transition line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovsiannikov, L V

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on the limiting case of a gas flow when the constant pressure in the surrounding medium is exactly equal to the critical pressure for the given initial state of the gas.

  16. Transition from magma dominant to magma poor rifting along the Nova Scotia Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. H.; Louden, K. E.; Nedimović, M. R.; Whitehead, M.; Farkas, A.; Watremez, L.; Dehler, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Passive margins have been characterized as magma-dominant (volcanic) or magma-poor (non-volcanic). However, the conditions under which margins might switch states are not well understood as they typically have been studied as end member examples in isolation to each other. The Nova Scotia (NS) continental margin, however, offers an opportunity to study the nature of such a transition between the magma-dominant US East Coast margin to the south and the magma-poor Newfoundland margin to the north within a single rift segment. This transition is evidenced by a clear along-strike reduction in features characteristic of syn-rift volcanism from south-to-north along the NS margin, such as the weakening of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly (ECMA) and the coincident disappearance of seaward dipping reflector sequences (SDRS) on multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles. Results from recent industry MCS profiles along and across the margin suggest a potentially narrow magma-dominant to magma-poor along-strike transition between the southern and the central NS margin. Such a transition is broadly consistent with results of several widely-spaced, across-strike ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) wide-angle profiles. In the southern region, the crustal structure exhibits a narrow (~120-km wide) ocean-continent transition (OCT) with a high velocity (7.2 km/s) lower crust, interpreted as a gabbro-rich underplated melt, beneath the SDRS and the ECMA, similar to crustal models across the US East Coast. In contrast, profiles across the central and northern margin contain a much wider OCT (150-200-km wide) underlain by a low velocity mantle layer (7.3-7.9 km/s), interpreted as partially serpentinized olivine, which is similar to the magma-poor Newfoundland margin to the north. However, the central-to-northern OBS profiles also exhibit significant variations within the OCT and the along-strike continuity of these OCT structures is not yet clear. In November 2010, we acquired, in the

  17. Demonstration and evaluation of gas turbine transit buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program was designed to demonstrate and evaluate the operation of gas turbine engines in transit coaches in revenue service compared with diesel powered coaches. The main objective of the program was to accelerate development and commercialization of automotive gas turbines. The benefits from the installation of this engine in a transit coach were expected to be reduced weight, cleaner exhaust emissions, lower noise levels, reduced engine vibration and maintenance requirements, improved reliability and vehicle performance, greater engine braking capability, and superior cold weather starting. Four RTS-II advanced design transit coaches were converted to gas turbine power using engines and transmissions. Development, acceptance, performance and systems tests were performed on the coaches prior to the revenue service demonstration.

  18. Structural and phase transitions of one and two polymer mushrooms in poor solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Using the recently proposed fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations and the corresponding lattice self-consistent field (LSCF) calculations based on the same model system, where multiple occupancy of lattice sites is allowed [Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 4564 (2009); Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 6206 (2010)], we studied the coil-globule transition (CGT) of one-mushroom systems and the fused-separated transition (FST) of two-mushroom systems, where a polymer mushroom is formed by a group of n homopolymer chains each of N segments end-grafted at the same point onto a flat substrate and immersed in a poor solvent. With our soft potential that allows complete particle overlapping, LSCF theory neglecting the system fluctuations/correlations becomes exact in the limit of n → ∞, and FLMC results approach LSCF predictions with increasing n. Using LSCF calculations, we systematically constructed the phase diagrams of one- and two-mushroom systems. A second-order symmetric-asymmetric transition (SAT) was found in the globule state of one-mushroom systems, where the rotational symmetry around the substrate normal passing through the grafting point is broken in each individual configuration but preserved by the degeneracy of different orientations of these asymmetric configurations. Three different states were also found in two-mushroom systems: separated coils, separated globules, and fused globule. We further studied the coupling between FST in two-mushroom systems and CGT and SAT of each mushroom. Finally, direct comparisons between our simulation and theoretical results, without any parameter-fitting, unambiguously and quantitatively revealed the fluctuation/correlation effects on these phase transitions.

  19. Imaging the Elusive H-poor Gas in the High adf Planetary Nebula NGC 6778

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, Jorge; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Monteiro, Hektor; Jones, David; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    We present the first direct image of the high-metallicity gas component in a planetary nebula (NGC 6778), taken with the OSIRIS Blue Tunable Filter centered on the O ii λ4649+50 Å optical recombination lines (ORLs) at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We show that the emission of these faint O ii ORLs is concentrated in the central parts of the planetary nebula and is not spatially coincident either with emission coming from the bright [O iii] λ5007 Å collisionally excited line (CEL) or the bright Hα recombination line. From monochromatic emission line maps taken with VIMOS at the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope, we find that the spatial distribution of the emission from the auroral [O iii] λ4363 line resembles that of the O ii ORLs but differs from nebular [O iii] λ5007 CEL distribution, implying a temperature gradient inside the planetary nebula. The centrally peaked distribution of the O ii emission and the differences with the [O iii] and H i emission profiles are consistent with the presence of an H-poor gas whose origin may be linked to the binarity of the central star. However, determination of the spatial distribution of the ORLs and CELs in other PNe and a comparison of their dynamics are needed to further constrain the geometry and ejection mechanism of the metal-rich (H-poor) component and hence, understand the origin of the abundance discrepancy problem in PNe.

  20. Long-term tillage and drainage influences on greenhouse gas fluxes from a poorly-drained soil of central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive tillage practices and poorly-drained soils of Midwestern USA are the prime reasons for greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes from agriculture. The naturally poorly-drained soils prevalent in this region require subsurface drainage for improved aeration and improved crop productivity. Soil surface GH...

  1. A Culture in Transition: Poor Reading and Writing Ability among Children in South African Townships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretorius, E.; Naude, H.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined factors contributing to poor literacy and numeracy development among black South African children ages 5.5 to 7 years. Findings pointed to a conglomerate of factors, namely inadequate visual-motor integration, poor visual analysis and synthesis, poor fine motor development, and inadequate exposure to mediated reading and…

  2. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  3. No tillage and liming reduce greenhouse gas emissions from poorly drained agricultural soils in Mediterranean regions.

    PubMed

    García-Marco, Sonia; Abalos, Diego; Espejo, Rafael; Vallejo, Antonio; Mariscal-Sancho, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    No tillage (NT) has been associated to increased N2O emission from poorly drained agricultural soils. This is the case for soils with a low permeable Bt horizon, which generates a perched water layer after water addition (via rainfall or irrigation) over a long period of time. Moreover, these soils often have problems of acidity and require liming application to sustain crop productivity; changes in soil pH have large implications for the production and consumption of soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Here, we assessed in a split-plot design the individual and interactive effects of tillage practices (conventional tillage (CT) vs. NT) and liming (Ca-amendment vs. not-amendment) on N2O and CH4 emissions from poorly drained acidic soils, over a field experiment with a rainfed triticale crop. Soil mineral N concentrations, pH, temperature, moisture, water soluble organic carbon, GHG fluxes and denitrification capacity were measured during the experiment. Tillage increased N2O emissions by 68% compared to NT and generally led to higher CH4 emissions; both effects were due to the higher soil moisture content under CT plots. Under CT, liming reduced N2O emissions by 61% whereas no effect was observed under NT. Under both CT and NT, CH4 oxidation was enhanced after liming application due to decreased Al(3+) toxicity. Based on our results, NT should be promoted as a means to improve soil physical properties and concurrently reduce N2O and CH4 emissions. Raising the soil pH via liming has positive effects on crop yield; here we show that it may also serve to mitigate CH4 emissions and, under CT, abate N2O emissions.

  4. DISCOVERY OF A GAS-RICH COMPANION TO THE EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXY DDO 68

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Alfvin, Erik D.; Johnson, Megan; Koribalski, Baerbel; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Bailin, Jeremy; Ford, H. Alyson; Girardi, Léo; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J.; Van Sistine, Angela; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E. C.; Marigo, Paola; Rosenfield, Philip; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Warren, Steven R.

    2014-05-20

    We present H I spectral-line imaging of the extremely metal-poor galaxy DDO 68. This system has a nebular oxygen abundance of only ∼3% Z {sub ☉}, making it one of the most metal-deficient galaxies known in the local volume. Surprisingly, DDO 68 is a relatively massive and luminous galaxy for its metal content, making it a significant outlier in the mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity relationships. The origin of such a low oxygen abundance in DDO 68 presents a challenge for models of the chemical evolution of galaxies. One possible solution to this problem is the infall of pristine neutral gas, potentially initiated during a gravitational interaction. Using archival H I spectral-line imaging obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we have discovered a previously unknown companion of DDO 68. This low-mass (M{sub H} {sub I} = 2.8 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}), recently star-forming (SFR{sub FUV} = 1.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, SFR{sub Hα} < 7 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) companion has the same systemic velocity as DDO 68 (V {sub sys} = 506 km s{sup –1}; D = 12.74 ± 0.27 Mpc) and is located at a projected distance of ∼42 kpc. New H I maps obtained with the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope provide evidence that DDO 68 and this companion are gravitationally interacting at the present time. Low surface brightness H I gas forms a bridge between these objects.

  5. Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition Control by Nanosecond Gas Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-07

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 1 April 2007 - 18 August 09 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deflagration-To- Detonation Transition Control By Nanosecond...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During the current project, an extensive experimental study of detonation initiation by high{voltage...nanosecond gas discharges has been performed in a smooth detonation tube with different discharge chambers and various discharge cell numbers. The chambers

  6. Growth rate and transition to turbulence of a gas curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobieff, P.; Rightley, P.; Benjamin, R.

    1997-09-01

    The authors conduct shock-tube experiments to investigate Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a narrow curtain of heavy gas (SF{sub 6}) embedded in lighter gas (air). Initial perturbations of the curtain can be varied, producing different flow patterns in the subsequent evolution of the curtain. Multiple-exposure video flow visualization provides images of the growth of the instability and its transition to turbulence, making it possible to extract quantitative information such as the width of the perturbed curtain. They demonstrate that the width of the curtain with initial perturbation on the downstream side is non-monotonic. As the initial perturbation undergoes phase inversion, the width of the curtain actually decreases before beginning to grow as the RM instability evolves.

  7. Gas sensor based on metal-insulator transition in VO2 nanowire thermistor.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Lilach, Yigal; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2009-06-01

    Using temperature driven sharp metal-insulator phase transition in single crystal VO(2) nanowires, the realization of a novel gas sensing concept has been tested. Varying the temperature of the nanowire close to the transition edge, the conductance of the nanowire becomes extremely responsive to the tiny changes in molecular composition, pressure, and temperature of the ambient gas environment. This gas sensing analog of the transition edge sensor radiometry used in astrophysics opens new opportunities in gas sensorics.

  8. Morphology, structure, and properties of Cu-poor and Cu-rich Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films partially selenized using H2Se gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anjun; Huang, Yongliang; Liu, Xiaohui; Xian, Wang; Meng, Fanying; Liu, Zhengxin

    2016-11-01

    Cu-poor and Cu-rich metallic precursors were prepared by cosputtering from In and Cu-Ga alloy targets and then partially selenized using H2Se gas. The properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films are comparatively studied and the phase transition process is analyzed. The cosputtered metallic precursor has a rough morphology mostly covered by large In-rich nodules. After selenization, a large number of crumblike InSe grains were formed from the nodules on the surface of the Cu-rich film, whereas the Cu-poor film shows a dense surface. The selenized films comprise CIGS, Cu9(In,Ga)4 intermetallic, and the InSe phases. The proportion of the Cu9(In,Ga)4 phase in the Cu-rich film is more than that in the Cu-poor film. After annealing, the residual Cu9(In,Ga)4 of the Cu-poor film is eliminated. A negligible effect of Cu/(In+Ga) on the grain size can be observed. The CIGS solar cell with an efficiency of 15.1% was prepared by this method.

  9. The Diamagnetic Phase Transition of Dense Electron Gas: Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Lü, Guoliang; Zhu, Chunhua; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of the de Haas-van Alphen effect and diamagnetic phase transition which is associated with magnetic domain formation. The “magnetic interaction” between delocalized magnetic moments of electrons (the Shoenberg effect), can result in an effect of the diamagnetic phase transition into domains of alternating magnetization (Condon's domains). Associated with the domain formation are prominent magnetic field oscillation and anisotropic magnetic stress which may be large enough to fracture the crust of magnetar with a super-strong field. Even if the fracture is impossible as in “low-field” magnetar, the depinning phase transition of domain wall (DW) motion driven by low field rate (mainly due to the Hall effect) in the randomly perturbed crust can result in a catastrophically variation of magnetic field. This intermittent motion, similar to the avalanche process, makes the Hall effect be dissipative. These qualitative consequences about magnetized electron gas are consistent with observations of magnetar emission, and especially the threshold critical dynamics of driven DW can partially overcome the difficulties of “low-field” magnetar bursts and the heating mechanism of transient, or “outbursting” magnetar.

  10. From magma-poor Ocean Continent Transitions to steady state oceanic spreading: the balance between tectonic and magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillard, Morgane; Manatschal, Gianreto; Autin, Julia; Decarlis, Alessandro; Sauter, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of magma-poor rifted margins is linked to the development of a transition zone whose basement is neither clearly continental nor oceanic. The development of this Ocean-Continent Transition (OCT) is generally associated to the exhumation of serpentinized mantle along one or several detachment faults. That model is supported by numerous observations (IODP wells, dredges, fossil margins) and by numerical modelling. However, if the initiation of detachment faults in a magma-poor setting tends to be better understood by numerous studies in various area, the transition with the first steady state oceanic crust and the associated processes remain enigmatic and poorly studied. Indeed, this latest stage of evolution appears to be extremely gradual and involves strong interactions between tectonic processes and magmatism. Contrary to the proximal part of the exhumed domain where we can observe magmatic activity linked to the exhumation process (exhumation of gabbros, small amount of basalts above the exhumed mantle), in the most distal part the magmatic system appears to be independent and more active. In particular, we can observe large amounts of extrusive material above a previously exhumed and faulted basement (e.g. Alps, Australia-Antarctica margins). It seems that some faults can play the role of feeder systems for the magma in this area. Magmatic underplating is also important, as suggested by basement uplift and anomalously thick crust (e.g. East Indian margin). It results that the transition with the first steady state oceanic crust is marked by the presence of a hybrid basement, composed by exhumed mantle and magmatic material, whose formation is linked to several tectonic and magmatic events. One could argue that this basement is not clearly different from an oceanic basement. However, we consider that true, steady state oceanic crust only exists, if the entire rock association forming the crust is created during a single event, at a localized

  11. WASP-36b: A NEW TRANSITING PLANET AROUND A METAL-POOR G-DWARF, AND AN INVESTIGATION INTO ANALYSES BASED ON A SINGLE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Smalley, B.; Southworth, J.; Collier Cameron, A.; Gillon, M.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Queloz, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Pepe, F.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Barros, S. C. C.; Pollacco, D.; Street, R. A.

    2012-04-15

    We report the discovery, from WASP and CORALIE, of a transiting exoplanet in a 1.54 day orbit. The host star, WASP-36, is a magnitude V = 12.7, metal-poor G2 dwarf (T{sub eff} = 5959 {+-} 134 K), with [Fe/H] =-0.26 {+-} 0.10. We determine the planet to have mass and radius, respectively, 2.30 {+-} 0.07 and 1.28 {+-} 0.03 times that of Jupiter. We have eight partial or complete transit light curves, from four different observatories, which allow us to investigate the potential effects on the fitted system parameters of using only a single light curve. We find that the solutions obtained by analyzing each of these light curves independently are consistent with our global fit to all the data, despite the apparent presence of correlated noise in at least two of the light curves.

  12. Overexpression of RACK1 Promotes Metastasis by Enhancing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Predicts Poor Prognosis in Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qiao-Li; Huang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Gui-Hua; Liu, Yan-Ling; Huang, Jin; Qu, Qiang; Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Cheng, Lin; Chen, Shu-Hui; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies show that dysregulation of the receptor of activated protein kinase C1 (RACK1) plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis and progression of various cancers. However, the biological function and underlying mechanism of RACK1 in glioma remains poorly defined. Here, we found that RACK1 was significantly up-regulated in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues, being closely related to clinical stage of glioma both in mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients with high RACK1 expression had a poor prognosis (p = 0.0062, HR = 1.898, 95% CI: 1.225–3.203). In vitro functional assays indicated that silencing of RACK1 could dramatically promote apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. More importantly, knockdown of RACK1 led to a vast accumulation of cells in G0/G1 phase and their reduced proportions at the S phase by suppressing the expression of G1/S transition key regulators Cyclin D1 and CDK6. Additionally, this forced down-regulation of RACK1 significantly suppressed migration and invasion via inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as MMP2, MMP9, ZEB1, N-Cadherin, and Integrin-β1. Collectively, our study revealed that RACK1 might act as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:27763568

  13. The VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment (VORTEX) GAS project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Langenderfer, Lynn S.; Jardon, Rebecca D.; Cutlip, Hansford H.; Kazerooni, Alexander C.; Thweatt, Amber L.; Lester, Joseph L.; Bernal, Luis P.

    1995-01-01

    Get Away Special (GAS) payload G-093, also called VORTEX (VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment), is an investigation of the propagation of a vortex ring through a liquid-gas interface in microgravity. This process results in the formation of one or more liquid droplets similar to earth based liquid atomization systems. In the absence of gravity, surface tension effects dominate the drop formation process. The Shuttle's microgravity environment allows the study of the same fluid atomization processes as using a larger drop size than is possible on Earth. This enables detailed experimental studies of the complex flow processes encountered in liquid atomization systems. With VORTEX, deformations in both the vortex ring and the fluid surface will be measured closely for the first time in a parameters range that accurately resembles liquid atomization. The experimental apparatus will record images of the interactions for analysis after the payload has been returned to earth. The current design of the VORTEX payload consists of a fluid test cell with a vortex ring generator, digital imaging system, laser illumination system, computer based controller, batteries for payload power, and an array of housekeeping and payload monitoring sensors. It is a self-contained experiment and will be flown on board the Space Shuttle in a 5 cubic feet GAS canister. The VORTEX Project is entirely run by students at the University of Michigan but is overseen by a faculty advisor acting as the payload customer and the contact person with NASA. This paper summarizes both the technical and programmatic aspects of the VORTEX Project.

  14. The X-ray emitting gas in poor clusters with central dominant galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, G. A.; Cioffi, D. F.; Canizares, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The 12 clusters detected in the present study by the Einstein Observatory's X-ray imaging proportional counter show X-ray emission centered on the dominant galaxy in all cases. Comparison of the deduced distribution of binding mass with the light distribution of the central galaxies of four clusters indicates that the mass/luminosity ratio rises to over 200 solar masses/solar luminosity in the galaxy halos. These halos must therefore, like the clusters themselves, posses dark matter. The X-ray data clearly show that the dominant galaxies sit at the bottoms of the poor cluster gravitational potential wells, suggesting a similar origin for dominant galaxies in poor and rich clusters, perhaps through the merger and cannibalism of cluster galaxies. It is the luminosity of the distended cD envelope that reflects the relative wealth of the cluster environment.

  15. WASP-80b: a gas giant transiting a cool dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Fumel, A.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Lovis, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star WASP-80 (1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2; 2MASS J20124017-0208391; TYC 5165-481-1; BPM 80815; V = 11.9, K = 8.4). Our analysis shows this is a 0.55 ± 0.04 Mjup, 0.95 ± 0.03 Rjup gas giant on a circular 3.07 day orbit around a star with a spectral type between K7V and M0V. This system produces one of the largest transit depths so far reported, making it a worthwhile target for transmission spectroscopy. We find a large discrepancy between the vsini⋆ inferred from stellar line broadening and the observed amplitude of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This can be understood either by an orbital plane nearly perpendicular to the stellar spin or by an additional, unaccounted for source of broadening. Using WASP-South photometric observations, from Sutherland (South Africa), confirmed with the 60 cm TRAPPIST robotic telescope, EulerCam, and the CORALIE spectrograph on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope, and HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m (Prog ID 089.C-0151), all three located at La Silla Observatory, Chile.Radial velocity and photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80

  16. Very metal-poor galaxies: ionized gas kinematics in nine objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The study of ionized gas morphology and kinematics in nine extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) 6-m telescope is presented. Some of these very rare objects (with currently known range of O/H of 7.12 < 12 + log(O/H) < 7.65, or ) are believed to be the best proxies of `young' low-mass galaxies in the high-redshift Universe. One of the main goals of this study is to look for possible evidence of star formation (SF) activity induced by external perturbations. Recent results from HI mapping of a small subsample of XMD star-forming galaxies provided confident evidence for the important role of interaction-induced SF. Our observations provide complementary or new information that the great majority of the studied XMD dwarfs have strongly disturbed gas morphology and kinematics or the presence of detached components. We approximate the observed velocity fields by simple models of a rotating tilted thin disc, which allows us the robust detection of non-circular gas motions. These data, in turn, indicate the important role of current/recent interactions and mergers in the observed enhanced SF. As a by-product of our observations, we obtained data for two Low Surface Brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies: Anon J012544+075957 that is a companion of the merger system UGC 993, and SAO 0822+3545 which shows off-centre, asymmetric, low star formation rate star-forming regions, likely induced by the interaction with the companion XMD dwarf HS 0822+3542. Based on observations obtained with the Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS 6-m telescope. E-mail: moisav@gmail.com (AVM); sap@sao.ru (SAP); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK)

  17. Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method

    DOEpatents

    Cromer, Robert Harold; Bechtel, William Theodore; Sutcu, Maz

    2002-01-01

    A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

  18. ALFALFA Discovery of the Most Metal-poor Gas-rich Galaxy Known: AGC 198691

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Cannon, John M.; Gordon, Alex J. R.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Janowiecki, Steven; Rhode, Katherine L.; Pogge, Richard W.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Aver, Erik

    2016-05-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nearby dwarf galaxy AGC 198691. This object is part of the Survey of H i in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs project, which is a multi-wavelength study of galaxies with H i masses in the range of 106-107.2 M ⊙, discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We have obtained spectra of the lone H ii region in AGC 198691 with the new high-throughput KPNO Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Mayall 4 m, as well as with the Blue Channel spectrograph on the MMT 6.5 m telescope. These observations enable the measurement of the temperature-sensitive [O iii]λ4363 line and hence the determination of a “direct” oxygen abundance for AGC 198691. We find this system to be an extremely metal-deficient (XMD) system with an oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H) = 7.02 ± 0.03, making AGC 198691 the lowest-abundance star-forming galaxy known in the local universe. Two of the five lowest-abundance galaxies known have been discovered by the ALFALFA blind H i survey; this high yield of XMD galaxies represents a paradigm shift in the search for extremely metal-poor galaxies.

  19. Gas-rich vs. gas-poor: LCID insights on the origin of different dwarf galaxy types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, C.; LCID Team

    In this paper, we discuss on the origin of different dwarf galaxy types, and the possible evolutionary links among them, based on full star formation histories (SFH) obtained through the Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs (LCID) project. In the case of the dIrr and dT galaxies, these are the first time that full SFHs, describing the early episodes of star formation with fine time resolution (≃ 2 Gyr), have been obtained. The LCID results show that the early SFH of dIrr galaxies is fundamentally different from that of the studied dT and dSph, in that they haven't experienced a strong early burst, followed by a very mild or nil star formation activity. Instead, they started forming stars slowly and continued similarly over most of their lifetimes. Their SFH is similar to that of the (minority) dSph satellites of the Milky Way that have important amounts of intermediate-age population (namely, Carina, Fornax and Leo I). Based on the derived SFHs, we hypothesize that there are two fundamental types of dwarf galaxies: one type started their evolution vigorously forming stars, but their period of star formation activity has been short lived (few Gyr). Another type has had a mild star formation activity at early times, and has continued forming stars to the present time (or almost). The current availability of gas or lack thereof doesnÕt necessarily correlate with these two globally different evolutionary paths.

  20. Rac1 overexpression is correlated with epithelial mesenchymal transition and predicts poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yujuan; Liao, Qianjin; Han, Yaqian; Chen, Jie; Liu, Zhigang; Ling, Hang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wenjuan; Oyang, Linda; Xia, Longzheng; Wang, Li; Wang, Heran; Xue, Lei; Wang, Hui; Hu, Bingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate1(Rac1) and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) are key therapeutic targets in cancer. We investigated the clinical significance of Rac1 and markers of EMT expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and their possible correlation with EMT phenotype. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of Rac1, Snail1, Twist1, N-cadherin (N-cad), Vimentin (Vim), and E-cadherin (E-cad) in 153 NSCLC paraffin-embedded specimens and 45 normal specimens adjacent to tumors. The correlation of Rac1 and EMT markers with clinicopathological characteristics and the relationship between the protein levels and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: Compared with non-tumor tissues, the NSCLC tissues showed marked elevation in the levels of Rac1, Snail1, Twist1, N-cad, and Vim levels, whereas the E-cad levels were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). The aberrant expression of Rac1 and EMT markers was significantly associated with TNM stage and metastasis (P < 0.05). Increased expression of Rac1 may be associated with poor OS and PFS compared with low expression (P<0.001 and P=0.004). Significant correlations were observed between the EMT markers expressed and OS or PFS(P<0.01). In addition, multivariate analysis indicated that the expression of Rac1, Snail1, Twist1, N-cad, Vim, and E-cad was an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC. Interestingly, Rac1 expression was positively correlated with Snail1, Twist1, N-cad, and Vim levels (r=0.563, r=0.440, r=0.247 r=0.536, P<0.01, respectively) and negatively correlated with E-cad levels (r=-0.464, P<0.001) in NSCLC tissues. Rac1, Twist, Snail1, Vim and N-cad were highly expressed in lung cancer patients resistant to radiotherapy, while E-cad was poorly expressed. Conclusion: Rac1 may promote NSCLC progression and metastasis via EMT, which may be considered as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27877226

  1. Physical model of the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) transition in an exciton gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a simple physical model describing the transition of an exciton gas to a conducting exciton liquid. The transition occurs due to cohesive coupling of excitons in the vicinity of the critical point, which is associated with transformation of the exciton ground state to the conduction band and the emergence of conduction electrons. We calculate the cohesion binding energy for the exciton gas and, using it, derive the equations of state, critical parameters, and binodal. The computational method is analogous to that used by us earlier [5] for predicting the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) phase transition in atomic (hypothetical, free of molecules) hydrogen and alkali metal vapors. The similarity of the methods used for hydrogen and excitons makes it possible to clarify the physical nature of the transition in the exciton gas and to predict more confidently the existence of a new phase transition in atomic hydrogen.

  2. An optical transmission spectrum of the transiting hot Jupiter in the metal-poor WASP-98 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Giordano, M.; Mollière, P.; Southworth, J.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th.

    2016-09-01

    The WASP-98 planetary system represents a rare case of a hot Jupiter hosted by a metal-poor main-sequence star. We present a follow-up study of this system based on multiband photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. Two new transit events of WASP-98 b were simultaneously observed in four passbands (g', r', i', z'), using the telescope-defocusing technique, yielding eight high-precision light curves with point-to-point scatters of less than 1 mmag. We also collected three spectra of the parent star with a high-resolution spectrograph, which we used to remeasure its spectral characteristics, in particular its metallicity. We found this to be very low, [Fe/H] = -0.49 ± 0.10, but larger than was previously reported, [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.19. We used these new photometric and spectroscopic data to refine the orbital and physical properties of this planetary system, finding that the stellar and planetary mass measurements are significantly larger than those in the discovery paper. In addition, the multiband light curves were used to construct an optical transmission spectrum of WASP-98 b and probe the characteristics of its atmosphere at the terminator. We measured a lower radius at z' compared with the other three passbands. The maximum variation is between the r' and z' bands, has a confidence level of roughly 6σ and equates to 5.5 pressure scale heights. We compared this spectrum to theoretical models, investigating several possible types of atmospheres, including hazy, cloudy, cloud-free, and clear atmospheres with titanium and vanadium oxide opacities. We could not find a good fit to the observations, except in the extreme case of a clear atmosphere with TiO and VO opacities, in which the condensation of Ti and V was suppressed. As this case is unrealistic, our results suggest the presence of an additional optical-absorbing species in the atmosphere of WASP-98 b, of unknown chemical nature.

  3. B2 1637+29, a massive radio galaxy probing a poor but gas-rich group

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruiter, H.R.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; Ekers, R.D.

    1988-06-01

    New VLA and CCD observations of the radio source B2 1637+29, a member of the faint B2 sample of low-luminosity radio galaxies, are reported. The environment of the galaxy is discussed, and a description of the radio source morphology is given. The CCD image reveals that the optical counterpart is a double galaxy with radio jets emanating from the nucleus of the brighter of the two galaxies. It is shown that the galaxy is the dominant member of a poor group of galaxies, and it is argued that it moves with an average velocity of a few hundred km/s with respect to an intergalactic gas cloud with mass of 10 to the 13th solar or more. The relevance of the enviroment of the radio galaxy to the source morphology is discussed, and an explanation for the highly peculiar features, such as the undulation in the radio tail and the difference in both length and brightness of the main and counter jet, is proposed. 32 references.

  4. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  5. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... and outbound transits through Cook Inlet, Alaska between the Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... and outbound transits through Cook Inlet, Alaska between the Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... and outbound transits through Cook Inlet, Alaska between the Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... and outbound transits through Cook Inlet, Alaska between the Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″...

  9. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions.

    PubMed

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers--or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  10. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M.; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S.; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers—or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)—has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  11. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... navigable waters within a 1000-yard radius of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tankers during their...

  12. Resonance transition 795-nm Rubidium laser using 3He buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S S; Soules, T F; Page, R H; Mitchell, S C; Kanz, V K; Beach, R J

    2007-08-02

    We report the first demonstration of a 795-nm Rubidium resonance transition laser using a buffer gas consisting of pure {sup 3}He. This follows our recent demonstration of a hydrocarbon-free 795-nm Rubidium resonance laser which used naturally-occurring He as the buffer gas. Using He gas that is isotopically enriched with {sup 3}He yields enhanced mixing of the Rb fine-structure levels. This enables efficient lasing at reduced He buffer gas pressure, improving thermal management in high average power Rb lasers and enhancing the power scaling potential of such systems.

  13. Nonequilibrium Features of the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwieglinski, B.; Odeh, T.; Gross, C.; Schwarz, C.; Bassini, R.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Emling, H.; Ferrero, A.; Fritz, S.; Gaff, S. J.; Imme, G.; Iori, I.; Kleinevoss, U.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunze, W. D.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Mahi, M.; Moroni, A.; Moehlenkamp, T.; Mueller, W. F. J.; Ocker, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Rubehn, Th.; Sann, H.; Schnittker, M.; Schuettauf, A.; Seidel, W.; Serfling, V.; Stroth, J.; Trautmann, W.; Trzcinski, A.; Verde, G.; Woerner, A.; Xi, H.; Zude, E.

    1999-03-01

    Energy spectra of protons emitted by the target residue in Au + Au collisions at 1 GeV/u were measured for different excitation energy bins. They reveal two components with different slopes attributed to preequilibrium and equilibrium emission. The relative contribution of the latter decreases rapidly with excitation energy, so that its presence becomes not apparent for the highest energy bins. It is argued therefore, that equilibrium may not be reached on the gas branch of the caloric curve.

  14. Scaling properties of the plateau transitions in the two-dimensional hole gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebin; Liu, Haiwen; Zhu, Junbo; Shan, Pujia; Wang, Pengjie; Fu, Hailong; Du, Lingjie; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Xie, X. C.; Du, Rui-Rui; Lin, Xi

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of phase coherence is studied in two-dimensional hole gas through the integer quantum Hall plateau-to-plateau transition. From the plateau transition as a function of temperature, scaling properties of multiple transitions are analyzed. Our results are in good agreement with the assumption of the zero-point fluctuations of the coherent holes, and support the intrinsic saturation of the coherence time at low temperature limit. The critical exponent p can also be determined under the scheme of the zero-point fluctuations. The similarity and difference in experimental observations between quantum Griffiths singularity and plateau transition is discussed. The spin-orbit coupling effect's influence on the plateau transition is explored by comparing the results from different transitions.

  15. Toward the renewables - A natural gas/solar energy transition strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, J. A.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The inevitability of an energy transition from today's non-renewable fossil base toward a renewable energy base is considered from the viewpoint of the need for a national transition strategy. Then, one such strategy is offered. Its technological building blocks are described in terms of both energy use and energy supply. The strategy itself is then sketched at four points in its implementation; (1) initiation, (2) early transition, (3) late transition, and (4) completion. The transition is assumed to evolve from a heavily natural gas-dependent energy economy. It then proceeds through its transition toward a balanced, hybrid energy system consisting of both centralized and dispersed energy supply technologies supplying hydrogen and electricity from solar energy. Related institutional, environmental and economic factors are examined briefly.

  16. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Kotarba, M. J.; Więcław, D.; Piestrzyński, A.

    2008-08-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977-984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. δ 13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of

  17. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Kotarba, M.J.; Wieclaw, D.; Piestrzynski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977–984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. δ13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of

  18. Finite-time thermodynamics and the gas-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Schön, J. C.; Jansen, M.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we study the application of the concept of finite-time thermodynamics to first-order phase transitions. As an example, we investigate the transition from the gaseous to the liquid state by modeling the liquification of the gas in a finite time. In particular, we introduce, state, and solve an optimal control problem in which we aim at achieving the gas-liquid first-order phase transition through supersaturation within a fixed time in an optimal fashion, in the sense that the work required to supersaturate the gas, called excess work, is minimized by controlling the appropriate thermodynamic parameters. The resulting set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is then solved for three systems, nitrogen N2 , oxygen O2 , and water vapor H2O .

  19. THE TRANSIT TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF A COLD GAS GIANT PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Veyette, Mark J.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2015-12-01

    We use solar occultations observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini Spacecraft to extract the 1–5 μm transmission spectrum of Saturn, as if it were a transiting exoplanet. We detect absorption from methane, ethane, acetylene, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and possibly carbon monoxide, with peak-to-peak features of up to 90 parts-per-million despite the presence of ammonia clouds. We also find that atmospheric refraction, as opposed to clouds or haze, determines the minimum altitude that could be probed during mid-transit. Self-consistent exoplanet atmosphere models show good agreement with Saturn’s transmission spectrum but fail to reproduce a large absorption feature near 3.4 μm, likely caused by gaseous ethane and a C–H stretching mode of an unknown aliphatic hydrocarbon. This large feature is located in one of the Spitzer Space Telescope bandpasses and could alter interpretations of transmission spectra if not properly modeled. The large signal in Saturn’s transmission spectrum suggests that transmission spectroscopy of cold, long-period gaseous exoplanets should be possible with current and future observatories. Motivated by these results, we briefly consider the feasibility of  using a survey to search for and characterize cold exoplanets that are analogous to Jupiter and Saturn utilizing a target-of-opportunity approach.

  20. Dynamic transition of supercritical hydrogen: defining the boundary between interior and atmosphere in gas giants.

    PubMed

    Trachenko, K; Brazhkin, V V; Bolmatov, D

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the physics of gas giants requires knowledge about the behavior of hydrogen at extreme pressures and temperatures. Molecular hydrogen in these planets is supercritical, and has been considered as a physically homogeneous state where no differences can be made between a liquid and a gas and where all properties undergo no marked or distinct changes with pressure and temperature, the picture believed to hold below the dissociation and metallization transition. Here, we show that in Jupiter and Saturn, supercritical molecular hydrogen undergoes a dynamic transition around 10 GPa and 3000 K from the "rigid" liquid state to the "nonrigid" gas-like fluid state at the Frenkel line recently proposed, with the accompanying qualitative changes of all major physical properties. The consequences of this finding are discussed, including a physically justified way to demarcate the interior and the atmosphere in gas giants.

  1. A Simple Model for Fine Structure Transitions in Alkali-Metal Noble-Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    fine- structure transition rates of the alkali atoms . The integration of this integral is primarily performed nu- merically, using an adaptive Romberg...Previous work on the fine structure transitions of alkali atoms as they collide with noble gas atoms includes a full quantum mechanical calculation of...adiabaticity in alkali atom fine structure mixing”. SPIE LASE, 896207–896207. International Society for Optics and Photonics, 2014. 4. Griffiths, David J

  2. Determination of the Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature of Platinum-Aluminide Gas Turbine Blade Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of five basic platinum- aluminide gas turbine blade coatings on a nickel-base superalloy (IN738). The results...gas turbine blade coatings on a nickel-base superalloy (IN738). The results of these tests were compared to similarly formed nickel- aluminide coatings ... aluminide coating became more widely used, it -°j.established itself as an excellent life extender for most superalloy blade materials. However, as

  3. Transition and Damping of Collective Modes in a Trapped Fermi Gas between BCS and Unitary Limits near the Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hang; Zhang, Wenyuan; Zhou, Li; Ma, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the transition and damping of low-energy collective modes in a trapped unitary Fermi gas by solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation in a scaled form, which is combined with both the T-matrix fluctuation theory in normal phase and the mean-field theory in order phase. In order to connect the microscopic and kinetic descriptions of many-body Feshbach scattering, we adopt a phenomenological two-fluid physical approach, and derive the coupling constants in the order phase. By solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov steady-state equation in a variational form, we calculate two viscous relaxation rates with the collision probabilities of fermion’s scattering including fermions in the normal fluid and fermion pairs in the superfluid. Additionally, by considering the pairing and depairing of fermions, we get results of the frequency and damping of collective modes versus temperature and s-wave scattering length. Our theoretical results are in a remarkable agreement with the experimental data, particularly for the sharp transition between collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviour and strong damping between BCS and unitary limits near the phase transition. The sharp transition originates from the maximum of viscous relaxation rate caused by fermion-fermion pair collision at the phase transition point when the fermion depair, while the strong damping due to the fast varying of the frequency of collective modes from BCS limit to unitary limit. PMID:26522094

  4. Tradeoffs between costs and greenhouse gas emissions in the design of urban transit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Julia B.; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2013-12-01

    Recent investments in the transit sector to address greenhouse gas emissions have concentrated on purchasing efficient replacement vehicles and inducing mode shift from the private automobile. There has been little focus on the potential of network and operational improvements, such as changes in headways, route spacing, and stop spacing, to reduce transit emissions. Most models of transit system design consider user and agency cost while ignoring emissions and the potential environmental benefit of operational improvements. We use a model to evaluate the user and agency costs as well as greenhouse gas benefit of design and operational improvements to transit systems. We examine how the operational characteristics of urban transit systems affect both costs and greenhouse gas emissions. The research identifies the Pareto frontier for designing an idealized transit network. Modes considered include bus, bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT), and metro (heavy) rail, with cost and emissions parameters appropriate for the United States. Passenger demand follows a many-to-many travel pattern with uniformly distributed origins and destinations. The approaches described could be used to optimize the network design of existing bus service or help to select a mode and design attributes for a new transit system. The results show that BRT provides the lowest cost but not the lowest emissions for our large city scenarios. Bus and LRT systems have low costs and the lowest emissions for our small city scenarios. Relatively large reductions in emissions from the cost-optimal system can be achieved with only minor increases in user travel time.

  5. WASP-37b: A 1.8 M{sub J} EXOPLANET TRANSITING A METAL-POOR STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, E. K.; Faedi, F.; Barros, S. C. C.; Pollacco, D.; Todd, I.; McCormac, J.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; Miller, G. R. M.; Hebb, L.; Smalley, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Butters, O. W.; Hebrard, G.; Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Street, R. A.; Skillen, I.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Bento, J.

    2011-01-15

    We report on the discovery of WASP-37b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting an m{sub v} = 12.7 G2-type dwarf, with a period of 3.577469 {+-} 0.000011 d, transit epoch T{sub 0} = 2455338.6188 {+-} 0.0006 (HJD; dates throughout the paper are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)), and a transit duration 0.1304{sup +0.0018}{sub -0.0017} d. The planetary companion has a mass M{sub p} = 1.80 {+-} 0.17 M{sub J} and radius R{sub p} = 1.16{sup +0.07}{sub -0.06} R{sub J}, yielding a mean density of 1.15{sup +0.12}{sub -0.15} {rho}{sub J}. From a spectral analysis, we find that the host star has M{sub *} = 0.925 {+-} 0.120 M{sub sun}, R{sub *} = 1.003 {+-} 0.053 R{sub sun}, T{sub eff} = 5800 {+-} 150 K, and [Fe/H] = -0.40 {+-} 0.12. WASP-37 is therefore one of the lowest metallicity stars to host a transiting planet.

  6. Swirling midframe flow for gas turbine engine having advanced transitions

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Matthew D.; Charron, Richard C.; Rodriguez, Jose L.; Kusters, Bernhard W.; Morrison, Jay A.; Beeck, Alexander R.

    2016-12-27

    A gas turbine engine can-annular combustion arrangement (10), including: an axial compressor (82) operable to rotate in a rotation direction (60); a diffuser (100, 110) configured to receive compressed air (16) from the axial compressor; a plenum (22) configured to receive the compressed air from the diffuser; a plurality of combustor cans (12) each having a combustor inlet (38) in fluid communication with the plenum, wherein each combustor can is tangentially oriented so that a respective combustor inlet is circumferentially offset from a respective combustor outlet in a direction opposite the rotation direction; and an airflow guiding arrangement (80) configured to impart circumferential motion to the compressed air in the plenum in the direction opposite the rotation direction.

  7. Influence of the coulomb interaction on the liquid-gas phase transition and nuclear multifragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gulminelli, F; Chomaz, Ph; Raduta, Al H; Raduta, Ad R

    2003-11-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition is analyzed from the topologic properties of the event distribution in the observables space. A multicanonical formalism allows one to directly relate the standard phase transition with neutral particles to the case where the nonsaturating Coulomb interaction is present, and to interpret the Coulomb effect as a deformation of the probability distributions and a rotation of the order parameter. This formalism is applied to a statistical multifragmentation model and consequences for the nuclear multifragmentation phase transitions are drawn.

  8. Coherence properties of a two-dimensional trapped Bose gas around the superfluid transition

    SciTech Connect

    Plisson, T.; Allard, B.; Salomon, G.; Aspect, A.; Bourdel, T.; Holzmann, M.; Bouyer, P.

    2011-12-15

    We measure the momentum distribution of a two-dimensional trapped Bose gas and observe the increase of the range of coherence around the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition. We quantitatively compare our observed profiles to both a Hartree-Fock mean-field theory and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In the normal phase, the momentum distribution is observed to sharpen well before the phase transition. This behavior is partially captured in a mean-field approach, in contrast to the physics of the BKT transition.

  9. Herschel evidence for disk flattening or gas depletion in transitional disks

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J. T.; Pascucci, I.; Espaillat, C.; Woitke, P.; Andrews, S.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Meeus, G.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2014-06-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission, with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [O I] 63.18 μm for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program ({sup G}as in Protoplanetary Systems{sup )} by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS in this wavelength. [O I] 63.18 μm traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities ∼2 times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self-consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g., bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g., disk dust mass, etc.) that could influence the [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosity, and we find no correlations that can explain the lower [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities in transitional disks. Using a grid of thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk models, we conclude that either transitional disks are less flared than full disks or they possess lower gas-to-dust ratios due to a depletion of gas mass. This result suggests that transitional disks are more evolved than their full disk counterparts, possibly even at large radii.

  10. Resolved gas cavities in transitional disks inferred from CO isotopologs with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, N.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bruderer, S.; Andrews, S. M.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Kempen, T.; Miotello, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transitional disks around young stars with large dust cavities are promising candidates to look for recently formed, embedded planets. Models of planet-disk interaction predict that young planets clear a gap in the gas while trapping dust at larger radii. Other physical mechanisms might also be responsible for cavities. Previous observations have revealed that gas is still present inside these cavities, but the spatial distribution of this gas remains uncertain. Aims: We present high spatial resolution observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of 13CO and C18O 3-2 or 6-5 lines of four well-studied transitional disks around pre-main-sequence stars with large dust cavities. The line and continuum observations are used to set constraints on the the gas surface density, specifically on the cavity size and density drop inside the cavity. Methods: The physical-chemical model DALI was used to analyze the gas images of SR21, HD 135344B (also known as SAO 206462), DoAr44, and IRS 48. The main parameters of interest are the size, depth and shape of the gas cavity in each of the disks. CO isotope-selective photodissociation is included to properly constrain the surface density in the outer disk from C18O emission. Results: The gas cavities are up to three times smaller than those of the dust in all four disks. Model fits indicate that the surface density inside the gas cavities decreases by a factor of 100 to 10 000 compared with the surface density profile derived from the outer disk. The data can be fit by either introducing one or two drops in the gas surface density or a surface density profile that increases with radius inside the cavity. A comparison with an analytical model of gap depths by planet-disk interaction shows that the disk viscosities are most likely low, between between 10-3 and 10-4 , for reasonable estimates of planet masses of up to 10 Jupiter masses. Conclusions: The resolved measurements of the gas and dust in

  11. Atom probe study of Cu-poor to Cu-rich transition during Cu(In,Ga)Se2 growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzinie-Devy, F.; Cadel, E.; Barreau, N.; Arzel, L.; Pareige, P.

    2011-12-01

    Atomic scale chemistry of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film has been characterized at key points of the 3-stage process using atom probe tomography. 3D atom distributions have been reconstructed when the layer is Cu-poor ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) < 1), Cu-rich ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) > 1), and at the end of the process. Particular attention has been devoted to grain boundary composition and Na atomic distribution within the CIGSe layer. Significant variation of composition is highlighted during the growing process, providing fundamental information helping the understanding of high efficiency CIGSe formation.

  12. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process: The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  13. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Progress report, [1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.

    1993-08-01

    A new hypothesis is introduced for the generation of petroleum and natural gas. The transition metals, activated under the reducing conditions of diagenesis, are proposed as catalysts in the generation of light hydrocarbons. The objective of this proposal is to test that hypothesis. Transition metals (Ni, V, Ti, Co, Fe), in kerogen, porphyrins, and as pure compounds, will be tested under catagenic conditions for catalytic activity in the conversion of normal paraffins and hydrogen into light hydrocarbons. If the hypothesis is correct, kerogenous transition metals should become catalytically active under the reducing conditions of diagenesis and catalyze the conversion of paraffins into the light hydrocarbons seen in petroleum. Moreover, the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons generated catalytically should be similar in molecular and isotopic compositions to natural gas.

  14. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  15. "Could charm (& τ) transitions be the `poor princess' providing a deeper understanding of fundamental dynamics ?" or: "Finding novel forces"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, Ikaros I.

    2015-06-01

    We know that our Universe is composed of only ˜ 4.5% "known" matter; therefore, our understanding is incomplete. This can be seen directly in the case of neutrino oscillations (without even considering potential other universes). Charm quarks have had considerable impact on our understanding of known matter, and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the only local quantum field theory to describe strong forces. It is possible to learn novel lessons concerning strong dynamics by measuring rates around the thresholds of [ Q¯ Q] states with Q = b, c. Furthermore, these states provide us with gateways towards new dynamics (ND), where we must transition from "accuracy" to "precision" eras. Finally, we can make connections with τ transitions and, perhaps, with dark matter. Charm dynamics acts as a bridge between the worlds of light- and heavy-flavor hadrons (namely, beauty hadrons), and finding regional asymmetries in many-body final states may prove to be a "game changer". There are several different approaches to achieving these goals: for example, experiments such as the Super Tau-Charm Factory, Super Beauty Factory, and the Super Z 0 Factory act as gatekeepers - and deeper thinking regarding symmetries.

  16. Upregulation of H19 indicates a poor prognosis in gallbladder carcinoma and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shou-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Cai; Zhang, Ming-Di; Weng, Ming-Zhe; Zhou, Di; Quan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The imprinted oncofetal long non-coding RNA H19 has been reported to be involved in many kinds of human cancers. However, whether lncRNA H19 implicate in oncogenesis and cancer progression in gallbladder cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, compared with adjacent normal tissues, the level of H19 was significantly upregulated in gallbladder cancer tissues and was positively associated with lymphatic metastasis and tumor size. The overall survival is shorter in those who had higher H19 expression among GBC patients. In vitro, both TGF-β1 and IL-6 treatment induced upregulation of H19, downregulated the protein level of E-cadherin while increased Vimentin, indicating an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in GBC. The overexpression of H19 in GBC cells enhanced tumor invasion and promoted EMT by upregulated transcription factor Twist1. On the contrary, Loss of function studies indicated that H19 interference in GBC suppressed tumor cell invasion and promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) via suppressing Twist expression. In vivo, the volume of the tumors in H19-inteference group was significantly decreased compared to those in the control group of nude mice. Both western-blot and immunohistochemistry confirmed that a MET phenotype existed in the H19 interference group when compared to control group. These results defined H19 as a novel prognostic factor for GBC, and indicated that it might play important regulatory roles in the EMT process. PMID:27073719

  17. Gas density drops inside dust cavities of transitional disks around young stars observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, N.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bruderer, S.; Pérez, L.; Isella, A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Transitional disks with large dust cavities are important laboratories in which to study planet formation and disk evolution. Cold gas may still be present inside these cavities, but quantying this gas is challenging. The gas content is important for constraining the origin of the dust cavity. Aims: We use Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of 12CO 6-5 and 690 GHz (Band 9) continuum of five well-studied transitional disks. In addition, we analyze previously published Band 7 observations of a disk in the 12CO 3-2 line and 345 GHz continuum. The observations are used to set constraints on the gas and dust surface density profiles, in particular, the drop δgas of the gas density inside the dust cavity. Methods: The physical-chemical modeling code DALI was used to simultaneously analyze the gas and dust images. We modeled SR21, HD 135344B, LkCa15, SR24S, and RX J1615-3255 (Band 9) and J1604-2130 (Band 7). The spectral energy distribution and continuum visibility curve constrain the dust surface density. Then we used the same model to calculate the 12CO emission, which we compared with the observations through spectra and intensity cuts. The amount of gas inside the cavity was quantified by varying the δgas parameter. Results: Model fits to the dust and gas indicate that gas is still present inside the dust cavity for all disks, but at a reduced level. The gas surface density drops inside the cavity by at least a factor 10, while the dust density drops by at least a factor 1000. Disk masses are comparable with previous estimates from the literature, cavity radii are found to be smaller than in the data obtained with the 345 GHz SubMillimeter Array. Conclusions: The derived gas surface density profiles suggest that the cavity was cleared by one or more companions in all cases, which trapped the millimeter-sized dust at the edge of the cavity. Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas... ahead and one mile astern, and 500 yards on each side of any liquefied natural gas carrier (LNGC)...

  19. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  20. Downregulation of FBP1 Promotes Tumor Metastasis and Indicates Poor Prognosis in Gastric Cancer via Regulating Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing-Guo; Xue, Jin-Jun; Wang, Zhu; Yuan, Xin; Tong, Jian-Dong; Xu, Li-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicated that some glycolytic enzymes are complicated, multifaceted proteins rather than simple components of the glycolytic pathway. FBP1 plays a vital role in glucose metabolism, but its role in gastric cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis has not been fully understood. Methods The prognostic value of FBP1 was first studied in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database and validated in in-house database. The effect of FBP1 on cell proliferation and metastasis was examined in vitro. Nonparametric test and Log-rank test were used to evaluate the clinical significance of FBP1 expression. Results In the TCGA cohort, FBP1 mRNA level were shown to be predictive of overall survival in gastric cancer (P = 0.029). In the validation cohort, FBP1 expression were inversely correlated with advanced N stage (P = 0.021) and lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.011). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that FBP1 was an independent predictor for both overall survival (P = 0.004) and disease free survival (P<0.001). Functional studies demonstrated that ectopic FBP1 expression inhibited proliferation and invasion in gastric cancer cells, while silencing FBP1 expression had opposite effects (P<0.05). Mechanically, FBP1 serves as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Conclusions Downregulation of FBP1 promotes gastric cancer metastasis by facilitating EMT and acts as a potential prognostic factor and therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:27978536

  1. Investigation of a New Monte Carlo Method for the Transitional Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Day, Chr.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is well developed for rarefied gas flow in transition flow regime when 0.0110, the gas flow is free molecular and can be simulated by the Test Particle Monte Carlo method (TPMC) without any problem even for a complex 3D vacuum system. In this paper we will investigate the approach to extend the TPMC to the transition flow regime by considering the collision between gas molecules as an interaction between a probe molecule and the gas background. Recently this collision mechanism has been implemented into ProVac3D, a new TPMC simulation program developed by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The preliminary simulation result shows a correct nonlinear increasing of the gas flow. However, there is still a quantitative discrepancy with the experimental data, which means further improvement is needed.

  2. Liquid-gas phase transitions in a multicomponent nuclear system with Coulomb and surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. J.; Mekjian, A. Z.

    2001-04-01

    The liquid-gas phase transition is studied in a multicomponent nuclear system using a local Skyrme interaction with Coulomb and surface effects. Some features are qualitatively the same as the results of Mu''ller and Serot where a relativistic mean field was used without Coulomb and surface effects. Surface tension brings the coexistence binodal surface to lower pressure. The Coulomb interaction makes the binodal surface smaller and causes another pair of binodal points at low pressure and large proton fraction with fewer protons in the liquid phase and more protons in the gas phase.

  3. METAL-POOR, COOL GAS IN THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF A z = 2.4 STAR-FORMING GALAXY: DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR COLD ACCRETION?

    SciTech Connect

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-10-20

    In our current galaxy formation paradigm, high-redshift galaxies are predominantly fueled by accretion of cool, metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. Hydrodynamical simulations predict that this material should be observable in absorption against background sightlines within a galaxy's virial radius, as optically thick Lyman limit systems (LLSs) with low metallicities. Here we report the discovery of exactly such a strong metal-poor absorber at an impact parameter R = 58 kpc from a star-forming galaxy at z = 2.44. Besides strong neutral hydrogen (N{sub H{sup 0}}=10{sup 19.50±0.16} cm{sup -2}) we detect neutral deuterium and oxygen, allowing a precise measurement of the metallicity: log{sub 10}(Z/Z {sub ☉}) = –2.0 ± 0.17, or (7-15) × 10{sup –3} solar. Furthermore, the narrow deuterium linewidth requires a cool temperature <20,000 K. Given the striking similarities between this system and the predictions of simulations, we argue that it represents the direct detection of a high-redshift cold-accretion stream. The low-metallicity gas cloud is a single component of an absorption system exhibiting a complex velocity, ionization, and enrichment structure. Two other components have metallicities >0.1 solar, 10 times larger than the metal-poor component. We conclude that the photoionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) of this galaxy is highly inhomogeneous: the majority of the gas is in a cool, metal-poor and predominantly neutral phase, but the majority of the metals are in a highly ionized phase exhibiting weak neutral hydrogen absorption but strong metal absorption. If such inhomogeneity is common, then high-resolution spectra and detailed ionization modeling are critical to accurately appraise the distribution of metals in the high-redshift CGM.

  4. Coagulation of charged microparticles in neutral gas and charge-induced gel transitions.

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G E; Konopka, U

    2002-11-04

    Coagulation of charged particles was studied using the mean-field Smoluchowski equation. The coagulation equation was generalized for the case of a conserved system of charged particles. It was shown that runaway cluster growth (gelation) solutions exist if the charge-dipole (induced) interaction of clusters is included. When clusters are in thermal equilibrium with the ambient gas, the charge-dipole interaction dramatically enhances the aggregation process and considerably increases the likelihood of a gelation transition.

  5. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Certain ratios of light hydrocarbons remain virtually invariant over the course of petroleum generation, indicating steady-state catalysis rather than thermal cracking as the central feature to the mechanism of petroleum generation. Although the evidence for catalytic intervention is now compelling, the nature of the catalytic agent, its mode of activation and action are not clear. The author proposes that the transition metals, activated in the lipophilic domains of kerogen, are the catalytic agents in the conversion of normal paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas. The process proceeds through specific catalytic steps involving 3-, 5-, and 6-carbon ring-closures and the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds in the key steps. This hypothesis is analyzed in the context of published literature on catalysis by Ni, V, Ti, Co, and related transition metals. Activated under anaerobic conditions, these metals express extraordinary catalytic activity in each of the postulated steps. Moreover, metal-catalysis provides a reasonable kinetic pathway through which hydrogen and normal paraffins may combine to form a methane-enriched a natural gas. Given the anaerobic conditions of diagenesis and a kerogenous source of hydrogen, it is concluded that the transition metals, under catagenic conditions, are potentially active catalysts in the conversion of hydrogen and paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas.

  6. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the search for ways of a more efficient usage of the large, unexploited resources of methane, recent progress in the gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal ions is discussed. Mass spectrometric experiments demonstrate that the ligands can crucially influence both reactivity and selectivity of transition-metal cations in bond-activation processes, and the most reactive species derive from combinations of transition metals with the electronegative elements fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine. Furthermore, the collected knowledge about intramolecular kinetic isotope effects associated with the activation of C–H(D) bonds of methane can be used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a mere hydrogen-abstraction, a metal-assisted mechanism or more complex reactions such as formation of insertion intermediates or σ-bond metathesis. PMID:18955709

  7. Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, Brent; Southworth, Frank; Meyer, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types of public transit service, and their usefulness in helping a transit agency to reduce its carbon footprint through informed vehicle and fuel procurement decisions. Available calculators fall into two categories: registry/inventory based calculators most suitable for standardized voluntary reporting, carbon trading, and regulatory compliance; and multi-modal life cycle analysis calculators that seek comprehensive coverage of all direct and indirect emissions. Despite significant progress in calculator development, no single calculator as yet contains all of the information needed by transit agencies to develop a truly comprehensive, life cycle analysis-based accounting of the emissions produced by its vehicle fleet operations, and for a wide range of vehicle/fuel technology options.

  8. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service. A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, George

    2015-11-01

    The Roaring Fork Transit Authority (RFTA) and its VelociRFTA Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) program are unique in many ways. For example, VelociRFTA was the first rural BRT system in the United States and the operational environment of the VelociRFTA BRT is one of the most severe in the country, with extreme winter temperatures and altitudes close to 8,000 feet. RFTA viewed high altitude operation as the most challenging characteristic when it began considering the use of natural gas. RFTA is the second-largest public transit system in Colorado behind Denver's Regional Transportation District (RTD), and it is one of the largest rural public transit systems in the country. In 2013, RFTA accepted delivery of 22 new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses that went into service after completion of maintenance and refueling facilities earlier that year. This paper examines the lessons learned from RFTA's experience of investigating--and ultimately choosing--CNG for their new BRT program and focuses on the unique environment of RFTA's BRT application; the decision process to include CNG fueling in the project; unforeseen difficulties encountered in the operation of CNG buses; public perception; cost comparison to competing fuels; and considerations for indoor fueling facilities and project funding.

  9. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.

    2015-11-03

    The Roaring Fork Transit Authority (RFTA) and its VelociRFTA Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) program are unique in many ways. For example, VelociRFTA was the first rural BRT system in the United States and the operational environment of the VelociRFTA BRT is one of the most severe in the country, with extreme winter temperatures and altitudes close to 8,000 feet. RFTA viewed high altitude operation as the most challenging characteristic when it began considering the use of natural gas. RFTA is the second-largest public transit system in Colorado behind Denver's Regional Transportation District (RTD), and it is one of the largest rural public transit systems in the country. In 2013, RFTA accepted delivery of 22 new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses that went into service after completion of maintenance and refueling facilities earlier that year. This paper examines the lessons learned from RFTA's experience of investigating--and ultimately choosing--CNG for their new BRT program and focuses on the unique environment of RFTA's BRT application; the decision process to include CNG fueling in the project; unforeseen difficulties encountered in the operation of CNG buses; public perception; cost comparison to competing fuels; and considerations for indoor fueling facilities and project funding.

  10. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  11. Boundary-Layer Transition on a Slender Cone in Hypervelocity Flow with Real Gas Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Joseph Stephen

    The laminar to turbulent transition process in boundary layer flows in thermochemical nonequilibrium at high enthalpy is measured and characterized. Experiments are performed in the T5 Hypervelocity Reflected Shock Tunnel at Caltech, using a 1 m length 5-degree half angle axisymmetric cone instrumented with 80 fast-response annular thermocouples, complemented by boundary layer stability computations using the STABL software suite. A new mixing tank is added to the shock tube fill apparatus for premixed freestream gas experiments, and a new cleaning procedure results in more consistent transition measurements. Transition location is nondimensionalized using a scaling with the boundary layer thickness, which is correlated with the acoustic properties of the boundary layer, and compared with parabolized stability equation (PSE) analysis. In these nondimensionalized terms, transition delay with increasing CO2 concentration is observed: tests in 100% and 50% CO2, by mass, transition up to 25% and 15% later, respectively, than air experiments. These results are consistent with previous work indicating that CO2 molecules at elevated temperatures absorb acoustic instabilities in the MHz range, which is the expected frequency of the Mack second-mode instability at these conditions, and also consistent with predictions from PSE analysis. A strong unit Reynolds number effect is observed, which is believed to arise from tunnel noise. NTr for air from 5.4 to 13.2 is computed, substantially higher than previously reported for noisy facilities. Time- and spatially-resolved heat transfer traces are used to track the propagation of turbulent spots, and convection rates at 90%, 76%, and 63% of the boundary layer edge velocity, respectively, are observed for the leading edge, centroid, and trailing edge of the spots. A model constructed with these spot propagation parameters is used to infer spot generation rates from measured transition onset to completion distance. Finally, a novel

  12. HAT-P-12b: A LOW-DENSITY SUB-SATURN MASS PLANET TRANSITING A METAL-POOR K DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. A.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Pal, A.; Latham, D. W.; Sipocz, B.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Sasselov, D. D.; Kovacs, Gabor; Stefanik, R. P.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kovacs, Geza; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Butler, R. P.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I.

    2009-11-20

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-12b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V approx 12.8 K4 dwarf GSC 03033 - 00706, with a period P = 3.2130598 +- 0.0000021 d, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2454419.19556 +- 0.00020 (BJD), and transit duration 0.0974 +- 0.0006 d. The host star has a mass of 0.73 +- 0.02 M{sub sun}, radius of 0.70{sup +0.02}{sub -0.01} R{sub sun}, effective temperature 4650 +- 60 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.29 +- 0.05. We find a slight correlation between the observed spectral line bisector spans and the radial velocity, so we consider, and rule out, various blend configurations including a blend with a background eclipsing binary, and hierarchical triple systems where the eclipsing body is a star or a planet. We conclude that a model consisting of a single star with a transiting planet best fits the observations, and show that a likely explanation for the apparent correlation is contamination from scattered moonlight. Based on this model, the planetary companion has a mass of 0.211 +- 0.012 M{sub J} and radius of 0.959{sup +0.029}{sub -0.021} R{sub J} yielding a mean density of 0.295 +- 0.025 g cm{sup -3}. Comparing these observations with recent theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-12b is consistent with a approx1-4.5 Gyr, mildly irradiated, H/He-dominated planet with a core mass M{sub C} approx< 10 M {sub +}. HAT-P-12b is thus the least massive H/He-dominated gas giant planet found to date. This record was previously held by Saturn.

  13. Long non-coding RNA CCAT2 is associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes tumor metastasis by regulating Snail2-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongfu; Wang, Binfeng; Zhang, Fabiao; Wang, Aidong; Du, Xuefeng; Hu, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Fang, Zheping

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that aberrant expressions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in various malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to investigate the role of lncRNA colon cancer-associated transcript 2 (CCAT2) in the progression of HCC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that CCAT2 was upregulated in HCC cell lines and cancerous tissues compared with normal liver cell line and adjacent normal tissue samples. The level of CCAT2 was positively associated with tumor–node–metastasis stages and vessel invasion. Survival analyses revealed that high CCAT2 expression predicted poor prognostic outcomes, serving as an independent prognostic factor for HCC patients. Patients with high CCAT2 expression had a 1.849-fold increased risk of death compared with those with low CCAT2 expression. Moreover, we also found that knockdown of CCAT2 expression reduced cell migration and invasion in vitro. We further demonstrated that CCAT2 played a key role in enhancing the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the regulation of vimentin, E-cadherin and transcription factor snail2 expression. Taken together, our findings showed that high CCAT2 expression is associated with poor survival in HCC patients. CCAT2 promotes HCC progression by regulating Snail2-induced EMT. CCAT2 may be a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:28280353

  14. Quantifying the Gas Inside Dust Cavities in Transitional Disks: Implications for Young Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; van der Marel, N.; Bruderer, S.; Pinilla, P.

    2015-12-01

    ALMA observations of a small sample of transitional disks with large dust cavities observed in Cycle 0 and 1 are summarized. The gas and dust surface density structures are inferred from the continuum and 12CO, 13CO and C18O line data using the DALI physical-chemical code. Thanks to its ability to self-shield, CO can survive inside dust cavities in spite of being exposed to intense UV radiation and can thus be used as a probe of the gas structure. Modeling of the existing data shows that gas is present inside the dust cavities in all cases, but at a reduced level compared with the gas surface density profile of the outer disk. The gas density decrease inside the dust cavity radius by factors of up to 104 suggests clearing by one or more planetary-mass companions. The accompanying pressure bumps naturally lead to trapping of the mm-sized dust grains observed in the ALMA images.

  15. {sup 87}Rb hyperfine-transition dephasing in mixed buffer-gas systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.; Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2007-05-15

    Elucidating the mechanisms of dephasing in the alkali-metal ground state hyperfine transition has remained an unsatisfactorily resolved problem since the mid-1960s, even though its solution has relevance to next-generation atomic clocks. Recently, however, measurements of electronic spin relaxation in strong magnetic fields have resolved a number of outstanding ambiguities, and the situation has greatly improved. Unfortunately, while these studies have illuminated the processes contributing to hyperfine transition dephasing, they only allow one to infer actual dephasing rates, {gamma}. The direct measurement of dephasing rates remains problematic, primarily as a result of temperature gradient inhomogeneous broadening, which makes it nearly impossible to distinguish systematic from physical effects. Here, we demonstrate that by measuring {gamma} as a function of mole fraction in mixed buffer-gas systems we can isolate temperature gradient effects, thereby allowing a direct comparison between theory and experiment. In the present work, we examine the linewidth of the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine transition in Ar-N{sub 2} mixed buffer-gas systems. We obtain good agreement between theory and experiment so long as we include the full dephasing contribution from RbAr van der Waals molecules: the spin-rotation contribution, {gamma}{sub SR}, and the contribution from the change in {sup 87}Rb hyperfine coupling, {gamma}{sub B}, which we refer to as the Bouchiat rate. We have been able to measure {gamma}{sub B}, obtaining {gamma}{sub B}=87{+-}6 s{sup -1} for RbAr.

  16. Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvan, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy G. The thermodynamical potential G is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

  17. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  18. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  19. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  20. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  1. Simulation of the transition radiation detection conditions in the ATLAS TRT detector filled with argon and krypton gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, A. S.; Maevskiy, A. S.

    2015-12-15

    Performance of the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) at the ATLAS experiment with argon and krypton gas mixtures was simulated. The efficiency of transition radiation registration, which is necessary for electron identification, was estimated along with the electron identification capabilities under such conditions.

  2. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  3. The role of gas phase reactions in the deflagration-to-detonation transition of high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.; Derr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The inadequacies of the two commonly used assumptions are shown, along with the need for considering gas phase reactions. Kinetic parameters that describe the gas phase reactions for several ingredients are provided, and the first steps in convective combustion leading to deflagration to detonation transition are described.

  4. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Hydrogen Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Burt W.; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed in earth-gravity to determine how buoyancy affected transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. The jet exit Froude number characterizing buoyancy in the flame was varied from 1.65 x 10(exp 5) to 1.14 x 10(exp 8) by varying the operating pressure and/or burner inside diameter. Laminar fuel jet was discharged vertically into ambient air flowing through a combustion chamber. Flame characteristics were observed using rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a line-of-site optical diagnostic technique. Results show that the breakpoint length for a given jet exit Reynolds number increased with increasing Froude number. Data suggest that buoyant transitional flames might become laminar in the absence of gravity. The schlieren technique was shown as effective in quantifying the flame characteristics.

  5. Clean air program: Compressed natural gas safety in transit operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D.M.; Malcosky, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report examines the safety issues relating to the use of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) in transit service. The safety issues were determined by on-site surveys performed by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of McLean, Virginia of seven transit agencies using CNG. The survey consisted of: (1) extensive interviews; (2) review of records, procedures, and plans relating to safety; (3) examination of facilities and equipment; (4) observation of operations including fueling, maintenance, morning start-up, and revenue service; and (5) measurements of methane concentrations in the air where the buses are being fueled or stored. Interviews included all job categories associated with management, operations, safety, maintenance, acquisition, and support.

  6. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  7. Thermal phase transitions in a honeycomb lattice gas with three-body interactions.

    PubMed

    Lohöfer, Maximilian; Bonnes, Lars; Wessel, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    We study the thermal phase transitions in a classical (hard-core) lattice gas model with nearest-neighbor three-body interactions on the honeycomb lattice, based on parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulations. This system realizes incompressible low-temperature phases at fractional fillings of 9/16, 5/8, and 3/4 that were identified in a previous study of a related quantum model. In particular, both the 9/16 and the 5/8 phase exhibit an extensive ground-state degeneracy reflecting the frustrated nature of the three-body interactions on the honeycomb lattice. The thermal melting of the 9/16 phase is found to be a first-order, discontinuous phase transition. On the other hand, from the thermodynamic behavior we obtain indications for a four-states Potts-model thermal transition out of the 5/8 phase. We find that this thermal Potts-model transition relates to the selection of one out of four extensive sectors within the low-energy manifold of the 5/8 phase, which we obtain via an exact mapping of the ground-state manifold to a hard-core dimer model on an embedded honeycomb superlattice.

  8. Multiple phase transitions in extended hard-core lattice gas models in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R

    2014-07-01

    We study the k-NN hard-core lattice gas model in which the first k next-nearest-neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from occupation by other particles on a two-dimensional square lattice. This model is the lattice version of the hard-disk system with increasing k corresponding to decreasing lattice spacing. While the hard-disk system is known to undergo a two-step freezing process with increasing density, the lattice model has been known to show only one transition. Here, based on Monte Carlo simulations and high-density expansions of the free energy and density, we argue that for k = 4,10,11,14,⋯, the lattice model undergoes multiple transitions with increasing density. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm the same for k = 4,...,11. This, in turn, resolves an existing puzzle as to why the 4-NN model has a continuous transition against the expectation of a first-order transition.

  9. Application of four dimensional matrix for thermal analysis of Slovak transit gas pipeline by program FENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széplaky, Dávid; Varga, Augustín

    2016-06-01

    The contribution describes the principle of the FENIX program operation, which was designed to determine the temperature field of the transit pipeline for the transportation of natural gas. The program itself consists of several modules which are reciprocally linked. The basis of the program is the elementary balance method by means of which the unsteady heat transfer is assigned in several layers in different directions. The first step was to assess both the pressure and temperature of the natural gas mode, the second step is to determine the heat transfer through the walls of the pipes, and the last one is to determine the distribution of the temperature field in the surroundings of the pipeline.

  10. Interfacial Friction in Gas-Liquid Annular Flow: Analogies to Full and Transition Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.C.; Beus, S.G.; Fore, L.B.

    1999-03-01

    New film thickness and pressure gradient data were obtained in a 5.08 by 101.6 mm duct for nitrogen and water in annular flow. Pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and temperatures of 38 and 93 C were used to vary the gas density and liquid viscosity. These data are used to compute interfacial shear stresses and interfacial friction factors for comparison with several accepted literature correlations. These comparisons are reasonable for small values of the relative film thickness. However, the new data cover conditions not approached by the data used to construct those correlations. By combining the current data with the results of two other comprehensive modern experimental studies, a new correlation for the interfacial friction factor has been developed. This correlation adds elements of transition roughness to Wallis' fully-rough analogy to better predict interfacial friction factors over a wide range of gas Reynolds numbers and liquid film thicknesses.

  11. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; McQuillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  12. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  13. Influence of the glass transition on the liquid-gas spinodal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Testard, Vincent; Berthier, Ludovic; Kob, Walter

    2011-03-25

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of the liquid-gas phase separation if the temperature is lowered across the glass transition of the dense phase. We observe a gradual change from phase separated systems at high temperatures to nonequilibrium, gel-like structures that evolve very slowly at low temperatures. The microscopic mechanisms responsible for the coarsening strongly depend on temperature, and change from diffusive motion at high temperature to a strongly intermittent, heterogeneous, and thermally activated dynamics at low temperature, leading to logarithmically slow growth of the typical domain size.

  14. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; Mcquillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  15. Finite-momentum superfluidity and phase transitions in a p-wave resonant Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungsoo; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2011-10-15

    We study a degenerate two-species gas of bosonic atoms interacting through a p-wave Feshbach resonance as, for example, realized in a {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture. We show that, in addition to a conventional atomic and a p-wave molecular spinor-1 superfluidity at large positive and negative detunings, respectively, the system generically exhibits a finite-momentum atomic-molecular superfluidity at intermediate detuning around the unitary point. We analyze the detailed nature of the corresponding phases and the associated quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  16. Molecular-Scale Remnants of the Liquid-Gas Transition in Supercritical Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, V. P.; Jones, A.; Cipcigan, F. S.; Crain, J.; Martyna, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    An electronically coarse-grained model for water reveals a persistent vestige of the liquid-gas transition deep into the supercritical region. A crossover in the density dependence of the molecular dipole arises from the onset of nonpercolating hydrogen bonds. The crossover points coincide with the Widom line in the scaling region but extend farther, tracking the heat capacity maxima, offering evidence for liquidlike and gaslike state points in a "one-phase" fluid. The effect is present even in dipole-limit models, suggesting that it is common for all molecular liquids exhibiting dipole enhancement in the liquid phase.

  17. Clean air program: Liquefied natural gas safety in transit operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D.M.; Malcosky, N.D.

    1996-03-01

    The report examines the safety issues relating to the use of Liquefied natural Gas (LNG) in transit service. The surveys consisted of: (1) extensive interviews; (2) review of recrods, procedures, and plans relating to safety; (3) examination of facilities and equipment; (4) observations of operations including fueling, maintenance, morning start-up, and revenue service; (5) measurement of methane concentrations in the air where the buses are being fueled or stored. Interviews included all job categories associated with management, operations, safety, maintenance, acquisition, and support. The surveys also included an examination of the occupational hygiene aspects of LNG use.

  18. MUSE searches for galaxies near very metal-poor gas clouds at z ˜ 3: new constraints for cold accretion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Dekel, Avishai; Morris, Simon L.; O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Theuns, Tom

    2016-10-01

    We report on the search for galaxies in the proximity of two very metal-poor gas clouds at z ˜ 3 towards the quasar Q0956+122. With a 5-hour Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integration in a ˜500 × 500 kpc2 region centred at the quasar position, we achieve a ≥80 per cent complete spectroscopic survey of continuum-detected galaxies with mR ≤ 25 mag and Lyα emitters with luminosity LLyα ≥ 3 × 1041 erg s- 1. We do not identify galaxies at the redshift of a z ˜ 3.2 Lyman limit system (LLS) with log Z/Z⊙ = -3.35 ± 0.05, placing this gas cloud in the intergalactic medium or circumgalactic medium of a galaxy below our sensitivity limits. Conversely, we detect five Lyα emitters at the redshift of a pristine z ˜ 3.1 LLS with log Z/Z⊙ ≤ -3.8, while ˜0.4 sources were expected given the z ˜ 3 Lyα luminosity function. Both this high detection rate and the fact that at least three emitters appear aligned in projection with the LLS suggest that this pristine cloud is tracing a gas filament that is feeding one or multiple galaxies. Our observations uncover two different environments for metal-poor LLSs, implying a complex link between these absorbers and galaxy haloes, which ongoing MUSE surveys will soon explore in detail. Moreover, in agreement with recent MUSE observations, we detected a ˜ 90 kpc Lyα nebula at the quasar redshift and three Lyα emitters reminiscent of a `dark galaxy' population.

  19. Two-dimensional imaging of gas-to-particle transition in flames by laser-induced nanoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiyang; Li, Shuiqing Ren, Yihua; Yao, Qiang; Law, Chung K.

    2014-01-13

    Two-dimensional imaging of gas/particle phase transition of metal oxides in their native high-temperature flow conditions, using laser-driven localized nanoplasmas, was obtained by utilizing the gap between the excitation energies of the gas and particle phases such that only the Ti atoms in the particle phase were selectively excited without detectable Bremsstrahlung background. These in situ images of the particle phase Ti distribution allow the quantitative visualization of the transition of the gas precursors to the nanoparticle phase across the flame sheet as well as diffusion of the particle concentration in the post-flame zone.

  20. KELT-6b: A P ~ 7.9 Day Hot Saturn Transiting a Metal-poor Star with a Long-period Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Karen A.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Siverd, Robert J.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Kielkopf, John F.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Street, Rachel A.; Cargile, Phillip; Mack, Claude E.; Oberst, Thomas E.; Avril, Ryan L.; Mellon, Samuel N.; McLeod, Kim K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Mao, Qingqing; Richert, Alexander J. W.; DePoy, Darren L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Pogge, Richard W.; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T eff = 6102 ± 43 K, log g_\\star =4.07_{-0.07}^{+0.04}, and [Fe/H] = -0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M sstarf = 1.09 ± 0.04 M ⊙ and radius R_\\star =1.58_{-0.09}^{+0.16} \\,R_\\odot. The planetary companion has mass MP = 0.43 ± 0.05 M Jup, radius R_{P}=1.19_{-0.08}^{+0.13} \\,R_Jup, surface gravity log g_{P}=2.86_{-0.08}^{+0.06}, and density \\rho _{P}=0.31_{-0.08}^{+0.07}\\,g\\,cm^{-3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22_{-0.10}^{+0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T c(BJDTDB) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ~4}-7}. KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ~0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images. KELT is a joint project of The Ohio State University, Vanderbilt University, and Lehigh University.

  1. KELT-6b: A P ∼ 7.9 day hot Saturn transiting a metal-poor star with a long-period companion

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Siverd, Robert J.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; and others

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T {sub eff} = 6102 ± 43 K, log g{sub ⋆}=4.07{sub −0.07}{sup +0.04}, and [Fe/H] = –0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M {sub *} = 1.09 ± 0.04 M {sub ☉} and radius R{sub ⋆}=1.58{sub −0.09}{sup +0.16} R{sub ⊙}. The planetary companion has mass M{sub P} = 0.43 ± 0.05 M {sub Jup}, radius R{sub P}=1.19{sub −0.08}{sup +0.13} R{sub Jup}, surface gravity log g{sub P}=2.86{sub −0.08}{sup +0.06}, and density ρ{sub P}=0.31{sub −0.08}{sup +0.07} g cm{sup −3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22{sub −0.10}{sup +0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T {sub c}(BJD{sub TDB}) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ∼4)-7). KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ∼0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images.

  2. An experimental trace gas investigation of fluid transport and mixing in a circular-to-rectangular transition duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Hingst, W. R.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1991-01-01

    An ethylene trace gas technique was used to map out fluid transport and mixing within a circular to rectangular transition duct. Ethylene gas was injected at several points in a cross stream plane upstream of the transition duct. Ethylene concentration contours were determined at several cross stream measurement planes spaced axially within the duct. The flow involved a uniform inlet flow at a Mach number level of 0.5. Statistical analyses were used to quantitatively interpret the trace gas results. Also, trace gas data were considered along with aerodynamic and surface flow visualization results to ascertain transition duct flow phenomena. Convection of wall boundary layer fluid by vortices produced regions of high total pressure loss in the duct. The physical extent of these high loss regions is governed by turbulent diffusion.

  3. Effect of transition from slip to free molecular flow on gas transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Maria Cecilia

    2007-10-01

    Traditional models, such as the advection-diffusion and the dusty gas models, overlook the contribution of the transition flow regime between the slip and the free molecular flow, on the gas transport in porous media. In this work we demonstrate that, due to the existence of this intermediate regime, the Klinkenberg [Drill. & Prod. Prac. 1941, 200 (1941)] parameter b depends on the pressure. Reported experiments were used to corroborate such an effect and a formulation that extends the Klinkenberg equation—to include the effect of a region at pore scale where both molecule-molecule and molecule-wall interactions are important—was developed. The mathematical form of the extended Klinkenberg equation remains the same, but the slippage Klinkenberg's parameter b is now a generalized parameter that is a function of Knudsen's number. It was demonstrated that the widely accepted relation between the parameter b and the Knudsen diffusion coefficient is a good approximation just for Knudsen numbers corresponding to the free molecular flow regime. The model proposed in this paper reproduces the experimental data and predicts practical situations where important errors on total flow rate can be expected if the transition flow regime is neglected in the formalism.

  4. Gas and dust hydrodynamical simulations of massive lopsided transition discs - II. Dust concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruteau, Clément; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of large dust grains in massive lopsided transition discs via 2D hydrodynamical simulations including both gas and dust. Our simulations adopt a ring-like gas density profile that becomes unstable against the Rossby-wave instability and forms a large crescent-shaped vortex. When gas self-gravity is discarded, but the indirect force from the displacement of the star by the vortex is included, we confirm that dust grains with stopping times of order the orbital time, which should be typically a few centimetres in size, are trapped ahead of the vortex in the azimuthal direction, while the smallest and largest grains concentrate towards the vortex centre. We obtain maximum shift angles of about 25°. Gas self-gravity accentuates the concentration differences between small and large grains. At low to moderate disc masses, the larger the grains, the farther they are trapped ahead of the vortex. Shift angles up to 90° are reached for 10 cm-sized grains, and we show that such large offsets can produce a double-peaked continuum emission observable at mm/cm wavelengths. This behaviour comes about because the large grains undergo horseshoe U-turns relative to the vortex due to the vortex's gravity. At large disc masses, since the vortex's pattern frequency becomes increasingly slower than Keplerian, small grains concentrate slightly beyond the vortex and large grains form generally non-axisymmetric ring-like structures around the vortex's radial location. Gas self-gravity therefore imparts distinct trapping locations for small and large dust grains, which may be probed by current and future observations.

  5. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell–cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  6. Over-Expressed Twist Associates with Markers of Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition and Predicts Poor Prognosis in Breast Cancers via ERK and Akt Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuan-Ke; Chen, Wei-Ling; Zhang, Fan; Bai, Jing-Wen; Qiu, Si-Qi; Du, Cai-Wen; Huang, Wen-He; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of Twist, a highly conserved basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and predicts poor prognosis in various kinds of cancers, including breast cancer. In order to further clarify Twist’s role in breast cancer, we detected Twist expression in breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry. Twist expression was observed in 54% (220/408) of breast cancer patients and was positively associated with tumor size, Ki67, VEGF-C and HER2 expression. Conversely, Twist was negatively associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and E-cadherin expression. Patients with Twist expression had a poorer prognosis for 30-month disease free survival (DFS) (82.9%) than patients with negative Twist (92.3%). Overexpression of Twist led to dramatic changes in cellular morphology, proliferation, migratory/invasive capability, and expression of EMT-related biomarkers in breast cancer cells. Moreover, we show that Twist serves as a driver of tumorigenesis, as well as an inducer of EMT, at least in part, through activation of the Akt and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathways which are critical for Twist-mediated EMT. Our results demonstrate that Twist expression is an important prognostic factor in breast cancer patients. PMID:26295469

  7. Glass transition of adsorbed stereoregular PPMA by inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, T.; Rezzaki, M.; Grohens, Y.; Schultz, J.

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, we used inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution that proved to be a powerful technique to determine glass transition and other transitions of PMMA adsorbed on α-alumina. We highlighted the glass transition temperature of the system PMMA/α-Al2O3 with defined polymer tacticity at various covered surface fractions. Thus, the Tg of the adsorbed isotactic PMMA increases strongly as compared to the bulk value. The study of the physical chemical properties of PMMA/α-alumina revealed an important difference in the acidic and basic behaviour, in Lewis terms, of aluminium oxide covered by various concentrations of PMMA. It appears that there is a stabilisation of the physical chemical properties of PMMA/α-Al2O3 for a surface coverage above 50%. This study also highlighted an important effect of the tacticity of the polymer on the acid-base character of the system PMMA/Al2O3. Dans cet article, nous montrons que la chromatographie gazeuse inverse (CGI) à dilution infinie se révèle être une technique très intéressante pour la détermination de la transition vitreuse de polymères stéréoréguliers adsorbés sur des substrats solides tels que l'alumine. Nous avons mis en évidence des transitions attribuées aux phénomènes de relaxation béta, transition vitreuse et autres transitions des systèmes PMMA/Al2O3 de tacticité définie à différents taux de recouvrement. Ainsi, la Tg du PMMA isotactique adsorbé augmente de façon significative par rapport a celle du polymère massique. L'étude des propriétés physico-chimiques du système PMMA/Al2O3, révèle une différence importante dans le comportement acido-basique, au sens de Lewis, de l'alumine pour de taux de recouvrement en PMMA variables. Il apparaît qu'il y a stabilisation des propriétés physico-chimiques de PMMA/Al2O3 pour un taux de recouvrement en PMMA supérieur à 50 %. Cette étude a montré également une influence importante de la tacticité du polymère sur le

  8. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  9. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of transition properties in highly charged inert-gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out an extensive investigation of various spectroscopic properties of highly charged inert-gas ions using a relativistic coupled-cluster method through a one-electron detachment procedure. In particular, we have calculated the atomic states 2 s22 p53/2 2P, 2 s22 p51/2 2P, and 2 s 2 p61/2 2S in F-like inert-gas ions; 3 s23 p53/2 2P, 3 s23 p51/2 2P, and 3 s 3 p61/2 2S states in Cl-like Kr, Xe, and Rn; and 4 s24 p53/2 2P, 4 s24 p51/2 2P, and 4 s 4 p61/2 2S states in Br-like Xe and Rn. Starting from a single-reference Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function, we construct our exact atomic states by including the dynamic correlation effects in an all-order perturbative fashion. Employing this method, we estimate the ionization potential energies of three low-lying orbitals present in their respective closed-shell configurations. Since the considered highly charged inert-gas ions exhibit huge relativistic effects, we have taken into account the corrections due to Breit interaction as well as from the dominant quantum electrodynamic correction such as vacuum polarization and self-energy effects in these systems. Using our calculated relativistic atomic wave functions and energies, we accurately determine various transition properties such as wavelengths, line strengths, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and lifetimes of the excited states.

  10. In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brent J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Hering, Susanne V.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the gas/particle-phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds is critical in determining atmospheric aerosol formation processes and growth rates, which in turn affect global climate and human health. The Study of Organic Aerosol at Riverside 2005 campaign was performed to gain a better understanding of the factors responsible for aerosol formation and growth in Riverside, CA, a region with high concentrations of secondary organic aerosol formed through the phase transfer of low-volatility reaction products from the oxidation of precursor gases. We explore the ability of the thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) to measure gas-to-particle-phase transitioning for several organic compound classes (polar and nonpolar) found in the ambient Riverside atmosphere by using in situ observations of several hundred semivolatile organic compounds. Here we compare TAG measurements to modeled partitioning of select semivolatile organic compounds. Although TAG was not designed to quantify the vapor phase of semivolatile organics, TAG measurements do distinguish when specific compounds are dominantly in the vapor phase, are dominantly in the particle phase, or have both phases present. Because the TAG data are both speciated and time-resolved, this distinction is sufficient to see the transition from vapor to particle phase as a function of carbon number and compound class. Laboratory studies typically measure the phase partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds by using pure compounds or simple mixtures, whereas hourly TAG phase partitioning measurements can be made in the complex mixture of thousands of polar/nonpolar and organic/inorganic compounds found in the atmosphere. PMID:20142511

  11. Modelling flow pattern transitions for steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes. [Bubble, slug, churn and dispersed-annular; also existence regions and transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taitel, Y.; Bornea, D.; Dukler, A.E.

    1980-05-01

    Models for predicting flow patterns in steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes (such as production-well tubing) delineate the transition boundaries between each of the four basic flow patterns for gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes: bubble, slug, churn, and dispersed-annular. Model results suggest that churn flow is the development region for the slug pattern and that bubble flow can exist in small pipes only at high liquid rates, where turbulent dispersion forces are high. Each transition depends on the flow-rate pair, fluid properties, and pipe size, but the nature of the dependence is different for each transition because of differing control mechanisms. The theoretical predictions are in reasonably good agreement with a variety of published flow maps based on experimental data.

  12. Flow behaviour and transitions in surfactant-laden gas-liquid vertical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Chakraborty, Sourojeet; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to elucidate the effect of surfactant additives on vertical gas-liquid counter-current pipe flows. Two experimental campaigns were undertaken, one with water and one with a light oil (Exxsol D80) as the liquid phase; in both cases air was used as the gaseous phase. Suitable surfactants were added to the liquid phase up to the critical micelle concentration (CMC); measurements in the absence of additives were also taken, for benchmarking. The experiments were performed in a 32-mm bore and 5-m long vertical pipe, over a range of superficial velocities (liquid: 1 to 7 m/s, gas: 1 to 44 m/s). High-speed axial- and side-view imaging was performed at different lengths along the pipe, together with pressure drop measurements. Flow regime maps were then obtained describing the observed flow behaviour and related phenomena, i.e., downwards/upwards annular flow, flooding, bridging, gas/liquid entrainment, oscillatory film flow, standing waves, climbing films, churn flow and dryout. Comparisons of the air-water and oil-water results will be presented and discussed, along with the role of the surfactants in affecting overall and detailed flow behaviour and transitions; in particular, a possible mechanism underlying the phenomenon of flooding will be presented. EPSRC UK Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  13. Mortality of urban transit workers: indications of an excess of deaths by suicide using gas.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, T L

    1992-08-01

    Urban bus drivers are exposed to a variety of discomforts and physical hazards associated with their occupation. We obtained death certificates for 99 per cent of 219 decreased members of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 596 of Edmonton, Alberta, and conducted a proportionate mortality study against the distribution of all deaths among men in the province of Alberta, standardized by age and year of death. We found a highly significant excess from undetermined accidents due to gas (proportionate mortality ratio (PMR) 3761, based on 3 cases; p less than 0.003), which may bear a relationship to an elevation observed for suicide due to gas, which failed to achieve statistical significance (PMR 242, based on 2 cases). Collateral evidence suggests that this excess may include misclassification of some suicides. Gas inhalation as an instrument of suicide may be suggested by familiarity with vehicle exhaust. No other excess achieved statistical significance. Several causes of death showed elevated PMRs of relatively modest magnitude; elevations in PMR for lung cancer (PMR 154) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (PMR 176) suggest a mutual association with smoking.

  14. Transit time of electrons and gas gain effects in P-10 and Ar+CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Gloria M.; Waker, Anthony J.

    2014-11-01

    An Electron Mobility Spectrometer (EMS) has been designed to measure the transit time and electron attachment effects in proportional counter fill gases. The aim of the EMS is to observe how electron parameters including the drift velocity, pulse formation time, multiplication gain and electron attachment depend on the gas composition and operating parameters of the EMS. The operating parameters of interest for the EMS include the applied high voltage and gas pressure. Current research interests include the measurement of the time between the generation of the electron-ion pairs and arrival of the electrons at the wire anode in P-10 and Ar+CO2 gases. Additionally, the study of the multiplication properties of the detector as a function of pulse formation time in the two gases and as a function of applied electric field will be presented. The overall objective of this work is to investigate if the gas-gain of a proportional counter can be optimized by minimizing electron attachment with oxygen to improve the measurement of tritium in air.

  15. Gas6 induces cancer cell migration and epithelial–mesenchymal transition through upregulation of MAPK and Slug

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Mira; Kim, Semi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cancer cell migration. •Gas6 treatment and subsequent Axl activation induce cell migration and EMT via upregulation of Slug. •Slug expression mediated by Gas6 is mainly through c-Jun and ATF-2 in an ERK1/2 and JNK-dependent manner. •The Gas6/Axl-Slug axis may be exploited as a target for anti-cancer metastasis therapy. -- Abstract: Binding of Gas6 to Axl (Gas6/Axl axis) alters cellular functions, including migration, invasion, proliferation, and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cell migration remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that Gas6 induced the activation of JNK and ERK1/2 signaling in cancer cells expressing Axl, resulting in the phosphorylation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors c-Jun and ATF-2, and induction of Slug. Depletion of c-Jun or ATF-2 by siRNA attenuated the Gas6-induced expression of Slug. Slug expression was required for cell migration and E-cadherin reduction/vimentin induction induced by Gas6. These results suggest that Gas6 induced cell migration via Slug upregulation in JNK- and ERK1/2-dependent mechanisms. These data provide an important insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating Gas6-induced cell migration.

  16. Gas holdup and flow regime transition in spider-sparger bubble column: effect of liquid phase properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besagni, G.; Inzoli, F.; De Guido, G.; Pellegrini, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of the liquid velocity and the liquid phase properties on the gas holdup and the flow regime transition in a large-diameter and large-scale counter-current two-phase bubble column. In particular, we compared and analysed the experimental data obtained in our previous experimental studies. The bubble column is 5.3 m in height, has an inner diameter of 0.24 m, it was operated with gas superficial velocities in the range of 0.004–0.20 m/s and, in the counter-current mode, the liquid was recirculated up to a superficial velocity of -0.09 m/s. Air was used as the dispersed phase and various fluids (tap water, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ethanol and monoethylene glycol) were employed as liquid phases. The experimental dataset consist in gas holdup measurements and was used to investigate the global fluid dynamics and the flow regime transition between the homogeneous flow regime and the transition flow regime. We found that the liquid velocity and the liquid phase properties significantly affect the gas holdup and the flow regime transition. In this respect, a possible relationship (based on the lift force) between the flow regime transition and the gas holdup was proposed.

  17. Sediments overlying exhumed continental mantle: a proxy for the morphotectonic evolution of the Ocean Continent Transition in magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpoff, A. M.; Manatschal, G.; Bernoulli, D.; Lagabrielle, Y.

    2003-04-01

    Observations from ancient and present-day magma-poor rifted margins in the Alps and Iberia provide compelling evidence that within the ocean-continent transition (OCT) crustal and sub-continental mantle rocks were exhumed along downward-concave faults which were active during final rifting and accommodated high amounts of extension. The faults are overlain by stranded allochthons of continental origin, pillow basalts, and pelagic sediments, i.e. radiolarites and/or pelagic limestones, and hemipelagic shales. Associated with the faults are tectono-sedimentary breccias and various types of clastic sediments, ranging from debris flow deposits to laminated sandstone, and quartz-rich silt- and claystones. Mineralogical studies of the shales, red jaspers, and red cherts overlying mantle rocks in the Alps of eastern Switzerland are typically quartz-rich and contain variable amounts of phyllosilicates (chlorite and/or mica), feldspars, ± calcite, oxides, pyrite, and epidote. Their main geochemical characteristic is the high silica and low iron and manganese content, which contrasts with that of "metalliferous" Fe-Mn-Si-rich sediments overlying oceanic basalts. High Fe, Ba, REE, U/Th values measured in black shales overlying mantle rocks in the proximal OCT point to a strong hydrothermal activity associated with mantle exhumation. The clastic sediments in the OCT show a wide range of compositions related to mantle, continental crust, and/or pelagic contributions. In particular, the fact that these sediments contain abundant material derived from continental basement rocks seems at odds with their occurrence on top of tectonized mantle rocks. However, drilling in the Iberia margin, where tectonized mantle rocks are overlain by sedimentary breccias (e.g. ODP Sites 1068, 1070), shed new light on the observations in the Alps. Based on drill-hole and seismic data, the tectono-sedimentary breccias drilled in the OCT off Iberia may be interpreted to result from a conveyor

  18. Self-consistent calculations of rare-gas-transition-metal interaction potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakova, D.; Doyen, G.; v. Trentini, F.

    1985-11-01

    A model Hamiltonian is used to calculate potential-energy surfaces for He and Ne on the (110) faces of Ni, Cu, Pd, and Ag. The calculations are nonperturbative, self-consistent, and contain no parameters which are fittable with respect to the gas-solid interaction. Static image-force effects are included. The theory represents the first quantum-mechanical approach to rare-gas-transition-metal potentials which includes the interaction of the rare-gas orbitals with the d electrons in a consistent way. Corrugation is found to be approximately proportional to the d-electron charge density. The sp band is represented by a Sommerfeld model with hybridization gap, which does not contribute to the corrugation. Part of the potential arises through the hybridization of the rare-gas orbitals with the unoccupied metal states. This interference energy is roughly a factor of 2 larger for neon than for helium, leading to larger corrugations of the neon potentials as compared with the helium potentials. This is in agreement with recent experiments, but in contrast to earlier theoretical predictions. The theoretically calculated corrugations and well depths compare reasonably to the experimental data where available. The computed values of corrugation for He increase in the order Ni, Cu, Ag, and Pd. This agrees with experiments where soft potentials have been fitted to the scattering data, although the predicted He/Ni(110) corrugation is overly large by more than a factor of 2. With increasing energy, the He corrugation increases slightly in the calculations. The dependence is nearly constant for Ni and strongest for Pd. For Ne/Ni(110) and Ne/Pd(110) corrugation decreases with energy. Image-force effects are found to be important for the corrugation and softness of the neon potentials.

  19. CCL20 and CXCL8 synergize to promote progression and poor survival outcome in patients with colorectal cancer by collaborative induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xian-Shuo; Li, Yun-Feng; Tan, Jing; Sun, Bin; Xiao, You-Chuan; Fang, Xing-Bao; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Qiang; Dong, Jian-Hua; Li, Ming; Qian, Hai-hua; Yin, Zheng-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Bin

    2014-06-28

    Liver metastases represent the major cause of death in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent studies have suggested that the chemotactic responses of tumor cells are necessary for metastatic spread to the liver, and CCL20 and CXCL8 have a strong association with CRC metastasis. The aim of our study was to identify the mechanisms by which CCL20 and CXCL8 synergize to promote metastatic progression and evaluated their potential as prognostic markers for CRC patients. The abilities of CCL20 and CXCL8 to promote CRC cell progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition(EMT)phenotype were analyzed in vitro. Possible signaling pathways were investigated with specific pathway inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA). 213 Patients with CRC who underwent surgery were enrolled for analysis of CCL20, CXCL8 and E-cadherin expressions in tumor tissues. Prognostic factors were then identified. CCL20 or CXCL8 alone was not sufficient to induce complete EMT in CRC cells, but both of them could coordinately induce EMT-like phenotype that was required to maintain CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion. PI3K/AKT-ERK1/2 pathway crosstalk was demonstrated to be responsible for this process. Coexpression of CCL20 and CXCL8 was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression in human CRC tissues. CRC patients with coexpression of CCL20 and CXCL8 were more likely to develop liver metastases and both coexpression was an independent high-risk factor for a most poor prognosis. CCL20 and CXCL8 synergize to promote CRC metastatic progression by coordinated induction of EMT via PI3K/AKT-ERK1/2 signaling axis. Detection of both coexpressions can be used to predict clinical outcomes in CRC patients.

  20. Theory of femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy of gas-phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lucht, Robert P; Kinnius, Paul J; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2007-07-28

    A theoretical analysis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy of gas-phase resonances using femtosecond lasers is performed. The time-dependent density matrix equations for the femtosecond CARS process are formulated and manipulated into a form suitable for solution by direct numerical integration (DNI). The temporal shapes of the pump, Stokes, and probe laser pulses are specified as an input to the DNI calculations. It is assumed that the laser pulse shapes are 70 fs Gaussians and that the pulses are Fourier-transform limited. A single excited electronic level is defined as an effective intermediate level in the Raman process, and transition strengths are adjusted to match the experimental Raman polarizability. The excitation of the Raman coherence is investigated for different Q-branch rotational transitions in the fundamental 2330 cm(-1) band of diatomic nitrogen, assuming that the pump and Stokes pulses are temporally overlapped. The excitation process is shown to be virtually identical for transitions ranging from Q2 to Q20. The excitation of the Raman coherences is also very efficient; for laser irradiances of 5x10(17) W/m2, corresponding approximately to a 100 microJ, 70 fs pulse focused to 50 microm, approximately 10% of the population of the ground Raman level is pumped to the excited Raman level during the impulsive pump-Stokes excitation, and the magnitude of the induced Raman coherence reaches 40% of its maximum possible value. The theoretical results are compared with the results of experiments where the femtosecond CARS signal is recorded as a function of probe delay with respect to the impulsive pump-Stokes excitation.

  1. Transition from gas to plasma kinetic equilibria in gravitating axisymmetric structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2014-04-15

    The problem of the transition from gas to plasma in gravitating axisymmetric structures is addressed under the assumption of having initial and final states realized by kinetic Maxwellian-like equilibria. In astrophysics, the theory applies to accretion-disc scenarios around compact objects. A formulation based on non-relativistic kinetic theory for collisionless systems is adopted. Equilibrium solutions for the kinetic distribution functions describing the initial neutral matter and the resulting plasma state are constructed in terms of single-particle invariants and expressed by generalized Maxwellian distributions. The final plasma configuration is related to the initial gas distribution by the introduction of appropriate functional constraints. Qualitative aspects of the solution are investigated and physical properties of the system are pointed out. In particular, the admitted functional dependences of the fluid fields carried by the corresponding equilibrium distributions are determined. Then, the plasma is proved to violate the condition of quasi-neutrality, implying a net charge separation between ions and electrons. This result is shown to be independent of the precise realization of the plasma distribution function, while a physical mechanism able to support a non-neutral equilibrium state is proposed.

  2. Residual Gas and Dust around Transition Objects and Weak T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doppmann, Greg W.; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.

    2017-02-01

    Residual gas in disks around young stars can spin down stars, circularize the orbits of terrestrial planets, and whisk away the dusty debris that is expected to serve as a signpost of terrestrial planet formation. We have carried out a sensitive search for residual gas and dust in the terrestrial planet region surrounding young stars ranging in age from a few to ∼10 Myr. Using high-resolution 4.7 μm spectra of transition objects (TOs) and weak T Tauri stars, we searched for weak continuum excesses and CO fundamental emission, after making a careful correction for the stellar contribution to the observed spectrum. We find that the CO emission from TOs is weaker and located farther from the star than CO emission from nontransition T Tauri stars with similar stellar accretion rates. The difference is possibly the result of chemical and/or dynamical effects (i.e., a low CO abundance or close-in low-mass planets). The weak T Tauri stars show no CO fundamental emission down to low flux levels (5 × 10‑20 to 10‑18 W m‑2). We illustrate how our results can be used to constrain the residual disk gas content in these systems and discuss their potential implications for star and planet formation. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory from telescope time allocated to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the agency’s scientific partnership with the California Institute of Technology and the University of California. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. Unregulated emissions from compressed natural gas (CNG) transit buses configured with and without oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Robert A; Kado, Norman Y; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Ayala, Alberto; Kobayashi, Reiko

    2006-01-01

    The unregulated emissions from two in-use heavy-duty transit buses fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and equipped with oxidation catalyst (OxiCat) control were evaluated. We tested emissions from a transit bus powered by a 2001 Cummins Westport C Gas Plus 8.3-L engine (CWest), which meets the California Air Resources Board's (CARB) 2002 optional NOx standard (2.0 g/bhp-hr). In California, this engine is certified only with an OxiCat, so our study did not include emissions testing without it. We also tested a 2000 New Flyer 40-passenger low-floor bus powered by a Detroit Diesel series 50G engine (DDCs50G) that is currently certified in California without an OxiCat. The original equipment manufacturer (OEM) offers a "low-emission" package for this bus that includes an OxiCat for transit bus applications, thus, this configuration was also tested in this study. Previously, we reported that formaldehyde and other volatile organic emissions detected in the exhaust of the DDCs50G bus equipped with an OxiCat were significantly reduced relative to the same DDCs50G bus without OxiCat. In this paper, we examine othertoxic unregulated emissions of significance. The specific mutagenic activity of emission sample extracts was examined using the microsuspension assay. The total mutagenic activity of emissions (activity per mile) from the OxiCat-equipped DDC bus was generally lower than that from the DDC bus without the OxiCat. The CWest bus emission samples had mutagenic activity that was comparable to that of the OxiCat-equipped DDC bus. In general, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions were lower forthe OxiCat-equipped buses, with greater reductions observed for the volatile and semivolatile PAH emissions. Elemental carbon (EC) was detected in the exhaust from the all three bus configurations, and we found that the total carbon (TC) composition of particulate matter (PM) emissions was primarily organic carbon (OC). The amount of carbon emissions far exceeded the

  4. Methodology Development of a Gas-Liquid Dynamic Flow Regime Transition Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doup, Benjamin Casey

    Current reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, TRACE, and CATHARE, use flow regime maps or flow regime transition criteria that were developed for static fully-developed two-phase flows to choose interfacial transfer models that are necessary to solve the two-fluid model. The flow regime is therefore difficult to identify near the flow regime transitions, in developing two-phase flows, and in transient two-phase flows. Interfacial area transport equations were developed to more accurately predict the dynamic nature of two-phase flows. However, other model coefficients are still flow regime dependent. Therefore, an accurate prediction of the flow regime is still important. In the current work, the methodology for the development of a dynamic flow regime transition model that uses the void fraction and interfacial area concentration obtained by solving three-field the two-fluid model and two-group interfacial area transport equation is investigated. To develop this model, detailed local experimental data are obtained, the two-group interfacial area transport equations are revised, and a dynamic flow regime transition model is evaluated using a computational fluid dynamics model. Local experimental data is acquired for 63 different flow conditions in bubbly, cap-bubbly, slug, and churn-turbulent flow regimes. The measured parameters are the group-1 and group-2 bubble number frequency, void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and interfacial bubble velocities. The measurements are benchmarked by comparing the prediction of the superficial gas velocities, determined using the local measurements with those determined from volumetric flow rate measurements and the agreement is generally within +/-20%. The repeatability four-sensor probe construction process is within +/-10%. The repeatability of the measurement process is within +/-7%. The symmetry of the test section is examined and the average agreement is within +/-5.3% at z/D = 10 and +/-3.4% at z/D = 32

  5. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process. The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  6. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a cooling system for the transition

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J.; Rodriguez, Jose L.

    2015-12-08

    A cooling system is provided for a transition (420) of a gas turbine engine (410). The cooling system includes a cowling (460) configured to receive an air flow (111) from an outlet of a compressor section of the gas turbine engine (410). The cowling (460) is positioned adjacent to a region of the transition (420) to cool the transition region upon circulation of the air flow within the cowling (460). The cooling system further includes a manifold (121) to directly couple the air flow (111) from the compressor section outlet to an inlet (462) of the cowling (460). The cowling (460) is configured to circulate the air flow (111) within an interior space (426) of the cowling (460) that extends radially outward from an inner diameter (423) of the cowling to an outer diameter (424) of the cowling at an outer surface.

  7. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition…

  8. Evolution of Shh endoderm enhancers during morphological transition from ventral lungs to dorsal gas bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sagai, Tomoko; Amano, Takanori; Maeno, Akiteru; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Nakamoto, Masatoshi; Takehana, Yusuke; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Okada, Norihiro; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Shh signalling plays a crucial role for endoderm development. A Shh endoderm enhancer, MACS1, is well conserved across terrestrial animals with lungs. Here, we first show that eliminating mouse MACS1 causes severe defects in laryngeal development, indicating that MACS1-directed Shh signalling is indispensable for respiratory organogenesis. Extensive phylogenetic analyses revealed that MACS1 emerged prior to the divergence of cartilaginous and bony fishes, and even euteleost fishes have a MACS1 orthologue. Meanwhile, ray-finned fishes evolved a novel conserved non-coding sequence in the neighbouring region. Transgenic assays showed that MACS1 drives reporter expression ventrally in laryngeal epithelium. This activity has been lost in the euteleost lineage, and instead, the conserved non-coding sequence of euteleosts acquired an enhancer activity to elicit dorsal epithelial expression in the posterior pharynx and oesophagus. These results implicate that evolution of these two enhancers is relevant to the morphological transition from ventral lungs to dorsal gas bladder. PMID:28155855

  9. Mechanism of gas saturated oil viscosity anomaly near to phase transition point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Baghir A.; Abbasov, Elkhan M.; Sisenbayeva, Marziya R.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents experimental studies of the phase behavior by the flash liberation test and of the viscosity of the live oil at different pressures. Unlike the typical studies at the pressure near the saturation pressure, the measurements were conducted at a relatively small pressure increment of 0.08-0.25 MPa. The viscosity anomaly was discovered experimentally near to the phase transition point in the range of the pressure levels P/Pb = 1-1.14 (Pb—bubble point pressure) and shows that it decreases about 70 times in comparison to the viscosity at the reservoir pressure. It was found that the bubble point pressure decreases significantly (up to 36%) with surfactant addition. Furthermore, the viscosity of the live oil at the surfactant concentration of 5 wt. % decreases almost 37 times in comparison to the viscosity at the reservoir pressure. The mechanism of observed effects was suggested based on the formation of the stable subcritical gas nuclei and associated slippage effect. The mechanism for the stabilization of the subcritical nuclei by the combined action of the surface and electrical forces, as well as the morphology of the formed nanobubbles, was considered. The model for determining the oil viscosity taking into account the slippage effect was suggested.

  10. WENO-enhanced gas-kinetic scheme for direct simulations of compressible transition and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, G.; Girimaji, S. S.; Kerimo, J.

    2013-02-01

    The recently developed Gas Kinetic Method (GKM) for computing fluid flow is enhanced with advanced reconstruction (interpolation) schemes to enable direct simulations of highly compressible transition and turbulence fields. Variants of Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction schemes of different orders of accuracy are implemented and examined along with more elementary van Leer method. The competing schemes are evaluated for their accuracy, efficiency and numerical stability. The computed results are compared against the Rapid Distortion Theory for the case of compressible shear turbulence and 'pressure-released' Burgers solution. In the case of decaying isotropic turbulence, the efficacy of the reconstruction schemes is evaluated by comparison against a 'gold standard' high-resolution simulation. The capabilities of the reconstruction schemes to capture linear, non-linear, pressure-released and viscous flow physics as well as solenoidal and dilatational features of the flow fields are established in isolation and combination. The most suitable WENO variant for integration with GKM is identified. Another important outcome of the study is the finding that temperature-interpolation is superior to energy-interpolation in avoiding negative temperatures arising due to the Gibbs phenomenon. Overall, this work advances the applicability of kinetic theory based GKM to a wider range of high Mach number flow physics.

  11. Accounting for exhaust gas transport dynamics in instantaneous emission models via smooth transition regression.

    PubMed

    Kamarianakis, Yiannis; Gao, H Oliver

    2010-02-15

    Collecting and analyzing high frequency emission measurements has become very usual during the past decade as significantly more information with respect to formation conditions can be collected than from regulated bag measurements. A challenging issue for researchers is the accurate time-alignment between tailpipe measurements and engine operating variables. An alignment procedure should take into account both the reaction time of the analyzers and the dynamics of gas transport in the exhaust and measurement systems. This paper discusses a statistical modeling framework that compensates for variable exhaust transport delay while relating tailpipe measurements with engine operating covariates. Specifically it is shown that some variants of the smooth transition regression model allow for transport delays that vary smoothly as functions of the exhaust flow rate. These functions are characterized by a pair of coefficients that can be estimated via a least-squares procedure. The proposed models can be adapted to encompass inherent nonlinearities that were implicit in previous instantaneous emissions modeling efforts. This article describes the methodology and presents an illustrative application which uses data collected from a diesel bus under real-world driving conditions.

  12. Widom line for the liquid-gas transition in Lennard-Jones system.

    PubMed

    Brazhkin, V V; Fomin, Yu D; Lyapin, A G; Ryzhov, V N; Tsiok, E N

    2011-12-08

    The locus of extrema (ridges) for heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and density fluctuations for model particle systems with Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential in the supercritical region have been obtained. It was found that the ridges for different thermodynamic values virtually merge into a single Widom line at T < 1.1T(c) and P < 1.5P(c) and become practically completely smeared at T < 2.5T(c) and P < 10P(c), where T(c) and P(c) are the critical temperature and pressure. The ridge for heat capacity approaches close to critical isochore, whereas the lines of extrema for other values correspond to density decrease. The lines corresponding to the supercritical maxima for argon and neon are in good agreement with the computer simulation data for LJ fluid. The behavior of the ridges for LJ fluid, in turn, is close to that for the supercritical van der Waals fluid, which is indicative of a fairly universal behavior of the Widom line for a liquid-gas transition.

  13. Improved Log(gf) Values for Lines of Ti I and Abundance Determinations in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-Poor Star HD 84937 (Accurate Transition Probabilities for Ti I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; Guzman, A.; Wood, M. P.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J.

    2013-04-01

    New atomic transition probability measurements for 948 lines of Ti I are reported. Branching fractions from Fourier transform spectra and from spectra recorded using a 3 m echelle spectrometer are combined with published radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements to determine these transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found in comparisons to the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The new Ti I data are applied to re-determine the Ti abundance in the photospheres of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 using many lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential to explore possible non-local thermal equilibrium effects. The variation of relative Ti/Fe abundance with metallicity in metal-poor stars observed in earlier studies is supported in this study.

  14. IMPROVED log(gf) VALUES FOR LINES OF Ti I AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937 (ACCURATE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FOR Ti I)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J. E.; Guzman, A.; Wood, M. P.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J. E-mail: adrianaguzman2014@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2013-04-01

    New atomic transition probability measurements for 948 lines of Ti I are reported. Branching fractions from Fourier transform spectra and from spectra recorded using a 3 m echelle spectrometer are combined with published radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements to determine these transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found in comparisons to the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The new Ti I data are applied to re-determine the Ti abundance in the photospheres of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 using many lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential to explore possible non-local thermal equilibrium effects. The variation of relative Ti/Fe abundance with metallicity in metal-poor stars observed in earlier studies is supported in this study.

  15. Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Xin, S.; Le Quéré, P.

    2014-02-01

    The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 108, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

  16. Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Xin, S.

    2014-02-15

    The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

  17. Sub-Doppler spectroscopy based on optical pumping and transit relaxation of atoms in a thin gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, Azad Ch.

    2007-06-01

    The paper is the review of methods, achievements, and possibilities of the recently elaborated and well tested high-resolution laser spectroscopy based on sub-Doppler absorption and polarization resonances (on centers of quantum transitions), which arise because of the optical pumping and specific transit relaxation of atoms (molecules) in a thin cell with a rarefied gas. Theoretical basis of this spectroscopy is presented. Experimental technique and results on the record of the sub-Doppler spectral structure of Cs and Rb atoms and on the frequency stabilization of diode lasers by given spectroscopy methods are discussed.

  18. Gas flow influence on streamer-to-leader transition in surface barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Y.; Karalnik, V.; Medvedev, M.; Petryakov, A.; Trushkin, N.; Shafikov, A.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental results on study of a sinusoidal surface barrier discharge (SBD) in airflow at different velocities are presented. Influence of gas flow velocity and its orientation on plasma structure of SBD is established and the conditions providing transition of SBD from the streamer mode to the mode with surface leaders (SL) are found out as well. It is shown the formation of the SL in SBD happens owing to thermal effects associated with a local gas heating in both the bright current spots disposed at the sharp edge of high-voltage electrode and thin current channels (streamers) originated from these spots. It was revealed that gas flow with a high velocity directed against the propagation of surface streamers leads to destruction of the bright anode spots and elimination of the SL (but not the streamers) on a barrier surface. However the gas flow with the same velocity but opposite direction leads to regular disposition of the bright current spots at the edge of high-voltage electrode and regular spatial structure of the thin current channels (streamers and leaders) originated from the current spots. It was found out that gas flow of any orientation leads to diminishing the gas temperature in the plasma channels compared to that in SBD in gas at rest.

  19. Protein conformational transitions at the liquid-gas interface as studied by dilational surface rheology.

    PubMed

    Noskov, Boris A

    2014-04-01

    Experimental results on the dynamic dilational surface elasticity of protein solutions are analyzed and compared. Short reviews of the protein behavior at the liquid-gas interface and the dilational surface rheology precede the main sections of this work. The kinetic dependencies of the surface elasticity differ strongly for the solutions of globular and non-globular proteins. In the latter case these dependencies are similar to those for solutions of non-ionic amphiphilic polymers and have local maxima corresponding to the formation of the distal region of the surface layer (type I). In the former case the dynamic surface elasticity is much higher (>60 mN/m) and the kinetic dependencies are monotonical and similar to the data for aqueous dispersions of solid nanoparticles (type II). The addition of strong denaturants to solutions of bovine serum albumin and β-lactoglobulin results in an abrupt transition from the type II to type I dependencies if the denaturant concentration exceeds a certain critical value. These results give a strong argument in favor of the preservation of the protein globular structure in the course of adsorption without any denaturants. The addition of cationic surfactants also can lead to the non-monotonical kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity indicating destruction of the protein tertiary and secondary structures. The addition of anionic surfactants gives similar results only for the protein solutions of high ionic strength. The influence of cationic surfactants on the local maxima of the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity for solutions of a non-globular protein (β-casein) differs from the influence of anionic surfactants due to the heterogeneity of the charge distribution along the protein chain. In this case one can use small admixtures of ionic surfactants as probes of the adsorption mechanism. The effect of polyelectrolytes on the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity of protein

  20. The success of Fermi gas model for overall scaling of 2D metal-to-insulator transition data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    The melting condition for two-dimensional Wigner solid (Platzman and Fukuyama, 1974) [14] is shown to contain an error of a factor of π. The analysis of experimental data for apparent 2D metal-to-insulator transition shows that the Wigner solidification (Tanatar and Ceperley, 1989) [16] has been never achieved. Within routine Fermi gas model both the metallic and insulating behavior of different 2D system for actual range of carrier densities and temperatures is explained.

  1. Body Dissatisfaction, Living Away from Parents, and Poor Social Adjustment Predict Binge Eating Symptoms in Young Women Making the Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Erin T.; Galambos, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    The current study explored how body dissatisfaction and challenges associated with the transition to university predicted symptoms of binge eating. Participants were 101 female full-time first-year university students (M=18.3 years of age; SD=0.50) who completed a background questionnaire and a web-based daily checklist assessing binge eating.…

  2. Development, Application, and Transition of Aerosol and Trace Gas Products Derived from Next-Generation Satellite Observations to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Naeger, Aaron; Zavodsky, Bradley; McGrath, Kevin; LaFontaine, Frank

    2016-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has a history of successfully transitioning unique observations and research capabilities to the operational weather community to improve short-term forecasts. SPoRTstrives to bridge the gap between research and operations by maintaining interactive partnerships with end users to develop products that match specific forecast challenges, provide training, and assess the products in the operational environment. This presentation focuses on recent product development, application, and transition of aerosol and trace gas products to operations for specific forecasting applications. Recent activities relating to the SPoRT ozone products, aerosol optical depth composite product, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol index products are discussed.

  3. Education and Change in Rich, Poor and National Minority Areas in China: Two Decades of Transition. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 61

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Keith M.; Lu, Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study traces education and change over two decades in three areas, Tongzhou on the periphery of Beijing chosen as one of the richest 300 counties in 1990; Ansai in Yan'an which was one of the poorest 300 counties and a famous base for the 8th Route Army at the end of the Long March, and Zhaojue a poor Yi national minority area in the…

  4. Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel. Final report, July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.

    1996-09-01

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has initiated the development of `Design Guidelines for Bus Transit Systems Using Alternative Fuels.` This report provides design guidelines for the safe uses of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). It forms a part of the series of individual monographs being published by the FTA on (the guidelines for the safe use of) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and alcohol fuels (Methanol and Ethanol). Each report in this series describes for the subject fuel the important fuel properties, guidelines for the design and operation of bus fueling, storage and maintenance facilities, issues on personnel training and emergency preparedness.

  5. Generation, Detection and characterization of Gas-Phase Transition Metal containing Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, Timothy

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this project was to generate, detect, and characterize small, gas-phase, metal containing molecules. In addition to being relevant to high temperature chemical environments (e.g. plasmas and combustion), gas-phase experiments on metal containing molecules serve as the most direct link to a molecular-level theoretical model for catalysis. Catalysis (i.e. the addition of a small about of recoverable material to control the rate and direction of a chemical reaction) is critical to the petroleum and pharmaceutical industries as well as environmental remediation. Currently, the majority of catalytic materials are based on very expensive metals such as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), iridium (Ir,) rhenium (Re), and rhodium (Rh). For example, the catalyst used for converting linear hydrocarbon molecules (e.g. hexane) to cyclic molecules (e.g. cyclohexane) is a mixture of Pt and Re suspended on alumina. It enables straight chain alkanes to be converted into branched-chain alkanes, cyclohexanes and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used, amongst other things, to enhance the octane number of petrol. A second example is the heterogeneous catalysis used in automobile exhaust systems to: a) decrease nitrogen oxide; b) reduce carbon monoxide; and c) oxidize unburned hydrocarbons. The exhaust is vented through a high-surface area chamber lined with Pt, Pd, and Rh. For example, the carbon monoxide is catalytically converted to carbon dioxide by reaction with oxygen. The research results from this work have been published in readily accessible journals1-28. The ground and excited electronic state properties of small metal containing molecules that we determine were: a) electronic state distributions and lifetimes, b) vibrational frequencies, c) bond lengths and angles, d) hyperfine interactions, e) permanent electric dipole moments, mel, and f) magnetic dipoles, μm. In general terms, μel, gives insight into the charge distribution and mm into

  6. Preparation and Thermodynamics of High Critical Transition Temperature Superconducting Films Growth by Liquid-Gas Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsiung

    The in situ Tl-base superconducting films have been grown successfully on MgO and SrTiO_3 < 100> substrates by Liquid-Gas-Solidification (LGS) process. The loss of Tl during growth process can be nearly eliminated by a proper geometry design of the LGS set up. there is no post anneal for forming the right structure or compensation of Tl applied after the initial deposition. The Tl-base films grown on MgO < 100> exhibits an oriented structure with c-axis perpendicular to the surface of substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal a coexistence of multi-phases in the films. The morphology of films shows flat and uniform domains of 0.5 times 1 mm^2. It exhibits a resistant transition onset of 117K and zero resistance at 103K. In the films grown on SrTiO _3 < 100> substrate, Ca-O precipitations on the edge of the film layer are observed. Upon a post anneal process, the Ca -O precipitates disappear resulted in an enhanced transport critical current density of 10^{-5 } A/cm^2. In forming the oxide film in LGS processing, oxygen is absorbed and diffuses into the liquid alloy reaching the liquid-substrate interface to form the oxide. The nucleation and growth of the films is a matter of the thermodynamic and the kinetic behavior of oxygen in the liquid precursor. A modified coulometric titration method is introduced to understand this behavior and to measure the activity, diffusivity and solubility of oxygen in the liquid high T_ {rm c} superconducting precursor alloys, rm Yb_1Ba_2Cu_3 , Ag-Yb_1Ba_2 Cu_3 and rm Tl_1Ba_2Ca_2Cu_3. In all alloy systems investigated, the formation energy of oxygen dissolved into the liquid alloys is relatively low ({~}{-}255 kJ/g-atom) which is attributed to the present of rare earth elements of Ba, Ca and Yb. The high affinity of oxygen with these elements results in a limited oxygen solubility (10^{-4} molar fraction), however, the diffusion coefficients of oxygen in the liquid alloys are high of the order of 10^{ -4} cm^2/sec. These

  7. Atom probe study of Cu-poor to Cu-rich transition during Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} growth

    SciTech Connect

    Couzinie-Devy, F.; Cadel, E.; Pareige, P.; Barreau, N.; Arzel, L.

    2011-12-05

    Atomic scale chemistry of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) thin film has been characterized at key points of the 3-stage process using atom probe tomography. 3D atom distributions have been reconstructed when the layer is Cu-poor ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) < 1), Cu-rich ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) > 1), and at the end of the process. Particular attention has been devoted to grain boundary composition and Na atomic distribution within the CIGSe layer. Significant variation of composition is highlighted during the growing process, providing fundamental information helping the understanding of high efficiency CIGSe formation.

  8. The Sizes and Depletions of the Dust and Gas Cavities in the Transitional Disk J160421.7-213028

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; van der Marel, Nienke; Hashimoto, Jun; Chiang, Eugene; Akiyama, Eiji; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Muto, Takayuki; Knapp, Gillian R.; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Brown, Joanna; Bruderer, Simon; Koyamatsu, Shin; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Rich, Evan; Satoshi, Mayama; Takami, Michihiro; Wisniewski, John; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tamura, Motohide

    2017-02-01

    We report ALMA Cycle 2 observations of 230 GHz (1.3 mm) dust continuum emission, and 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2–1 line emission, from the Upper Scorpius transitional disk [PZ99] J160421.7-213028, with an angular resolution of ∼0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 25 (35 au). Armed with these data and existing H-band scattered light observations, we measure the size and depth of the disk’s central cavity, and the sharpness of its outer edge, in three components: sub-μm-sized “small” dust traced by scattered light, millimeter-sized “big” dust traced by the millimeter continuum, and gas traced by line emission. Both dust populations feature a cavity of radius ∼70 au that is depleted by factors of at least 1000 relative to the dust density just outside. The millimeter continuum data are well explained by a cavity with a sharp edge. Scattered light observations can be fitted with a cavity in small dust that has either a sharp edge at 60 au, or an edge that transitions smoothly over an annular width of 10 au near 60 au. In gas, the data are consistent with a cavity that is smaller, about 15 au in radius, and whose surface density at 15 au is {10}3+/- 1 times smaller than the surface density at 70 au; the gas density grades smoothly between these two radii. The CO isotopologue observations rule out a sharp drop in gas surface density at 30 au or a double-drop model, as found by previous modeling. Future observations are needed to assess the nature of these gas and dust cavities (e.g., whether they are opened by multiple as-yet-unseen planets or photoevaporation).

  9. Direct detection of Rydberg-Rydberg millimeter-wave transitions in a buffer gas cooled molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Grimes, David D.; Barnum, Timothy J.; Patterson, David; Coy, Stephen L.; Klein, Ethan; Muenter, John S.; Field, Robert W.

    2015-11-01

    Millimeter-wave transitions between molecular Rydberg states (n ∼ 35) of barium monofluoride are directly detected via Free Induction Decay (FID). Two powerful technologies are used in combination: Chirped-Pulse millimeter-Wave (CPmmW) spectroscopy and a buffer gas cooled molecular beam photoablation source. Hundreds of Rydberg-Rydberg transitions are recorded in 1 h with >10:1 signal:noise ratio and ∼150 kHz resolution. This high resolution, high spectral velocity experiment promises new strategies for rapid measurements of structural and dynamical information, such as the electric structure (multipole moments and polarizabilities) of the molecular ion-core and the strengths and mechanisms of resonances between Rydberg electron and ion-core motions. Direct measurements of Rydberg-Rydberg transitions with kilo-Debye dipole moments support efficient and definitive spectral analysis techniques, such as the Stark demolition and polarization diagnostics, which enable semi-automatic assignments of core-nonpenetrating Rydberg states. In addition, extremely strong radiation-mediated collective effects (superradiance) in a dense Rydberg gas of barium atoms are observed.

  10. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  11. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF EPDM ELASTOMER AND ON THE CONDUCTIVITY OF POLYANILINE

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E; Marie Kane, M

    2008-12-12

    Four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer were exposed to tritium gas initially at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for between three and four months in closed containers. Material properties that were characterized include density, volume, mass, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. EPDM samples released significant amounts of gas when exposed to tritium, and the glass transition temperature increased by about 3 C. during the exposure. Effects of ultraviolet and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of polyaniline films are also documented as complementary results to planned tritium exposures. Future work will determine the effects of tritium gas exposure on the electrical conductivity of polyaniline films, to demonstrate whether such films can be used as a sensor to detect tritium. Surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma rays and ultraviolet light. The results of the gamma and UV experiments will be correlated with the tritium exposure results.

  12. Mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their glass transition temperatures investigated using inert gas permeation.

    PubMed

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers are heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg, and as a result, the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across 5 orders of magnitude (∼10(-14) to 10(-9) cm(2)/s). The diffusivity data are compared to viscosity measurements and reveal a breakdown in the Stokes-Einstein relationship at low temperatures. However, the data are well fit by the fractional Stokes-Einstein equation with an exponent of 0.66. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  13. HAT-P-24b: An Inflated Hot Jupiter on a 3.36 Day Period Transiting a Hot, Metal-poor Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Shporer, A.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R. W.; Howard, A. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Béky, B.; Perumpilly, G.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2010-12-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-24b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V = 11.818 F8 dwarf star GSC 0774-01441, with a period P = 3.3552464 ± 0.0000071 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455216.97669 ± 0.00024 (BJD)11, and transit duration 3.653 ± 0.025 hr. The host star has a mass of 1.191 ± 0.042 M sun, radius of 1.317 ± 0.068 R sun, effective temperature 6373 ± 80 K, and a low metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.16 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.681 ± 0.031 M J and radius of 1.243 ± 0.072 R J yielding a mean density of 0.439 ± 0.069 g cm-3. By repeating our global fits with different parameter sets, we have performed a critical investigation of the fitting techniques used for previous Hungarian-made Automated Telescope planetary discoveries. We find that the system properties are robust against the choice of priors. The effects of fixed versus fitted limb darkening are also examined. HAT-P-24b probably maintains a small eccentricity of e = 0.052+0.022 -0.017, which is accepted over the circular orbit model with false alarm probability 5.8%. In the absence of eccentricity pumping, this result suggests that HAT-P-24b experiences less tidal dissipation than Jupiter. Due to relatively rapid stellar rotation, we estimate that HAT-P-24b should exhibit one of the largest known Rossiter-McLaughlin effect amplitudes for an exoplanet (ΔV RM ~= 95 m s-1) and thus a precise measurement of the sky-projected spin-orbit alignment should be possible. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO and NASA.

  14. Long non-coding RNA ATB promotes growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor prognosis in human prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    XU, SONG; YI, XIAO-MING; TANG, CHAO-PENG; GE, JING-PING; ZHANG, ZHENG-YU; ZHOU, WEN-QUAN

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified to be critical mediators in various tumors associated with cancer progression. Long non-coding RNA activated by TGF-β (lncRNA-ATB) is a stimulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the biological role and clinical significance of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. The present study was designed to explore the expression of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer patients and the role of lncRNA-ATB in prostate cancer cells. We showed that lncRNA-ATB expression was significantly upregulated in tumor tissues in patients with prostate cancer in comparison with adjacent non-tumor tissues. Further analysis indicted that high lncRNA-ATB expression may be an independent prognostic factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival in prostate cancer patients. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB promoted, and knockdown of lncRNA-ATB inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells via regulations of cell cycle regulatory protein expression levels. In addition, lncRNA-ATB stimulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with ZEB1 and ZNF217 expression levels via ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results indicated that lncRNA-ATB may be considered as a new predictor in the clinical prognosis of patients with prostate cancer. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB exerts mitogenic and EMT effects of prostate cancer via activation of ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. PMID:27176634

  15. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Inertial Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of buoyancy on transition from laminar to turbulent flow are presented for momentum-dominated helium jet injected into ambient air. The buoyancy was varied in a 2.2-sec drop tower facility without affecting the remaining operating parameters. The jet flow in Earth gravity and microgravity was visualized using the rainbow schlieren deflectometry apparatus. Results show significant changes in the flow structure and transition behavior in the absence of buoyancy.

  16. Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

    2004-02-17

    An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

  17. Electronic Stopping of Slow Protons in Transition and Rare Earth Metals: Breakdown of the Free Electron Gas Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D.; Bruckner, B.; Moro, M. V.; Gruber, S.; Goebl, D.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.; Steinberger, R.; Duchoslav, J.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2017-03-01

    The electronic stopping cross sections (SCS) of Ta and Gd for slow protons have been investigated experimentally. The data are compared to the results for Pt and Au to learn how electronic stopping in transition and rare earth metals correlates with features of the electronic band structures. The extraordinarily high SCS observed for protons in Ta and Gd cannot be understood in terms of a free electron gas model, but are related to the high densities of both occupied and unoccupied electronic states in these metals.

  18. Crossover behavior in the phase transition of the Bose-Einstein condensation in a microwave-driven magnon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2009-09-01

    A magnon gas in a film of yttrium iron garnet driven by microwave radiation exhibits Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) when the driving power exceeds a critical value. We show that the nature and the critical exponents of the BEC transition change dramatically if the BEC magnons are significantly coupled to the zone-center magnons. The theoretical results explain the diverse behavior of the order parameter inferred from the experimental data for the light scattering and the microwave emission from the BEC observed with coherent and incoherent microwave pumping.

  19. Metastable quantum phase transitions in a periodic one-dimensional Bose gas. II. Many-body theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamoto, R.; Carr, L. D.; Ueda, M.

    2010-02-15

    We show that quantum solitons in the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian are precisely the yrast states. We identify such solutions with Lieb's type II excitations from weak to strong interactions, clarifying a long-standing question of the physical meaning of this excitation branch. We demonstrate that the metastable quantum phase transition previously found in mean-field analysis of the weakly interacting Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian [Phys. Rev. A 79, 063616 (2009)] extends into the medium- to strongly interacting regime of a periodic one-dimensional Bose gas. Our methods are exact diagonalization, finite-size Bethe ansatz, and the boson-fermion mapping in the Tonks-Girardeau limit.

  20. Electronic Stopping of Slow Protons in Transition and Rare Earth Metals: Breakdown of the Free Electron Gas Concept.

    PubMed

    Roth, D; Bruckner, B; Moro, M V; Gruber, S; Goebl, D; Juaristi, J I; Alducin, M; Steinberger, R; Duchoslav, J; Primetzhofer, D; Bauer, P

    2017-03-10

    The electronic stopping cross sections (SCS) of Ta and Gd for slow protons have been investigated experimentally. The data are compared to the results for Pt and Au to learn how electronic stopping in transition and rare earth metals correlates with features of the electronic band structures. The extraordinarily high SCS observed for protons in Ta and Gd cannot be understood in terms of a free electron gas model, but are related to the high densities of both occupied and unoccupied electronic states in these metals.

  1. Nature of the interaction between rare gas atoms and transition metal doped silicon clusters: the role of shielding effects.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Vu Thi; Janssens, Ewald; Claes, Pieterjan; Fielicke, André; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Lievens, Peter

    2015-07-21

    Mass spectrometry experiments show an exceptionally weak bonding between Si7Mn(+) and rare gas atoms as compared to other exohedrally transition metal (TM) doped silicon clusters and other SinMn(+) (n = 5-10) sizes. The Si7Mn(+) cluster does not form Ar complexes and the observed fraction of Xe complexes is low. The interaction of two cluster series, SinMn(+) (n = 6-10) and Si7TM(+) (TM = Cr, Mn, Cu, and Zn), with Ar and Xe is investigated by density functional theory calculations. The cluster-rare gas binding is for all clusters, except Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+), predominantly driven by short-range interaction between the TM dopant and the rare gas atoms. A high s-character electron density on the metal atoms in Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+) shields the polarization toward the rare gas atoms and thereby hinders formation of short-range complexes. Overall, both Ar and Xe complexes are similar except that the larger polarizability of Xe leads to larger binding energies.

  2. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas on Cavity Dynamics and Sheet to Cloud Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiharju, Simo; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Partial cavitation occurs in numerous industrial and naval applications. Cavities on lifting surfaces, in cryogenic rocket motors or in fuel injectors can damage equipment and in general be detrimental to the system performance, especially as partial cavities can undergo auto-oscillation causing large pressure pulsations, unsteady loading of machinery and generate significant noise. In the current experiments incipient, intermittent cloud shedding and fully shedding cavities forming in the separated flow region downstream of a wedge were investigated. The Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter was of the order of one million. Gas was injected directly into the cavitation region downstream of the wedge's apex or into the recirculating region such that with the same amount of injected gas less ended up in the shear layer. The cavity dynamics were studied with and without gas injection. The hypothesis to be tested were that i) relatively miniscule amounts of gas introduced into the shear layer at the cavity interface can reduce vapor production and ii) gas introduced into the separated region can dampen the auto oscillations. The authors also examined whether the presence of gas can switch the shedding mechanism from one dominated by condensation shock to one dominantly by re-entrant jet. The work was supported by ONR Grant Number N00014-11-1-0449.

  3. Overexpression of forkhead Box C2 promotes tumor metastasis and indicates poor prognosis in colon cancer via regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingguo; Wu, Jitao; Wei, Ping; Xu, Ye; Zhuo, Changhua; Wang, Yuwei; Li, Dawei; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box protein C2 (FOXC2) plays a vital role in carcinogenesis; however, its significance and prognostic value in colon cancer remain unclear. In this study, FOXC2 expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 185 samples of primary colon cancer tumor samples and in human colon cancer cell lines. The effect of FOXC2 on cell proliferation, tumorigenesis, and metastasis was examined in vitro and in vivo. FOXC2 was overexpressed in human colon cancer cells and tissues, and correlated with colon cancer progression and patient survival. Functional study demonstrated that FOXC2 promoted cell growth, cell migration, and tumor formation in nude mice, whereas knockdown of FOXC2 by short hairpin RNA (shRNAs) significantly suppressed cell growth, cell migration and tumor formation. Further study found that FOXC2 enhanced AKT activity with subsequent GSK-3β phosphorylation and Snail stabilization, and then induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and promoted tumor invasion and metastasis. Collectively, FOXC2 promotes colon cancer metastasis by facilitating EMT and acts as a potential prognostic factor and therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  4. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA zinc finger antisense 1 enhances epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro and predicts poor prognosis in glioma.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiao-Li; Chen, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Qu, Qiang; Huang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Gui-Hua; Liu, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long noncoding RNAs play important roles in development and progression of various cancers. Zinc finger antisense 1 is a novel long noncoding RNA whose clinical significance, biological function, and underlying mechanism are still undetermined in glioma. In this study, we reported that zinc finger antisense 1 expression was markedly upregulated in glioma and tightly correlated with clinical stage. Moreover, patients with high zinc finger antisense 1 expression had shorter survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis provided a clue that, probably, zinc finger antisense 1 level could serve as an independent prognostic factor for glioma. Functionally, zinc finger antisense 1 acted as an oncogene in glioma because its knockdown could promote apoptosis and significantly inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, zinc finger antisense 1 silencing could result in cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and correspondingly decrease the percentage of S phase cells in both U87 and U251 cell lines. Moreover, it was found that silenced zinc finger antisense 1 could impair migration and invasion by inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition through reducing the expression of MMP2, MMP9, N-cadherin, Integrin β1, ZEB1, Twist, and Snail as well as increasing E-cadherin level in glioma. Taken together, our data identified that zinc finger antisense 1 might act as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target for glioma.

  5. CCR7 enhances TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and is associated with lymph node metastasis and poor overall survival in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huiying; Gao, Lingling; Li, Shichao; Qin, Jie; Chen, Long; Liu, Xinzhou; Xu, Pingping; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Honglei; Zhou, Shuang; Gao, Qiang; Liu, Binbin; Sun, Yihong; Liang, Chunmin

    2015-09-15

    CCR7 is a G protein-coupled chemokine receptor. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry with tissue microarrays to measure CCR7 expression in tumor specimens from 122 patients with gastric cancer. We show that CCR7 expression is associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.022) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.025), and is an independent factor associated with poorer overall survival (P = 0.032). The CCR7 mechanism was predicted based on bioinformatic analysis and verified in gastric cancer cell lines and primary tumor samples. The data show that CCR7 contributes to TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and that the effects of TGF-β1 are inhibited by a CCR7 neutralizing antibody or a NF-κB inhibitor. Increased TGF-β1 expression was accompanied by nuclear localization of NF-κB-p65 and higher levels of the mesenchymal marker vimentin in human gastric cancer samples. We conclude that the CCR7 axis mediates TGF-β1-induced EMT via crosstalk with NF-κB signaling, facilitating lymph node metastasis and poorer overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. These findings suggest CCR7 is a novel prognostic indicator and a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  6. CCR7 enhances TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and is associated with lymph node metastasis and poor overall survival in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jie; Chen, Long; Liu, Xinzhou; Xu, Pingping; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Honglei; Zhou, Shuang; Gao, Qiang; Liu, Binbin; Sun, Yihong; Liang, Chunmin

    2015-01-01

    CCR7 is a G protein-coupled chemokine receptor. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry with tissue microarrays to measure CCR7 expression in tumor specimens from 122 patients with gastric cancer. We show that CCR7 expression is associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.022) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.025), and is an independent factor associated with poorer overall survival (P = 0.032). The CCR7 mechanism was predicted based on bioinformatic analysis and verified in gastric cancer cell lines and primary tumor samples. The data show that CCR7 contributes to TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and that the effects of TGF-β1 are inhibited by a CCR7 neutralizing antibody or a NF-κB inhibitor. Increased TGF-β1 expression was accompanied by nuclear localization of NF-κB-p65 and higher levels of the mesenchymal marker vimentin in human gastric cancer samples. We conclude that the CCR7 axis mediates TGF-β1-induced EMT via crosstalk with NF-κB signaling, facilitating lymph node metastasis and poorer overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. These findings suggest CCR7 is a novel prognostic indicator and a potential target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26176983

  7. Surface-induced liquid-gas transition in salt-free solutions of model charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Budkov, Yu A; Frolov, A I; Kiselev, M G; Brilliantov, N V

    2013-11-21

    We report a novel phenomenon of a surface-induced phase transition in salt-free solutions of charged colloids. We develop a theory of this effect and confirm it by Molecular Dynamics simulations. To describe the colloidal solution we apply a primitive model of electrolyte with a strong asymmetry of charge and size of the constituent particles - macroions and counterions. To quantify interactions of the colloidal particles with the neutral substrate we use a short-range potential which models dispersion van der Waals forces. These forces cause the attraction of colloids to the surface. We show that for high temperatures and weak attraction, only gradual increase of the macroion concentration in the near-surface layer is observed with increase of interaction strength. If however temperature drops below some threshold value, a new dense (liquid) phase is formed in the near-surface layer. It can be interpreted as a surface-induced first-order phase transition with a critical point. Using an appropriately adopted Maxwell construction, we find the binodal. Interestingly, the observed near-surface phase transition can occur at the absence of the bulk phase transition and may be seemingly classified as prewetting transition. The reported effect could be important for various technological applications where formation of colloidal particle layers with the desired properties is needed.

  8. Unintended greenhouse gas consequences of lowering level of service in urban transit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Julia B.; Cheng, Han; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-12-01

    Public transit is often touted as a ‘green’ transportation option and a way for users to reduce their environmental footprint by avoiding automobile emissions, but that may not be the case when systems run well below passenger capacity. In previous work, we explored an approach to optimizing the design and operations of transit systems for both costs and emissions, using continuum approximation models and assuming fixed demand. In this letter, we expand upon our previous work to explore how the level of service for users impacts emissions. We incorporate travel time elasticities into the optimization to account for demand shifts from transit to cars, resulting from increases in transit travel time. We find that emissions reductions are moderated, but not eliminated, for relatively inelastic users. We consider two scenarios: the first is where only the agency faces an emissions budget; the second is where the entire city faces an emissions budget. In the latter scenario, the emissions reductions resulting from reductions in transit level of service are mitigated as users switch to automobile.

  9. Usefulness of right-to-left shunting and poor exercise gas exchange for predicting prognosis in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oudiz, Ronald J; Midde, Raghu; Hovenesyan, Arsen; Sun, Xing-Guo; Roveran, Giorgio; Hansen, James E; Wasserman, Karlman

    2010-04-15

    We hypothesized that the longitudinal changes in peak oxygen uptake, ventilatory efficiency, and exercise-induced right-to-left shunting in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) would predict outcomes better than baseline measurements alone. Patients with PAH die prematurely. Identifying prognostic markers is critical for treating patients with PAH; however, longitudinal prognostic information of PAH is limited. We enrolled 103 patients with PAH into a long-term, prospective outcome study using serial cardiopulmonary exercise testing to measure the peak oxygen uptake, ventilatory efficiency (ratio of ventilation to carbon dioxide output at the anaerobic threshold), right-to-left shunting, and other factors in patients treated with optimal therapy. The patients were followed up for a mean of 4.7 years. During the study period, 20 patients died, and 3 underwent lung transplantation. The baseline peak oxygen uptake and ventilatory efficiency was 0.79 L/min and 49 (normal <34), respectively, reflecting severe disease. Poorer ventilatory efficiency and greater New York Heart Association classification were associated with poor outcome at baseline and at follow-up. On multivariate analysis, the persistence or development of an exercise-induced right-to-left shunt strongly predicted death or transplantation (p <0.0001), independent of the hemodynamics and all other exercise measures, including peak oxygen uptake and ventilatory efficiency. The absence of a shunt at baseline was associated with a 20% rate of nonsurvival, which decreased to 7% at follow-up. A poorer ventilatory efficiency appeared to be associated with a poor outcome in patients without a shunt. In conclusion, a persistent exercise-induced right-to-left shunt and poor ventilatory efficiency were highly predictive of poor outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  10. Quantum phase transition of a Bose gas in a lattice with a controlled number of atoms per site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xu

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the superfluid-Mott insulator quantum phase transition [1] of a gas of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice. We are able to prepare the gas with a controllable number of one, two, or three atoms per lattice site, as verified with photoassociation spectroscopy. We measure momentum distributions using standard time-of-flight imaging techniques. These are similar to those of ref. [1], and exhibit narrow peaks at moderate lattice strengths. We find that the width of these peaks increases for lattice heights greater than about 13 times the recoil energy [2], and we observe interesting differences in this behavior, depending on the number of atoms per site. The data suggest that the quantum phase transition occurs at higher lattice strength with larger site occupation. We acknowledge the support of this work by the R. A. Welch Foundation, The N. S. F., and the D.O.E. Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] Thilo St"oferle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004).

  11. Sensor Transition Failure in the Hi-Flow Sampler™: Implications for Methane Emissions Estimates from Natural Gas Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, T.; Ferrara, T.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas (NG) extraction and distribution are large anthropogenic sources of methane (CH4), and documenting the magnitude of leaks from NG infrastructure is a key step in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The United States Environmental Protection Agency requires measurement and reporting of emissions of CH4 from NG transmission facilities. The Bacharach Hi-Flow Sampler (BHFS) is commonly used for quantifying CH4 emissions at transmission and other types of NG facilities. Here we document failure of the BHFS to transition from a catalytic oxidation sensor used to measure low NG (~5% or less) concentrations to a thermal conductivity sensor for higher concentrations (from ~5% to 100%), resulting in underestimation of NG emission rates, under one or more conditions: 1), calibration is more than ~2 weeks old; 2), firmware is out of date; or 3), the NG source is less than ~91% CH4. The extent to which this issue has affected recent emission studies is uncertain, but the analysis presented here suggests that BHFS sensor transition failure occurred during three recent field sampling programs.

  12. Evidence for the Direct Detection of the Thermal Spectrum of the Non-Transiting Hot Gas Giant HD 88133 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskorz, Danielle; Crockett, Nathan R.; Lockwood, Alexandra; Benneke, Björn; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Barman, Travis S.; Bender, Chad F.; Bryan, Marta; Carr, John S.; Fischer, Debra; Howard, Andrew; Isaacson, Howard T.; Johnson, John A.

    2016-10-01

    We target the thermal emission spectrum of the non-transiting gas giant HD 88133 b with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, by treating the planet and its host star as a spectroscopic binary. For sufficiently deep summed flux observations of the star and planet across multiple epochs, it is possible to resolve the signal of the hot gas giant's atmosphere compared to the brighter stellar spectrum, at a level consistent with the aggregate shot noise of the full data set. To do this, we first perform a principal component analysis to remove the contribution of the Earth's atmosphere to the observed spectra. Then, we use a cross-correlation analysis to tease out the spectra of the host star and HD 88133 b to determine its orbit and identify key sources of atmospheric opacity. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC L band observations and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC K band observations of the HD 88133 system were obtained. Based on an analysis of the maximum likelihood curves calculated from the multi-epoch cross correlation of the full data set with two atmospheric models, we report the direct detection of the emission spectrum of the non-transiting exoplanet HD 88133 b and measure a radial projection of its Keplerian orbital velocity, its true mass, its orbital inclination, and dominant atmospheric species. This, combined with eleven years of radial velocity measurements of the system, provides the most up-to-date ephemeris for HD 88133.

  13. Schlieren Measurements of Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flow in helium jets discharged into air was studied using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry technique. In particular, the effects of buoyancy on jet oscillations and flow transition length were considered. Experiments to simulate microgravity were conducted in the 2.2s drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet Reynolds numbers varied from 800 to1200 and the jet Richardson numbers ranged between 0.01 and 0.004. Schlieren images revealed substantial variations in the flow structure during the drop. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of the data obtained in Earth gravity experiments revealed the existence of a discrete oscillating frequency in the transition region, which matched the frequency in the upstream laminar regime. In microgravity, the transition occurred farther downstream indicating laminarization of the jet in the absence of buoyancy. The amplitude of jet oscillations was reduced by up to an order of magnitude in microgravity. Results suggest that jet oscillations were buoyancy induced and that the brief microgravity period may not be sufficient for the oscillations to completely subside.

  14. First and second sound in a two-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose gas across the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia-Ji Hu, Hui

    2014-12-15

    We theoretically investigate first and second sound of a two-dimensional (2D) atomic Bose gas in harmonic traps by solving Landau’s two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. For an isotropic trap, we find that first and second sound modes become degenerate at certain temperatures and exhibit typical avoided crossings in mode frequencies. At these temperatures, second sound has significant density fluctuation due to its hybridization with first sound and has a divergent mode frequency towards the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless (BKT) transition. For a highly anisotropic trap, we derive the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations and discuss the sound-wave propagation along the weakly confined direction. Due to the universal jump of the superfluid density inherent to the BKT transition, we show that the first sound velocity exhibits a kink across the transition. These predictions might be readily examined in current experimental setups for 2D dilute Bose gases with a sufficiently large number of atoms, where the finite-size effect due to harmonic traps is relatively weak.

  15. 76 FR 37175 - FY 2011 Discretionary Sustainability Funding Opportunity Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) Program and Clean Fuels Grant Program, Augmented... fossil fuels, making America energy independent by: Breaking Dependence on Oil. Promote the next... use of fossil fuels. Producing More Energy at Home. Enhance U.S. energy supplies through...

  16. 75 FR 18942 - FY 2010 Discretionary Sustainability Funding Opportunity; Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) Program and Clean Fuels Grant Program, Augmented... dependence on fossil fuels, making America energy independent by: Breaking Dependence on Oil. Provide... of alternative fuel vehicles. Producing More Energy at Home. Enhance U.S. energy supplies...

  17. Water and greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with a transition to a low carbon transportation system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transportation fuels are heavily dominated by the use of petroleum, but concerns over oil depletion, energy security, and greenhouse gas emissions from petroleum combustion are driving the search for alternatives. As we look to shift away from petroleum-based transportation fuels...

  18. Non-Adiabatic Atomic Transitions: Computational Cross Section Calculations of Alkali Metal-Noble Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    collisions were computationally simulated. The alkali metals were potassium, rubidium, and cesium and the noble gas partners were helium, neon, and argon...195 20. Spin-Orbit split energies of Potassium, Rubidium, and Cesium ...composed of an alkali metal typically Rubidium[26, 37] or Cesium [5, 18]. The unique character of the alkali atoms, having a single valence electron in

  19. Atomic-to-molecular gas phase transition triggered by the radio jet in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Q.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.; Hamer, S.

    2016-10-01

    NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) is one of the best example to study AGN-feedback in the local Universe. At 13.5 kpc from the galaxy, optical filaments with recent star formation are lying along the radio-jet direction. We used the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) to map the CO(2-1) emission all along the filaments structure. Molecular gas mass of (8.2 ± 0.5) × 107 M⊙ was found over the 4.2 kpc-structure which represents about 3% of the total gas mass of the NGC 5128 cold gas content. Two dusty mostly molecular structures are identified, following the optical filaments. The region corresponds to the crossing of the radio jet with the northern H i shell, coming from a past galaxy merger. One filament is located at the border of the H i shell, while the other is entirely molecular, and devoid of H i gas. The molecular mass is comparable to the H i mass in the shell, suggesting a scenario where the atomic gas was shocked and transformed in molecular clouds by the radio jet. Comparison with combined far-IR Herschel and UV GALEX estimation of star formation rates in the same regions leads to depletion times of more than 10 Gyr. The filaments are thus less efficient than discs in converting molecular gas into stars. Kinetic energy injection triggered by shocks all along the jet and gas interface is a possible process that appears to be consistent with MUSE line ratio diagnostics derived in a smaller region of the northern filaments. Whether the AGN is the sole origin of this energy input and what is the dominant (mechanical vs. radiative) mode for this process is however still to be investigated. This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) under programme ID 096.B-0892.The reduced APEX spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/595/A65

  20. Fine cohesive powders in rotating drums: Transition from rigid-plastic flow to gas-fluidized regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, A.; Valverde, J. M.; Quintanilla, M. A.

    2002-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of fine cohesive powders inside rotating drums. We show that these powders may be fluidized due to entrapment of ambient gas, and we determine the onset of fluidization. Experimental measurements on the bed expansion as a function of the rotation velocity have been performed. Drums of different diameters and fine powders of varying cohesiveness have been tested. We show that (i) fine powders transit directly from a rigid-plastic state to a gas-fluidized state in accordance with the flow regime boundaries predicted elsewhere [A. Castellanos et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1156 (1999)], (ii) the onset of fluidization in the rotating drum is determined by the ratio of the powder kinetic energy per unit volume to its tensile strength, and (iii) once the powder is completely fluidized the average interstitial gas velocity increases proportionally to the rotation velocity. The last two results imply that the required velocity to fluidize a powder, ωR (ω angular velocity, R radius of the drum), must increase as the square root of its tensile strength, and this has been confirmed by independent measurements and estimations.

  1. Condensate fraction in a 2D Bose gas measured across the Mott-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Spielman, I B; Phillips, W D; Porto, J V

    2008-03-28

    We realize a single-band 2D Bose-Hubbard system with Rb atoms in an optical lattice and measure the condensate fraction as a function of lattice depth, crossing from the superfluid to the Mott-insulating phase. We quantitatively identify the location of the superfluid to normal transition by observing when the condensed fraction vanishes. Our measurement agrees with recent quantum Monte Carlo calculations for a finite-sized 2D system to within experimental uncertainty.

  2. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a relativistic gas at the transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo

    2016-11-01

    The Jüttner distribution function for equilibrium relativistic fluids has two well-known limits, the non-relativistic limit at low temperatures and ultra-relativistic limit for high temperatures. Recently, the description of this transition in velocity space in the system, from a gaussian to a bimodal distribution was made by Mendoza et al. Physically, it is a transition between a regime where the relativistic energy is dominated by kinetic to another where the rest energy dominates. It has been found that the critical temperature at which the relativistic corrections becomes relevant, depends just on the dimension of the system, this allowed a description in terms of the theory of critical points (Montakhab et al.). In this contribution a review of the thermodynamic quantities that are only dependent on the ratio between temperature and critical temperature, and the dimension is made. We will also analyze the effects of critical temperature on dissipative processes in simple special relativistic fluids. Particularly, purely relativistic terms that are usually proportional to the number density gradient are studied. The transport coefficients can be written in terms of the transition temperature, this will allow us to identify the lower order relativistic effects just in terms of the dimension of the system.

  3. A Gas-Poor Planetesimal Feeding Model for the Formation of Giant Planet Satellite Systems: Consequences for the Atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2005-01-01

    Given our presently inadequate understanding of the turbulent state of the solar and planetary nebulae, we believe the way to make progress in satellite formation is to consider two end member models that avoid over-reliance on specific choices of the turbulence (alpha), which is essentially a free parameter. The first end member model postulates turbulence decay once giant planet accretion ends. If so, Keplerian disks must eventually pass through the quiescent phases, so that the survival of satellites (and planets) ultimately hinges on gap-opening. In this scenario, the criterion for gap-opening itself sets the value for the gas surface density of the satellite disk.

  4. The transition from silicon to gas detection media in nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollacco, Emanuel C.

    2016-06-01

    Emerging radioactive beams and multi petawatt laser facilities are sturdily transforming our base concepts in instruments in nuclear physics. The changes are fuelled by studies of nuclei close to the drip-line or exotic reactions. This physics demands high luminosity, wide phase space cover with good resolution in energy, time, position and sampled waveform. By judiciously modifying the micro-world of the particle or space physics instruments (Double Sided Strip Si Detectors, Micro-Pattern Gas Amplifiers, microelectronics), we are on the path to initiate dream experiments. In the following a brief status in the domain is reported for selected instruments that highlight the present trends with silicon and the growing shift towards gas media for charged particle detection.

  5. A revised host galaxy association for GRB 020819B: a high-redshift dusty starburst, not a low-redshift gas-poor spiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Michałowski, Michał J.; Thöne, Christina C.; Petry, Dirk; Graham, John F.; Greiner, Jochen; Klose, Sylvio; Schulze, Steve; Kim, Sam

    2017-02-01

    The purported spiral host galaxy of GRB 020819B at z = 0.41 has been seminal in establishing our view of the diversity of long-duration gamma-ray burst environments: Optical spectroscopy of this host provided evidence that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can form even at high metallicities, whereas millimetric observations suggested that GRBs may preferentially form in regions with minimal molecular gas. We report new observations from the Very Large Telescope (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer and X-shooter), which demonstrate that the purported host is an unrelated foreground galaxy. The probable radio afterglow is coincident with a compact, highly star forming, dusty galaxy at z = 1.9621. The revised redshift naturally explains the apparent non-detection of CO(3-2) line emission at the afterglow site from the Atacama Large Millimetre Observatory. There is no evidence that molecular gas properties in GRB host galaxies are unusual, and limited evidence that GRBs can form readily at a super-Solar metallicity.

  6. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-15

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  7. Transport of a Bose gas in 1D disordered lattices at the fluid-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Luca; Lucioni, Eleonora; Chaudhuri, Saptarishi; Gori, Lorenzo; Kumar, Avinash; D'Errico, Chiara; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2013-09-13

    We investigate the momentum-dependent transport of 1D quasicondensates in quasiperiodic optical lattices. We observe a sharp crossover from a weakly dissipative regime to a strongly unstable one at a disorder-dependent critical momentum. In the limit of nondisordered lattices the observations suggest a contribution of quantum phase slips to the dissipation. We identify a set of critical disorder and interaction strengths for which such critical momentum vanishes, separating a fluid regime from an insulating one. We relate our observation to the predicted zero-temperature superfluid-Bose glass transition.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Molecular interactions in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael A.

    2008-11-14

    Transition metal-molecular complexes produced in a molecular beam are mass-selected and studied with infrared laser photodissociation spectroscopy. Metal complexes with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, water, acetylene or benzene are studied for a variety of metals. The number and intensity of infrared active bands are compared to the predictions of density functional theory calculations to derive structures, spin states and coordination numbers in these systems. These studied provide new insights into subtle details of metal-molecular interactions important in heterogeneous catalysis, metal-ligand bonding and metal ion solvation.

  9. Induced Interactions and the Superfluid Transition Temperature in a Three-Component Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Martikainen, J.-P.; Kinnunen, J. J.; Toermae, P.; Pethick, C. J.

    2009-12-31

    We study many-body contributions to the effective interaction between fermions in a three-component Fermi mixture. We find that effective interactions induced by the third component can lead to a phase diagram different from that predicted if interactions with the third component are neglected. As a result, in a confining potential a superfluid shell structure can arise even for equal populations of the components. We also find a critical temperature for the BCS transition in a {sup 6}Li mixture which can deviate strongly from the one in a weakly interacting two-component system.

  10. Endohedral nitrogen storage in carbon fullerene structures: physisorption to chemisorption transition with increasing gas pressure.

    PubMed

    Barajas-Barraza, R E; Guirado-López, R A

    2009-06-21

    We present extensive pseudopotential density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to analyze the structural properties and chemical reactivity of nitrogen molecules confined in spheroidal (C(82)) and tubelike (C(110)) carbon fullerene structures. For a small number of encapsulated nitrogens, the N(2) species exist in a nonbonded state within the cavities and form well defined molecular conformations such as linear chains, zigzag arrays, as well as both spheroidal and tubular configurations. However, with increasing the number of stored molecules, the interaction among the confined nitrogens as well as between the N(2) species and the fullerene wall is not always mainly repulsive. Actually, at high densities of the encapsulated gas, we found both adsorption of N(2) to the inner carbon surface together with the formation of (N(2))(m) molecular clusters. Total energy DFT calculations reveal that the shape of the interaction potential of a test molecule moving within the carbon cavities strongly varies with the number and proximity of the coadsorbed N(2) from being purely repulsive to having short-range attractive contributions close to the inner wall. In particular, the latter are always found when a group of closely spaced nitrogens is located near the carbon cage (a fact that will naturally occur at high densities of the encapsulated gas), inducing the formation of covalent bonds between the N(2) and the fullerene network. Interestingly, in some cases, the previous nitrogen adsorption to the inner surface is reversible by reducing the gas pressure. The calculated average density of states of our considered carbon compounds reveals the appearance of well defined features that clearly reflect the occurring structural changes and modifications in the adsorption properties in the systems. Our results clearly underline the crucial role played by confinement effects on the reactivity of our endohedral compounds, define this kind of materials as nonideal

  11. Complexation of diazaperylene and bisisoquinoline with transition metal ions in the gas phase studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Starke, Ines; Kammer, Stefan; Grunwald, Nicolas; Schilde, Uwe; Holdt, Hans-Jürgen; Kleinpeter, Erich

    2008-01-01

    The complex formation of the ligands 1,12-diazaperylene (dap), 1,1'-bisisoquinoline (bis), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) with transition metal ions (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ru, Os, Re, Pd, Pt, Ag and Cd) in the gas phase has been studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. With the exception of Ru, Os, Fe, Ni and Cu, singly charged complexes [MLn](+) (n = 1,2) were observed. The complexes of dap and bis with Ru, Os, Fe and Ni ions, and the mixed ligand complexes with bpy and phen, are preferably of the doubly charged type [ML3]2+. In addition, collision-induced dissociation (CID) measurements were employed to evaluate the relative stabilities of these complexes. The CID experiments of mixed-ligand complexes which contain both dap and phen or dap and bpy exhibit preferential elimination of bpy, indicating that bpy is a weaker ligand than phen and dap.

  12. Evidence for the Direct Detection of the Thermal Spectrum of the Non-Transiting Hot Gas Giant HD 88133 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskorz, Danielle; Benneke, Björn; Crockett, Nathan R.; Lockwood, Alexandra C.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Barman, Travis S.; Bender, Chad F.; Bryan, Marta L.; Carr, John S.; Fischer, Debra A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A.

    2016-12-01

    We target the thermal emission spectrum of the non-transiting gas giant HD 88133 b with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, by treating the planet and its host star as a spectroscopic binary. For sufficiently deep summed flux observations of the star and planet across multiple epochs, it is possible to resolve the signal of the hot gas giant’s atmosphere compared to the brighter stellar spectrum, at a level consistent with the aggregate shot noise of the full data set. To do this, we first perform a principal component analysis to remove the contribution of the Earth’s atmosphere to the observed spectra. Then, we use a cross-correlation analysis to tease out the spectra of the host star and HD 88133 b to determine its orbit and identify key sources of atmospheric opacity. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC L-band observations and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC K-band observations of the HD 88133 system were obtained. Based on an analysis of the maximum likelihood curves calculated from the multi-epoch cross-correlation of the full data set with two atmospheric models, we report the direct detection of the emission spectrum of the non-transiting exoplanet HD 88133 b and measure a radial projection of the Keplerian orbital velocity of 40 ± 15 km s-1, a true mass of {1.02}-0.28+0.61{M}{{J}}, a nearly face-on orbital inclination of {15}-5+6^\\circ , and an atmosphere opacity structure at high dispersion dominated by water vapor. This, combined with 11 years of radial velocity measurements of the system, provides the most up-to-date ephemeris for HD 88133.

  13. A nonlinear dynamical 2D coupled mathematical model for phase transitions in methane gas hydrates within permafrost under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Romanovskii, N. N.; Garagulya, L. S.; Brouchkov, A. V.; Komarov, I. A.; Roman, L. T.; Tipenko, G. S.; Buldovich, S. N.; Maximova, L. N.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed coupled permafrost - carbon physical and numerical models, where carbon is in the form of methane clathrate hydrate ( CH4*6H2O ) in a porous subsurface environment. The driving force for the subsurface temperature field dynamics is climate variations on the Earth's surface. This is an upper boundary condition for the nonlinear evolutionary system of partial differential equations (PDEs) describing subsurface heat transfer (parabolic PDEs) in a generalized Stefan formulation. The developed numerical model is a valuable computational tool to quantitatively study nonlinear dynamical thermal processes with phase transitions in terrestrial and Martian subsurfaces. Our model is multifrontal and therefore allows one to perform computations for a problem with any number of emerging/vanishing phase transition interfaces (both in methane gas hydrate deposits and in permafrost), since the model treats these fronts implicitly in an enthalpy formulation and in corresponding finite-difference scheme. This model takes into account the pressure (and therefore the depth) dependence of the phase transition temperature for methane clathrate hydrate. We have performed model computations using the thermophysical characteristics (heat capacity, density/porosity, thermal conductivity) for the Siberian subsurface. It can be used as a terrestrial analog for the Martian subsurface (e.g., Duxbury et al., 2001). Also, thermophysical coefficients from laboratory experiments for methane clathrate hydrate were used in our model. In addition, our model takes into account the dependence of subsurface thermophysical characteristics on temperature and spatial coordinates. The results of our computations and their interpretation will be presented. References. N. S. Duxbury, I. A. Zotikov, K. H. Nealson, V. E. Romanovsky, F. D. Carsey (2001). A numerical model for an alternative origin of Lake Vostok and its exobiological implications for Mars, Journal of Geophysical Research

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of Gravitational Effects on Transitional and Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Jaberi, Farhad A.

    2001-01-01

    The basic objective of this work is to assess the influence of gravity on "the compositional and the spatial structures" of transitional and turbulent diffusion flames via large eddy simulation (LES), and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The DNS is conducted for appraisal of the various closures employed in LES, and to study the effect of buoyancy on the small scale flow features. The LES is based on our "filtered mass density function"' (FMDF) model. The novelty of the methodology is that it allows for reliable simulations with inclusion of "realistic physics." It also allows for detailed analysis of the unsteady large scale flow evolution and compositional flame structure which is not usually possible via Reynolds averaged simulations.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation Of Gravitational Effects In Transitional And Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, Farhad A.; Givi, Peyman

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravity on the spatial and the compositional structures of transitional and turbulent hydrocarbon diffusion flames are studies via large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of round and planar jets. The subgrid-scale (SGS) closures in LES are based on the filtered mass density function (FMDF) methodology. The FMDF represents the joint probability density function (PDF) of the SGS scalars, and is obtained by solving its transport equation. The fundamental advantage of LES/FMDF is that it accounts for the effects of chemical reaction and buoyancy exactly. The methodology is employed for capturing some of the fundamental influences of gravity in equilibrium flames via realistic chemical kinetic schemes. Some preliminary investigation of the gravity effects in non-equilibrium flames is also conducted, but with idealized chemical kinetics models.

  16. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  17. Origins of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in gas-phase combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Oran, Elaine S.; Gamezo, Vadim N.

    2007-01-15

    This paper summarizes a 10-year theoretical and numerical effort to understand the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). To simulate DDT from first principles, it is necessary to resolve the relevant scales ranging from the size of the system to the flame thickness, a range that can cover up to 12 orders of magnitude in real systems. This computational challenge resulted in the development of numerical algorithms for solving coupled partial and ordinary differential equations and a new method for adaptive mesh refinement to deal with multiscale phenomena. Insight into how, when, and where DDT occurs was obtained by analyzing a series of multidimensional numerical simulations of laboratory experiments designed to create a turbulent flame through a series of shock-flame interactions. The simulations showed that these interactions are important for creating the conditions in which DDT can occur. Flames enhance the strength of shocks passing through a turbulent flame brush and generate new shocks. In turn, shock interactions with flames create and drive the turbulence in flames. The turbulent flame itself does not undergo a transition, but it creates conditions in nearby unreacted material that lead to ignition centers, or 'hot spots,' which can then produce a detonation through the Zeldovich gradient mechanism involving gradients of reactivity. Obstacles and boundary layers, through their interactions with shocks and flames, help to create environments in which hot spots can develop. Other scenarios producing reactivity gradients that can lead to detonations include flame-flame interactions, turbulent mixing of hot products with reactant gases, and direct shock ignition. Major unresolved questions concern the properties of nonequilibrium, shock-driven turbulence, stochastic properties of ignition events, and the possibility of unconfined DDT. (author)

  18. MULTI-TRANSITION STUDY OF M51'S MOLECULAR GAS SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schinnerer, E.; Weiss, A.; Aalto, S.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2010-08-20

    Two selected regions in the molecular gas spiral arms in M51 were mapped with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) mm-interferometer in the {sup 12}CO(2-1), {sup 13}CO(1-0), C{sup 18}O(1-0), HCN(1-0), and HCO+(1-0) emission lines. The CO data have been combined with the {sup 12}CO(1-0) data from Aalto et al. covering the central 3.5 kpc to study the physical properties of the molecular gas. All CO data cubes were short spacing corrected using IRAM 30 m ({sup 12}CO(1-0): NRO 45 m) single-dish data. A large velocity gradient analysis finds that the giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are similar to Galactic GMCs when studied at 180 pc (120 pc) resolution with an average kinetic temperature of T{sub kin} = 20(16) K and H{sub 2} density of n(H{sub 2}) = 120(240) cm{sup -3} when assuming virialized clouds (a constant velocity gradient dv/dr). The associated conversion factor between H{sub 2} mass and CO luminosity is close to the Galactic value for most regions analyzed. Our findings suggest that the GMC population in the spiral arms of M51 is similar to those of the Milky Way and therefore the strong star formation occurring in the spiral arms has no strong impact on the molecular gas in the spiral arms. Extinction inferred from the derived H{sub 2} column density is very high (A{sub V} about 15-30 mag), about a factor of 5-10 higher than the average value derived toward H II regions. Thus, a significant fraction of the ongoing star formation could be hidden inside the dust lanes of the spiral arms. A comparison of MIPS 24 {mu}m and H{alpha} data, however, suggests that this is not the case and most of the GMCs studied here are not (yet) forming stars. We also present low (4.''5) resolution OVRO maps of the HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) emission at the location of the brightest {sup 12}CO(1-0) peak.

  19. Rarefied gas flow in converging microchannel in slip and early transition regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemadri, Vadiraj; Varade, Vijay V.; Agrawal, Amit; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2017-03-01

    This work presents the study of isothermal rarefied gas flows in converging microchannels. Experiments are carried out on microchannels of three different converging angles (4°, 8°, and 12°). Numerical investigation is carried out using commercial software to study the local behaviour of the flow parameters. The simulations show a sudden drop in the fluid temperature at the exit of the microchannel. Knudsen minimum, which was experimentally observed for the first time recently in diverging microchannels, is also noted here in the case of flow in converging cross section. It is interesting to note that, at the location of Knudsen minimum, the Knudsen number and the value of the minimum mass flow rate are same for both converging and diverging cross sections, for all the angles tested. This result implies the absence of any flow preference at high Knudsen numbers when the flow is subjected to converging and diverging orientations of the microchannel.

  20. Effects of Buoyancy on Laminar, Transitional, and Turbulent Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Stocker, Dennis P.; Vaughan, David F.; Zhou, Liming; Edelman, Raymond B.

    1993-01-01

    Gas jet diffusion flames have been a subject of research for many years. However, a better understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena occurring in these flames is still needed, and, while the effects of gravity on the burning process have been observed, the basic mechanisms responsible for these changes have yet to be determined. The fundamental mechanisms that control the combustion process are in general coupled and quite complicated. These include mixing, radiation, kinetics, soot formation and disposition, inertia, diffusion, and viscous effects. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling a fire, laboratory-scale laminar and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames have been extensively studied, which have provided important information in relation to the physico-chemical processes occurring in flames. However, turbulent flames are not fully understood and their understanding requires more fundamental studies of laminar diffusion flames in which the interplay of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics is more tractable. But even this basic, relatively simple flame is not completely characterized in relation to soot formation, radiation, diffusion, and kinetics. Therefore, gaining an understanding of laminar flames is essential to the understanding of turbulent flames, and particularly fires, in which the same basic phenomena occur. In order to improve and verify the theoretical models essential to the interpretation of data, the complexity and degree of coupling of the controlling mechanisms must be reduced. If gravity is isolated, the complication of buoyancy-induced convection would be removed from the problem. In addition, buoyant convection in normal gravity masks the effects of other controlling parameters on the flame. Therefore, the combination of normal-gravity and microgravity data would provide the information, both theoretical and experimental, to improve our understanding of diffusion flames in general, and the effects of gravity on the

  1. Properties of the most metal-poor gas-rich LSB dwarf galaxies SDSS J0015+0104 and J2354-0005 residing in the Eridanus void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Martin, J.-M.; Lyamina, Y. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2013-07-01

    SDSS J0015+0104 is the lowest metallicity low surface brightness dwarf (LSBD) galaxy known. The oxygen abundance in its H II region SDSS J001520.70+010436.9 (at ˜1.5 kpc from the galaxy centre) is 12+log (O/H) = 7.07 (Guseva et al.). This galaxy, at the distance of 28.4 Mpc, appears to reside deeply in the volume devoid of luminous massive galaxies, known as the Eridanus void. SDSS J235437.29-000501.6 is another Eridanus void LSBD galaxy, with parameter 12+log (O/H) = 7.36 (also Guseva et al.). We present the results of their H I observations with the Nançay Radio Telescope revealing their high ratios of M(H I)/LB ˜ 2.3. Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey images, we derived for both galaxies their radial surface brightness profiles and the main photometric parameters. Their colours and total magnitudes are used to estimate the galaxy stellar mass and ages. The related gas mass fractions, fg ˜ 0.98 and ˜0.97, and the extremely low metallicities (much lower than for their more typical counterparts with the same luminosity) indicate their unevolved status. We compare these Eridanus void LSBDs with several extreme LSBD galaxies residing in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. Based on the combination of all their unusual properties, the two discussed LSBD galaxies are similar to the unusual LSBDs residing in the closer void. This finding presents additional evidence for the existence in voids of a sizeable fraction of low-mass unevolved galaxies. Their dedicated search might result in the substantial increase of the number of such objects in the local Universe and in the advancement of understanding their nature.

  2. Poor Americans: How the Poor White Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilisuk, Marc; Pilisuk, Phyllis

    Contents of this book include the following essays which originally appeared in "Transaction" magazine: (1) "Poor Americans: an introduction," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (2) "How the white poor live," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (3) "The culture of poverty," Oscar Lewis; (4) "Life in Appalachia--the case of Hugh McCaslin," Robert…

  3. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    Global energy markets and climate change in the twenty first century depend, to an extraordinary extent, on China. China is now, or will soon be, the world's largest energy consumer. Since 2007, China has been the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Despite its large and rapidly expanding influence on global energy markets and the global atmosphere, on a per capita basis energy consumption and GHG emissions in China are low relative to developed countries. The Chinese economy, and with it energy use and GHG emissions, are expected to grow vigorously for at least the next two decades, raising a question of critical historical significance: How can China's economic growth imperative be meaningfully reconciled with its goals of greater energy security and a lower carbon economy? Most scholars, governments, and practitioners have looked to technology---energy efficiency, nuclear power, carbon capture and storage---for answers to this question. Alternatively, this study seeks to root China's future energy and emissions trajectory in the political economy of its multiple transitions, from a centrally planned to a market economy and from an agrarian to a post-industrial society. The study draws on five case studies, each a dedicated chapter, which are organized around three perspectives on energy and GHG emissions: the macroeconomy; electricity supply and demand; and nitrogen fertilizer production and use. Chapters 2 and 3 examine how growth and structural change in China's macroeconomy have shaped energy demand, finding that most of the dramatic growth in the country's energy use over the 2000s was driven by an acceleration of its investment-dominated, energy-intensive growth model, rather than from structural change. Chapters 4 and 5 examine efforts to improve energy efficiency and increase the share of renewable generation in the electric power sector, concluding that China's power system lacks the flexibility in generation, pricing, and demand to

  4. Phosphorylation of the growth arrest-specific protein Gas2 is coupled to actin rearrangements during Go-->G1 transition in NIH 3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Growth arrest-specific (Gas2) protein has been shown to be a component of the microfilament system, that is highly expressed in growth arrested mouse and human fibroblasts and is hyperphosphorylated upon serum stimulation of quiescent cells. (Brancolini, C., S. Bottega, and C. Schneider. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 117:1251-1261). In this study we demonstrate that the kinetics of Gas2 phosphorylation, during Go-->G1 transition, as induced by addition of 20% FCS to serum starved NIH 3T3 cells, is temporally coupled to the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton. To better dissect the relationship between Gas2 phosphorylation and the modification of the microfilament architecture we used specific stimuli for both membrane ruffling (PDGF and PMA) and stress fiber formation (L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid LPA) (Ridley, A. J., and A. Hall. 1992. Cell. 70:389-399). All of them, similarly to 20% FCS, are able to downregulate Gas2 biosynthesis. PDGF and PMA induce Gas2 hyperphosphorylation that is temporally coupled with the appearance of membrane ruffling where Gas2 localizes. On the other hand LPA, a specific stimulus for stress fiber formation, fails to induce a detectable Gas2 hyperphosphorylation. Thus, Gas2 hyperphosphorylation is specifically correlated with the formation of membrane ruffling possibly implying a role of Gas2 in this process. PMID:8120096

  5. The effusive-explosive transitions at Rokatenda 2012-2013: unloading by extrusion of degassed magma with lateral gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primulyana, Sofyan; Bani, Philipson; Harris, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Between October 2012 and August 2013, Rokatenda, one of the most poorly understood volcanoes in Indonesia, entered a phase of intense eruptive activity which involved extrusion of viscous lava, gas discharge and explosive activity. During the 10-month-long eruption, a lava volume of 2-5 × 106 m3 was extruded at mean output rate of 0.3 m3 s-1, with 2 to 3-month-long high extrusion rate phases being terminated by explosive events. Extrusion built a lava dome attaining a maximum height of ˜80 m above the crater rim, with a basal width of about 250 m. The composition of the 2012-2013 lava dome is comparable to that of the 1980 lava dome, both being andesite-trachydacite. Mineralogically, the 2012-2013 lava dome is mainly composed of plagioclase, pyroxene and an undetermined opaque mineral. Halogens released during eruption are consistent with the extrusion being fed, at least in the first eruption phase, by a degassed magma. This resulted in the formation of a dense, viscous plug in the conduit that led to a lateral gas flow, with gasses escaping around the plug to form multiple craters surrounding the dome. During the course of the eruptive activity, degassed magma was progressively forced out of the vent to unload deeper magma and force the system into an explosive phase. Such a scenario has occurred in the past at Rokatenda and is likely to be repeated in the future and creates an activity pattern that may be used to characterize such systems.

  6. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Butlitsky, M. A.; Zelener, B. V.

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a “shelf Coulomb” model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The “shelf Coulomb” model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ε parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ε and γ = βe{sup 2}n{sup 1/3} (where β = 1/k{sub B}T, n is the particle's density, k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ε and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ε{sub crit}≈13(T{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.076),γ{sub crit}≈1.8(v{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.17),P{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ{sup 3} and reduced temperature T{sup *} = ε{sup −1}.

  7. Vibrational structure of n-π* transition of the UV absorption spectrum of acryloyl fluoride in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, Lidiya A; Tyulin, Vladimir I; Matveev, Vladimir K; Pentin, Yuriy A

    2014-03-25

    UV absorption spectrum of acryloyl fluoride molecule in the gas phase has been obtained in the region at 32600-35500 cm(-1) with the purpose of the investigation of the hindered internal rotation. The resolved vibrational structure of this spectrum consists of 92 absorption bands, each of which corresponds to a certain transition from the ground (S0) to excited (S1) electronic state. The assignment of all bands has been made. The values ν00trans=34831.8 cm(-1) and ν00cis=34679.2 cm(-1) have been determined. Several Deslandres Tables (DTs) have been constructed for torsional vibration of s-trans- and s-cis-isomers of investigated molecule. The origins in these DTs correspond to bands assigned to ν00 and to fundamental frequencies of each isomer in the S0 and S1 states. These DTs have been used to determine the harmonic frequencies ωe, anharmonicity coefficients x11, and frequencies of the torsional vibration transitions (0-υ) up to high values of the vibrational quantum number υ of s-trans- and s-cis-isomers in the both electronic states. The frequencies of torsional vibrations are ν1(″)=116.5cm(-1) for s-trans-isomer and ν1(″)=101.2 cm(-1) for s-cis-isomer in the S0 state. The frequencies of ones are ν1(')=170.4 cm(-1) for s-trans-isomer and ν1(')=139.7 cm(-1) for s-cis-isomer in the S1 state. The fundamental vibrational frequencies set has been found for isomers in the S0 and S1 states.

  8. Educational attainment in poor comprehenders

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Jessie; Sperring, Rachael; Nation, Kate

    2014-01-01

    To date, only one study has investigated educational attainment in poor (reading) comprehenders, providing evidence of poor performance on national UK school tests at age 11 years relative to peers (Cain and Oakhill, 2006). In the present study, we adopted a longitudinal approach, tracking attainment on such tests from 11 years to the end of compulsory schooling in the UK (age 16 years). We aimed to investigate the proposal that educational weaknesses (defined as poor performance on national assessments) might become more pronounced over time, as the curriculum places increasing demands on reading comprehension. Participants comprised 15 poor comprehenders and 15 controls; groups were matched for chronological age, nonverbal reasoning ability and decoding skill. Children were identified at age 9 years using standardized measures of nonverbal reasoning, decoding and reading comprehension. These measures, along with a measure of oral vocabulary knowledge, were repeated at age 11 years. Data on educational attainment were collected from all participants (n = 30) at age 11 and from a subgroup (n = 21) at 16 years. Compared to controls, educational attainment in poor comprehenders was lower at ages 11 and 16 years, an effect that was significant at 11 years. When poor comprehenders were compared to national performance levels, they showed significantly lower performance at both time points. Low educational attainment was not evident for all poor comprehenders. Nonetheless, our findings point to a link between reading comprehension difficulties in mid to late childhood and poor educational outcomes at ages 11 and 16 years. At these ages, pupils in the UK are making key transitions: they move from primary to secondary schools at 11, and out of compulsory schooling at 16. PMID:24904464

  9. Condensation of N bosons. II. Nonequilibrium analysis of an ideal Bose gas and the laser phase-transition analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharovsky, V. V.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Suhail Zubairy, M.

    2000-02-01

    A nonequilibrium approach to the dynamics and statistics of the condensate of an ideal N-atom Bose gas cooling via interaction with a thermal reservoir using the canonical ensemble is developed. We derive simple analytical expressions for the canonical partition function and equilibrium distribution of the number of atoms in the ground state of a trap under different approximations, and compare them with exact numerical results. The N-particle constraint associated with the canonical ensemble is usually a burden. In the words of Kittel, ``in the investigation of the Bose-Einstein...laws it is very inconvenient to impose the restriction that the number of particles in the subsystem shall be held constant.'' But in the present approach, based on the analogy between a second-order phase transition and laser threshold behavior, the N-particle constraint makes the problem easier. We emphasize that the present work provides another example of a case in which equilibrium (detailed balance) solutions to nonequilibrium equations of motion provide a useful supplementary approach to conventional statistical mechanics. We also discuss some dynamical and mesoscopic aspects of Bose-Einstein condensation. The conclusion is that the present analytical (but approximate) results, based on a nonequilibrium approach, are in excellent agreement with exact (but numerical) results. The present analysis has much in common with the quantum theory of the laser.

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Cationized Arginine in the Gas Phase: Direct Evidence for the Transition from Nonzwitterionic to Zwitterionic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew F.; O'Brien, Jeremy T.; Prell, James S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Williams, Evan R.

    2009-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of protonated and alkali metal cationized arginine (Arg) and arginine methyl ester (ArgOMe) are investigated with infrared spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Infrared spectra, measured in the hydrogen-stretch region, provide compelling evidence that arginine changes from its nonzwitterionic to zwitterionic form with increasing metal ion size, with the transition in structure occurring between lithium and sodium. For sodiated arginine, evidence for both forms is obtained from spectral deconvolution, although the zwitterionic form is predominant. Comparisons of the photodissociation spectra with spectra calculated for low-energy candidate structures provide additional insights into the detailed structures of these ions. Arg•Li+, ArgOMe•Li+, and ArgOMe•Na+ exist in nonzwitterionic forms in which the metal ion is tricoordinated with the amino acid, whereas Arg•Na+ and Arg•K+ predominately exist in a zwitterionic form where the protonated side chain donates one hydrogen bond to the N terminus of the amino acid and the metal ion is bicoordinated with the carboxylate group. Arg•H+ and ArgOMe•H+ have protonated side chains that form the same interaction with the N terminus as zwitterionic, alkali metal cationized arginine, yet both are unambiguously determined to be nonzwitterionic. Calculations indicate that for clusters with protonated side chains, structures with two strong hydrogen bonds are lowest in energy, in disagreement with these experimental results. This study provides new detailed structural assignments and interpretations of previously observed fragmentation patterns for these ions. PMID:17249666

  11. High-temperature superfluidity of the two-component Bose gas in a transition metal dichalcogenide bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2016-06-01

    The high-temperature superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) layers is predicted. We study Bose-Einstein condensation in the two-component system of dipolar A and B excitons. The effective mass, energy spectrum of the collective excitations, the sound velocity, and critical temperature are obtained for different TMDC materials. It is shown that in the Bogoliubov approximation, the sound velocity in the two-component dilute exciton Bose gas is always larger than in any one-component exciton system. The difference between the sound velocities for two-component and one-component dilute gases is caused by the fact that the sound velocity for a two-component system depends on the reduced mass of A and B excitons, which is always smaller than the individual mass of A or B exciton. Due to this fact, the critical temperature Tc for superfluidity for the two-component exciton system in a TMDC bilayer is about one order of magnitude higher than Tc in any one-component exciton system. We propose to observe the superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel TMDC layers, which causes two opposite superconducting currents in each TMDC layer.

  12. Determination of scale-invariant equations of state without fitting parameters: application to the two-dimensional Bose gas across the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition.

    PubMed

    Desbuquois, Rémi; Yefsah, Tarik; Chomaz, Lauriane; Weitenberg, Christof; Corman, Laura; Nascimbène, Sylvain; Dalibard, Jean

    2014-07-11

    We present a general "fit-free" method for measuring the equation of state (EoS) of a scale-invariant gas. This method, which is inspired from the procedure introduced by Ku et al. [Science 335, 563 (2012)] for the unitary three-dimensional Fermi gas, provides a general formalism which can be readily applied to any quantum gas in a known trapping potential, in the frame of the local density approximation. We implement this method on a weakly interacting two-dimensional Bose gas across the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and determine its EoS with unprecedented accuracy in the critical region. Our measurements provide an important experimental benchmark for classical-field approaches which are believed to accurately describe quantum systems in the weakly interacting but nonperturbative regime.

  13. Changes in time-use and drug use by young adults in poor neighbourhoods of Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina, after the political transitions of 2001-2002: Results of a survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In some countries, "Big Events" like crises and transitions have been followed by large increases in drug use, drug injection and HIV/AIDS. Argentina experienced an economic crisis and political transition in 2001/2002 that affected how people use their time. This paper studies how time use changes between years 2001 and 2004, subsequent to these events, were associated with drug consumption in poor neighbourhoods of Greater Buenos Aires. Methods In 2003-2004, 68 current injecting drug users (IDUs) and 235 young non-IDUs, aged 21-35, who lived in impoverished drug-impacted neighbourhoods in Greater Buenos Aires, were asked about time use then and in 2001. Data on weekly hours spent working or looking for work, doing housework/childcare, consuming drugs, being with friends, and hanging out in the neighbourhood, were studied in relation to time spent using drugs. Field observations and focus groups were also conducted. Results After 2001, among both IDUs and non-IDUs, mean weekly time spent working declined significantly (especially among IDUs); time spent looking for work increased, and time spent with friends and hanging out in the neighbourhood decreased. We found no increase in injecting or non-injecting drug consumption after 2001. Subjects most affected by the way the crises led to decreased work time and/or to increased time looking for work--and by the associated increase in time spent in one's neighbourhood--were most likely to increase their time using drugs. Conclusions Time use methods are useful to study changes in drug use and their relationships to every day life activities. In these previously-drug-impacted neighbourhoods, the Argentinean crisis did not lead to an increase in drug use, which somewhat contradicts our initial expectations. Nevertheless, those for whom the crises led to decreased work time, increased time looking for work, and increased time spent in indoor or outdoor neighbourhood environments, were likely to spend more time

  14. THE HIGHLY DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF THE INNERMOST DUST AND GAS IN THE TRANSITION DISK VARIABLE LRLL 31

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, K. M.; Rieke, G.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Balog, Z.; Herbst, W.; Megeath, S. T.; Kun, M.

    2011-05-10

    We describe extensive synoptic multi-wavelength observations of the transition disk LRLL 31 in the young cluster IC 348. We combined 4 epochs of IRS spectra, 9 epochs of MIPS photometry, 7 epochs of cold-mission IRAC photometry, and 36 epochs of warm-mission IRAC photometry along with multi-epoch near-infrared spectra, optical spectra, and polarimetry to explore the nature of the rapid variability of this object. We find that the inner disk, as traced by the 2-5 {mu}m excess, stays at the dust sublimation radius while the strength of the excess changes by a factor of eight on weekly timescales, and the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m photometry show a drop of 0.35 mag in 1 week followed by a slow 0.5 mag increase over the next 3 weeks. The accretion rate, as measured by Pa{beta} and Br{gamma} emission lines, varies by a factor of five with evidence for a correlation between the accretion rate and the infrared excess. While the gas and dust in the inner disk are fluctuating, the central star stays relatively static. Our observations allow us to put constraints on the physical mechanism responsible for the variability. The variable accretion, and wind, are unlikely to be causes of the variability, but are both effects of the same physical process that disturbs the disk. The lack of periodicity in our infrared monitoring indicates that it is unlikely that there is a companion within {approx}0.4 AU that is perturbing the disk. The most likely explanation is either a companion beyond {approx}0.4 AU or a dynamic interface between the stellar magnetic field and the disk leading to a variable scale height and/or warping of the inner disk.

  15. A computer program for two-dimensional and axisymmetric nonreacting perfect gas and equilibrium chemically reacting laminar, transitional and-or turbulent boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.; Anderson, E. C.; Lewis, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program is described in detail for laminar, transitional, and/or turbulent boundary-layer flows of non-reacting (perfect gas) and reacting gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium. An implicit finite difference scheme was developed for both two dimensional and axisymmetric flows over bodies, and in rocket nozzles and hypervelocity wind tunnel nozzles. The program, program subroutines, variables, and input and output data are described. Also included is the output from a sample calculation of fully developed turbulent, perfect gas flow over a flat plate. Input data coding forms and a FORTRAN source listing of the program are included. A method is discussed for obtaining thermodynamic and transport property data which are required to perform boundary-layer calculations for reacting gases in chemical equilibrium.

  16. Rich Donors, Poor Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The shifting ideological winds of foreign aid donors have driven their policy towards governments in poor countries. Donors supported state-led development policies in poor countries from the 1940s to the 1970s; market and private-sector driven reforms during the 1980s and 1990s; and returned their attention to the state with an emphasis on…

  17. Inference in `poor` languages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    1996-10-01

    Languages with a solvable implication problem but without complete and consistent systems of inference rules (`poor` languages) are considered. The problem of existence of finite complete and consistent inference rule system for a ``poor`` language is stated independently of the language or rules syntax. Several properties of the problem arc proved. An application of results to the language of join dependencies is given.

  18. Two-Equation Low-Reynolds-Number Turbulence Modeling of Transitional Boundary Layer Flows Characteristic of Gas Turbine Blades. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Rodney C.; Patankar, Suhas V.

    1988-01-01

    The use of low Reynolds number (LRN) forms of the k-epsilon turbulence model in predicting transitional boundary layer flow characteristic of gas turbine blades is developed. The research presented consists of: (1) an evaluation of two existing models; (2) the development of a modification to current LRN models; and (3) the extensive testing of the proposed model against experimental data. The prediction characteristics and capabilities of the Jones-Launder (1972) and Lam-Bremhorst (1981) LRN k-epsilon models are evaluated with respect to the prediction of transition on flat plates. Next, the mechanism by which the models simulate transition is considered and the need for additional constraints is discussed. Finally, the transition predictions of a new model are compared with a wide range of different experiments, including transitional flows with free-stream turbulence under conditions of flat plate constant velocity, flat plate constant acceleration, flat plate but strongly variable acceleration, and flow around turbine blade test cascades. In general, calculational procedure yields good agreement with most of the experiments.

  19. Two-equation low-Reynolds-number turbulence modeling of transitional boundary layer flows characteristic of gas turbine blades. Ph. D. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.C.; Patankar, S.V.

    1988-05-01

    The use of low Reynolds number (LRN) forms of the k-epsilon turbulence model in predicting transitional boundary layer flow characteristic of gas turbine blades is developed. The research presented consists of: (1) an evaluation of two existing models; (2) the development of a modification to current LRN models; and (3) the extensive testing of the proposed model against experimental data. The prediction characteristics and capabilities of the Jones-Launder (1972) and Lam-Bremhorst (1981) LRN k-epsilon models are evaluated with respect to the prediction of transition on flat plates. Next, the mechanism by which the models simulate transition is considered and the need for additional constraints is discussed. Finally, the transition predictions of a new model are compared with a wide range of different experiments, including transitional flows with free-stream turbulence under conditions of flat plate constant velocity, flat plate constant acceleration, flat plate but strongly variable acceleration, and flow around turbine blade test cascades. In general, calculational procedure yields good agreement with most of the experiments.

  20. Ultrafine PM emissions from natural gas, oxidation-catalyst diesel, and particle-trap diesel heavy-duty transit buses.

    PubMed

    Holmén, Britt A; Ayala, Alberto

    2002-12-01

    This paper addresses how current technologies effective for reducing PM emissions of heavy-duty engines may affect the physical characteristics of the particles emitted. Three in-use transit bus configurations were compared in terms of submicron particle size distributions using simultaneous SMPS measurements under two dilution conditions, a minidiluter and the legislated constant volume sampler (CVS). The compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled and diesel particulate filter (DPF)-equipped diesel configurations are two "green" alternatives to conventional diesel engines. The CNG bus in this study did not have an oxidation catalyst whereas the diesel configurations (with and without particulate filter) employed catalysts. The DPF was a continuously regenerating trap (CRT). Particle size distributions were collected between 6 and 237 nm using 2-minute SMPS scans during idle and 55 mph steady-state cruise operation. Average particle size distributions collected during idle operation of the diesel baseline bus operating on ultralow sulfur fuel showed evidence for nanoparticle growth under CVS dilution conditions relative to the minidiluter. The CRT effectively reduced both accumulation and nuclei mode concentrations by factors of 10-100 except under CVS dilution conditions where nuclei mode concentrations were measured during 55 mph steady-state cruise that exceeded baseline diesel concentrations. The CVS data suggest some variability in trap performance. The CNG bus had accumulation mode concentrations 10-100x lower than the diesel baseline but often displayed large nuclei modes, especially under CVS dilution conditions. Partly this may be explained by the lack of an oxidation catalyst on the CNG, but differences between the minidiluter and CVS size distributions suggest that dilution ratio, temperature-related wall interactions, and differences in tunnel background between the diluters contributed to creating nanoparticle concentrations that sometimes exceeded diesel

  1. A GAS GIANT CIRCUMBINARY PLANET TRANSITING THE F STAR PRIMARY OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR KIC 4862625 AND THE INDEPENDENT DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TWO TRANSITING PLANETS IN THE KEPLER-47 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, V. B.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; McCullough, P. R.; Valenti, J. A.; Hinse, T. C.; Hebrard, G.; Diaz, R. F.; Deleuil, M.

    2013-06-10

    We report the discovery of a transiting, gas giant circumbinary planet orbiting the eclipsing binary KIC 4862625 and describe our independent discovery of the two transiting planets orbiting Kepler-47. We describe a simple and semi-automated procedure for identifying individual transits in light curves and present our follow-up measurements of the two circumbinary systems. For the KIC 4862625 system, the 0.52 {+-} 0.018 R{sub Jupiter} radius planet revolves every {approx}138 days and occults the 1.47 {+-} 0.08 M{sub Sun }, 1.7 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Sun} F8 IV primary star producing aperiodic transits of variable durations commensurate with the configuration of the eclipsing binary star. Our best-fit model indicates the orbit has a semi-major axis of 0.64 AU and is slightly eccentric, e = 0.1. For the Kepler-47 system, we confirm the results of Orosz et al. Modulations in the radial velocity of KIC 4862625A are measured both spectroscopically and photometrically, i.e., via Doppler boosting, and produce similar results.

  2. HCO+ Detection of Dust-depleted Gas in the Inner Hole of the LkCa 15 Pre-transitional Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabek-Maunder, E.; Mohanty, S.; Greaves, J.; Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.

    2016-12-01

    LkCa 15 is an extensively studied star in the Taurus region, known for its pre-transitional disk with a large inner cavity in the dust continuum and normal gas accretion rate. The most popular hypothesis to explain the LkCa 15 data invokes one or more planets to carve out the inner cavity, while gas continues to flow across the gap from the outer disk onto the central star. We present spatially unresolved HCO+ J=4\\to 3 observations of the LkCa 15 disk from the James Clerk Maxwell telescope (JCMT) and model the data with the ProDiMo code. We find that: (1) HCO+ line-wings are clearly detected, certifying the presence of gas in the cavity within ≲50 au of the star. (2) Reproducing the observed line-wing flux requires both a significant suppression of cavity dust (by a factor ≳104 compared to the interstellar medium (ISM)) and a substantial increase in the gas scale-height within the cavity (H 0/R 0 ˜ 0.6). An ISM dust-to-gas ratio (d:g = 10-2) yields too little line-wing flux, regardless of the scale-height or cavity gas geometry, while a smaller scale-height also under-predicts the flux even with a reduced d:g. (3) The cavity gas mass is consistent with the surface density profile of the outer disk extended inwards to the sublimation radius (corresponding to mass M d ˜ 0.03 M ⊙), and masses lower by a factor ≳10 appear to be ruled out.

  3. Poorly controlled gout: who is doing poorly?

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Faith Li-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Gout, an inflammatory arthritis caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals, is commonly seen in primary care and specialist clinics. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in gout due to advances in therapies and the understanding of pathophysiology, with new guidelines being published by international bodies. However, there is still a gap between the goals of treatment and actual day-to-day practice. Barriers that result in poorly controlled gout include patient factors such as lack of understanding of the disease, stigma and nonadherence to treatment, as well as physician factors such as knowledge gaps, inadequate use of allopurinol and lack of ownership of the disease. The medical profession needs to do more to bridge the gap through physician and patient education, identification of treatment targets with appropriate use of drugs, and dissemination of guidelines. PMID:27549096

  4. Constraining the Structure of the Transition Disk HD 135344B (SAO 206462) by Simultaneous Modeling of Multiwavelength Gas and Dust Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmona, A.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W. F.; Benisty, M.; Menard, F.; Grady, C.; Kamp, I.; Woitke, P.; Olofsson, J.; Roberge, A.; Brittain, S.; Duchene, G.; Meeus, G.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Dent, B.; Le Bouquin, J. E.; Berger, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Constraining the gas and dust disk structure of transition disks, particularly in the inner dust cavity, is a crucial step toward understanding the link between them and planet formation. HD 135344B is an accreting (pre-)transition disk that displays the CO 4.7 micrometer emission extending tens of AU inside its 30 AU dust cavity. Aims: We constrain HD 135344B's disk structure from multi-instrument gas and dust observations. Methods: We used the dust radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermochemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk structure from the simultaneous modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED), VLT/CRIRES CO P(10) 4.75 Micrometers, Herschel/PACS [O(sub I)] 63 Micrometers, Spitzer/IRS, and JCMT CO-12 J = 3-2 spectra, VLTI/PIONIER H-band visibilities, and constraints from (sub-)mm continuum interferometry and near-IR imaging. Results: We found a disk model able to describe the current gas and dust observations simultaneously. This disk has the following structure. (1) To simultaneously reproduce the SED, the near-IR interferometry data, and the CO ro-vibrational emission, refractory grains (we suggest carbon) are present inside the silicate sublimation radius (0.08 is less than R less than 0.2 AU). (2) The dust cavity (R is less than 30 AU) is filled with gas, the surface density of the gas inside the cavity must increase with radius to fit the CO ro-vibrational line profile, a small gap of a few AU in the gas distribution is compatible with current data, and a large gap of tens of AU in the gas does not appear likely. (4) The gas-to-dust ratio inside the cavity is >100 to account for the 870 Micrometers continuum upper limit and the CO P(10) line flux. (5) The gas-to-dust ratio in the outer disk (30 is less than R less than 200 AU) is less than 10 to simultaneously describe the [O(sub I)] 63 Micrometers line flux and the CO P(10) line profile. (6) In the outer disk, most of the gas and dust mass should be located in the midplane, and

  5. Light Scattering in Exoplanet Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-10-01

    Transit spectroscopy is currently the leading technique for studying exoplanet atmospheric composition, and has led to the detection of molecular species, clouds, and/or hazes for numerous worlds outside the Solar System. The field of exoplanet transit spectroscopy will be revolutionized with the anticipated launch of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2018. Over the course of the design five year mission for JWST, the observatory is expected to provide in-depth observations of many tens of transiting exoplanets, including some worlds in the poorly understood 2-4 Earth-mass regime. As the quality of transit spectrum observations continues to improve, so should models of exoplanet transits. Thus, certain processes initially thought to be of second-order importance should be revisited and possibly added to modeling tools. For example, atmospheric refraction, which was commonly omitted from early transit spectrum models, has recently been shown to be of critical importance in some terrestrial exoplanet transits. Beyond refraction, another process that has seen little study with regards to exoplanet transits is light multiple scattering. In most cases, scattering opacity in exoplanet transits has been treated as equivalent to absorption opacity. However, this equivalence cannot always hold, such as in the case of a strongly forward scattering, weakly absorbing aerosol. In this presentation, we outline a theory of exoplanet transit spectroscopy that spans the geometric limit (used in most modern models) to a fully multiple scattering approach. We discuss a new technique for improving model efficiency that effectively separates photon paths, which tend to vary slowly in wavelength, from photon absorption, which can vary rapidly in wavelength. Using this newly developed approach, we explore situations where cloud or haze scattering may be important to JWST observations of gas giants, and comment on the conditions necessary for scattering to become a major

  6. Constraining the Evolution of Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broming, Emma J.; Fuse, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    There currently exists no method by which to quantify the evolutionary state of poor clusters (PCs). Research by Broming & Fuse (2010) demonstrated that the evolution of Hickson compact groups (HCGs) are constrained by the correlation between the X-ray luminosities of point sources and diffuse gas. The current investigation adopts an analogous approach to understanding PCs. Plionis et al. (2009) proposed a theory to define the evolution of poor clusters. The theory asserts that cannibalism of galaxies causes a cluster to become more spherical, develop increased velocity dispersion and increased X-ray temperature and gas luminosity. Data used to quantify the evolution of the poor clusters were compiled across multiple wavelengths. The sample includes 162 objects from the WBL catalogue (White et al. 1999), 30 poor clusters in the Chandra X-ray Observatory archive, and 15 Abell poor clusters observed with BAX (Sadat et al. 2004). Preliminary results indicate that the cluster velocity dispersion and X-ray gas and point source luminosities can be used to highlight a weak correlation. An evolutionary trend was observed for multiple correlations detailed herein. The current study is a continuation of the work by Broming & Fuse examining point sources and their properties to determine the evolutionary stage of compact groups, poor clusters, and their proposed remnants, isolated ellipticals and fossil groups. Preliminary data suggests that compact groups and their high-mass counterpart, poor clusters, evolve along tracks identified in the X-ray gas - X-ray point source relation. While compact groups likely evolve into isolated elliptical galaxies, fossil groups display properties that suggest they are the remains of fully coalesced poor clusters.

  7. The Elum Project: A Network of UK Sites to Understand Land-Use Transitions to Bioenergy and Their Implications for Greenhouse Gas Balance and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Z. M.; Alberti, G.; Bottoms, E.; Rowe, R.; Parmar, K.; Marshall, R.; Elias, D.; Smith, P.; Dondini, M.; Pogson, M.; Richards, M.; Finch, J.; Ineson, P.; Keane, B.; Perks, M.; Wilkinson, M.; Yamulki, S.; Donnison, I.; Farrar, K.; Massey, A.; McCalmont, J.; Drewer, J.; Sohi, S.; McNamara, N.; Taylor, G.

    2014-12-01

    Rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions coupled with an increasing need to address energy security are resulting in the development of cleaner, more sustainable alternatives to traditional fossil fuel sources. Bioenergy crops have been proposed to be able to mitigate the effects of climate change as well as provide increased energy security. The aim of this project is to assess the impact of land conversion to second generation non-food bioenergy crops on GHG balance for several land use transitions, including from arable, grassland and forest. A network of 6 sites was established across the UK to assess the processes underpinning GHG balance and to provide input data to a model being used to assess the sustainability of different land use transitions. Monthly analysis of soil GHGs shows that carbon dioxide contributes most to the global warming potential of these bioenergy crops, irrespective of transition. Nitrous oxide emissions were low for all crops except arable cropping and methane emissions were very low for all sites. Nearly all sites have shown a significant decrease in CO2 flux from the control land use. Eddy flux approaches, coupled with soil assessments show that for the transition from grassland to SRC willow there is a significant reduction in GHG emissions from soil and a negative net ecosystem exchange due to increased GPP and ecosystem respiration. These results suggest for this land use transition to bioenergy in a UK specific context, there may be a net benefit for ecosystem GHG exchange of transition to bioenergy Finally we are developing a meta-modelling tool to allow land use managers to make location-specific, informed decisions about land use change to bioenergy. This work is based on the Ecosystem Land Use Modelling & Soil Carbon GHG Flux Trial (ELUM) project, which was commissioned and funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI). This project is co-ordinated by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (www.elum.ac.uk).

  8. Numerical solution of the hypersonic viscous-shock-layer equations for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over blunt axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations applicable to hypersonic laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over two-dimensional plane or axially symmetric blunt bodies are presented. The equations are solved by means of an implicit finite difference scheme, and the results are compared with a turbulent boundary layer analysis. The agreement between the two solution procedures is satisfactory for the region of flow where streamline swallowing effects are negligible. For the downstream regions, where streamline swallowing effects are present, the expected differences in the two solution procedures are evident.

  9. Calculation of Collisional Cross Sections for the 2P3/2 - 2P1/2 Transition in Alkali-Noble Gas Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    collisional cross sections given input potentials of a system may provide a partial answer to this question in systems where collisions play a major...CALCULATION OF COLLISIONAL CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE 2P3/2 → 2P1/2 TRANSITION IN ALKALI-NOBLE GAS SYSTEMS THESIS Sam Butler, Captain, USAF AFIT/GAP/ENP...States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/GAP/ENP/10-M04 CALCULATION OF COLLISIONAL CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE 2P3/2

  10. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  11. Two-photon microwave transitions and strong-field effects in a room-temperature Rydberg-atom gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Miller, S. A.; Thaicharoen, N.; Raithel, G.; Gordon, J. A.; Holloway, C. L.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate two-photon Autler-Townes splitting and strong-field effects of 85Rb Rydberg atoms in a room-temperature vapor cell. To observe the level structure we employ electromagnetically induced transparency. We first study the two-photon 62 S1 /2-63 S1 /2 microwave transition using an electric-field reference measurement obtained with the one-photon 62 S1 /2-62 P3 /2 transition. We then study the 61 D5 /2-62 D5 /2 transition where the microwave electric-field range is extended up to ˜40 V /m . A Floquet analysis is used to model field-induced level shifts and state-mixing effects present in the strongly driven quantum systems under consideration. Calculations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Mathematical modeling of gas-condensate mixture filtration in porous media taking into account non-equilibrium of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachalov, V. V.; Molchanov, D. A.; Sokotushchenko, V. N.; Zaichenko, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    At the present time, a considerable part of the largest dry gas reservoirs in Russia are found in the stage of declining production, therefore active exploitation of gas-condensate fields will begin in the coming decades. There is a significant discrepancy between the project and the actual value of condensate recovery factor while producing reservoir of this type, which is caused by insufficient knowledge about non-equilibrium filtration mechanisms of gas-condensate mixtures in reservoir conditions. A system of differential equations to describe filtration process of two-phase multicomponent mixture for one-, two- and three-dimensional cases is presented in this work. The solution of the described system was made by finite-element method in the software package FlexPDE. Comparative distributions of velocities, pressures, saturations and phase compositions of three-component mixture along the reservoir model and in time in both cases of equilibrium and non-equilibrium filtration processes were obtained. Calculation results have shown that system deviation from the thermodynamic equilibrium increases gas phase flow rate and reduces liquid phase flow rate during filtration process of gas-condensate mixture.

  13. Transition from parabolic to ring-shaped valence band maximum in few-layer GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybkovskiy, Dmitry V.; Osadchy, Alexander V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2014-12-01

    By performing first-principles electronic structure calculations in frames of density functional theory we study the dependence of the valence band shape on the thickness of few-layer III-VI crystals (GaS, GaSe, and InSe). We estimate the critical thickness of transition from the bulklike parabolic to the ring-shaped valence band. Direct supercell calculations show that the ring-shaped extremum of the valence band appears in β -GaS and β -GaSe at a thickness below 6 tetralayers (˜4.6 nm ) and 8 tetralayers (˜6.4 nm ), respectively. Zone-folding calculations estimate the β -InSe critical thickness to be equal to 28 tetralayers (˜24.0 nm ). The origin of the ring-shaped valence band maximum can be understood in terms of k.p theory, which provides a link between the curvature of the energy bands and the distance between them. We explain the dependence of the band shape on the thickness, as well as the transition between two types of extremes, by the k -dependent orbital composition of the topmost valence band. We show that in the vicinity of critical thickness the effective mass of holes in III-VI compounds depends strongly on the number of tetralayers.

  14. Superfluid to Normal Fluid Phase Transition in the Bose Gas Trapped in Two-Dimensional Optical Lattices at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, M. O. C.; de Passos, E. J. V.

    2017-02-01

    We develop the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory at finite temperature for Bose gas trapped in the two-dimensional optical lattice with the on-site energy low enough that the gas presents superfluid properties. We obtain the condensate density as function of the temperature neglecting the anomalous density in the thermodynamics equation. The condensate fraction provides two critical temperature. Below the temperature T_{C1}, there is one condensate fraction. Above two condensate fractions merger up to the critical temperature T_{C2}. At temperatures larger than T_{C2}, the condensate fraction is null and, therefore, the gas is normal fluid. We resume by a finite-temperature phase diagram where three domains can be identified: the normal fluid, the superfluid with one stable condensate fraction and the superfluid with two condensate fractions being unstable one of them.

  15. The Poor Pay More.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folse, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a sociology experiential learning assignment where students learned why people living in poverty can sometimes pay more for products than people with better incomes. Focuses specifically on the rent to own concept. States students achieved the goal of learning how life constraints of poverty can hinder the poor from overcoming their…

  16. Confronting Poor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Bruce L.

    Responsible and effective administrative leadership requires confronting those members of the teaching staff who are a negative influence on the institution. Importantly, the absence of expressed appreciation for good work can have a devastating impact on a principal's image if he or she suddenly begins to confront poor performances. Actually, the…

  17. Urban University Access and Affordability: The Implications of the Relationship between Gas Prices and Suburban Transit Ridership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baginski, Jessie

    2010-01-01

    Many college campuses across the country have implemented U-Pass transit programs to mitigate transportation costs for students. However, urban university U-pass programs fall short for suburban students who cannot get to the urban metro area without connecting public transportation. As urban universities rely on suburbs as feeder communities,…

  18. In-vehicle measurement of ultrafine particles on compressed natural gas, conventional diesel, and oxidation-catalyst diesel heavy-duty transit buses.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Davyda; Jones, Steven; Lalor, Melinda

    2007-02-01

    Many metropolitan transit authorities are considering upgrading transit bus fleets to decrease ambient criteria pollutant levels. Advancements in engine and fuel technology have lead to a generation of lower-emission buses in a variety of fuel types. Dynamometer tests show substantial reductions in particulate mass emissions for younger buses (<10 years) over older models, but particle number reduction has not been verified in the research. Recent studies suggest that particle number is a more important factor than particle mass in determining health effects. In-vehicle particle number concentration measurements on conventional diesel, oxidation-catalyst diesel and compressed natural gas transit buses are compared to estimate relative in-vehicle particulate exposures. Two primary consistencies are observed from the data: the CNG buses have average particle count concentrations near the average concentrations for the oxidation-catalyst diesel buses, and the conventional diesel buses have average particle count concentrations approximately three to four times greater than the CNG buses. Particle number concentrations are also noticeably affected by bus idling behavior and ventilation options, such as, window position and air conditioning.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide in the marine atmospheric boundary layer during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment in the eastern subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Daniel; Tsivou, Maria; Bonsang, Bernard; Abonnel, Christian; Carsey, Thomas; Springer-Young, Margie; Pszenny, Alex; Suhre, Karsten

    1997-03-01

    Gas phase H2O2 was measured in surface air on the NOAA ship Malcolm Baldrige from June 8 to 27, 1992 (Julian days 160-179), during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment in the eastern subtropical North Atlantic region. Average H2O2 mixing ratios observed were 0.63±0.28 ppbv, ranging between detection limit and 1.5 ppbv. For the entire experiment, only weak or no correlation was found between H2O2 mixing ratio and meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, humidity, or UV radiation flux) as well as with tracers of continental air masses (CO, black carbon, radon). The average daily H2O2 cycle for the entire period exhibits a maximum of 0.8±0.3 ppbv near sunset and a minimum of 0.4±0.2 ppbv 4-5 hours after sunrise. Several clear H2O2 diurnal variations have been observed, from which a first-order removal rate of about 1×10-5 s-1 for H2O2 can be inferred from nighttime measurements. This rate compares well with those deduced from measurements taken at Cape Grim (Tasmania, 41°S) and during the Soviet-American Gas and Aerosol III experiment (equatorial Pacific Ocean).

  20. Letting the poor speak.

    PubMed

    2000-09-29

    This paper comments on two documents prepared by the Washington-based World Bank: the "World Development Report" and the three-volume study "Voices of the Poor." The author provides a brief overview of these documents then examines their potential impact on the delegates to the annual meetings of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund in Prague on September 19-28, 2000. The author further examines the implication of the new strategies embraced by the global lenders--"opportunity, empowerment, security." Apart from these strategies, the World Bank sets out other strategies like spreading the benefits of technology, as it calls for the elimination of absolute poverty by 2015. However, the most crucial tack is the one illustrated by the way the reports were made: letting the poor speak and responding to their cries.

  1. Computer program for solving compressible nonsimilar-boundary-layer equations for laminar, transitional, or turbulent flows of a perfect gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. M.; Harris, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is described which solves the compressible laminar, transitional, or turbulent boundary-layer equations for planar or axisymmetric flows. Three-point implicit difference relations are used to reduce the momentum and energy equations to finite-difference form. These equations are solved simultaneously without iteration. Turbulent flow is treated by the inclusion of either a two-layer eddy-viscosity model or a mixing-length formulation. The eddy conductivity is related to the eddy viscosity through a static turbulent Prandtl number which may be an arbitrary function of the distance from the wall boundary. The transitional boundary layer is treated by the inclusion of an intermittency function which modifies the fully turbulent model. The laminar-boundary-layer equations are recovered when the intermittency is zero, and the fully turbulent equations are solved when the intermittency is unity.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell with transitioned cross-section for improved anode gas management at the open end

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R [Murrysville, PA; Draper, Robert [Pittsburgh, PA

    2012-01-17

    A solid oxide fuel cell (400) is made having a tubular, elongated, hollow, active section (445) which has a cross-section containing an air electrode (452) a fuel electrode (454) and solid oxide electrolyte (456) between them, where the fuel cell transitions into at least one inactive section (460) with a flattened parallel sided cross-section (462, 468) each cross-section having channels (472, 474, 476) in them which smoothly communicate with each other at an interface section (458).

  3. Structure and Gas-Phase Thermochemistry of a Pd/Cu Complex: Studies on a Model for Transmetalation Transition States.

    PubMed

    Oeschger, Raphael J; Chen, Peter

    2017-01-25

    A heterobimetallic Pd(II)/Cu(I) complex was prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystal structure shows a remarkably short Pd-Cu bond and a trigonal ipso carbon atom. The Pd-Cu interaction, as determined by energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation cross-section experiments, models the net stabilizing energy of the Pd-Cu interaction in the transition state of the transmetalation step in Pd/Cu-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The bonding situation in the bimetallic dinuclear complex has been studied by atoms-in-molecules analysis.

  4. Molecular Gas In Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Debris disks are generally thought to be the gas poor descendants of protoplanetary disks. While this characteristic may be true for most debris systems, recent surveys in rotational transitions of carbon monoxide led to a growing sample of debris disks where gas has been detected. The origin of gas in these disks is unclear yet. It may be secondary, i.e., similarly to dust grains it is continuously replenished via erosion of larger bodies. However, because of their youth, one cannot exclude that some disks may be hybrid in the sense that they retain their residual primordial gas, while the dust component may predominantly be second generation. The first observations of gaseous debris disks with ALMA provided examples of both types. This talk will review the currently known CO-rich debris disks with special emphasis on the origin of gas and on the commonly shared disk/host star properties.

  5. Structure of dense molecular gas in TMC 1 from observations of three transitions of HC3N

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schloerb, F. P.; Snell, R. L.; Young, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    The Taurus dark cloud complex is a collection of many individual clouds scattered across approximately 50 pc. Within one of these, Heiles Cloud 2, is the dense condensation TMC 1. TMC 1 is one of the few sources in which some of the long carbon chain molecules are found. The present investigation is concerned with a mapping of the density structure in a narrow ridge of the TMC 1 structure. It is shown that the HC3N emission from the J = 5 to 4, J = 9 to 8, and J = 12 to 11 transitions is well matched by a narrow ridge of material at a single density of 50,000-100,000 per cu cm. There is evidence that the HC3N fractional abundance is variable along the ridge. Evidence is also found for the presence of subcondensations within this ridge from maps at individual velocities.

  6. The Effect of Transition-Metal Addition on the Non-Equilibrium E.M.F.-TYPE SnO2 Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jong Hoon; Choi, Gyeong Man

    Solid-oxide electrolytes develop electrical potential when their two opposite electrodes are exposed to the different oxygen potential. When an electrolyte is exposed to the same ambient gas, a potential may develop due to the different catalytic behavior of two electrodes to ambient gas. Such a sensor is called as a non-equilibrium e.m.f.-type sensor or mixed potential sensor. In this study, to improve the sensitivity of the sensor to reducing gases (CO, H2), transition metal oxide (T.M.O.) was added to one of two SnO2 electrodes of the sensor. T.M.O. addition was expected to change the catalytic behavior of the electrode and to change e.m.f. values. The Co addition increased the e.m.f. of working electrode (T.M.O.-added SnO2) in air, implying the enhanced oxygen adsorption. Fe addition showed the reverse effect. The addition of T.M.O. to SnO2 was also effective in changing the e.m.f. values in H2 balanced by air. Fe and Ni addition exhibited decreased e.m.f. in H2 from that in air. Thus, Fe and Ni addition improved the catalytic activity for H2 oxidation. On the other hand, the catalytic activity for H2 oxidation was suppressed by Co addition. However, no appreciable change in CO sensitivity was obtained with the T.M.O. addition.

  7. Atomic-to-Molecular Gas Transition in Nearby Galaxies: What can we learn from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed comparison of molecular and atomic gas distributions in 18 nearby galaxies at sub-kpc or kpc scales, based on the CO J = 1 - 0 data from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) and the HI 21cm data in the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) archive. The observation spatial coverage extends to a quarter of the optical radius for each galaxy. The average molecular and atomic gas column density sensitivities are ~8M⊙/pc2 and ~3M⊙/pc2 at the comparison resolution. A metallicity dependence of the HI saturation limit was possibly detected in the galaxy sample ( 8.1<12+Log(O/H)<9.0 ). We used the CO and HI pixel-by-pixel comparison results to test models of the atomic-to-molecular transition and CO formation at different metallicities. An acceptable agreement was found at the limited spatial resolutions and sensitivities of the observational datasets.

  8. Development of novel low-temperature selective hydrogen gas sensors made of palladium/oxide or nitride capped Magnesium-transition metal hydride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu Ming

    Palladium capped Mg-based transition metal alloy film (Pd/Mg-TM) is a potentially useful hydrogen gas (H2) sensing material, which can operate at low temperature for detection of H2 leakage in an environment to ensure safe use and storage of the gas. The Pd layer catalytically dissociates hydrogen molecules, and the hydrogen atoms produced can enter (hydridation) or be detached (dehydridation) from the alloy layer. These processes are reversible, such that the film is switchable between a metal state and a hydride state, giving rise to substantial changes in its optical transmittance/reflectance and electrical resistivity. Unlike a conventional metal-oxide (MOx) H2 sensor, hydridation of an Mg-TM film is associated with relatively low enthalpy, and hence can perform at temperature much lower than the operation temperature of an MOx sensor (typically around 500°C or above). As such, an Mg-TM based sensor does not experience undesired annealing effect during operation, and hence is much more stable and durable. Furthermore, the detection selectivity of a Pd/Mg-TM film versus other reducing gases is superior to most conventional MOx-type hydrogen sensors. In this project, we systematically investigated the H2 sensing properties of Pd/Mg-TM films.

  9. Poor ovarian reserve

    PubMed Central

    Jirge, Padma Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Poor ovarian reserve (POR) is an important limiting factor for the success of any treatment modality for infertility. It indicates a reduction in quantity and quality of oocytes in women of reproductive age group. It may be age related as seen in advanced years of reproductive life or may occur in young women due to diverse etiological factors. Evaluating ovarian reserve and individualizing the therapeutic strategies are very important for optimizing the success rate. Majority or women with POR need to undergo in vitro fertilization to achieve pregnancy. However, pregnancy rate remains low despite a plethora of interventions and is associated with high pregnancy loss. Early detection and active management are essential to minimize the need for egg donation in these women. PMID:27382229

  10. Direct reduction of carbon dioxide to formate in high-gas-capacity ionic liquids at post-transition-metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, John D; Bocarsly, Andrew B

    2014-01-01

    As an approach to combat the increasing emissions of carbon dioxide in the last 50 years, the sequestration of carbon dioxide gas in ionic liquids has become an attractive research area. Ionic liquids can be made that possess incredibly high molar absorption and specificity characteristics for carbon dioxide. Their high carbon dioxide solubility and specificity combined with their high inherent electrical conductivity also creates an ideal medium for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Herein, a lesser studied ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate, was used as both an effective carbon dioxide capture material and subsequently as an electrochemical matrix with water for the direct reduction of carbon dioxide into formate at indium, tin, and lead electrodes in good yield (ca. 3 mg h(-1) cm(-2)).

  11. Morphosyntax in Poor Comprehenders

    PubMed Central

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2016-01-01

    Children described as poor comprehenders (PCs) have reading comprehension difficulties in spite of adequate word reading abilities. PCs are known to display weakness with semantics and higher-level aspects of oral language, but less is known about their grammatical skills, especially with regard to morphosyntax. The purpose of this study was to examine morphosyntax in fourth grade PCs and typically developing readers (TDs), using three experimental tasks involving finiteness marking. Participants also completed standardized, norm-referenced assessments of phonological memory, vocabulary, and broader language skills. PCs displayed weakness relative to TDs on all three morphosyntax tasks and on every other assessment of oral language except phonological memory, as indexed by nonword repetition. These findings help to clarify the linguistic profile of PCs, suggesting that their language weaknesses include grammatical weaknesses that cannot be fully explained by semantic factors. Because finiteness markers are usually mastered prior to formal schooling in typical development, we call for future studies to examine whether assessments of morphosyntax could be used for the early identification of children at risk for future reading comprehension difficulty. PMID:27397969

  12. Aerosol size distribution and aerosol water content measurements during Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.; Wellman, D.; Pszenny, A.

    1995-11-01

    Aerosol size distribution data measured during the June 1992 Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of fine marine aerosol particles measured over the North Atlantic near the Azores Islands. Measured aerosol size distribution data were corrected using the corrected size calibration data based on the optical properties of particles being measured. The corrected size distribution data were then approximated with either one or two lognormal size distributions, depending on air mass conditions. Under clean air mass conditions <3 μm diameter aerosol size distributions typically exhibited two modes, consisting of an accumulation mode and the small end of the sea-salt particle mode. However, under the influence of continental polluted air masses, the aerosol size distribution was dominated by <1 μm diameter particles in a single mode with an increased aerosol concentration. Aerosol water content of accumulation mode marine aerosols was estimated from differences between several series of ambient and dried aerosol size distributions. The average aerosol water fraction was 0.31, which is in good agreement with an empirical aerosol growth model estimate. The average rate of SO4= production in the accumulation mode aerosol water by H2O2 oxidation was estimated to be <7×10-10 mol L-1 s-1, which is an insignificant contributor to the observed non-sea-salt SO4= in the accumulation mode.

  13. Gas sorption and transition-metal cation separation with a thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    SK, Mostakim; Grzywa, Maciej; Volkmer, Dirk; Biswas, Shyam

    2015-12-15

    The modulated synthesis of the thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework (MOF) material having formula [Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(DMTDC){sub 6}]·4.8DMF·10H{sub 2}O (1) (H{sub 2}DMTDC=3,4-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid; DMF=N,N'-dimethylformamide) was carried out by heating a mixture of ZrCl{sub 4}, H{sub 2}DMTDC linker and benzoic acid (used as a modulator) with a molar ratio of 1:1:30 in DMF at 150 °C for 24 h. Systematic investigations have been performed in order to realize the effect of ZrCl{sub 4}/benzoic acid molar ratio on the crystallinity of the material. The activation (i.e., the removal of the guest solvent molecules from the pores) of as-synthesized compound was achieved by stirring it with methanol and subsequently heating under vacuum. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric (TG) and elemental analysis was used to examine the phase purity of the as-synthesized and thermally activated 1. The material displays high thermal stability up to 310 °C in an air atmosphere. As revealed from the XRD measurements, the compound retains its crystallinity when treated with water, acetic acid and 1 M HCl solutions. The N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} sorption analyses suggest that the material possesses remarkably high microporosity (S{sub BET}=1236 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}; CO{sub 2} uptake=3.5 mmol g{sup −1} at 1 bar and 0 °C). The compound also shows selective adsorption behavior for Cu{sup 2+} over Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions. - Graphical abstract: Selective transition-metal cation adsorption by a thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework material. - Highlights: • The modulated synthesis of a thienothiophene based Zr(IV) MOF has been described. • Effect of metal salt/modulator ratio on the crystallinity was thoroughly studied. • The compound showed high thermal and physiochemical stability. • N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} sorption experiments revealed

  14. Nitrogen dioxide reactions with 46 atomic main-group and transition metal cations in the gas phase: room temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Michael J Y; Blagojevic, Voislav; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2013-02-14

    Experimental results are reported for the gas-phase room-temperature kinetics of chemical reactions between nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and 46 atomic main-group and transition metal cations (M(+)). Measurements were taken with an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer in helium buffer gas at a pressure of 0.35 ± 0.01 Torr and at 295 ± 2 K. The atomic cations were produced at ca. 5500 K in an ICP source and allowed to decay radiatively and to thermalize to room temperature by collisions with Ar and He atoms prior to reaction with NO(2). Measured apparent bimolecular rate coefficients and primary reaction product distributions are reported for all 46 atomic metal cations and these provide an overview of trends across and down the periodic table. Three main types of reactions were observed: O-atom transfer to form either MO(+) or NO(+), electron transfer to form NO(2)(+), and addition to form MNO(2)(+). Bimolecular O-atom transfer was observed to predominate. Correlations are presented between reaction efficiency and the O-atom affinity of the metal cation and between the prevalence of NO(+) product formation and the electron recombination energy of the product metal oxide cation. Some second-order reactions are evident with metal cations that react inefficiently. Most interesting of these is the formation of the MNO(+) cation with Rh(+) and Pd(+). The higher-order chemistry with NO(2) is very diverse and includes the formation of numerous NO(2) ion clusters and a number of tri- and tetraoxide metal cations. Group 2 metal dioxide cations (CaO(2)(+), SrO(2)(+), BaO(2)(+)) exhibit a unique reaction with NO(2) to form MO(NO)(+) ions perhaps by NO transfer from NO(2) concurrent with O(2) formation by recombination of a NO(2) and an oxide oxygen.

  15. Consequences of Growing Up Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.

    The consequences and correlates of growing up poor as well as the mechanisms through which poverty influences children are explored. This book is organized with a primary focus on research findings and a secondary concern with policy implications. The chapters are: (1) "Poor Families, Poor Outcomes: The Well-Being of Children and Youth" (Jeanne…

  16. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  17. Landau levels and spin splitting in the two-dimensional electron gas of a HgTe quantum well near the critical width for the topological phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, M.; Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Stier, A. V.; McCombe, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report a detailed low-temperature study of the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in a 6.1-nm-wide HgTe quantum well with H g0.3C d0.7Te barriers by terahertz magnetophotoconductivity and magnetotransmission combined with magnetotransport measurements (Rx x and Rx y) in magnetic fields up to 10 T. This well width, close to that at the topological phase transition, corresponds to conventional band ordering, and we probe the "bulk" quasi-2D Landau-level (LL) spectrum of the conduction band at high energies (≈135 -160 meV ) above the Dirac point. The calculated separations between adjacent LLs of the same spin based on published parameters for this structure are in fair agreement with the measured cyclotron resonance energies. However, the very large spin splittings observed (Espin>Ecyclotron) require a significantly larger g -parameter ge for electrons. Tilted field coincidence experiments are consistent with the large spin splitting showing coincidences at 3/2 and twice the cyclotron energy. This large value of ge also leads to interesting crossings of the calculated LLs, and we find direct evidence of these crossings in the Rx x measurements at lower electron densities (Fermi energies) produced by negative gate bias.

  18. Emissions of toxic pollutants from compressed natural gas and low sulfur diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested over multiple driving cycles.

    PubMed

    Kado, Norman Y; Okamoto, Robert A; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Kobayashi, Reiko; Ayala, Alberto; Gebel, Michael E; Rieger, Paul L; Maddox, Christine; Zafonte, Leo

    2005-10-01

    The number of heavy-duty vehicles using alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and new low-sulfur diesel fuel formulations and equipped with after-treatment devices are projected to increase. However, few peer-reviewed studies have characterized the emissions of particulate matter (PM) and other toxic compounds from these vehicles. In this study, chemical and biological analyses were used to characterize the identifiable toxic air pollutants emitted from both CNG and low-sulfur-diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested on a chassis dynamometer over three transient driving cycles and a steady-state cruise condition. The CNG bus had no after-treatment, and the diesel bus was tested first equipped with an oxidation catalyst (OC) and then with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Emissions were analyzed for PM, volatile organic compounds (VOCs; determined on-site), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and mutagenic activity. The 2000 model year CNG-fueled vehicle had the highest emissions of 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde) of the three vehicle configurations tested in this study. The 1998 model year diesel bus equipped with an OC and fueled with low-sulfur diesel had the highest emission rates of PM and PAHs. The highest specific mutagenic activities (revertants/microg PM, or potency) and the highest mutagen emission rates (revertants/mi) were from the CNG bus in strain TA98 tested over the New York Bus (NYB) driving cycle. The 1998 model year diesel bus with DPF had the lowest VOCs, PAH, and mutagenic activity emission. In general, the NYB driving cycle had the highest emission rates (g/mi), and the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) had the lowest emission rates for all toxics tested over the three transient test cycles investigated. Also, transient emissions were, in general, higher than steady-state emissions. The emissions of toxic compounds from an in-use CNG transit bus (without an oxidation

  19. Theoretical studies on the catalysis of the reverse water-gas shift reaction using first-row transition metal beta-diketiminato complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Munjanja, Lloyd; Cundari, Thomas R; Wilson, Angela K

    2010-06-03

    The reverse water-gas shift reaction CO(2) + H(2) --> H(2)O + CO has been investigated using a set of homogeneous catalyst models L'M(I) (L' = beta-diketiminate, C(3)N(2)H(5)(-); M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn). The thermodynamics of prototypical reaction pathways were simulated at two levels of theory: B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ. The modeled catalytic reaction has been considered in the following steps: coordination of CO(2) by the catalyst to generate a carbon dioxide complex, L'M(CO(2)); scission of L'M(CO(2)) to yield L'M(CO) and L'M(O); L'M(O) hydrogenation to form L'M(H(2)O). The final products, H(2)O and CO, were obtained from the dissociation of L'M(H(2)O) and L'M(CO). All of the reactants, intermediates, and products were modeled, where different possible conformers and multiplicities were identified and considered as potential minima. The reaction enthalpy DeltaH, of all steps for each catalyst as a function of transition metal have been determined. The Mn and Fe catalysts show more thermodynamically accessible pathways than the other catalyst models studied. The overall reaction enthalpy has been determined not only by B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ but also via a more rigorous ab initio electron-correlation-based approach, the correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA).

  20. Federal Supervisors and Poor Performers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    This report looks at the prevalence of poor performance in the Federal workplace from the perspective of employees and supervisors. The report also...examines what supervisors do about poor performers, the effects of supervisors’ actions, and the factors that influence supervisors’ decisions about how they will handle inadequate performance.

  1. The Etiology of Poor Neighborhoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Stanley B.

    The inner city aggregations of blacks, Appalachian whites, and Mexicans are not simply the focal points for short-term instability or remedial governmental programs: they are the first native American urban poor. The poor neighborhoods of America's inner city are a result of three great population movements. One originated in the Atlantic Coastal…

  2. Improvement of Gas-Sensing Performance of Large-Area Tungsten Disulfide Nanosheets by Surface Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung Yong; Song, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Youngjun; Choi, Taejin; Shin, Sera; Lee, Chang Wan; Lee, Kyounghoon; Koo, Jahyun; Lee, Hoonkyung; Kim, Jongbaeg; Lee, Taeyoon; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-10-05

    Semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are promising gas-sensing materials due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. However, their poor gas-sensing performance resulting from the low response, incomplete recovery, and insufficient selectivity hinders the realization of high-performance 2D TMDC gas sensors. Here, we demonstrate the improvement of gas-sensing performance of large-area tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets through surface functionalization using Ag nanowires (NWs). Large-area WS2 nanosheets were synthesized through atomic layer deposition of WO3 followed by sulfurization. The pristine WS2 gas sensors exhibited a significant response to acetone and NO2 but an incomplete recovery in the case of NO2 sensing. After AgNW functionalization, the WS2 gas sensor showed dramatically improved response (667%) and recovery upon NO2 exposure. Our results establish that the proposed method is a promising strategy to improve 2D TMDC gas sensors.

  3. Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the California Transportation Sector: Dynamics in Vehicle Fleet and Energy Supply Transitions to Achieve 80% Reduction in Emissions from 1990 Levels by 2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighty, Wayne Waterman

    California's "80in50" target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80 percent below 1990 levels by the year 2050 is based on climate science rather than technical feasibility of mitigation. As such, it raises four fundamental questions: is this magnitude of reduction in greenhouse gas emissions possible, what energy system transitions over the next 40 years are necessary, can intermediate policy goals be met on the pathway toward 2050, and does the path of transition matter for the objective of climate change mitigation? Scenarios for meeting the 80in50 goal in the transportation sector are modelled. Specifically, earlier work defining low carbon transport scenarios for the year 2050 is refined by incorporating new information about biofuel supply. Then transition paths for meeting 80in50 scenarios are modelled for the light-duty vehicle sub-sector, with important implications for the timing of action, rate of change, and cumulative greenhouse gas emissions. One aspect of these transitions -- development in the California wind industry to supply low-carbon electricity for plug-in electric vehicles -- is examined in detail. In general, the range of feasible scenarios for meeting the 80in50 target is narrow enough that several common themes are apparent: electrification of light-duty vehicles must occur; continued improvements in vehicle efficiency must be applied to improving fuel economy; and energy carriers must de-carbonize to less than half of the carbon intensity of gasoline and diesel. Reaching the 80in50 goal will require broad success in travel demand reduction, fuel economy improvements and low-carbon fuel supply, since there is little opportunity to increase emission reductions in one area if we experience failure in another. Although six scenarios for meeting the 80in50 target are defined, only one also meets the intermediate target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020. Furthermore, the transition path taken to reach any

  4. A gas density drop in the inner 6 AU of the transition disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 139614 . Further evidence for a giant planet inside the disk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Baruteau, C.; Matter, A.; van den Ancker, M.; Pinte, C.; Kóspál, A.; Audard, M.; Liebhart, A.; Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Pinilla, P.; Regály, Zs.; Güdel, M.; Henning, Th.; Cieza, L. A.; Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Meeus, G.; Eiroa, C.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Quantifying the gas surface density inside the dust cavities and gaps of transition disks is important to establish their origin. Aims: We seek to constrain the surface density of warm gas in the inner disk of HD 139614, an accreting 9 Myr Herbig Ae star with a (pre-)transition disk exhibiting a dust gap from 2.3 ± 0.1 to 5.3 ± 0.3 AU. Methods: We observed HD 139614 with ESO/VLT CRIRES and obtained high-resolution (R 90 000) spectra of CO ro-vibrational emission at 4.7 μm. We derived constraints on the disk's structure by modeling the CO isotopolog line-profiles, the spectroastrometric signal, and the rotational diagrams using grids of flat Keplerian disk models. Results: We detected υ = 1 → 0 12CO, 2→1 12CO, 1→0 13CO, 1→0 C18O, and 1→0 C17O ro-vibrational lines. Lines are consistent with disk emission and thermal excitation. 12CO υ = 1 → 0 lines have an average width of 14 km s-1, Tgas of 450 K and an emitting region from 1 to 15 AU. 13CO and C18O lines are on average 70 and 100 K colder, 1 and 4 km s-1 narrower than 12CO υ = 1 → 0, and are dominated by emission at R ≥ 6 AU. The 12CO υ = 1 → 0 composite line-profile indicates that if there is a gap devoid of gas it must have a width narrower than 2 AU. We find that a drop in the gas surface density (δgas) at R < 5-6 AU is required to be able to simultaneously reproduce the line-profiles and rotational diagrams of the three CO isotopologs. Models without a gas density drop generate 13CO and C18O emission lines that are too broad and warm. The value of δgas can range from 10-2 to 10-4 depending on the gas-to-dust ratio of the outer disk. We find that the gas surface density profile at 1 < R < 6 AU is flat or increases with radius. We derive a gas column density at 1 < R < 6 AU of NH = 3 × 1019-1021 cm-2 (7 × 10-5-2.4 × 10-3 g cm-2) assuming NCO = 10-4NH. We find a 5σ upper limit on the CO column density NCO at R ≤ 1 AU of 5 × 1015 cm-2 (NH ≤ 5 × 1019 cm-2). Conclusions

  5. Variational Transition State Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2016-09-29

    This is the final report on a project involving the development and applications of variational transition state theory. This project involved the development of variational transition state theory for gas-phase reactions, including optimized multidimensional tunneling contributions and the application of this theory to gas-phase reactions with a special emphasis on developing reaction rate theory in directions that are important for applications to combustion. The development of variational transition state theory with optimized multidimensional tunneling as a useful computational tool for combustion kinetics involved eight objectives.

  6. Gas Emissions in Planck Cold Dust Clumps—A Survey of the J = 1-0 Transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Meng, Fanyi; Li, Di; Qin, Sheng-Li; Ju, Bing-Gang

    2012-09-01

    A survey toward 674 Planck cold clumps of the Early Cold Core Catalogue (ECC) in the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O has been carried out using the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope. Six hundred seventy-three clumps were detected with 12CO and 13CO emission, and 68% of the sample has C18O emission. Additional velocity components were also identified. A close consistency of the three line peak velocities was revealed for the first time. Kinematic distances are given for all the velocity components, and half of the clumps are located within 0.5 and 1.5 kpc. Excitation temperatures range from 4 to 27 K, slightly larger than those of Td . Line width analysis shows that the majority of ECC clumps are low-mass clumps. Column densities N_{H_{2}} span from 1020 to 4.5 × 1022 cm-2 with an average value of (4.4 ± 3.6) × 1021 cm-2. N_{H_{2}} cumulative fraction distribution deviates from the lognormal distribution, which is attributed to optical depth. The average abundance ratio of the 13CO to C18O in these clumps is 7.0 ± 3.8, higher than the terrestrial value. Dust and gas are well coupled in 95% of the clumps. Blue profile asymmetry, red profile asymmetry, and total line asymmetry were found in less than 10% of the clumps, generally indicating that star formation is not yet developed. Ten clumps were mapped. Twelve velocity components and 22 cores were obtained. Their morphologies include extended diffuse, dense, isolated, cometary, and filament, of which the last is the majority. Twenty cores are starless, and only seven cores seem to be in a gravitationally bound state. Planck cold clumps are the most quiescent among the samples of weak red IRAS, infrared dark clouds, UC H II candidates, extended green objects, and methanol maser sources, suggesting that Planck cold clumps have expanded the horizon of cold astronomy.

  7. Simple Model for Vibration-Translation Exchange at High Temperatures: Effects of Multiquantum Transitions on the Relaxation Of A N2 Gas Flow Behind a Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-22

    relaxation of a N2 gas flow behind a shock A. Aliat,1,* P. Vedula,1,* and E. Josyula2 1School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of...influence on the relaxation of the macroscopic parameters of the gas flow behind the shock, especially on vibrational distributions of high levels. All...simulate hypersonic gas flows are based on the assumption of quasistationary distributions (Boltzmann or Treanor) over vibrational energies [2–5]. These

  8. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH TRANSITION METAL CONTENT AND FLUE GAS HCL/SO2 RATIO ON MERCURY SPECIATION IN WASTE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results of research on the effect of sulfur dioxide (SO2):HCI ratio on heterogeneous Hg0 oxidation. The addition of SO2 to moist flue gas at high SO2:HCI ratios (4:1 to 10:1) caused a decrease in oxidation of Hg0 relative to flur gas without SO2. This is attrib...

  9. The management of poor performance

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, John F

    2007-01-01

    Identification of poor performance is in an integral part of government policy. The suggested approach for the identification of such problems, advocated by the General Medical Council, is that of appraisal. However, traditionally, there has been a reluctance to deal with poor performers, as all doctors have made mistakes and are usually only too ready to forgive and be non‐critical of colleagues. The problems are widespread, and 6% of the senior hospital workforce in any 5‐year period may have problems. PMID:17308213

  10. Blue metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, George W.; Sneden, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    We review the discovery of blue metal-poor (BMP) stars and the resolution of this population into blue stragglers and intermediate-age Main-Sequence stars by use of binary fractions. We show that the specific frequencies of blue stragglers in the halo field and in globular clusters differ by an order of magnitude. We attribute this difference to the different modes of production of these two populations. We report carbon and s-process enrichment among very metal-poor field blue stragglers and discuss how this result can be used to further resolve field blue stragglers into groups formed during RGB and AGB evolution of their erstwhile primary companions.

  11. The Power of Poor Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaub, Alfred R.

    1975-01-01

    Most breakdowns in communications are the result of the quest for power on behalf of organization members, not the result of poor communications training. Organizational power may be accrued by withholding information, sabotaging communications, refusing to communicate bad news to superiors, and avoiding confrontations by not communicating at all.…

  12. Standard and Poor's Rich Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMaria, Frank

    2006-01-01

    To help parents investigate and locate quality school districts and to help policy-makers, principals, and superintendents to make well-informed decisions about education, Standard and Poor's has launched a website called SchoolMatters.com. It is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and featured on its website (www.ed.gov/parents).…

  13. Prospects for the Working Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Based on a chapter entitled "Barriers to Employment of the Disadvantaged by Martin Deutsch and S. M. Miller in "Manpower Report of the President, 1968. Discusses the Nixon proposals for remediating poverty in relation to the socioeconomic factors operating to maintain the condition of being poor while working. (JM)

  14. Educating Canada's Urban Poor Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, Bill; Foster, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    Presents six critical thoughts and questions about educating poor urban children in Canada. These thoughts were derived from the development of a directory of Canadian educational poverty programs. Findings from that study emphasize the increasing diversity of the student population, the importance of temporary and large-scale funding, and the…

  15. On the excited state dynamics of vibronic transitions. High-resolution electronic spectra of acenaphthene and its argon van der Waals complex in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Plusquellic, David F; Yi, John T; Pratt, David W

    2011-09-01

    Rotationally resolved fluorescence excitation spectroscopy has been used to study the dynamics, electronic distribution, and the relative orientation of the transition moment vector in several vibronic transitions of acenaphthene (ACN) and in its Ar van der Waals (vdW) complex. The 0(0)(0) band of the S(1) ← S(0) transition of ACN exhibits a transition moment orientation parallel to its a-inertial axis. However, some of the vibronic bands exhibit a transition moment orientation parallel to the b-inertial axis, suggesting a Herzberg-Teller coupling with the S(2) state. Additionally, some other vibronic bands exhibit anomalous intensity patterns in several of their rotational transitions. A Fermi resonance involving two near degenerate vibrations has been proposed to explain this behavior. The high-resolution electronic spectrum of the ACN-Ar vdW complex has also been obtained and fully analyzed. The results indicate that the weakly attached argon atom is located on top of the plane of the bare molecule at ~3.48 Å away from its center of mass in the S(0) electronic state.

  16. Are poor Chinese text comprehenders also poor in written composition?

    PubMed

    Guan, Connie Qun; Ye, Feifei; Meng, Wanjin; Leong, Che Kan

    2013-10-01

    We studied the performance in three genres of Chinese written composition (narration, exposition, and argumentation) of 158 grade 4, 5, and 6 poor Chinese text comprehenders compared with 156 good Chinese text comprehenders. We examined text comprehension and written composition relationship. Verbal working memory (verbal span working memory and operation span working memory) and different levels of linguistic tasks-morphological sensitivity (morphological compounding and morphological chain), sentence processing (syntax construction and syntax integrity), and text comprehension (narrative and expository texts)-were used to predict separately narrative, expository, and argumentation written compositions in these students. Grade for grade, the good text comprehenders outperformed the poor text comprehenders in all tasks, except for morphological chain. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed differential contribution of the tasks to different genres of writing. In particular, text comprehension made unique contribution to argumentation writing in the poor text comprehenders. Future studies should ask students to read and write parallel passages in the same genre for better comparison and incorporate both instructional and motivational variables.

  17. Discovery of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-α system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery and analysis of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-α (DLA) system currently known, based on observations made with the Keck HIRES spectrograph. The metal paucity of this system has only permitted the determination of three element abundances: [C/H] =-3.43 ± 0.06, [O/H] =-3.05 ± 0.05, and [Si/H] =-3.21 ± 0.05, as well as an upper limit on the abundance of iron: [Fe/H] ≤-2.81. This DLA is among the most carbon-poor environment currently known with detectable metals. By comparing the abundance pattern of this DLA to detailed models of metal-free nucleosynthesis, we find that the chemistry of the gas is consistent with the yields of a 20.5 M⊙ metal-free star that ended its life as a core-collapse supernova; the abundances we measure are inconsistent with the yields of pair-instability supernovae. Such a tight constraint on the mass of the progenitor Population III star is afforded by the well-determined C/O ratio, which we show depends almost monotonically on the progenitor mass when the kinetic energy of the supernova explosion is Eexp ≳ 1.5 × 1051 erg. We find that the DLA presented here has just crossed the critical `transition discriminant' threshold, rendering the DLA gas now suitable for low mass star formation. We also discuss the chemistry of this system in the context of recent models that suggest some of the most metal-poor DLAs are the precursors of the `first galaxies', and are the antecedents of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies.

  18. HST imaging of hydrogen-poor ejecta in Abell 30 and Abell 78 - Wind-blown cometary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Harrington, J. P.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Clegg, Robin E. S.

    1993-01-01

    HST Faint Object Camera images of hydrogen-poor gas in the planetary nebulae A30 and A78 have revealed remarkable 'cometary' structures in the O III 5007-A forbidden line. Most of these cometary structures, consisting of compact (0.15-0.5 arcsec) knots with radial tails several arcsec in length, are located in an equatorial plane in both nebulae. In addition, two bright, compact (0.3 arcsec) polar knots are present in A30, one of them forming a bow shock. Corresponding polar features in A78 are more diffuse. The central stars of both nebulae have energetic winds which are most likely responsible for the 'cometary' knot morphology. We interpret this morphology in terms of dense (several thousand electrons per cu cm) H-poor condensations whose outer expanding layers are swept outward by stellar winds. Photoionization modeling indicates that while dense knot cores are mostly heated by atomic photoionization, expanding tenuous gas is heated by photoelectrons ejected from abundant dust grains. Our models predict steep temperature gradients for which there is observational evidence and possible abrupt phase transitions in the expanding gas.

  19. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  20. Health solutions for the poor.

    PubMed

    Castro, J L; Fujiwara, P I; Bhambal, P; Emaille-Léotard, N; Harries, A D

    2014-03-21

    The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) is the oldest international non-governmental organisation involved in the fight against tuberculosis. In 2008, the Institute of The Union was challenged to think boldly about the future and to develop a diverse work portfolio covering a wide spectrum of lung health and other disease-related problems. The vision adopted by The Union at that time was 'Health solutions for the poor'. More recently, there has been lengthy debate about the need for the Union to concentrate just on its core mandate of tuberculosis and lung health and for the Union's vision to reflect this narrower spectrum of activity as 'Lung health solutions for the poor'. In this viewpoint article we outline our reasons for believing that this narrower vision is incompatible with The Union's mission statement, and we argue that making such a change would be a mistake.

  1. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service: A Case Study on Leadership: Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (Presentation); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) represents a series of unique successes in alternative fuel deployment by pushing the envelope with innovative solutions. In the last year, RFTA demonstrated the ability to utilize compressed natural gas buses at a range of altitudes, across long distances, in extreme weather conditions and in a modern indoor fueling and maintenance facility - allwhile saving money and providing high-quality customer service. This case study will highlight how the leadership of organizations and communities that are implementing advances in natural gas vehicle technology is paving the way for broader participation.

  2. Individual and community factors associated with geographic clusters of poor HIV care retention and poor viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Michael G.; Yehia, Baligh R.; Hillier, Amy; Voytek, Chelsea D.; Fiore, Danielle J.; Blank, Michael; Frank, Ian; Metzger, David S.; Brady, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous analyses identified specific geographic areas in Philadelphia (hotspots) associated with negative outcomes along the HIV care continuum. We examined individual and community factors associated with residing in these hotspots. Methods Retrospective cohort of 1,404 persons newly diagnosed with HIV in 2008–2009 followed for 24 months after linkage to care. Multivariable regression examined associations between individual (age, sex, race/ethnicity, HIV transmission risk, and insurance status) and community (economic deprivation, distance to care, access to public transit, and access to pharmacy services) factors and the outcomes: residence in a hotspot associated with poor retention in care and residence in a hotspot associated with poor viral suppression. Results 24.4% and 13.7% of persons resided in hotspots associated with poor retention and poor viral suppression, respectively. For persons residing in poor retention hotspots, 28.3% were retained in care compared to 40.4% of those residing outside hotspots (p<0.05). Similarly, for persons residing in poor viral suppression hotspots, 51.4% achieved viral suppression compared to 75.3% of those outside hotspots (p<.0.05). Factors significantly associated with residence in a poor retention hotspots included: female sex, lower economic deprivation, greater access to public transit, shorter distance to medical care, and longer distance to pharmacies. Factors significantly associated with residence in a poor viral suppression hotspots included; female sex, higher economic deprivation, and shorter distance to pharmacies. Conclusions Individual and community-level associations with geographic hotspots may inform both content and delivery strategies for interventions designed to improve retention in care and viral suppression. PMID:25867777

  3. Transition Planning for Foster Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geenen, Sarah J.; Powers, Laurie E.

    2006-01-01

    The study evaluated the IEPs/Individualized Transition Plans of 45 students who were in special education and foster care, and compared them to the plans of 45 students who were in special education only. Results indicate that the transition plans of foster youth with disabilities were poor in quality, both in absolute terms and in comparison to…

  4. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  5. Carbon monoxide in an extremely metal-poor galaxy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gao, Yu; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Gu, Qiusheng

    2016-12-09

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies with metallicity below 10% of the solar value in the local universe are the best analogues to investigating the interstellar medium at a quasi-primitive environment in the early universe. In spite of the ongoing formation of stars in these galaxies, the presence of molecular gas (which is known to provide the material reservoir for star formation in galaxies such as our Milky Way) remains unclear. Here we report the detection of carbon monoxide (CO), the primary tracer of molecular gas, in a galaxy with 7% solar metallicity, with additional detections in two galaxies at higher metallicities. Such detections offer direct evidence for the existence of molecular gas in these galaxies that contain few metals. Using archived infrared data, it is shown that the molecular gas mass per CO luminosity at extremely low metallicity is approximately one-thousand times the Milky Way value.

  6. Carbon monoxide in an extremely metal-poor galaxy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yong; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gao, Yu; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Gu, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies with metallicity below 10% of the solar value in the local universe are the best analogues to investigating the interstellar medium at a quasi-primitive environment in the early universe. In spite of the ongoing formation of stars in these galaxies, the presence of molecular gas (which is known to provide the material reservoir for star formation in galaxies such as our Milky Way) remains unclear. Here we report the detection of carbon monoxide (CO), the primary tracer of molecular gas, in a galaxy with 7% solar metallicity, with additional detections in two galaxies at higher metallicities. Such detections offer direct evidence for the existence of molecular gas in these galaxies that contain few metals. Using archived infrared data, it is shown that the molecular gas mass per CO luminosity at extremely low metallicity is approximately one-thousand times the Milky Way value. PMID:27934880

  7. [Drug access in poor countries].

    PubMed

    Sebbag, Robert

    2007-11-01

    As a responsible player in the global pharmaceutical industry, Sanofi-Aventis recognizes its special responsibility to provide poor countries with access to drugs and vaccines. This is a key component of the Group's approach to sustainable development. As such, the Access to Medicines department draws on Sanofi-Aventis' expertise in order to address major public health issues, starting with the treatment of malaria, tuberculosis, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis and epilepsy, as well as access to vaccines. The department has four main activities: research and development of new drugs; improvement of existing treatments; information, communication and education of patients and healthcare professionals; and development of a differential pricing and distribution policy adapted to patients' income, with a "no profit-no loss" equilibrium.

  8. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets.

  9. Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using compressed natural gas as an alternative fuel. Final report, July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.

    1996-06-01

    The guidelines document presents various facility and bus design issues that need to be considered to ensure safe operations when using CNG (Compressed Natural Gas) as the alternative fuel. Fueling facility, garaging facility, maintenance facility requirements and safety practices are indicated. Among the issues discussed are fuel properties, potential hazards, fuel requirements for specified level of service, applicable codes and standards, ventilation, and electrical classification. Critical fuel related safety issues in the design of the related systems on the bus are also discussed.

  10. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  11. TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R.; Giordano, S.; Ko, Y.-K.; Ciaravella, A.

    2011-07-10

    There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

  12. Reactions of methyl fluoride with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations: gas-phase room-temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2006-09-14

    Reactions of CH(3)F have been surveyed systematically at room temperature with 46 different atomic cations using an inductively coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube tandem mass spectrometer. Rate coefficients and product distributions were measured for the reactions of fourth-period atomic ions from K(+) to Se(+), of fifth-period atomic ions from Rb(+) to Te(+) (excluding Tc(+)), and of sixth-period atomic ions from Cs(+) to Bi(+). Primary reaction channels were observed corresponding to F atom transfer, CH(3)F addition, HF elimination, and H(2) elimination. The early-transition-metal cations exhibit a much more active chemistry than the late-transition-metal cations, and there are periodic features in the chemical activity and reaction efficiency that maximize with Ti(+), As(+), Y(+), Hf(+), and Pt(+). F atom transfer appears to be thermodynamically controlled, although a periodic variation in efficiency is observed within the early-transition-metal cations which maximizes with Ti(+), Y(+), and Hf(+). Addition of CH(3)F was observed exclusively (>99%) with the late-fourth-period cations from Mn(+) to Ga(+), the fifth-period cations from Ru(+) to Te(+), and the sixth-period cations from Hg(+) to Bi(+) as well as Re(+). Periodic trends are observed in the effective bimolecular rate coefficient for CH(3)F addition, and these are consistent with expected trends in the electrostatic binding energies of the adduct ions and measured trends in the standard free energy of addition. HF elimination is the major reaction channel with As(+), while dehydrogenation dominates the reactions of W(+), Os(+), Ir(+), and Pt(+). Sequential F atom transfer is observed with the early-transition-metal cations, with the number of F atoms transferred increasing across the periodic table from two to four, maximizing at four for the group 5 cations Nb(+)(d(4)) and Ta(+)(d(3)s(1)), and stopping at two with V(+)(d(4)). Sequential CH(3)F addition was observed with many atomic cations and all of

  13. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs. PMID:25961006

  14. Constraining the volatile fraction of planets from transit observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The determination of the abundance of volatiles in extrasolar planets is very important as it can provide constraints on transport in protoplanetary disks and on the formation location of planets. However, constraining the internal structure of low-mass planets from transit measurements is known to be a degenerate problem. Aims: Using planetary structure and evolution models, we show how observations of transiting planets can be used to constrain their internal composition, in particular the amount of volatiles in the planetary interior, and consequently the amount of gas (defined in this paper to be only H and He) that the planet harbors. We first explore planets that are located close enough to their star to have lost their gas envelope. We then concentrate on planets at larger distances and show that the observation of transiting planets at different evolutionary ages can provide statistical information on their internal composition, in particular on their volatile fraction. Methods: We computed the evolution of low-mass planets (super-Earths to Neptune-like) for different fractions of volatiles and gas. We used a four-layer model (core, silicate mantle, icy mantle, and gas envelope) and computed the internal structure of planets for different luminosities. With this internal structure model, we computed the internal and gravitational energy of planets, which was then used to derive the time evolution of the planet. Since the total energy of a planet depends on its heat capacity and density distribution and therefore on its composition, planets with different ice fractions have different evolution tracks. Results: We show for low-mass gas-poor planets that are located close to their central star that assuming evaporation has efficiently removed the entire gas envelope, it is possible to constrain the volatile fraction of close-in transiting planets. We illustrate this method on the example of 55 Cnc e and show that under the assumption of the absence of

  15. Self-preservation and structural transition of gas hydrates during dissociation below the ice point: an in situ study using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Rong; Zeng, Xin-Yang; Zhou, Feng-He; Ran, Qi-Dong; Sun, Chang-Yu; Zhong, Rui-Qin; Yang, Lan-Ying; Chen, Guang-Jin; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrate structure type and dissociation behavior for pure methane and methane-ethane hydrates at temperatures below the ice point and atmospheric pressure were investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. The self-preservation effect of sI methane hydrate is significant at lower temperatures (268.15 to 270.15 K), as determined by the stable C-H region Raman peaks and AL/AS value (Ratio of total peak area corresponding to occupancies of guest molecules in large cavities to small cavities) being around 3.0. However, it was reduced at higher temperatures (271.15 K and 272.15 K), as shown from the dramatic change in Raman spectra and fluctuations in AL/AS values. The self-preservation effect for methane-ethane double hydrate is observed at temperatures lower than 271.15 K. The structure transition from sI to sII occurred during the methane-ethane hydrate decomposition process, which was clearly identified by the shift in peak positions and the change in relative peak intensities at temperatures from 269.15 K to 271.15 K. Further investigation shows that the selectivity for self-preservation of methane over ethane leads to the structure transition; this kind of selectivity increases with decreasing temperature. This work provides new insight into the kinetic behavior of hydrate dissociation below the ice point.

  16. Self-preservation and structural transition of gas hydrates during dissociation below the ice point: an in situ study using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jin-Rong; Zeng, Xin-Yang; Zhou, Feng-He; Ran, Qi-Dong; Sun, Chang-Yu; Zhong, Rui-Qin; Yang, Lan-Ying; Chen, Guang-Jin; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrate structure type and dissociation behavior for pure methane and methane-ethane hydrates at temperatures below the ice point and atmospheric pressure were investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. The self-preservation effect of sI methane hydrate is significant at lower temperatures (268.15 to 270.15 K), as determined by the stable C-H region Raman peaks and AL/AS value (Ratio of total peak area corresponding to occupancies of guest molecules in large cavities to small cavities) being around 3.0. However, it was reduced at higher temperatures (271.15 K and 272.15 K), as shown from the dramatic change in Raman spectra and fluctuations in AL/AS values. The self-preservation effect for methane-ethane double hydrate is observed at temperatures lower than 271.15 K. The structure transition from sI to sII occurred during the methane-ethane hydrate decomposition process, which was clearly identified by the shift in peak positions and the change in relative peak intensities at temperatures from 269.15 K to 271.15 K. Further investigation shows that the selectivity for self-preservation of methane over ethane leads to the structure transition; this kind of selectivity increases with decreasing temperature. This work provides new insight into the kinetic behavior of hydrate dissociation below the ice point. PMID:27941857

  17. Itinerant magnetic phases and quantum Lifshitz transitions in a three-dimensional repulsively interacting Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shang-Shun; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic phenomena in itinerant electron systems have been at the forefront of materials science. Here we show that the Weyl spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in three-dimensional repulsively interacting itinerant Fermi systems opens up a platform to host new itinerant magnetic phases, excitations, and phase transitions. A putative ferromagnetic state (FM) is always unstable against a stripe spiral spin density wave (S-SDW) or a stripe longitudinal SDW (LSDW) at small or large SOC strengths, respectively. The stripe-ordering wave vector is given by the nesting momentum of the two SOC-split Fermi surfaces with the same or opposite helicities at small or large SOC strengths, respectively. The LSDW is accompanied by a charge density wave (CDW) with half of its pitch. The transition from the paramagnet to the SSDW or LSDW+CDW is described by quantum Lifshitz-type actions, in sharp contrast to the Hertz-Millis types for itinerant electron systems without SOC. The collective excitations and Fermi surface reconstructions inside the SSDW and LSDW+CDW are also studied. The effects of a harmonic trap in cold-atom experiments are briefly discussed. In view of recent ground-breaking experimental advances in generating two-dimensional SOC in cold atoms, these phenomena can be observed in current or near-future cold-atom experiments even at very weak interactions. They may also be relevant to some itinerant magnetic materials with a strong SOC.

  18. Gas-phase energy of the S2←S0 transition and electrostatic properties of the S2 state of carotenoid peridinin via a solvatochromic shift and orientation broadening of the absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, Vladimir S

    2014-10-01

    The solvent effect on the position and the shape of the absorption spectrum of peridinin for 12 protic and aprotic solvents as well as the temperature effect for methanol were studied using a solvatochromic theory based on the Onsager sphere cavity model. (Experimental data have been provided by T. Polivka and V. Sundström.) Solvatochromic calculations combined with estimations of orientation broadening of the absorption spectrum by convolution allowed the conclusion that the orientation (dipole-dipole), induction and dispersion solute-solvent interactions reasonably describes the position of the 0-0 frequency. The orientation interactions led to the blue solvatochromic shift, separating them from the induced and dispersion interactions, which produce a red shift. The FWHM of Gaussian of inhomogeneous broadening originated from the fluctuations of orientation interactions was demonstrated to be high (945 cm(-1)) even for such a nonpolar solvent as hexane. The value of |Δμ|/cos φ of -18.7 D has been found (Δμ = μ2 - μg, φ is the angle between Δμ and μg). By assigning peridinin to the idealized C2v point group, the large change of dipole moment |Δμ| of 18.7 D under S2←S0 transition is obtained for peridinin in gas phase. Moreover, the S2-excited state dipole moment μ2 has the opposite orientation relative to that at the ground S0 state μg. The determined gas-phase 0-0 energy of the S2←S0 transition, 22 910 cm(-1) (2.84 eV) is employed to calculate the polarizability change between the S0 and S2 states of 376 Å(3). The finding for the effective Onsager radius is of 9.4 Å. Obtained results for electrostatic properties of the S2 state are compared with those known from Stark spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical calculations.

  19. Chemical abundances in metal-poor stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim; Norris, John; Shetrone, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Stars in low-mass dwarf galaxies show a larger range in their chemical properties than those in the Milky Way halo. Not only are alpha-poor stars found at lower metallicities, but also r-process challenged stars, and a disparate fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars. A more pristine and chemically inhomogeneous interstellar medium, combined with stoichastic star formation in a metal-poor environment, is thought to cause these detectable differences in the early SN II contributions. We are also now finding stars in dwarf galaxies that appear to be iron-enhanced, i.e., stars that have formed in pockets of SN Ia enriched gas. A comparison of their chemical abundances with individual SN Ia models can provide unique constraints on the SN Ia progenitors.

  20. Modeling the transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Bart A.

    1994-04-01

    The calculation of engineering flows undergoing laminar-turbulent transition presents special problems. Mean-flow quantities obey neither the fully laminar nor the fully turbulent correlations. In addition, local maxima in skin friction, wall temperature, and heat transfer often occur near the end of the transition region. Traditionally, modeling this region has been important for the design of turbine blades, where the transition region is long in relation to the chord length of the blade. More recently, the need for better transition-region models has been recognized by designers of hypersonic vehicles where the high Mach number, the low Reynolds number, and the low-disturbance flight environment emphasize the importance of the transition region. Needless to say, a model that might work well for the transitional flows typically found in gas turbines will not necessarily work well for the external surface of a hypersonic vehicle. In Section 2 of this report, some of the important flow features that control the transition region will be discussed. In Section 3, different approaches to the modeling problem will be summarized and cataloged. Fully turbulent flow models will be discussed in detail in Section 4; models specifically designed for transitional flow, in Section 5; and the evaluation of models, in Section 6.

  1. Gas and Bloating

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Gaseous symptoms including eructation, flatulence, and bloating occur as a consequence of excess gas production, altered gas transit, or abnormal perception of normal amounts of gas within the gastrointestinal tract. There are many causes of gas and bloating including aerophagia, luminal obstructive processes, carbohydrate intolerance syndromes, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, diseases of gut motor activity, and functional bowel disorders including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Because of the prominence of gaseous complaints in IBS, recent investigations have focused on new insights into pathogenesis and novel therapies of bloating. The evaluation of the patient with unexplained gas and bloating relies on careful exclusion of organic disease with further characterization of the underlying condition with directed functional testing. Treatment of gaseous symptomatology should be targeted to pathophysiologic defects whenever possible. Available therapies include lifestyle alterations, dietary modifications, enzyme preparations, adsorbents and agents which reduce surface tension, treatments that alter gut flora, and drugs that modulate gut transit. PMID:28316536

  2. Computer simulation of supersonic rarefied gas flow in the transition region, about a spherical probe; a Monte Carlo approach with application to rocket-borne ion probe experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, B. E.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1971-01-01

    This report describes a Monte Carlo simulation of transition flow around a sphere. Conditions for the simulation correspond to neutral monatomic molecules at two altitudes (70 and 75 km) in the D region of the ionosphere. Results are presented in the form of density contours, velocity vector plots and density, velocity and temperature profiles for the two altitudes. Contours and density profiles are related to independent Monte Carlo and experimental studies, and drag coefficients are calculated and compared with available experimental data. The small computer used is a PDP-15 with 16 K of core, and a typical run for 75 km requires five iterations, each taking five hours. The results are recorded on DECTAPE to be printed when required, and the program provides error estimates for any flow field parameter.

  3. Coordination and dehydrogenation of PH(3) by 23 transition metal ions in the gas phase: FTICR experiments and density functional interpretations.

    PubMed

    Harris, H; Fisher, K; Dance, I

    2001-12-31

    The reactions of 23 transition metal ions M+(g) with phosphane (PH(3)) have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry. Two main reaction pathways are observed, sequential dehydrogenation of multiple (up to nine) phosphane molecules, and addition of multiple (up to four) phosphane molecules. The addition and dehydrogenation reaction pathways are, for the most part, mutually exclusive for a particular metal. Dehydrogenation of phosphane is observed for metal ions toward the lower left of the transition block, and the addition process is predominant toward the top right. The dehydrogenation process is considerably faster than the addition, and sequentially produces the species MPH+, MP(2)(+), MP(3)H(+), MP(4)(+), etc. Density functional calculations were used to evaluate collision trajectories, reaction mechanisms, structures of intermediates (including a number of MoP(x)H(y)(+) species), and to identify the factors determining whether each metal reacts by dehydrogenation or addition. Insertion of M+ into P-H bonds is calculated to be a barrierless, exergonic process for only those metals which are observed to dehydrogenate phosphane molecules. A reaction mechanism involving the transfer of H atoms from P to M followed by the elimination of H(2) from M is profiled for Ru. The energetic origins of the metal influence on reaction type have been traced to the energy changes for the first stage migration of H from P to M. These experimental and theoretical results should be valuable in applications where PH(3(g)) is used in the generation of bulk and surface materials involving metal phosphides.

  4. Characterizing the intrinsic stability of gas-phase clusters of transition metal complex dianions with alkali metal counterions: counterion perturbation of multiply charged anions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ruth M; Boxford, William E; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2007-02-14

    The authors report the gas-phase generation and characterization of a series of cation-dianion clusters, e.g., M(+).PtCl(6) (2-), M(+).PtCl(4) (2-), M(+).Pt(CN)(6) (2-), and M(+).Pd(CN)(4) (2-), where M(+)=Na(+),K(+),Rb(+), as model systems for investigating gas-phase contact ionpairs. Low-energy collisional excitation of these systems isolated within a quadrupole ion trap reveals that the fragmentation products are determined by the dianion and are independent of the counterion. This indicates that cation-dianion clusters represent gaseous ion-pair complexes, in line with recent findings for K(+).Pt(CN)(n) (2-), n=4,6 [Burke et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 021105 (2006)]. The relative fragmentation energies of several cation-dianion systems are obtained as a function of the counterion to explore the nature of ion-pair binding. For most of the systems studied, e.g., M(+).PtCl(6) (2-), the fragmentation energy increases as the cation size decreases, in line with a simple electrostatic description of the cation-dianion binding. However, the M(+).Pt(CN)(4) (2-) clusters displayed the reverse trend with the fragmentation energy increasing as the cation size increases. Density functional theory calculations of the cation-dianion fragmentation potential energy surfaces reveal the existence of a novel double-minima surface, separated by a repulsive Coulomb barrierlike feature at short range. The experimentally observed trends in the fragmentation energies can be fully understood with reference to the computed surfaces, hence providing strong support for the existence of the double-minima surface.

  5. Inverse gas chromatography study on the effect of humidity on the mass transport of alcohols in an ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer near the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Cava, David; Lagarón, José M; Martínez-Giménez, Félix; Gavara, Rafael

    2007-12-21

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was used to study the effect of moisture on transport properties of three low molecular weight alcohols (methanol, ethanol, and 1-butanol) through high barrier copolymers of ethylene-vinyl alcohol with an ethylene content of 38%mol (EVOH38) at 40 degrees C. The value of the partition coefficient (K) was obtained by using two approaches: (a) the fit of the slope of sorption isotherms obtained through the method of Kiselev and Yashin; and (b) the solution to the model of Romdhane and Danner obtained by using the law of moments. The second method also allowed the estimation of the diffusion coefficient (D(p)) at the different humidity conditions. None of these two methods were applicable at low values of relative humidity. With the first method, the diffusion of the permeants through the copolymer was not fast enough to allow them to reach the core of the EVOH particles used as stationary phase resulting in sorption values unrealistically low. The fit of the chromatograms obtained by using the second method also suggested questionable values of the mass transport parameters. Although the theoretical curve perfectly described the chromatogram, the low extent of the interaction and the slow diffusion resulted in interdependent values of the coefficients K and D(p), with infinite pairs of values providing the same curve profile. As the relative humidity of the carrier gas increased, the diffusivity and the sorption of the alcohols also increased, making both methods applicable. In the case of the partition coefficient, the sorption of the biggest molecules (ethanol and 1-butanol) was the most affected, the increment of K for methanol being moderate. As regards the D(p) value, methanol was the most influenced compound and 1-butanol the least. Finally, a sharp increment of the D(p) of the three alcohols was observed between 35 and 47% RH and attributed to the plasticization of the copolymer.

  6. Work transitions.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Nadya A; Bynner, John

    2008-01-01

    Individuals make choices in, and adjust to, a world of work that is often a moving target. Because work is so central to human functioning, and transitions in and out of work can have major mental health repercussions, the authors argue that applied psychologists in health services need to understand those transitions. This article focuses on the different types of transition throughout a person's working life and the resources needed at different stages to ensure the success of these transitions. The authors start by examining the roles of capability and adaptability in supporting and facilitating adjustment to work transitions and their relation to identity development. They then examine the role of social and institutional contexts in shaping work transitions and their outcomes. The authors focus on voluntary versus involuntary transitions and then broaden the lens in discussing the policy implications of research on work transitions.

  7. An insight into the interaction of L-proline with the transition metal cations Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+): a gas phase theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) with L-proline has been studied. Three modes of interaction have been considered: salt bridged (SB), involving binding in a bi-dentate manner through the carboxylate group of L-proline, charge solvated 1 (CS1) involving carbonyl and hydroxyl oxygen, and charge solvated 2 (CS2) involving carbonyl oxygen and the lone pair of the nitrogen atom. All calculations including geometry optimization, metal ion affinities (MIAs), and frequency calculations of the binding structures of Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) to L-proline were calculated using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT-B3LYP) method. All three cations were found to bind preferentially in a zwitterionic (SB) coordination pattern with the metal ion affinity in the order Ni(2+) ˃ Co(2+) ˃ Fe(2+) in all binding forms. The nature of the binding interaction between metal cations and L-proline was found to be mainly electrostatic. Comparison of the infrared vibrations of the C=O, the N-H and the O-H groups of free L-proline with L-proline-M(2+) in both CS1 and CS2 complex structures indicated a considerable shift to lower frequency during complexation. In order to gain more insight into the nature of the interaction of L-proline with group VIIIB metal ions, comparison of the interaction of L-proline with other cations such as (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Be(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)) was made. Graphical Abstract L-proline with the transition metal cations Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2.)

  8. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  9. Uncertainty in particle number modal analysis during transient operation of compressed natural gas, diesel, and trap-equipped diesel transit buses.

    PubMed

    Holmén, Britt A; Qu, Yingge

    2004-04-15

    The relationships between transient vehicle operation and ultrafine particle emissions are not well-known, especially for low-emission alternative bus technologies such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel buses equipped with particulate filters/traps (TRAP). In this study, real-time particle number concentrations measured on a nominal 5 s average basis using an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) for these two bus technologies are compared to that of a baseline catalyst-equipped diesel bus operated on ultralow sulfur fuel (BASE) using dynamometer testing. Particle emissions were consistently 2 orders of magnitude lower for the CNG and TRAP compared to BASE on all driving cycles. Time-resolved total particle numbers were examined in terms of sampling factors identified as affecting the ability of ELPI to quantify the particulate matter number emissions for low-emitting vehicles such as CNG and TRAP as a function of vehicle driving mode. Key factors were instrument sensitivity and dilution ratio, alignment of particle and vehicle operating data, sampling train background particles, and cycle-to-cycle variability due to vehicle, engine, after-treatment, or driver behavior. In-cycle variability on the central business district (CBD) cycle was highest for the TRAP configuration, but this could not be attributed to the ELPI sensitivity issues observed for TRAP-IDLE measurements. Elevated TRAP emissions coincided with low exhaust temperature, suggesting on-road real-world particulate filter performance can be evaluated by monitoring exhaust temperature. Nonunique particle emission maps indicate that measures other than vehicle speed and acceleration are necessary to model disaggregated real-time particle emissions. Further testing on a wide variety of test cycles is needed to evaluate the relative importance of the time history of vehicle operation and the hysteresis of the sampling train/dilution tunnel on ultrafine particle emissions. Future studies should

  10. Family Structure and Employment Characteristics Differentiate Poor from Near-Poor Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagata, Elizabeth M.

    1997-01-01

    Current Population Survey data indicate that rural workers were more likely than urban workers to be poor or near-poor. Poor and near-poor rural workers were more likely than other workers to be southern, young, and in a minority group. Barriers to livable-wage employment included low educational attainment, being a single mother, and having young…

  11. Do Middle-Class Students Perceive Poor Women and Poor Men Differently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozzarelli, Catherine; Tagler, Michael J.; Wilkinson, Anna V.

    2002-01-01

    Examined college students' attitudes and stereotypes regarding poor women, attributions for their poverty, and whether those thoughts and feelings differed from those about poor men. Attitudes and stereotypes were significantly more positive regarding poor women than poor men. Participants endorsed internal attributions for both women's and men's…

  12. Sweet gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    When poisonous hydrogen sulfide contaminates a natural gas deposit, the drilling company usually caps the well and moves on to other areas that may contain larger reserves and offer stronger economic incentives. Chemical and biological methods exist to purify these wells, but most are complex and costly. However, a group of scientists now is developing what could be a cheaper, easier method to clean up and utilize this polluted natural gas.The technique—which involves growing “enrichment” cultures of bacteria that metabolize the hydrogen sulfide into harmless compounds—could be particularly useful to poor and energy-starved developing nations, says Norman Wainwright, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory. “We're hoping the technique can be robust enough and inexpensive enough to be used in a developing country,” Wainwright says. Other scientists involved with the project are Porter Anderson, a University of Rochester professor emeritus associated with the lab and Ben Ebenhack, also of Rochester.

  13. BIRTH CONTROL, CULTURE AND THE POOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RIESSMAN, CATHERINE KOHLER

    EVIDENCE FROM STUDIES INDICATE THAT THE POOR DESIRE TO CONTROL THEIR FAMILY SIZE AND PREFER TO USE BIRTH CONTROL DEVICES (PILLS OR INTERUTERINE DEVICES) WHICH ARE NOT COITUS-CONNECTED AND ANTITHETICAL TO THEIR SEXUAL ATTITUDES AND TRADITIONS. CONTRARY TO THE BELIEF THAT THE POOR ARE LESS LIKELY TO UTILIZE EXISTING HEALTH FACILITIES OR TO TAKE PART…

  14. Poor Rural Children Attract Close Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Growing up poor in isolated rural areas and small towns is qualitatively different from growing up poor in the city. Yet most of what experts know about the effects of poverty on children's development comes from studies conducted in big cities. Now, an ambitious project run by universities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina is putting what some…

  15. RADAR OBSERVATION CONDITIONS OF POOR VISIBILITY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Ship navigational radar is an effective means for revealing above-water objects in conditions of poor visibility. A radar image of the surrounding...radar observation and with the competent operation of the set, radar is a reliable means of detection of encountered vessels in conditions of poor

  16. The Chronically Poor: Breaking the Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris-Bilotti, Sharon

    This question-and-answer format paper looks at some of the basic issues surrounding the chronically poor and initiatives and services designed to break the poverty cycle. A first section explores some of the myths and realities surrounding the characteristics of the chronically poor population and notes that this population is comprised of…

  17. Cognitive Profiles of Korean Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Jeung-Ryeul; Ji, Yu-Kyong

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the performance of 30 poor readers in the third grade with those of 30 average readers of the same age and 30 younger readers matched with the same reading level on phonological, visuo-perceptual, orthographic, and naming speed tasks. Individual data revealed heterogeneous profiles for the poor readers: six (20%) exhibited…

  18. The Crisis of the Near Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Katherine S.; Tan Chen, Victor

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the "missing class," the near poor whose incomes place them above the poverty line, but well below the middle class. Near-poor families with two parents and two children subsist on $20,000 to $40,000 a year, which disqualifies them for virtually all public subsidies, but is a far cry from what they need to be…

  19. Factors influencing doping control and abrupt metallurgical transitions during atmospheric pressure MOVPE growth of AlGaAs and GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. S.; Mason, N. J.; Robinson, M.

    1984-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure MOVPE of GaAs and AlGaAs has been investigated using two gas handling systems and a conventional horizontal reactor. Initially a simple source/carrier gas manifold design was assessed but severe retention of reagents in the pipework resulted in poor control of doping and interface abruptness. However, integration of the reagent and carrier gas in a pressure balanced vent/run configuration gave a significant improvement. AlGaAs/GaAs multilayers and n +/n - GaAs transitions have been used to assess the performance of both systems. Abrupt p-type doping transitions using bis-cyclopentadienylmagnesium proved unsuccessful as long doping tails were observed.

  20. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-16

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no 'metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe.

  1. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  2. Gas and Gas Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gas and bloating occur mainly after eating dairy products, it may be because your body isn' ... able to break down the sugar (lactose) in dairy foods. Other food intolerances, especially to gluten — a ...

  3. Energy and minorities, women, and the poor

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, H.L.; Perry, E.B.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive, up-to-date (1975 to 1980) bibliography of articles, books and other publications is presented dealing with the subject of energy and minorities, women and the poor. Included are academic, popular, and government publications as well as publications by private groups and organizations. It is intended for political scientists, sociologists, economists, home economists, energy planners, energy managers and others interested in the interface of minorities, women, and the poor with energy. Following a brief introduction, there is a general listing. Also included are references dealing with energy and black Americans, native Americans (Indians), the poor, and women. (MJJ)

  4. DYNAMIC S0 GALAXIES. II. THE ROLE OF DIFFUSE HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jiangtao; Chen Yang; Daniel Wang, Q.; Li Zhiyuan

    2011-08-10

    Cold gas loss is thought to be important in star formation quenching and morphological transition during the evolution of S0 galaxies. In high-density environments, this gas loss can be achieved via many external mechanisms. However, in relatively isolated environments, where these external mechanisms cannot be efficient, the gas loss must then be dominated by some internal processes. We have performed Chandra analysis of hot gas in five nearby isolated S0 galaxies, based on the quantitative subtraction of various stellar contributions. We find that all the galaxies studied in the present work are X-ray faint, with the luminosity of the hot gas (L{sub X} ) typically accounting for {approx}< 5% of the expected Type Ia supernova (SN) energy injection rate. We have further compared our results with those from relevant recent papers, in order to investigate the energy budget, cold-hot gas relation, and gas removal from S0 galaxies in isolated environments. We find that elliptical and S0 galaxies are not significantly different in L{sub X} at the low-mass end (typically with K-band luminosity L{sub K} {approx}< 10{sup 11} L{sub sun,K}). However, at the high-mass end, S0 galaxies tend to have significantly lower L{sub X} than elliptical galaxies of the same stellar masses, as already shown in previous observational and theoretical works. We further discuss the potential relationship of the diffuse X-ray emission with the cold (atomic and molecular) gas content in the S0 and elliptical galaxies included in our study. We find that L{sub X} /L{sup 2}{sub K} tends to correlate positively with the total cold gas mass (M{sub H{sub 2}+H{sub i}}) for cold-gas-poor galaxies with M{sub H{sub 2}+H{sub i}}{approx}<10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, while they anti-correlate with each other for cold-gas-rich galaxies. This cold-hot gas relationship can be explained in a scenario of early-type galaxy evolution, with the leftover cold gas from the precursor star-forming galaxy mainly removed by the

  5. A study of cooling flows in poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Dillingham, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    We observed three poor clusters with central dominant galaxies (AWM 4, MKW 4, and MKW 3's) using the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter on the ROSAT X-ray satellite. The images reveal smooth, symmetrical X-ray emission filling the cluster with a sharp peak on each central galaxy. The cluster surface brightness profiles can be decomposed using superposed King models for the central galaxy and the intracluster medium. The King model parameters for the cluster portions are consistent with previous observations of these clusters. The newly measured King model parameters for the central galaxies are typical of the X-ray surface brightness distributions of isolated elliptical galaxies. Spatially resolved temperature measurements in annular rings throughout the clusters show a nearly isothermal profile. Temperatures are consistent with previously measured values, but are much better determined. There is no significant drop in temperature noted in the innermost bins where cooling flows are likely to be present, nor is any excess absorption by cold gas required. All cold gas columns are consistent with galactic foreground absorption. We derive mass profiles for the clusters assuming both isothermal temperature profiles and cooling flow models with constant mass flow rates. Our results are consistent with previous Einstein IPC observations by Kriss, Cioffi, & Canizares, but extend the mass profiles out to 1 Mpc in these poor clusters.

  6. Transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals such as Iron (Fe) and Copper (Cu) are essential for plant cell development. At the same time, due their capability to generate hydroxyl radicals they can be potentially toxic to plant metabolism. Recent works on hydroxyl-radical activation of ion transporters suggest that hydroxyl radicals generated by transition metals could play an important role in plant growth and adaptation to imbalanced environments. In this mini-review, the relation between transition metals uptake and utilization and oxidative stress-activated ion transport in plant cells is analyzed, and a new model depicting both apoplastic and cytosolic mode of ROS signaling to plasma membrane transporters is suggested. PMID:23333964

  7. Effect of adduct formation with molecular nitrogen on the measured collisional cross sections of transition metal-1,10-phenanthroline complexes in traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry: N2 is not always an "inert" buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Nicole J; Weiske, Thomas; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-10-06

    The number of separations and analyses of molecular species using traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) is increasing, including those extending the technique to analytes containing metal atoms. A critical aspect of such applications of TWIMS-MS is the validity of the collisional cross sections (CCSs) measured and whether they can be accurately calibrated against other ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques. Many metal containing species have potential reactivity toward molecular nitrogen, which is present in high concentration in the typical Synapt-G2 TWIMS cell. Here, we analyze the effect of nitrogen on the drift time of a series of cationic 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late transition metals, [(phen)M](+), (M = Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, and Hg) in order to understand potential deviations from expected drift time behaviors. These metal complexes were chosen for their metal open-coordination site and lack of rotameric species. The target species were generated via electrospray ionization (ESI), analyzed using TWIMS in N2 drift gas, and the observed drift time trends compared. Theoretically derived CCSs for all species (via both the projection approximation and trajectory method) were also compared. The results show that, indeed, for metal containing species in this size regime, reaction with molecular nitrogen has a dramatic effect on measured drift times and must not be ignored when comparing and interpreting TWIMS arrival time distributions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to analyze the periodic differences due to the metal's interaction with nitrogen (and background water) in detail.

  8. Modeling of transitional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Thomas S.

    1988-01-01

    An effort directed at developing improved transitional models was initiated. The focus of this work was concentrated on the critical assessment of a popular existing transitional model developed by McDonald and Fish in 1972. The objective of this effort was to identify the shortcomings of the McDonald-Fish model and to use the insights gained to suggest modifications or alterations of the basic model. In order to evaluate the transitional model, a compressible boundary layer code was required. Accordingly, a two-dimensional compressible boundary layer code was developed. The program was based on a three-point fully implicit finite difference algorithm where the equations were solved in an uncoupled manner with second order extrapolation used to evaluate the non-linear coefficients. Iteration was offered as an option if the extrapolation error could not be tolerated. The differencing scheme was arranged to be second order in both spatial directions on an arbitrarily stretched mesh. A variety of boundary condition options were implemented including specification of an external pressure gradient, specification of a wall temperature distribution, and specification of an external temperature distribution. Overall the results of the initial phase of this work indicate that the McDonald-Fish model does a poor job at predicting the details of the turbulent flow structure during the transition region.

  9. THE KENNICUTT–SCHMIDT RELATION IN EXTREMELY METAL-POOR DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, M. E.; Almeida, J. Sánchez; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Amorín, R.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Kennicutt–Schmidt (KS) relation between the gas mass and star formation rate (SFR) describes the star formation regulation in disk galaxies. It is a function of gas metallicity, but the low-metallicity regime of the KS diagram is poorly sampled. We have analyzed data for a representative set of extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), as well as auxiliary data, and compared these to empirical and theoretical predictions. The majority of the XMPs possess high specific SFRs, similar to high-redshift star-forming galaxies. On the KS plot, the XMP H i data occupy the same region as dwarfs and extend the relation for low surface brightness galaxies. Considering the H i gas alone, a considerable fraction of the XMPs already fall off the KS law. Significant quantities of “dark” H{sub 2} mass (i.e., not traced by CO) would imply that XMPs possess low star formation efficiencies (SFE{sub gas}). Low SFE{sub gas} in XMPs may be the result of the metal-poor nature of the H i gas. Alternatively, the H i reservoir may be largely inert, the star formation being dominated by cosmological accretion. Time lags between gas accretion and star formation may also reduce the apparent SFE{sub gas}, as may galaxy winds, which can expel most of the gas into the intergalactic medium. Hence, on global scales, XMPs could be H i-dominated, high-specific-SFR (≳10{sup −10} yr{sup −1}), low-SFE{sub gas} (≲10{sup −9} yr{sup −1}) systems, in which the total H i mass is likely not a good predictor of the total H{sub 2} mass, nor of the SFR.

  10. Coping with health care expenses among poor households: evidence from a rural commune in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim Thuy; Khuat, Oanh Thi Hai; Ma, Shuangge; Pham, Duc Cuong; Khuat, Giang Thi Hong; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2012-03-01

    With the 1980s "Doi Moi" economic reforms, Vietnam transitioned from state-funded health care to a privatized user fee system. Out-of-pocket payments became a major source of funding for treatments received at both public and private health facilities. We studied coping strategies used by residents of Dai Dong, a rural commune of Hanoi, for paying health care costs, assessing the effects of such costs on economic and health stability. We developed a 2008 survey of 706 households (166 poor, 184 near-poor, 356 non-poor; 100% response rate). Outcome measures were reported episodes of illness; inpatient, outpatient, and self-treatments; out-of-pocket expenditures; and funding sources for health care costs. Households of all income levels borrowed to pay for inpatient treatments; loans are also more heavily used by the poor and near-poor than the non-poor for outpatient treatments. Compared to low cost treatments, the use of loans is intensified for extremely high cost health treatments for all poverty levels, but especially for the poor and near-poor. The likelihood of reducing food consumption to pay for extremely high cost treatment versus low cost treatments increased most for the poor in both inpatient and outpatient contexts. Decreased funding and increased costs in health care rendered Dai Dong's population vulnerable to the consequences of detrimental coping strategies such as debt and food reduction. Future reforms should focus on obviating these funding measures among at-risk populations.

  11. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.

    Gas chromatography (GC) has many applications in the analysis of food products. GC has been used for the determination of fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, gases, water, alcohols, pesticides, flavor compounds, and many more. While GC has been used for other food components such as sugars, oligosaccharides, amino acids, peptides, and vitamins, these substances are more suited to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. GC is ideally suited to the analysis of volatile substances that are thermally stable. Substances such as pesticides and flavor compounds that meet these criteria can be isolated from a food and directly injected into the GC. For compounds that are thermally unstable, too low in volatility, or yield poor chromatographic separation due to polarity, a derivatization step must be done before GC analysis. The two parts of the experiment described here include the analysis of alcohols that requires no derivatization step, and the analysis of fatty acids which requires derivatization. The experiments specify the use of capillary columns, but the first experiment includes conditions for a packed column.

  12. Role of stranded gas in increasing global gas supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    This report synthesizes the findings of three regional studies in order to evaluate, at the global scale, the contribution that stranded gas resources can make to global natural gas supplies. Stranded gas, as defined for this study, is natural gas in discovered conventional gas and oil fields that is currently not commercially producible for either physical or economic reasons. The regional studies evaluated the cost of bringing the large volumes of undeveloped gas in stranded gas fields to selected markets. In particular, stranded gas fields of selected Atlantic Basin countries, north Africa, Russia, and central Asia are screened to determine whether the volumes are sufficient to meet Europe’s increasing demand for gas imports. Stranded gas fields in Russia, central Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia are also screened to estimate development, production, and transport costs and corresponding gas volumes that could be supplied to Asian markets in China, India, Japan, and South Korea. The data and cost analysis presented here suggest that for the European market and the markets examined in Asia, the development of stranded gas provides a way to meet projected gas import demands for the 2020-to-2040 period. Although this is a reconnaissance-type appraisal, it is based on volumes of gas that are associated with individual identified fields. Individual field data were carefully examined. Some fields were not evaluated because current technology was insufficient or it appeared the gas was likely to be held off the export market. Most of the evaluated stranded gas can be produced and delivered to markets at costs comparable to historical prices. Moreover, the associated volumes of gas are sufficient to provide an interim supply while additional technologies are developed to unlock gas diffused in shale and hydrates or while countries transition to making a greater use of renewable energy sources.

  13. Is American business working for the poor?

    PubMed

    Bane, M J; Ellwood, D T

    1991-01-01

    At first glance, poverty seems to have little to do with business. When most people--managers included--think about poverty, they assume that people are poor because they are isolated from the mainstream economy, not productive participants in it. But according to Harvard University professors Mary Jo Bane and David Ellwood, this is a misleading image of the true face of poverty in the United States today. Most poor adults--and a full 90% of poor children--live in families where work is the norm, not the exception. Poor people often work or want to work. But at the low-wage end of the American economy, having a job is no guarantee of avoiding poverty. Poverty is a business issue, then, because the American poor are part of the American work force. And this poses a problem for managers. In a more competitive and fast-changing economic environment, the performance of companies increasingly depends on the capabilities of their employees. In response to this human-resource challenge, more and more managers are embracing the language of "empowerment". And yet how can low-wage employees believe empowerment when their experience of work is, quite literally, impoverishment? It is unlikely that American companies can create the work force of the future with the poverty policies of the past. Fortunately, there are some simple policy mechanisms that can assist the working poor without putting an undue burden on business. Enacting them, however, requires managers to see poverty policy as one part of a national human-resource strategy that links the strategic concerns of companies to a broad social agenda.

  14. 76 FR 77302 - Federal Transit Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) and Clean Fuels Grant Program, Augmented With... projects funded under two discretionary programs: The Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) program and the Clean Fuels Grant program enhanced with Section 5309 Bus and...

  15. Future volcanic lake research: revealing secrets from poorly studied lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Tassi, F.; Mora-Amador, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after the 1986 Lake Nyos lethal gas burst, a limnic rather than volcanic event. This led to the formation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990's. At Lake Nyos, a degassing pipe is functional since 2001, and two additional pipes were added in 2011, aimed to prevent further limnic eruption events. There are between 150 and 200 volcanic lakes on Earth. Some acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously or discontinuously. Such detailed studies have shown their usefulness in volcanic surveillance (e.g. Ruapehu, Yugama-Kusatsu-Shiran, Poás). Others are "Nyos-type" lakes, with possible gas accumulation in bottom waters and thus potentially hazardous. "Nyos-type" lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term gas build-up and thus higher potential risk. In temperate climates, such lakes tend to turn over in winter (monomictic), and thus liberating its gas charge yearly. We line out research strategies for the different types of lakes. We believe a complementary, multi-disciplinary approach (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, biology, statistics, etc.) will lead to new insights and ideas, which can be the base for future following-up and monitoring. After 25 years of pioneering studies on rather few lakes, the scientific community should be challenged to study the many poorly studied volcanic lakes, in order to better constrain the related hazard, based on probabilistic approaches.

  16. Food as pharma: marketing nutraceuticals to India's rural poor.

    PubMed

    Street, Alice

    2015-05-27

    This commentary sketches out the politics of the expansion of affordable, fast-moving nutraceutical products into rural India, with a focus on fortified foods and beverages. It examines the relationships between industry, government and humanitarian organisations that are being forged alongside the development of markets for nutraceuticals; the production of evidence and the harnessing of science to support nutraceutical companies' claims; the ways in which nutraceuticals are being marketed and distributed in rural areas; and the concepts of health and well-being that are being promulgated through those marketing campaigns. Lastly, it asks what kinds of impact fast-moving nutraceuticals are likely to have on the lives of India's rural poor. It concludes by questioning how smooth a transition to nutraceutical consumption Big Food marketing strategies can really facilitate and how readily low-income families seeking to feed their families and safeguard health will actually adopt concepts of wellness and internalise micro-nutrient associated risks.

  17. Hibernation and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Milsom, William K; Jackson, Donald C

    2011-01-01

    Hibernation in endotherms and ectotherms is characterized by an energy-conserving metabolic depression due to low body temperatures and poorly understood temperature-independent mechanisms. Rates of gas exchange are correspondly reduced. In hibernating mammals, ventilation falls even more than metabolic rate leading to a relative respiratory acidosis that may contribute to metabolic depression. Breathing in some mammals becomes episodic and in some small mammals significant apneic gas exchange may occur by passive diffusion via airways or skin. In ectothermic vertebrates, extrapulmonary gas exchange predominates and in reptiles and amphibians hibernating underwater accounts for all gas exchange. In aerated water diffusive exchange permits amphibians and many species of turtles to remain fully aerobic, but hypoxic conditions can challenge many of these animals. Oxygen uptake into blood in both endotherms and ectotherms is enhanced by increased affinity of hemoglobin for O₂ at low temperature. Regulation of gas exchange in hibernating mammals is predominately linked to CO₂/pH, and in episodic breathers, control is principally directed at the duration of the apneic period. Control in submerged hibernating ectotherms is poorly understood, although skin-diffusing capacity may increase under hypoxic conditions. In aerated water blood pH of frogs and turtles either adheres to alphastat regulation (pH ∼8.0) or may even exhibit respiratory alkalosis. Arousal in hibernating mammals leads to restoration of euthermic temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange and occurs periodically even as ambient temperatures remain low, whereas body temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange of hibernating ectotherms are tightly linked to ambient temperature.

  18. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  19. Planning Behaviour in Good and Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    A group of 50 good readers and a group of 50 poor readers of Grade 5 matched for age and intelligence and selected on the basis of their proficiency in reading comprehension were tested for their competence in word reading and the process of planning at three different levels, namely, perceptual, memory and conceptual in order to study the…

  20. Resilient Parenting: Overcoming Poor Parental Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Wendy J.; Combs-Orme, Terri

    2007-01-01

    This study identified groups of mothers with varying patterns of adaptive functioning and bonds with their own parents. These patterns were related to mothers' parenting of their own children to understand how some mothers avoid repeating the cycle of poor parenting. Data from 210 new mothers were analyzed before hospital discharge about bonding…

  1. The Other Poor: Rural Poverty and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Books, Sue

    1997-01-01

    This paper argues that rural poverty remains relatively invisible because, although shameful, it is profitable, and the rural poor pose little threat to their suburban neighbors. This is illustrated via interrogation concerning a rural poultry plant fire. The paper examines implications of this case for foundations scholars and educational…

  2. Who Are The Poor In Puerto Rico?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Barry B.; de Cintron, Celia F.

    Dichotomous poverty is defined by taking an arbitrary standard of consumption capability as a dividing line between rich and poor. An investigation into dichotomous poverty below the 2000 dollar level will be worthwhile, since, in 1953, the Planning Board announced as a goal the attempt to lift all families above this margin. In 1953, 78 percent…

  3. COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH SERVICES FOR THE RURAL POOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LOGSDON, DONALD N.

    SEVERAL WRITERS HAVE DEPICTED AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS AS BEING ONE OF THE MOST DEPRIVED GROUPS IN OUR COUNTRY. HOWEVER, THE NON-MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS, WHO FAR OUTNUMBER THE MIGRANTS, ALSO LIVE IN EXTREMELY POOR CIRCUMSTANCES AND ARE VIRTUALLY UNNOTICED BECAUSE THEY DO NOT DRAW ATTENTION THROUGH MIGRATION. BOTH OF THESE GROUPS ARE IN DIRE NEED…

  4. Runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2012-01-01

    More recently, research on enhancing the situational awareness of pilots, especially in poor visibility flight conditions, gains more and more interests. Since pilots may not be able to spot the runway clearly in poor visibility conditions, such as fog, smoke, haze or dim lighting conditions, aviation landing problem can occur due to the (unexpected) presence of objects on the runway. Complicated and trivial instruments, switches, bottoms, plus sudden happenings are enough for the pilots to take care of during landing approach. Therefore, an automatic hazard detection approach that combines non-linear Multi-scale Retinex (MSR) image enhancement, edge detection with basic edge pattern analysis, and image analysis is investigated. The effect of applying the enhancement method is to make the image of the runway almost independent from the poor atmospheric conditions. The following smart edge detection process extracts edge information, which can also reduce the storing space, the comparison and retrieval time, and the effect of sensor noise. After analyzing the features existing in the edge differences occurring in the runway area by digital image processing techniques, the existing potential hazard will be localized and labeled. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective in runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions.

  5. Resilient Learners in Schools Serving Poor Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frempong, G.; Visser, M.; Feza, Nosisi; Winnaar, L.; Nuamah, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Through the education for all initiative, a number of education systems have been able to provide access to their students at the basic education level. The major challenge is that most of these learners, especially, those from poor families who attend schools with limited resources are often not successful. However, in South Africa,…

  6. EEG Power Spectra of Adolescent Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; McPherson, W. Brian; Oglesby, D. Michael; Dykman, Roscoe A.

    1998-01-01

    Electroencephalographic power spectra were studied in two poor-reading adolescent groups (n=38), dysphonetic and phonetic. Significant Group x Hemisphere effects were found in the alpha and beta bands, with the phonetic group showing right greater than left asymmetry. Results suggest more circumscribed and mature processing in the phonetically…

  7. From Many Lands. Voices of the Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narayan, Deepa, Ed.; Petesch, Patti, Ed.

    This book, the last volume in a three-part series, draws on a large-scale worldwide poverty study to present the views, experiences, and aspirations of poor people in 14 selected countries. In each country, interviews and discussion groups were held in 8-15 rural and urban communities that reflected the most prevalent poverty groups and the…

  8. Katharine Drexel: Learning to Love the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Although born into privilege, Katharine Drexel was blessed with parents, siblings, friends, and spiritual guides who kept her rooted in a deep, Eucharistic faith. Responding to the needs of the poor was a responsibility of the rich, and Katharine learned this value at the hands of her parents at an early age. With the good counsel of popes and…

  9. Using Story to Help Student Understanding of Gas Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Rick; Stinner, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Students tend to have a poor understanding of the concept of gas pressure. Usually, gas pressure is taught in terms of the various formulaic gas laws. The development of the concept of gas pressure according to the early Greeks did not include the concept of a vacuum. It was not for another 2000 years that Torricelli proposed that a vacuum can…

  10. Presidential Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-09

    Podesta for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, “Presidential Transition Guidance,” Nov. 13, 2000. 89 U.S. General Services Administration...2000, presidential election, White House Chief of Staff John Podesta issued a November 13, 2000, memorandum to executive branch agencies stating that

  11. Tessellations & Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  12. Quantifying capture efficiency of gas collection wells with gas tracers.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul; Han, Byunghyun; Mei, Changen; Augenstein, Don

    2015-09-01

    A new in situ method for directly measuring the gas collection efficiency in the region around a gas extraction well was developed. Thirteen tests were conducted by injecting a small volume of gas tracer sequentially at different locations in the landfill cell, and the gas tracer mass collected from each test was used to assess the collection efficiency at each injection point. For 11 tests the gas collection was excellent, always exceeding 70% with seven tests showing a collection efficiency exceeding 90%. For one test the gas collection efficiency was 8±6%. Here, the poor efficiency was associated with a water-laden refuse or remnant daily cover soil located between the point of tracer injection and the extraction well. The utility of in situ gas tracer tests for quantifying landfill gas capture at particular locations within a landfill cell was demonstrated. While there are certainly limitations to this technology, this method may be a valuable tool to help answer questions related to landfill gas collection efficiency and gas flow within landfills. Quantitative data from tracer tests may help assess the utility and cost-effectiveness of alternative cover systems, well designs and landfill gas collection management practices.

  13. Differences in Nutrient Adequacy among Poor and Non-Poor Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John T.; Martin, Katie S.

    This study compared the proportion of 1- to 5-year-olds in poor and non-poor households whose intakes of key nutrients were inadequate. Data were obtained from the 1986 United States Department of Agriculture Nationwide Food Consumption Survey and Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals. An intake below 70 percent of the Recommended Daily…

  14. Parenting Efficacy and the Early School Adjustment of Poor and Near-Poor Black Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Aurora P.; Choi, Jeong-Kyun; Bentler, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study investigates whether maternal educational attainment, maternal employment status, and family income affect African American children's behavioral and cognitive functioning over time through their impacts on mothers' psychological functioning and parenting efficacy in a sample of 100 poor and near-poor single…

  15. Gas at the Inner Disk Edge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    radii for individual stars, and to orbital radii of extrasolar planets. 2. Gas probes of the inner disk The useful probes of gas in the inner disk are...molecules, whose transitions occur in the near- to mid-infrared. Hence, infrared molecular spectroscopy is a prime tool for studying the inner disk gas...CO, H2O, OH and both infrared and UV transitions of H2 (see Najita et al. 2007 for an overview). The infrared transitions of these molecules are

  16. DETERMINING INTERSTELLAR CARBON ABUNDANCES FROM STRONG-LINE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, U. J.; Parvathi, V. S.; Babu, B. R. S.; Murthy, J.

    2011-01-15

    Carbon is arguably the most important element in the interstellar medium, yet its abundance in gas and dust is poorly understood due to a paucity of data. We explore the possibility of substantially increasing our knowledge of interstellar carbon by applying and assessing a new method for determining the column density of the dominant ion of interstellar carbon in diffuse neutral lines of sight. The method relies on profile fitting of the strong transition of C II at 1334 A in spectra continuum normalized with stellar models. We apply our method to six sight lines for which the carbon abundance has previously been determined with a weak intersystem absorption transition. Our strong-line method consistently shows a significantly lower gas-phase C abundance than the measurements from the weak lines. This result implies that more carbon could reside in dust than was previously thought. This has implications for dust models, which often suffer from a lack of sufficient carbon to plausibly explain extinction. There is no immediately clear explanation for the difference found between the strong- and weak-line C II determinations, but there are indications that the results from the method presented here have advantages over the weak-line column densities. If this is the case, then the reported oscillator strength for the C II transition at 2325 A may be too small. Our findings further suggest that damping wings modeled with a single absorption component may not produce accurate abundances. This problem could affect a large number of H I abundances determined through absorption line analysis that are reported in the literature.

  17. The origin of the most iron-poor star

    SciTech Connect

    Marassi, S.; Schneider, R.; Limongi, M.; Omukai, K.; Nozawa, T.; Chieffi, A.

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the origin of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars starting from the recently discovered [Fe/H] < -7.1 star SMSS J031300. We show that the elemental abundances observed on the surface of SMSS J031300 can be well fit by the yields of faint, metal-free, supernovae (SNe). Using properly calibrated faint SN explosion models, we study, for the first time, the formation of dust grains in such carbon-rich, iron-poor SN ejecta. Calculations are performed assuming both unmixed and uniformly mixed ejecta and taking into account the partial destruction by the SN reverse shock. We find that, due to the paucity of refractory elements beside carbon, amorphous carbon is the only grain species to form, with carbon condensation efficiencies that range between (0.15 and 0.84), resulting in dust yields in the range (0.025-2.25) M {sub ☉}. We follow the collapse and fragmentation of a star-forming cloud enriched by the products of these faint SN explosions and we explore the role played by fine structure line cooling and dust cooling. We show that even if grain growth during the collapse has a minor effect of the dust-to-gas ratio, due to C depletion into CO molecules at an early stage of the collapse, the formation of CEMP low-mass stars, such as SMSS J031300, could be triggered by dust cooling and fragmentation. A comparison between model predictions and observations of a sample of C-normal and C-rich metal-poor stars supports the idea that a single common pathway may be responsible for the formation of the first low-mass stars.

  18. Star formation sustained by gas accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulations predict that metal-poor gas accretion from the cosmic web fuels the formation of disk galaxies. This paper discusses how cosmic gas accretion controls star formation, and summarizes the physical properties expected for the cosmic gas accreted by galaxies. The paper also collects observational evidence for gas accretion sustaining star formation. It reviews evidence inferred from neutral and ionized hydrogen, as well as from stars. A number of properties characterizing large samples of star-forming galaxies can be explained by metal-poor gas accretion, in particular, the relationship among stellar mass, metallicity, and star-formation rate (the so-called fundamental metallicity relationship). They are put forward and analyzed. Theory predicts gas accretion to be particularly important at high redshift, so indications based on distant objects are reviewed, including the global star-formation history of the universe, and the gas around galaxies as inferred from absorption features in the spectra of background sources.

  19. Dilemma continues for resource-poor women.

    PubMed

    Denoon, D J

    1999-09-06

    This article presents the resource-poor women facing a difficult dilemma of making choices regarding breast-feeding. Findings showed that there were 1600 perinatal HIV infections in resource-poor settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. Even prior to zidovudine interventions, a doubling HIV infection risk was found in both HIV-exposed and breast-fed infants, particularly in the first 5 months after birth. Because of these findings, the WHO recommends voluntary HIV testing and counseling for all pregnant women. A study documents that a neonate with nevirapine treatment was found to reduce transmission to about 50%. Further research is needed on infectious unit in breast milk, role of host immunity and genetics, identification of protective factors in breast milk and factors affecting HIV viral load, breast conditions and breast milk substitutes.

  20. Enhancement of imagery in poor visibility conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2005-05-01

    Current still image and video systems are typically of limited use in poor visibility conditions such as in rain, fog, smoke, and haze. These conditions severely limit the range and effectiveness of imaging systems because of the severe reduction in contrast. The NASA Langley Research Center"s Visual Information Processing Group has developed an image enhancement technology based on the concept of a visual servo that has direct applications to the problem of poor visibility conditions. This technology has been used in cases of severe image turbidity in air as well as underwater with dramatic results. Use of this technology could result in greatly improved performance of perimeter surveillance systems, military, security, and law enforcement operations, port security, both on land and below water, and air and sea rescue services, resulting in improved public safety.

  1. Alcohol from corn: poor energy balance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-10

    It is reported that most processing plants producing alcohol from corn currently operate with very unfavourable energy balances. The energy needed to grow and harvest corn plus petroleum or natural gas used in the processing phase often exceeds the energy that can be derived from the alcohol.

  2. Going Global, for Rich and Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jay; Mathews, Linda

    2012-01-01

    International Baccalaureate (IB) programs are turning up in a diverse mix of school districts, an attempt to add rigor and depth. For rich and for poor, for big schools and small ones, IB has become a way to add rigor and depth to public school curricula. But each school district has adapted IB for its own needs. Some use it in all schools for all…

  3. Health practices of the elderly poor.

    PubMed Central

    Lubben, J E; Weiler, P G; Chi, I

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the health practices of the elderly poor and to examine the association between specific health practices and subsequent hospital use. Data came from a sample of 931 Medicaid elderly living in California. Smoking, limited social networks, and lack of regular exercise significantly increased the odds of subsequent hospital utilization. Implications of these findings, which could benefit health promotion intervention and treatment programs for the elderly, were discussed. PMID:2658629

  4. Poorly differentiated (anaplastic) seminoma of the testis.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, A G; Vugrin, D; Batata, M; Hajdu, S; Whitmore, W F

    1984-05-01

    Anaplastic seminoma constitutes approximately 17% of total experience with seminoma at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Among 25 previously untreated patients, 11 (44%) were clinical Stage I, and 14 (56%) were clinical Stage II or III. Treatment of these 25 patients with the same regimens employed for classical seminoma yielded an overall 80% 5-year apparent cure rate. Survival rates were poor in eight previously treated patients referred with recurrence.

  5. The Complexity that the First Stars Brought to the Universe: Fragility of Metal-enriched Gas in a Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykutalp, A.; Spaans, M.

    2011-08-01

    The initial mass function (IMF) of the first (Population III) stars and Population II (Pop II) stars is poorly known due to a lack of observations of the period between recombination and reionization. In simulations of the formation of the first stars, it has been shown that, due to the limited ability of metal-free primordial gas to cool, the IMF of the first stars is a few orders of magnitude more massive than the current IMF. The transition from a high-mass IMF of the first stars to a lower-mass current IMF is thus important to understand. To study the underlying physics of this transition, we performed several simulations using the cosmological hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo for metallicities of 10-4, 10-3, 10-2, and 10-1 Z sun. In our simulations, we include a star formation prescription that is derived from a metallicity-dependent multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM) structure, an external UV radiation field, and a mechanical feedback algorithm. We also implement cosmic ray heating, photoelectric heating, and gas-dust heating/cooling, and follow the metal enrichment of the ISM. It is found that the interplay between metallicity and UV radiation leads to the coexistence of Pop III and Pop II star formation in non-zero-metallicity (Z/Z sun >= 10-2) gas. A cold (T < 100 K) and dense (ρ > 10-22 g cm-3) gas phase is fragile to ambient UV radiation. In a metal-poor (Z/Z sun <= 10-3) gas, the cold and dense gas phase does not form in the presence of a radiation field of F 0 ~ 10-5-10-4 erg cm-2 s-1. Therefore, metallicity by itself is not a good indicator of the Pop III-Pop II transition. Metal-rich (Z/Z sun >= 10-2) gas dynamically evolves two to three orders of magnitude faster than metal-poor gas (Z/Z sun <= 10-3). The simulations including supernova explosions show that pre-enrichment of the halo does not affect the mixing of metals.

  6. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  7. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  8. Sliding Over a Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe E.

    2011-03-01

    The frictional response experienced by a stick-slip slider when a phase transition occurs in the underlying solid substrate is a potentially exciting, poorly explored problem. We show, based on 2-dimensional simulations modeling the sliding of a nanotip, that indeed friction may be heavily affected by a continuous structural transition. First, friction turns nonmonotonic as temperature crosses the transition, peaking at the critical temperature Tc where fluctuations are strongest. Second, below Tc friction depends upon order parameter directions, and is much larger for those where the frictional slip can cause a local flip. This may open a route towards control of atomic scale friction by switching the order parameter direction by an external field or strain, with possible application to e.g., displacive ferroelectrics such as BaTi O3 , as well as ferro- and antiferro-distortive materials. Supported by project ESF FANAS/AFRI sponsored by the Italian Research Council (CNR).

  9. Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    2000-11-07

    In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

  10. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  11. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  12. Breeding Super-Earths and Birthing Super-puffs in Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-02-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1-4R⊕, 2-20M⊕) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earths formed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many (in one case up to 9) orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can still robustly emerge after ˜0.1-1 Myr with percent-by-weight atmospheres. Super-Earth cores are naturally bred in gas-poor environments where gas dynamical friction has weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to gravitationally stir one another and merge. So little gas is present at the time of core assembly that cores hardly migrate by disk torques: formation of super-Earths can be in situ. The basic picture—that close-in super-Earths form in a gas-poor (but not gas-empty) inner disk, fed continuously by gas that bleeds inward from a more massive outer disk—recalls the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4-10R⊕, 2-6M⊕). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ˜1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths, which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content. We close by confronting observations and itemizing remaining questions.

  13. BREEDING SUPER-EARTHS AND BIRTHING SUPER-PUFFS IN TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu

    2016-02-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1–4R{sub ⊕}, 2–20M{sub ⊕}) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earths formed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many (in one case up to 9) orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can still robustly emerge after ∼0.1–1 Myr with percent-by-weight atmospheres. Super-Earth cores are naturally bred in gas-poor environments where gas dynamical friction has weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to gravitationally stir one another and merge. So little gas is present at the time of core assembly that cores hardly migrate by disk torques: formation of super-Earths can be in situ. The basic picture—that close-in super-Earths form in a gas-poor (but not gas-empty) inner disk, fed continuously by gas that bleeds inward from a more massive outer disk—recalls the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4–10R{sub ⊕}, 2–6M{sub ⊕}). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ∼1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths, which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content. We close by confronting observations and itemizing remaining questions.

  14. A 'Scottish Poor Law of Lunacy'? Poor Law, Lunacy Law and Scotland's parochial asylums.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    Scotland's parochial asylums are unfamiliar institutional spaces. Representing the concrete manifestation of the collision between two spheres of legislation, the Poor Law and the Lunacy Law, six such asylums were constructed in the latter half of the nineteenth century. These sites expressed the enduring mandate of the Scottish Poor Law 1845 over the domain of 'madness'. They were institutions whose very existence was fashioned at the directive of the local arm of the Poor Law, the parochial board, and they constituted a continuing 'Scottish Poor Law of Lunacy'. Their origins and operation significantly subverted the intentions and objectives of the Lunacy Act 1857, the aim of which had been to institute a public district asylum network with nationwide coverage.

  15. Asthma Care in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in low-to middle-income countries is at least the same or higher than in rich countries, but with increased severity. Lack of control in these settings is due to various factors such as low accessibility to effective medications, multiple and uncoordinated weak infrastructures of medical services for the management of chronic diseases such as asthma, poor compliance with prescribed therapy, lack of asthma education, and social and cultural factors. There is an urgent requirement for the implementation of better ways to treat asthma in underserved populations, enhancing the access to preventive medications and educational approaches with modern technological methods. PMID:23282401

  16. India ink incorporated multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets for photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality imaging and photoacoustic effect based tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms-conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic, and ultrasound imaging contrasts, but also a new avenue for photoacoustic effect mediated tumor therapy. Upon pulsed laser illumination above a relatively low energy threshold, liquid-gas phase transition of the INDs has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, offering excellent contrasts for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging. With further increased laser energy, the nanodroplets have been shown to be capable of destructing cancer cells in vivo, presumably due to the photoacoustic effect induced shock-wave generation from the carbon particles of the incorporated India ink. The demonstrated results suggest that the developed multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets have a great potential for many theranostic biomedical applications, including photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality molecular imaging and targeted, localized cancer therapy.

  17. Unusually gas-rich central galaxies in small groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven; xGASS Team

    2017-01-01

    Observations of gas in galaxies have shown dramatic differences between rich clusters and isolated field environments. However, pre-processing in intermediate group environments is expected to be responsible for much of the transformation between gas-rich blue and gas-poor red galaxies. We investigate this by taking advantage of the deepest observations to date of atomic and molecular gas in local galaxies from the GASS and COLD GASS surveys and their extensions to low stellar masses. This sample is uniquely suited to quantify gas and star formation properties of galaxies across environments, reaching the gas-poor regime of groups and clusters. We find that central galaxies in small groups are unusually gas rich and star-forming, compared to isolated galaxies. Below log Mst/Msun = 10, gas-poor group central galaxies are rare. We suggest that these central galaxies are being fed by the filaments of the cosmic web.

  18. Electronic transitions of palladium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, Zhihua; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-11-21

    The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been observed and analyzed. The gas-phase Pd{sub 2} molecule was produced by laser ablation of palladium metal rod. Eleven vibrational bands were observed and assigned to the [17.1] {sup 3}II{sub g} - X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} transition system. The bond length (r{sub o}) and vibrational frequency (ΔG{sub 1/2}) of the ground X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} state were determined to be 2.47(4) Å and 211.4(5) cm{sup −1}, respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram was used to understand the observed ground and excited electronic states. This is the first gas-phase experimental investigation of the electronic transitions of Pd{sub 2}.

  19. Oxygen Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulbright, J. P.

    1999-05-01

    The oxygen abundances of metal-poor late-type stars can be obtained by one four methods: 1) the [O I] forbidden lines at 6300 and 6363 Angstroms, 2) the O I triplet at 7774 Angstroms, 3) OH lines at 3100-3150 Angstroms, and 4) IR CO and OH bands. Each of these methods have their strengths and weaknesses, and finding common agreement between the methods has sometimes been elusive. Recently two groups (Israelian et al, 1998, ApJ, 507, 805 and Boesgaard et al, 1999, AJ, 117, 492) have presented results from the UV OH lines and the O I triplet that suggest that the [O/Fe]-ratio continues to increase as [Fe/H] decreases. This differs from the 'traditional' result that held that [O/Fe] plateaus at +0.5 as [Fe/H] decreases. Conversely, Fulbright and Kraft (AJ, July 1999) show that in two very metal-poor stars the [O I] 6300 Angstroms line gives abundances 0.5 dex lower than obtained in the above studies. In this talk, I hope to discuss these papers and speculate on potental causes to the discrepency.

  20. Melt extrusion with poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sejal; Maddineni, Sindhuri; Lu, Jiannan; Repka, Michael A

    2013-08-30

    Melt extrusion (ME) over recent years has found widespread application as a viable drug delivery option in the drug development process. ME applications include taste masking, solid-state stability enhancement, sustained drug release and solubility enhancement. While ME can result in amorphous or crystalline solid dispersions depending upon several factors, solubility enhancement applications are centered around generating amorphous dispersions, primarily because of the free energy benefits they offer. In line with the purview of the current issue, this review assesses the utility of ME as a means of enhancing solubility of poorly soluble drugs/chemicals. The review describes major processing aspects of ME technology, definition and understanding of the amorphous state, manufacturability, analytical characterization and biopharmaceutical performance testing to better understand the strength and weakness of this formulation strategy for poorly soluble drugs. In addition, this paper highlights the potential advantages of employing a fusion of techniques, including pharmaceutical co-crystals and spray drying/solvent evaporation, facilitating the design of formulations of API exhibiting specific physico-chemical characteristics. Finally, the review presents some successful case studies of commercialized ME based products.

  1. Low Gas Fractions Connect Compact Star-Forming Galaxies to their z~2 Quiescent Descendants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Justin; Bezanson, Rachel; Marrone, Daniel P.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Williams, Christina C.

    2017-01-01

    Early quiescent galaxies at z ~ 2 are known to be remarkably compact compared to their nearby counterparts. Possible progenitors of these systems include galaxies that are structurally similar, but are still rapidly forming stars. I will present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the CO(1-0) line towards three such compact, star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.3, significantly detecting one. The VLA observations indicate baryonic gas fractions 5 times lower and gas depletion times 10 times shorter than normal, extended massive star-forming galaxies at these redshifts. At their current star formation rates, all three objects will deplete their gas reservoirs within 100Myr. These objects are among the most gas-poor objects observed at z > 2 and are outliers from standard gas scaling relations, a result which remains true regardless of assumptions about the CO-H2 conversion factor. Our observations are consistent with the idea that compact, star-forming galaxies are in a rapid state of transition to quiescence in tandem with the build-up of the z ~ 2 quenched population. In the detected compact galaxy, we see no evidence of rotation or that the CO-emitting gas is spatially extended relative to the stellar light. This casts doubt on recent suggestions that the gas in these compact galaxies is rotating and significantly extended compared to the stars. Instead, we suggest that, at least for this object, the gas is centrally concentrated, and only traces a small fraction of the total galaxy dynamical mass. I will conclude by discussing my ongoing efforts to characterize the gas and star forming properties of this unusual population of galaxies.

  2. Is there a basin-centered gas accumulation in Cotton Valley Group Sandstones, Gulf Coast Basin, U.S.A.?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartberger, Charles E.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Condon, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    high permeabilities and high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation indicate that fi elds in this trend are conventional. Within the tight massive-sandstone trend, permeability is suffi ciently low that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts either have not been encountered or are poorly defi ned. With increasing depth through these transition zones, gas saturation decreases and water saturation increases until eventually gas saturations become suffi ciently low that, in terms of ultimate cumulative production, wells are noncommercial. Such progressive increase in water saturation with depth suggests that poorly defi ned gas-water contacts probably are present below the depth at which wells become noncommercial. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the tight, Cotton Valley massive-sandstone trend suggests that gas accumulations in this trend, too, are conventional, and that a basin-centered gas accumulation does not exist within Cotton Valley sandstones in the northern Gulf Basin.

  3. How poor are women in rural India?

    PubMed

    Rajuladevi, A K

    1992-07-01

    The assessment of poor women in India as dependent and exploited regardless of poverty focused strategies is reflected in this review of relevant literature. The scholarly approaches to the problems of poor women involve redirection and expansion of resources to women (increase bank credit) through policy and institutional changes, and involve improving women's welfare through changes in class and gender hierarchies; both pertain to restructuring power groups. A little ascribed to belief is that the organization of women's numbers will empower women; the constraints are stated. There is also some argument over whether to design women-specific programs or integrate women into existing programs; some examples are given of successes and difficulties. The regionalization of poverty in eastern and central India is discussed. The growth of the poor has been among the landless, wage-dependent households. 9.6% of households (7.5 million) are headed by women. Women work fewer hours and at lower wage scales and have fewer employment opportunities. Lower earnings are coupled with differentials in demand for female and male labor in agriculture and a crowded labor market. There is a concentration of women in less visible, nonmonetary subsistence production and domestic work. Women are undercounted in employment studies. Women predominate in agricultural activity. Women's status is influenced by economic status, caste, and ethnic background. Domestic work increases status for women and households. The poorer households have greater labor force participation, particularly as wage laborers rather than unpaid family workers. Regional factors affecting rural household strategies are factors affecting the economy (topography, rainfall, climate) and the degree of development, plus sociocultural variables (kinship and religious beliefs which affect the social domain of women), and the degree of dependence on hired vs. family labor. There are sharp contrasts in the value and survival

  4. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  5. Interpreting Gas Production Decline Curves By Combining Geometry and Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. P.; Hu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas production forms an increasing fraction of domestic US energy supplies, but individual gas production wells show steep production declines. Better understanding of this production decline would allow better economic forecasting; better understanding of the reasons behind the decline would allow better production management. Yet despite these incentives, production declines curves remain poorly understood, and current analyses range from Arps' purely empirical equation to new sophisticated approaches requiring multiple unavailable parameters. Models often fail to capture salient features: for example, in log-log space many wells decline with an exponent markedly different from the -0.5 expected from diffusion, and often show a transition from one decline mode to another. We propose a new approach based on the assumption that the rate-limiting step is gas movement from the matrix to the induced fracture network. The matrix is represented as an assemblage of equivalent spheres (geometry), with low matrix pore connectivity (topology) that results in a distance-dependent accessible porosity profile given by percolation theory. The basic theory has just 2 parameters: the sphere size distribution (geometry), and the crossover distance (topology) that characterizes the porosity distribution. The theory is readily extended to include e.g. alternative geometries and bi-modal size distributions. Comparisons with historical data are promising.

  6. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice.

  7. Periodontal disease and poor obstetrical outcome.

    PubMed

    Carta, G; Persia, G; Falciglia, K; Iovenitti, P

    2004-01-01

    Maternal infective processes sustained especially by Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria like periodontal disease, during pregnancy, have been demonstrated to perturb the physiologic course of parturition through inflammatory cytokine production, sometimes resulting in preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm low birth weight. In a matched case-control study, the hypothesis that poor oral health of pregnant women is a risk factor for low birth weight (LBW) was evaluated. Gingival crevicular fluid levels of PGE2 and IL-1beta were measured in order to determine whether mediator levels were related to current pregnancy outcome. Results indicate that GCF-PGE2 and GCF-IL-1beta levels are significantly higher in preterm low birth weight (PLBW) mothers as compared with normal birth weight controls. The data confirm that there is a possible correlation between periodontal problems typical of pregnancy and the occurrence of complications such as preterm low birth weight.

  8. Pfizer donates drug to South Africa's poor.

    PubMed

    This article reports on Pfizer's AIDS drug donation to South Africa. The donated drug, Diflucan, treats cryptococcal meningitis, a lethal brain infection that occurs in one out of 10 HIV patients. Its daily dose in South Africa costs about US$15, far more than poor people can afford. The HIV and AIDS Treatment Action Campaign, an advocacy group, had lobbied New York-based Pfizer for a year to reduce the drug's price. The donation offered hope among activists that other pharmaceutical companies would follow suit and offer HIV- and AIDS-related drugs at a discount or for free. After the announcement of the donation, the group is now lobbying Glaxo Wellcome, maker of Zidovudine. The group is asking to make the drug available for free to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. Glaxo Wellcome, however, has no plans of offering Zidovudine for free, although the drug was offered 75% cheaper in developing nations.

  9. The dust in the hydrogen-poor ejecta of Abell 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Harrington, J. Patrick; Blair, William P.; Bregman, Jesse D.

    1994-01-01

    We present new optical and near-infrared images of the hydrogen-poor planetary nebula Abell 30 and produce detailed models that account for the major observed morphological and IR properties. By imaging the nebula in the K band, we confirm the presence of hot dust in an expanding equatorial ring of H-poor gas. No emission was detected from the H-poor polar knots, suggesting a dust deficiency htere relative to the equatorial ring. The near-IR emission is attributed to small carbonaceous dust grains which are stochastically heated by stellar ultraviolet photons. Using an adaptive version of a matrix method devised by Guhathakurta & Draine (1989) to model stochastic heating, we find that the near-IR spectrum observed by Dinerstein & Lester (1984) requires the presence of dust grains down to approximately 0.0007 microns in radius. This minimum grain radius is in excellent agreement with our calculations of the grain destruction by energetic stellar UV photons: we find that carbon clusters with less than approximately 140 atoms (0.0007 microns in radius) are destroyed by stellar UV photons in approximately 1000 yr, the kinematic age of H-poor ejecta. Modeling of the far-IR dust emission implies that the bulk of the dust mass in A30 must reside at distances several times greater than the distance of the equatorial ring from the central star. This spatial dust distribution is attributed to the interaction of the stellar wind with the inhomogeneous H-poor ejecta. Most of the H-poor gas and dust has been apparently carried outward by the stellar wind, leaving behing dense, H-poor knots with prominent wind-blown tails in the equatorial ring and in the polar knots. This picture is supported by the presence of a stellar wind-blown bubble within the H-rich envelope in our optical images.

  10. Hybrid Electric Transit Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    A government, industry, and university cooperative is developing an advanced hybrid electric city transit bus. Goals of this effort include doubling the fuel economy compared to current buses and reducing emissions to one-tenth of current EPA standards. Unique aspects of the vehicle's power system include the use of ultra-capacitors as an energy storage system, and a planned natural gas fueled turbogenerator developed from a small jet engine. Power from both the generator and energy storage system is provided to a variable speed electric motor attached to the rear axle. At over 15000 kg gross weight, this is the largest vehicle of its kind ever built using ultra-capacitor energy storage. This paper describes the overall power system architecture, the evolution of the control strategy, and its performance over industry standard drive cycles.

  11. Deep Imaging of Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding whether the most metal-poor and actively star-forming galaxies in the local universe such as I Zw 18 contain evolved stars. We propose to help settle this issue by obtaining deep ACS/HRC U, narrow-V, I, and H-alpha images of nine nearby {z < 0.01} extremely metal-poor {12 + O/H < 7.65} galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These objects are only marginally resolved from the ground and appear uniformly blue, strongly motivating HST imaging. The continuum images will establish: 1.} If underlying populations of evolved stars are present, by revealing the objects' colors on scales 10 pc, and 2.} The presence of any faint tidal features, dust lanes, and globular or super star clusters, all of which constrain the objects' evolutionary states. The H-alpha images, in combination with ground-based echelle spectroscopy, will reveal 1.} Whether the objects are producing "superwinds" that are depleting them of their metals; ground-based images of some of them indeed show large halos of ionized gas, and 2.} The correspondence of their nebular and stellar emission on scales of a few parsecs, which is important for understanding the "feedback" process by which supernovae and stellar winds regulate star formation. One of the sample objects, CGCG 269-049, lies only 2 Mpc away, allowing the detection of individual red giant stars in it if any are present. We have recently obtained Spitzer images and spectra of this galaxy to determine its dust content and star formation history, which will complement the proposed HST observations. [NOTE: THIS PROPOSAL WAS REDUCED TO FIVE ORBITS, AND ONLY ONE OF THE ORIGINAL TARGETS, CGCG 269-049, AFTER THE PHASE I REVIEW

  12. "Managing" the poor: neoliberalism, Medicaid HMOs and the triumph of consumerism among the poor.

    PubMed

    Maskovsky, J

    2000-10-01

    In order to explore the contradictions of neoliberal health policy, this article examines Medicaid managed care in Philadelphia. At the federal and state levels, government is increasingly promoting private-sector market-based strategies over policies formerly associated with the welfare state, arguing that the former are the most effective means of achieving economic growth and guaranteeing social welfare. A prime example of this shift, Medicaid managed care is a policy by which states contract with private-sector health maintenance organizations to provide health coverage to the poor. Drawing on ethnographic and historical data, this paper shows how Pennsylvania's Medicaid managed care program has created access barriers for poor Philadelphians. It also illustrates how ideologies that justify this policy shift serve to mask its detrimental effects on the poor. By contrasting the state's consumerist model with one group's protest efforts, this article calls into question the neoliberal ideology that undergirds health and welfare "reform."

  13. Breeding Super-Earths and Birthing Super-Puffs in Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-12-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1--4 Earth radii, 2--20 Earth masses) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earthsformed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can robustly emerge with percent-by-weight atmospheres after ~0.1--1 Myr. We propose that 1) close-in super-Earths form in situ, because their cores necessarily coagulate in gas-poor environments—gas dynamical friction must be weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to cross orbits and merge; 2) super- Earths acquire their atmospheres from ambient wisps of gas that are supplied from a diffusing outer disk. The formation environment is reminiscent of the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also 3) address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short- period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4--10 Earth radii, 2--6 Earth masses). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ~1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content.

  14. Poor-data and data-poor species stock assessment using a Bayesian hierarchical approach.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yan; Cortés, Enric; Andrews, Kate; Guo, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Appropriate inference for stocks or species with low-quality data (poor data) or limited data (data poor) is extremely important. Hierarchical Bayesian methods are especially applicable to small-area, small-sample-size estimation problems because they allow poor-data species to borrow strength from species with good-quality data. We used a hammerhead shark complex as an example to investigate the advantages of using hierarchical Bayesian models in assessing the status of poor-data and data-poor exploited species. The hammerhead shark complex (Sphyrna spp.) along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the United States is composed of three species: the scalloped hammerhead (S. lewini), the great hammerhead (S. mokarran), and the smooth hammerhead (S. zygaena) sharks. The scalloped hammerhead comprises 70-80% of the catch and has catch and relative abundance data of good quality, whereas great and smooth hammerheads have relative abundance indices that are both limited and of low quality presumably because of low stock density and limited sampling. Four hierarchical Bayesian state-space surplus production models were developed to simulate variability in population growth rates, carrying capacity, and catchability of the species. The results from the hierarchical Bayesian models were considerably more robust than those of the nonhierarchical models. The hierarchical Bayesian approach represents an intermediate strategy between traditional models that assume different population parameters for each species and those that assume all species share identical parameters. Use of the hierarchical Bayesian approach is suggested for future hammerhead shark stock assessments and for modeling fish complexes with species-specific data, because the poor-data species can borrow strength from the species with good data, making the estimation more stable and robust.

  15. GAS BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  16. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  17. Rich and Poor Cities in Europe. An Urban Scaling Approach to Mapping the European Economic Transition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the urban science make broad use of the notion of scaling. We focus here on the important scaling relationship between the gross metropolitan product (GMP) of a city and its population (pop). It has been demonstrated that GMP ∝ Y Ypopβ with β always greater than 1 and close to 1.2. This fundamental finding highlights a universal rule that holds across countries and cultures and might explain the very nature of cities. However, in an increasingly connected world, the hypothesis that the economy of a city solely depends on its population might be questionable. Using data for 248 cities in the European Union between 2005 and 2010, we found a double GMP/pop scaling regime. For West EU cities, β = 1 over the whole the period, while for post-communist cities β > 1 and increases from ∼1.2 to ∼1.4. The evolution of the scaling exponent describes the convergence of post-communist European cities to open and liberal economies. We propose a simple model of economic convergence in which, under stable political conditions, a linear GMP/pop scaling is expected for all cities. The results suggest that the GMP/pop super-linear scaling represents a phase of economic growth rather than a steady, universal urban feature. The results also suggest that relationships between cities are embedded in their political and economic context and cannot be neglected in explanations of cities, urbanization and urban economics. PMID:27551719

  18. Rich and Poor Cities in Europe. An Urban Scaling Approach to Mapping the European Economic Transition.

    PubMed

    Strano, Emanuele; Sood, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the urban science make broad use of the notion of scaling. We focus here on the important scaling relationship between the gross metropolitan product (GMP) of a city and its population (pop). It has been demonstrated that GMP ∝ Y Ypopβ with β always greater than 1 and close to 1.2. This fundamental finding highlights a universal rule that holds across countries and cultures and might explain the very nature of cities. However, in an increasingly connected world, the hypothesis that the economy of a city solely depends on its population might be questionable. Using data for 248 cities in the European Union between 2005 and 2010, we found a double GMP/pop scaling regime. For West EU cities, β = 1 over the whole the period, while for post-communist cities β > 1 and increases from ∼1.2 to ∼1.4. The evolution of the scaling exponent describes the convergence of post-communist European cities to open and liberal economies. We propose a simple model of economic convergence in which, under stable political conditions, a linear GMP/pop scaling is expected for all cities. The results suggest that the GMP/pop super-linear scaling represents a phase of economic growth rather than a steady, universal urban feature. The results also suggest that relationships between cities are embedded in their political and economic context and cannot be neglected in explanations of cities, urbanization and urban economics.

  19. Transitional Boundary Layers Under the Influence of High Free Stream Turbulence, Intensive Wall Cooling and High Pressure Gradients in Hot Gas Circulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rued, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for fundamental experimental studies of the influence of free stream turbulence, pressure gradients and wall cooling are discussed. Under turbine-like free stream conditions, comprehensive tests of transitional boundary layers with laminar, reversing and turbulent flow increments were performed to decouple the effects of the parameters and to determine the effects during mutual interaction.

  20. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  1. Gas Chromatograph.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Patents, * Gas chromotography , *Hydrocarbons, *Carbon monoxide, *Carbon dioxide, *Water, Field equipment, Portable equipment, Sensitivity, Halogenated hydrocarbons, Test methods, Gases, Liquids, Purity

  2. Gas magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of a precessional rate of a gas, such as an alkali gas, in a magnetic field is made by promoting a non-uniform precession of the gas in which substantially no net magnetic field affects the gas during a majority of the precession cycle. This allows sensitive gases that would be subject to spin-exchange collision de-phasing to be effectively used for extremely sensitive measurements in the presence of an environmental magnetic field such as the Earth's magnetic field.

  3. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  4. Restructuring Energy Industries: Lessons from Natural Gas

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    For the past 20 years, the natural gas industry has been undergoing a restructuring similar to the transition now confronting the electric power industry. This article presents a summary of some of these gas industry experiences to provide a basis for some insights into energy industry restructuring.

  5. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  6. Pulsating Blue Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, George W.; Landolt, Arlo U.

    1999-12-01

    The blue metal-poor (BMP) star CS 22966-043 is an SX Phoenicis star and the primary of a spectroscopic binary with a provisional orbital period of ~430 days. Radial velocity and UBV photometric observations of this star made in 1998 require downward revision of the orbital period to 319 days. The BMP star CS 29499-057 also appears to be an SX Phoenicis star with small amplitude (ΔV~0.04 mag) and short period (P=0.0417 days), on the basis of photometric and radial velocity observations obtained in 1998. There is some indication that it too may be the primary of a spectroscopic binary. Three other BMP stars have radial velocity standard deviations greater than those of 17 BMP radial velocity standards. We suggest that they may be small-amplitude SX Phoenicis stars. Finally, the BMP star CS 29497-017 is shown to be a short-period velocity variable (P=0.302 days) on the basis of observations accumulated over an interval of 2200 days, but we were unable to detect a light variation in 1998 July. Therefore, the nature of the velocity variation of this object remains uncertain.

  7. Poor oral health and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Joshipura, K J; Rimm, E B; Douglass, C W; Trichopoulos, D; Ascherio, A; Willett, W C

    1996-09-01

    A few recent studies have shown associations between poor oral health and coronary heart disease (CHD). The objective of this study was to examine the incidence of CHD in relation to number of teeth present and periodontal disease, and to explore potential mediators of this association, in a prospective cohort study. This study is a part of the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). Participants included a US national sample of 44,119 male health professionals (58% of whom were dentists), from 40 to 75 years of age, who reported no diagnosed CHD, cancer, or diabetes at baseline. We recorded 757 incident cases of CHD, including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and sudden death, in six years of follow-up. Among men who reported pre-existing periodontal disease, those with 10 or fewer teeth were at increased risk of CHD compared with men with 25 or more teeth (relative risk = 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 2.71), after adjustment for standard CHD risk factors. Among men without pre-existing periodontal disease, no relationship was found (relative risk = 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 1.68). The associations were only slightly attenuated after we controlled for dietary factors. No overall associations were found between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease. Tooth loss may be associated with increased risk of CHD, primarily among those with a positive periodontal disease history; diet was only a small mediator of this association.

  8. Low Gas Fractions Connect Compact Star-forming Galaxies to Their z ~ 2 Quiescent Descendants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Justin S.; Bezanson, Rachel; Marrone, Daniel P.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Williams, Christina C.

    2016-11-01

    Early quiescent galaxies at z˜ 2 are known to be remarkably compact compared to their nearby counterparts. Possible progenitors of these systems include galaxies that are structurally similar, but are still rapidly forming stars. Here, we present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the CO(1-0) line toward three such compact, star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z˜ 2.3, significantly detecting one. The VLA observations indicate baryonic gas fractions ≳ 5 times lower and gas depletion timescales ≳ 10 times shorter than normal, extended massive SFGs at these redshifts. At their current star formation rates, all three objects will deplete their gas reservoirs within 100 Myr. These objects are among the most gas-poor objects observed at z\\gt 2, and are outliers from standard gas scaling relations, a result that remains true regardless of assumptions about the CO-H2 conversion factor. Our observations are consistent with the idea that compact, SFGs are in a rapid state of transition to quiescence in tandem with the buildup of the z˜ 2 quenched population. In the detected compact galaxy, we see no evidence of rotation or that the CO-emitting gas is spatially extended relative to the stellar light. This casts doubt on recent suggestions that the gas in these compact galaxies is rotating and significantly extended compared to the stars. Instead, we suggest that, at least for this object, the gas is centrally concentrated, and only traces a small fraction of the total galaxy dynamical mass.

  9. Towards ab initio extremely metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Extremely metal-poor stars have been the focus of much recent attention owing to the expectation that their chemical abundances can shed light on the metal and dust yields of the earliest supernovae. We present our most realistic simulation to date of the astrophysical pathway to the first metal-enriched stars. We simulate the radiative and supernova hydrodynamic feedback of a 60 M⊙ Population III star starting from cosmological initial conditions realizing Gaussian density fluctuations. We follow the gravitational hydrodynamics of the supernova remnant at high spatial resolution through its freely expanding, adiabatic, and radiative phases, until gas, now metal-enriched, has resumed runaway gravitational collapse. Our findings are surprising: while the Population III progenitor exploded with a low energy of 1051 erg and injected an ample metal mass of 6 M⊙, the first cloud to collapse after the supernova explosion is a dense surviving primordial cloud on which the supernova blast wave deposited metals only superficially, in a thin, unresolved layer. The first metal-enriched stars can form at a very low metallicity, of only 2-5 × 10-4 Z⊙, and can inherit the parent cloud's highly elliptical, radially extended orbit in the dark matter gravitational potential.

  10. Searching for Dust around Hyper Metal Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Divell, Mike; Côté, Stephanie; Lambert, David L.; Starkenburg, Else

    2014-08-01

    We examine the mid-infrared fluxes and spectral energy distributions for stars with iron abundances [Fe/H] <-5, and other metal-poor stars, to eliminate the possibility that their low metallicities are related to the depletion of elements onto dust grains in the formation of a debris disk. Six out of seven stars examined here show no mid-IR excesses. These non-detections rule out many types of circumstellar disks, e.g., a warm debris disk (T <= 290 K), or debris disks with inner radii <=1 AU, such as those associated with the chemically peculiar post-asymptotic giant branch spectroscopic binaries and RV Tau variables. However, we cannot rule out cooler debris disks, nor those with lower flux ratios to their host stars due to, e.g., a smaller disk mass, a larger inner disk radius, an absence of small grains, or even a multicomponent structure, as often found with the chemically peculiar Lambda Bootis stars. The only exception is HE0107-5240, for which a small mid-IR excess near 10 μm is detected at the 2σ level; if the excess is real and associated with this star, it may indicate the presence of (recent) dust-gas winnowing or a binary system.

  11. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasek, Francis W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review covers fundamental developments in gas chromatography during 1982 and 1983. Literature is considered under these headings: columns; liguid phases; solid supports; sorption processes and solvents; open tubular column gas chromatography; instrumentation; high-resolution columns and applications; other techniques; qualitative and…

  12. The LENS Facilities and Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Modeling of Boundary Layer Transition, Shock/Boundary Layer Interaction, Real Gas, Radiation and Plasma Phenomena in Contemporary CFD Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Center Body Mylar Diaphragms Nozzle Throat Evacuated Test Section Test Model Tunnel Loaded, Ready to Fire To Vacuum Tank Tunnel Started by Pressurizing ...Layer Interaction, Real Gas, Radiation and Plasma Phenomena in Contemporary CFD Codes Michael S. Holden, PhD CUBRC, Inc. 4455 Genesee Street Buffalo...Phenomena in Contemporary CFD Codes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  13. Testing Metal-Poor Stellar Models and Isochrones with HST Parallaxes of Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboyer, B.; McArthur, B. E.; O’Malley, E.; Benedict, G. F.; Feiden, G. A.; Harrison, T. E.; McWilliam, A.; Nelan, E. P.; Patterson, R. J.; Sarajedini, A.

    2017-02-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) fine guidance sensor observations were used to obtain parallaxes of eight metal-poor ([Fe/H] < ‑1.4) stars. The parallaxes of these stars determined by the new Hipparcos reduction average 17% accuracy, in contrast to our new HST parallaxes, which average 1% accuracy and have errors on the individual parallaxes ranging from 85 to 144 μas. These parallax data were combined with HST Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry in the F606W and F814W filters to obtain the absolute magnitudes of the stars with an accuracy of 0.02–0.03 mag. Six of these stars are on the main sequence (MS) (with ‑2.7 < [Fe/H] < ‑1.8) and are suitable for testing metal-poor stellar evolution models and determining the distances to metal-poor globular clusters (GCs). Using the abundances obtained by O’Malley et al., we find that standard stellar models using the VandenBerg & Clem color transformation do a reasonable job of matching five of the MS stars, with HD 54639 ([Fe/H] = ‑2.5) being anomalous in its location in the color–magnitude diagram. Stellar models and isochrones were generated using a Monte Carlo analysis to take into account uncertainties in the models. Isochrones that fit the parallax stars were used to determine the distances and ages of nine GCs (with ‑2.4 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ ‑1.9). Averaging together the age of all nine clusters led to an absolute age of the oldest, most metal-poor GCs of 12.7 ± 1.0 Gyr, where the quoted uncertainty takes into account the known uncertainties in the stellar models and isochrones, along with the uncertainty in the distance and reddening of the clusters.

  14. Chronic Pain More Likely for Poor, Less Educated

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163650.html Chronic Pain More Likely for Poor, Less Educated: Study Researchers ... 17, 2017 FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pain is much more common among poor, less educated ...

  15. Factors predicting poor prognosis in ischemic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Añón, Ramón; Boscá, Marta Maia; Sanchiz, Vicente; Tosca, Joan; Almela, Pedro; Amorós, Cirilo; Benages, Adolfo

    2006-01-01

    ). Stenosis was the only endoscopic finding that appeared more frequently in seriously ill patients than in slightly ill patients (66.6% vs 17.3%, P = 0.017). CONCLUSION: The factors that can predict poor prognosis of IC are the absence of hematochezia, tachycardia and peritonism, anemia and hyponatremia and stenosis. PMID:16937472

  16. Topological Lifshitz transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    Different types of Lifshitz transitions are governed by topology in momentum space. They involve the topological transitions with the change of topology of Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, nodal lines, and also the transitions between the fully gapped states.

  17. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  18. Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    1999-05-01

    The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

  19. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cram, Stuart P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Selects fundamental developments in theory, methodology, and instrumentation in gas chromatography (GC). A special section reviews GC in the People's Republic of China. Over 1,000 references are cited. (CS)

  20. Volcanic Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards Tephra/Ash Lava Flows Lahars Volcanic Gas Climate Change Pyroclastic Flows Volcanic Landslides Preparedness Volcano Hazard Zones ... Please see our discussion of volcanic gases and climate change for additional information. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is ...

  1. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the ... share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory ...

  2. Advertising and the Poor. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Lawrence

    This monograph examines the impact of media advertising on the poor. The first half of the report discusses research on the conceptual styles of the poor, mass communication among the poor, and advertising and the low-income consumer. The second half describes the methodology and results of a study of the advertising evaluation capacity and…

  3. Orthographic Processing and Visual Sequential Memory in Unexpectedly Poor Spellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Malone, Aisling M.; Redenbach, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Does unexpectedly poor spelling in adults result from inferior visual sequential memory? In one experiment, unexpectedly poor spellers performed significantly worse than better spellers in the immediate reproduction of sequences of visual symbols, but in a second experiment, the effect was not replicated. Poor spellers were also no worse at the…

  4. Laboring for Less: Working but Poor in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Isaac

    Most of the nonmetropolitan poor live in a household with at least one worker. In 1987, 70% of nonmetro poor family heads who were not ill, disabled, or retired worked for at least part of the year, and 24% worked full time, year-round. The employed proportion of the poor was significantly larger in nonmetro than metro areas. Despite a lengthy…

  5. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  6. Discovery of Molecular Gas around HD 131835 in an APEX Molecular Line Survey of Bright Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, A.; Henning, Th.; Juhász, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Balog, Z.; Kóspál, Á.; Pascucci, I.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Vavrek, R.; Curé, M.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Güsten, R.; Kiss, Cs.

    2015-11-01

    Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10-40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30 m radio telescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3-2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk at both 70 and 100 μm, with a characteristic radius of ˜170 AU. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles β Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young (≤40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of a detectable amount of gas in the most massive debris disks around young A-type stars is a common phenomenon. Our current data cannot conclude on the origin of gas in HD 131835. If the gas is secondary, arising from the disruption of planetesimals, then HD 131835 is a comparably young, and in terms of its disk, more massive analog of the β Pic system. However, it is also possible that this system, similar to HD 21997, possesses a hybrid disk, where the gas material is predominantly primordial, while the dust grains are mostly derived from planetesimals.

  7. DISCOVERY OF MOLECULAR GAS AROUND HD 131835 IN AN APEX MOLECULAR LINE SURVEY OF BRIGHT DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Kóspál, Á.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, Cs.; Henning, Th.; Balog, Z.; Juhász, A.; Pascucci, I.; Vavrek, R.; Csengeri, T.; Güsten, R.; Grady, C.

    2015-11-20

    Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10–40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30 m radio telescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3–2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk at both 70 and 100 μm, with a characteristic radius of ∼170 AU. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles β Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young (≤40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of a detectable amount of gas in the most massive debris disks around young A-type stars is a common phenomenon. Our current data cannot conclude on the origin of gas in HD 131835. If the gas is secondary, arising from the disruption of planetesimals, then HD 131835 is a comparably young, and in terms of its disk, more massive analog of the β Pic system. However, it is also possible that this system, similar to HD 21997, possesses a hybrid disk, where the gas material is predominantly primordial, while the dust grains are mostly derived from planetesimals.

  8. Sandia and NJ TRANSIT Authority Developing Resilient Power Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, Charles J.; Ellis, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    Through the memorandum of understanding between the Depratment of Energy (DOE), the New Jersey Transit Authority (NJ Transit), and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, Sandia National Labs is assisting NJ Transit in developing NJ TransitGrid: an electric microgrid that will include a large-scale gas-fired generation facility and distributed energy resources (photovoltaics [PV], energy storage, electric vehicles, combined heat and power [CHP]) to supply reliable power during storms or other times of significant power failure. The NJ TransitGrid was awarded $410M from the Department of Transportation to develop a first-of-its-kind electric microgrid capable of supplying highly-reliable power.

  9. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, A.; Dent, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planetforming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  10. Living under a democracy: participation and its impact on the living conditions of the poor.

    PubMed

    Avritzer, Leonardo

    2010-01-01

    The Brazilian democratization took place between 1985 and 1988. In 1985, the authoritarian power holders transferred political power to civilians, and in 1988, a new democratic constitution was enacted, thus finalizing the transition. The end of the transition triggered processes of participation in different Brazilian cities, such as São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Recife, and Rio de Janeiro. However, only in Porto Alegre could the political context in the postdemocratization period generate a process of reverting priorities, that is to say, of inverting the pattern of democratic participation and the pattern of public investment at the urban level. In this article, I show the social conditions of the poor in the city of Porto Alegre in 1985, explain the emergence of participatory budgeting in the city, and show how democracy made a difference in the living conditions of the urban poor in the city of Porto Alegre. In the second part of the article, I analyze the recent expansion of participatory budgeting in Brazil and its recent expansion to midsize cities. In the final part of the article, I show how new participatory institutions are being introduced at the federal level of government. Participation at the local and national levels is making a difference in the living conditions of the Brazilian poor.

  11. Electronic transitions of yttrium monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biu Wa; Chan, Man-Chor; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2015-11-01

    The electronic transition spectrum of the yttrium monophosphide (YP) molecule in the near infrared region between 715 nm and 880 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The YP molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated yttrium atoms with PH3 gas seeded in argon. Eleven vibrational bands were analyzed and six electronic transitions have been identified, namely the [12.17] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.27] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.44] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.46] Ω = 3 - X3Π2 and [13.40] Ω = 2 - X3Π2 transitions and a [13.69] Ω = 3 - a1Δ2 transition. Least squares fits of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the ground and excited states. The ground state has been determined to be a X3Π2 state and the bond length ro and vibrational separation, ΔG1/2, were determined to be 2.4413 Å and 390.77 cm-1 respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram has been used to aid the assignment of the observed electronic states. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the electronic spectrum of the YP molecule.

  12. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Clampin, M.; Latham, D. W.; Seager, S.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Villasenor, J. S.; Winn, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. In a two-year survey, TESS will monitor more than 500,000 stars for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. No ground-based survey can achieve this feat. A large fraction of TESS target stars will be 30-100 times brighter than those observed by Kepler satellite, and therefore TESS . planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. TESS will make it possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars. TESS will provide prime targets for observation with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future. TESS data will be released with minimal delay (no proprietary period), inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the very nearest and brightest main-sequence stars hosting transiting exoplanets, thus providing future observers with the most favorable targets for detailed investigations.

  13. DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

    2002-03-01

    GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

  14. System for exposing cultured cells to intermittent hypoxia utilizing gas permeable cultureware.

    PubMed

    Polak, Jan; Studer-Rabeler, Karen; McHugh, Holly; Hussain, Mehboob A; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2015-07-01

    Tissue intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs in obstructive sleep apnea, sickle cell anemia, physical exercise and other conditions. Poor gas solubility and slow diffusion through culture media hampers mimicking IH-induced transitions of O(2) in vitro. We aimed to develop a system enabling exposure of cultured cells to IH and to validate such exposure by real-time O(2) measurements and cellular responses. Standard 24-well culture plates and plates with bottoms made from a gas permeable film were placed in a heated cabinet. Desired cycling of O(2) levels was induced using programmable solenoids to purge mixtures of 95% N(2) + 5% CO(2) or 95% O(2) + 5% CO(2). Dissolved oxygen, gas pressure, temperature, and water evaporation were measured during cycling. IH-induced cellular effects were evaluated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and NF-κB luciferase reporters in HEK296 cells and by insulin secretion in rat insulinoma cells. Oxygen cycling in the cabinet was translated into identical changes of O(2) at the well bottom in gas permeable, but not in standard cultureware. Twenty-four hours of IH exposure increased HIF (112%), NF-κB (111%) and insulin secretion (44%). Described system enables reproducible and prolonged IH exposure in cultured cells while controlling for important environmental factors.

  15. High-rangeability ultrasonic gas flowmeter for monitoring flare gas.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, K S

    1989-01-01

    A transit-time ultrasonic gas flowmeter for high-rangeability requirements, such as those encountered in flare-gas flow-metering, is presented. The concept of ray rescue angle for the orientation of the ultrasonic transducers in single-beam transit-time ultrasonic flowmeters is introduced to overcome the problem of ultrasonic beam drift in high-velocity flows. To overcome problems associated with noise at high velocities, a chirp signal is used. To preserve the accuracy of the meter at low velocities near zero flow, a combination of chirp and continuous-wave signals is used to interrogate the flow. Overall system performance is presented, based on results from extensive wind-tunnel tests.

  16. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan, Comp.; Morningstar, Mary E., Comp.

    2009-01-01

    The Tips for Transition contains 134 Transition Tips submitted from all over the country by practitioners. The purpose of the Tips was to identify grassroots transition practices being used by practitioners. Tips are categorized into the following domains: (1) Transition Planning; (2) Student Involvement; (3) Family Involvement; (4) Curriculum and…

  17. Psychologists and the transition from pediatrics to adult healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Monaghan, Maureen C.; Marchak, Jordan Gilleland; Driscoll, Kimberly A.; Hilliard, Marisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Guidelines for optimal transition call for multidisciplinary teams, including psychologists, to address youth and young adults’ multifactorial needs. This study aimed to characterize psychologists’ roles in and barriers to involvement in transition from pediatric to adult healthcare. Methods Psychologists were invited via professional listservs to complete an online survey about practice settings, roles in transition programming, barriers to involvement, and funding sources. Participants also responded to open-ended questions about their experiences in transition programs. Results One hundred participants responded to the survey. Involvement in transition was reported at multiple levels from individual patient care to institutional transition programming, and 65% reported more than one level of involvement. Direct clinical care (88%), transition-related research (50%) and/or leadership (44%) involvement were reported, with 59% reporting more than one role. Respondents often described advocating for their involvement on transition teams. Various sources of funding were reported, yet 23% reported no funding for their work. Barriers to work in transition were common and included healthcare systems issues such as poor coordination among providers or lack of a clear transition plan within the clinic/institution. Conclusions Psychologists assume numerous roles in the transition of adolescents from pediatric to adult healthcare. With training in healthcare transition-related issues, psychologists are ideally positioned to partner with other health professionals to develop and implement transition programs in multi-disciplinary settings, provided healthcare system barriers can be overcome. PMID:26499856

  18. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  19. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  20. Catalytic decomposition of petroleum into natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.; Hightower, J.

    1997-12-01

    Petroleum is believed to be unstable in the earth, decomposing to lighter hydrocarbons at temperatures > 150{degrees}C. Oil and gas deposits support this view: gas/oil ratios and methane concentrations tend to increase with depth above 150{degrees}C. Although oil cracking is suggested and receives wide support, laboratory pyrolysis does not give products resembling natural gas. Moreover, it is doubtful that the light hydrocarbons in wet gas (C{sub 2}-C{sub 4}) could decompose over geologic time to dry gas (>95% methane) without catalytic assistance. We now report the catalytic decomposition of crude oil to a gas indistinguishable from natural gas. Like natural gas in deep basins, it becomes progressively enriched in methane: initially 90% (wet gas) to a final composition of 100% methane (dry gas). To our knowledge, the reaction is unprecedented and unexpectedly robust (conversion of oil to gas is 100% in days, 175{degrees}C) with significant implications regarding the stability of petroleum in sedimentary basins. The existence or nonexistence of oil in the deep subsurface may not depend on the thermal stability of hydrocarbons as currently thought. The critical factor could be the presence of transition metal catalysts which destabilize hydrocarbons and promote their decomposition to natural gas.

  1. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph, a system which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentration of the individual gases, was designed for the Viking Lander. The technology was further developed under National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and funded by Ames Research Center/Stanford as a toxic gas leak detection device. Three researchers on the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. to commercialize the product. It is a battery-powered system consisting of a sensing wand connected to a computerized analyzer. Marketed as the Michromonitor 500, it has a wide range of applications.

  2. Nonperturbative effects on the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2012-04-01

    It is generally believed that a dilute spin-(1)/(2) Fermi gas with repulsive interactions can undergo a ferromagnetic phase transition to a spin-polarized state at a critical gas parameter (kFa)c. Previous theoretical predictions of the ferromagnetic phase transition have been based on the perturbation theory, which treats the gas parameter as a small number. On the other hand, Belitz, Kirkpatrick, and Vojta (BKV) have argued that the phase transition in clean itinerant ferromagnets is generically of first order at low temperatures, due to the correlation effects that lead to a nonanalytic term in the free energy. The second-order perturbation theory predicts a first-order phase transition at (kFa)c=1.054, consistent with the BKV argument. However, since the critical gas parameter is expected to be of order O(1), perturbative predictions may be unreliable. In this paper we study the nonperturbative effects on the ferromagnetic phase transition by summing the particle-particle ladder diagrams to all orders in the gas parameter. We consider a universal repulsive Fermi gas where the effective range effects can be neglected, which can be realized in a two-component Fermi gas of 6Li atoms by using a nonadiabatic field switch to the upper branch of a Feshbach resonance with a positive s-wave scattering length. Our theory predicts a second-order phase transition, which indicates that ferromagnetic transition in dilute Fermi gases is possibly a counterexample to the BKV argument. The predicted critical gas parameter (kFa)c=0.858 is in good agreement with the recent quantum Monte Carlo result (kFa)c=0.86 for a nearly zero-range potential [S. Pilati , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.030405 105, 030405 (2010)]. We also compare the spin susceptibility with the quantum Monte Carlo result and find good agreement.

  3. Greenhouse gas impacts of natural gas: Influence of deployment choice, methane leak rate, and methane GWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohan, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Growing supplies of natural gas have heightened interest in the net impacts of natural gas on climate. Although its production and consumption result in greenhouse gas emissions, natural gas most often substitutes for other fossil fuels whose emission rates may be higher. Because natural gas can be used throughout the sectors of the energy economy, its net impacts on greenhouse gas emissions will depend not only on the leak rates of production and distribution, but also on the use for which natural gas is substituted. Here, we present our estimates of the net greenhouse gas emissions impacts of substituting natural gas for other fossil fuels for five purposes: light-duty vehicles, transit buses, residential heating, electricity generation, and export for electricity generation overseas. Emissions are evaluated on a fuel cycle basis, from production and transport of each fuel through end use combustion, based on recent conditions in the United States. We show that displacement of existing coal-fired electricity and heating oil furnaces yield the largest reductions in emissions. The impact of compressed natural gas replacing petroleum-based vehicles is highly uncertain, with the sign of impact depending on multiple assumptions. Export of liquefied natural gas for electricity yields a moderate amount of emissions reductions. We further show how uncertainties in upstream emission rates for natural gas and in the global warming potential of methane influence the net greenhouse gas impacts. Our presentation will make the case that how natural gas is deployed is crucial to determining how it will impact climate.

  4. From comic relief to real understanding; how intestinal gas causes symptoms.

    PubMed

    Quigley, E M M

    2003-12-01

    Gas content and transit appear to conspire with the motor and sensory responses of the gut to produce gas related symptoms, both in normal individuals and especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In relation to gas in IBS, two questions need to be addressed: do IBS patients produce more gas and what are the relationships between intestinal gas and symptoms? The balance of evidence seems to indicate that distension is a real phenomenon in IBS and that such distension accurately reflects gas content. More problematic is extrapolation of the observations relating symptoms to gas transit and retention.

  5. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  6. Investigation of Plasma Processes in Electronic Transition Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    essential features of electron-beau controlled dis- charges of the type coumon to rare gas halide and mercury- halide lasers. Particular attention is...ELECTRON-BEAM CONTROLLED DISCHARGES A. Application to Electronic Transition Lasers III. RARE GAS- HALIDE AND MERCURY- HALIDE LASERS I A. XeCl(B X) Laser...Dist Special I I iii I oI. INTRODUCTION Electrically excited rare gas- halide lasers and their closely related I] mercury- halide counterparts are

  7. Detailed Abundances of Two Very Metal-poor Stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-12-01

    The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae (SNe). These SNe could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way (MW) halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two MW dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[α/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of SN yields is the cause. The earliest SNe in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest SNe in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample SNe with [Fe/H] Lt -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample SNe with [Fe/H] ~ -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. Electronic transitions and multiferroicity in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haidong

    Four systems have been studied for the localized-itinerant electronic transition in transition-metal oxides: (i) In CaV1- xTixO3, substitution of Ti(IV) introduces Anderson-localized states below a mobility edge mu c that increases with x, crossing epsilon F in the range 0.2 < x< 0.4 and also transforms the strong-correlation fluctuations to localized V(IV): t1e0 configurations for x ≥ 0.1. (ii) The properties of LaTiO3+delta reveal that a hole-poor, strongly correlated electronic phase coexists with a hole-rich, itinerant-electron phase. With delta ≥ 0.03, the hole-rich phase exists as a minority phase of isolated, mobile itinerant-electron clusters embedded in the hole-poor phase. With delta ≥ 0.08, isolated hole-poor clusters are embedded in an itinerant-electron matrix. As delta > 0.08 increases, the hole-poor clusters become smaller and more isolated until they are reduced to super-paramagnetic strong-correlation fluctuations by delta = 0.12. (iii) The data of Y1-xLaxTiO 3 appears to distinguish an itinerant-electron antiferromagnetic phase in the La-rich samples from a localized-electron ferromagnetic phase with a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion in the Y-rich phase. (iv) The transition at Tt in Mg[Ti2]O4 is a semiconductor-semiconductor transition associated with Ti-Ti dimerization instabilities. The dimerization is caused by lattice instabilities resulting from a double-well Ti-Ti bond potential at a crossover from localized to itinerant electronic behavior. RMn1-xGaxO 3 (R = Ho, Y) and Ho1-xY xMnO3 have been studied for the multiferroicity of RMnO3. Ga doping raises the ferrielectric Curie temperature TC and the Mn-spin reorientation temperature TSR while lowering TN of the Mn spins and the Ho magnetic ordering temperature T 2. The data show an important coupling between the Mn3+-ion and HO3+-ion spins as well as a TSR that is driven by a cooperative MnO5 site rotation and R 3+-ion displacements that modify the c lattice parameter. The data also

  9. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on

  10. Characteristics of transitional and turbulent jet diffusion flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, Yousef M.; Small, James F., Jr.; Hegde, Uday G.; Zhou, Liming; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the ground-based results obtained to date in preparation of a proposed space experiment to study the role of large-scale structures in microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames by investigating the dynamics of vortex/flame interactions and their influence on flame characteristics. The overall objective is to gain an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. Understanding of the role of large-scale structures on the characteristics of microgravity transitional and turbulent flames will ultimately lead to improved understanding of normal-gravity turbulent combustion.

  11. Poor Performers: Supervisors’ and Subordinates’ Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Technical Report 517 POOR PERFORMERS: SUPERVISORS’ AND SUBORDINATES’ RESPONSES t--4 )0~ Daniel R. Ilgen Purdue University Terrence R. Mitchell and...NUMBER Technical Report 517 !’,- 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED POOR PERFORMERS: SUPERVISORS’ AND Technical Report...Continue on reverese aide if neceeeary and Identify by block number) Job performance Power Poor performers Performance feedback * Job interdependence

  12. Gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  13. A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE ECLIPSE DEPTHS OF KEPLER GAS GIANT CANDIDATES AND THE METALLICITIES OF THEIR PARENT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-10

    Previous studies of the interior structure of transiting exoplanets have shown that the heavy-element content of gas giants increases with host star metallicity. Since metal-poor planets are less dense and have larger radii than metal-rich planets of the same mass, one might expect that metal-poor stars host a higher proportion of gas giants with large radii than metal-rich stars. Here I present evidence for a negative correlation at the 2.3{sigma} level between eclipse depth and stellar metallicity in the Kepler gas giant candidates. Based on Kendall's {tau} statistics, the probability that eclipse depth depends on star metallicity is 0.981. The correlation is consistent with planets orbiting low-metallicity stars being, on average, larger in comparison with their host stars than planets orbiting metal-rich stars. Furthermore, since metal-rich stars have smaller radii than metal-poor stars of the same mass and age, a uniform population of planets should show a rise in median eclipse depth with [M/H]. The fact that I find the opposite trend indicates that substantial changes in the gas giant interior structure must accompany increasing [M/H]. I investigate whether the known scarcity of giant planets orbiting low-mass stars could masquerade as an eclipse depth-metallicity correlation, given the degeneracy between metallicity and temperature for cool stars in the Kepler Input Catalog. While the eclipse depth-metallicity correlation is not yet on firm statistical footing and will require spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements for validation, it is an intriguing window into how the interior structure of planets and even the planet formation mechanism may be changing with Galactic chemical evolution.

  14. Getting the gas out - developing gas networks in magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Rust, Alison; Oppenheimer, Julie; Belien, Isolde

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruption style, and explosive potential, are strongly controlled by the pre-eruptive history of the magmatic volatiles: specifically, the more efficient the gas loss prior to eruption, the lower the likelihood of primary (magmatic) explosive activity. Commonly considered gas loss mechanisms include separated flow, where individual bubbles (or bubble clouds) travel at a rate that is faster than the host magma, and permeable flow, where gas escapes through permeable (connected) pathways developed within a (relatively) static matrix. Importantly, gas loss via separated flow is episodic, while gas loss via permeable flow is likely to be continuous. Analogue experiments and numerical models on three phase (solid-liquid-gas) systems also suggest a third mechanism of gas loss that involves the opening and closing of 'pseudo fractures'. Pseudo fractures form at a critical crystallinity that is close to the maximum particle packing. Fractures form by local rearrangement of solid particles and liquid to form a through-going gas fracture; gas escape is episodic, and modulated by the available gas volume and the rate of return flow of interstitial liquid back into the fracture. In all of the gas escape scenarios described above, a fundamental control on gas behaviour is the melt viscosity, which affects the rate of individual bubble rise, the rate of bubble expansion, the rate of film thinning (required for bubble coalescence), and the rate of melt flow into gas-generated fractures. From the perspective of magma degassing, rates of gas expansion and film thinning are key to the formation of an interconnected (permeable) gas pathway. Experiments with both analogue and natural materials show that bubble coalescence is relatively slow, and, in particle-poor melts, does not necessarily create permeable gas networks. As a result, degassing efficiency is modulated by the time scales required either (1) to produce large individual bubbles or bubble clouds (in low viscosity

  15. THE TERZAN 5 PUZZLE: DISCOVERY OF A THIRD, METAL-POOR COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Origlia, L.; Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.

    2013-12-10

    We report on the discovery of three metal-poor giant stars in Terzan 5, a complex stellar system in the Galactic bulge, known to have two populations at [Fe/H] = –0.25 and +0.3. For these three stars we present new echelle spectra obtained with NIRSPEC at Keck II, which confirm their radial velocity membership and provide an average [Fe/H] = –0.79 dex iron abundance and [α/Fe] = +0.36 dex enhancement. This new population extends the metallicity range of Terzan 5 to 0.5 dex more metal poor, and it has properties consistent with having formed from a gas polluted by core-collapse supernovae.

  16. Are the Formation and Abundances of Metal-poor Stars the Result of Dust Dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Conroy, Charlie

    2017-02-01

    Large dust grains can fluctuate dramatically in their local density, relative to the gas, in neutral turbulent disks. Small, high-redshift galaxies (before reionization) represent ideal environments for this process. We show via simple arguments and simulations that order-of-magnitude fluctuations are expected in local abundances of large grains (>100 Å) under these conditions. This can have important consequences for star formation and stellar metal abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. Low-mass stars can form in dust-enhanced regions almost immediately after some dust forms even if the galaxy-average metallicity is too low for fragmentation to occur. We argue that the metal abundances of these “promoted” stars may contain interesting signatures as the CNO abundances (concentrated in large carbonaceous grains and ices) and Mg and Si (in large silicate grains) can be enhanced and/or fluctuate almost independently. Remarkably, the otherwise puzzling abundance patterns of some metal-poor stars can be well fit by standard IMF-averaged core-collapse SNe yields if we allow for fluctuating local dust-to-gas ratios. We also show that the observed log-normal distribution of enhancements in these species agrees with our simulations. Moreover, we confirm that Mg and Si are correlated in these stars the abundance ratios are similar to those in local silicate grains. Meanwhile [Mg/Ca], predicted to be nearly invariant from pure SNe yields, shows very large enhancements and variations up to factors of ≳100 as expected in the dust-promoted model, preferentially in the [C/Fe]-enhanced metal-poor stars. Together, this suggests that (1) dust exists in second-generation star formation, (2) local dust-to-gas ratio fluctuations occur in protogalaxies and can be important for star formation, and (3) the light element abundances of these stars may be affected by the local chemistry of dust where they formed, rather than directly tracing nucleosynthesis from earlier

  17. Shale Gas: Development Opportunities and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Zoback, Mark D.; Arent, Douglas J.

    2014-03-01

    The use of horizontal drilling and multistage hydraulic fracturing technologies has enabled the production of immense quantities of natural gas, to date principally in North America but increasingly in other countries around the world. The global availability of this resource creates both opportunities and challenges that need to be addressed in a timely and effective manner. There seems little question that rapid shale gas development, coupled with fuel switching from coal to natural gas for power generation, can have beneficial effects on air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy security in many countries. In this context, shale gas resources represent a critically important transition fuel on the path to a decarbonized energy future. For these benefits to be realized, however, it is imperative that shale gas resources be developed with effective environmental safeguards to reduce their impact on land use, water resources, air quality, and nearby communities.

  18. Kinematics and dynamics of the MKW/AWM poor clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Kriessler, Jeffrey R.; Bird, Christina M.; Huchra, John P.

    1995-01-01

    We report 472 new redshifts for 416 galaxies in the regions of the 23 poor clusters of galaxies originally identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White (MKW), and Albert, White, and Morgan (AWM). Eighteen of the poor clusters now have 10 or more available redshifts within 1.5/h Mpc of the central galaxy; 11 clusters have at least 20 available redshifts. Based on the 21 clusters for which we have sufficient velocity information, the median velocity scale is 336 km/s, a factor of 2 smaller than found for rich clusters. Several of the poor clusters exhibit complex velocity distributions due to the presence of nearby clumps of galaxies. We check on the velocity of the dominant galaxy in each poor cluster relative to the remaining cluster members. Significantly high relative velocities of the dominant galaxy are found in only 4 of 21 poor clusters, 3 of which we suspect are due to contamination of the parent velocity distribution. Several statistical tests indicate that the D/cD galaxies are at the kinematic centers of the parent poor cluster velocity distributions. Mass-to-light ratios for 13 of the 15 poor clusters for which we have the required data are in the range 50 less than or = M/L(sub B(0)) less than or = 200 solar mass/solar luminosity. The complex nature of the regions surrounding many of the poor clusters suggests that these groupings may represent an early epoch of cluster formation. For example, the poor clusters MKW7 and MKWS are shown to be gravitationally bound and likely to merge to form a richer cluster within the next several Gyrs. Eight of the nine other poor clusters for which simple two-body dynamical models can be carried out are consistent with being bound to other clumps in their vicinity. Additional complex systems with more than two gravitationally bound clumps are observed among the poor clusters.

  19. Germanium, Arsenic, and Selenium Abundances in Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2012-09-01

    The elements germanium (Ge, Z = 32), arsenic (As, Z = 33), and selenium (Se, Z = 34) span the transition from charged-particle or explosive synthesis of the iron-group elements to neutron-capture synthesis of heavier elements. Among these three elements, only the chemical evolution of germanium has been studied previously. Here we use archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope and observations from several ground-based facilities to study the chemical enrichment histories of seven stars with metallicities -2.6 <= [Fe/H] <= -0.4. We perform a standard abundance analysis of germanium, arsenic, selenium, and several other elements produced by neutron-capture reactions. When combined with previous derivations of germanium abundances in metal-poor stars, our sample reveals an increase in the [Ge/Fe] ratios at higher metallicities. This could mark the onset of the weak s-process contribution to germanium. In contrast, the [As/Fe] and [Se/Fe] ratios remain roughly constant. These data do not directly indicate the origin of germanium, arsenic, and selenium at low metallicity, but they suggest that the weak and main components of the s-process are not likely sources. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. This research made use of StarCAT, hosted by the Mikulski Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST). These data are associated with Programs GO-7348, GO-7433, GO-8197, GO-9048, GO-9455, and GO-9804.Based on data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Science Archive Facility. These data are associated with Programs 67.D-0439(A), 074.C-0364(A), 076.B-0055(A), and 080.D-0347(A).This research has made use of the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA), which is operated by

  20. Neutron-poor Nickel Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Russell, Sara; Elliott, Tim

    2012-10-01

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as ɛ60Ni58/61, ɛ62Ni58/61, and ɛ64Ni58/61, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the 58Ni/61Ni internally normalized 60Ni/61Ni, 62Ni/61Ni, and 64Ni/61Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in ɛ60Ni58/61, ɛ62Ni58/61, and ɛ64Ni58/61 relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between ɛ62Ni58/61 and ɛ64Ni58/61, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 ± 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on 58Ni. We also determined to high precision (~10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of ɛ62Ni58/61 and ɛ64Ni58/61. These analyses show that "absolute" ratios of 58Ni/61Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of 62Ni/61Ni and 64Ni/61Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor 58Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, 62Ni and 64Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other transition elements which invoked variable contributions of a neutron-rich component. We have examined different nucleosynthetic environments to determine the possible source of the anomalous material responsible for the isotopic variations observed in Ni and other transition elements within bulk samples. We find

  1. NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim; Russell, Sara

    2012-10-10

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other

  2. Fiber-optic exhaust-gas sensor based on the fluorescence characteristics of Cu containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, Jeffrey

    2000-03-01

    A single catalyst in the exhaust system can reduce the concentration of toxic gases emitted by automobiles if the engine is operated close to the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. This is accomplished through the use of an electrochemical oxygen sensor in the exhaust stream. Near the stoichiometric point, this sensor produces a step-function response when the exhaust gas transitions from an oxygen-poor to an oxygen-rich condition. This talk describes a different kind of sensor based on the use of copper-containing zeolites that produces a proportional output. Zeolites are a class of aluminosilicate materials that have an open 3D structure containing channels and cavities. The Al sites are negatively charged and are generally compensated by cations present during formation of the zeolite. Our experiments use a zeolite designated Cu-ZSM-5, which has the protons originally present in the ZSM-5 material replaced with cupric (Cu^+2) ions. Exposure of this zeolite to a reducing gas results in the conversion of some cupric ions to cuprous (Cu^+1) ions. Subsequent exposure of the zeolite to an oxidizing gas reverses this reaction. The use of this material as a gas sensor is based on the observation that cuprous ions produce a green fluorescent emission when exposed to blue light, whereas no fluorescence is observed from cupric ions. Monitoring the fluorescence of Cu-ZSM-5 placed in a gas stream can thus provide information on the gas's reductant-to-oxidant ratio. We present the results of high temperature in-situ fluorescence spectra, intensity, and reponse-time measurements performed on samples of Cu-ZSM-5 exposed to various O_2-reductant combinations and also discuss data obtained from a single-fiber prototype sensor fabricated using a sol-gel processing technique.(J.T. Remillard et al.), Appl. Opt. 38 5306 (1999).

  3. Poor Women Are Still Shut Out of Mainstream Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saris, Renee N.; Johnston-Robledo, Ingrid

    2000-01-01

    Followed up a 1993 study which concluded that poor and minority women were essentially shut out of mainstream psychological research and theory. Analysis of PsycLit abstracts from 1991-97 investigated whether significant change had occurred and noted the inclusion of poor women in research on sexuality and reproductive health. Results suggest that…

  4. Prevalence and Nature of Late-Emerging Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catts, Hugh W.; Compton, Donald; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Bridges, Mindy Sittner

    2012-01-01

    Some children demonstrate adequate or better reading achievement in early school grades but fall significantly behind their peers in later grades. These children are often referred to as late-emerging poor readers. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and heterogeneity of these poor readers. We also examined the early language and…

  5. Pathologizing the Language and Culture of Poor Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley-Marling, Curt; Lucas, Krista

    2009-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of deficit discourses that implicate deficiencies in the language and culture of poor students as the cause of their academic failures. An influential study by Betty Hart and Todd Risley concludes that high levels of academic failure among poor children can be linked to the quantity and quality of language interactions…

  6. Unexpectedly Poor Spelling and Phonological-Processing Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Quinn, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the phonological skills of university students who were unexpectedly poor spellers relative to their word reading accuracy. Compared with good spellers, unexpectedly poor spellers showed no deficits in phonological memory, selection of appropriate graphemes for phonemes in word misspellings and nonword spellings, and…

  7. Metropolitan Influences on Migration into Poor and Nonpoor Neighborhoods*

    PubMed Central

    South, Scott J.; Pais, Jeremy; Crowder, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and three decennial U.S. censuses are used to examine the influence of metropolitan-area characteristics on black and white households' propensity to move into poor versus nonpoor neighborhoods. We find that a nontrivial portion of the variance in the odds of moving to a poor rather to a nonpoor neighborhood exists between metropolitan areas. Net of established individual-level predictors of inter-neighborhood migration, black and white households are more likely to move to a poor or extremely poor tract rather than to a nonpoor tract in metropolitan areas containing many poor neighborhoods and a paucity of recently-built housing in nonpoor areas. Blacks are especially likely to move to a poor tract in metropolitan areas characterized by high levels of racial residential segregation and in which poor tracts have a sizeable concentration of blacks. White households are more likely to move to a poor than to a nonpoor tract in metropolitan areas that have comparatively few African Americans. PMID:21625368

  8. Addressing Classism, Extending Multicultural Competence, and Serving the Poor: Reply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Replies to comments on "Psychotherapy, classism, and the poor: Conspicuous by their absence" (see record 2005-11834-002). In this article, the current author outlined what psychologists over the past four decades have had to say about the field's neglect of the poor in its research, practice, and theory. Characterizing this exclusion of the poor…

  9. Poor Kids in a Rich Nation: Eating the Seed Corn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Patricia

    This paper examines the problem of having many poor children in the wealthy United States and the need to find answers to this problem. Despite much recent talk about "family values," the dominant U.S. ideology holds that family welfare is a private rather than a public responsibility. Poor children are seen as a special population that diverts…

  10. Benefits of Computer-Presented Speed Training for Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irausquin, Rosemarie S.; Drent, Jeanine; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of computer-presented automatization exercises in a group of 14 poor readers were assessed in comparison to a matched control group of 14 poor readers that received computer-presented exercises aimed at the use of context for word identification and comprehension. Training took place three sessions a week for 15 minutes per session and…

  11. Distinguishing between Poor/Dysfunctional Parenting and Child Emotional Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, David A.; McIsaac, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper was intended to distinguish between poor parenting and child emotional maltreatment (CEM), to inform child welfare and public health policymakers of the need for differentiated responses. Methods: Scientific literature was integrated with current practice and assumptions relating to poor/dysfunctional parenting and child…

  12. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  13. An Image Study on the Rich and Poor Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koçak, Recep

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to project people's perceptions about the rich and poor. In this descriptive study, a questionnaire developed by the researcher and caricatures were used to collect data. The questionnaire composed of seven items including questions directed to adjectives related to the participants' perceptions about the rich and poor as…

  14. The Prevalence of Poor Reading in Dutch Special Elementary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Bon, Wim H. J.; Bouwmans, Mieke; Broeders, Ivy N. L. D. C.

    2006-01-01

    The relative frequency of poor readers in Dutch general elementary education (GEE) and special elementary education (SEE) and the characteristics of their reading performance were investigated using a lexical decision procedure. According to the same norms that identified 9% of students as poor readers in GEE, no less than 73% of the students in…

  15. GAS SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

    1961-07-11

    A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

  16. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

  17. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous three evaluation reports.

  18. Volcanic gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  19. Gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Eiceman, G A; Hill, H H; Gardea-Torresdey, J

    1998-06-15

    This review of the fundamental developments in gas chromatography (GC) includes articles published from 1996 and 1997 and an occasional citation prior to 1996. The literature was reviewed principally using CA Selects for Gas Chromatography from Chemical Abstracts Service, and some significant articles from late 1997 may be missing from the review. In addition, the online SciSearch Database (Institute for Scientific Information) capability was used to abstract review articles or books. As with the prior recent reviews, emphasis has been given to the identification and discussion of selected developments, rather than a presentation of a comprehensive literature search, now available widely through computer-based resources. During the last two years, several themes emerged from a review of the literature. Multidimensional gas chromatography has undergone transformation encompassing a broad range of activity, including attempts to establish methods using chromatographic principles rather than a totally empirical approach. Another trend noted was a comparatively large effort in chromatographic theory through modeling efforts; these presumably became resurgent with inexpensive and powerful computing tools. Finally, an impressive level of activity was noted through the themes highlighted in this review, and this was particularly true with detectors and field instruments.

  20. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.